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OSWEGO COUNTY

BUSINESS $4.50

April / May 2018

OswegoCountyBusiness.com

CNY’s Top Boss CEO Danielle Laraque-Arena is in the driver’s seat at SUNY Upstate Medical University — CNY’s largest employer with nearly 10,000 employees and a payroll of $600 million. She talks about the organization, its economic impact and how she manages it.

April / May 2018

$4.50


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In addition always looking for the best apt to their physical and cognitive Whether you are an RN, Morningstar Care Center is to open its community outpatient therapy service to open its community outpatient therapy service to open its community outpatient therapy service in early 2017! Stay tuned! active and comfortable environment and most qualified individuand most qualified individuwould love to meet you! would love to meet you! and most qualified individumily owned and operated Assisted Living would love to meet you! Whether you are an RN, ly owned and operated Assisted Living owned and operated Assisted Living ly owned and operated Assisted Living UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center is working UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center working owned and operated Assisted Living UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center isis working ctive and comfortable environment keeping, laundry, activities or dietary. 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We ve their individual best quality of life. or if you are not a clinician and would lik operated skilled nursing operated skilled nursing always looking for the best Morningstar is a family owned and operated skilled nursing and independence. In addition LPN or Certified Nurse to open its community outpatient therapy service to open its community outpatient therapy service to open its community outpatient therapy service New York. Our mission is to provide Morningstar is a family owned and keeping, laundry, activities or dietary. Ple keeping, laundry, activities or dietary. Plea als to join our team. New York. Our mission is to provide als to join our team. keeping, laundry, activities or dietary. Pleas als to join our team. LPN or Certified Nurse New York. Our mission is to provide New York. Our mission is provide New York. Our mission is to provide yuality owned and operated Assisted Living ality and independence. In addition and independence. In addition Contact: Paula Whitehouse Contact: Paula Whitehouse a clinician and would like to work in houseclinician and would like to work in houseContact: Paula Whitehouse clinician and would like to work in houseWhether you are an RN, Whether you are an RN, o, New York. Our mission is provide New York. Our mission is provide always looking for the best Whether you are an RN, always looking for the best New Our mission is provide always looking for the best Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA –is adapt totheir their physical cognitive apt toYork. their physical and cognitive als toand join our team. apt to physical and cognitive sidents to our fourth floor! We have Whether you are an RN, Whether you are an RN, Morningstar Care Center Morningstar Care Center is pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com Whether you are an RN, Morningstar Care Center is and most qualified individuin early 2017! Stay tuned! you! in early 2017! Stay tuned! ean services and general support to help would love to meet you! in early 2017! Stay tuned! active comfortable environment active and comfortable environment active and comfortable environment operated skilled nursing and Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA –RN, Whether you are an Whether you are an RN, Whether you are an RN, New York. Our mission is to provide Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA – competitive and comprehensive wage active and comfortable environment active and comfortable environment The Gardens islaundry, alaundry, family owned and operated Assisted Living ctive and comfortable environment keeping, activities or dietary. Ple keeping, activities or dietary. 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We ieve their individual best quality of life. would love to meet you! ve their individual best quality of life. Whether you are an RN, ctivities or dietary. Please give us a call. We ve their individual best quality of life. to their physical and cognitive st six months and greatly appreciate always looking for the best always looking for the best Morningstar is a family owned and Morningstar is a family owned and always looking for the best Morningstar is a family owned and als to join our team. iduality and independence. In addition uality and independence. In addition LPN or Certified Nurse LPN or Certified Nurse uality and independence. In addition LPN or Certified Nurse Morningstar is a family owned and Morningstar is a family owned and Morningstar is a family owned and active and comfortable environment LPN or Certified Nurse LPN or Certified Nurse LPN or Certified Nurse Contact: Paula Whitehouse Contact: Paula Whitehouse a clinician and would like to work in houseily owned and operated Assisted Living clinician and would like to work in housey owned and operated Assisted Living uality and independence. In addition and independence. In addition yality owned and operated Assisted Living lity and independence. In addition dapt to their physical and cognitive Residence in Oswego, NY. Our missionthat is to provide ourand residents apt to their physical and cognitive New York. Our mission is to provide iduality and independence. In addition uality and independence. In addition uality and independence. In addition Morningstar is aAide, family owned and operated rehabilitation center provides Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA –at PT, PTA, OT, COTA Morningstar is a family owned als to join our team. als to join our team. Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA ––you (315) 343-0880 or als to join our team. activities or dietary. Please give us aindividucall. We ieve their individual best quality ofto life. residents to our fourth floor! We have LPN or Certified Nurse to our fourth floor! We have pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com sidents to our fourth floor! We have pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com and most qualified individuand most qualified et you! you! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If or aThe loved one isaisaconsidering are services and general support help eality services and general support to help would love to meet you! would love to meet you! and most qualified individuyou! eesidents services and general support to help would love to meet you! Whether you are an RN, and benefit package, comfortable and family owned and operated skilled nursing and operated skilled nursing and and independence. In addition operated skilled nursing and Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA – Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA – Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA – rehabilitation center that provides , New York. Our mission is to provide New York. Our mission is to provide Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA – Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA – competitive and comprehensive wage New York. Our mission is to provide competitive and comprehensive wage Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA – at (315) 343-0880 or rehabilitation center that provides Gardens a family owned and operated Assisted Living The Gardens is family owned and operated Assisted Living competitive and comprehensive wage activities or dietary. Please give us a call. We The Gardens is family owned and operated Assisted Living ieve their individual best quality of life. e services and general support to help services and general support to help active and comfortable environment ervices and general support to help at (315) 343-0880 or are services and general support to help eadapt services and general support to help or dietary. Please give us a in call. We ve individual best quality of life. general support to help mily owned and operated Assisted Living ly owned and operated Assisted Living with an active and comfortable environment thatand promotes yactivities owned and operated Assisted Living operated skilled nursing and operated skilled nursing operated skilled nursing and operated skilled nursing and operated skilled nursing and skilled nursing and rehabilitation center that Contact: Paula Whitehouse Contact: Paula Whitehouse residents to our fourth floor! We have ot atheir clinician and would like to work in houseaservices clinician and would like to work in housePaula Whitehouse pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com Whether you are an RN, Whether you are an RN, clinician and would like to work houseWhether you are an RN, et you! Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA –Contact: adapt to their physical and cognitive to their physical and cognitive first six months and greatly appreciate rst six months and greatly appreciate dapt to their physical and cognitive st six months and greatly appreciate Morningstar is acomprehensive family owned and als to join our team. als to join our team. ence we would love to meet you. als to join our team. LPN or Certified Nurse services general support to help competitive and wage The Gardens is a family owned and operated Assisted Living ed nursing and n active and comfortable environment active and comfortable environment active and comfortable environment operated skilled nursing and Contact: Paula Whitehouse Contact: Paula Whitehouse Contact: Paula Whitehouse residents to our fourth floor! We have ot a clinician and would like to work in housea clinician and would like to work in houseContact: Paula Whitehouse clinician and would like to work in houseContact: Paula Whitehouse pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com a clinician and would like to work in houseuality and independence. In addition clinician and would like to work in houseet you! adapt their physical and cognitive adapt to their physical and cognitive Residence in Oswego, NY. Our mission is to provide our residents Residence in Oswego, NY. Our mission is to provide our residents apt to their physical and cognitive dapt to their physical and cognitive o, New York. Our mission is to provide Residence in Oswego, NY. Our mission is to provide our residents New York. Our mission is to provide apt to their physical and cognitive New York. Our mission is to provide sidents to our fourth floor! We have pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com Morningstar is a family owned and operated Morningstar is a family owned and operated Morningstar is a family owned and operated rehabilitation center that provides you! rehabilitation center that provides individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services rehabilitation center that provides first six months and greatly appreciate supportive team atmosphere and high competitive and comprehensive wage Morningstar is a family owned and Morningstar is a family owned and The Gardens is a family owned and operated Assisted Living at (315) 343-0880 or at (315) 343-0880 or Morningstar is a family owned and Morningstar OUTPATIENT PHYSICAL AND OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY! PLEASE CALL FOR INFORMATION at (315) 343-0880 or ry, activities or dietary. Please give us a call. We , activities or dietary. Please give us a call. We chieve their individual best quality of life. ieve their individual best quality of life. provides a competitive and comprehensive wage LPN or Certified Nurse LPN or Certified Nurse activities or dietary. Please give us a call. We ieve their individual best quality of life. LPN or Certified Nurse Contact: Paula Whitehouse adapt clinician and would like to work in houset! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or aloved loved one isconsidering considering Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or a(315) one isOswego, Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or arehabilitation loved one is considering Whether you are an RN, Whether you are an RN, and benefit package, comfortable and and benefit package, comfortable and competitive and comprehensive wage to their physical and cognitive Whether you are an RN, and benefit package, comfortable and The Gardens is a family owned and operated Assisted Living Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA – a family owned and family owned and family owned and duality and independence. In addition ality and independence. In addition ality and independence. In addition Residence in NY. Our mission is to provide our residents rehabilitation center that provides rehabilitation center that provides rehabilitation center that provides first six months and greatly appreciate services general support to help at 343-0880 or at (315) 343-0880 or nter that provides center that provides Morningstar is a family owned and operated at (315) 343-0880 or y, activities or dietary. Please give us a call. We activities or dietary. Please give us a call. We rehabilitation center that provides chieve their individual best quality of life. ieve their individual best quality of life. activities or dietary. Please give us a call. We eve their individual best quality of life. n active and comfortable environment active and comfortable environment at (315) 343-0880 or active and comfortable environment skilled nursing and (315) 343-0880 or ,residents activities or dietary. Please give us aCOTA call. We activities or dietary. Please give us call. We ieve their individual quality of life. ve their individual best quality of life. ctivities or dietary. Please give us aaacenter call. We ve their individual best quality of life. with an active and comfortable environment that promotes with anoperated active and comfortable environment that promotes with an active and comfortable environment that promotes st six months and greatly appreciate sted living community being developed in Oswego NY. We are accepting t! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or aMorningstar loved one isor considering and benefit package, comfortable and skilled nursing and rehabilitation that skilled nursing and rehabilitation center that Residence in Oswego, NY. Our mission isowned to provide our residents skilled nursing and rehabilitation center that gdence residents to our fourth floor! We have residents to our fourth floor! We have a family owned and and general support to help people overcome or adapt to their pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com to our fourth floor! We have rehabilitation center that provides pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com meet you! et you! Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA –atyou Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA et you! Morningstar is abest family owned and operated Aide, PT, PTA, OT, –– at (315) 343-0880 and benefit package, comfort and supportive team is a family owned and Morningstar is a family owned and activities or dietary. Please give us call. We eve their individual best quality of life. Morningstar is a family and we would love to meet you. ence we would love to meet you. ence we would love to meet you. LPN or Certified Nurse LPN or Certified Nurse LPN or Certified Nurse re services and general support to help services and general support to help Contact: Paula Whitehouse a clinician and would like to work in houseservices and general support to help Residence in Oswego, NY. Our mission is to provide our residents competitive and comprehensive wage competitive and comprehensive wage t! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If or a loved one is considering with an active and comfortable environment that promotes The Gardens is a family owned and operated Assisted Living The Gardens a family owned and operated Assisted Living lled nursing and ed nursing and competitive and comprehensive wage The Gardens is a family owned and operated Assisted Living ed nursing and dapt to their physical and cognitive and benefit package, comfortable and operated skilled nursing and operated skilled nursing and operated skilled nursing and gresidents residents to our fourth floor! We have to our fourth floor! We have Morningstar isand a family owned and operated a family owned skilled nursing and rehabilitation center pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com that pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com residents to our fourth floor! We have duality and independence. In addition uality and independence. In addition pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com meet you! uality and independence. In addition et you! omprehensive wage et you! quality care and service. residents to our fourth floor! We have esidents to our fourth floor! We have dence we would love to meet you. pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com sidents to our fourth floor! We have et you! you! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or aPaula loved one isisais considering individuality and We provide healthcare services individuality and We provide healthcare services you! ul first six months and greatly appreciate first six months and greatly appreciate individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services supportive team atmosphere and high competitive and comprehensive wage supportive atmosphere and high competitive and comprehensive wage and benefit package, comfortable and six months and greatly appreciate with anGardens active and comfortable environment that promotes The is aindependence. family owned and operated Assisted Living The Gardens aaindependence. family owned and operated Assisted Living supportive team atmosphere and high competitive and comprehensive wage lled nursing sed Practical Nurses, qualified home health aides and personal care aides. The Gardens ateam family owned and operated Assisted Living family owned and provides afourth competitive and comprehensive wage provides aand competitive and comprehensive wage provides anursing competitive and comprehensive wage and rehabilitation center that Contact: Paula Whitehouse Contact: Paula Whitehouse physical and cognitive limitations so as to achieve their individual esidents toindividual our floor! We have tdapt aservices clinician would like to work in houseafirst clinician and would like to work in houseContact: Whitehouse pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com clinician and would like to work in houseyou! rehabilitation center that provides competitive and comprehensive wage adapt to their physical and cognitive competitive and comprehensive wage toskilled their physical and cognitive The Gardens is family owned and operated Assisted Living The Gardens is a family owned and operated Assisted Living atmosphere and high quality care service. competitive and comprehensive wage dapt to their physical and cognitive Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA – Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA – The Gardens is family owned and operated Assisted Living Aide, PT, PTA, OT, COTA – at (315) 343-0880 or dence we would love to meet you. activities or dietary. Please give us a call. We eve their best of life. individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services Residence in Oswego, NY. Our mission is to provide our residents Residence in Oswego, NY. Our mission is to provide our residents Residence in Oswego, NY. 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We are accepting sted living community being developed in Oswego NY. We are accepting ort! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or a loved one is considering t! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or a loved one is considering st six months and greatly appreciate ted living community being developed in Oswego NY. We are accepting t! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! Ifteam you or arehabilitation loved one isor considering and benefit package, comfortable and and benefit package, comfortable and ence we would love to meet you. individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services and benefit package, comfortable and Residence in Oswego, NY. Our mission is to provide our residents Residence insupport Oswego, NY. Our mission to provide our residents enter that provides is a family owned and Residence in Oswego, NY. Our mission isis to provide our residents a family owned and and general to help people overcome or adapt to their and general support to help people overcome or adapt to their supportive team atmosphere and high center that provides rehabilitation center that provides a family owned and and general support to help people overcome or adapt to their rehabilitation center that provides rst six months and greatly appreciate provides a competitive and comprehensive wage Morningstar is a family owned and operated Morningstar is a family owned and operated at (315) 343-0880 or at (315) 343-0880 or Morningstar is a family owned and operated ed nursing and and benefit package, comfort and supportive and benefit package, comfort and supportive team at (315) 343-0880 y, activities or dietary. Please give us a call. We activities or dietary. Please give us a call. We hieve their individual best quality of life. eve their individual best quality of life. and benefit package, comfort and supportive team activities or dietary. Please give us a call. We eve their individual best quality of life. sisted living community being developed in Oswego NY. We are accepting best quality of life. Contact: Paula Whitehouse Contact: Paula Whitehouse residents to our fourth floor! We have ot a clinician and would like to work in housea clinician and would like to work in houseContact: Paula Whitehouse pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com a clinician and would like to work in houseResidence in Oswego, NY. Our mission is to provide our residents Residence in Oswego, NY. Our mission is to provide our residents and general support to help people overcome or adapt to their ort! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or a loved one is considering t! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or a loved one is considering with an active and comfortable environment that promotes with an active and comfortable environment that promotes Residence in Oswego, NY. Our mission is to provide our residents et you! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! Ifteam yousupportive or a NY. loved one isand considering with an active comfortable environment that promotes adapt to their physical and cognitive adapt to their physical and cognitive benefit package, comfortable and and benefit package, comfortable and dapt to their physical and cognitive and benefit package, comfortable and enter that provides Morningstar isand aand family owned and operated Morningstar isand aafamily family owned and operated and benefit package, comfort supportive s!Thank a family owned skilled nursing and rehabilitation center that a family owned skilled nursing and rehabilitation center that inis Oswego, NY. Our mission is tohealthcare provide our residents Morningstar is owned and operated a family owned and skilled nursing and rehabilitation center that individuality and independence. We provide services comprehensive wage omprehensive wage quality care and service. quality care and service. team atmosphere high mprehensive wage quality care and service. Morningstar isalove family owned and operated competitive and comprehensive wage provides anursing competitive and comprehensive wage Gardens is acare family owned and operated Assisted Living UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center iscenter working we would to meet you. idence we would love to meet you. isted living community being developed in Oswego We are accepting dence we would love to meet you. mosphere and high t! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or aloved loved one is considering Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! IfIf you or aand one is considering you Oswego Onondaga County! 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We dence we would love to meet you. their individual best of life. ieve their individual best of life. physical and cognitive limitations so as to achieve their individual individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services activities or dietary. Please give us a call. We eve their individual best quality of life. individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services supportive team atmosphere and high supportive team atmosphere and high with an active and comfortable environment that promotes supportive team atmosphere and high with an active and comfortable environment that promotes comprehensive wage quality care and with an active and comfortable environment that promotes killed nursing and lled nursing and atmosphere and high quality care service. competitive and comprehensive wage provides a competitive and comprehensive wage competitive and comprehensive wage provides a competitive and comprehensive wage with an active comfortable environment that promotes The Gardens aand family owned and operated Assisted Living The Gardens acare family owned and operated Assisted Living lled nursing and sted living community being developed inwage Oswego NY. We are accepting competitive comprehensive wage provides acommunity competitive and comprehensive The Gardens isiscognitive ais family owned and operated Living skilled nursing rehabilitation center that skilled nursing and rehabilitation center that The Gardens issupport now accepting residents to our fourth floor! We have had skilled nursing and rehabilitation center that skilled nursing and rehabilitation center that and general to help people overcome or adapt to their age, comfortable and ge, comfortable Residence in Oswego, NY. 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We have best quality of life. a family owned and omprehensive wage pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com quality care and service. residents to our fourth floor! We have pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com and general support to help people overcome or adapt to their and general support to help people overcome or adapt to their eet you! et you! and general support to help people overcome or adapt to their t you! best quality of life. age, comfortable and n center that provides center that provides and benefit package, comfort and supportive team and benefit package, comfort and supportive team individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services in NY. Our mission is to provide our residents Residence in Oswego, NY. Our mission is to provide our residents enter that provides and benefit package, comfort and supportive team Residence in Oswego, NY. Our mission is to provide our residents supportive team atmosphere and high individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services a very successful first six months and greatly appreciate the community individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services supportive team atmosphere and high supportive team atmosphere and high provides a competitive and comprehensive wage Morningstar is a family owned and operated Morningstar is a family owned and operated supportive team atmosphere and high sed Practical Nurses, qualified home health aides and personal care aides. Morningstar is a family owned and operated competitive and comprehensive wage competitive and comprehensive wage provides a competitive and comprehensive wage with an active and comfortable environment that promotes provides a competitive and comprehensive wage The Gardens is a family owned and operated Assisted Living The Gardens is a family owned and operated Assisted Living UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center is working UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center is working competitive and comprehensive wage provides a competitive and comprehensive wage The Gardens is a family owned and operated Assisted Living ssisted living community being developed in Oswego NY. We are accepting sisted living community being developed in Oswego NY. We are accepting Waterville Resdiential Care Center is a 92 bed, family owned UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center is working physical and cognitive limitations so as to achieve their individual isted living community being developed in Oswego NY. We are accepting Life in Balance atmosphere and high tmosphere and high UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center is working mosphere and high skilled nursing and rehabilitation center that and general support to help people overcome adapt to their and general support to help people overcome oror adapt to their atmosphere and high d comprehensive wage comprehensive wage quality care and service. quality care and service. general support to help people overcome or adapt to their atmosphere and high quality care service. rt! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or aloved loved one is considering !nter Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! Ifteam you orand abest one considering comprehensive wage in early 2017! Stay tuned! quality of life. quality care and service. Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! 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If you or a loved one is considering and benefit package, comfortable and and benefit package, comfortable and and benefit package, comfortable and enter that provides ssed a family owned and a family owned and comprehensive wage wage quality care and service. quality care and service. a family owned and mprehensive wage quality care and service. to open its community outpatient therapy service nsed Practical Nurses, qualified home health aides and personal aides. best quality of life. best quality of life. 17 Sunrise Drive Oswego, NY 13126 • 315.342.4790 re and service. best quality life. UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center is working ckage, comfortable and age, comfortable and is considering an assisted living residence we would love to meet you. Please a very successful physical and cognitive limitations so as to achieve their individual age, comfortable and and independence. We provide healthcare services individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services mosphere and high individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services supportive team atmosphere and high supportive team atmosphere and high first six months and greatly appreciate the community a very successful first six months and greatly appreciate the community isted living community being developed in Oswego NY. We are accepting team atmosphere high aphysical successful first six months andpeople greatly appreciate the community atmosphere and high quality care service. provides aand competitive and comprehensive wage provides a2017! competitive and comprehensive wage Waterville Resdiential Care Center is a92 92 nsed Practical Nurses, qualified home aides and personal care aides. 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Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or a one support! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or a loved one and general to help people or adapt to their www.morningstarcares.com support! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or a loved one best quality of life. to open its community outpatient therapy service contact Paula Whitehouse at (315) 343-0880 or pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com nsed Practical Nurses, qualified home aides and personal care aides. and operated skilled nursing and rehabiltation facility located The Gardens is now accepting residents to our fourth floor! We have had The Gardens is now accepting residents to our fourth We have had and service. and benefit package, comfort and supportive team and benefit package, comfort and supportive team The Gardens is now accepting residents to our fourth floor! We have had and benefit package, comfort and supportive team physical and cognitive limitations soWe as to achieve their individual individuality and independence. provide healthcare services individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services individuality and independence. We provide healthcare services supportive team atmosphere and high supportive team atmosphere and high supportive team atmosphere and and operated skilled nursing andrehabiltation rehabiltation facility located and operated skilled nursing and rehabiltation facility located to open its community outpatient therapy service to open its community outpatient therapy service atmosphere and high quality care service. provides acommunity competitive and comprehensive wage provides awage competitive and comprehensive wage and operated skilled nursing and facility located to open its outpatient therapy service support! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! Iffloor! you or a high loved one provides a competitive and comprehensive wage care and service. re and service. continuum based here in Central NY. Please contact Joe Murabito re and service. best quality of life. best quality of life. UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center is working best quality of life. tmosphere and high comprehensive wage omprehensive wage quality care and service. quality care and service. omprehensive quality care and service. 17 Sunrise Drive Oswego, NY 13126 • 315.342.4790 and operated skilled nursing and rehabiltation facility located The Gardens is now accepting residents to our fourth floor! We have had The Gardens is now accepting residents to our fourth We have had is considering an assisted living residence we would love to meet you. Please The Gardens is now accepting residents to our fourth floor! We have had age, comfortable and a very successful first six months and greatly appreciate the community n center that provides enter that provides enter that provides to open its community outpatient therapy service to open its community outpatient therapy service ensed Practical Nurses, qualified home health aides and personal care aides. nsed Practical Nurses, qualified home health aides and personal care aides. tar Residential Care Center. . . . to open its community outpatient therapy service sed Practical Nurses, qualified home health aides and personal care aides. 17 Sunrise Drive Oswego, NY 13126 • 315.342.4790 17 Sunrise Drive Oswego, NY 13126 • 315.342.4790 care and service. re and service. UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center is working UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center is working 17 Sunrise Drive Oswego, NY 13126 • 315.342.4790 is considering an assisted living residence we would love to meet you. Please is considering an assisted living residence we would love to meet you. 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The facility is part a92 health care provider comfortable and We accepting applications for Licensed Practical Nursed, www.morningstarcares.com contact Paula Whitehouse atmonths (315) 343-0880 or pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center is working Waterville Resdiential Center is a92 92 bed, family owned Waterville Resdiential Care Center abest bed, family owned support! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! Iffloor! you or acommunity loved one Life in Life in Balance Waterville Resdiential Care Center isis a bed, family owned atmosphere and high d comprehensive wage comprehensive wage Life in Balance quality care and service. quality care and service. comprehensive wage quality care and service. The Gardens is now accepting residents to our fourth floor! We have had The Gardens is now accepting residents to our fourth We have had support! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! Ifthe you or a had loved one support! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! 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Please contact Joe Murabito atmosphere and high atmosphere and high tmosphere and high 17 Sunrise Drive Oswego, NY 13126 • 315.342.4790 and operated skilled nursing and rehabiltation facility located 17 Sunrise Drive Oswego, NY 13126 • 315.342.4790 17 Sunrise Drive Oswego, NY 13126 • 315.342.4790 and operated skilled nursing and rehabiltation facility located is considering an assisted living residence we would love to meet you. Please 17 Sunrise Drive Oswego, NY 13126 • 315.342.4790 and operated skilled nursing and rehabiltation facility located is considering an assisted living residence we would love meet you. Please to open its community outpatient therapy service is considering an assisted living residence we would love to meet you. Please home health aides and personal carePractical aides. isWe considering an assisted living residence we would love to meet you. 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Gardens now accepting residents our fourth We have had best quality of life. The isisfacility now accepting residents to our fourth floor! We have had very successful first six months and greatly appreciate the community (845)-750-4566 or Judy Harding (315) 525-4473 gstar Residential Care Center. . . (845)-750-4566 or Judy Harding (315) 525-4473 tar Residential Care Center. . (845)-750-4566 or Judy (315) 525-4473 to open its community outpatient therapy service to open its community outpatient therapy service (845)-750-4566 or Judy Harding (315) 525-4473 tar Residential Center. . . Waterville Resdiential is a 92 bed, family owned to open its community outpatient therapy service are and service. e and service. Life in Balance e service. We are accepting applications for Practical Nursed, in NY. facility is part of a health care provider in Waterville NY. The facility is part of a health care provider We We are accepting applications for Licensed Practical Nursed, in Waterville NY. The facility is part of a health care provider We are accepting applications for Licensed Practical Nursed, www.morningstarcares.com www.morningstarcares.com www.morningstarcares.com contact Paula Whitehouse at (315) 343-0880 or pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com contact Paula Whitehouse at (315) 343-0880 or pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com in early 2017! Stay tuned! UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center is working UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center is working contact Paula Whitehouse at (315) 343-0880 or pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com UPDATE: Morningstar Care Center is working support! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or a loved one support! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or a loved one m atmosphere and high atmosphere and high www.morningstarcares.com support! Thank you Oswego and Onondaga County! If you or a loved one 17 Sunrise Drive Oswego, NY 13126 • 315.342.4790 atmosphere and high contact Paula Whitehouse at (315) 343-0880 or pwhitehouse@gardens-alf.com is considering an assisted living residence we would love to meet you. Please w.morningstarcares.com continuum based here in Central NY. Please contact Joe Murabito continuum based here in Central NY. Please contact Joe Murabito Community Outpatient Therapy Service Open continuum based here in Central NY. 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Summer Guide

The Best of Upstate New York 2018 Edition

Free Distribution All Season Long

PUBLISHED BY OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS MAGAZINE • cnysummer.com P.O. Box 276 • Oswego, NY 13126 • Phone: 315-342-8020 • Fax: 315-342-7776 • Email: editorCNYsummer@gmail. com

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Distribution this year will include all Wegmans locations in CNY

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

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APRIL / MAY 2018 Issue 155

PROFILE SHANE BROADWELL Life for the co-owner of Oswego’s Broadwell Hospitality Group and father of two sons just got a lot busier as he was selected to be the chairman of Oswego County Legislature. Find out how he juggles all his responsibilities.................................14

COVER STORY

SPECIAL FEATURES

Economic Driver SUNY Upstate Medical University leads economic development initiatives in Central New York. CEO Danielle Laraque-Arena is in the driver’s seat 60

Where in the World is Sandra Scott? Kathmandu, a city of over a million people with not a single traffic light.............................. 18 Flying Drones for Money Commercial use of drones is finding its way in the marketplace......................... 48 Drones CNY at heart of developing unmanned aerial technology............... 50

Real Estate • Expensive Homes Most expensive home in Onondaga goes for $3.9 million, in Oswego for $1.4 million • Technonoly Advanced technology such as use of drones helping marketing properties in CNY • Fewer Homes for Sale Despite inventory shortage, Onondaga County real estate market features stability 40

Health Care Special •Economic Catalyst Oswego Health continues to spur significant growth in county • Oswego Hospital Its charity care’ is estimated at $600,000 a year • Seniors New social adult day care program offers families respite • Mental Health New behavioral health facility taking shape 4

Market Share New Pathfinder Bank regional president wants to expand banks’ reach in Onondaga County..... 54 Nonprofits New rules of fundraising might help nonprofits ........ 58 Mandated Mayhem? Is New York over-regulating its small businesses? It depends on who you ask.................................................. 54

SUCCESS STORY

In its first year of operation in 2014, Digital Hyve generated more than $100,000 in total revenue. In 2017, the company’s revenue was more than $5.2 million.....................................................82

DEPARTMENTS On the Job Advice to people starting a business now............................. 9 How I Got Started Tammy Wilkinson, Theatre Du Jour ......................... 12 Newsmakers................................................................................................... 20 Dining Out Mimi’s Drive-In...................................................................... 26 Business Updates................................................................................................................................ 29 My Turn Trump is helping investigative journalism ............................ 38 Economic Trends Competition has record number of applicants.......... 53 Last Page Tom Kells on the job to remove snow in Oswego .............. 98 OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

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COVERING CENTRAL NEW YORK

Attorney Anne Ruffer stands Anne in herRuffer office at Attorney Mackenzie Hughes stands in her office at LLP law firm in Syracuse Mackenzie Hughes LLP

OswegoCountyBusiness.com

law firm in Syracuse

Editor and Publisher Wagner Dotto

Associate Editor Lou Sorendo

Columnists

L. Michael Treadwell Bruce Frassinelli, Sandra Scott

Writers & Contributing Writers

Deborah Jeanne Sergeant Kenneth Sturtz, Payne Horning Maria Pericozzi, Kimberly Blaker George Chapman

Advertising

Peggy Kain Ashley Slattery

Office Assistant Kimberley Tyler

Giving Giving Advice Advice

I know thatthat my my clients withwith I know clients charitable interests are in charitable interests aregood in good hands when working with the the hands when working with Community Foundation. The staff is Community Foundation. The staff is attentive to detail, caring, and most attentive importantly, to detail, caring, and most they listen.

importantly, they listen.

Many clients choose to set up a Many clientsfund. choose set up a donor-advised This to allows fund.support This allows themdonor-advised to flexibly and easily the charities and causes that they them to flexibly and easily support care during lifetimes. the about charities andtheir causes that they The Community Foundation also care about during their lifetimes. provides a number of ways for also The Community Foundation my clients to continue making an for provides a number of ways impact on the community even my clients to continue making an after they’re gone for perpetuity.

8

Cover Photo

Chuck Wainwright Oswego County Business is published by Local News, Inc., which also publishes CNY Summer Guide, Business Guide, CNY Winter Guide, College Life, In Good Health– The Healthcare Newspaper (four editions), CNY Healthcare Guide and 55PLUS, a Magazine for Active Adults (two editions)

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impact on the community even after they’re gone for perpetuity. Read more of Anne’s story at CNYCF.org/Ruffer

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APRIL / MAY 2018


ON THE JOB

What advice would you give to someone starting a business now

M

y best advice is to create a team of trusted professionals who are experts in their field. This team could be comprised of your banker, an accountant, an attorney, an insurance agent and a business development specialist. Build your team, review your team regularly and make changes to your team when necessary. Additionally, get as much free education as you can. There is a plethora of free resources in the community to consider. “ Deana M. Michaels, AVP, Branch Manager, Pathfinder Bank, Fulton

“Be confident about and able to articulate your value to your target market/prospects. Have solid financial runway for at least one year; bootstrap wherever you can. Build trusting relationships and collaborate or cross-market your product/ services. Don’t try to do it all alone; seek help and resources from SBA, WISE, etc.” Leslie Rose McDonald, President Pathfinders CTS, Inc., Liverpool “You don’t know what you don’t know! You should seek to learn extensively the area your pursuing. Glean wisdom from those around you and professionals who can enlighten you. Pay attention to the advice of a stranger higher than your friends. The stranger is more liable going to tell you the truth. If your instincts are usually right then follow them even when others try and dissuade you. Be prepared to work hard. Above all, keep your word.” Tony Pauldine, Owner Canal Commons and other properties in Oswego “Take a set salary. Protect yourself during slow times. Be honest with your customers. If you can’t provide the service they ask for, let them know, and suggest who might be able to help. They’ll respect you for it.” APRIL / MAY 2018

Tom Brady, Fulton Screen Printing, Fulton

“Do your research. Have a plan. Try to have twice as much money as you think you need.”

Joe Cortini, Owner Cortini Shoe Store, Fulton

“Educate yourself as much as possible. Gain work experience in a similar business, attend seminars/ classes offered by local organizations and speak with professionals who have worked in fields related to your interest. Join the chamber of commerce to network with other business professionals.” Linda A. Tyrrell, Owner Harbor Towne Gifts & Souvenirs, Oswego “Research your industry. Just because you’ve always wanted to own a restaurant, for example, that doesn’t mean that the area in which you want to do business may not have a need, or you may saturate the market. Also, if you have never worked in the field extensively before, you may want to reconsider entrepreneurship until you have real experience under your belt, or else you may find many unexpected, unpleasant surprises.” Bill Wadsworth, managing partner Bistro 197, Oswego

“Be ready to work a lot more than 40 hours as week. Have some working capital available to keep you going in the beginning, if necessary.”

Bill Symons, Founder Canale Insurance & Accounting, Oswego OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

“Don’t. Unless you have more passion and drive than you ever thought you had before. Don’t. Unless you can handle the wild swings of the ups and downs that come from the day-to-day operations. Don’t. If you want to make a quick buck or get rich quick; it will never happen. What will happen is waking up every day with the greatest feeling that you had this idea and every day it’s working. Starting a business is one of most difficult things I have done. It’s not made for everyone, but can be obtained by the strong-willed, passionate and highly driven person.” Timothy Bonner, Owner PC Masters Tech Repair, Oswego “Be sure you have enough money set aside for unexpected expenses. You want to send a message of abundance so that your customers feel they are getting their money’s worth and more. Treat every customer as though he/ she is the most important person in your world at that moment.” Anne Hutchins, Owner River Edge Mansion Bed & Breakfast, Pennellville “Every day, keep the big vision for your business front and center while taking action that directly leads to generating revenue. Without focus and intention, it’s easy to get distracted and spend time on tasks that don’t help you grow your business.” Deb Coman, Owner Deb Coman Writing, Syracuse “When starting a new business, do your homework to ensure there is demand for the product or service you will be offering. We often get caught up in our own passions and unfortunately, sometimes those interests only apply to a small group of people, making the business model unsustainable. You should also immediately begin to think how you will differentiate your business from others that offer similar products or services. How will you draw people into your business? Some examples are enhanced customer service, product customization or expanded offerings. Owning a business is not a Monday through Friday, 9 to 5 proposition. It can be time consuming and before you take the plunge, be sure you are able to dedicate the time 9


and resources necessary to get your idea off the ground, especially in the beginning.” Kevin Hill, Owner JP Jewelers, Oswego

“Write up a detailed business plan and stick to it. Run monthly profit and loss and cash flow statements and understand them.”

Randy Sabourin, Owner Metro Fitness, Syracuse

“Know your product inside and out. Make sure there is demand for your product. Know your demographics. Have a plan with adequate financing.” Edward Galvin, Owner Port City Chiropractic, P.C., Oswego “Carefully analyze your prospective customer. Know your market well and plan wisely for how you will reach them. Develop a thoughtful business plan that carefully considers how much start-up cash will be needed. Seek outside help with small business adviser resources to develop your business plan, if needed. Most potential business owners underestimate the amount of capital needed to create their business start-up and so begin their business seriously under-capitalized. Plan for a four- to five-year start-up period for all capital requirements. Undercapitalization is one of the primary

reasons for small business failure. Randy L. Zeigler, certified financial planner, Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc., Oswego “Be sure to know all of your costs of doing business, and then budget for more. Have an experienced business owner review your budget. Any unforeseen expenses will come from the owner’s pocket.” Brooks Wright, Owner KBM Management, East Syracuse “Know your competition. Define your market. Work with a mentor outside of your organization. This person can give you an outsider’s perspective and also guide you short term and long term.” Jill Zampogna Abbott, Owner Zamp Marketing LLC., DBA Uniforms, Etc., Fulton

“Find something you are excited about and do your research on the industry while finding a mentor that can help guide you in the big decisions you’re about to make.”

Michael Leszczynski, Owner Dynamic Auto and Home Accessories, Oswego

“Consider how your new

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Every year thousands of people buy commercial or residential properties in the region. Many of these people are new to the area and some are just buying newer, bigger properties. Either way, they all receive a complimentary subscription to Oswego County Business. This is one more reason to advertise.

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business is more appealing than your competitors. The market is in search of convenience more and more. Price and quality are not the only drivers for our business. We consistently consider how our marketing strategy makes it easier for our customers to receive our product.” Dustin Trimble, General Manager, The Eis House, Mexico “Befriend people who are already doing that business. I reached out to Village Cleaners in Syracuse for assistance and the father-and-son team had over 90 years of knowledge in the dry cleaning business. They offered tips, tutorials and advice, along with friendship. I have reached out to them several times over my five years in business and know they will always have my back. It’s always great to talk with someone who is as passionate about your profession as you are.” Jeanne McManus, Owner Ontario Cleaners Drycleaners, Fulton “’Plans fail for lack of counsel.’ Talk out your plans; tell everyone! You make a commitment to yourself every time you tell someone else. Ask questions and don’t be afraid to ask for help.” Nancy Fox, Executive Director, CNY Arts Center, Fulton “The first step should be to do some research to determine if there is a need for your product or service. Define the demographics of your potential customers; for example age, income level, location, etc. Identify your direct competition and establish a brand for your business that will differentiate it from your competitors. Ask yourself, ‘Why would someone choose my products or services over my competition?’ With a clear picture of what your strengths are, decide the most cost effective way to advertise and market your business to establish a customer-client base. While this is one aspect of a comprehensive business plan that would include other aspects such as cash flow, employees, location, insurance, etc., it is perhaps the most important. Without customers-clients, everything else is a moot point.” John DeRousie, Owner Custom Marketing Solutions, Oswego By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant APRIL / MAY 2018


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Started How I Got

Tammy Wilkinson Theatre Du Jour founder puts ‘community’ into the interactive touring dinner theater experience By Lou Sorendo

Q: What motivated you to first explore the world of theater? A: If you ask my mom, she’ll say it started when I was a little girl singing “Here Comes Peter Cottontail” to folks on the bus as we went downtown. I definitely was always a ham, but did not enter the official world of theater in any capacity until Morrisville College in 1991. I got to be part of two productions, “Sweet Charity” and “Skin of Our Teeth,” and really came in as a person without any official training. I just had that ham mentality and a lot of natural talent because I was very outgoing. It wasn’t until 2007 that I got involved in The Oswego Players, and was first lead in “Born Yesterday,” playing the role of Billie Dawn. Again, I had no real official theatrical training, just a lot of chutzpah. I wanted to get involved in a community organization, and so I did that and worked with a lot of playhouses around Central New York. Q: When did you come to realize that theater would become your passion? A: As I worked with The Players longer, I ended up becoming their producer and taking a spot on its board. This is where it turned, because one of the main challenges that I faced as a producer was getting people in the seats. You have 120 seats at The Oswego Players’ Francis Marion Brown Theatre, and we were not filling 120 seats at that time. It was a $10 ticket, and it was quite frustrating. We were doing a show called “The Dining Room” and I asked, “Hey, what do you think about bringing this show out into the community? If they are not coming to us, let’s bring it to them!” I talked with Ray Jock at La Parrilla restaurant in downtown Oswego, and he was totally game. We just endeavored to do so, and that was kind of where the juices started flowing. It was such a success. The interesting thing to me was at that time, we couldn’t get them in for $10. The dinner theater experience ticket was $45. La Parrilla is a lovely, intimate space and we filled every table. In my mind, it needed to be an experience. They want to be able to have a nice meal, have something to drink and have all the interactive extras that we bring to the table. Q: When did the business really begin to gain traction? A: Working with The Redhouse in

Photo courtesy of Chuck Wainwright. 12

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

APRIL / MAY 2018


Syracuse, we toured schools and that just planted seeds for me. I worked with enough companies where I think that seeds were planted, but I didn’t see anyone doing the interactive thing. I just knew there was a niche after bringing the one main stage show out to the community because the response was overwhelming. Fast forward, and we got our DBA. It was 2015, and we’re doing “Love Letters,” and we get the community involved. La Parrilla, Bistro 197 and The American Foundry were our three venues to start with, and we got [retired SUNY Oswego theater professor] R. Mark Cole and [Oswego Players’ actress] Banna Rubinow involved. That was a show they truly loved. Meanwhile, we were forming sponsorships and partnerships. During my first show, there were press posters that featured our press releases, and there were cast posters that have cast photographs on the table. You had all the little details — candy, confetti and little frames that say ‘TDJ’. There were so many pieces to that puzzle for that evening for those experiences. It was just everything we could possibly do to make it beautiful, professional, enjoyable, and an engaging experience.

Q: How much capital did you need to launch the business? A: Initially when we started, there was a few thousand dollars in savings allotted for something like this. We spent less than $50 to file a DBA, and then there is licensing for every show. It’s different depending on whether I’m doing a musical, which is thousands of dollars, or I’m doing a straight play which is often $100 or less per show for licensing. But in the beginning, there wasn’t a ton of money and we got creative in that we secured sponsorships and partnerships. There are so many things you need to do to make a show happen, so if I needed a photographer, I would go and make a trade agreement with a photographer and would give them a full page ad in our program and a season ticket for the year. It’s a lovely way to do things and in the beginning, it’s how you have to do things. I needed a website, print and promotional materials, and assets in order to make this look like a million bucks. So I went to every single community member that I knew could help us in some way and elevate us in some way and we just APRIL / MAY 2018

figured out ways to give back. Q: What were some of your foremost obstacles while building the business? A: With every venue that we were involved with, we had to build it. When we first started, it was a struggle to fill all the seats sometimes. In fact, here we are in year four, and I still have that little ping of nerves as we grow. As we add more venues, there are more seats to fill. So again, as we began, was there a ton of money and was there a ton of resources? To be quite frank, not at all. However, I think it was kind of cool that we got to figure it out as we went. You know, collaborative effort is such a buzz phrase right now. Collaboration was key in launching this project. If we needed a prop, we might go to one of our fellow theater organizations and borrow a prop. In fact, that still happens. Even if I had a million dollars, I would still want to do it the same way. It was quite the treasure hunt and quite the little puzzle to figure out. Even today, we find ourselves asking, “What can we buy? What can we borrow? “What can we make?”You have to be frugal because it’s just very expensive. Part of our mission is also to be able to offer actors a little something so that they were being paid as an artist, they were being appreciated as an artist and they were being mentored. It’s very important to me that we would find situations where actors, producers and directors can learn and grow. I’m not naïve in that I know we need to sustain ourselves financially. Obviously, we have to secure enough capital that we’re able to continue to do what we love to do. That comes slowly over time as we build bigger sponsorships, secure more venues and broaden our demographic. Q: What is the most gratifying aspect of what you do? A: My favorite part of every show is when I get to sit back and watch the patrons enjoy what we have built. Every smile, every chuckle or gasp as the actors take them on the journey with them is so satisfying to watch. People want to laugh; they want to be engaged. I believe now more than ever, we are all looking for an escape from our hectic lives. And since we always offer an interactive experience, folks can escape into our world for the evening. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

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PROFILE By Lou Sorendo

SHANE BROADWELL

New chairman of Oswego County legislature, local business leader keeps family first

U

sing the same determination and grit that his father and grandfather displayed, Shane Broadwell has risen to the pinnacle of success in his family, business and political lives. He was recently elected chairman of the Oswego County Legislature, and is hitting his stride in terms of providing leadership in a county fraught with potential. When Mary Flett died in August of 2012, it left the 17th district legislative seat open. When the vacancy occurred, Broadwell discussed with his wife Elise the possibility of joining the legislature, and in October of that same year, was sworn in. He won a special election in 2013 and has been on the legislature ever since. The 17th legislative district includes part of Scriba — where the Broadwell family resides — and parts of Oswego’s wards 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6. “I have no intention of going beyond county politics,” said Broadwell, noting that working within higher levels of government would demand a more significant commitment. “I wouldn’t give up that time from my family,” he said. Broadwell, 47, co-owns Broadwell Hospitality Group and has worked with the organization since May of 1991. The company is a major player on the county’s hospitality and tourism scene. It owns the Best Western Plus, The Captain’s Club Health & Fitness Spa, Lake Ontario Event and Conference Center, Quality Inn & Suites Riverfront, GS Steamers Bar & Grill, Bayshore Grove, and most recently opened Alex’s On The Water. “I started in the business by doing dishes in my Little League uniform when I was 12 years old,” he said. “You learn a lot when you start on that level.” Broadwell earned an associate’s degree in hotel and restaurant management at SUNY College of Agriculture 14

and Technology at Cobleskill in 1991. Following graduation, he worked at the front desk of the Best Western six days a week for many years. He then managed The Captain’s Club before becoming more involved in growing business at Bayshore Grove. That site has evolved from a small restaurant with limited catering to a premiere wedding destination. When the former Holiday Harbor hotel was transformed into the Econo Lodge Riverfront on East First Street in Oswego, Broadwell stepped up as co-owner of the company. Today, his father George “Buddy” Broadwell, his brother George Jr. and sister Alex are all heavily involved in running the business. “Our real focus and priority is to continue to bring more conference center business into Oswego. That will be the key to the future for us,” he said. Next on the agenda is a water park development that bodes well for Oswego County’s tourism industry. T h e site, which will be attached to

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

the Quality Inn, is already being prepared for construction work to begin in the spring. Targeted demographics range from young children, to “tweeners”, to hotel customers wishing to swim laps. “It’s going to be an exciting piece of our puzzle,” he noted. He said the key to the project is how it interfaces with the city of Oswego’s $10 million Downtown Revitalization Initiative. DRI proponents considered it as a priority project, while L. Michael Treadwell, executive director of Operation Oswego County, referred to the park as one of the more critical aspects of the DRI given its uniqueness as an amusement piece.

Family feels While his government and business duties are demanding, Broadwell keeps things in proper perspective. Married for more than 20

APRIL / MAY 2018


years, he and Elisa have two sons, Sam and Matthew. “I am very focused on my family first,” Broadwell said. “My wife and kids are my priority. I’ve always kept in my mind that I have one crack at this, and I am going to do the best job I possibly can with my kids so I get it right. “You learn as you go. There are all kinds of things that get thrown in front of you along the way. You have to stay focused because your kids are your legacy. It’s just important for me — with so much going on in life — that I try to make sure I have time for them,” he added. “I’m very lucky to have my partner and my wife, who is also a native of Oswego. She always has my back,” he said. Broadwell said the hospitality industry is not easy. “It is a 24-hour, seven-days-a-week business, and then you jump into politics at the same time, so you have to be thick -skinned. But Elisa has always been in my corner and I wouldn’t have done it if I didn’t have all her support,” he said. Broadwell has his own workout space in the basement of his home, and regularly attends to fitness needs early in the day. “I like to have my nights available while I still have my boys at home,” said Broadwell, noting the family enjoys outdoor life, particularly fishing. “We’re very passionate about fishing the river and always say it’s the bestkept secret,” he said. “When we get the opportunity, there are so many things to do right here in our own back yard that are awesome.” The reason Broadwell entered the political arena was a result of what he saw at Fitzhugh Park Elementary School while his two boys attended there. Broadwell had a bird’s eye view of a changing demographic among the student base at the school, and it came in the form of concentrated poverty. Broadwell began to discuss the issue with professionals familiar with poverty, and that’s when he decided to get involved on a political level. He served as the Republican majority leader for three years prior to becoming the legislature’s chairman last fall. While leading the caucus, Broadwell focused on molding the group into a more informed and cohesive unit. The chairman also placed an emphasis on not just discussing issues, but setting goals in terms of how problems are going to be resolved. “I’m an optimistic guy,” said Broadwell, noting it can be challenging in an APRIL / MAY 2018

age when politicians on all levels are being cast in a negative light. “You have to keep a positive attitude and stay focused on all those things you need to try to accomplish,” he added. Broadwell noted he strives to be conscientious in terms of always wanting to do the right thing. The combination of being positive and conscientious helps people become engaged, he noted, and more willing to display a “can-do” approach.

The patriarchs George “Buddy” Broadwell is one of the most successful entrepreneurs in the city of Oswego. His business savvy and unrelenting drive are obviously traits that Shane Broadwell reflects. In the late 1970s, when middle class jobs were beginning to disappear, Buddy was securely employed at Alcan, which is now Novelis in Oswego. Buddy opted to leave his job, purchase an old warehouse at the end of an abandoned street, turn it into a restaurant, and then create a vision of building a hotel in the future, his son recalls. “Everybody thought he went bananas,” said Broadwell. “How could

Lifelines Birth date: March 3, 1971 Birthplace: Oswego Current residence: County Route 1, Scriba Education: Associate’s degree in hotel and restaurant management, SUNY College of Agriculture and Technology at Cobleskill Affiliations: Coordinator, Lake Ontario Pro-Am Salmon and Trout Team Tournament; Founder, coordinator of TriOswego Triathlon Personal: Married to Elisa with two sons, Samuel, 17, and Matthew, 15 Hobbies: Spending time with family; lake and river fishing, golfing with family and friends; landscaping and gardening at home

anyone possibly leave a solid industrial job in the late ‘70s during a difficult time? Who would take that risk and have the determination to do that? Nobody can put that past my father,” he noted. Does Broadwell have the same level of risk? “I think we’re in a different day and age now and it’s difficult to take risks like that,” he said. “Everything is so expensive and it’s just a different world today. You’ve got to be protective regarding what you have rather than making a gamble that can jeopardize that, especially when you have a family,” he said. Broadwell said one of the most significant lessons he was taught by his father is to do homework. Whether it’s a minor or major detail, “doing homework inside and out will position you to make that purchase or decision the right one,” he said. Another lesson he learned from his father is to always have a plan and think about the future. He used the new water park as an example. “The water park has been talked about for about 12 years in concept and conversation,” Broadwell said. Financing has been elusive, but the recent DRI program has allowed sufficient gap financing to make it become a viable enterprise. Buddy Broadwell demonstrated his special brand of determination following a fire that leveled his Captain’s Lounge property, his first business venture. The loss of the food and beverage venue for the Best Western hotel facility was turned into a plus, however. The focus then became accelerating plans to construct the conference center and with it, adding Alex’s On The Water for food and beverage support. When his father built the Best Western Captain’s Quarters, he designed it knowing it would some day accommodate the conference center. It’s this forward thinking and drive that sets his father apart, Broadwell noted. Buddy’s father, Claude Broadwell , blazed the business trail for the family. After working for Armstrong Industries and the Niagara Mohawk Power Corp. for many years, Claude Broadwell became well known in Oswego for the sale of Christmas trees. He went on to operate several successful businesses, including Broadwell’s Tavern, Bayshore Grove Restaurant and the Old Timer’s Inn. “Claude was into so many things,

continued on p. 88 OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

15


Publisher’s note By Wagner Dotto

W

e’re excited with the fact that we are publishing the Summer Guide – The Best of Upstate New York for the 23rd straight year. That‘s right, 23 years in a row. This was the very first tourism guide in Oswego County at a time when county officials were waking up to the potential tourism represented to the area. Needless to say, the publication met a growing need in the market and it was warmly welcomed by readers, advertisers and tourism officials. The first few years, the guide was distributed as the “Vacation Guide” and was limited to Oswego County. Today we distribute the Summer Guide in several regions, stretching from the Finger Lakes to the Adirondacks. The Summer Guide has worked and grown over the years because it is simply the best place for advertisers to promote their businesses during the season. Ads are inexpensive and bring great results — and we’re happy to

com. It’s visually appealing, easy to navigate and has tons of information for visitors and residents alike. Check it out when you get a chance. Over the years we’ve had a great deal of support from tourism officials and business owners who advertise with us. At the same, we’re fortunate that readers have responded in an enthusiastic manner and have picked up every single copy of the publication. We’re now working hard to keep the Summer Guide interesting, lively and generating business to hundreds of advertisers who trust our publication. have many repeat advertisers. The colorful magazine is widely available and free of charge — all season long, which means advertisers get a lot of mileage out of their ads. On top of that, the entire publication is available online with links to all advertisers. Online readers click on the ads and it takes them directly to the advertiser’s website. We just revamped our site — cnysummer.

WAGNER DOTTO is the publisher of Oswego County Business Magazine.

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17


Where in the World is Sandra Scott? By Sandra Scott

Kathmandu

A city of over a million people in Nepal and not a single traffic light

B

ob Segar sang “… if I ever get out of here I’m going to Kathmandu…” For most people, the name of Kathmandu seems like a place at the “end of the world” mainly because they associate it with climbing Mount Everest, the world’s highest peak. But there is more to Kathmandu and Nepal than scaling the world’s highest peaks. Other misconceptions about Kathmandu is that it is cold and at a high altitude. Not true. The city is nestled in a valley where the temperature ranges from an average

of 35 in winter to an average of 77 in the summer. At an altitude of 4,593 it is lower than Denver, the Mile High City. Kathmandu, a city of over a million people, does not have any traffic lights. A good-doer organization installed some but they were ignored and frequent interruptions in electricity didn’t help. Basically, people ignored them but one rule they do follow, most of the time, is no horn blowing. The city traffic is chaotic because of the number of vehicles, the constant road repairs, and installation of public

services, not to mention the occasional sacred cow roaming the streets. In the midst of the chaos is the Garden of Dreams, a serene neo-classic garden with fountains, trees, ponds and pavilions. Most of the high-end hotels have large beautiful gardens with swimming pools. The city has more UNESCO-listed World Heritage sites than any other world capital. Even though the devastating 2015 earthquake destroyed many of the iconic sites in Durbar Square there are many that remain, some of which are

Kathmandu’s Durbar Square was where the city’s kings were once crowned and legitimized, and from where they ruled.

18

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

APRIL / MAY 2018


being repaired. Durbar Square is where the kings were crowned and from where they ruled. Today Nepal is a republic so there are no more kings. The demise of the royalty is a story that even the movies could not imagine. In 2001, at the royal family’s monthly reunion dinner, the Crown Prince killed nine members of the royal family including his parents, the king and queen. His self-inflicted wound left him in a coma for three days during which time he was the king, after which his uncle became king. It is thought that the royal family did not approve of the Crown Prince’s choice of a bride. Turmoil followed and in 2008 Nepal was declared a republic. Palace tours are given with marked locations where some of the royal family died. Interestingly, Nepal is one of the few countries that was never ruled by foreigners. There are many temples, stupas and monuments to visit, including Swaymbhunath (Monkey Temple), considered where Kathmandu began. On the grounds there are shrines and many monkeys. It is one of the holiest places in Nepal. One way to get a taste of the culture is at one of the several cultural shows that include dinner and music. The food is served traditional style on low tables with diners sitting on rugs. Keep in mind when agreeing to have a certain dish served that bobbing your head from side-to-side means “yes” not “no.” To get a view of the Himalayas without trekking there is a flightseeing trip where everyone is guaranteed a window seat and view of the mountains. Multi-day trips from Kathmandu should include Pokkhara — with spectacular scenery and adventure activities; and Chitwan National Park, home to rhinos and Bengal tigers. There are home stays, meditation centers, hiking trips, white water rafting and, of course, mountain climbing. The cost for climbing Mount Everest (29,029 ft.) is about $45,000.

Sandra Scott, a retired history teacher and the co-author of two local history books, has been traveling worldwide with her husband, John, since the 1980s. The Scotts live in the village of Mexico. APRIL / MAY 2018

The Garden of Dreams, a serene neo-classic garden with fountains, trees, ponds and pavilions.

One of the several cultural shows in Kathmandu, which include dinner and music.

Temple Swaymbhunath (Monkey Temple), considered where Kathmandu began. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

19


NEWSMAKERS NEWS BRIEFS ON LOCAL BUSINESSES & BUSINESS PEOPLE

John Hewitt Joins Beardsley Architects Auburn-based Beardsley Architects + Engineers has announced that architectural engineer John E. Hewitt, P.E., has joined the firm as mechanical engineer. Hewitt has 38 years of experience in the deHewitt sign of systems for commercial, industrial, educational, healthcare, governmental and large

20

residential projects. He offers design solutions categorized by innovation, cost efficiency, soundness of design, constructability, and a commitment to thorough design documentation. He has a comprehensive knowledge of construction processes and utilizes a holistic approach in the resolution of complex problems.

Capella Named Pathfinder’s Retail Products Specialist Daniel J. Capella has been named retail products specialist at Pathfinder Bank. He replaces David Guynn, who is retiring from his position.

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

The appointment of Capella to retail products specialist will provide the bank and its customers with almost two decades worth of experience in banking, as well as experience in residential mortgage lending, according to a bank’s press release. “Daniel’s prior experience in the area of residential loan processing will be extremely valuable in his new position at Pathfinder Bank,” said Reyne Pierce, the bank’s vice president, team leader residential and consumer lending. “In his new role, Daniel will Capella originate mortgages, promote the financial institution and its lending services to the real estate community, help to identify and serve the communities financial needs through seminars and sales meetings, and participate in and promote the financial institution community activities.”

APRIL / MAY 2018


“We believe he will continue to complement our growing lending division. Daniel provides a strong vision, intellect and commitment to our mission, and will be instrumental in the execution of our strategic plan and growth going forward.” Capella holds a bachelor’s degree in public relations and marketing and a master’s in business administration from SUNY Oswego. He currently resides in his newly renovated mid-century home in Oswego. Before joining Pathfinder Bank in 2014, Capella was previously employed with JP Morgan Chase, Alliance Bank, and Oswego County Savings Bank. In his spare time, Capella serves on the Harborfest board of directors and enjoys spending time with his friends and family, fine automobiles and fine dining.

OH Foundation Adds Two Staff Members The Oswego Health Foundation has recently welcomed two new key staff members. Michele Hourigan, of Oswego, was named as development manager, while Margaret Barclay, of Pulaski, was appointed to the position of major gifts officer. Hourigan brings with her several years of experience in event planning and management, both professionally and in the community. She was previous employed at Oswego Industries/ARC, where she was responsible for event coordination. Hourigan has a bachelor’s degree from SUNY Oswego. Barclay arrives at Oswego Health with more than six years of development experience Hourigan that includes Oswego County Opportunities, Vera House and Manlius Pebble Hill School. She holds a bachelor’s degree from St. Lawrence University.  “I am pleased to have both Michele and Margaret join the Oswego Health Foundation,” said Karen Ferguson, the foundation’s director. “They have experiences that will assist in our philanthropic growth at the health system as we support the healthcare needs of APRIL / MAY 2018

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the health system and our community.” The Oswego Health Foundation exists to raise and manage philanthropic support for Oswego Health as it provides accessible, quality care and improves the health of the residents in our community. Created in 2011, the OsweBarclay go Health Foundation is a 501(c) (3) nonprofit organization. As an integral partner with Oswego Health, the foundation encourages, solicits and receives charitable gifts in support of programs, projects and services provided through Oswego Health affiliates. Gifts to the Oswego Health Foundation are tax-deductible in accordance with IRS guidelines.

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Ed Fayette, sales associate with Century 21 Galloway Realty, has recently received the Century 21 President’s Producer Award. The annual award is bestowed upon those Century 21 System sales affiliates that earn the Century 21 Centurion award and the Century 21 Quality Service Pinnacle Producer award in the same calendar year. “Earning significant production in the competitive real estate industry is extraordinary but combining that with top-rated third-party testimonials, now that is Ed Fayette; a relentless go-getter who will not stop until home buyers’ and sellers’ needs are met,” said Nick Fayette Bailey, president and chief executive officer, Century 21 Real Estate LLC. “This is an outstanding honor since only a small percentage of C21 affiliated agents receive this award.” The Centurion Producer award honors Century 21 System sales affiliates that earn $263,000 in sales production or 70 closed transaction sides within the calendar year. APRIL / MAY 2018


To earn the Century 21 Quality Service Pinnacle Producer Award, a C21 sales affiliate must receive completed customer surveys for at least 80 percent of their transactions from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, with an average survey score of at least 95 percentage or better for two consecutive years. Century 21 Real Estate LLC is comprised of approximately 7,700 independently-owned and operated franchised broker offices in 78 countries and territories worldwide with more than 117,000 independent sales professionals.

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Century 21Recognizes agent Kim McPherson Kim McPherson, a sales associate with Century 21 Galloway Realty in Oswego, has received the Century 21 Quality Service Pinnacle Producer Award. “Century 21 Kim McPherson’s relentless pursuit of the extraordinary, and the standards they are setting in the market are helping to set us apart from the sea of sameness space in real estate,” said Nick Bailey, president and chief executive officer of Century 21 Real Estate LLC. “We all know we live in a world that bases many of its decisions on third-party testimonials, and Century 21 Kim McPherson is living our misMcPherson sion every day: to defy mediocrity and deliver extraordinary experiences.” The annual award is based on results from the Century 21 Quality Service Survey, which is emailed to consumers immediately after the purchase or sale of a home. To earn the Century 21 Quality Service Pinnacle Producer Award, an agent must receive completed customer surveys for at least 80 percent of their transactions from Jan. 1 through Dec. 31, with an average survey score of at least 95 percent or better for 2 consecutive years. “Kim McPherson provides their clients with knowledge and advice related to their real estate transaction and offers them confidence during what may be the most significant purchase of a lifetime,” said William Galloway, broker/ owner of Century 21 Galloway Realty. APRIL / MAY 2018

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and Ellen is a big reason why. We are delighted to present her with this award. “The award recipient is chosen by our staff. In their nominations, they pointed out that Ellen’s positive attitude and personal attentiveness goes above and beyond in her interactions with our agency,“ said Christiansen.

SUNY Oswego to Partner with Indian Institutions, Yale Eryl Christiansen (left), ESA vice president, marketing, giving the Commercial Lines Partnership Award to Ellen Scheiderich, commercial lines underwriter, Main Street America Group.

Scheiderich Earns Eastern Shore Associates’ Annual ‘Partnership Award’ Eastern Shore Associates Insurance (ESA) has awarded its annual Commercial Lines Partnership Award to Ellen Scheiderich, commercial lines underwriter, Main Street America Group (MSA). “This award was established to recognize individuals from our insurance carriers for their outstanding performance and relationship with our agency,” said Eryl Christiansen, ESA vice president, marketing. “MSA and ESA have had an excellent relationship

SUNY Oswego will serve as the U.S. lead for a funded astrophysics project probing the age and size of the universe, working with Yale University and two top Indian institutions — the University of Delhi and the Inter University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics in Pune. The exchange of scholars and research, funded by the Kanbur Indo-U.S. Science and Technology Forum, continues and expands work by its co-principal investigators, Oswego physics chairman and professor Shashi Kanbur and H.P. Singh of the University of Delhi. It follows a previous grant and ongoing research that have led Kanbur, Singh and other international partners to a number of publications on stellar structure and evolution.

Their work uses galactic markers such as Cepheids and RR Lyrae — period-variable stars whose pulsation allow an estimate of their distance from Earth — to provide research on the extra-galactic distance scale and studies that are “important for theories of galaxy formation and stellar populations,” according to the grant application. The grant — for 42,97,000 rupees (or around $60,000 U.S.) — succeeds a previous one from the same group. Previous work was “more empirical in nature, while this will have a changed focus, more on the theoretical,” Kanbur said. The grant will fund the ability of student and faculty researchers to travel from India to the U.S. and vice versa. “Much of this work is computer-based, but the best interactions come from meeting other people face-to-face,” Kanbur explained. Kanbur and the team will use satellite data and observations to study such phenomena as the hydrogen ionization front-stellar photosphere interaction with the pulsating stars to test and explore theories about parameters applying to stars and space. International investment on studying the universe continues to advance their work, including the planned June 2018 launch of the TESS satellite by NASA to “monitor more than 200,000 stars for planetary companions, but in doing so, will provide accurate light curves for many cool stars that exhibit non-radial pulsations,” the grant explained. “I hope that some of this work will be related to the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope,” the largest infrastructure project ever funded by the National Science Foundation, he said.

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Letter to the editor Re: Founding of Fulton Tool Co. I would like to make it known to your readers that the article about Mr. Bruce Phelps, owner of Fulton Tool Co., published in the February-March 2018, contained some misconceptions. Fulton  Machine and Tool Company was founded in 1960 by Joseph Metivier, not by Mr. Phelps. It was located in one of the old woolen mill buildings in Futlon. A year later it was relocated to 113 Schuyler St. A year later Fulton Tool Co. was incorporated, according to a Certificate of Incorporation signed on Aug. 22, 1961 and witnessed by Wallace Van C. Auser and Ina H. Crandall (also notarized). Only Mr. Metivier ‘s name is on the document.  An article in the “Oswego Valley News” lists Mr. Phelps and Mr. Edward McGuane as stock holders in 1962. The three men were partners by 1963, according to the article. My sister, Marie Metivier Hansen, and I are proud of the accomplishments of our father, Mr. Joseph Metivier, and would like the community to know that Fulton Tool Company was his undertaking initially.

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DiningOut Restaurant

Guide

Mimi’s Drive-In

For Fulton diner, there is only “busy” or “very busy”

N

estle and Miller have come and gone but if there’s one constant in the city of Fulton, it’s Mimi’s.

Family-owned Mimi’s Drive-In has been serving breakfast, lunch and dinner to hungry locals and travelers drawn in by the bright red neon sign visible for hundreds of yards from either direction of Route 104 since 1970. Due likely to both its prime location and good food, Mimi’s doesn’t seem to have a “down time.” Pass by at 3 in the afternoon and it seems like the large parking lot is still at least half-full. There’s busy and there’s very busy, as it was when we stopped in for dinner around 6 p.m. on a recent Thursday evening. Save for a lone seat or two at the counter, the restaurant was completely full. Two other parties waited ahead of us, occasionally peeping over a barrier to see if any tables had cleared. Mimi’s typically asks diner to seat themselves, but a hostess guided us to a table that

26

had just opened in a rear dining area. The menu is filled with all the classic American diner staples: Pancakes, eggs, French toast, and other breakfast items (including homemade cinnamon raisin bread) and lunch and dinner options, such as burgers, hot turkey sandwiches, meatloaf sandwiches and liver and onions. Central New York loves its fried fish and Mimi’s serves that daily, along with fried shrimp, scallops and clams. Several specials round out the menu, including chicken and biscuits ($8.99) — that night’s hot entrée special. The large split biscuit was tender, yet sturdy enough to do its job, which was to support the star of the show: The chicken. The white meat chicken was pulled into pieces large enough to require a knife and fork to eat. It’s chicken and biscuits, not gravy and biscuits and OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

this rendition of the classic dish was a welcome reminder of that. It was served with a side of potatoes — I chose home fries with onion, but mashed potatoes with gravy and French fries are also available—and the vegetable of the day. That night, it was mashed butternut squash, which was sweet, rich and not the slightest bit bitter or watery. Picking the home fries, speckled with flavorful browned bits from the griddle, proved to be a good decision. Mimi’s is one of the few places where diners can get prime rib any night of the week for less than the price of a cheeseburger at some restaurants. Available in both regular cut ($12.99) and the larger king cut ($15.99), the prime rib is served with tossed salad or cottage cheese, choice of potato and a buttered roll. There are more aesthetically-pleasing slabs of prime rib out there, as Mimi’s’ APRIL / MAY 2018


apparent technique of dunking the meat in hot au jus to finish off the beef to the desired doneness does leave the exterior a little drab, but the meat was perfectly cooked to the desired medium-rare, a feat especially impressive considering the relative thinness of the beef. Dinner ended with our waitress rattling off a list from memory of nearly a dozen homemade pies, cakes and other desserts. From those, we picked the carrot cake ($4.99) and chocolate cream pie ($4.49). The dessert case, located front and center next to the cash register, is one of the first things diners see upon entering. And if there was a silver lining to having to wait for a table, it was that it gave us time to scope out the desserts before sitting down. The thick slice of carrot cake was moist and packed full of nuts and raisins, which gave the cake a nice texture. I would have loved an even thicker layer of frosting, but it was by no means skimpy. Chocolate cream pie always sounds good on paper, but when with plain ol’ instant chocolate pudding, is typically too messy and bland. But at Mimi’s, the chocolate cream was a thick, rich, well-crafted mousse, packed with chocolate flavor. Paired with a hefty helping of whipped cream, Mimi’s chocolate cream pie was among the best versions I’ve had. The many paper fliers promoting neighborhood dinners, benefits and sales tacked to boards near the front entrance and the numerous ads for local businesses that line the menu pages and specials boards serve as tangible proof of Mimi’s long-held role in the Oswego County community. Mimi’s earned that role for serving good food at a great price just about any time of day any day of the week. So, whether you’re a local looking for a new go-to breakfast (or lunch, or dinner) spot, or you’re zipping through Fulton en route to SUNY Oswego, Mimi’s is worth a stop.

Mimi’s bills their chicken and biscuits as famous, and for good reason. The large pieces of pulled white meat chicken were a highlight of the meal.

Prime rib at a diner? Mimi’s serves it nightly, with salad, potatoes and a roll on the side.

Mimi’s Drive-In Address: 201 N. Second St., Fulton Hours: 6 a.m. to 9 p.m. Monday to Saturday; 6:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., Sunday Phone: 315-593-7400. Website: www.facebook.com/ MimisDriveIn/ APRIL / MAY 2018

Carrot cake: The thick slice of homemade carrot cake is studded with chopped nuts and raisins. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

27


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SPECIAL REPORT

From left, Lance Pezzlo, Sara Pezzlo and Jake Mulcahey take care of business at their new store, Gateway Liquor & Wine in Fulton.

Partners Launch Gateway Liquor & Wine in Fulton Former county legislator and his partner betting on new liquor store’s success

T

wo business partners are making a spirited effort to establish a gateway to success. Jake Mulcahey and Lance Pezzlo have teamed to launch Gateway Liquor & Wine, 417 S. Second St., Fulton (state Route 481). The store, which opened in late February, is located directly across from Huhtamaki, a manufacturer with about 500 employees. The partners also own and operate a contract company, Pinnacle Builders USA Inc., in Oswego. The partners, both born and raised in Oswego, have known each other as friends for about 20 years. That friendship has evolved into a successful partAPRIL / MAY 2018

nership, as their contract company is nearing its 10-year milestone. Gateway Liquor & Wine features about 2,000 square feet of space, with half of that dedicated to storage. “We each have our strengths and weaknesses and certainly help each other out,” Pezzlo said. Pezzlo’s wife Sara anchors the front line staff. The partners decided to create their first retail venture in Fulton because they saw an opportunity and “took a leap of faith,” Pezzlo said. “We did some due diligence on it and we saw an opportunity here, and it was a matter of getting the ball rolling and making sure everything fell into

line,” he added. “We were able to purchase the building, which was key. Once that all happened, the wheels really got spinning,” Pezzlo added. Mulcahey noted inventory is constantly growing. “As customers come in and ask for things, we try to get it on the shelves for them,” he said. “We spend a lot of time paying attention to demand and what people would like to see, and treat people right when they come in the store.” He noted some positive developments are occurring in Fulton, including planned construction in an area next to Fajita Grill on South Second Street. “Hopefully we will get some nice businesses coming,” said Pezzlo, noting they are at the forefront of what hopefully will be an economic resurgence in the city. Pezzlo said short-term challenges involve getting the word out on the new business, making sure the right staff is in place, ensuring that everyone understands the ins and outs of the systems involved and having the correct inventory. Running a contracting company for many years has given the partners a solid business background. “It all helps, and certainly this is a different beast,” he said. “There are different aspects involved here. We rely on a lot of people and can’t always be hands on deck.” One of the foremost challenges in launching the business was acquiring a liquor license, a process that requires a fair amount of red tape, Pezzlo said. The store was a former Verizon wireless building. The partners took down walls to open up the space, while the store features new lighting, floors and racking. “We cleaned up everything and hope that everybody around here appreciates it,” he said. “The response has been great,” said Pezzlo, noting officials at City Hall in Fulton have been nothing but supportive to the new business venture. “If we have any questions, they are right there,” he said. “I would certainly say that if anyone has the opportunity to work with them, give it a go,” he said. The partners also gave credit to support from Pathfinder Bank to help make the venture possible.

BUSINESS UPDATE

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

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Responding to feedback The partners agree that success will be measured more by appreciative customers than by the amount of money to be made. “We get folks in all the time who come and get the same product on a regular basis. We want to make sure it’s here as well as whatever else they want,” Mulcahey said. To achieve success, staff intends on being friendly and receptive to ideas, while keeping the facility neat and clean. “We want to make sure the store is well organized and make it easy for customers to find the products they are looking for,” Mulcahey said. “I got some advice once: Just be good at what you are doing and don’t pay attention to what everybody else is doing,” he said. “That’s what we are trying to do here.” The business strives to offer a variety of products at competitive pricing with quality customer service, Mulcahey said. “We’re happy to see you when you come to the door,” he said. The business has a presence on Facebook and features signage on the building that lets passers-by know who they are. In addition, they also have the option of donning a Captain Morgan’s promotional suit and hitting the sidewalk. The business uses Facebook (@ gatewayliquorwine) to get the word out as well as to promote upcoming events, such as wine tastings and sales. Special events such as wine tastings bring people together at the store where they can check out products and socialize. “We always have a good time when we are doing it,” Mulcahey added. Mulcaney served for eight years on the Oswego County Legislature. “I didn’t realize how much time it did take up. Since we started Pinnacle, I was involved in politics and it has always been part of my schedule. You take that part out of the schedule, and there definitely is more time to apply yourself to work,” Mulcahey said. In terms of New York state products, the business carries some ciders and a significant array of wines. Gateway also does business with Lock 1 Distilling Co. based in Phoenix as well as features 21 Tequila, a product created and marketed by Fulton’s Brandon Bellinger.

By Lou Sorendo 30

Jeanne McManus of Oswego gave up her profession as a dental hygienist because of health reasons. She bought Ontario Cleaners, a dry cleaner in Fulton, five years ago. “I love being my own boss,” McManus said.

Owner of Ontario Cleaners in Fulton Turns Business Around Former dental hygienist who bought the business five years ago, is upgrading, buying new equipment

J

eanne McManus, a former dental hygienist and Oswego native, purchased Ontario Cleaners in Fulton five years ago and has been working to turn the business around. After having two back surgeries, McManus could no longer be a dental hygienist. A close friend of hers and real estate agent recommended she buy Ontario Cleaners. The previous owner had been trying to sell the business, located at 312 Seneca St., Fulton, for years. “Finally, I came up to look at [Ontario Cleaners] and I fell in love with it,” McManus said. “I had my husband come look at it and he loved it. My parents came to see it and they thought it was a great idea, so I ended up becoming a dry cleaner at age 44.” McManus said the previous owner did not have hours on the door and had little foot traffic. When she purchased the business, McManus decided it was important to her put hours on the door and maintain them, as well as upgrade old, rundown equipment.

“If I’m going to be here every day, I want it to be nice,” McManus said. “Slowly, room by room, we’re gutting it.” McManus bought Ontario Cleaners for $90,000, which was a great investment, she said. During the first winter, the windows leaked and every three hours, McManus and her family came by to empty buckets of water. They soon would replace the roof. “The first year, the roof was a big expense,” McManus said. “That was the first thing we did.” Last year, McManus purchased a new boiler that supplies the equipment. This year, she plans to upgrade the machinery and purchase new presses, a dryer, and dry-cleaning machine. “We’re just trying to button up the building and make it a better place,” McManus said.

BUSINESS UPDATE

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Focus on quality As soon as the equipment is APRIL / MAY 2018


“I didn’t know anything [about the business].Without a business degree, I had no action plan, no business plan — I just bought it and jumped in.” Jeanne McManus, owner of Ontario Cleaners in Fulton.

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upgraded, McManus plans to advertise more to get people in the shop. “We never want to grow super big,” Starting a new business or looking to expand? Here is your McManus said. “Right now, we’re so focused on quality. We’ll spend hours chance to sit down with professionals and discuss on something to make it perfect.” all your business options. McManus said she has the capacity Business Plan Development to do that because they are not extremely Finding Sources of Funding • Small Business Start-Ups • busy, but she never wants to lose quality in their work. Business Expansion • Marketing • Record Keeping There are two employees that work 121 East First St. Oswego, NY 13126 • 315-312-3493 at Ontario Cleaners, but she eventually would like to hire more. “I love being my own boss,” McManus said. “The first year, my mom and I Take the short drive were pressing, but it’s so great to have to save $1,000s employees.” McManus’ parents own 1 percent of the business and have been instrumental in helping McManus. She loves that her family is very involved in Ontario Cleaners. “I didn’t know anything,” McManus said. “Without a business degree, I had 1698 County Route 57 no action plan, no business plan — I just bought it and jumped in.” Fulton • 315-598-2135 “My first year I was doing snow longleybros.com removal all by myself,” McManus said. “I was the only person working the desk, I was pressing and then I was making deliveries.” She was working 12- to 14-hour days, trying to build up the business. “It’s nice to have a plow guy, employees and a bookkeeper,” McManus The Port of Oswego is the first port of call on the Great Lakes said. “There are people trained to do it.”first port of call on the Great Lakes The Port of Oswego is the St. of Lawrence Seaway - from Thethe Port Oswego is the first port of call on the from theher St. Lawrence Seaway McManus earned bachelor’s Great Lakes from the St. Lawrence Seaway degree from SUNY Oswego in commuCentral New York’s intermodal center with direct connection nications with a minor in public relations. - Central New York’s intermodal center with direct Central New York’s intermodal center with direct connection to the CSX system and all New York “There no York book you can just pick to the CSX system and allisNew connection to the CSX system and all New York up that can tell you what to do as a small 1 East Second Street Oswego NY 13126 business owner,” McManus said. 1 East Second Street Oswego NY 13126

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Bill Jacquin and his wife Joann. “We’re open for business,” Bill said. “We’re ready to rock n’ roll here.”

Couple Buys Oswego B&B for $185,000 Serendipity Bed and Breakfast on the west side now under new ownership

B

ill Jacquin and his wife Joann purchased Serendipity Bed and Breakfast in Oswego in October and are open for business. The house is an 1870s federal-style home, with a unique mix of rooms decorated in different styles. There are four bedrooms, including a dragon room and a Van Gogh room. Serendipity Bed and Breakfast is located at 7225 state Route 104 near SUNY Oswego. “I’m outside now fixing everything up and getting ready for the good weather,” Bill said. “We’re going to plant a garden with food my wife can use for her creativity [in the kitchen.]” Joann runs a cooking blog — The Italian Next Door on Blogspot — where she posts her recipes. “She is an Italian expert,” Bill said. “She loves it. She’s always messing around with something, but it translates into the best breakfasts.” Joann is an Oswego native and attended Crane School of Music in Potsdam. Bill is an alumnus of SUNY Oswego. They moved away in 1993, when Bill accepted a job as a pastor for River of Life, a church located in Butler, Ohio.

Within the last few years, Joann wanted to move back to Oswego to be closer to their family. They had stayed at the Serendipity Bed and Breakfast multiple times when they came to visit Oswego. “In the 24 years we were gone, we always came back for Harborfest, as well as New Year’s,” Bill said. “We stayed at

BUSINESS UPDATE

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the bed and breakfast each time.” Bill said he met the previous owners, and they were wonderful. “They were just so friendly, and they showed us the place for a little bit when we were here,” Bill said. “Six hours later and we were still talking about the place.” They purchased the business Oct. 27 for about $185,000, which included all of the antiques, amenities, carpets, kitchenware and other items. Bill said he had a great experience with Pathfinder Bank, as well as their real estate agent, from Realty by Design. Serendipity Bed and Breakfast is normally closed throughout the winter, but they have opened it and have had people staying. “We’re open for business,” Bill said. “We’re ready to rock n’ roll here.” There is also a large barn in the back that Bill is working on getting ready for weddings and other events. “We don’t want to add anything else, but we want to make it clean and attractive from the outside,” Bill said. “We want everyone to know when we come here we have scrubbed, wiped down and thoroughly gone through every inch of this place.” Bill said in 10 years, he’s not sure where they’ll be, but won’t be surprised if they’re still running Serendipity Bed and Breakfast. “We are here to serve Oswego State and their families,” Bill said. “For parents’ days, hockey game, basketball games or folks checking it out. I’m a college grad of this place and I know it well.”

By Maria Pericozzi

Serendipity Bed and Breakfast located at 7225 state Route 104 in Oswego has been sold. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

APRIL / MAY 2018


121 E. First., Oswego, NY, 13126 315-312-3492 | www.oswego.edu/obcr

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Sharon Chevrolet has been doing business On Route 57 in Phoenix for 35 years. It’s now building a much larger facility on Route 31 in Clay. The new headquarters (photo) will open by early fall and will feature a 20,000 square-foot building on 7.5 acres.

Flight from Phoenix

After 35 years, Sharon Chevrolet relocating to Route 31 in Clay

W

elcome to auto row. Route 31 in Clay features an ever-growing business cluster with multiple car dealerships. Sharon Chevrolet, a longtime business on Route 57 in Phoenix, is the latest dealership to construct a new facility along what has become a shopping Mecca in Central New York. The Chevrolet dealership and a new shopping plaza are the latest developments along the rapidly growing commercial corridor along Route 31, between Route 57 and Interstate 481, in Clay. Three dealerships from Oswego County have relocated to Route 31 over the past several years • Fred Raynor Ford Lincoln & Mercury in Fulton (now Davidson Ford of Clay) • Nissan North (now Fuccillo Nissan) • Sharon Chevrolet. Davidson Ford opened a 42,000-square-foot dealership on Route 31 in July of 2016, which is directly across the roadway from the new Sharon Chevrolet site. The new Sharon Chevrolet site

is located on the north side of Route 31, a short distance east of Route 57. Meanwhile, The Widewaters Group is proposing a 100,000-squarefoot-plus retail complex with restaurants and stores on the north side of Route 31 in Clay. The project, known as Widewaters Commons, would be located on Route 31 west of Kohl’s and about a mile west of Route 481. Sharon Chevrolet has been doing business in Phoenix for 35 years. It is a member of the Fox family of dealerships with a staff of long-time employees headed by Sharon Fox. Mike Carroll, executive manager of Fox Dealerships of CNY, said recently that the new building is framed and all steel work is done. “Going forward, the interior work is going to be starting in the next few weeks,” he said in mid-March. The new facility should be opening in late summer or early fall, he noted. Carroll oversees Fox Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram, Honda, Toyota and Subaru dealerships along Route 5 in

BUSINESS UPDATE

34

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Auburn, as well as Sharon Chevrolet in Phoenix. The move is being made mainly for the convenience of the customers, Carroll said. “Most of our customers — even from the Phoenix area — are shopping on that Route 31 corridor. Also, a large number of our customers live in the town of Clay as well as Liverpool and Baldwinsville, so it’s more convenient for our larger customer base,” Carroll said.

‘Tough move’ “It is a very tough move and we love Phoenix,” Carroll said. “We’ve done a lot to support the community and have been very well received there.” However, “I think most of the folks in Phoenix and Oswego County have been accustomed to coming to Route 31 for all their retail needs, so we think it’s going to continue to be convenient for them,” Carroll said. He noted in Phoenix, Sharon Chevrolet was working out of an 8,000 square-foot building on 1.5 acres of land. The new facility will feature a 20,000 APRIL / MAY 2018


square-foot building on 7.5 acres. “The store has grown substantially over that period of time and quite frankly, we’ve just outgrown the space,” he noted. “There’s also things that customers expect that we just can’t do in Phoenix, such as service customer drives, larger customer lounges and more amenities,” he said. “We just don’t have space to put amenities in that building that customers expect today.” Carroll noted the site is within the business’ Chevrolet assigned territory. “We can’t go outside our assigned territory. There’s only a certain number of areas that we could have moved to,” he noted. The Route 31 location “makes the most sense due to the fact of its popularity with customers,” he added. The new facility will feature a large customer lounge for customers who opt to wait for their vehicles. It will also have four vehicle service drives so customers coming into the service department will be able to drive inside and be greeted by a service adviser. He said that makes it more convenient for customers when dropping off vehicles, for instance. “They will be able to pull right inside the building, be greeted and taken care of,” Carroll said. Also, the showroom will be much larger at 1,600 square feet to allow customers to see more vehicles. The business expected inventories to triple, he noted. Initially, the staff will be increased by 10 to 12 members, and then in upcoming years, could see as many as 25 to 30 new employees, he said. The evolution of Route 31 as an “auto row” follows other industry trends. “Typically it happens in markets over a period of time,” Carroll said. “Automobile dealers try to get to areas where the customer finds it most convenient.” Locations next to retail titans such as Walmart, Target, Home Depot, Lowe’s and Kohl’s are ideal being that they create high customer traffic. “It’s convenient for them to shop for vehicles in the same place they shop for other items that they need,” he added. Due to proprietary reasons, Carroll did not disclose the projected cost of the project.

By Lou Sorendo

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learned what systems are most efficient. “It’s exciting to develop this store in a way that increases how efficient our whole organization is run,” he said.

Big plans ahead

Headquarters of Burritt Motors on the east side of Oswego. The only auto dealer in the city of Oswego now has plans to expand.

Burritt Motors Expands, Plans a Superstore

BUSINESS UPDATE

Dealership plans to have six auto franchises in one location

B

urritt Motors, led by president Rich Burritt, is gaining a significant market share in Oswego County thanks to its ability to change with the times. Burritt Motors recently acquired Shapiro Motors, 410 W. First St., Oswego. “It’s going to be very exciting,” Burritt said. “We are working on plans right now and developing it.” Burritt is leasing the building from Shapiro Motors, which expires in November of 2019. The acquisition of the cross-town

36

Burritt intends on constructing a new superstore adjacent to his existing Chevy location. It will be located between the current store at 340 state Route 104 East and Lake Ontario Prompt Medical Care, 300 state Route 104 East. The Chevy store will remain intact and is expected to complement the new facility. “It will be a whole new facility and we are going to be sharing some individuals, so there will be some economies of scale that we will have there,” Burritt said. Added amenities include a Touchless Car Wash, an Express Quick Lube and tire center, multiple car wash bays, a rust proofing and undercoating facility, and a food truck for customers and the public. The facilities will feature a combined inventory showcasing six franchises. There will be about 600 vehicles available for sale. Burritt said he wants to delve more into dealing in commercial vehicles as well. The $5 million, 25,000 square-foot facility is going to be only one of three dealerships in the state to feature the new Chrysler-Dodge-Jeep-Ram prototype building. The facility will have an exclusive stand-alone showroom for Jeep and also a showroom designated strictly for Dodge-Chrysler-Ram products. Burritt said he would like to see construction complete by November of 2019.

dealership mimics a nationwide trend that has larger organizations scooping up smaller, family owned establishments. Rich joined Burritt Motors in 1997 and represents the fourth generation of business ownership within his family. He is in full control of the dealership after his father Chris transferred ownership in the fall of 2016. “We’ve been cultivating, changing and tweaking the current Chevy store. We did a remodel about five years ago, and have kept tweaking it,” Burritt said. During that process, the staff has OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Changing landscape Burritt said profit margins are getting compressed in the auto sales industry thanks to factors such as the internet. “What dealers have to do is pick up different business models. We have to constantly make our organization more efficient,” Burritt said. “We have to be so well run and keep adding on things just to make enough money to be in survival mode.” As a result, the smaller mom-andAPRIL / MAY 2018


pop dealerships just don’t have the volume of sales to achieve economies of scale, Burritt noted. Meanwhile, manufacturers are rewarding the volume dealers with stair step programs, he noted. Stair step programs are incentives given to dealers that are tied to sales quotas. As sales increase for the dealer, then the incentive amounts also increase. Burritt said 10 percent of dealers are considered “leading edge” and adjust to change while making their organizations stronger and more efficient. Then there are 60 percent of dealers who follow the first 10 percent’s lead, tracking trends, making moves and staying progressive, he noted. Finally, there is the 30 percent comprised of the mom-and-pop establishments that are married to doing business the old-fashioned way. “What you see now is the 10 percent buying the 30 percent. That is the trend you are seeing with these conglomerates,” he noted. “We are in the 10 percent, and in order for us to survive, we’re looking at economies of scale and capitalizing on some of these efficiencies that we’ve learned that are helping us thrive on the larger scale market,” he noted.

Battling ‘Auto Row’ In terms of state Route 31 in Cicero and the growth of auto dealers there, Burritt disagrees that having many dealerships grouped together on one thoroughfare in a benefit. “With the use of the internet, I don’t think physical real estate is as relevant as it used to be,” said Burritt, noting that his idea of physical real estate is being a premium online distribution center. “That’s what I call my real estate,” he said. “Places don’t have to be on Route 31 to have prime real estate in the digital world,” he said. “Yes, it’s an advantage because people can go from place to place, but that doesn’t happen as much anymore. I don’t think it’s something that is going to make a world of difference,” he added. While a Ford and Nissan dealership have defected from Oswego County to Route 31, Burritt said he doesn’t “see their numbers going up.” He noted the Ford store is limited to one franchise. “I’ve got 600 vehicles, six franchises, one marketing scheme and one efficiently run organization,” Burritt said. “I have APRIL / MAY 2018

more economies of scale than what they have individually.” This leads to his ability to compete on price. “My salespeople sell 20 to 30 vehicles a month while they sell considerably less,” he said. “I can do things differently and I can turn my inventory differently. I’m selling more vehicles than they are.” In March, Burritt projected his team was close to selling 300 vehicles for the month. Burritt noted manufacturers are expecting dealers to have well-run organizations, and a strong brick-and-mortar presence is essential. “You have to give customers an unparalleled customer experience,” Burritt said. He said having a brick-and-mortar presence is still relevant. However, “I don’t think relevancy of location is as important as it used to be because the walk-in traffic is not there,” he said. “But certainly when you get that customer in your facility doing business with you, because there is so much competition, you have to be able to show them a positive experience and something different,” Burritt added. “From that perspective, the facility has to conform to new standards and expectations.” In terms of his website, Burritt said it is being developed to reach both manufacturers’ requirements a well as to give consumers a consistent user experience. “We’re also combining stores for one group site so it’s one easy user experience for all vehicles under one house,” he said. Because of how efficient the Internet is, people who use search queries when seeking out vehicles are presented with what is most relevant to them. “We use technology to reach consumers when they want to purchase and make it user-friendly,” he said. “You have to leverage technology in order to provide the customer with a better user experience. “If you know how and can do that, it bodes well with our process. We reach them at the right time when they are ready and we give them a good, consistent message.” Burritt said consumers “now find us. “If you set up technology where they find you versus us reaching them, that is what you want to do and that is what we’ve been trying to accomplish.”

By Lou Sorendo OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Pathfinder to Open Branch on Route 31 in Clay It will be bank’s third branch in Onondaga

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athfinder Bank announced the purchase of the building formerly used by Key Bank located at 3775 state Route 31 in the town of Clay. The opening is scheduled for October, after interior renovations are complete. This will be the third banking office in Onondaga County. The new office will be a full service branch, offering a wide array of financial services including retail, residential mortgage, commercial lending and wealth management services, as well as teller and ATM drive-thru service. The bank plans to hire six new employees, which would increase our total number of employees to 160. “Our commitment to Onondaga County continues to grow, as does the communities support of our presence,” says Tom Schneider, President and CEO of Pathfinder Bank. “Our business model involves full engagement and leadership in the communities we serve. We seek to assist customers and the community and strengthen the economic, social, civic and cultural fabric of our communities. We recognize a need to provide our customers with more convenience and have been searching for a new location that would enhance our accessibility. Now that we have found one, we look forward to becoming an even more visible and vital part of the communities we serve.” Pathfinder’s newest location will sit alongside the proposed Widewaters Commons located at 3715 Route 31, west of an existing Kohl’s store and about a mile west of Route 481. Widewaters Commons, a project of Widewaters Group, is about halfway through the planning board approval process. The proposal calls for a 100,000-square-foot-plus retail complex with restaurants and stores. Widewaters Group is a Syracuse-based real estate development and management company with over than 30 years of development, construction, management and investment experience.

n More about Pathfinder Bank on p. 54. 37


Bruce Frassinelli bfrassinelli@ptd.net

Thanks to Trump, Investigative Journalism Is Alive and Well

T ‘One of the unintended consequences of the Trump presidency was to launch a new era of investigative reporting, spearheaded by the Times and The Washington Post.’

he jaw-dropping ascendancy of Donald Trump to the position of most powerful person on the face of the planet has had any number of unintended consequences. Not the least of these has been a reinvigorated commitment to investigative journalism. So-called experts who thought that there were immutable realities in the political firmament have been proven wrong again and again ever since Trump announced in 2015 that he would seek the highest office in the land. They pronounced his campaign dead several times, especially after the Hollywood Access audio emerged in which Trump bragged that if you are a media star you can do essentially what you want with women, even “grab them by the p----.” In the end, none of it mattered. Trump captured 304 electoral votes to Hillary Clinton’s 227, even though Clinton emerged from the 2016 election with 2.9 million more popular votes. Throughout 2017, Trump’s incessant tweeting, which caught his inner circle and cabinet members off guard many times, created the appearance of a White House administration in crisis and at times at odds with its cabinet members. By the end of the year, the Re-

My Turn

BRUCE FRASSINELLI is the former publisher of The Palladium-Times and an adjunct online instructor at SUNY Oswego. He served as a governor of the Rotary Club District 7150 (Central New York) from July 2001 to June 2002. 38

publicans had passed a major tax overhaul plan, and top Republican leaders from both houses of Congress tripped over themselves heaping praise on Trump’s leadership in ramrodding the legislation through by Christmas, as the president had promised. Despite a historically low approval rating at this point in his presidency of between 35 and 40 percent, none of Trump’s missteps or misstatements seem to matter to his fiercely loyal base, and they are ready to vote for him again in 2020. Democrats, on the other hand, are ready for a battle royal in this year’s mid-term elections, a dress rehearsal for the main event two years from now. During his first year in office, Trump has had about a half-dozen favorite targets, but none energizes his base as much as when he sounds off against the “fake news media.” He specifically aims his most persistent assaults at CNN, The Washington Post and The New York Times. Some of his closest advisers say that Trump has a love-hate relationship with t h e media. He relishes seeing his name in newspapers, on TV and on social media, they say, but while he is giddy about positive mentions, he becomes enraged when he feels he has been unfairly maligned. He is an avid follower and vocal supporter of Fox News, and it is not unusual for him to tweet a message based on a Fox News story or report. In late December, while on a holiday outing at his Florida resort, Trump gave a surprise exclusive interview to a New York

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

APRIL / MAY 2018


Times reporter. As you might imagine, its contents were given wide dissemination by print, broadcast and social media, especially since it was a slow news week. A few days later, the new publisher of the New York Times, A.G. Sulzberger, great-great-grandson of the paper’s founder, published what can essentially be called a statement of principles for the newspaper under his leadership going forward. A day later, Trump tweeted congratulations to Sulzberger, adding that here is a last chance for the “failing New York Times to fulfill the vision of its founder, Adolph Ochs, `to give the news impartially, without fear or FAVOR, regardless of party, sect, or interests involved.’” He urged the new publisher to “get impartial journalists of a much higher standard, lose all of your phony and non-existent sources and treat the President of the United States FAIRLY, so that the next time I (and the people) win, you won’t have to write an apology to your readers for a job poorly done.” In the end-of-the-year Times interview, Trump said that the media would slant the 2020 presidential election in his favor because “without me, The New York Times will indeed be not the failing New York Times but the failed New York Times.” Although he assails the news media for using unnamed sources, he does it, too, as he makes unsubstantiated claims while attributing them to unnamed reports or sources. Keeping a tally of Trump’s false or misleading statements since he took office, The Washington Post listed more than 1,950 between Jan. 20 and the end of 2017, and it hasn’t gotten any better since then. Let’s also not forget that during his days as a New York City tabloid star and real estate developer, Trump would call media contacts, disguise his voice and claim to be “John Miller” or “John Barron,” then provide them with juicy personal items about Trump himself or the Trump brand. Of course, there is nothing new about some presidents hating the news media. Richard Nixon had some journalists on his “enemies list” and ordered the Internal Revenue Service to audit them, including muckraker Jack Anderson. Ronald Reagan’s Press Secretary Larry Speakes blacklisted reporters who wrote or broadcast critical stories about the administration. Bill Clinton’s aides lied constantly, and Clinton himself lied under oath, which led to his impeachment APRIL / MAY 2018

‘Despite a historically low approval rating at this point in his presidency of between 35 and 40 percent, none of Trump’s missteps or misstatements seem to matter to his fiercely loyal base, and they are ready to vote for him again in 2020.’ but not conviction. The news media went bonkers last year when Trump called the media the “enemy of the people.” Nixon and his aides didn’t use those exact words, but what they said amounted to the same thing. One of the unintended consequences of the Trump presidency was to launch a new era of investigative reporting, spearheaded by the Times and The Washington Post. In his letter from the publisher, the Times’ Sulzberger said, “ This is a period of profound challenge for The Times, for the news media more broadly, and for everyone who believes that journalism sustains a healthy society.” Sulzberger said there is a reason freedom of speech and freedom of the press were placed first among our essential rights. “Our founders understood that the free exchange of ideas and the ability to hold power to account were prerequisites for a successful democracy,” he wrote, “but a dangerous confluence of forces is threatening the press’s central role in helping people understand and engage with the world around them.” Sulzberger said that misinformation is rising, and trust in the media is declining as technology elevates rumor and propaganda over real journalism, and politicians jockey for advantage by inflaming suspicion of the press. He laments that growing polarization is jeopardizing even the fundamental assumption about truth, the stuff that binds a society together. Sulzberger pledges that he and his colleagues will not give in to these forces. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

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REAL ESTATE

Most Expensive CNY Homes in the Market Lakefront homes in Oswego and Bernhards Bay in the market for $1.8 million and $1.4 million, while the asking price of a Skaneateles home is $3.9 million

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icture the most expensive homes for sale in Central New York and your mind could run wild with the possibilities. It’s easy to conjure up images of a lavish Italian-style villa, a house with its own lighthouse or even a commercial pier. All that and more can be yours for the right price. Housing throughout much of Central New York tends to

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By Kenneth Sturtz be affordable and reliably inexpensive compared to other regions, though there are exceptions. And in the last year or two real estate agents have reported a shortage of houses on the market. When we reviewed the most expensive single-family homes on the market in Onondaga and Oswego counties, one similarity was obvious. Each home is on lakefront property OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

and offers a sweeping, unobstructed view. Two properties are on the east side of Skaneateles Lake. One is located on Oneida Lake and another is in a secluded spot on Lake Ontario. They range in price from $1.5 million to just under $4 million. All with the exception of one of the properties were built in the last 15 years. APRIL / MAY 2018


Onondaga County 3109 E. Lake Road, Skaneateles

Asking Price: $3,975,000 Acreage: 1.95 Square Feet: 5,861 Year Built: 2007 Agent: Romy Callahan, Howard Hanna

With six bedrooms and five full bathrooms, this house on eastern Skaneateles Lake has plenty of room for family or guests. Philippe Schwimmer is owner and co-listing agent of the property. She says when she and her husband built the house she wanted something that was comfortable and not too formal. So, she chose local, natural materials. “I wanted to incorporate a lot of local history,” she says. “I didn’t want it to feel out of place.” The home incorporates repurposed 100-year-old barn flooring. Antique barn wood was used in other places in the house. The most notable feature is a stone silo inspired by the silos on nearby farms, Schwimmer says. The property includes a boathouse, pump house, small barn and 207 feet of lakefront. Decks on top of the boathouse and pump house offer views of the lake. The house also comes with finished walk-out basement with an open floor plan big enough to hold a movie theater or bowling alley, Schwimmer says. “Someone could create their dream space down there,” she says. “It really is another level of the house that could be anything.” APRIL / MAY 2018

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

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146, 147, 159 Five Mile Point, Skaneateles Asking Price: $3,195,000 Acreage: 6.95 Square Feet: 2,650 Year Built: 2000 Agent: Jane Ross, FLR Partners This property features three renovated year-round cottages. The main cottage has been redone and is right on the property’s 270 feet of lake front. The Five Mile Point area of Skaneateles Lake still has a campy feel, going back to when seasonal camps were more common, says Jane Ross, of FLR Partners. Even though the cottages have been updated, the property still feels very rustic and homey, she says. Seven acres of green space and woods enhances the rustic feel. “It feels like an old historic camp,” she says. “It kind of brings you back in time.” This property comes with a permanent commercial pier with water and electricity, the only one of its kind on the lake, Ross says. There’s also a trout stream bordering the property and a recently installed tennis court. The previous owner only used the property seasonally. But Ross says there is enough acreage with the property that a new owner would have the choice of retaining the existing cottages or building something from scratch. 42

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Oswego County 304 Lakeshore Road, Oswego

Asking Price: $1,800,000 Acreage: 45.76 Square Feet: 4,306 Year Built: 2008 Agent: James Gamble, Coldwell Banker

If you’re looking for seclusion, this ranch has as much of it as any lake front property. Between a whopping 46 acres and a quarter of a mile of lake frontage on Lake Ontario it’s easy to forget there are neighbors. “I think what is most intriguing about this place is the location,” says James Gamble, of Coldwell Banker. “It’s private and still convenient.” The four-bedroom, three-bathroom house features a lighthouse tower that faces the lake. And if climbing the tower for that view of the lake didn’t wasn’t enough, the master bedroom, living room and indoor swim-in-place pool also face the lake. There are more than 130 windows throughout the home, Gamble says. The property, owned by Fred Raynor, a former dealership owner in Fulton, includes a seven-car garage, a pond, a guest house and a 3,400-squarefoot storage building. The outbuildings and so many additional acres with the property means the new owner could do almost anything, Gamble says. “The pictures do not do this house justice,” he says. “It really is a big house.” APRIL / MAY 2018

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

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1013 State Route 49, Bernhards Bay Asking Price: $1,490,000 Acreage: 2.71 Square Feet: 6,722 Year Built: 2003 Agent: Sara Feola-Marcoccia, Howard Hanna This four-bedroom, 3.5-bath mansion on the north shore of Oneida Lake is about as exotic a house as can be found in Central New York. “It’s not like the other houses that are around it,” says Sara Feola-Marcoccia, of Howard Hanna. Built in an Italian and Spanish style, the property is surrounded by a gate and stone wall. The roof is made with 100-year Italian terracotta tiles. The archways are African mahogany, crafted in Russia. Ionic columns in the two-story foyer lead to a Great Room that includes floor-to-ceiling windows facing the lake. The property has 320 feet of lake frontage and an extensive stone patio. The patio even comes with a couple lion statues. Although it’s just 10 minutes from Interstate 81, the property still feels very secluded, Feola-Marcoccia says. “It’s a beautiful spot in the summertime,” she says. “It would make a great summer home, second home or year-round home.” 44

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

APRIL / MAY 2018


Advanced Technology Helps Sell Homes Many buyers now expect drone images of properties, say real estate agents

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By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

eal estate agents have long used good photography to help sell properties. But today, they’re using more than just a wide-angle lens. At offices such as Leah’s Signature Century 21 in Fulton, drone photography helps showcase properties. Tom Haggerty, licensed real estate broker and co-owner at Leah’s, said that hiring commercially authorized operators of the tiny, unmanned aircraft can help his office obtain photos that truly give an impressive viewpoint of properties. “It doesn’t have to be 500 feet in the air,” he said. “Just up 20 feet above the rooftop makes a big difference. It’s a nice way to get an overall picture that most people would never get.” Knowing the layout of the property, outbuildings and interesting landscaping can help make appeal to potential buyers. Haggerty recalled a waterfront property in Fair Haven that he had photographed from the viewpoint of the water so it highlighted the recre-

ational elements of the property. He has also used drones to perform a fly-through inside larger homes to create a video that offers better angles and a feel for the flow of the layout. “People are used to stills,” he said. “When they see one that will move, they’re actually much more likely to click on it.” During showings, he likes using a tablet to display a slideshow of homeowner photos that depict the landscaping. “It gives them an idea of what it looks like without a foot of snow on it,” Haggerty said. His office also creates 360-degree virtual tours with a specialized camera on a tripod. It takes pictures in quadrants, then, through computer generation, creates a 360 view so users can rotate it to whatever they want to see. Faye Beckwith, broker and owner at Freedom Real Estate in Hannibal, has also used aerial photography for some of her larger properties, as well

as leveraging social media. “That has proven a productive tool for us at Freedom Real Estate,” she said. “Virtual tours are available to customers and clients on all our listings through our Central New York Information Service (MLS). “Additionally, FaceTime walks through homes can be productive, particularly for clients coming in from out of town.” Eric Pedrotti, manager of the Oswego and North Syracuse office and real estate agent for Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices CNY Realty, said that agents are wise to list online, as he estimates about 95 percent of buyers and sellers begin there. Berkshire uses drone photography and creates Matterport 3D immersive virtual tours. Home buyers using a virtual reality headset with a phone or tablet can feel like they’ve really visited a home in which they’re interested. “I’ve been told that 65 to 75 percent of buyers are expecting this sort of technology,” Pedrotti said. “It gives a realistic view of the house. You can have a dollhouse view, like you’re standing over the house and seeing into every room of the house. It gives an idea of the flow of the house. It’s one thing to say ‘2,000 sq. feet’, but how it flows makes a difference.” 3-D headsets offer a realistic look that’s responsive to the user’s head movement. Buyers can also use a tablet or phone without the headset to look at listing tours.

Taking aerial photos can highlight unique facets of a property, such as Anchor Resort & Marina in Fair Haven, a property Tom Haggerty of Leah’s Signature Century 21 is working to sell. Photo provided.

APRIL / MAY 2018

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

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There was nearly a 29 percent drop-off in closed sales in Onondaga County in February when compared to year-ago statistics

Fewer Homes for Sale in Onondaga Real estate market in Onondaga County reflecting nationwide trends By Lou Sorendo

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shortage of homes on the real estate market is not just an Onondaga County thing — it’s a national trend. In terms of new listings, there was a 16.7 percent drop in the number of new listings in February when compared to February 2017 in Onondaga County, according to the New York State Association of Realtors. That was even worse than January, when there was a 12 percent drop in the number of new listings when compared to January 2017 in Onondaga County. In terms of closed sales, there was nearly a 29 percent drop-off in closed sales in Onondaga County in February when compared to year-ago statistics. This followed nearly an 18 percent drop-off in the number of closed sales in January when compared to January of 2017. “It’s just what’s going on across the country and not just Onondaga County,” said Lynnore Fetyko, chief executive officer at cnyREALTOR.com, owned and operated by the Greater Syracuse Association of Realtors and the Central New York Information Service, Inc. “Housing shortages are a national trend.” Fetyko said those buyers who were lookFetyko ing to purchase up have done so while real estate rates

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were relatively low. “I think you are going to see some inflation happening across the country and that is the prediction,” she said. “That would force interest rates to go up a little bit more. They are projected to go up at least twice before the end of the year.” She said, “That sometimes gets people off the fence when that happens.” The average 30-year fixed-rate mortgage was at about 4.5 percent as of March 24. “The stock market went through a natural correction, and the housing market is going through a natural correction as well,” she said. She said lack of inventory causes a pent-up demand, which causes appreciation to occur in some areas. “It will in turn spur a healthy marketplace,” she said. In terms of median sales price of homes in Onondaga County, there was a 12.5 percent increase ($135,000) in February when compared to year-ago figures. In some areas of the county, there will be appreciation, Fetyko said. Interest rates are predicted to increase slightly a couple of times in 2018 as well, but they are still at historic lows, she added. “We have to wait and see what happens with the Fed [Federal Reserve] and how inflation is,” she noted. “But it’s all directly related right back to jobs and how strong the job market is in our community.” Fetyko said real estate professionals are hoping pent up demand will help in the area of new home construction. “That has been weak over the years,” OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

she said, noting that new construction is predicted to be stronger in 2018 due to the low housing inventory. She noted the 2018 Parade of Homes slated for September — produced by Home Builders & Remodelers of Central New York — already has contracts secured for new homes. Fetyko said this news is welcome given that the bracket of homes with higher listings was stalling. “Pent-up demand has caused folks to be able to really take a look at higher level homes, and banks are qualifying them for more,” she said.

Less homes for sale In terms of homes for sale, the Onondaga County market featured more than a 10 percent decrease when comparing February numbers to those of a year ago. That followed a 12 percent decline when comparing January numbers to January 2017 figures. Fetyko said there is no one reason to pinpoint why the decline is happening, and some of it is purely supply and demand. “People — like myself for example — would sell my house for the right price,” she said. “Do I have to sell? No, not unless my circumstances change.” Fetyko said the region has gone through many years with a healthy marketplace. She said, however, that the market only sustains a robust level of activity for so long before a correction takes place. “I remember mortgage companies APRIL / MAY 2018


and realtors were so busy over the last four to five years, that they had no life,” she said. In the months supply category, or the months it takes to sell all existing inventory in a given market based on current sales rates, it would take Onondaga County 2.8 months to accomplish that, based on February data provided by the NYSAR. While that may indicate a seller’s market, Fetyko said you “can’t paint with a broad brush” when it comes to real estate.

“Every area in a county is different and some areas are more desirable than others — for whatever the reasons,” Fetyko said. “One can say there is a shortage in certain pockets in our Onondaga County footprint, but there is a better supply in other areas. It just depends on where you want to live and what the reason is,” she said. She noted the days on market statistic being shorter “is a good thing.” “It’s taking less time to turn over and get that house sold,” she said. “That

Banker: Real Estate Market Leaning Toward the Seller

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homas Greco, residential and commercial mortgage loan originator at Fulton Savings Bank, said a decrease in days on market in Onondaga County when comparing December 2017 to December 2016 was a positive indication. That figure went from 77 days in 2016 to 59 days in 2017. “We’ve had times in the past when time on the market was extraordinarily long. It’s dropping on a regular basis which is absolutely positive,” he said. G r e c o said the current market “definitely” Greco leans toward the seller. “I’ve had customers in both Oswego and Onondaga counties that, at certain price points, are fighting for houses,” he said. “That is also a function of limited inventory as well.” “Think of yourself as a homeowner,” he said. “You would rather get it done faster than longer.” Greco said a key factor affecting the real estate is the employment market. “It’s what’s happening in terms of job creation and job loss in Onondaga County,” he said. Greco said interest rates recently hit 4.5 percent for 30-year loans, a level that has not been seen since January of 2014.

APRIL / MAY 2018

He said real estate sales activity is also a function of mortgage interest rates, which have “been too low for too long.” “That’s part of the United States quantitative easing program,” said Greco, referring to a monetary policy that had been used to kick start economic growth by injecting liquidity and pulling down interest rates. “For those of us who had high mortgages in the early 1980s, that is a gorgeous number,” Greco said while referring to the 4.5 percent interest rate. However, “it does cause some people to get off the fence,” he said. “Every time you see a re-jump, people are going to say, ‘We better do this before they go up higher.’” He said predictions see the interest rate being pushed up toward 5 percent by the end of the year, he noted. “As those rates go up, you are buying less house,” he said. In terms of prices for homes in Onondaga County, Greco said stability reigns but there has been some upward movement. Recent statistics (March 8) from the Greater Syracuse Association of Realtors indicates that the average sales price of a home has gone up $7,000 in Onondaga County this year. In terms of consumer confidence, Greco said he feels it is positive. “I think people are making a move, and it goes beyond just interest rates going up. I think they may have been hesitating over recent years, and they are finally saying, ‘Let’s get out and do this.’”

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

means the banks are not quite as busy as they were because you are not standing in line and can get closed quicker.” However, she did say there are areas in Onondaga County that are looking at multiple offers. “So if you are out there buying, I would say your first offer should be your best,” she said. Fetyko noted it is difficult to say when a market is a seller’s or buyer’s version. She said a seller can overprice a property believing that the market is appreciating, but a realtor may counter by saying the given property is more appealing on the market at a lower cost point. The seller may balk at that, pointing to the fact that there are not a lot of listings available and he or she can sell higher. “Now the house is going to sit there. If enough people do that, what’s going to happen to the market? It’s not going to move,” she said. Fetyko said it is imperative that the seller listen to the advice of his or her realtor and do a market analysis on order to see what the property should be best listed for “to keep it moving.” “Once you start saying it’s a seller’s market, sellers start putting on the brakes and it won’t be good for the market,” Fetyko said. “They have to listen to the professional recommendations from the realtor.” Meanwhile, realtors in Onondaga County are gearing up for what they hope is a brisk sales season. “They are starting to get really busy,” said Fetyko, noting there is a set of veteran realtors who have a steady referral base who are always going to be busy. “I’m already experiencing a lack of participation at committee meetings and functions because they are busy already,” she said. “If you drive past restaurants and malls, there is no room for anyone from Thursday to Sunday,” she said. “The economy seems to be favorable in our Onondaga footprint.” Fetyko said while factors such as interest rates are main factors in buying a home, the decision is a personal one and depends on what is happening to people. “Are they moving away? Are they moving up? Are they moving out of an apartment? Are they downsizing? What’s happening in their personal lives?” she asked. “That is usually the biggest motivator ranked ahead of our job market and economy.”

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SPECIAL REPORT By Kenneth Sturtz

Flying Drones for Money Commercial use of drones is finding its way in the marketplace

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hen Sean Falconer graduated from Syracuse University in 2014, he landed a job at an architecture firm. Around that time, he saw a man who was flying a drone for money. “And I was thinking to myself, ‘This is pretty interesting,’” he says. Falconer says he thought there was a hole in the market for drone services in Central New York and decided to try it. He took one of the first paychecks from his day job and used it to buy a DJI Phantom 2 drone. He built a website, obtained a Federal Aviation Administration certification for commercial drone operators and began building up clients. “It’s been pretty awesome how it has snowballed,” he says. “I just kind of stumbled upon it.” From photography, news-gathering and marketing, to construction, real estate and entertainment, drones are increasingly finding their way into businesses in Central New York. Advances in technology in recent years have made consumer drones more reliable and easier to fly. Likewise, prices have plummeted for drones that are ready to fly out of the box. Some operators such as real estate agents, photographers and developers use drones as a tool for their business. For others, drone services become the business itself. Steve Roberts, who owns Zoey Advertising in Syracuse, has been shooting aerial photography for 30 years. He started out shooting photographs from airplanes and eventually began chartering helicopters for aerial photography jobs. A few years ago, Roberts says, the quality of the drones and cameras on them reached a point that he invested in a drone and began offering it as another service at his marketing and advertising business. “This wasn’t, ‘Gosh I can buy a toy and fly,’” Roberts says. “Everyone is a photographer with a phone and a drone, but that’s not what we’re offering.” Roberts uses a DJI Inspire 1. For simple jobs, such as photographing progress

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Man-made lake/rock quarry in Cortland where they dredge material out. Photo courtesy of Zoey Advertising. at a construction site from month to month, one person flies the drone. For more complicated assignments, however, Roberts flies the drone and his photographer, Jordan Harmon, runs the camera. “It kind of became a big aspect of what I do here,” Harmon says. Harmon, a former TV news photographer, had never done professional drone photography before. Now he flies the drone about once a week. He also does editing and post-production on photos and video shot with the drone. Aerial photography is rarely a standalone service for Zoey’s clients. Rather, it tends to be part of a larger marketing campaign or project, Harmon says. Like Harmon, many of the people offering drone services have some kind of background in photography. Demetri Andritsakis, of Photos by Meem, grew up in Oswego and lives OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

in Liverpool. He works in information technology, but had shot landscape photography for years. In 2014, he purchased a DJI Phantom 2 Vision Plus and started dabbling in aerial photography. He eventually upgraded his drone, got his FAA certification and offered drone services.

Social media access Andritsakis says he reaches customers through photos and videos he shares on social media. He sells prints of his work and also sells the rights to his photos, such as shots he took during the first concert at the Lakeview Amphitheater. He also does work for a tourism company and real estate companies, but does not see his business going beyond part-time. “There’s a lot of other people doing it too,” he says. Bill Galloway, owner of Century 21 APRIL / MAY 2018


Galloway in Oswego, did not have experience flying drones. But he noticed the value aerial photos could add to certain real estate listings. A little over a year ago, he purchased a DJI Phantom 3. Several agents in his office fly the drone. “We noticed that if you get the right property, it’s really helpful,” Galloway says. “It’s really helpful to have that kind of view with it.” Waterfront properties, where the view is a major selling point, benefit from aerial photos. It is also usual on wooded areas or properties with wetlands when clients want to see the big picture. Galloway says his office intends to use its drone on more properties in the future. As more businesses have begun employing drones, they have re-imagined what the devices can be used for. Advance Media New York, which includes The Post-Standard and syracuse.com, purchased a drone a couple years ago. At first, the company used it mostly to make promotional videos and videos of scenery around the area, says Scott Trimble, an Advance Media photographer. “As we’re getting more used to it, we’re trying to apply it to more newsworthy things,” he says. Trimble earlier this year used a drone for a video about construction on Interstate 690 causing traffic problems. That required a special waiver. The possibilities for newsgathering are almost endless, Trimble says, especially for traffic and issues where a high vantage point is helpful. “When you’re trying to attract an audience to video, it gives you something you normally wouldn’t have,” he says. “It lets you go some places we normally wouldn’t go otherwise.” Trimble also used the drone close to the ground as a substitute for a camera dolly to capture smooth shots. Others have found uses for drones beyond aerial photography. Falconer says his Syracuse business, Falcon View Aerial Photography, does a lot of photography for construction and commercial real estate due to his background as an architect. “It’s very easy for me to speak with them when they’re building something,” he says. His background led him to begin offering 3-D imaging. A drone takes photos of a building. Later, software stitches them together into 3-D models accurate enough to take measurements from. The models can be useful in architecture and APRIL / MAY 2018

Encampment of reenactors at Fort Ontario in Oswego. Courtesy of Falcon View Aerial Photography.

LaFayette Apple Festival. Photo courtesy of Zoey Advertising. construction, he says. While drones do not appear likely to disappear anytime soon, their future use by businesses is not certain. The proliferation of drones has not eliminated the need for helicopters for some aerial photography, Roberts says, OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

because drones can legally only fly up to 400 feet. And with so many drones flying, it is not clear what role they will play in businesses long term. “I think the drone industry is still in its infancy,” Falconer says. “I’m really excited to see what the future holds.” 49


Jonathan Meringer of Ascent AeroSystems releases the company’s “Sprite” drone for a flight test. He and a partner started in Arizona and then moved to Syracuse for the GENIUS NY competition and now manufacture their drones in Central New York.

Eye in the Sky Central New York at heart of developing unmanned aerial systems technology By Lou Sorendo

L

ook! Up in the sky! It’s a bird. It’s a plane. No, it’s not Superman. It’s an unmanned aerial systems (UAS) vehicle, more commonly known as a drone. According to GENIUS NY, emerging drone technology will be increasingly prevalent as the years march forward. GENIUS NY is the world’s largest accelerator competition for the UAS market, which is commonly known as the drone market, according to Jon Parry, who is in his second year as the organization’s director. It annually awards six finalist teams a total of $2.75 million in investments. Parry and his team work mainly

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with the startup side of the industry, which is where a lot of developments are being made. GENIUS NY is funded through Empire State Development and hosted at The Tech Garden in Syracuse, a component of CenterState CEO. Parry said his first cohort arrived in January of 2017 for a yearlong stay, and he had his second group of six teams arrived this past. “I think CenterState CEO and New York state did a great job in targeting the drone industry. It’s very much an emerging industry with a lot of innovation and technology being developed by multiple industries,” he said. A similar program — 43North in OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Buffalo — also nurtures startups, but the Syracuse version is highly focused on the UAS market. Parry said there are many reasons for that. “We have a cluster of other programs in the region to support the commercial and industrial drone industry,” he said. One of those is Griffiss International Airport in Rome, one of seven Federal Aviation Administration test sites in the country for testing drones. The site is the first air corridor in the nation where unmanned aerial vehicles can safely fly beyond line of sight for testing and development. Fueling the rise is $250 million in state funding through Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s Upstate Revitalization Initiative. Parry said a good portion of URI funds targeted to Central New York was focused on supporting the unmanned systems market. Prior to his current stint, Parry spent 10 years working for two startup companies in Upstate New York. “The most important thing for me is investing in an industry that will create jobs in our region,” said Parry, noting that he has a love for Central New York and Syracuse. “I would love to see Syracuse make a comeback and invest heavily in an industry that is emerging like the drone industry,” he added. He said the UAS industry generates high-paying jobs, develops useful technologies and creates a return on investment for the region. Parry graduated from Clarkson University with a Bachelor of Science degree in business and technology management and lives in Skaneateles. Central New York and the Mohawk Valley are leaders in the country if not the world in drone testing, according to him. Parry said companies are working not just on drones themselves, but the sensors, radar and air traffic management systems that will allow the industry to grow. He pointed to the 50-mile corridor between the test site at Griffiss Air Force Base in Rome and Syracuse. “It allows these companies to do true, long-range beyond visible line of sight testing. That’s very unique to the region,” he noted. One of the main reasons the state and Gov. Cuome have invested in the unmanned systems industry in Central New York is because it has a history of drone development. Parry said UAS have been explored APRIL / MAY 2018


on the military side at Griffiss and by the 174th Attack Wing based out of Hancock Field in Syracuse. He said there is also a cluster of businesses in the region that has been in the radar and sensor market, such as Lockheed Martin, Saab Sensis, SRC, Inc., and Gryphon Sensors. Parry said GENIUS NY is seeing significant counter drone security technology being developed as well. He said drones can easily sneak into areas such as prisons, airports and large public gatherings. Drones are about the size of birds, and technology is being developed to be able to discern the difference and “take that drone down,” Parry said.

Unique vantage point One of the earliest commercial uses of drone technology is photography and cinematography, used by various industries ranging from real estate to television and movies. Users have the flexibility of putting a camera on a drone and sending it up into the sky to take video, Parry noted. Prior to this technology, those in the news and entertainment media had to absorb the cost of a helicopter to capture those types of images. “Now you can buy a $2,000 drone with a high-definition camera and amateur and professional filmmakers can get shots that they never were capable of before,” Parry said. Either the task was too cost prohibitive or adverse weather conditions presented obstacles, he noted. “Of course, everyone likes to talk about drones and package delivery, but to be honest, until regulatory issues are figured out through the FAA, we will not see package delivery for quite a few years,” Parry noted. He said package delivery by drones will happen in the future, but only in situations that make sense, create efficiencies and return on investment for companies. Meanwhile, the cost of drones has gone down significantly over the years. “The cost has reduced but capabilities have increased,” Parry said. In terms of a professional level drone, they can cost anywhere from thousands of dollars to tens of thousands of dollars depending on what the user’s needs are. Factors include how far it needs to travel and how much of a payload it can carry, Parry noted. He said the most expensive parts APRIL / MAY 2018

Sasi Viswanathan, owner of Akrobotix, was a 2017 Genius NY finalist. His technology for safe and reliable autonomous flight by drones was developed at Syracuse University.

The ROI factor In terms of return on investment, drone usage is effective in creating a safer environment, especially in the inspection market. AutoModality, a global leader in advanced unmanned aerial vehicle flight control software for use in infrastructure inspection, was awarded the top prize of $1 million by GENIUS NY in 2017. “AutoModality does bridge inspections, and to keep lanes open instead of closing them is a major cost-saver,” Parry said. Companies are also forced to rent large equipment in the form of access platforms or cherry pickers to put individuals in dangerous situation, Parry noted. “I think that is one of most effective uses of drones today is to remove people out of hazardous conditions,” said Parry, noting that drones can be used to inspect bridges or even smoke stacks of a power plant. “It’s one of the first places we’ll see drones be implemented in the industry,” said Parry, cautioning however that it is in the early stages of the development cycle. “Not only can they do the video, but we have technologies being developed in the current cohort of GENIUS NY that focuses on gas leak detection,” he said. Parry said technology is being developed where drones can be flown over pipelines or pipelines under bridges in efforts to detect gas leaks instead of trying to send a human into what OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

would be a difficult situation. Users are also proving out software capabilities in order for drones to assist in construction site management, he added. Drones can oversee construction sites on an hourly and daily basis, capturing day-to-day progress so project managers can share advances with their teams. “It doesn’t necessarily remove the job. A lot of people are concerned that drones will take away jobs. But they still need an operator at this point. Down the road, there may be more autonomy, as machine learning and artificial intelligence come into play in the future,” he said. Machine learning is a field of computer science that gives computers the ability to learn without being explicitly programmed. “These are quite a ways off. They are still working on just getting actual data systems of drones collecting information, analyzing the data and creating a faster, more efficient work system,” Parry said. “It’s one thing to send up a drone and get gigabytes of video, but another to convert that information into usable data,” he said. “That’s what a lot of our teams are working on, whether it’s urban planning, traffic management studies or agricultural applications. The data side, like most industries, is the most compelling and valuable component of the industry,” Parry added.

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of a drone are usually what sensors or cameras are attached to the vehicles, or what is considered their payload. “But if you want a standard drone, there’s a lot of off-the-shelf drones,” said Parry, noting that the Chinese-based DJI technology company is the largest commercial drone manufacturer in the world. Its drones range from $600 to a few thousand dollars depending on what purpose a person is using it for, Parry noted.

Whole new era

Parry compared the rise of drone technology to that of autonomous vehicles. “There are vehicles that have the proven ability to drive autonomously, but a person is still in the driver’s seat for safety reasons,” he said. Companies involved in developing that technology include Tesla, Uber, Google and BMW. “I would say that is a great comparison to where the drone industry is,” Parry said. “But until the safety case is truly proven out, and there is a regulatory

“I would love to see Syracuse make a comeback and invest heavily in an industry that is emerging like the drone industry” Jon Parry, GENIUS NY director in Syracuse

body to coordinate air traffic management of drones, we probably won’t see larger uses of them that involves flying beyond the visible line of sight anytime soon,” Parry added. In terms of when drone technology will advance, Parry said it is similar to the autonomous vehicle industry. “Some people say three years; some say 13,” Parry said. He noted the industry should start seeing regulation altering the “visible line of sight” rule over the next three to five years, opening the door for more commercial and industrial uses.

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Parry noted there are companies that lease and rent drones. “But again, if it is being used for a business purpose, you need a Part 107 license,” he noted. “What we are seeing are more service industries being created. There are quite a number of FAA Part 107 drone pilots that are licensed that you can hire, whether it’s for real estate, agriculture or other business purposes,” he said. Parry said a business can hire a pilot who usually has his or her own equipment, noting that this meshes well for businesses that have no knowledge of how to fly a drone.

Licensed to Fly

he FAA has made some important changes in how drones are regulated. “It’s important for people to know that although you can go and buy a drone as a hobbyist and use it around your home, that’s legal as long as you are within what is called a visible line of sight,” Parry said. However, to use it for professional or commercial purposes, one must obtain an FAA Part 107 flying license. “There’s also some regulations on how high you can fly. You are not allowed to fly above 500 feet,” he noted. There are specific waivers that can be applied for. “I would say there are very few waivers being handed out at this point until the FAA and other agencies are comfortable with issues such as drones flying over public areas and things of that nature,” Parry added. The license spells out many details in terms of what is legal and illegal in

operating a drone. “Most of it is around safety and understanding how to fly safely,” Parry said. Parry said the license costs around $100. Training courses vary, with some offered online for about $150. There are others that are more intensive, such as SkyOp’s 18-hour course that costs about $1,000. One of GENIUS NY’s investments during its first year was SkyOp, a Canandaigua-based company that offers certification test prep and flight training for drones and small, unmanned aircraft systems. “They do drone training courses all the way from high school STEM programs to universities to professionals who are looking to enter this industry and get their Part 107 license,” Parry said. “It is actually a growing industry and there are a lot of people who want to be drone pilots.”

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L. Michael Treadwell ooc@oswegocounty.org

Business Competition Has Record Number of Applicants The Next Great Idea will award $50,000 to best business plan

‘The NGI is the result of business and community leaders joining together to launch a competition that encourages entrepreneurs to commit to new business development. ‘

L. MICHAEL TREADWELL, CEcD, is executive director of Operation Oswego County based in Oswego. To contact him call 315-343-1545 or visit www.oswegocounty.org. APRIL / MAY 2018

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he 2018 Next Great Idea business plan The first phase of the 2018 NGI competicompetition (NGI) has kicked off — this tion is currently underway and the judges are will be the fourth time the competition reviewing business concept proposals. takes place. This year’s competition received a record The initiative is directed at addressing the number of business concept proposals, with development and promotion of entrepreneur- 33 submitted by the March 1 deadline. The ship. Enhancing entrepreneur development proposals represent a vast range of industries was one of the primary objectives of “Goal including tourism, manufacturing, technology, 3: Build momentum around targeted indus- retail, hospitality and agribusiness. Approxitries” incorporated in the Oswego County mately half of the submissions were by women Economic Advancement Plan, which was entrepreneurs and the vast majority of the subadopted by the Oswego County Legislature missions were from Oswego County residents. in November 2017. The entire competition will consist of The NGI is the result of business and three phases that will require semi-finalists community leaders joining together to advancing to the second phase to develop full launch a competition that business plans. In the third encourages entrepreneurs phase, finalists will make Economic Trends to commit to new business their “pitch” in person to development. The winner will receive a the panel of judges. This panel will determine $50,000 prize, double the amount given in which proposals will be selected to enter the prior competitions. This increase has been subsequent phases culminating in the winner made possible largely due to the support of being chosen and honored at a ceremony in the Shineman Foundation. the fall. Ideas that are not selected will receive The panel of judges for the competition valuable written feedback from the judges of are Adam Gagas, founder of Breakwall Asset how to improve their proposals for the future. Management; Carla Deshaw, executive dean The event website —‚ www.oswegocounty. of Cayuga Community College Fulton Cam- org/NGI/index.htm — includes an overview pus; Ron Tascarella, Jr., vice president at Path- of the event, a competition timeline, guidelines, finder Bank; John Fitzgibbons, owner of the details on the $50,000 prize, sponsors, partners Fitzgibbons Agency; Chena Tucker, executive and contact information. director of the Oswego County If the winning business will reWorkforce Development quire additional funding, the $50,000 Board; David Dano, business can potentially be leveraged for finance director at Operation financing in partnership with local Oswego County; professor banks, the County of Oswego IndusSarfraz Mian, from the school trial Development Agency, the cities of business at SUNY Oswego; of Oswego and Fulton community Allison Nelson, owner of development offices, and the U.S. Nelson Law; Shane Stepien, Small Business Administration. president of Step One CreNGI is being coordinated by ative; Vinny Lobdell, Jr., of Austin Wheelock, deputy director HealthWay Home Products for Operation Oswego County, Inc. and the Kallet Theater; and George Broadwell, The award ceremony will be held on Sept. Jr., of Broadwell Hospitality Group. 18 at the Lake Ontario Event and Conference Judges were selected based on their local Center in Oswego. business knowledge and expertise in the For more information, visit the web site fields of operations, management, financing at www.oswegocounty.org/NGI/index.htm and entrepreneurship. or by email at ngioswegocounty@gmail.com. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

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SPECIAL REPORT By Payne Horning

Blazing a New Path Pathfinder Bank names new regional president for Syracuse market eyeing on expanding market share in Onondaga County

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athfinder Bank is appointing Calvin Corriders to lead the company in the greater Syracuse area-Onondaga County market. It’s his second promotion at Pathfinder since he started at the bank six years ago. Most recently, Corriders served as the bank’s first vice president and sales manager. “This is a great organization and I am honored and flattered,” Corriders said. “I take this responsibility very seriously, and I’m looking for us to continue to have a great relationship with our community, with our customers and with our employees. We have done and will continue to do some really great and unique things here.” Corriders will be charged with leading the organization as it expands its footprint in the area. Pathfinder has two branches in Onondaga County — one in downtown Syracuse and another in Cicero. According to Corriders, there are plans to add two other branches in the county, possibly a third. “We have about 2 percent market share in Syracuse-Onondaga County,” Corriders said. “In Oswego County, we have about a 33 percent market share. That is significant. If you look at any banking research, when you have that much market share, there’s not much area for you to grow. Two percent market share — there’s significant opportunities to grow.” Corriders, who has lived in Syracuse nearly his entire life, says those local roots will serve him well in the regional president role. “I’m a native of Syracuse and I was actually born half a mile from this branch, so I’ve been here my entire life,” Corriders said. “I’ve been educated here in Syracuse, raised my family here in Syracuse, so I know the greater Syracuse-Onondaga County market

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n More about Pathfinder Bank on p. 37. very well.” His intimate knowledge of the community partially comes from how involved he is in it. Corriders is the treasurer for Home Headquarters, a housing and home improvement organization providing loans to low- to moderate-income families. He also serves on the boards of the Syracuse Community Health Center, which provides health services to low- and moderate-income families, and Excellus BlueCross Blue Shield. “Our organization allows for employees to do those things, to be engaged in their community,” Corriders said. “It’s also why I’m so in tuned with the community. It’s how I know what’s going on.” Corriders also volunteers as a way to give back. He had humble beginnings, growing up poor in a single-parent household. Now as a prominent banker, Corriders mentors young African-American students through the organization he helped found, 100 Black Men of Syracuse, Inc. It aims to improve the lives of African-American children by linking them with successful male role models who provide tutoring and counsel-

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

ing. Corriders also served 14 years on the Syracuse City School District’s Board of Education. “I’ve been fortunate — someone who grew up poor in a single-parent household, very poor and in public housing and now I’m a regional president of a bank. I didn’t get here alone,” Corriders said. “There were a variety of people and organizations — like some of the ones I mentioned — that helped me, educated me, informed me. So this is certainly the right thing to do and my way of paying back all the things that were given to me, all the blessings I received.” Corriders earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration from SUNY Brockport in 1985. He met his wife Sandra during his studies there. They moved to Syracuse upon graduation, where they raised two children – Sydnee, who resides in Brooklyn, and Calvin, who works with his father at Pathfinder in residential mortgages. Both are graduates of Syracuse University. In his free time, Corriders likes to read and go to the gym. Corriders also plays golf, though he admits that he enjoys the recreation more than his scorecard.

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School of Business Accreditation Extended for 5 years

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he globally respected Association for the Advancement of Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB) has extended the accreditation of SUNY Oswego’s School of Business for five years, following a rigorous review. Commending Oswego’s School of Business — first AACSB-accredited in 2002 -— for a variety of strengths, innovations and unique features, a site-visit report compiled by deans representing other high-performing schools of business noted: • High levels of student satisfaction with faculty and staff engagement, through advisement, internship supervision, business-based student organizations and other applied-learning opportunities • A cross-industry advisory board proactively involved in curriculum development and student recruitment

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• A pioneering online MBA program, recently top-ranked in the state by U.S. News Media Group • Responsiveness to the needs of business in the region; for example, offering a new MBA program in health services administration and a customized MBA program to SRC Inc. employees • A peer-advising system in which upper-division business students serve as mentors and advisers to lower division students School of Business Dean Richard Skolnik expressed the school’s appreciation for the work of the review team and the AACSB board’s subsequent

decision to extend School of Business accreditation. The review provides a periodic critique focused on continuous improvement and best practices, providing assurance that students are getting an education that “meets the highest standards,” he said. A business education at SUNY Oswego goes far beyond the classroom, Skolnik said. “It’s a nurturing community, with all the mentoring that takes place engaging students with faculty, staff, alumni and employers,” he said. “It really is a larger enterprise than coursework, and I believe the review team was impressed.” The review team noted SUNY Oswego has the largest business program in the system of SUNY comprehensive colleges save the nontraditional SUNY Empire State College and, over the years, a number of firsts: the first to offer an MBA program; an option for a five-year program for an accounting bachelor’s degree and an MBA; majors in marketing, human resource management, and risk management and insurance; an endowed professorship in finance; and participation in the online Open SUNY network.

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Jennifer Owens, senior vice president and chief development officer for Central New York Community Foundation.

New Rules of Fundraising for Nonprofits ‘Organizations relying on special events, government contracts and grants are relying on a funding model of the last century,’ says expert By Deborah Jeanne Sergeant

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he recession tightened purse strings for many people and lowered grant money, spurring nonprofit organizations to become multi-faceted in their fundraising efforts. Jennifer Owens, senior vice president and chief development officer for Central New York Community Foundation in Syracuse, said that social media has been helping many organizations become more efficient. Many younger donors feel more skeptical of unknown entities asking for money; however, Owens credits sites such as GoFundMe with bringing fundraising into the forefront. It also saves time and money, she said. Online “challenges” represent another example of how social media has affected fundraising. Once a stunt goes

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viral — whether it’s to drench one’s self in ice water or make a snow angel — the dollars roll in as friends join in and donate. Owens said that some people like promoting a cause by posting on Facebook, “It’s my birthday, so give to my cause.” Websites such as that of Office Depot and eBay allow people to give when they check out. Advances in technology have also made it easier to take and distribute videos, although the slick, professional videos of previous decades’ fundraising may not be as effective anymore. Owens said that some potential donors feel turned off if they think that the organization has spent a lot of money on video production instead of the cause. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Donors may also feel that the request is more genuine for an emergency need if the video appears more man-on-the-street. Many younger donors have grown up watching homemade videos and don’t necessarily expect movie-quality videos anyway. Owens said that keeping the length to 60 seconds is important because the attention span on social media won’t tolerate much more. Elizabeth Quilter, certified fundraising executive, owns a consulting practice and works as a nonprofit fundraising consultant from Baldwinsville. She said that these days, fundraising is all about building a relationship with donors. Quilter quoted a study published in June 2017 by Giving USA that states about 75 percent of gifts to nonprofits comes from individual donors. “That will continue to be the case,” she said. “Organizations relying on special events, government contracts and grants are relying on a funding model of the last century.” Quilter said that big, black-tie events have begun to turn off some donors who don’t feel that an event that expensive wisely uses the organization’s money. Nonprofits need to identify who cares the most about their cause to ensure they build that relationship. Engaging with them at a public event or through a direct communication can begin the relationship, but sooner or later, a more personal approach will help ensure a repeat donor. The appeal should tap into the emotional element of the charity. Statistics can help educate donors and sharing a personal story about someone affected identifies a real person to the donor — someone needing his help. “Rewarding” a donor with a trinket may tap into the donor’s desire to connect to a larger cause or remember a special time, such as completing a 5K run for charity. But gifts also cost money and eventually, they no longer hold as much appeal to donors. APRIL / MAY 2018


Karen M. Ferguson, certified fund raising executive and director of Oswego Health Foundation. “I’m really urging volunteers to look at the transformational nature of fundraising, rather than the transactional nature of sales,” Quilter said. “If I give to my public radio station and I get a coffee mug, it’s like a sale. I may give more in a few years but say, ‘Keep the mug’ because I want to see the radio station stay on the air.” When the donor gives simply for the joy of giving, it benefits the nonprofit more (and saves the donor from acquiring a cupboard full of mugs). “As long as it’s something people will see in the future and think of you, that helps, but what you really want is people to have the experience of helping and providing — people need to feel good about helping the mission,” Quilter said. Instead of constantly tapping donors, Quilter encourages nonprofits to reconnect by sharing the effect of their gift. At this point, the interaction conditions the donor to desire that good feeling again and keep giving. Karen M. Ferguson, certified fundraising executive and director of Oswego Health Foundation, keeps her approach diversified with three special events: a golf tournament, run and gala, an annual giving plan to tap repeat givers, and planned gifts, such as bequests. “A key thing is looking at donor retention,” she said. “It’s much less expensive to retain than acquire a new donor. You have to look at taking care of donors so they’ll continue to give. We spend a lot of time thanking donors and letting them know we’re grateful for the support they provide.” That includes social media and a phone call, email, letter or in-person expression. These gestures illustrate how donor-oriented fundraising has become. “What’s important is to make the connection at the level they want to about the things they want to,” Ferguson said. “It’s an opportunity for people to make a difference and our job is to match up people who want to give with what they want to support.” APRIL / MAY 2018

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OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

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Economic Driver SUNY Upstate Medical University leads economic development initiatives in Central New York. CEO Danielle Laraque-Arena is in the driver’s seat COVER STORY By Lou Sorendo

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an you imagine going to work in the morning to lead an organization with a budget of about $1.4 billion and nearly 10,000 employees? For physician Danielle Laraque-Arena, president of SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse, it’s an everyday reality. Upstate, the region’s only public academic medical center, powers the Central New York economy to the tune of $2.3 billion. Upstate is a public organization of higher education that is focused on health. The economic benefit to the region

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complements Upstate’s presence as the region’s largest employer with more than 9,800 people from nearly 30 New York counties. Buoyed by the multiplier effect, a payroll of more than $600 million creates significant purchasing power throughout CNY, as well as contributes to state and local taxes. Upstate’s research enterprise, totaling more than $40 million, and its clinical operations, serving nearly half a million patients, adds to Upstate’s economic impact. How does one person such as Laraque-Arena oversee such a vast complex OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

of facilities and people? “You do it hopefully through visionary leadership and by bringing a true vision as to where we are and the steps we need to take to continuously improve,” said Laraque-Arena, noting it also includes a vision for where Upstate wants to be in five to 10 years. “But at the end of the day, it’s a team effort” led by a talented group of administrators and clinicians that include physicians, nurses and other health care professionals, she said. “We are also a university and place of learning and have students in all health fields from nursing to medicine APRIL / MAY 2018


Headquarters of SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. It’s the largest employer in Central New York. Photo provided

to health professions, because health care is a team science these days,” said Laraque-Arena, who began her leadership post at Upstate in January of 2016. “We do it by collaborative, distributive leadership that allows us to leverage everyone’s strengths, lift the economy, improve health and obviously the quality of life overall, because that’s the final destination,” she added. “SUNY Upstate Medical University is happy to be very much a part of the economic vitality of the region,” said Laraque-Arena, noting the area consists of the city of Syracuse and its more than 143,000 inhabitants, the Syracuse Metropolitan Statistical Area (Onondaga, Oswego, and Madison counties) which features more than 660,000 residents, and the entire Central New York region and its population of about 1.8 million people. Laraque-Arena said she oversees an extensive health system that is a 24-hour operation “that never sleeps.” Round-the-clock activity on the 30acre campus “is the definition of being in the health field,” said Laraque-Arena, who earned her medical degree at the University of California at Los Angeles School of Medicine. Laraque-Arena is the CEO of Upstate University Health System, APRIL / MAY 2018

CNYREDC Involvement

Danielle Laraque-Arena, president of SUNY Upstate Medical University in Syracuse. Managing the organization is a “team effort,” she says. which includes Upstate University Hospital; Upstate University Hospital at Community Campus; Upstate Golisano Children’s Hospital, and numerous satellite sites. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Laraque-Arena said the economic vitality that Upstate produces is garnered through continuous innovation while it develops existing and future workforces. Laraque-Arena is also co-chairwoman of the Central New York Regional Economic Development Council, a position she was appointed to by Gov. Andrew Cuomo in December 2016. “The purpose of the council is to partner academia with industry, because we believe that in the 21st century, it takes the synergies of those two different areas to really accelerate progress,” she said. She said academia must be in tune with the workforce needs of industry and what is required to drive innovation and jobs. “If we are disconnected from that, then we will not be producing those that need to be employed,” said Laraque-Arena. She represents academia on the CNYREDC while complementing the efforts of co-chairman Randy Wolken, president and CEO of the Manufacturers Association of Central New York. Laraque also served as co-chairwoman along with Robert Simpson, president and chief executive officer of 61


CenterState CEO. By partnering academia with workforce development, Laraque-Arena said, “We really are working in concert so we can produce innovations, accelerate startups, and get the workforce that is needed for the jobs of the 21st century. We are really critically important to that endeavor.” With the REDC came a focus on the Upstate Revitalization Initiative, which essentially creates competition among the 10 statewide REDCs to drive innovation and economic growth. The CNYREDC is also placing emphasis on the growth of unmanned aerial systems and making CNY a destination point in that high technology area. Laraque-Arena said Upstate also recently featured life science and talent work groups. “Life sciences are one of those technologies that are really going to create the

opportunity for economic development and eventually improve quality of life,” she added. The talent work group studies how the region first itemizes gaps in the workforce “so that we can then attend to filling those gaps to drive innovation, employment and economic revitalization,” she noted.

Taking the lead When it comes to leadership, everyone brings his or her own style, Laraque-Arena said. “It’s what gets you up in the morning,” she noted. “I am very data driven and like distributive leadership, which means I like to have folks who are complementary leaders so that we bring to the table the distinct expertise of individuals and allow them to help drive the agenda,”

she said. “I truly can tell you that I have a vision for the future, an inclusive vision that looks at the entire population,” she added. Laraque-Arena said the Syracuse area does feature some serious problems, including concentrated poverty and issues with respect to violence. “Unless it is a shared mental model, we can’t move forward together,” she said. “We have different talents. My talent may be in one area, and yours in another. Those things are not competitive; they are complementary,” she said. “I want a diverse and inclusive leadership team and I want folks to know that not everything will be successful and it’s OK to fail.” She said it’s important to use that failure to “energize things to move it forward, and not be engrossed by

Here Come the Baby Boomers

Aging population continues to grow as SUNY Upstate Medical University prepares for the surge

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ith 75 million baby boomers preparing to retire, regional health care systems are gearing up for what is expected to be a robust wave of demand for health care services. For the next 20 years, it is estimated that an average of 10,000 people each day will reach age 65. Physician Danielle Laraque-Arena, president of SUNY Upstate Medical University and CEO for Upstate Health System, said it is essential to respond to the growth in the aging population, or those 65 and older. “It’s a good thing that we are living longer, but it challenges the system in terms of how we support the quality of life for those that are living longer,” she noted. She said when Medicare and Social Security were created, “we were able to bring seniors out of poverty because of the support systems that were afforded them. We should take note because we have not done so in our geriatric population and need to do that more effectively.” She said the region needs to devise different systems of health care that are more community-based to keep folks in their homes, reduce re-hospitalization

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and provide the kind of support services that are needed. “We have to take a look at our policies in respect to continued employment of those who are aging,” she said. Discussions concerning setting arbitrary age limits for those who can work may be met with skepticism, she noted. “We need to take a look at people’s ability and competence to continue being productive in the workforce, and I think it is leading to very robust discussions on how we maintain mental and physical health, what our policies are in supporting folks to continue in the workforce, or to support them if they choose to retire,” noted Laraque-Arena, adding she has been working since she was 13 years of age. “We have to figure out the kind of society we want,” she said. “We want folks in their lifetimes to not end up in poverty because they are crushed by medical bills.” An $8 million gift from Sam and Carol Nappi of Jamesville will support the creation of an eight-floor, 360,000 square-foot health and wellness complex at Upstate. The gift is the largest ever received by the Upstate Foundation and Upstate Medical University and will be used to OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

expand the building’s services related to “brain health” or neurosciences, including a focus on Alzheimer’s disease, and will be named the Nappi Longevity Institute in recognition of the couple’s philanthropy. On a related note, Laraque-Arena recently announced the inaugural chairwoman for Upstate’s new geriatrics department — Sharon Brangman. “We are putting the pieces together to start this new department of geriatrics, acknowledging that we need to increasingly do a better job at supporting our elderly,” she said. “We are also focused on neurosciences, which are critically important when dealing with diseases such as Alzheimer’s, which becomes more prevalent with increasing age.” “What is the science of the brain that will help us to have folks not only live longer, but also live better lives and better quality lives?” she asked. “I think science is critically important to unlock some of those questions about degenerative conditions and diseases such as Alzheimer’s.”

By Lou Sorendo APRIL / MAY 2018


SUNY Upstate Medical University President and Health System CEO Danielle Laraque-Arena, MD, speaks at the opening of Upstate new academic building in September 2016. The building added new classroom and a main campus home for Upstate’s College of Nursing. Photo provided. negativity.” “We really need to enjoy the fact that we have a beautiful region here in Syracuse and Central New York,” she noted. “We must celebrate that and allow folks to express their talents through partnerships, and allow leaders to really have independence and autonomy within that larger, shared vision.” Laraque-Arena said Upstate is distinct because it is the only academic health center in the region. “We can’t lose sight of the fact that learning is our core,” whether it is in the colleges of medicine, nursing, health professions or graduate studies, she said. As a leader, Laraque-Arena said her mission is to apply the best science to solve the issues of the day. She said the key to changing economic reality is to have an economic focus. “If folks are living in poverty, they are not healthy. If folks are living in poverty, they can’t learn appropriately. They can learn, of course, but we must create the environment to allow people to reach their full potential,” she said. “In terms of mental health, if folks are not receiving services that they need, they can’t operate at the highest level. We have an opioid epidemic here, and if we don’t address these key issues, then we can’t leverage our science and clinical care to improve economic possibilities.” APRIL / MAY 2018

The university has a very distinct role as a place of learning and where the administrative focus is on economic vitality, Laraque-Arena said. She noted during her 35-year career, she has seen a shift as universities are increasingly addressing the percentage of time that leaders spend thinking about economic issues. “If you look at universities across the country, there is a deliberate effort to link knowledge and economic advancement,” she said. She said over the past 10 to 15 years, there is a trend toward developing models of apprenticeship and other things “that will accelerate meeting those gaps in the workforce and to address the new technology that we know our learners need.”

The financial picture Like any head of a large organization, Laraque-Arena is faced with challenging financial circumstances. “I think we are in a time when the financing of health care is very much in flux,” she said. Upstate benefits from being part of higher education, Laraque-Arena said. The state backs capital projects and provides direct support and policies that help to drive where Upstate is going as a higher education institution, she said. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

It is buttressed by its clinical operations within a health care system “which is very important not only for our trainees, but also for the care delivery that we have, and that produces revenue for us to continue to recycle those revenues into the machinery of health care delivery.” Upstate features both clinical and research enterprises supported by both National Institute of Health and nonNIH funding that continues to fuel key research questions that will drive significant innovations, she noted. “We also have this academic-industry relationship, exemplified by Upstate’s biotech accelerator, where the university supports small startups so they can then be in a position to scale up and bring economic revitalization to the area, which benefits the university as well,” she said. Upstate has multiple sources of clinicians in its medical specialty groups, outpatient services that are linked to the hospital and inpatient endeavors, she noted. “It’s a complex mix of revenue sources and balancing those so that we are achieving our goals,” she said. Laraque-Arena advocates for maintaining Upstate’s Disproportionate Share Hospital funding, which provides at least partial compensation for treating indigent patients. She also underlines the importance of federal funding through the NIH that Upstate lobbies for. “So this is a mix, and right now, we are in the black, which is a good thing,” she said. 63


SUNY Upstate Sets Pace for Biotech Business Innovation CNY Biotech Accelerator provides incubation and acceleration for new product and service ideas By Lou Sorendo

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odern biotechnology is rapidly changing the world of medicine. Whether it involves pharmaceutical drug discovery or genetic testing, biotech is becoming the rage in both educational and research circles. Physician Robert J. Corona Jr. leads the Central New York Biotech Accelerator at SUNY Upstate Medical University. It is a 60,000-square-foot facility offering wet labs, services, coordinated resources, mentorship and education to individuals and startup companies involved in the commercialization of biotech innovation. The accelerator, at 841 E. Fayette St., is a division of SUNY Upstate. Corona is chairman of pathology and laboratory medicine at SUNY Upstate Medical University, and also is the vice president of innovation and business development. He is a neuropathologist and leader in bioinformatics and the application of technology in medicine. “The center offers an opportunity to incubate in an academic environment where you have access to the university section of the city with SUNY Upstate Medical University, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and Syracuse University,” he said. “So we get a lot of students and young entrepreneurs who show interest and attend our conferences and seminars on how to start a business.” Corona said many physicians and nurses from Upstate also express interest. Providing legal advocacy are patent attorneys who have set up shop at the accelerator. The legal team helps clients learn how to protect their ideas. “We have people who will help them write business plans. It’s a nice fertile ground for incubation and acceleration of ideas,” he said. It is the clients at the center that

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provide services. “We provide the facility, internet access and educational pieces. It’s the clients that occupy the spaces that provide a lot of services for other clients. It works out really well,” he said. There is an extension of a hospital laboratory in the biotech center that is more of an entrepreneurial venture on behalf of Upstate that focuses on personalized medicine. There is also a business that was spun out of SUNY ESF. “We are finding that we are running out of space, so we are doubling up businesses that don’t need the full bay, which is about 1,000 square feet,” he said. “They will pick a quadrant of the laboratory and that’s where they run their business,” he said. “We also have shared equipment that they can all use. It’s working out pretty well.” There are a number of ongoing discussions about expansion involving the Syracuse University Center of Excellence. “My vision would be to create a biotech park where people live and work, and perhaps feature gardens and bike trails. It would be a vibrant part of the inner city,” he said. “We have other area on our Upstate Medical University campus that we could place people,” he said. “We had a company that was researching head trauma and concussions. They ultimately ended up going into our Institute for Human Performance, which is located about a block away. It changed its name to Quadrant Biosciences. They went there because we really didn’t have space for them, and they are doing quite well.” Corona noted that many prospective clients cold call the center and get reviewed by its advisory board. “We decide whether or not they fit the vision and mission of the accelerator,” he said. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Focus on medical devices The accelerator hosted a medical device competition recently. “We focus on medical devices because the Central New York area has companies like Welch-Allyn and ConMed Corp. along with other smaller medical device companies,” Corona said. The center selected six companies from the competition that spent several months incubating and getting mentoring by members of its advisory board. “We picked a winner who went on to present and we looked to see if we could land them in various areas in the region,” he noted. The Upstate MIND — a medical innovation and novel discovery center within the CNY Biotech Accelerator — provides a grant-funded intensive mentorship program to assist early stage medical device innovators. BioSpherix also was a company that incubated at the center before moving to Altmar, where it makes tissue culture incubators. “Our transplant surgeons are using those very incubators for their research,” Corona said. “We’re open to biotech, and it tends to be health oriented. In terms of agriculture, we’re looking for superior food for nutrition to create opportunities for longevity and cancer patients,” he said. Corona noted companies seeking ways to be more environmentally responsible with food could incubate there at the center. The accelerator once featured a company that made dog biscuits from excess food from buffets. “They spun out, but we would be open to it. Food is a big part of health and we could make the link,” he said. “I think it’s a wonderful agonistic breeding ground for new ideas, companies, products and services. We leverage the fact that we are in the midst of all the universities and it draws people with really good ideas,” he said. Corona said more recently, the center is getting local executives to visit and mentor some of the younger entrepreneurs. “I think it’s a great opportunity to really invigorate the downtown Syracuse area by leveraging its location to Upstate and other facilitated universities,” he said. APRIL / MAY 2018


Health Care Special

n Oswego Health: Economic catalyst n New social adult day care program offers respite to families n Why prescription drugs cost so much n New behavioral health facility taking shape n Oswego Health has new chief operating officer APRIL / MAY 2018

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

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HEALTHCARE SPECIAL By Lou Sorendo

Economic Catalyst Oswego Health continues to spur significant growth in county

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midst a growing trend of mergers and acquisitions within the health care industry, Oswego Health is proving it can go it alone. One only has to take a look at its balance sheet to determine that. In less than a year, new president and CEO Michael Harlovic — accompanied by top administrators that include executive vice president of business development Jeff Coakley and chief financial officer Eric Campbell — is not only leading the nonprofit organization into financial prosperity but has also enacted operational efficiencies that bode well for the bottom line. Oswego Health is Oswego County’s second-largest private employer with 1,243 workers, and is ranked third overall behind only Exelon Generation and SUNY Oswego. Oswego Health features a payroll this year of $66 million, a growth of about 6 percent over 2017. When considering the “multiplier effect,” the spending clout Oswego Health has in the community is undeniable. Relatively higher pay scales result in larger amounts of disposable income being spent in the local economy. “With 85 percent of our workers living in Oswego County, we’re assuming — and I’m sure it’s true — that they are spending that money in the county,”

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Harlovic said. Leaders at Oswego Health see the organization as one of the main pillars and collaborative forces within the community. “It’s difficult to quantify what that collaboration means, but health care, education and employers really are those pillars within the community,” Coakley said. “They support the function of the economy as well as our ability to attract new resources. We take seriously our responsibility to be one of those pillars.” Harlovic noted that when people evaluate whether they will move, relocate here or obtain services, they are going to look to see if there is good, accessible high-quality health care. “We’re one of those pillars that holds the community together,” Harlovic said.

On the rise According to the Health Association of New York State’s “Economic & Community Impact” study for Oswego Health, the health care system had a total economic impact of approximately $189 million on the community in 2017. Based on the 2018 budget for Oswego Health and all of its related entities, Campbell said that number will be about $208 million this year, or a 9 percent increase over 2017. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

The major indicators to determine that figure include salary, operating expense and capital spending, Campbell said. Employer-related spending on salaries and wages for 2018 is going up about 6 percent over 2017. “We continue that growth in spending on salaries,” Campbell said. In 2017, Oswego Health had a 3 percent growth over 2016 in terms of salaries and wages. Harlovic noted the average hourly salary at Oswego Health is about $31, which figures to be about $62,000 annually. “We’ve very competitive and right on the mark when it comes to mid-levels such as nurse practitioners and physician assistants, which are earning around $110,000,” he said. According to the New York State Department of Labor, the mean annual wage for 2017 for health care practitioners and technical occupations was $89,540. For experienced professionals, the annual wage was $111,540. “We do offer a highly competitive wage right here, and there is no significant difference in the wage rate here and the wage rate you would see in Syracuse or other markets in Central New York,” Harlovic said. Supply expenses, meanwhile, have been “pretty consistent,” Campbell APRIL / MAY 2018


noted. Oswego Health will be making some significant capital investments this year, which Campbell said will serve to drive up the organization’s overall economic impact. On the agenda are significant upgrades to radiology equipment, while the organization will also be updating information technology systems in 2018. The IT project is about a $4.5 million initiative. Medical-surgical facility renovations are also on tap, and Oswego Health will begin focusing on building its new behavioral health center thanks to $13 million in state grant funding. Some of that will be expended in 2018, Campbell noted. The behavioral health center is about a $17 million project with construction getting under way this year with completion planned in 2019. Oswego Health will be upgrading and renovating its inpatient-nursing unit, which will be a $7 million project that will start late this year.

Significant revenue stream Oswego Health does not pay taxes due to its nonprofit status, but its

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Behind Oswego Health’s finance’s decisions are, from left, Jeff Coakley, newly appointed chief operating officer, CEO Michael Harlovic and chief financial officer Eric Campbell.

Oswego Health to Open Primary Care Office at Novelis

swego Health has plans to open a primary care office this year at Novelis, Oswego County’s largest manufacturer company in Scriba. The business employs 1,180 workers, according to the 2018 Business Guide, published by Oswego County Business magazine. “We want to work with them on their site by providing primary care,” said executive vice president of business development Jeff Coakley. This way, employees can conveniently access services and better manage their own chronic conditions, or receive acute care services “so [illnesses] don’t linger and turn into something larger where they are going to need emergency department service or in-patient services, which truly are the most expensive levels of care we provide,” Coakley noted.

APRIL / MAY 2018

Coakley said Oswego Health has been offering that service in the form of a mobile trailer located off the back of the Novelis plant. “It’s not optimal in its current situation, but we’ve developed a collaboration where they are improving space for a brand new primary care office and suite,” Coakley said. “We’re going to provide primary care services in house as well as provide lab services, even if they don’t use that primary care facility.” Oswego Health will also be providing physical therapy for those workers who have an occupational health injury they need to recover from. “They can be there on light duty and receiving those types of services and that type of collaboration is important to them to manage the cost,” he said. Oswego Health will be looking to partner with organizations like Novelis OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

to help manage those costs and keep their workforces healthy. “It’s really that type of collaboration that’s important to us that can drive economic development, not only for us as an organization, but for them as leading employers here in the community,” he said. Oswego Health has more than 125 contracts with employers for a number of different services through its occupational health division, Coakley noted. “We want to continue to maintain and support additional services to them as they request,” said Coakley, noting efforts will be made to determine the needs of employees and their families and help determine strategies to manage the cost of those services. Keeping people out of the hospital is the best way to manage those costs, he noted. 67


workforce creates a total tax impact of approximately $13 million. “I would say we anticipate adding personnel to the organization as we continue to grow,” Harlovic said. When the new behavioral health center opens and primary care and a number of different services are offered there, Oswego Health anticipates adding another 20 to 25 positions. “As we’ve developed a growth team for business, we just added three full-time equivalent positions within that department,” Harlovic said. He said job growth will be incremental as Oswego Health develops new service lines. Harlovic said placing an emphasis on operational efficiency also dictates what is needed in terms of human resources. “We’re just taking resources and putting them in other places in some circumstances. We need less resources because we’re more efficient,” he added. Coakley said one of the factors that will impact Oswego Health’s ability to hire more employees is its success in recruiting physicians. “As we add physicians and practices, that will give us the opportunity to continue employing their staff and other technicians that need to support them in different venues within the organization, whether that’s radiology, the operating room or other locations,” he said. “I think if there is a factor that will stimulate our growth as an entire organization, it is the recruitment of physicians.” “It will drive volume,” Harlovic said. “The other piece that will drive volume is our alignment with primary care physicians in the market so that they bring all their business here and people use us as their local health care facility,” he added. Oswego Health has seen its inpatient volume trending down, but its outpatient service has been trending up, including its emergency room, urgent care facilities, and lab and radiology services. “We anticipate as we go forward in 2018 and into 2019 that our inpatient business will grow as well, because we see practitioners in the community referring more,” Harlovic said. “For example, in January of this year, we exceeded our projections for number of inpatients. So while the trend nationally has gone down, we’re going to see ours go back up because of factors such as less people leaving the community and wanting to stay here,” 68

Harlovic said.

Growth mode In terms of total assets, Oswego Health is growing. “We’re looking at growth up to $147 million in 2018,” said Campbell. He noted that in 2016, that number was $142 million. Oswego Health has grown at a pace of 3.5 percent over the last two years. “We’re looking at continued growth in the strength of our balance sheet,” Campbell said. Campbell said $147 million in assets is the goal for 2018 based on the organization’s entire aggregated budget for the system. “We’re expecting a 2 percent operating margin in 2018. By generating an operating margin, we are able to invest in the facility and culture to increase our assets of the organization. It’s the primary driver,” Campbell added. “One of the things we can do as we move forward is continue to employ more people based on several factors,” Coakley said. “Our net operating surplus is really what allows us as a nonprofit to continue to reinvest in our employees, new equipment and health care infrastructure that fuels our growth,” he said. “So when people in our community utilize the services of their local community hospital and health system instead of going to Syracuse, that allows us to generate additional dollars on an annual basis, all of which is reinvested. That’s the difference between us as a nonprofit and a for-profit.” Coakley said there are for-profit organizations within the county and in Syracuse that provide the same services that Oswego Health does. “One of the things we are very proud of is the fact that we have extraordinarily high quality in our areas of service throughout our health care system, whether it’s here at the hospital, our skilled nursing facility, our home care services and even retirement living,” he said. “By having people utilize those services here and allowing us to generate a profit even as a non-profit, that allows us to continue to build and grow services here.” Coakley said local residents can take advantage of services locally that are of equal or higher quality than what one would find in Syracuse.

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Is There a Doctor in the House? Oswego Health seeks ways to attract, retain health care professionals

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swego Health is not alone. Michael Harlovic, Oswego Health’s president and CEO, said there is a “huge need” for primary care physicians locally as well as across the nation. “That’s the greatest access need and care really starts with your primary care physician,” he said. “There is a national shortage of primary care doctors but also a localized shortage of primary care physicians,” he said. “We’re very targeted on increasing the number of primary care positions that we have in the community right now.” Oswego Health is also funding a residency program at SUNY Upstate Medical University. It will fund a psychiatric resident who will come to Oswego Health and upon finishing, will commit to working at the new behavioral health facility which will be constructed on the city’s east side. “There’s a definite need for psychiatrists in the community,” Harlovic noted. Jeff Coakley, executive vice president of business development, noted there is also a continuing need for nurses, particularly in the outpatient setting. “As we look at how we are providing services efficiently at the hospital, we’re still struggling with nursing services and recruiting home care nurses to meet the needs of the community. There are huge growth opportunities there for us and for residents in the community who want to become nurses or primary care providers, whether those primary care providers are physicians or nurse practitioners, which we also see a huge demand for,” he added. The nurse practitioners and physician assistants, or advance care providers, are helping Oswego Health fill the gap in terms of access to services. “We just don’t have enough physicians,” Coakley said. “They are providing additional APRIL / MAY 2018


President and CEO Michael Harlovic, middle, talking to professionals from the emergency department. From left are emergency department director Frank Lackey, ED technician Steve Merron, Harlovic, ED technician Paige Blum and registered nurse Jill Bennett. services in sub-specialty offices, like our ENT office, and also in primary care, orthopedics and in a number of other places. I’m going to say the growth is probably in a number of different service lines, but considerable growth in those areas with nurse practitioners and physician assistants,” he added. Harlovic noted the nursing shortage is not due to a skills gap. “It’s probably just a product of supply and demand and how many are available,” Harlovic said. “I think the big thing that we focus on is recruitment and retention of registered nurses, as well as other professionals within the organization.” Harlovic said Oswego Health “has some pretty creative ways for people to enter the system.” “We created a registry program for our nursing staff and as part of that, they can work for a much higher hourly rate if they don’t require health care benefits,” he said. “They can earn up to $45 an hour working as an RN here if they don’t take health insurance and commit to working so many hours.” “There are creative ways to attract staff here as well as things like self scheduling,” he said. “It’s the quality of work life that they are looking for as well as scheduling and certainly compensation.”

APRIL / MAY 2018

Need for physical therapists Coakley said there probably will be a high need in the future for physical therapists as the population continues to age. He said aging baby boomers will most likely need new joints or the opportunity to recover from a medical illness, making the physical therapy piece important. “I think we also will have a need for health care coordinators with different levels of skill to help us manage people to the right place, at the right time and for the right care,” Coakley said. He noted care is coordinated between Oswego Health and other health and human service agencies in the community to help people move to the right place at the right time. “We actually brought on a number of those people here within the organization over the last three to four years to make sure we’re helping people manage their chronic illness by getting to their physician, and receiving transportation, pharmacy and home services that they need,” he said. “All of that is integrated now and it becomes our responsibility as a leader in the health care community here to help provide those services that fill those gaps and don’t allow those people to fall through the cracks.” The state is providing stimulus to OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

organizations throughout the community in the form of finances to help hire and maintain a staff that will support the navigation of these patients in the community so they don’t have to receive the high cost care in the hospital, said Coakley in regards to the patient-centered medical home care delivery model. He noted the state’s interest is primarily to control the cost of Medicaid, which it is responsible for. “We also see the same interest on behalf of commercial insurers. They would also like to see us make sure we are supporting those patients in all walks of their life to make sure that we are keeping them healthy and out of the hospital,” Coakley said. “We are partnering with both state and federal agencies for Medicare and Medicaid to support those types of collaborations as well as those commercial insurers that are looking to also reduce the cost of providing services to their beneficiaries,” he added. Oswego Health is also adding a specially trained nurse educator for its emergency department. It is also looking for a specially trained person to help manage its cardiology department. Harlovic said to also expect continued employment and growth with some of Oswego Health’s entry-level and maintenance positions.

By Lou Sorendo 69


HEALTHCARE SPECIAL By George Chapman

Big Pharma Rules Why prescription drugs cost so much

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t’s complicated. The Council of Economic Advisors (CEA) recently released a report titled, “Reforming Biopharmaceutical Pricing at Home and Abroad.” It is an excellent summary of the complicated reasons why Americans pay more for drugs than the citizens of almost every other country. The dilemma we face is making drugs affordable without seriously impacting the continued innovation and research of new drugs. We face a daunting but achievable task. Everyone, including the president, has bemoaned the high cost of drugs and is looking for some sort of price and cost control on drug manufacturers. Lowering drug prices is one of the most important social issues in the United States regardless of political party. Medicare already controls and regulates what it pays for physicians and hospitals, but not for drugs. Price gouging by manufacturers always makes provocative headlines. Remember when the price of an EpiPen, used to stop an allergic reaction, was increased from $100 to $600 or when the HIV/AIDS drug Daraprim 70

was raised from $13 to $750 a pill? We spent $360 billion on drugs last year, up $20 billion from 2016. Foreign governments negotiate drug prices with U.S. manufacturers. Our government does not. Because they are buying in bulk for their entire populations (Mexico 130 million, UK 66 million, Canada 37 million, Germany 82 million, France 65 million, etc.), they get volume discounts. By offering discounted prices to foreign countries, drug manufacturers earn lower profit margins there. So where do you think they make up for lost profits? The CEA estimates Americans account for 70 percent of drug profits despite accounting for only 34 percent of sales. Basically, foreign governments sit back, wait for innovative drugs to come to market, and negotiate discounts. The least they could do is thank American consumers and taxpayers for subsidizing what they pay for their drugs. The annual cost per patient to treat certain diseases is astounding. Here are some low-high annual per patient costs for certain diseases: cancer, hematological malignancies: $12,900-$540,600; cystic fibrosis: $40,500-$368,700; growth hormone deficiency: $30,000-39,000; OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

infectious diseases $13,500/$226,800. However, one must consider the price of an effective drug against the reduced price of overall health care for the individual going forward, not to mention the extra priceless years of life the patient lived. The price of better health decreases further as competing drugs enter the market. The “free market” doesn’t apply to drug manufacturers. Typically, new improved products come out and drive the price down on the old version. Not so for drugs because patents on drugs guarantee high prices for the “old” product for years. But without this temporary exclusivity for a few years, drug innovation could come to a halt. In order to be in the Medicaid drug rebate program, drug manufacturers must offer states a discount from their “average” price. (There are 75 million people with Medicaid coverage). In exchange for the discount, states will include these drugs in their formularies. If a lot of their business is in the Medicaid market, there is an incentive to raise prices in the private market in order to compensate for the discount in the Medicaid market.

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Purchasing power stifled So basically, drug manufacturers are robbing Peter (private market) to pay Paul (Medicaid market). Medicare allows physicians to mark up purchased drugs by 6 percent to cover handling, storage, administration, etc. Since, on average, it doesn’t cost much more to store a $1,000 drug vs. a cheaper version of a drug at $500, there is little incentive to have the cheaper drug on hand because 6 percent of $1,000 is higher than 6 percent of $500. There is no incentive for manufacturers to compete for the doctor’s business on price. Unlike the states that negotiate prices for their Medicaid recipients, the federal government does not negotiate prices for its 60 million Medicare recipients. Imagine the purchasing power if the government negotiated prices for the combined 135 million Americans on Medicaid and Medicare! The Federal Drug Administration isn’t helping. A 2013 study of drug development by Tufts University estimated that in 2013, it costs an average of $2.6 billion to get final approval of a new prescription drug. It all starts with basic research at universities and government settings like the National Institutes of Health. Then there is drug discovery and development, pre-clinical testing with animals, clinical trials with humans, FDA review and approval and post-approval research and monitoring. Altogether, this takes over 10 years. The required clinical trials and FDA approval take eight of the 10 years. Reforms are needed to reduce both the time and expense to get a new drug to your pharmacy. Faster generic drug approvals would decrease the cost of entry thereby further decreasing drug prices. The Trump administration has pressured the

APRIL / MAY 2018

FDA to bring down costs. Last year, the FDA announced its drug competition and action plan to get more safe and effective generic drugs on the shelves. Big Pharma has spent $2.3 billion over the last 10 years on lobbying. Last year, it spent $240 million, putting it far ahead of the $157 million spent by the second-place insurance industry on lobbying. There are 1,500 registered drug lobbyists is Washington — that is nearly three lobbyists per member of Congress. High on their priority list is preventing Congress from negotiating drug prices for the 60 million Americans on Medicare. Of course, Big Pharma literally buys favor. Over the past 10 years, Big Pharma has contributed heavily to the campaigns of key senators. For example: Richard Burr got $1.3 million; Orin Hatch, $1.2 million; Mitch McConnell, $1 million; and Roy Blunt, $850,000. In order for prices to come down, a lot of planets must align. First, we have to stop subsidizing drug prices around the world. The obvious irony or duplicity is that drug manufacturers negotiate prices with just about everyone else, including all 50 states for Medicaid recipients and just about every other country in the world for all their citizens. The “freeloading” countries cost the American consumer because drug manufacturers make up for lost profits in the U.S. Second, there needs to be far more pricing transparency. What does a drug really cost? The prices are all over the map. Discounts are meaningless if all the drug manufacturer does is jack up the “price” then discount. How does anyone know if they are really getting a deal if the price is constantly changing? Third, the FDA needs to make it far faster and cheaper to get new, innovative drugs to the market. $2.6 billion per new drug is a lot to recoup. Drug companies are entitled to make a profit. We don’t want to kill their incentive to innovate. Finally, and this is the most difficult, our lawmakers need to begin to push back on Big Pharma and come up with some win-win plans to keep drug prices from bankrupting consumers, Medicaid and Medicare.

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Sea Grant, DEC Announce $200,000 in Grants For Great Lakes Basin Projects

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ew York Sea Grant and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) recently announced $200,000 is available for Great Lakes ecosystem-based management projects through the New York Great Lakes Basin small grants program, which is administered by New York Sea Grant in partnership with DEC. Up to $25,000 is available for each project. “These grants support eco-based recreation and tourism projects and reinforce Gov. Cuomo’s statewide efforts to connect more New Yorkers with the outdoors,” said DEC Commissioner Basil Seggos. “Not only do these grants protect our environment, they support recreation and tourism, major drivers of New York’s Great Lakes Basin economy.” “These small grants create opportunities for stakeholders to build upon the unique natural strengths of their communities to enhance environmental quality, resiliency, and the economic benefits intrinsically tied to New York’s Great Lakes coastal resources,” said Katherine Bunting-Howarth, New York Sea Grant associate director and Cornell University Cooperative Extension assistant director, based in Ithaca. Application instructions are online at www.nyseagrant.org. Proposals must be submitted by 4:30 p.m. May 1. For more information, contact New York Sea Grant at 315-312-3042. Proposed projects must use a complete ecosystem-based approach rather than a single issue or single species focus, incorporate stakeholder participation, and address key priorities in the New York Great Lakes Action Agenda. Those priorities include enhancing community resiliency and ecosystem integrity through restoration, protection, and improved resource management; and enhancing recreation and tourism opportunities that capitalize on the rivers and lakes, scenic beauty, and natural and cultural resources that define the character of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence region. Nonprofit organizations, county and local government or public agencies and educational institutions are eligible to apply. 71


Mike Krause and Joan DeYulio doing exercise at the St. Luke’s Cornerstone Club, a day care for adults in Fulton. They are accompanied by Nicole Greenier, program director on the right.

Welcome to the Club New social adult day care program in Oswego County offers families respite By Payne Horning

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or those who frequent the Cornerstone Club, it’s exactly that — a hangout where a group of regulars come together to reminisce about old memories and make new ones. But for their families, it’s something much more. “A lot of families come here and are stressed out because they have nowhere else to turn to,” said Michelle Petrie, a staff member at the Cornerstone Club. “They don’t want to place their family member in a nursing home yet.” St. Luke’s Cornerstone Club in Fulton is something between a nursing home and a senior center. The social adult day care center offers supervised care of seniors and those with functional impairments, like Alzheimer’s disease, on weekdays. Families drop off their loved ones while they go to work or run errands, and take comfort that they are under the care of health professionals. The business prides itself on offering that peace of mind. “We just reassure them that we’re going to take good care of them,” said

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Nicole Greenier, program director at Cornerstone. “They’re going to have fun, do all sorts of stuff, meet new friends, socialize — instead of staying at home and staring at the same four walls or maybe not being as safe as they could be.” St. Luke’s Cornerstone is the first “social model” day care in Oswego County. It’s one more option for families who don’t need the “medical model,” like St. Luke’s Adult Day Health Care program, which serves those who require ongoing rehabilitation and medical services or are not yet ready to separate from their loved ones by placing them in a nursing home. “In a nursing home now, they’re out of their home,” Greenier said. “They’re now in a place they don’t recognize. So this actually helps keep them at home in a place where they love.” Cornerstone currently has 15 clients from across Oswego County – and one from Syracuse – with room to serve up to 40. Some visit Monday through Friday, while others come sporadically. They OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

are kept busy throughout the day with a variety of activities: games, crafting, baking, reading and individualized time for reading or napping. Balanced meals for breakfast and lunch are provided by Oswego County Opportunities each day. Greenier says it’s an all-inclusive experience. “We have something almost every hour,” Greenier said. “That way it gives people a wide range. They don’t have to do everything that’s on the calendar, but at least they can participate in a couple things.” Greenier says there’s a rhyme and reason to what’s on the calendar too. The day is designed to keep everyone engaged and stimulated, like card games and time set aside for reminiscing as a way to improve memory, and exercise to maintain good health. In addition to keeping their clients entertained, Cornerstone also takes over some of the caregiver responsibilities. That means making sure they are eating, staying hydrated, taking their medication and even helping shower or shave them. Greenier says it can alleviate some of the burden on families, and as a result can even help change relationships. “It’s hard when you’re a caregiver versus being a daughter or son or a husband or a wife,” Greenier said. “They kind of lose that when they become a caregiver because now you’re more of the person who has to do the showering and the bathing and the feeding and the ‘no’ person who unfortunately has to tell their loved one, ‘no, you can’t do that.’ We kind of alleviate that stress for them so they can be a husband, a wife, a son, a daughter again.” Since opening in August of 2017, the dynamic between the staff and their clients has changed. They have become part of the families they serve, building tight bonds and even eating lunch together every day around a large family-style table at the club. “This is another home,” said Michelle Krause, whose 63-year-old father Mike Krause has dementia. “It’s a home away from home. They love Dad just as much as we do.” Mike Krause was diagnosed with primary aggressive aphasia dementia at the age of 59. The former carpenter had retired early to work on the house he resides. Soon after, his measurements and numbers were slipping. He was fine for a couple of years, Michelle says, but he was beginning to struggle to communicate, a symptom of the disease. His dementia progressed to the APRIL / MAY 2018


point that he was unable to be left at home alone. Krause’s mother, who was divorced from her husband, started watching him during the day. The arrangement ended when Krause’s mother developed her own medical issues that prevented her from watching Mike Krause any longer. That’s when Krause found Cornerstone. “Dad loves it,” Krause says. “He absolutely loves it. He gets upset when we’re not here.” Krause’s family loves it too. Cornerstone is convenient and the staff often gives them advice on how to better care for Mike Krause, and comforts them when they need emotional support. But perhaps the biggest benefit of the program is how it’s ameliorating Mike Krause’s condition. “For the longest while, he wouldn’t talk,” Krause said. “And the first week of him being here, I picked him up on a Friday and he literally said a full sentence. And that was probably the first time he has ever spoken more than a “yeah” or a nod in two years. It was absolutely amazing – so heartwarming – to know that it’s bringing him back out.” Krause says her father has gotten better about expressing himself because he has to convey what he needs while at Cornerstone. The regular interaction with more people is also beneficial for her father, whom Krause calls “a social butterfly.” Greenier says Mike Krause is just one of many of their success stories. One client with Alzheimer’s disease who suffers from short-term and long-term memory loss has learned where the club is and how to get to the front door when she’s dropped off. “Her smile lights up and she actually walks into the building and knows what door to come in, which is amazing,” Greenier says. “It’s an emotional memory for them, which is what we strive for to be part of their family.”

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Architectural rendering of the new behavioral health facility being built by Oswego Health. It will replace the vacant former Price Chopper building on East Cayuga Street. The $17.2 facility will feature a 20-bed adult and 12-bed geriatric unit, along with outpatient and primary care services.

New Behavioral Health Facility Taking Shape Oswego Health is still in the planning stages for construction and a building timetable has not been established By Lou Sorendo

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ehavioral health services are in the midst of a major transformation, not only in Oswego County, but across the nation. This trend is occurring as the stigma diminishes and the benefits of BHS are recognized. Although the quality and effectiveness of mental health treatments and services have improved significantly over the past 50 years, many people who might benefit from these services choose not to obtain them or do not fully adhere to treatment regimens once they are begun, studies show. Stigma is one of several reasons why people make such choices; namely, societal pressures motivate people to avoid the label of mental illness that results when people are associated with mental health care, experts say. It is estimated that one in five Americans reportedly has a diagnosable mental health condition. Furthermore, the Centers for Prevention and Health estimate that mental

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illness and substance abuse issues cost employers between $79 and $105 billion each year. Reduced productivity, absenteeism, and increased health care costs are several ways mental illness cost employers money. The local health care community, however, is answering the call for help. Oswego Health is converting the former Price Chopper site on East Cayuga Street — a 40,000 square-foot building that has been vacant for about a decade — into a behavioral health facility with a 20-bed adult and 12-bed geriatric unit, along with outpatient and primary care services. Future plans call for added health services. Oswego Health CEO and President Michael Harlovic said for the first time, community members needing BHS will receive care in a facility built to provide these services at the highest level. Oswego Health has partnered with a nationally known firm that specializes in the construction of BHS facilities. “Not only will the facility house OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

high-quality care, it will be an attractive and well-maintained facility,” he said. Last summer, Oswego Health was awarded a $13 million grant from the New York State Department of Health that the health system will use to upgrade BHS in the county. Oswego Health anticipates its new project to cost $17.2 million. According to CEO Harlovic, the cost of the project has grown by $3.5 million since the grant was announced through the integration of primary care services and care coordination. The remainder of the funding will be borrowed, he noted. “This location improves access to care by being close to Oswego Hospital, allowing our physicians and patients to travel quickly and efficiently between the two locations,” Harlovic said. He said most of the patients Oswego provides BHS care to initially arrive at the Oswego Hospital emergency department. “Once the facility is completed, we APRIL / MAY 2018


believe that our hospitalist physicians may travel between the hospital and new BHS location,” he said. He noted the location also gives Oswego Health the opportunity to construct a new facility specifically built to meet the needs of its patients and clients. “Unlike most of our recent projects, the BHS build allows the health system to start fresh, so to speak. Construction will not be ongoing in an area where we are providing care,” he said. Harlovic said compared to two of Oswego Health’s more recent projects — the Fulton and Central Square medical centers — the BHS center project will be a less-complicated undertaking. “During both of those projects, we were building facilities while providing care, which of course, isn’t ideal,” he said. Harlovic said the center will employ 105 workers, which includes 25 new positions. Oswego Health has not named the facility yet. The health system is still in the planning stages for construction and a building timetable has not been established. “It is our estimate that once we start construction, the project will take 14 months to complete,” Harlovic said.

Bad habits prevail Harlovic said Oswego County has a relatively high incidence of alcohol and drug abuse among adults, as well as a comparatively high suicide death rate when compared to the rest of the state, according to the Oswego County Community Health Assessment 2014-2017. “Together with other local health care partners such as Oswego County’s Mental Hygiene Division, Farnham Family Services and many others substance abuse organizations, we strive to offer the best possible programs for those that suffer from substance and alcohol abuse,” he noted. “We are also collaborating with similar agencies and our medical staff to establish suicide prevention programs in our community to assist residents.” Also according to the assessment, Oswego County has only one-fifth of mental health providers compared with the state average (6,429:1 vs. 1,285:1). Harlovic said the BHS center will help in the process of recruiting mental health professionals. “We anticipate our new location will become a model for BHS care and will thus attract new physicians, mid-level providers and others,” he said. APRIL / MAY 2018

Harlovic said Oswego Health is fortunate to have a child and adolescent psychiatrist and several highly trained BHS mid-level providers. “Not all communities are able to offer this care,” he noted.

Spark to local economy Harlovic said among the economic development benefits the new center will offer, the project “will eliminate a city eyesore that has existed for more than 15 years.” In addition, Oswego Health’s renewal of the former Price Chopper store into its main BHS location complements a major city of Oswego revitalization project being planned for the area. The city of Oswego was awarded $10 million by the state in Downtown Revitalization Initiative funds to transform its appearance and image. It will build on the city’s existing strengths while creating new residential, retail and tourism opportunities. “Once we open our new facility, we believe local businesses will benefit from our employees who will use these nearby services,” he said. Harlovic said the health care community in general looks to benefit from the existence of the new center. “Oswego Health specifically will benefit as the project will transform BHS into a financially sustainable institution capable of preserving and enhancing essential health care services,” Harlovic said. Historically, the health system has sustained financial losses while providing BHS to the community, he added. He said in addition to making BHS financially viable, the health system will strive to integrate primary care and BHS services while receiving an increase in the Medicaid reimbursement rate for these services. Oswego Health has provided BHS to Oswego County residents for more than three decades, providing care at the BHS division at the county building on Bunner Street in Oswego and its child and family services department on North Second Street in Fulton. All of Oswego Health’s BHS currently offered at Bunner Street will be relocated to its new facility on Cayuga Street. “As more and more individuals seek BHS, it is our hope that they identify Oswego Health as having the care they deserve in a facility that is welcoming,” Harlovic said. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Hospital Provides ‘Charity Care’ Estimated at $600,000 a Year By Lou Sorendo

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hile its nonprofit status insulates Oswego Health from property and school taxes, it retains that standing due to its high level of charity care. “We take all comers regardless of their ability to pay. The charity care we give for people unable to pay is far greater than any taxes that we would ever pay,” said Michael Harlovic, president and CEO at Oswego Health. “We’re giving back to the community, and that’s how we retain that nonprofit status.” Oswego Health directed $19 million toward community benefits and investments in 2017. Eric Campbell, Oswego Health’s chief financial officer, noted that is inclusive of Oswego’s Health’s financial assistance, or charity care, as well as the cost of covering uninsured patients. It is also related as well to shortfalls from the Medicare and Medicaid programs. “It’s an aggregate of all those factors,” Campbell said. Campbell noted that financial assistance associated with charity care costs Oswego Health $600,000 a year. “We’re taking all comers, including the uninsured and underinsured,” he said. “They can’t pay their bills, and that doesn’t include our bad debt for those who have not applied, which is $3 million a year.” Medicaid expenditures are included in that number as well. Oswego Health realizes a 56 percent reimbursement from Medicaid and Medicare. At Oswego Health, Medicare and Medicaid cover 81 percent of inpatient discharges and 62 percent of outpatient visits. Oswego Health takes various avenues to deal with any shortfalls in service provided and revenue received, Campbell noted. The main sources of revenue for Oswego Health are Medicare, Medicaid and commercial insurance.

continued on p. 88 75


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Coakley was recently promoted to executive vice president, chief operating officer

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eff Coakley has been appointed to the position of executive vice president and chief operating officer of Oswego Hospital. “It is my pleasure to announce Jeff’s appointment as he continues to advance in his career at Oswego Health,” said Oswego Health President and CEO Michael Harlovic. “Jeff is a proven leader who possesses a strong vision for Oswego Hospital and the health system as it continues its growth as Oswego County’s healthcare leader.” In this new position, Coakley will continue to fulfill his responsibilities for business development, overseeing the growth of the health system, which also includes strategic planning, physician recruitment and community relations. As the hospital’s chief operating officer “he will provide leadership as Oswego Hospital continues to develop a positive culture for its physicians and staff, which, in turn, creates the teamwork that is necessary as we evolve to meet the needs of patients and remain competitive in the market,” added Harlovic. “I look forward to collaborating with physicians and colleagues as we continue improving access to high quality and efficient health services,” 76

Coakley said. “I also want to develop relationships with local businesses and community members as we present the health system’s recent accomplishments in terms of physician recruitment, the introduction of new services and the improvements to our facilities. These successes are paramount as the health system remains one of the few strong, independent community hospitals in New York state. Our team is committed to continuing our success, which will protect the many healthcare services and jobs we provide within the community.” Coakley, a Fulton native, was initially hired in 1997 and during his tenure has played an integral role in the organization’s growth into a health system. He assisted with the planning, development and construction activities for many facilities within the system, including Springside at Seneca Hill, Oswego Heath’s premier retirement community, as well as the major transformations of the Central Square and Fulton Medical Centers. He currently is directing Oswego Health’s renewal of its behavioral health service program as the health system constructs a new facility in Oswego. Coakley holds a bachelor’s degree OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

from SUNY Oswego and earned his Master of Business Administration degree from Le Moyne College. He took part in the Cornell University/Healthcare Association of New York State (HANYS) Academy for Healthcare Leadership Advancement program. He is also a member of the Society for Healthcare Strategy and Market Development. In 2013, Coakley was named as a Rural Healthcare Worker of the Year by the New York State Association for Rural Health. Coakley is also an active member of the community. He currently serves as co-chairman of the Rural Health Network of Oswego County and is a board member of Oswego County Opportunities. He is a former president of both the Fulton Kiwanis Club and Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce. He and his wife, Gretchen, a teacher at Leighton Elementary School in Oswego, have two college-age daughters.  APRIL / MAY 2018


Health Care BRIEFS Oswego Health Has New Breast Surgeon Oswego Health welcomes breast surgeon Lisa Lai, who will provide community members with a range of services through General Surgery Associates. Lai will provide care to patients at the Fulton Medical Office Building and Oswego Hospital’s adlai vanced surgery center. She will provide a complete range of care from screenings, to evaluation of breast masses or other concerns, management of abnormal breast imaging and surgery for benign or malignant disease including lumpectomies and mastectomies. Lai is affiliated with the Cancer Center at Upstate Medical Center and serves as the medical director for the breast cancer program. She brings a continuum of services through the partnerships between Upstate and Oswego Health. This collaboration provides radiation oncology and medical oncology services locally for the convenience of cancer patients. This partnership will further benefit local breast cancer patients who require specialized care or choose to have plastic surgery following a breast procedure. A Buffalo native, Lai received her medical degree and undergraduate degrees from SUNY Buffalo, graduating from both programs Summa Cum Laude. She completed her surgery residency at SUNY Upstate Medical University and a fellowship in breast surgical oncology at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta.

Crouse Appoints New Chief Financial Officer Crouse Health has announced the appointment of Michael Tengeres as chief financial officer. A native of Western New York, Tengeres will assume the APRIL / MAY 2018

position April 30. Tengeres has served most recently as corporate vice president and chief financial officer for Bassett Healthcare Network in Cooperstown, where he was responsible for the integrated healthcare system’s financial operations, including Tangeres long-range forecasting, operating and capital budget development. Prior to Bassett, Tengeres was senior director for international finance operations for the Cleveland Clinic, where he helped establish the full spectrum of financial operations for the Clinic’s operations in Abu Dhabi. In his role at Crouse, Tengeres will oversee and provide strategic direction and leadership for all financial aspects of Crouse’s integrated delivery network, including finance, revenue cycle, purchasing and oversight for facilities. “We are fortunate to have someone of Michael’s caliber, background and expertise join the Crouse leadership team,” says Kimberly Boynton, president and chief executive officer. “The depth of his financial leadership at leading healthcare organizations will be invaluable to Crouse as we continue to expand our network and strategic affiliations.” Tengeres holds an MBA from the William E. Simon Graduate School of Business Administration at the University of Rochester. He has also held leadership positions with MedStar Health System in Baltimore and Strong Memorial Hospital in Rochester.  

Oswego, Watertown, Auburn, Gouverneur and Pulaski. “The New York Heart Center is a key strategic partner of St. Joseph’s Health,” said physician Joseph Spinale, chief medical officer at St. Joseph’s Health.  “The formal union of both organizations is a decisive and major step in the creation of a sustainable best-in-class cardiology practice given the complexities of the business of health care, alternative Medicare payment models and the uncertainties of reform. Together, we will enhance care in new ways that improve quality and outcomes for heart patients across Central and Northern New York. Indeed, the NYHC was recently cited in a Stanford University study as among the very few US cardiology practice sites that ranked favorably for both high quality outcomes provided at a low cost to the patient.” St. Joseph’s Health will now include the NYHC’s seven locations and 99 employees, including its 11 cardiologists, as part of the acquisition. There will be no disruption in service and patients should expect the same level of care they received at the NYHC. Patients have been notified of the transaction.. The NYHC serves more than 40,000 patients a year. St. Joseph’s Health has the most awarded cardiovascular care program in the region — with nearly a dozen different accreditations, certifications and recognitions for cardiovascular care. It has also been the first to bring several new cardiovascular procedures to Central New York, beginning with the first open heart surgery in Central New York in 1958.

St. Joseph’s Acquires New York Heart Center

Oswego Health general surgeon Yuriy Zhurov is now offering office hours at the Pulaski Health Center at 61 Delano St. in the village. Zhurov received his medical degree from Kharkiv National Medical University and a Ph.D. from the Institute of General and EmerYuriy gency Surgery in Ukraine. He completed his residency

St. Joseph’s Health recently announced it has reached an agreement to acquire the New York Heart Center, a Syracuse-based cardiology practice that offers comprehensive services for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of a wide variety of heart conditions. Since its establishment in 1983, the board-certified cardiologists at the New York Heart Center (NYHC) have worked closely with St. Joseph’s Health and other local hospitals and health systems to create streamlined care for patients at each of its seven locations in Syracuse, Cicero, OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Oswego Health Surgeon to Hold Office Hours in Pulaski

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Helping people with disabilities achieve independence and participate in the community Advocacy & Accessibility Basic Needs & Assistance Recreation & Art Education, Employment, & Skill-Building Health & Wellness Oswego Office 9 Fourth Ave / Ph: (315) 342-4088 / TTY: (315) 342-8696 Fulton Mental Health Office 113 Schuyler St., Ste 2 / Ph: (315) 887-5156

at Nassau University Medical Center in East Meadow, Long Island. He also completed fellowship at the Institute of General and Emergency Surgery in Ukraine. This fellowship included training in thoracic surgery, as well as hepatobiliary and minimally invasive surgery. A second fellowship was completed in minimally invasive and bariatric surgery at New York Medical College in Valhalla. He is a third-generation physician. His mother was an endocrinologist, while his grandmother was a general practitioner who during her medical career treated wounded World War II soldiers. “I chose to pursue a different medical field than my family members. I wanted to be an accomplished and innovative surgeon who can offer his patients the very best chance for a positive outcome.” Zhurov said.

Oswego Hospital to Upgrade ER, Main Lobby

Trevor Bacon 315-445-3145 • Russell Sturtz 315-445-3137

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OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Oswego Hospital is tackling its own list of building improvements this spring, as it updates two of its most used departments. The patient areas of the hospital’s emergency department will be updated with new attractive flooring, new ceiling tiles, improved lighting and fresh paint. “This is our most used hospital area and we want our patients and their families to have a clean and comfortable area in which they receive their care,” said Oswego Health President and CEO Michael Harlovic. “These upgrades will be completed quickly and with minimal disruption.” The emergency department provides care to more than 27,000 visitors each year. The department features 17 private patient exam rooms, all with their own televisions, as well as two trauma bays and the latest technology. A board-certified emergency medicine physician is always on staff and is supported by a team of physician assistants, nurse practitioners, registered nurses and technicians, who have the latest training. The hospital will also upgrade its main entrance on West Sixth Street, with new furniture and flooring. The area will also receive a fresh coat of paint. Oswego Hospital, a 164-bed acute care facility is part of the Oswego Health system.

APRIL / MAY 2018


Mandated

Mayhem? Is New York over-regulating its small businesses? By Lou Sorendo

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t’s not uncommon to hear that the reason why a business outmigration is occurring in New York state is because of high taxes and stringent regulations. Existing and proposed mandates affecting businesses in New York have often been characterized as stifling profit margins. Some legislators — including Assemblyman William Barclay (R-C-I-RefPulaski) — say the state has a penchant for creating policies that are punishing to businesses. Conversely, while employers may grumble over being “overregulated” in New York state, many mandates offer significant benefits to employees. Business owners in New York are absorbing several new mandates such as higher minimum wages and a paid family-leave policy enacted over the past several years. The state Department of Labor is now considering another mandate, the “call-in pay” regulation, that will if passed impact the business community. Steven Abraham, professor of human resources at SUNY Oswego, notes that businesses in New York state are more heavily regulated — as are others in the Northeast — than other states in the nation. APRIL / MAY 2018

NYS Department of Labor is considering another mandate, the “call-in pay” regulation, that will if passed impact the business community. According to Forbes, states with the highest levels of regulation include Connecticut, Maine, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island and Vermont. None of these states is a right to work state, Forbes reported. In addition, these states also burden their small businesses with excessive family leave mandates, larger energy regulatory burdens, stricter land use regulations, more expensive workers compensation regulations and higher unemployment insurance costs, Forbes noted. Abraham said regulations “are not enacted just to make life difficult for businesses.” “Regulations are designed to protect employees,” he said. “Otherwise, they might be abused or taken advantage of by employers.” Abraham said it would be a “value judgment” to try to ascertain whether a state is overly regulated or not regulated enough. Abraham does concede there is a greater amount of regulation on small OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

businesses in New York state, which serves to discourage capitalism and entrepreneurship compared to other states. He said judging whether the state is overregulated or lacks sufficient regulations depends on whether one is the boss or employee.

Right to work laws According to the Legal Defense Foundation, right-to-work laws prohibit union security agreements, or agreements between employers and labor unions, that govern the extent to which an established union can require employees’ membership, payment of union dues, or fees as a condition of employment, either before or after hiring. “Actually, the fact that New York state does not have a right-to-work law is very consistent with everything else,” Abraham said. He said right-to-work laws are “totally pro-business.” Abraham said research shows right79


to-work laws hurt union organizing, increase wages, and attract business. “Businesses would love it if New York would enact the right-to-work law,” he said. “Right-to-work laws would not be considered in the same vein as things like an increase in the minimum wage because many argue that right-to-work laws help business by hurting unions.” He said in terms of regulations effecting employment, the minimum wage issue is perhaps the most onerous. The minimum wage in Upstate New York state will increase to $11.10 an hour on Dec. 31, and will increase to $12.50 an hour by Dec. 31, 2020. “The minimum wage applies to everybody. If you have 20 employees, all of those employees are going to get the increase in minimum wage,” he said. Abraham said the increase in the minimum wage is particularly hurtful to small businesses, mainly because their profit margins are not as impressive as those within larger businesses. “A large business can make up for minimum wage increases by doing

The minimum wage in Upstate New York state will increase to $11.10 an hour on Dec. 31, and will increase to $12.50 an hour by Dec. 31, 2020. things like substituting capital for labor or amortizing costs,” he said. “It’s much easier for larger businesses to get away with letting go or laying off a couple of employees,” Abraham said. “A small business generally can’t reduce the size of its workforce in response to an increase in the minimum wage.” “Very often, small businesses are running on a much smaller profit margin, so a dollar increase an hour in the minimum wage could be the straw that broke the camel’s back so to speak,” he noted. He said other regulations such as paid family leave and call-in pay don’t apply to everyone. “If you have a business where people are not required to be on call or don’t take medical leave, you don’t have to worry about those regulations,” he said. “Those regulations are going to vary

Family-Friendly Family leave policy takes effect in a state considered heavy on business regulations

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hile New York state’s new family leave policy can be considered another “onerous” regulation on business owners, it has appeal as an employee-friendly provision. However, it does add another layer of administrative work for the employer, said Brooks Wright, director of new business and group health plan manager at KBM Management in East Syracuse. “I think it’s important to know that New York state is only the third state to implement this. There’s other states that are planning on it, but this is relatively new throughout the country,” he said. Wright believes it should probably not be imposed on small employers. “If you have 100 employees and someone leaves for eight weeks, you can move people around. If you have four employees and someone leaves for eight weeks, you just lost 25 percent of your workforce,” he said. Wright said the law states if you are paying for an employee’s health insurance or a portion of it, and if that employee goes out on leave, the employer is responsible for paying their

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health insurance. “Meanwhile, the employee is not producing anything for you. You are trying to fill their position and you are paying their health insurance as well,” he said. Wright noted his agency has already processed claims for family leave. “I don’t think any employers are excited about having employees leave and then having to retain their position,” he said. “So far, the claims we have processed have been at larger employers that can withstand having an employee out for an extended period of time. We haven’t had to deal with it yet with smaller employers, but that will happen. It’s only been several months into this being effective.” “We did some seminars and advised our clients that if all possible, have a plan in place in terms of how to replace an employee,” he said. “Are you able to shift workload around? Are you able to bring in temporary staffing? Some employers just have to deal with it and make do,” said Wright, noting seeking automation remedies is not out of the question as well. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

depending on the type of business and type of employee,” he said. Meanwhile, New York state is entertaining the regulation of a call-in pay policy, which essentially mandates that employees who work “on call” may soon get extra pay if their shifts are not scheduled in advance. “I would not think that has much of an impact because it only effects employers and businesses that require employees to be on call or if they require employees to call in or be notified in a short amount of time that their shift is going to be canceled,” he said. For most businesses, employees work a regular work week and know what their regular hours are going to be, he said. Abraham did say there are some businesses that simply don’t know exactly what their employees’ schedules are going to be in advance. “I would be very surprised if more than 5 percent of businesses would be subject to the rule,” he said. “It may affect smaller businesses more than larger ones because smaller businesses are more likely to have fluctuations in their work cycles,” he added.

Dealing with mandates In terms of New York state’s paid family leave policy, Abraham said gauging its value depends on whether you are looking at it from an employer’s or employee’s perspective. “I don’t know if I want to get into value judgments, but it is certainly stringent to have to pay employees for significant amounts of time to take off to rear a child or take care of a sick relative,” he said. Abraham did say a worker cannot take more than 26 weeks of combined short-term disability and paid family leave in a 52-week period. Abraham said paid family leave is less onerous than the minimum wage increases because not all employees are going to take advantage of it. “It’s a significant one, however, because with the minimum wage mandate you are paying a worker more, but at least the person is working. With paid family leave, you’re actually paying an employee who is not working and not producing anything for you. In and of APRIL / MAY 2018


itself, it’s a greater cost,” he said. Meanwhile, New York state has traditionally been ranked in the topfive in the country for cost of workers’ compensation. “I don’t know if there can be anything done in regards to workers compensation costs,” Abraham said. “It’s just another type of insurance premium. If employees get injured as a result of their employment, the more that happens, the more premiums will increase.” He said w h i l e e ff o r t s can be made to make the workplace safer, there are types of jobs where injuries will inevitably occur. On the unAbarham employment insurance front, Abraham said contributions to the state’s unemployment fund only increase if a company’s or business’s employees make use of that fund. Basically, employees can only use the fund if they are laid off for a reason not of their own doing. Employees who are dismissed for gross misconduct or a clear violation of company policy will not be allowed to collect unemployment. “What businesses need to do to try to protect themselves is only hire employees if they know they are going to need them for a certain amount of time and also try to make sure not to let employees go for reasons that are unrelated to their own fault,” he said. However, Abraham did note that some businesses are cyclical in nature and employees are going to collect unemployment benefits regardless. “Again, this is done to protect employees who are laid off rather than to stifle business growth or formation,” he said. Abraham said business owners can advocate for change through elected leaders, but the small business community is not going to have as big an impact as large businesses unless they band together and act in a unified manner.

Mandates affect insurance Brooks Wright, director of new business and group health plan manager at KBM Management in East Syracuse, said his main focus is employee health insurance. APRIL / MAY 2018

“New York state has more mandates built within health insurance than almost every other state,” he said. “It creates mandates you don’t necessarily see built into your health insurance, which most people have. It definitely adds levels of mandates that everybody is dealing with.” Wright said rates escalate when mandates are added to health insurance. “New York state has some of the higher employer-based insurance rates in the country,” he said. “A portion of it comes back to mandates. It forces heath insurance companies to cover more services, and then they need to charge more Barclay for premiums,” Wright said. How does a business counteract that? Along the health insurance lines, options include looking at alternative funding, checking out telemedicine or providing education to employees on healthy lifestyles, Wright noted. Insurance providers aid in this process, he added. Wright said which option is chosen depends on a business’ size. “There is no one size fits all answer,” he said. “There are things that larger employers can do to effect rates and things that smaller players can do. There are different answers depending on their current situation.” Wright noted an option to seek change in the regulatory system would be form a collective voice through organizations such as CenterState CEO. “Be willing to look at alternatives. You can obviously write and call your legislators and talk to politicians, but at the same time, I think we know that is a very slow process, if it’s effective at all. Employers just need to look at alternatives,” he said. “Speaking to legislators is a good idea, and I think also going to those sources for education to make sure you are up to date is important,” he said. “With all these regulations comes the opportunity to miss things and be fined. Those are good sources to get education to avoid running into problems with these mandates,” he said.

OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

Grant Helps Fund Professor’s Study of Transparency in Diamond Trade

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indsay Bell, a SUNY Oswego anthropology faculty member, recently obtained funding to learn in detail how the diamond trade creates transparency — a hot topic ethically and financially in the world of diamonds and other conflict-laden gemstones. Wenner-Gren Foundation approved a grant of $16,650 to support Bell’s research into the institutions, trade groups, companies and individuals whose work and practices can enhance or reduce a diamond’s value to today’s consumers, many of whom are determined to stay away from illicitly traded conflict diamonds, also known as blood diamonds. As one of the early steps in the project, Bell and research assistant Howard Boutelle, a senior anthropology major, have set out to become certified gemologists, trained to identify and evaluate gems. That’s in keeping with their research methods, which are ethnographic, focused on the systematic observation and analysis — the insider’s view — of institutions, cultures or peoples. “A lot of what we are doing is showing how a process works. We’re not going in trying to show that this is a bad industry,” said Bell. Bell wrote in the Wenner-Gren grant application that how experts along the diamond supply chain create transparency “remains a theoretically nebulous and ethnographically elusive category of transparency that occludes more than it purports to reveal.” Boutelle, who plans to attend University of Texas-San Antonio for graduate school, has been an assistant to Bell for three years, and said he welcomes the opportunity to expand his research skills on the project. Both have completed an online course called “Diamond Essentials” from the Gemological Institute of America, and hope to travel this summer for a practical class on grading diamonds, required for certification as a gemologist. “How do people learn to evaluate diamonds for origin, clarity and other characteristics?” Boutelle said. “That’s our interest in this training.” 81


Success Story

By Lou Sorendo

Jeff Knauss, a SUNY Oswego grad, co-founded Digital Hyve in Syracuse. Photo courtesy of Robert Mescavage.

The Digital Hyve Digital Marketing Business Started by SUNY Oswego Grad Is Now One of the Country’s Fastest Growing Companies

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ixing virtue with hard work is a proven recipe for success. SUNY Oswego graduate Jeff Knauss knows this as co-founder and co-owner of Digital Hyve in Syracuse and Rochester. Knauss has teamed with business partner and fellow alum Jacob Tanner to create one of the fastest growing companies in the nation. Digital Hyve is a full-service digital marketing agency. “My wife Heta is Finnish and hyve is Finnish for virtue. We chose that specifically because we always wanted to do the right and virtuous thing for our clients and employees,” Knauss said. “We want to always be a virtuous company. Obviously, ‘hyve’ is a connotation for a beehive, where people are busy working every day toward a

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common goal,” he added. Digital Hyve connects businesses and their messages to specific online audiences. The targeted audience could be on their favorite social media; Googling or searching for something using a search engine; on their favorite websites or checking their email messages. “If they are connected to the internet, we can take a business and message and connect them to a very specific, targeted audience that will most likely become customers of that business,” he noted. In terms of tactics, the team at Digital Hyve delves into designing, developing and building websites, search engine optimization and marketing and social media advertising. Digital Hyve is one of the fastest-growing companies in the nation. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

In its first year of operation in 2014, Digital Hyve generated more than $100,000 in total revenue. In 2017, the company’s revenue was more than $5.2 million. Inc.com comes out with an annual list of the fastest-growing private companies in the United States, and Digital Hyve has surged into the top-100. According to Knauss, expect the company to be ranked 92nd or 93rd among the nation’s elite when the latest ratings are released this summer. In its first year of operation in 2014, the company generated more than $100,000 in total revenue. In 2017, Digital Hyve brought in more than $5.2 million. “We still don’t feel like it’s enough. We’re always driving ourselves. Although we hit milestones and goals, we can always definitely do better,” he added. “We are very impatient when it comes to success, growth and goals, which helps accelerate the business.” Knauss said the majority of business APRIL / MAY 2018


comes from referrals. “We have always kept in mind what is truly best for our clients, whether it’s picking the right tactic for them or understanding what the business truly needs to get a return on investment on their marketing,” he said. Knauss, SUNY Oswego class of 2007, spoke at the college’s December commencement, a decade after he crossed the same stage to receive his bachelor’s degree in public relations. Mostly recently, he was the guest speaker at the annual luncheon organized by the Greater Oswego-Fulton Chamber of Commerce. The entrepreneur grew up in the Clifton Springs area of the Finger Lakes. He has always been a communicator, so was naturally drawn to advertising and communications. “I didn’t know what I wanted to do after school, but I knew I wanted to go to a great communications school, and that’s why I chose Oswego,” he said.

Tight rein on finances “I’m very proud to say we actually have bootstrapped this company,” Knauss said. “We have a line of credit that largely goes untouched.” “There were not a lot of startup costs. We were fortunate in that respect,” said Knauss, noting that he and Tanner initially worked in a modest 200-squarefoot office that “cost close to nothing.” “We didn’t have a payroll or anything, so it was a very low cost to start this company other than the cost of time,” he added. The partners recently moved into their fourth location — 7,500 square feet of office space on the fifth and sixth floors of the former First Niagara Bank building in Clinton Square. The business has also expanded in Rochester, going from one 500-squarefoot office to three offices with a combined 1,500 square feet. The Digital Hyve was named CenterState CEO’s 2017 Business of the Year for organizations with less than 50 employees. “My reaction was definitely one of shock, to be honest with you,” Knauss said. “We knew we could grow this thing, and were confident in each other’s abilities, mainly because we have very different abilities and complement each other very well,” he noted. Knauss’ focus is on business, sales and the accounting side, while Tanner APRIL / MAY 2018

“We’re always driving ourselves. Although we hit milestones and goals, we can always definitely do better. We are very impatient when it comes to success, growth and goals, which helps accelerate the business.” handles the logistics and the tactical side of the business. He said in “three very short years, we had phenomenal growth.” The reasons were clear: A talented crew, support from the business community and clients. “I’m just blown away with the talent that we have on our staff. I am so fortunate to have them,” he added. “Besides our community and clients, our people are really what made us into what we are today.” The Digital Hyve also was recently recognized among the Central New York Business Journal’s Best Places to Work and won a Small Business Excellence Award from the U.S. Small Business Administration. Knauss said the “Best Places to Work” designation stands as his favorite honor because his employees voted on it. “It’s going to attract new talent to Digital Hyve,” said Knauss, noting his business went from 11 employees in 2016 to 25 today.

Growth strategies Knauss said the business’ growth strategy hinges on taking advantage of “incredible” market opportunities. “Every single company in the world — no matter what they do — could use digital marketing. Because of the lack of people in companies that really truly understand that and know how to leverage digital marketing tactics well and provide a great return on investment for their clients, it gives us a great opportunity to continue to grow,” he said. Besides hiring top talent, another OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

key aspect of its growth strategy is continuing to expand with more office locations. “We plan on expanding along the Thruway with other office locations. Albany and Buffalo are on our radar over the next few years,” he noted. Opening new markets will create additional opportunities for hiring local people to make local connections and grow, he said. He said Digital Hyve has an extensive outreach and services clients in Texas, California, and Florida. Knauss said the digital world “just moves so quickly and seemingly changes all the time. Everyday there is new social media, apps and websites being created. “What we really decided when we started Digital Hyve was that in order to stay ahead of the curve and really understand how to use best practices for the digital market, we made the conscious decision to only focus on the digital market,” he added. He said if they got involved in media such as TV, radio and print advertising, “we would be spreading ourselves too thin. We’d be good at a lot of things but great at none.” Knauss said there are several benefits to zeroing in on the digital market. “You are only talking to your core customers, or people who are most likely going to become new customers of your business,” he said. “It’s very specific, so there’s very little waste in your advertising dollars because you are only talking to your perfect audience.” He said the other advantage is its measurability. “It’s like the old adage, ‘Half the 83


money I spend on advertising is wasted; the trouble is I don’t know which half.’ With digital, you are able to see what people are doing, how many people saw your ad, how many people were reached and whether they clicked on your ad and went to your website,” Knauss said. “You are able to follow that complete customer journey, from awareness all the way to decision making. That’s what we’ve been able to do at Digital Hyve. It’s super exciting,” Knauss said.

Foundation in sales Knauss said he never wanted to be an entrepreneur, unlike his business partner who aspired to be in that role throughout his career. “I enjoyed the corporate life,” said Knauss, who joined forces with WHAM Television in Rochester, an ABC affiliate, following graduation from SUNY Oswego. “I enjoyed my eight-year career in television. But I’ve always had this thing about me that’s never satisfied with anything. I always want more out of everything. For me personally, that’s what it was. I just saw the market opportunity and an opportunity to partner up with this really smart guy,” he said. At 26, Knauss was on the fast track with his career in television — and on the day he told the station he was leaving, he was actually offered the post of vice president of the news station. “I had to turn that down, which was tough because I had a 3-month-old son at home at the time. My wife stays at home with my son and now daughter. So it was a single-income household,” he said. “It was a really scary decision because we were going from making a pretty great income and health insurance and all those things that make you feel comfortable in life to really starting a company from the ground up,” he said. Knauss characterizes himself as a “risk enthusiast.” “Without risk, there is no reward,” he said. “I think you have to create your own luck, and the only way you create luck is through risk taking,” he said. “You have to do things that make you uncomfortable.” He said the factors that prompted him to take the plunge was the belief in his business partner, the market opportunity, and belief in himself “that no matter what, I was going to work as hard as it took to take care of my family 84

The Digital Hyve was named CenterState CEO’s 2017 Business of the Year for organizations with less than 50 employees. and provide a stable income for myself and my business partner.” Knauss is no stranger to working until 2 or 3 in the morning every day, and rarely takes a day off. “That’s what you got to do because it’s just that important. Luckily, my business is my hobby and I don’t have a lot of outside hobbies. So it’s easier for me to make the decision to plug into work at night. My way to unwind is to get more into work, so I’m fortunate in that way.” Knauss said one thing that he has noticed are business owners sacrificing time from their families in order to make their business successful. “That’s something that I just can’t allow to happen,” he said. As a result, from 6 p.m. until his kids go to bed around 10 p.m., Knauss doesn’t work. “Those are my off times. Then when they go to bed, I’m back to work,” he said. “During those times, I make sure I’m there for my kids and my wife and OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

try to be the best dad and husband I can be,” he said. Knauss said he loves to travel, and goes on a yearly excursion to Finland to visit his wife’s family. “I like traveling as much as I can for work and more so for the experience of seeing how other people live,” he said. “In advertising, it’s important to realize your viewpoint is not everyone’s viewpoint, and it’s important to experience as much as possible, particularly in my position,” he said. Knauss is involved with the community as a board member of the Food Bank of Central New York; the Loretto Foundation; and Byrne Dairy, a fourth-generation, family owned producer of dairy products. Knauss recently accepted a position on the advisory board of SparkCharge. He and his wife live in Camillus and are parents to a 3-year-old son, Max, and 4-month-old daughter, Lila. APRIL / MAY 2018


Kimberly Blaker Public Speaking: Preparing for and Getting Through Your Presentation

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‘To deliver a speech confidently and effectively, preparation is essential.’

Kimberly Blaker is the author of a kid’s STEM book, “Horoscopes: Reality or Trickery?” She also writes a blog, Modern FamilyStyle at  modernfamilystyle.com APRIL / MAY 2018

points you’ll discuss. The body of your speech should cover three to five main points, each of which should then be divided into three to five subpoints. This formula will help keep your speech focused, yet detailed enough to communicate your message. For your conclusion, briefly review your main points and thesis again, then end with a remark that’ll stick in your audience’s mind. Next, put your speech on 4” x 6” index cards. Your manuscript will be less conspicuous while presenting your speech. Small chunks of writing on each card will also assist Breaking the rules in keeping your place. Type your speech in Many of us were taught that speaking 14-point size font and leave 2 ½ inch margins from a script is a no-no. In fact, to the horror on each side of the paper. Then cut and tape of some, even a brief outline placed incon- your manuscript to the index cards. Don’t spicuously nearby is sometimes discouraged. forget to number the cards to avoid a mix up. If you plan to use visual aids such as Fortunately, adherence to such strict rules is handouts or a display during your presentaoften unnecessary and not beneficial. It’s true, there are occasions when im- tion, make a hand written note in your cards promptu or “off-the-cuff” deliveries occur. at the appropriate point, and highlight it so you won’t forget. Avoid Also, an extemporaneous blending this notation speech, a well-prepared Guest Columnist into your speech text, or speech delivered from you might find yourself notes rather than written word for word, is often the best approach. Still, according to reading the note to your audience. Finally, rehearse, rehearse and rehearse Patricia Hayes Andrews and John E. Baird, Jr. in “Communication for Business and the Pro- again. As you rehearse, glance at each senfessions,” not only are there many occasions tence, then look up toward your invisible when business and professional speakers use audience while you speak. One of the biggest a script. In many cases complete manuscripts problems with speaking from a script is the are even “required when the speaking occasion tendency not to look at the audience. This is detrimental to delivery, as the audience is an especially important one.” So if your anxiety stems from fears of will quickly lose interest. By practicing in forgetting important details, fumbling for this manner, you’ll memorize your speech to words or a sudden inability to present your some degree. But complete memorization is thoughts in a clear, logical manner, put those not recommended. Practicing this way will also make the act of looking up second nature. fears aside. When rehearsing pay close attention to For some, the only way to take a shot at your speaking pace. Speaking too slowly can giving a presentation or public speech is with the comfort of a well-prepared manuscript put your audience to sleep. While speech that always within reach. Use the following advice spills out too quickly will cause your words to to deliver your speech effectively and boost run together, slurring, and ultimately prevent an audience from being able to process the your confidence for future presentations. information. Body language is also vital to your speech Preparation is the key as it assists in delivering your message, works as a visual memory aid and helps to keep To deliver a speech confidently and ef- your audience tuned in. Use facial expressions fectively, preparation is essential. Begin by to show enthusiasm, happiness, concern, outlining your speech and then drafting it. sadness, and other emotions related to your Include an introduction that begins with an point or remarks. Although one hand may attention grabber such as a quote, an anecdote be holding your index cards, rehearse hand or a startling fact. Then briefly review the main utterflies, sweaty palms, dry mouth — these are just some of the symptoms most public speakers experience. In fact, according to at least one study, nearly 80 percent of all experienced speakers have experienced stage fright. Such figures may offer solace to those who are inexperienced and feel alone in their fears. But regardless of your lack of experience or how severe your fear of public speaking, you can pull off a successful presentation or speech.

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movement with the other as you speak. Be sure to move about the room, as well. Avoid pacing. Yet change your position in the room from time-to-time to keep your audience from zoning out. Walk casually to one side of the room as you continue speaking for a few moments, then move elsewhere. This gives listeners different views, and the activity helps to keep their attention. Finally, practice fluctuating your voice just as you would in conversation to emphasize and add characterization to your discussion. Avoid speaking in monotone, or your delivery will fall on deaf ears.

Hints for handling the jitters Communication specialists point out while stage fright can pose serious problems, to some degree this nervousness is actually beneficial. It keeps your energy level high, an important element in public speaking. Some ways speakers are affected by anxiety include a tendency to speak much faster, dry mouth which causes smacking, butterflies in the stomach, nervous shaking, and even rambling. Keep in mind your anxieties, while extremely evident to you, are rarely noticeable to the audience. This fact alone is comforting. To keep your anxiety under control, try the following: • Don’t take on topics you’re not familiar with until you’ve had successful experiences. • Be prepared. Follow the important steps outlined above to increase confidence in delivering your speech.

SUNY Oswego Endowment Grows

Survey shows endowment has brought strong returns, outperforms peers

T

he Oswego College Foundation’s endowment continues to outperform not only peer schools, but the industry average as well, according to the survey results of the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO)-Commonfund Study of Endowments. SUNY Oswego’s endowment has yielded stronger returns than the NACUBO average for the past 11 years and 14 out of 15 years. With a net rate of return at 12.4 percent, Oswego was two-tenths of a percentage point higher than the NACUBO average of 12.2 percent for 2017. Oswego’s 10-year rate of return of 6.7 percent yielded 2.1 percent more than the NACUBO average, 2.2 percent more than its peer group of colleges with endowments of $25 million to $50 million, and 1.7 percent more than its aspirational peers with endowments valued over $1 billion. This rate of return figure is significant because it is a key factor in determining how much money the Oswego College Foundation will pay out for its more than 350 privately endowed scholarships and its dozens of endowed funds.

“We are so fortunate to have a stellar group of alumni volunteers on the Oswego College Foundation Investment Committee who, in conjunction with President Deborah F. Stanley and finance director Mark Slayton, have astutely guided our endowment’s asset allocations,” said Mary Gibbons Canale, the college’s vice president for development and alumni relations and a 1981 alumna. “These returns enable us to maintain our significant support for students and their learning experiences that happen inside and outside of the classroom. This report signifies to our thousands of loyal donors that we are stewarding their gifts very carefully to ensure the biggest impact on our students’ experiences.” This latest report shows other positive news about the college endowment, which, as of March 1 was valued at $36.6 million — up 8.9 percent since June 30. Increasing the endowment has been a major goal for SUNY Oswego, and much was gained through the most recent fundraising campaign, which started in 2011 with an endowment of $11.5 million. The college has more than tripled that amount in less than seven years.

• Practice in front of family members. • Take a bottle of water and a small cup to keep near you during your speech in case a dry mouth sets in. • Try to meet members of the audience before you begin. Introduce yourself and shake their hands. • Keep your mind occupied while waiting your turn to speak. • Take plenty of deep breaths while you wait and just before you begin. When necessary pause briefly at the end of a sentence, and take a deep breathe. • Recognize that every time you give a presentation, it will become easier than the last. 86

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APRIL / MAY 2018


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SHANE BROADWELL Shane Broadwell, new chairman of Oswego County Legislature

from page15

and all his kids were working at a young age,” Broadwell noted.

What’s next? Broadwell’s main business focus is as general manager at Quality Inn & Suites Riverfront and G.S. Steamers, where he is “boots on the ground” every day. “When your card is on the front desk, you’re still dealing with the general public when issues happen,” he said. “You’re the first phone call in the middle of the night when there is a problem.” He noted his business has a solid team and senior management that have been working together for years. “We cover each other and meet regularly to talk about the future and where we’re going and how to adapt to change,” he said. “Obviously, with two new hotel properties in town, we have to keep moving and asking ourselves, ‘What’s next?’” Adding to the competition for Broadwell Hospitality Group are hotel newcomers Holiday Inn Express & Suites and Home2 Suites by Hilton, both situated along the state Route 104 East corridor of the city. Broadwell said there was a time when the city needed to have more ho-

tel rooms so as not to steer prospective guests out of the county for lodging. “What we’re learning now with the addition of other properties how to navigate the same pool of business travelers that we are now sharing,” he said. “It’s continuing to drive to the next thing, such as the water park.” “For a period of time, we had some of the only properties in the city of Oswego. Our market has now grown,” he added. He noted the stressor is staying ahead of the curve. “It’s not easy. We’re not talking about a high volume of transients for the city of Oswego,” he noted. Broadwell said having food and beverage venues at the hotels proves to be a competitive advantage, along with strong cleanliness, service and overall

“We need to do a better job in getting people from Oswego County job-ready and educated for the jobs we do have.”

Hospital Provides ‘Charity Care’ from page 75 “A portion of that offset is funding from commercial insurance, and that allows us to overcome the deficits that Medicaid and Medicare are not paying us,” Campbell said. “That’s really the big piece. We also have other sources of funding. Obviously we participate in a lot of different programs, grants and philanthropy as well as dealer-employer arrangements that we have for services,” Campbell said. “There’s so many other pieces, but the biggest piece of that is business with the portion of the population that 88

is insured.” Another approach to closing the gap is fine-tuning operational efficiencies. “A big initiative for the organization this year is to reduce the amount of time people stay in the hospital,” Harlovic said. “We went from an average patient stay of five days to four days, which has a significant impact on the organization,” he noted. “A patient shouldn’t have to stay in the hospital a minute longer than they need to, or they shouldn’t leave a minute earlier than they need to. Just by OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

hospitality ratings. Their downtown location is also a plus, Broadwell noted, situating visitors within walking distance of many other destination points as well as recreational opportunities. “I think we’ve got a couple of great properties,” he said. “When we get people in the door, we typically get them as return customers.” While Broadwell has been deeply entrenched in community activities in the past, his heavy responsibilities with the legislature are his major focus. “Oswego County has got probably some of the best department heads and employee base that I’ve ever been around,” he said. “Every day is an education and rewarding experience.” Broadwell intends to embrace the Oswego County Economic Advancement Plan, prepared by Camoin Associates of Saratoga Springs, which was adopted by the Oswego County Legislature last November. Broadwell noted the study pinpoints the need to develop workforce capabilities, particularly with all the upgrades, changes and new developments happening in targeted sectors such as advanced manufacturing, energy, food processing and tourism/recreation. “We have jobs available here. We need to do a better job in getting people from Oswego County job ready and educated for the jobs we do have,” he said. Once efforts are made to retain and expand the business sector, then discussion will focus on the need to enhance infrastructure. Broadwell will be putting together an economic advancement advisory committee that will report to the counmaking that change represents about a $2 million savings in efficiencies for the facility,” Harlovic added. Oswego Hospital provides about $30,000 worth of support in the community through various sponsorships. “We have a community service plan, which is a document we share with the state Department of Health based on its requirements that outline how we need to support the community in ways other than just providing direct patient care,” said Jeff Coakley, include executive vice president of business development. “We don’t have all of the resources to support the community in every way.” By partnering with other community organizations, Oswego Health is able to carry out its philanthropic mission. APRIL / MAY 2018


Best Business Directory AUCTION & REAL ESTATE Dean Cummins – Over 35 Years Experience. All Types of Auctions & Real Estate. Route 370 in Cato – 315246-5407

AUTO COLLISION Northside Collision, Baldwinsville. Upstate’s largest collision/repair center. Lifetime warranty, loaners or rentals. We assist with the insurance claims. 75 E. Genesee St., Baldwinsville. More information, call 638-4444.

BUILDING SUPPLIES Burke’s Home Center. The complete building and supply center. Two locations for your convenience: 38 E. Second St. in Oswego (343-6147); and 65 N. Second St. in Fulton (592-2244). Free deliveries.

CONSTRUCTION Dunsmoor Construction Inc. – Residential-Commercial Construction. Serving Oswego County. Home Improvement Contractor. 315-343-4380 or 315-591-5020.

EXCAVATING Gilbert Excavating. Septic systems. Gravel & top soil. Septic tank pumping. 685 County Route 3, Fulton, 13069. Call 593-2472.

FIREWOOD Northern Firewood & Earth Products – www. northernfirewood.net 315-668-9663 – Seasoned and Unseasoned split hardwoods. Block or Log Length. FREE DELIVERY! We Accept all major credit cards

and HEAP. Call today to place your order.

INSURANCE & ACCOUNTING Canale Insurance & Accounting Service for all your insurance, Accounting, Payroll and Tax needs. Locally owned and operated. Call 315-343-4456.

TRACTOR/LAWN EQUIPMENT RanMar Tractor Supply, Sales and Service of New and Used Tractors and Farm Equipment – 5219 US Rte 11 Pulaski.

JEWELERS JP Jewelers is your hometown jeweler offering supreme design at wholesale prices. Whether you’re buying or selling, JP Jewelers is here to be your local jeweler. 136 W. Bridge St. Oswego. (315) 342-GOLD. Find us on Facebook.

LAND SURVEYOR Robert M. Burleigh, licensed land surveyor. Quality land surveying. Residential, subdivision, commercial, boundary surveying. 593-2231.

LUMBER White’s Lumber. Four locations to serve you. Pulaski: state Route 13 (315-298-6575); Watertown: N. Rutland Street (315-788-6200); Clayton: James Street (315686-1892); Gouverneur: Depot Street (315-287-1892).

OUTBOARD MOTORS Arney’s Marina. Route 14 Sodus Point. Honda fourstroke motors, 2 HP to 250 HP. Repower your boat with the best! Call 315-483-9111 for more information.

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Oswego County Business • P.O. Box 276 • Oswego, NY 13126 OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

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Last Page

Sarfraz Mian SUNY Oswego professor a strong proponent of establishing a campus-supported business incubator

Q.: Why did you select business incubators and accelerators as your field of specialized study? A.: I had a diverse academic background — science, multiple engineering and business management degrees — and had been involved in industrial and economic development jobs. With the appropriate background and a passion to support economic growth and wealth creation through “operationalization of innovation,” I was attracted to business incubation as a novel tool to make it happen. Q.: What do you enjoy the most about this particular field of study? A.: It’s gratifying to see that innovation is actually operationalized through venture creation and growth resulting in economic development and jobs. Also, I enjoy the development of regional entrepreneurial ecosystems to potentially replicate the Silicon Valley phenomenon.

the community? How does that impact economic development as a whole? A.: They provide focal points for the promotion of a start-up oriented entrepreneurship policy, and they also serve as a training ground of experiential entrepreneurship. As hybrid mechanisms — particularly accelerators — they serve as screening tools for business ideas. [Editor ’s note: The difference between a business incubator and accelerator is the former mentors companies through their infancy while accelerators guide them in later stages of development.] Q.: How gratifying is it to know that you spearheaded entrepreneurship curriculum here at SUNY Oswego? Do you see this as your legacy within educational circles? A.: It is definitely very gratify-

By Lou Sorendo ing to have championed and established entrepreneurship research and teaching at SUNY Oswego. With limited resources, it had been a constant struggle. But with my own passion, persistence, and support from colleagues, I believe I had considerable success. I hope to pay back SUNY Oswego where I have spent the best 25 years of my professional life. Q.: What are the chances of establishing a campus-supported business incubator at SUNY Oswego? What will it take to make that happen? A.: I am very hopeful that in the next year or two, we will have a respectable business incubation-acceleration facility for our students. This will require partnerships with area businesses and industry, SUNY Oswego alumni, and support from the State University of New York system. Q.: How does the rate of technology impact the need for business incubators? In what sectors of the economy do you believe incubators would be most effective and beneficial? A.: A business incubator facility at SUNY Oswego will help support student startups across college disciplines that include engineering, information technology, science and the arts. It will also help promote female entrepreneurship and social entrepreneurship projects.

Q.: Why do you believe that entrepreneurship and its support network should be nurtured through business incubators and accelerators? What is the ultimate payoff for the business community in general? A.: The ultimate pay-off is for the novice entrepreneur struggling with the “market failure” where these novel tools provide the necessary value-added inputs and serve as focal points. In the longer term, the region, community and country benefit with the promotion of entrepreneurship-led economic growth. These tools are especially useful for catch-up regions and countries, and are a great option for technology-led, knowledge–based economic development. Q.: In your estimation, what are some of the greater benefits realized by having business incubators and accelerators in place and active within 90

Professor Sarfraz Mian of SUNY Oswego’s School of Business is one of the foremost authorities on business incubators and accelerators in the nation. OSWEGO COUNTY BUSINESS

APRIL / MAY 2018


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We will always be here for you and your family “Our goal for Oswego Health is to become the healthcare organization of choice in the area, offering localized, efficient care through strategic partnerships.” — Michael Harlovic, CEO and President for Oswego Health

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