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Considering Ocala? Millionaire’s Row Equestrian Farm 29+ Acre Luxury Equestrian Property is located in NW Ocala. Just minutes to the Ocala Jockey Club Events and HITS. Incredible estate offers light and airy rooms with beautiful views from every window. True Chef’s kitchen, expansive dining room overlooks screen enclosed pool, and lanai with summer kitchen. For the equestrian: stable with apartment & four paddocks. Lastly, there is luxury RV parking platform for your guests.

Lakeview Farm Gated Equestrian Paradise-17.6 Acres-Dressage Arena with Mirrors and Synthetic Footing plus 8 stall stable, round pen, lush paddocks, and exercise track. Incredible Residence features open floor plan. Chef ’s kitchen opens to expansive family room with stone fireplace. Family room opens onto a/ c lanai with summer kitchen, Jacuzzi spa, floor to ceiling windows overlooking arena and lush paddocks. Stocked pond adds to the curb appeal of this unique property.

Shady Road Equestrian Farm Enjoy this 5 bedroom, 3 bath residence which sits on the highest location of this 20 acres equestrian property. Your guests will enjoy the private guest home of their choice. Guests can choose either the 2 bedroom, 2 bath home with lots of storage or the a 1 bedroom /1 bath home. Equestrian enthusiast will the enjoy newly constructed 7-stall barn, riding arena, and 8 lush green paddocks.


Lake Weir Luxury Luxurious Florida Living on Beautiful Lake Weir with 250 feet of waterfront frontage on the lake. 5.97 +/- acres for your privacy & enjoyment. This Brick 3 bedroom 3.5 bath residence features: formal living & formal dining rooms, plus office. The gourmet kitchen Island & Breakfast bar, and Large Family Room. Family Room includes fireplace and access to the screened enclosed patio. The screened patio leads out to a large open back deck with cook house. The tram car goes from the house on the bluff down to the lake for Sun and Fun! This residence has a 3 car attached garage plus an additional 2,400 sq.ft. detached garage for extra storage or could be used as a workshop.

Spring Grove Estate Uniquely customized estate on 3.86 acres. Enjoy entertaining? Your formal living room and formal dining room are great for entertaining friends and family. Equine friendly community.

Weekend Getaway Enjoy 100’ of Lake Weir frontage plus dock and white sandy beaches? This home is for you! Enter this 2 bedroom, 1.5 bath home thru a cozy front porch to the living room/dining room area and sliding glass doors leading to the back porch and out to enjoy the lake. This property has 3 storage buildings to house all your lake toys.

For this and other properties, visit JoanPletcher.com for information, videos and more choices. 352.347.1777 | Cell: 352.266.9100 | 352.804.8989 | joanpletcher@aol.com Due to the privacy and at the discretion of my clients, there are additional training centers, estates, and land available that are not advertised.


You Will Love Your New Smile! Chandra Smile Designs is a oneof-a-kind haven for your smile transformation. Your smile and oral health are very important. If you are thinking of enhancing your smile, you owe it to yourself to seek out the best. Beautiful results take an expertly trained dentist/artist. Dr. Chandra is uniquely qualified and has earned the highest level of achievement from the Las Vegas Institute for Advanced Dental Studies. Let

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Ocala Window&Door Showroom TRY IT BEFORE YOU BUY IT

In our Ocala Window & Door Showroom we display a unique blend of windows, doors, and mouldings for any style Florida home. Actual house facades have been created with installed windows, doors, and mouldings. Our interactive, window and door displays provide you with the opportunity to open, close, and inspect the products, just as they would be installed in your home. So much safer than buying from a photo on the internet or from a brochure. WINDOWS, DOORS, AND MOULDINGS Unlike other window and door companies that show a single product line, the Ro-Mac Ocala Window & Door Showroom prominently displays all the top quality manufacturers, like Kolbe, PGT, MI/BetterBilt, YKK, Andersen, Lincoln, and Custom Window Systems, along with a full line of Therma-Tru and Masonite Doors. A complete line of mouldings and millwork products are used to accent the windows and doors. We can build special sized doors, manufacture specialty trim, and provide complete millwork solutions for any size home. Plus we have one of the best installation departments in Central Florida. A WELL EARNED REPUTATION Serving Central Florida since 1945, Ro-Mac has a reputation for offering the best in quality products and customer service. Our Ocala location has provided builders, remodelers, and homeowners with building supplies, millwork, and windows for over a decade.

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Bowen Tile Sales Express Your Good Taste They say what you buy says a great deal about your taste and persona. Florida Tile believes that what we design and manufacture also says the same about our company. We infuse the qualities of strength, durability, sustainability & value into every product we make. Our line of HDP (High Definition Porcelain) products bring our attention for detail to the surface. From slate, wood and marble look products, we produce a finished product that is both beautiful and responsible. Visit one of our Florida Tile locations for more information.

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Put your heart in the hands O F W E L L -T R A I N E D , E X P E R I E N C E D AN D CARI NG CARDIOLOG I STS.

Dr. Paul Urban

Dr. Prem Singh

MD, FACC, FSCAI

MD, FACC, FSCAI

A board-certified, fellowshiptrained clinical and interventional cardiologist, Dr. Paul Urban has been practicing medicine since 1977 and serving Ocala for more than two decades. Dr. Urban prides himself on developing lasting relationships with his patients and his honest, direct and caring bedside manner is welcomed by them. He treats patients in the office and at Ocala Regional Medical Centers, West Marion Community Hospital. Dr. Urban received his medical degree from Jefferson Medical College (now the Sidney Kimmel Medical College) at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia. He completed his internship at Wilmington Medical Center and his residency and fellowship in cardiovascular disease at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Outside the office, his interests include underwater photography and collecting historical items.

W H E R E W E G ET TO T H E

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Dr. Prem Singh is a fellowshiptrained, board-certified interventional cardiologist. He completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of Illinois College of Medicine in 2004. Dr. Singh pursued a research fellowship in the Department of Cardiology at the Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Massachusetts, followed by fellowships in clinical cardiology and interventional cardiology at the Lahey Clinic in 2008 and 2009. Dr. Singh is on staff at Ocala Regional Medical Center, West Marion Hospital and MRMC. Dr. Singh has had research published in numerous prestigious journals. Apart from treating cardiac patients, Dr. Singh specializes in treating Peripheral Artery Diseases, Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm, Carotid Artery Diseases and Venous Diseases.

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In Every Issue

Contents OCTOBER ’16

017 T H E

BUZZ

By Cealia Athanason, Kevin Christian, JoAnn Guidry, Bonnie Kretchik and Katie McPherson

018 020 022 024 026

GREAT OUTDOORS GIVING BACK HORSIN’ AROUND THE HOMEFRONT CLASS ACTS

029 T H E

HIVE

By Laurel Gillum & Molly Norman

030 P A R E N T I N G P O I N T E R S 032 G O O D T I M E S 034 S N A P S H O T S

In This Issue

054 Different Strokes. There are

a host of jobs that take a special skill set and definitely don’t require a suit or heels. Read on to meet four people with career choices some of us might find a bit unsettling... but that they couldn’t be happier with. › By Cynthia McFarland

040 Coastal Camping (And Beyond). With a

plethora of camping choices in this beautiful state, here’s a take on the best of the best. › By Brett Ballantini

067 T H E

DISH

By Laurel Gillum & Molly Norman

068 070 072 074

EAT LIKE A FARMER EXPIRATION DATE: IDK CHANNEL YOUR INNER COOK GET GRILLIN’

046 Fallin’ For Fun. Florida’s autumn

activities offer abundant family fun. › By Brett Ballantini

060 Making A Scene. Florida art festivals

abound. › By Angelique Anacleto

081 T H E

SCENE

By Bonnie Kretchik & Katie McPherson

082 H I P H A P P E N I N G S 084 A Q U I C K Q & A 090 T H E S O C I A L S C E N E

Cover and Contents photos by John Jernigan


19 9 1 e Sinc PIN US ON


Ocala

Experience the Magic of Live Theatre

Magazine PUBLISHER

Kathy Johnson kathy@ocalastyle.com

OFFICE/PRODUCTION MANAGER

Cynthia Brown

cynthia@ocalastyle.com Editorial EXECUTIVE EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR

Karin Fabry-Cushenbery Melissa Peterson

karin@ocalastyle.com melissa@ocalastyle.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Katie McPherson Cealia Athanason

katie@ocalastyle.com cealia@ocalastyle.com

A Theatrical Concert Event

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Frank Sinatra Tribute Concert

Angelique Anacleto Brett Ballantini Kevin Christian Jim Gibson Laurel Gillum

JoAnn Guidry Bonnie Kretchik Cynthia McFarland Judge Steven Rogers

EDITORIAL INTERN

Molly Norman Art

CREATIVE DIRECTOR ART DIRECTOR

Jason Fugate Jessi Miller Castro

October 6-9 Vocalist Michael Mathews pays tribute to the legendary Frank Sinatra in an intimate concert of timeless classics: “Come Fly With Me,” “The Way You Look Tonight,” “Night and Day,” “The Best Is Yet to Come,” and many more!

jason@ocalastyle.com jessi@ocalastyle.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNER SOCIAL SCENE EDITOR

Christina Geiger Ronald W. Wetherington ronald@ocalastyle.com

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Sheila Hartley

sheila@ocalastyle.com

John Jernigan

jernigan@ocalastyle.com

By Agatha Christie

Sales

November 3-27

Crys Williams fotolia.com

Sponsored By: Elite Equestrian Magazine

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Dean Johnson

deanjohnson@ocalastyle.com

A winter weekend at an English country house takes a terrifying turn when a snowstorm strands the guests… including an unknown killer. This thrilling murder mystery is a classic whodunit from the Queen of Crime!

SALES MANAGER

Sharon Morgan

sharon@ocalastyle.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Lori Tani

lori@ocalastyle.com

UPCOMING SHOWS

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Dawn Anderson

Menopause: The Musical

dawn@ocalastyle.com

Liza Fritz

Crowns

liza@ocalastyle.com

Dec. 29, 2016 – Jan. 15, 2017

Apr. 20-23, 2017

skip@ocalastyle.com

The Fantasticks

Shrek: The Musical

Skip Linderman

Peggy Sue Munday

peggysue@healthylivingmagazines.com

Cecilia Sarco

Feb. 2-26, 2017

Tammy Walters

The Affections of May

cecilia@ocalastyle.com tammy@healthylivingmagazines.com

May 18 – Jun. 11, 2017

Mar. 16 – Apr. 9, 2017

DISTRIBUTION

Become a Subscriber!

Dave Adams

dave@ocalastyle.com

Debra McQueen Rick Shaw

OCALA PUBLICATIONS, INC.

o: 352.732.0073 › f: 352.732.0226 1007 E. Fort King St., Ocala, FL 34731 ocalastyle.com OCALA STYLE MAGAZINE / OCTOBER 2016 / VOL. 18, NO. 10

Published monthly by Ocala Publications, Inc. All contents © 2016 by Ocala Publications Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. For back issues or advertising information, call (352) 732-0073. Return postage must accompany all unsolicited manuscripts and artwork if they are to be returned. Manuscripts are welcomed, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. “Promotional” and “Promotional Feature” denote a paid advertising feature. Publisher is not responsible for claims and content of advertisements.

OCALA / MARION COUNTY

FONTS

OCALA / MARION COUNTY

CHAMBER & ECONOMIC PARTNERSHIP

OCALA / MARION COUNTY

CHAMBER & ECONOMIC PARTNERSHIP OCALA / MARION COUNTY

CHAMBER & ECONOMIC PARTNERSHIP

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MOVING FORWARD MOVING FORWARD MOVING FORWARD MOVING FORWARD

TRADE GOTHIC BOLD (Kerning 50pt) TAGLINE FONT:

352.236.2274 • OcalaCivicTheatre.com 4337 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala, FL 34470 In The Appleton Cultural Center

OCT ’16 ›

015


• TILE • WOOD • LAMINATE • VINYL • CARPET • GLASS • MOSAICS • TRAVERTINE • MARBLE • BACKSPLASHES • BATHROOMS • MURALS

240 N

Serving Marion County and surrounding counties for over thirty years 016

› Ocala

.com

352- 368- 2838 W

10t h S t . ( H WY

27) , O

c al a

w w w .i t a l i a n t i l e i m p o r t s .c o m M O N - F R I 7: 30a-

5: 0p

| S A T 8: 0a-

12: 0p


TH E R E AL PE O PLE , PL AC E S & E VE NTS THAT S HAPE OU R CO M M U N IT Y

the

OCT

5-8

All For One

In an effort to promote racial harmony and cultural awareness in today’s often tense climate, the City of Ocala presents a week of activities to unite the people of our community. This year’s One Ocala One America Week will include a variety show consisting of local performers, a social for children and families promoting racial and social tolerance, an airing of My Big Fat Greek Wedding at Citizens’ Circle and a Cultural Festival to cap off the week. The activities are headed up by the City off Ocala’s Racial Harmony and Cultural Awareness Task Force, which is made up of city staff and local volunteers of diverse cultural backgrounds. All activities are free and open to the public.

B U Z Z page

017

ART ALL AROUND

018

Schedule of Events OCTOBER 5: One Ocala One America Variety Show › Reilly Arts Center › 6-8pm

OCTOBER 6: Kids Involved in Diversity Social › E.D. Croskey Center › 6pm

OCTOBER 7: My Big Fat Greek Wedding screening › Citizens’ Circle › 7pm

LOG BY LOG

OCTOBER 8: Cultural Festival › Citizens’ Circle › 10am-4pm

FIND OUT MORE › Racial Harmony and Cultural Awareness Task Force › ocalafl.org or (352) 368-5517

020

THOROUGHBRED SUCCESS

022

PARADE A PLENTY

024

CLASS ACTS

026


Art Park, Meet Paint Out

Remember last year’s MAX Paint Out hosted by the Magnolia Art Xchange? This year they’re joining forces with the Tuscawilla Art Park Opening Celebration for a can’t-miss community event Saturday, October 15. › By Katie McPherson Want To Participate As An Artist? Sign up by October 10 to receive your free canvas and participate. › No entry fee. › Visit maxocala.org/events to download the registration form.

E

xperience the induction of Tuscawilla Art Park the evening of October 15, and welcome this new cultural hub into the Ocala community, which just so happens to fall on the centennial anniversary of Tuscawilla Park. To celebrate, this park will become a participatory public art installation dotted with plein air painters, photographers, watercolorists and more all depicting Ocala Union Station and the art park in their own ways as they participate in the 2nd Annual MAX Paint Out. This year’s theme is Inspiring Spaces. “Last year we did a paint out where we did a call to artists so they could come over and paint outside the Union Station, and we had great participation in the project. This year we’re combining it and doing it as part of the centennial so artists will be painting while the celebration starts,” explains Maggie Weakly, a MAX volunteer. After the paint out, artists can either keep their work, exhibit or sell it. Finished work can be exhibited at Ocala Union Station, and artists can choose to donate their piece to MAX. These will be included in the Art Heist fundraiser on Thursday, November 17. Other performers include Left On Broadway, College of Central Florida’s theatrical department, theater companies from West Port and Forest High Schools and a group of professional dancers led by Rebecca Lott and accompanied by the Ocala Symphony Orchestra. They’ll all be moving about the park and interacting with guests. There will even be food vendors and fireworks to end the night. “We are providing an intimate space for community gatherings as well as a space for artists to work within,” says Melissa

Photo by Maggie Weakley

GRE AT OUTDOORS

Photo by Maggie Weakley

Buzz

Photo by Katie McPherson

THE

Townsend, community cultural arts manager for the City of Ocala. “We hope the space will be used not only for visual and performing artists to create work but also for poetry readings or public speaking events. It’s a space for the entire community to enjoy. The art park combined with the Magnolia Art Xchange really creates a destination.” There’s no question the art park is for the community, by the community. Numerous local artists lent their talents to create special pieces throughout the park, such as the shade structure and stage canopy created by John Gamache, among many others. “I think it’s such an incredible part of Tuscawilla and the vision happening in the downtown area. I think a lot of events will happen there like weddings and anniversaries, and people will want to celebrate there,” says Weakly. “The community always gains from having art transpire.”

OCT

018

› Ocala

.com

Ske tch

by E

liza

bet hC . Ho

uck

, PL

A, A SLA

WANT TO GO? › 2nd Annual MAX Paint

15

Out in conjunction with the Tuscawilla Art Park Opening Celebration › Saturday,

October 15 › 223 NE 5th Street, Ocala › Paint Out 3-8:30pm, Opening Celebration 5-8:30pm, Fireworks begin at 7:45 › ocalafl.org/tpark100years or maxocala.org/events


Florida Metal Buildings of Ocala was recently ranked #1 for metal building construction. We are a familyowned, third-generation company.

We offer • Turnkey Building Packages • Concrete, Windows, Insulation, Overhead Doors • Design/Build • Sales/Erection

The days of steel buildings being uninviting metal boxes are over. Our prefabricated buildings can be enhanced with any number of state-of-the-art exterior options that include brick, rock, stone or stucco facades. We remain the leading and most competitively priced steel/metal building contractor – in sales and erection.

Before you purchase your next building, call Florida Metal. (877) 589-3627 or (352) 789-6009 www.flmetalbuildings.com

State CGC# 010181


THE

Buzz

GIVING BACK

(Re)forging The Fort

F

ort King was burned in battle in 1836 and then used as Marion County’s first courthouse before being dismantled by townspeople for building materials in 1844. Now The Fort King Heritage Association has begun the Buy A Log, Build a Fort Campaign to create an accurate Fort King reconstruction. Bill McCall, vice president of the Fort King Heritage Association, grew up on the approximately 40 acres known today as the site of historic Fort King. His childhood home is now the visitors center, which houses artifacts found on-site—uniform buttons, a 2-pound cannon ball and shards of fine china used by officers. When Bill was young, a large tree on the property fell during Hurricane Gladys. Its roots unearthed a settler store near the fort, revealing hundreds of intact bottles of beer and wine. (The liquid had long since evaporated, of course.) Remnants like these bring history to life. That’s why the City of Ocala and the Fort King Heritage Association intend to reconstruct Fort King with the Buy A Log, Build A Fort Campaign. Area businesses, individuals and community groups can purchase gold, silver or bronze commemorative logs. Funds will help purchase real logs for the reconstruction. They’ll need about 600 of them, 12 inches in diameter and 16 feet long each. Donation levels come with special privileges, like the donator’s name on an engraved plaque or VIP invitations to special events.

The response to our campaign has come from all of the citizens of Marion. This is their history! › Bill McCall

Burned log from dig site Nail from dig site

“We are moving ahead on our fundraising and are about one-third of the way to $300,000. We want to reach our goal by year’s end,” says McCall. While the original fort and blockhouses had to withstand battles and blazes, the reconstruction will need to stand the test of time. It will resemble Fort King as closely as possible—but with a few adjustments to ensure longevity. “The blockhouses will be designed with tongue and groove walls so they can be insulated and built to last. Rough cut plank siding will be added to the exteriors. This will give the public a more accurate visual representation of what the blockhouses looked like while concealing their durability and modern requirements to meet code,” McCall explains. “The palisade walls will be mounted to a cantilever system at ground level to avoid penetration of the ground, limiting our exposure to rot and other issues faced when wood is buried. It will allow the city to make repairs efficiently, as only the affected sections can be removed when repairs are needed.” The City of Ocala is already planning a reenactment of the attack on Fort King for December 3 and 4, complete with educational stops depicting life for soldiers and Seminole people. The Seminole Tribe of Florida has agreed to participate in the event and demonstrate handto-hand combat tactics used in the Seminole Wars. Other educational stations will feature crafts, lessons and live shows. One thing’s for sure: Marion County is about to regain a special piece of its past. “The response to our campaign has come from all of the citizens of Marion,” says McCall. “This is their history!”

LEARN MORE › Fort King Heritage Association › For more information or to donate to the Buy A Log, Build A Fort Campaign, visit fkha.org or call (352) 368-5533. 020

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.com

Photos courtesy of The Fort King Heritage Association

› By Katie McPherson


Buzz

HORSIN’ AROUND

Photo by HorsePhotos

THE

Top Of The Hill

Ocala-based Glen Hill Farm, the second oldest active Thoroughbred operation in Florida, celebrates its 50th anniversary. › By JoAnn Guidry

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n 1966 and having just become actively involved in the Thoroughbred business, Chicago businessman Leonard Lavin was in town visiting Joe O’Farrell at his Ocala Stud Farm. As it happened, the Florida division of Kentucky-based Greentree Stud was across the road from Ocala Stud. “Joe took me over to Greentree Stud for a tour,” recalls Lavin. “I fell in love with that farm on first sight. Joe told me the property wasn’t for sale. But when I got home, I called Jock Whitney, who owned Greentree Stud, and we had a deal in an hour.” Lavin re-named the 325-acre property Glen Hill Farm, a nod to his native Glencoe, Illinois. Over the ensuing five decades, that fortuitous purchase has proven to be a highly successful one. To date, Glen Hill Farm’s distinctive burnt orange, white and black racing silks have been in the winner’s circle for 185 stakes wins. The farm has bred and/or raced 108 stakes winners, including 75 Florida-breds. The leading money earners bred and/or raced by the operation include Marketing Mix ($2,015,893), One Dreamer ($1,266,067) and Coil ($1,154,360). That extraordinary success earned now 96-yearold Lavin the 2015 Eclipse Award of Merit, the highest honor given in the Thoroughbred industry, for a lifetime of outstanding achievement. “I was deeply honored to receive the Eclipse Award of Merit,” says Lavin. “It was truly my proudest moment in the Thoroughbred business, a business that has been one of the great pleasures of my life.”

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Craig Bernick and Leonard Lavin

Leonard Lavin

Ten years prior to establishing Glen Hill Farm, Lavin, who began his business career as a fragrance salesman in Chicago, bought a West Coast beauty supply company. He moved the company to Chicago and kept only one of its products—V05 hair conditioner. And that would be the base on which he and his late wife, Bernice, built Alberto-Culver Co. into a personal beauty care and household products worldwide corporation. In 2010, Alberto-Culver Co. was sold to Unilever for $3.7 billion. After having developed Glen Hill Farm into a nationally prominent Thoroughbred operation, Lavin turned over the day-to-day management of the farm to his grandson, Craig Bernick, in 2008. Bernick is the president and chief executive officer of Glen Hill Farm; › Craig Bernick Lavin remains a very active chairman of the board. “My grandfather and I have always been close,” says Bernick, 38. “Growing up, I always loved spending time on the farm with him. We would spend hours talking about the horses, watching races and studying pedigrees. I just soaked it all in.” After graduating from Tulane University, Bernick held several executive positions with Alberto-Culver in both its Chicago and New York offices. Later, he operated his own successful racing stable. Today, Bernick oversees a Glen Hill Farm that has grown to 380 acres with frontage on both 27th Avenue (475A) and 42nd Street. “My grandfather taught me well, and he is still very involved in a long-term strategy for Glen Hill Farm,” says Bernick. “I’m proud to be a part of that plan, but Glen Hill Farm will always be my grandfather’s farm, his legacy. My goal is to have Glen Hill Farm endure for another 50 years.”

Growing up, I always loved spending time on the farm with him. We would spend hours talking about the horses, watching races and studying pedigrees. I just soaked it all in.


SATURDAY & SUNDAY • OCT 15 & 16, 2016 5331 N. U.S. Hwy. 441, Ocala

(800) 624-1910 ext. 4000

www.warhor sehar ley.com


THE

Buzz

HOMEFRONT

Homes On Parade

S

ince the 1970s, builders have been displaying newly built homes as part of the Marion County Building Industry Association’s Parade of Homes. It all started when several builders got together, came up with the idea and decided to pull it off. Now, there are multiple Parade of Homes events throughout the state. “It’s exposure to get the builder’s name out there,” says Jackie Suarez, MCBIA parade committee co-chair. “They use this as a marketing tool.” Because the builders are already members of the MCBIA, they just have to fill out an application, obtain the permits needed and pay a fee for each participating home in order to be involved in the parade—besides, of course, completing each home in time. And that’s exactly what you’ll get to see: brand-new model homes that have never been occupied. Construction is already underway for the homes that will be in the 2017 Spring Parade of Homes. The upcoming 2016 Fall Parade of Homes will feature 12 homes by 10 builders—On Top of the World, Dream Custom Homes, Armstrong Homes, T.L. Carlson Construction, Secure Built, Murphy Kaufman OCT

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Builders, Kinsell Custom Homes, Abio Corporation, The Deltona Corporation and Triple Crown Homes. It’s exposure to get the Although there’s no Showcase Builder award for builder’s name out there. They this one, it’s a great opportunity for builders and the use this as a marketing tool. community to connect. The parade kicks off Thursday, October 13 for a › Jackie Suarez long weekend of home tours, conversations with builders, gorgeous layouts and up-and-coming design through Sunday, October 16. Then, the very next Thursday, October 20, it starts up again. Locator maps, layouts and home details will be published in the Ocala Star Banner on Sunday, October 9 and will also be available on mcbia.org. The homes will be open from 11am to 5pm, with the builder of each and possibly a few staff members ready to welcome you. Many locals have enjoyed this event in years past. In fact, a few builders could barely keep up with the flow of people during last spring’s parade. They reported having houses that would get up to 200 people each day. “That’s definitely what we want to see,” Jackie says. She also mentions that Marion County is a great area when it comes to the housing market, and construction is one of the biggest industries in the state. Throughout the Parade of Homes’ 45 years, housing trends, styles and designs have seen plenty of changes. Jackie remembers seeing traditional homes in the past, but she’s seen more craftsman-style homes this year. “[Ocala] may be a couple years behind, but we pick up on it,” Jackie says. “All the builders want to do their best.” These builders will show the community their take on the newest trends and home innovations. Think: Pinterest, but in real life.

WANT TO GO? › Parade of Homes › Thursday through Sunday, October 13-16 and 20-23 › mcbia.org .com

Photos courtesy of Bennett Construction

› By Cealia Athanason


GEOFF, CATHY AND JUSTIN ABBOTT

Y our Vision. Our Commitment.

Unsurpassed Results. OC A

PRO ING RS LA/MAR UDLY SERV FOR 35 YEA ION COUNTY

CUSTOM HOMES | REMODELS | ADDITIONS

MEGACONSTRUCTIONOCALA.COM


THE

Buzz

CLASS ACTS

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS AND DISTRICT NEWS THAT SHAPE MARION COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS. › By Kevin Christian, APR, CPRC

Forest On The Bucs’ Field

Color Guard cadets from Forest High’s Air Force JROTC program traveled to Tampa for some NFL pre-season exposure. They presented our nation’s colors to thousands of Bucs fans at Raymond James Stadium, certainly marking the biggest event for these senior cadets to date.

Massive Donation Helps Homeless

Collect 60,000 personal hygiene products worth $40,000. Put them all on tables inside a church fellowship hall and have volunteers pack them up to benefit homeless students in our public schools. That’s exactly what happened at St. Paul’s Polish National Catholic Church in Belleview. Now, all those supplies are at schools being put into the hands of students who need them the most! Thank you, St. Paul’s, for an amazing and mammoth donation.

Baton Rouge Bound

Students at Vanguard High collected hundreds of items to help flood victims in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, recently. Donating everything from diapers and baby food to shampoo and laundry detergent, these volunteer efforts no doubt will help flood victims get their lives back on track after Mother Nature’s wrath.

Summer Celebration At Sparr

How do you convince students to read over the summer? Give them free books for doing so! That’s the idea behind a recent celebration at Sparr Elementary. Students who documented their reading adventures earned points for free books from the school library. Oh yeah, free ice cream also convinced kids to take their minds on a literary adventure!

Georgia Pacific Plants Paper

Teachers and paper—they go hand in hand. Recently, paper giant Georgia-Pacific partnered with the Kids in Need Foundation to bring hundreds of reams of free paper to the Tools 4 Teaching store. Each shopper took home 2,000 pages plus other free classroom supplies. “Superhero Teachers” turned out in large numbers to take advantage of the special shopping day.

Honoring 9/11 Heroes

Hundreds of Forest High Air Force JROTC cadets remembered the 2,996 people who lost their lives in the 9/11 terrorist attacks 15 years ago. Each year, the school dedicates time for a special salute, wreath laying and musical tribute to honor those killed in the greatest terrorist attack on home soil.

Are You #iAmMarion Proud?

Our school district is featuring a billboard campaign showcasing local graduates who now make Marion County their home. If you’re a Marion County graduate or student, you, too, can join the campaign by posting your picture with your high school and graduation year @MarionCountyK12 on Twitter. Let’s all be #iAmMarion proud!

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National Semifinalists Announced

Vanguard High School has six seniors on the Class of 2017 National Merit Scholar semifinalist list. They include Terry Derias, Harrell Phillips, Jacob Mosley, Riya Patel, Kunal Upadya and Daniel Egitto. These students represent the top one-half percent of students nationwide and could earn prestigious college scholarships if they advance to the winner’s stage. These students certainly make our community #iAmMarion proud!


Brilliant Ideas

Since 1990 Certified Diamonds Specialize in Large Diamonds Custom Design Studio-One of a Kind Appraisals-Remounting-Repair Nancy Porter Graduate Gemologist Diamontologist

(352) 401-0044 • 315 E Silver Springs Blvd.

L adyJeweler .com

Survival Architecture and the Art of Resilience Through November 13

4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala, FL 34470 AppletonMuseum.org | 352-291-4455 Museum, Appleton Store and ARTSpace Hours Tuesday–Saturday 10 a.m.–5 p.m., Sunday noon–5 p.m. Tomas Saraceno, Becoming Aerosolar, 2014, digital video (00:41)

–an equal opportunity college–

OCT ’16 ›

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FALL INTO FAMILY FUN FALL FESTIVAL OCTOBER 28 from 5:30 to 8 p.m.

Celebrate God’s harvest season with us outside on the soccer fields. This FREE COMMUNITY EVENT is the perfect opportunity to enjoy fall with games, treats and costumes.

VETERANS DAY MARCH NOVEMBER 11 at 4:45 p.m.

Join us in honoring our local heroes with a special Veterans March. Participants will march from the Frank DeLuca YMCA to the Veterans Memorial on 25th Ave., where they will tour the memorial before returning back to the Y, where they will have the option to participate in one of two workouts that honors fallen soldiers. Registration: https://runsignup.com/Race/FL/Ocala/YMCAVeteransMarch

TURKEY TROT NOVEMBER 24 at 7:15 a.m.

We believe that strong traditions build strong communities, and our 21st Annual Turkey Trot is designed to do just that. This year’s event includes:  5K  10K  Outdoor Cycling  Youth Dodgeball Tournament (ages 4-15)  Turkey Burner Specialty Class Registration: https://runsignup.com/Race/FL/Ocala/ymcaocalaturkeytrot

THE Y IS THE PLACE FOR ALL AGES TO... DISCOVER. LEARN. PLAY. ENGAGE. EXPLORE. HAVE FUN. “The Frank DeLuca YMCA has been a lifesaver for our family. We had tried multiple gyms with daycares and our children hated them. No matter how many times we took them, they cried hysterically, and we were never able to get our workout in. Then, we found the Y. We will never go anywhere else. The whole staff has been great in helping us get our little ones adapted, and they are happy to go to the Child Development Center. Now, they cry every night because they want to go to the gym to play and see their friends and teachers. It has changed our whole experience because now, Mommy, Daddy and the kids can be happy and healthy.” —Ronda Baker, YMCA Member

FRANK DELUCA YMCA


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D E D I C ATE D TO E N R I C H I N G TH E LIVE S O F LO C AL FAM I LI E S

Womb Woes

Sources: ufhealth.org/news

A recent study involving 1.5 million Florida birth records from 1994-2004 showed babies who spend a week longer in the womb have higher test scores in the future. The down side? Your child could be at higher risk of having a physical disability. Jeffrey Roth, Ph.D., a University of Florida Health research professor within the UF College of Medicine, conducted a study and found that babies born at 41 weeks are 2.8 percent more likely to be classified as “gifted” and have higher standardized test scores. However, they also found that babies born at 41 weeks showed a 2.1 percent chance of having a

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY

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F A M I LY F A V O R I T E S

physical disability. Children born to women with low education levels demonstrated the largest advantage of spending an extra week in the womb. “What our findings suggest is that while 40 weeks remains the safest time for most babies to be delivered, in uncomplicated pregnancies, going another week seems to have beneficial effects on later performance in school,” said Roth.

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SNAPSHOTS

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THE

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› PARENTING POINTERS

Safety First

Stop, drop and roll. Left, right, left before crossing. Stranger danger. We know all of the rules, but do our kids know how to handle situations when they arise?

911, What’s Your Emergency?

Make sure your child knows what to expect if they ever find themselves in a situation where they need to dial 911. They will need to be prepared to give the dispatcher information such as their name, age, address and why they dialed 911. Practice phone numbers and addresses with your child weekly. This will come in handy. Lastly, make sure your child knows 911 is only for real emergencies—it’s not a game.

Fire In The Hole!

Host a family night, and create a fire escape plan. You’ll want to remind your child that if a fire ever breaks loose, they will want to get out as fast as they can. Remind them not to try and grab toys or electronics. It could mean their life!

Stranger Danger

Although we teach our children to be polite to new people, we also want them to be cautious. If an adult needs help finding their puppy or directions to the nearest frozen yogurt place, they will ask another adult. This logic will help your kids learn how to put up red flags and make smart choices.

No Secrets

Stress to your child that even if someone has told them it's OK, an adult should never touch their genital areas. Even at the doctor’s office, you should be with your child if the doctor needs to examine the genital area. They should always feel free to come to you, even if someone has told them to keep it a secret.

Help Me, I’m Lost

Not So Sweet Various medications and pills closely resemble candy. Through the eyes of children, the medicine cabinet is full of bright colors and colorful liquids. At your home, it's true that you may have these stored out of reach. At someone else’s house, however, their cabinets may not be so childproof. Teach your child to always double check with a responsible adult before putting any “candy” in their mouths.

In the event that your child gets lost, tell them it's important to stay where they are. If they see another parent with kids nearby, they can ask them for help. The most common place a child will get lost is a supermarket or other store. They should know to go to the customer service counter and tell the employee they are lost. And most importantly, they should never leave the store or wander outside. 030

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Sources: momjunction.com, thehumbledhomemaker.com

I

f your children are ever faced with a dangerous situation, how well will they handle it? Make sure your child’s first response is their best response. These five steps are perfect reminders for both you and your kids.


CH_AUGUST 2016_A.pdf

7/19/16

4:53:17 PM

N E W B O R N

T H R U

A D O L E S C E N C E

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CM

“We treat your children like our own ”.

MY

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CMY

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––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– NEW PATIENTS WELCOME Chris N. Okonkwo MD FAAP

Susan Lakatos ARNP

Katie Falco ARNP

Visit us at: www.ChildrensHealthofOcala.com PRO M OTI O N AL FE ATU R E

3-D Mammography

at Radiology Associates of Ocala Breast Cancer Awareness Month isn’t just important for survivors—it reminds us all to make annual mammograms and early detection a priority. Radiology Associates of Ocala, P.A. helps patients detect abnormalities as soon as possible using 3-D mammography to optimize the imaging process.

3

-D mammography (a.k.a. tomosynthesis) is the new standard for screening exams and diagnostic breast imaging. It utilizes X-ray imaging and low-level radiation to capture numerous images of the breast, which form a 3-D composite. “A normal mammogram takes four pictures, two on each side. Now, when we’re doing each one of those pictures, the machine is taking slices through the breasts rather than just four pictures. Sometimes now we have 100 to 300 pictures, so obviously we’re seeing a lot more of the tissue,” says Dr. Amanda Aulls, radiologist at RAO.

So what’s the process like for patients? No different than usual. Patients still have to deal with the compression positioning, but 3-D mammography adds no more than a few extra seconds to the screening. Patients with Medicare will be pleased to know 3-D mammography is covered by their insurance. Patients with other providers can call RAO at (352) 671-4300 to find out if they’re covered (but if not, 3-D mammography costs just $50 more for the extra imaging and accuracy).

The best treatment outcomes come from finding cancer really early. › Dr. Amanda Aulls

Radiology Associates of Ocala, P.A.

› TimberRidge Imaging Center › 9521 SW Hwy 200, Ocala › Women’s Imaging Center › 1901 SE 18th Avenue, Building 200, Ocala › (352) 671-4300 › raocala.com


THE

Hive

› GOOD TIMES

Need More Screen Time?

Fresh popcorn and a couple of VHS tapes (fully rewound, of course)— the nostalgia is in full effect. It’s time your kids watch some real television. These old-time blockbusters should keep your family entertained for the next few movie nights. The Karate Kid (1984), PG

Hiyah! The new kid in town, Daniel, quickly finds himself the target of a group of bullies studying karate in Southern California. Fortunately, Daniel befriends Mr. Miyagi, a martial arts master turned repairman.

Back to the Future, PG

In this 1980s classic, Marty McFly, a small-town California teen, is thrown back into the ‘50s. When an experiment by his eccentric scientist friend, Doc Brown, goes awry, he is the only one who can fix it.

The Princess Bride, PG

This fairy tale adventure details the relationship between a lovely young woman and her true love. After a lengthy separation, he hopes to find his way back to her. Along the way, though, he must battle the evils lurking within a mythical kingdom. Finally, your kids will understand the meaning of “mawage.”

The Wizard of Oz, PG

When a tornado hits, Dorothy and her dog, Toto, are whisked away in their house to the magical land of Oz, far from Kansas. They follow the yellow brick road toward the Emerald City in hopes of meeting the great and powerful wizard. En route, they meet Scarecrow, Tin Man and Cowardly Lion.

Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory, G

Charlie Bucket, a sweet, poor boy, finds the last of five golden tickets, hidden in candy bars, ensuring him a trip to the strangest and most famous chocolate factory in the world. As the tour unfolds, he and his grandpa follow Mr. Wonka, not knowing what he has in mind for their future or his factory.

Mrs. Doubtfire, PG-13

Divorced Daniel Hillard doesn’t think he spends enough time with his children. In order to remedy that, he hatches an elaborate scheme to dress as an older British woman and convince his ex-wife to hire him as a nanny. Mrs. Doubtfire wins over the children and helps Daniel become a better parent. It’s only a matter of time, though, until the secret is exposed. 032

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The Sandlot The Goonies Mighty Ducks Jumanji Home Alone Bad News Bears George of the Jungle E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial The Parent Trap

10. Hook 11. The Secret Garden 12. Who Framed Roger Rabbit

13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.

Edward Scissorhands An American Tail Babe Beetlejuice Short Circuit Honey, I Shrunk the Kids

19. Harry and the Henderson’s

20. 21. 22. 23. 24.

The Land Before Time Free Willy The Muppet Movie The Sound of Music The Indian in the Cupboard

25. Homeward Bound 26. James and the Giant Peach

27. 28. 29. 30.

A Little Princess Little Rascals Dennis the Menace The Neverending Story

Source: IMDb, bustle.com

You’ve Gotta See This

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.


Come Enjoy a Real...

FARM!

Pumpkin Patch & Hay Maze Open in October

Fall Fun Nights

Oct. 14, 15, 21 & 22 7:30 to 9:30pm

PETTING FARM WILDLIFE EXHIBIT HAYRIDE • PONY RIDES PICNIC AREA

'S #1 VY  2017 CLUB SEASON OCALA POWER UNITED TRYOUTS Fast Pass Pre-Registration $15 (players must be present). Day of Tryouts Registration $30 (dates & times on our website).

OCT. 23RD & 24TH, 2016

UNCLE DONALD’S FARM

SUNDAY, OCT. 23

14-Under: Register 8-9am • Tryout 9-11am 13-Under: Register 10-11am • Tryout 11am-1pm 10-Under, 11-Under, 12-Under: Register 12:30-1:30pm • Tryout 1:30-3:30pm

352-753-2882 • 2713 Griffin Ave. Lady Lake

www.UncleDonaldsFarm.com

Family Fun at Family Prices! Call for admission prices and hours.

MONDAY, OCT. 24

10’s - 12’s: Register 5-5:30pm • Tryout 5:30-7pm 13’s & 14’s: Register 6:30-7pm • Tryout 7-9pm

The Peacock Cottage

NOV. 6TH & 7TH, 2016 SUNDAY, NOV. 6

15s & 16s: Register 9:30-10am • Tryout 10am-12:30pm 17s & 18s: Register 12:30-1pm • Tryout 1-3pm

Ocala’s New Plant Shop! • Unique Houseplants • Fun Classes

Fairy Gardens

• Garden Gifts • Supplies

Located in Chelsea Square 3243 East Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala 352-624-0116 • thepeacockcottage@gmail.com Like us! facebook.com/thepeacockcottage

www.dandypot.com

It is highly recommended that players attend both tryout dates. If you are not going to be able to attend, please notify the OPU office IMMEDIATELY.

mposterocalapower@gmail.com

MONDAY, NOV. 7

15s & 16s: Register 5-5:30pm • Tryout 5:30-7:30pm 17s & 18s: Register 7-7:30pm • Tryout 7:30-9pm

More general information listed on our website:

WWW.OCALAPOWERUNITED.COM. 352-351-4837 www.ocalapowerunited.com 1433 SW 15th Ave Ocala, FL 34471

HIRE TODAY.

Tomorrow’s Leaders -an equal opportunity college-

The Bachelor of Applied Science, B.A.S., in Business and Organizational Management program prepares students to become effective leaders in organizations and society. Specializations include Management Information Systems and Logistics and Supply Chain Management.

www.cf.edu/hotemployer

For more information contact Bonnie Hays at

352-840-5762 or haysb@cf.edu. This product or workforce solution was funded in whole (or in part) by a $10 million TAACCCT grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration. College of Central Florida does not discriminate against any person on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, gender, pregnancy, age, marital status, national origin, genetic information or disability status in its programs, activities and employment. For inquiries regarding nondiscrimination policies contact Equity Officer, Ocala Campus, Ewers Century Center, Room 201C, 3001 S.W. College Road, 352-854-2322, ext. 1437, or smithc@cf.edu. OCT ’16 ›

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› SNAPSHOTS

THESE LOCAL KIDS KNOW HOW TO HAVE FUN! CHECK OUT THEIR PHOTO-WORTHY MOMENTS.

Haley, 5, & Hayden, 2, at the Sanford Zoo

J.C., 5, working on his bike

Aviana, 6, at her first lesson at Ocala Equestrian Center

Stella, 14 months, posing by the pool

David, 7, enjoys a field of flowers

Aubree, 9, getting ready for cheerleading practice at Legendz of Ocala

Ashlyn, 2, enjoying the art room at Mokey Madness

Austin, 10, Andrew, 9, & Shay, 7, enjoy a movies at the Ocala Drive-In

Aubrey, 5, having fun on the beach

Liam, 6, looking for a Halloween costume

Kadance, 8, at The Pickin' Patch

WANT TO SEE YOUR KIDS ON THE PAGES OF OCALA STYLE? Send your photos from around town and local events to melissa@ocalastyle.com. Yours might just get picked! 034

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Xavier, 9, receiving award for A/B honor roll at Legacy Elementary


PRO M OTI O N AL FE ATU R E

Gold Standard Of Service

Tradewinds RV stands out with quality products and exceptional service.

Y

ou’re part of the family at Tradewinds RV. From the moment you arrive at the dealership, owner Rick Couch and his employees are there to welcome and serve you, and you can always expect a laid back, friendly atmosphere. Their philosophy is all about meeting your needs, through their service and the quality RVs they offer. Besides being family owned for 30 years, that’s what makes it a family style of business. “Everyone is that comfortable with the business,” Rick says. “We’re not out there to provide average service—we’re out there to provide service to go nuts over.” That’s just what Rick and his employees do. It’s all about the people for Rick, both his employees and his customers, and that’s why Tradewinds RV offers outstanding after-sales service. When customers have a need, they can come back and Rick and his team will know who they are. “I’m 100 percent accessible to all my customers,” Rick says. “We want to have a relationship with our customers. We want to serve the people that buy from us.” The service and quality offered at Tradewinds RV are just the beginning. It all started because the Couch family loves to camp. When Rick says, “We are camping people,” he means it. He doesn’t remember his grandparents ever not having an RV, and Rick and his family have traveled all over the eastern and southeastern parts of the United States. So it wasn’t a huge surprise when his grandparents first opened Tradewinds RV in the mid-1980s after purchasing three RVs and selling two of them. They found the RVs weren’t hard to sell, so they kept at it. “They were only open when they wanted to be, and they would have four or five at a time,” says Rick. After a few years, Tradewinds RV was doing exceptionally well, and Rick’s grandparents offered the dealership to Rick’s parents. Avid campers themselves, they decided to take over ownership. Several years later, Rick accepted ownership, and he continues to sell industry-

leading brands—including the gold standard Jayco brand of travel trailers—along with high-performance brands. The idea is to provide you, the customer, with the RV that best fits your needs. “We don’t pressure anyone. This › Rick Couch is supposed to be a fun thing you’re buying, and we want you to take your time,” Rick says. Most of the employees have been there for more than a decade, creating that family-like environment where everyone’s on the same page. Certified technicians are available on-site to take care of any repairs or issues, and, although these technicians bill by the job, they’re on salary so they can focus on completing each job correctly the first time, without any added pressure. If you’re looking to hit the road in a quality RV, consider becoming part of the Tradewinds family. They’ll give you the gold standard, not only in brand but also in customer service.

We’re not out there to provide average service— we’re out there to provide service to go nuts over.

Tradewinds RV › 7677 South US Hwy 441, Ocala › (352) 598-5705 › tradewindsrv.com

OCT ’16 ›

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PRO M OTI O N AL FE ATU R E

Experience Counts:

Talking Mako™ Robotic-Arm-Assisted Surgery with Dr. Derek Farr

Using Mako™ technology, Dr. Derek Farr of Twin Palm Orthopedics treats his patients’ osteoarthritis with unparalleled surgical accuracy and effectiveness.

O

steoarthritis is the wearing out of the bone surfaces in synovial joints like knees, hips and shoulders. These joints are lined with articular cartilage, and as it wears down, it becomes pitted, cracked and rough. This results in bone-onbone contact and can lead to deformities like bowing in the bones, stiffness and trouble doing normal activities or spending time on beloved hobbies. Doctors first try treatment methods such as ice, anti-inflammatory medications, bracing, electrical stimulation, injection therapy and pain medication. If these modalities fail to work for patients, surgery becomes the best option to improve quality of life. The best possible surgery means using the Mako™ robotic-arm-assisted surgery system, especially when the patient does not need a complete knee replacement. “Study after study shows that up to 65 percent of patients who receive total knee replacements only have arthritis in one or two of the three compartments of the knee. Which means that many people do not require a total knee replacement but do require a partial knee replacement,” says Dr. Derek Farr, board-certified orthopedic surgeon at Twin Palm Orthopedics. “Not a lot of surgeons are doing partial knee replacements due to the traditionally higher failure rate and because they are technically more difficult for the surgeon. However, that is what

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Board certified and fellowship trained in sports orthopedics, Dr. Farr has vast experience treating complex joint conditions. If you or a loved one has exhausted nonsurgical methods to remedy your osteoarthritis, make an appointment with Dr. Farr of Twin Palm Orthopedics today. Demand the latest and most innovative treatment in orthopedic care.

the Mako™ offers: the ability to perform a partial knee replacement with precision and much greater technical success.” No two patients are exactly alike, and neither are their joints. A specialized CT scan allows Dr. Farr to create a 3-D model of each patient’s unique hip or knee joint. Then, he can virtually place the implant on the joint and fine tune its placement so that he can determine how the joint will respond before surgery even begins. “It’s similar to standing on the tee box in golf and knowing you will hit a hole in one before you tee off. I know ahead of time how the patient’s knee will respond and can anticipate the outcome of the procedure before the patient enters the operating room,” Dr. Farr says. Once the 3-D modeling and virtual placement is complete and surgery begins, the Mako™ roboticarm-assisted surgery system provides innumerable benefits to patients. Firstly, there is only a small threeto three-and-a-half-inch incision required. Secondly, the procedure only takes approximately 30 minutes

or less. Lastly, “The Mako™ system sculpts the worn cartilage just enough so I can place the implant precisely. The robotic arm will › Dr. Derek Farr not allow a surgeon to remove too much cartilage or bone, so there are a lot of checks and balances. It limits any collateral damage or excessive bone loss and decreases the risk of a fracture,” says Dr. Farr. It allows the surgeon to place implants in the hip and knee more precisely. This is very important, as the more precisely an implant is placed, the longer the implant will last, which results in a better outcome and greater patient satisfaction. Mako™ partial knee replacement procedures are less invasive and less painful than traditional methods. Patients benefit, as they require less recovery time with discharge to home often the same day.

It’s similar to standing on the tee box in golf and knowing you will hit a hole in one before you tee off.

Twin Palm Orthopedics › 2640 SW 32nd

Place, Ocala › (352) 369-1099 › twinpalmortho.com OCT ’16 ›

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Oct. 2016 Issue MAY 2013 ISSUE www.ocalaice.com

MAY 2013 ISSUE www.ocalaice.com

Personal Back To matters Lifematters Personal

Mrs. EC is an 87-year-old retired bookkeeper from New York who was not happy with her debilitating shortness of breath due to her severe aortic valve No matter how long one has been married or in a relationship, you experience many of life’s joys and challenges in the journey together. You stenosis. She also has a history of emphysema. She Last month we wrote about two patients from the share in the excitement and nervousness of becoming parents forathe first time, as well as the happiness comfort in simpler moments such No matter how long one has been married or in relationship, you experience many life’s joys and challenges in thewith journey together. You wants to attend herofand 60th wedding anniversary Institute of Cardiovascular Excellence with severe as an evening walkin holding hands or aand loving glance exchanged acrossparents the dinner table. Spending quality time together and being attentive takes moments such share the excitement nervousness of becoming forher the first time, as well as the happiness and comfort in simpler husband in 2017. mitral valve leakage who underwent the placement of work in today’s world, where hypertasking and smartphones are commonplace. With my commitment to ICE, I also struggle with that balance. I as an evening walk holding hands or a loving glance exchanged across the dinner table. Spending quality time together and being attentive takes a mitraclip device from the groin the for communication, trust, honesty, and making time for each other. find that the key to keeping a relationship solid and awithout love strong areneed evergreen: Both patients underwent TAVR (transcatheter aortic work in today’s world, where hypertasking and smartphones are commonplace. With my commitment to ICE, I also struggle with heart surgery. Both patients did extremely well. which is why tackling misunderstood issues such as erectile dys- that balance. I These are open the facets of a relationship that can make or break this partnership, valve replacement) with Dr.trust, Joshua Rovin atmaking Mortontime for each other. find that the key to keeping a relationship solid and a love strong are evergreen: communication, honesty, and HORIZONTAL LOGOS function in an open and honest way is extremely important. For men and women, honest communication makes you vulnerable, but you’ll find Plant Hospital. One year later, both are leading the facets of a relationship that can make ButThese whatare about another common valvular heartor break this partnership, which is why tackling misunderstood issues such as erectile dysthat being vulnerable can also feel quite liberating. The value this openness has onactive a relationship and your overall health is incomparable to any without limiting symptoms of vulnerable, aortic function in an open honest way is extremely For men and lives women, honestthe communication makes you but you’ll find disease that has, and up until recently, requiredimportant. open dinner reservation or tangible gift you can present to your better halves. Besides, when bottle up your emotions, this added stress negatively valveyou stenosis. that being vulnerable canvalve also feel quite liberating. value this openness has on a relationship and your overall health is incomparable to any heart surgery? Aortic stenosis is whenThe deposits affects your heart-health and, simply put, can only make intimacy more challenging. dinner reservation tangible gift you of calcium on theor aortic valve leaflcan ets present lead totoa your better halves. Besides, when you bottle up your emotions, this added stress negatively I encourage you to open up and love with your whole heart. Overcome the fearAortic that is “now” know that on the other side of thatacquired tough convalveand stenosis is the most commonly limited opening of theand, aortic valve. the affects your heart-health simply put,Consequently, can only make intimacy more challenging. versation lies a stronger, healthier heart and relationship. valvular heart disease in the world. In the United heart has to generate a greater force toyour pushwhole blood I encourage you to open up and love with heart. Overcome the fear that is “now” and know that on the other side of that tough conStates alone, 300,000 people have severe aortic through a smaller opening to meet the circulatory versation lies a stronger, healthier heart and relationship. Yours, stenosis. More than 50,000 people in the world have demands of the body. This scenario leads to episodes undergone the placement of either the Core valve or passing out, congestive heart failure, angina and Yours, Asad U.of Qamar, MD the Edward Sapien valve. Both of these devices can be arrhythmias. The newer generation of balloonFACC, FCCP, FSGC, FACP, FSCAI inserted through the groin for high- or intermediatemounted aortic valves can be placed on the inside of CardiologistAsad U. Qamar, MD risk patients. At this time, an evaluation is underway the natural aortic valve or on the inside FACC, FCCP, degenerating FSGC, FACP, FSCAI for low-risk patients of an artificial tissue valve with high success rates. Cardiologist This takes away the need for open heart surgery in a patient who would otherwise be a high- or an intermediate-risk candidate for open heart surgery.

The hard truth – Erectile Dysfunction Mr. LP is an hard 85-year-old retired teacher– from Ohio who The truth Erectile Dysfunction was suffering from progressively worsening angina

necessary blood flow required of our arteries and our veins are vascular health needs some seriErectile dysfunction is a very for creating and sustaining an responsible for returning the ous attention. intimate andfrom oftencritical intimidating aortic valve stenosis. He had undergone a erection. For example, men with blood back to our heart. It might Vascular disease is a broad condition. Because of its personal necessary blood flow required of our arteries and our veins are health some seriErectileheart dysfunction is asurgery very previous bypass 12vascular years ago. Heneeds wants coronary artery disease, periphalso help to know that the main term for any disease that afnature, it is often left untreated for creating and sustaining an responsible for returning the ousgraduate attention. from intimate and often intimidating to see his youngest granddaughter eralItvascular high blood intoto the the circulatory system. The is aartery and misunderstood, causing erection. For example, men with bloodoff back our heart. might disease, Vascular disease broadthat branches condition. personal college inBecause 2019. of itsfects pressure, cholesterol pelvis internal circulatory system made great emotional distress. This left untreated coronary artery disease, periphalso help toiliac know that the mainand high termisfor any up disease that af- is called the nature, it is often levels are at an increased risk for artery, which extends into the of arteries and veins that spread makes it even more important to eral vascular disease, high blood artery that branches off into the fects the circulatory system. The and misunderstood, causing erectile dysfunction. penisup as the internal pudendal through thesystem body is made understand that erectile dysfuncpressure, and high cholesterol pelvis is called the internal iliac great emotional distress.from Thisthe heartcirculatory Restthe assured. dysfuncartery. If any artery in the vascular to the tips tion does notmakes necessarily happen Core Valve Edward Erectile Sapien Valve levels are at an increased risk for artery, which extends into ofextremities. arteries andThe veins that spread it even more important to of our tion can be treated at any age. system is compromised, the puheart pumps bloodVERTICAL away from LOGOS because of age and that it is most erectile dysfunction. penis as the internal pudendal from the heart through the body understand that erectile dysfuncdendal artery may not receive the Treatment options vary from itself through the body by way likely the result of a heart-health Rest assured. Erectile dysfuncartery. If any artery in the vascular to the tips of our extremities. The tion does not necessarily happen exercise and a healthy diet, smokissue, not a psychological one. tion can be treated at any age. system is compromised, the puheart pumps blood away from because of age and that it is most ing cessation and medication, to As many as 30 million men in dendal artery may not receive the Treatment options vary from itself through the body by way likely the result of a heart-health surgical procedures. But the first the United States are affected by exercise and a healthy diet, smokissue, not a psychological one. and often-dreaded step is to have ED with 64 percent of those men ingconversation cessation and medication, to As many as 30 million men in a serious and open over the age of 60, according to surgical But the first the United States are affected by with a doctor who can helpprocedures. identhe National Institutes of Health. Summerfield/The Villages Ocala Williston and often-dreaded step is to have ED with 64 percent of those men tify the root of erectile dysfunction But while incidences increase 10435 SE 170th Pl. 4730 SW 49th Rd. 412 W. Noble Ave. a serious and open conversation the age of 60, according to and provide comfort and clarity with age, it is over not an inevitable part Summerfield, FL 34491 Ocala, FL 34474 Williston, FLwho 32696 with a doctor can help identheaNational Institutes while helping to solve it. of aging, rather signal that your of Health. Offi ce: 352.233.4393 Offi ce: 352.854.0681 Offi ce: 352.528.0790 tify the root of erectile dysfunction But while incidences increase Fax: 352.245.6278 Fax: 352.854.8031 Fax:provide 352.528.0721 and comfort and clarity with age, it is not an inevitable part while helping to solve it. of aging, rather a signal that your Accepting Most Insurances. New Patients Welcome.


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(and beyond)

With a plethora of camping choices in this beautiful state, here’s a take on the best of the best. By Brett Ballantini


Coastal Camping

Photo by Ebyabe

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Anastasia boasts four miles of pristine beach and incredible canoeing, kayaking, surfing and fishing. Paddlers can navigate the park’s tidal salt marsh (Salt Run), while hikers can explore a nicely shaded nature trail. To catch your breath afterward, stand anywhere near the middle of the beach and it seems like the surf and sand run on forever. floridastateparks.org/park/Anastasia (904) 461-2033

Bahia Honda State Park

Big Pine Key

This one is a haul (12 miles south of Marathon) but well worth the effort, because when you arrive, you’re in paradise. Undeniably deep blue waters, tropical breezes and endless sunshine could convince campers that they’ve been transported to a Virgin Island getaway—only one with the amenities of two boat ramps and three different campsites. Obviously, the beaches and snorkeling are not only as good as you’ll find in the state but the entire country. The coral reefs off the Keys are accessible, as well. floridastateparks.org/park/Bahia-Honda (305) 872-2353

Bill Baggs Cape Florida State Park

Key Biscayne

Florida’s oldest standing structure, the Cape Florida Light (built in 1825 and reconstructed in 1846) is a highlight. This park was also once a stop on the Underground Railroad. In recreational terms, Cape Florida boasts a mile of sandy Atlantic beachfront. Visitors can bike or kayak, and the seawall along Biscayne Bay provides amazing fishing. Tours of the lighthouse are available, and there are two Cuban restaurants on the grounds as well. Overnight boat camping is available in No Name Harbor. floridastateparks.org/park/Cape-Florida (305) 361-5811

Blue Spring State Park

Orange City

Not just a fun campsite, it’s also a designated manatee refuge! Blue Spring is the winter home of a growing number of West Indian manatees. Stretching more than 2,600 acres, Blue Spring also includes the largest spring on the St. John’s River. During designated swimming months, visitors scuba or swim in crystal-clear, 73-degree water. The St. John’s River also offers canoeing, fishing and boating. In addition to a full-facility campground, Blue Spring hosts the historic Thursby House, built in 1872, and three covered pavilions for picnicking. floridastateparks.org/park/Blue-Spring (386) 775-3663

Other park photos courtesy of the Florida Department of Environmental Protection

St. Augustine

Photo by Kimberly Eisele

Anastasia State Park

Photo by Joe Dube

ith more than 160 state parks in Florida, there’s no definitive list of camping hot spots. And because the state boasts one of the best park systems in the country, you truly can’t go wrong camping in any of those locations. However, our informal survey yielded these as the hottest spots to pitch a tent and take in nature.


Gadgets Galore

Caladesi Island State Park

Once you’ve picked a spot to take in nature, be sure you’ve got the latest camping gear. We’ve got you covered.

Dunedin

Cayo Costa State Park

Boca Grande

This is a great gulf-view campsite and is only accessible by boat or ferry. Cayo Costa is incredibly private (offering nine miles of deserted beach) and surrounded by water. Tent sites can accommodate up to eight; public restrooms, showers and potable water are available. If you want fishing, kayaking, snorkeling or swimming to be part of your camping experience, you can’t beat Cayo Costa. floridastateparks.org/park/Cayo-Costa (941) 964-0375

Falling Waters State Park

Photo by Karen Boudrie

Not only is Caladesi Island a spectacular Gulf Coast beach, it’s a rarity in that it has been kept completely natural. Swimming, sunbathing and beachcombing are musts here. Saltwater fishing is available by boat or off shore. Two three-mile trails, one for hikers and another for kayakers, are available. Overnight boat camping is available, and access to the island is only available by boat or ferry. floridastateparks.org/park/Caladesi-Island (727) 469-5918

Florida Caverns State Park

Marianna

The standout characteristic of Florida Caverns is right there in the name: The park boasts dry (airfilled) caves and is the only park in Florida to offer cave tours. You’ll see limestone stalactites, stalagmites, soda straws, draperies and flowstones. Outside of the caves, there’s the Chipola River and Blue Hole Spring to offer boating, canoeing and fishing. Another rarity: Florida Caverns boasts a nine-hole, New Deal-era golf course. floridastateparks.org/park/Florida-Caverns (850) 482-1228

Photo by Deborah Phillips

You won’t find many waterfalls in Florida, but you will at Falling Waters: a 73-foot limestone cliff that spills water into a huge sinkhole. (The sinkhole itself is a 100-foot deep, 20-foot wide pit.) The water’s final destination is unknown. Falling Waters also boasts a butterfly garden and offers a lake for swimming. Campsites are nestled among the shady pines of this North Florida getaway. floridastateparks.org/park/Falling-Waters (850) 638-6130

Photo by D Harrison

Chipley

Fort Clinch State Park

Fernandina Beach

The centerpiece of Fort Clinch is its namesake, a well-maintained 19th century U.S. fort. Troops occupied Fort Clinch during the Civil War and the Spanish-American War, although they never saw combat. Unsurprisingly, Fort Clinch is one of the oldest state parks in Florida. The park boasts a six-mile hiking/biking trail as well as superb fishing and swimming. There are two separate campsites, one at the beach and the other near the Amelia River. floridastateparks.org/park/Fort-Clinch (904) 277-7274

BioLite Campstove with Portable Grill Make fire with a snap of the fingers—and that cooking heat charges the battery pack. Then, the battery pack can charge your USB devices! Talk about a multitasker. biolitestove.com, $190 CamelBak All-Clear Bottle Dirty water gets cleaned in one minute. A USB plug is needed to recharge, but each full charge cleans 80 bottles. camelbak.com, $89 Eton Scorpion NOAA weather/AM/FM radio with an LED flashlight. Rugged and splash proof, the radio is also capable of charging your other devices using a hand crank or solar panels. shopetoncorp.com, $50 Garmin The Quatix ($400) is a wristwatch that provides hands-free navigation with a built-in GPS, compass, thermometer, altimeter and barometer. Connects wirelessly to smartphones and heart rate monitors and can be recharged via USB. And for a GPS that’s nearly a smartphone, get the Monterra ($650), with Android and Google Play apps, Wi-Fi, 3-D maps, camera and a touch screen. buy.garmin.com JakPak Waterproof Jacket This do-all jacket converts to a sleeping bag and a tent. jakpak.com, $200 LifeProof Braven BRV-1 These waterproof Bluetooth speakers are built tough for the outdoors. lifeproof.com, $180 Lumix TS5 Tough This camera is dustproof, shockproof, freeze proof and waterproof with Wi-Fi capability to wirelessly transfer content. shop.panasonic.com, $400 OCT ’16 ›

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Courtesy of Pinellas County Communications Department

Coastal Camping

Fort De Soto County Park

Grayton Beach State Park

Fort De Soto is a huge Pinellas County park, boasting 238 campsites and full services. The park is made up of five offshore keys. True to its name, Fort De Soto is a historical park, and on its grounds crossed Spanish explorers, Native Americans and Civil War soldiers. It’s very family-friendly, with washers and dryers, electricity, fresh water, picnic tables and grills, restrooms, showers, and even a camp play area and store. Families can enjoy more than seven miles of waterfront, including sand dunes, nature trails, a paved bike trail, a canoe trail and two fishing piers. pinellascounty.org/park (727) 582-2267

If a magical sunset is an integral part of your camping experience, there’s no better spot in the country than Grayton Beach. But before the sun drops, hit one of the park’s nature trails, taking you through terrain that seems ripped right from a rain forest. There are more than four miles of trails for cyclists and hikers, while hitting the water in a canoe or kayak will lead you to a salt marsh, Western Lake. floridastateparks.org/park/Grayton-Beach (805) 231-4210

Santa Rosa Beach

Ocala National Forest

Silver Springs

Little Manatee River State Park

Wimauma

Gamble Rogers Memorial State Recreation Area

Flagler Beach

Not many parks are named after folk singers, but this is one. And at Gamble Rogers, you can enjoy the music of the waters of the Intracoastal Waterway and the Atlantic Ocean, which means there are tons of boating options available. The 34-site campground is full-service and abuts the Atlantic Ocean. floridastateparks.org/park/Gamble-Rogers (386) 517-2086 044

› Ocala

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The Little Manatee River, named an Outstanding Florida Water, runs for four and a half miles through the park, through 11 unique natural communities. The river, and its expertly maintained natural areas, makes Little Manatee a true treasure for nature lovers. The park features the Oxbow Nature Trail for hiking, as well as canoeing and horseback riding options. floridastateparks.org/park/Little-Manatee-River (813) 671-5005

Long Key State Park

Long Key

In Long Key, your tent abuts the Atlantic Ocean itself. There are 60 waterfront campsites, with the ocean as close as 100 feet away. That means you are mere steps from catching a fish for your dinner—you can’t get one fresher than that! Picnic tables and grills are part of each campsite. The highlight of Long Key’s nature trails is a special trail for kayakers that traverses a shallow lagoon. floridastateparks.org/park/Long-Key (303) 664-4815

The southernmost forest in the continental United States is also the world’s largest contiguous sand pine scrub forest, hence the nickname “Big Scrub.” Ocala’s 75-mile portion of the 1,300-mile Florida National Scenic Trail is breathtaking, comprising 360,000 acres on which to hike. More than 600 lakes, rivers and springs are on the property, including three first-magnitude springs in which visitors can dive, snorkel and swim year-round. fs.usda.gov/ocala (352) 625-2520

Paynes Prairie Preserve State Park

Micanopy

In 1971, Paynes Prairie became the first Florida state preserve and is now a National Natural Landmark. There is an extraordinary variety of animal life at the park, including 270 bird species, wild horses, bison and alligators. Visitors can map out their preferred hiking/horseback riding/ bicycling trail (of eight total) from the panoramic view atop a 50-foot high observation tower. Feel free to fish on Lake Wauburg, although gasoline motors are not allowed. floridastateparks.org/park/Paynes-Prairie (352) 466-3397

Photo by Barb-Winters

Tierra Verde


T.H. Stone Memorial St. Joseph Peninsula State Park

St. Joe

Another campsite that is also considered a top U.S. beach-going (and bird-watching) destination, T.H. Stone offers double-water access to both the Gulf of Mexico and St. Joseph Bay. The peninsula has recorded sightings of around 250 bird species. T.H. Stone is divided into two areas, totaling 119 campsites: Gulf Breeze (open-air and accommodating to large campers) and Shady Pines (smaller and more secluded). floridastateparks.org/park/St-Joseph (850) 227-1327

Meet Earl Survival Tablet This multifaceted tablet acts as a GPS, weather sensor, AM/FM/SW/LW radio, Bluetooth 4.0, walkie-talkie (20-mile radius), barometer, thermometer and compass. Plus it’s solar charging and features Android 4.4 technology. The best part? The excellent battery life. meetearl.com, $299 MPOWERD Luci This solar lantern capable of lighting 15 square feet with 80 lumens. mpowerd.com, $15 Nemo Helio Bagged pressure shower operates by foot pedal, with water warmed by the sun. nemoequipment.com, $100 Olympus OM-D E-M5 You can’t preserve memories better than with this, a weatherproof camera that takes 1080p video and 16.1- megapixel photos. getolympus.com, $1,300

Sebastian Inlet State Park

Melbourne Beach

This Treasure Coast park boasts top-tier fishing and surfing on three miles of beach. Kayaks and canoes can navigate the Indian River Lagoon. Best of all, campsites are mere minutes’ walking distance from the beach. floridastateparks.org/park/Sebastian-Inlet (321) 984-4852

St. Andrews State Park

Panama City Beach

Despite its lineage as a former military reservation, St. Andrews’ boasts sugar white sands and emerald green waters. Almost two miles of beach can be enjoyed on both the Gulf of Mexico and Grand Lagoon. Obviously, water sports are big here, including canoeing, kayaking, swimming, snorkeling and scuba diving. There are ample opportunities for bird watching and fishing as well. floridastateparks.org/park/St-Andrews (800) 233-5140 Ext. 5141

Torreya State Park

Bristol

Torreya is named for a rare species of tree that grows on the bluffs along the Apalachicola River. In the 1930s, the Civilian Conservation Corps created the park, which is now a great spot for camping, hiking, bird-watching (more than 100 species have been recorded at Torreya) and picnicking. Heavily forested, the park offers 16 miles of hiking trails and 29 campsites. floridastateparks.org/park/Torreya (850) 643-2674

Petzl NAO A lithium-ion headlamp with a light sensor to automatically shine the amount of light you need for map reading or hiking. petzl.com, $140 Sawyer Squeeze The Sawyer Squeeze is a bagged water filtration system for hikes and climbs. sawyersafetravel2.com, $60 Sony Digital Reading Binoculars No mere binoculars with 25x magnification, these also record video in H-D and 3-D modes. store.sony.com, $2,000

Take Note! Particularly in the winter months and on all weekends, each of Florida’s parks may fill to capacity. It’s strongly recommended that visitors call ahead to make campsite reservations.

Victorinox Expedition Kit This 41-function, multi-tool kit features an LED light, thermometer, barometer, altimeter and alarm clock. victorinox.com, $185 X-1 Surge This contact headset boasts waterproof earphones and a built-in microphone in case you prefer music to the sounds of nature. X-1.com, $70 OCT ’16 ›

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’ n i l l a F r o F

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Florida’s autumn activities offer abundant family fun. By Brett Ballantini


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hen the leaves start to trickle down from the trees and the humidity wanes (even if just slightly), it’s a cue to bring out the pumpkins, take in a tune, tour the area amusement parks and even try to finally solve that tricky corn maze. Florida offers a huge variety of autumn amusements as well as some tricks and treats. Page on and earmark some special fun this fall.

The Carnival Is Coming!

Fun Lo Fairs cal & Fes ts If you want ke to ep to homit close events e, these conve are all n to Oca ient la.

Nuttiness

28th Annual Central Florida Fall Harvest & Peanut Festival HERITAGE PARK, WILLISTON October 1 This great event is one day only (9am-4pm), so don’t miss out on this famous fest where you can go nuts for peanuts. Sample and purchase boiled, baked, roasted or fried peanuts—and if you’re fortunate, bump into Mr. Peanut himself! The festival also features rides, music, and arts and crafts booths with a peanut theme.

Blessed Trinity Carnival

Get Cultured

BLESSED TRINITY CHURCH AND SCHOOL, OCALA October 20-23

CITIZENS’ CIRCLE, OCALA October 8 The Cultural Festival is Ocala’s celebration of diversity in the community, “a kaleidoscope of fun, food, music and dance.” Also enjoy cultural demonstrators, ethnic or world arts and crafts, and children’s activities and entertainment.

Talk about a huge weekend: At least 40,000 people attend the carnival every year, enjoying to dozens of rides, playing games and traipsing through the fun house. When the munchies set in, enjoy food from local restaurateurs (past chow has come from Mojo Grill, Carrabba’s and Ocala Ale House) and traditional carny fare.

ocalafl.org (352) 368-5517

btcarnival.org (352) 622-5808

12th Annual Ocala Cultural Festival

Jeep Mayhem

19th Annual Jeeptoberfest MARKET OF MARION, BELLEVIEW October 14-16

10th Annual GM Octoberfest

If a tagline like “three levels of offroad Jeep mayhem!” captures your fancy, you know where to visit in mid-October. This annual fundraiser for the Ocala Jeep Club is one of the largest Jeep-only events in the entire Southeast. The Show & Shine Jeep competition, held on the square in downtown Ocala, takes place on opening night and is limited to the first 100 Jeeps that register. There are also three competitive courses and a ramp for off-roading.

SILVER SPRINGS STATE PARK, OCALA October 1

ocalajeepclub.com/jeeptoberfest bethbluejeep@aol.com

willistonfl.com (352) 528-5552

Rev It Up

This General Motors enthusiast event is strictly for fun, with judging and awards by popular vote—as David Letterman used to joke, no wagering. GM owners and fans mingle in the relaxing garden, enjoying all the great vehicles on display.

Turn Back The Clock McIntosh 1890s Festival

5835 AVENUE G, MCINTOSH October 22 Dive deep into the past 120 years, and stroll through 280 vendor tents and the historic Old Train Depot. Between 35,000 and 50,000 visitors are expected. Don’t turn your clock too far, though: The festival, which traces its roots to 1974, runs just one day, from 8am to 5pm.

friendsofmcintosh.org (352) 591-4038

npdlink.com (352) 861-8701 x4227

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Cooterween Costumes Hot Stuff

Rockin’ Good Times

LIBERTY PARK, 286 N. APOPKA AVE., INVERNESS October 28-30

TUSCAWILLA PARK, OCALA November 12

Great American Cooter Festival

You wouldn’t think so much craziness could be packed into little ol’ Inverness. The festival, active since 2004, features a barbecue cook-off, kayak racing, live entertainment and groovy music, children’s activities, carnival rides, food and craft vendors—and, of course, the Cooterween costume contest.

Marion County’s 35th Annual Chili Cook-Off SOUTHEASTERN LIVESTOCK PAVILION, 2232 NE JACKSONVILLE ROAD, OCALA November 5 Tickle your taste buds with 40 varieties of chili, crafted by flavor masters. This is some serious spice, buster. Cool off with music from The Band 4Play and others. Rain or shine, the chili will be piping hot from 10am to 5pm.

The best live music fest in Ocala returns again with a national headliner and eight regional music acts across two stages for daylong tunes. Getting hungry dashing between stages and dancing up a storm? A dozen food trucks will supply the feast.

marioncountychilicookoff.com (352) 351-8840

feeldowntownlive.com (352) 401-3980

cooterfestival.com (352) 726-2611

Downhome Happiness Farm City Festival

High Octane

LIBERTY PARK, 286 N. APOPKA DRIVE, INVERNESS November 12

Ocala Pumpkin Run

CASTRO FARMS, 7700 OLD BLICHTON ROAD, OCALA October 28-30 Castro Farms boasts 400 acres, and they need every one of them to pack all the motorized fun into this weekend. The run features monster truck rides, classic and custom car shows, a NASCAR simulator, FMX Motocross bikes, BMX bike riders and Marion County Therapeutic Riding Association horses. The festivities also feature live music, Frisbee dogs, beekeeping, chainsaw exhibitions, a magic show and obstacle courses. The children’s area—where kids are encouraged to arrive in costume—features bounce houses and slides, hay rides, pony rides, a huge pumpkin patch, face painting, pumpkin decorating, games and trunkor-treating (parking lot trick-or-treat).

ocalapumpkinrun.com (352) 620-9998

3rd Annual Harvest Fest Music & Food Truck Festival

Boot Scootin’

Riverhawk Music Festival SERTOMA YOUTH RANCH, BROOKSVILLE November 10-13 Sertoma Youth Ranch is a campground that will accommodate at least 2,500 attendees as well as overnight camping. Delta Rae headlines a roster of 13-plus national and local music acts, including the Travelin’ McCourys, Solas, Driftwood, Cornmeal, Shiny Ribs, Frank Solivan and Dirty Kitchen, and Grandpa’s Cough Medicine. It’s not just an adult event, however; there is a kid’s parade and children’s vendors as well as hayrides, piñatas, arts and crafts, games, ping-pong ball race and face-painting.

riverhawkmusic.com (863) 984-8445

This festival is a celebration of local farmers, growers and ranchers, as part of the national Farm City Week. Come see local food and natural product vendors, representatives of University of Florida’s Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS), and 4-H clubs—and don’t forget about the live music, tractor parade and petting zoo.

inverness-fl.gov (352) 726-2611

Lake of Fire

Lake Hernando Dragon Boat Festival HERNANDO November 12 Who knew such an awesome boat race could be tucked away in the modest hamlet of Hernando? Last year’s competition featured 58 teams—including the Blazing Paddles, Brannen Bank Assassins, Citrus Crazies, Jazzy Paddlers and This Boat Rocks—competing in 11- or 21-person teams. The festival also boasts a dozen or more food vendors, live music, 50 arts and crafts vendors, and youth games. For one day, Hernando becomes the boat-racing capital of Florida.

lakehernandodragonboatfestival.com (352) 201-6500

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Ready, Steady, Go

6th Annual Inverness Grand Prix DOWNTOWN INVERNESS November 18-19 The Grand Prix Motorsport Festival is a high-speed, five-turn street kart race through downtown Inverness. November 18 marks the Street Party, with the all-day races taking place the next day. This family-friendly event also includes car shows and vendors.

inverness-fl.gov/387/Inverness-Grand-Prix (352) 726-2611

Let There Be Light 33rd Annual Light Up Ocala HISTORIC DOWNTOWN OCALA November 19 Light Up Ocala is more than just a tree lighting ceremony. The 4-9pm event includes live entertainment, crafts, children’s activities, ice-skating, food, the Junior Sunshine parade and a Santa visit. But the highlight, of course, is illuminating Ocala’s 42-foot tree.

ocalafl.org/lightup (352) 368-5517

Corn ents e-M z a M A is the Fall time to t perfecyour way wind a puzzle h througe of corn! mad

Search for the Great Pumpkin! Dunnellon Pickin’ Patch DUNNELLON Fridays through Sundays, October 1-30 The Pickin’ Patch has a heady claim as Florida’s “only true pumpkin patch.” The patch itself is a sort of marvel, because pumpkins normally thrive in cooler conditions than Florida offers. Besides, why choose from a farm or grocery’s selections when you can get into the field yourself and cut your perfect jack-o-lantern pumpkin right off the vine? The 13-acre farm also offers gourds of all sizes as well as sunflower bouquets. And the whole family can be entertained by a corn maze, hayrides and a hay fort.

11000 Rolling Hills Road, Dunnellon dunnellonpumpkinpatch.com (352) 533-4344

Corny Challenge

Scott’s Maze Adventures and Corn Maze LONG & SCOTT FARMS, MOUNT DORA October 1-November 14 Long & Scott’s truly amazing fall complex is sure to please families. Founded in 1963 and carving mazes out of cornfields since 2003, 30,000 visitors will take the challenge this fall. The maze is actually two: a six-acre challenge and a one-acre mini-maze. Not up for meandering through corn? Check out a 60-foot super slide, labyrinth/ rock maze, rope maze, playground, children’s zip line, jumping pillow, mist maze, three-acre tree maze and tire sand pile.

Hollo Back

Coon Hollo Corn Maze MICANOPY Fridays through Sundays, October 7-November 6 You can’t beat the fun at Coon Hollo, which is much more than its storied crop maze. Other activities include a hayride to feed the cows, pony rides, a farm train, pasture putt-putt, a burlap sack slide, hay bale obstacle course and farm scavenger hunt. For a small fee, pick your own sunflowers. And when your stomach gets empty, stop by Nana’s Country Store and The Feed Trough concession stand.

coonhollowcornmaze.com (352) 318-9258

Pick Up a Pack of Pumpkins Druid Hills Pumpkin Patch DRUID HILLS UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, OCALA October 8-28 (Monday-Saturday 9am8pm, Sunday noon-6pm) Every fall season, the church rolls out pumpkins of all shapes, sizes and colors. There are cutouts for photo ops, a storytelling circle for children and wonderful spirit throughout.

druidhillsocala.org (352) 629-5688

longandscottfarms.com (352) 383-6900

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Tasty Treats

Epcot International Food & Wine Festival

Biking By The Waves 24th Annual Biketoberfest DAYTONA BEACH October 13-16 Hop on your hog and head east to the beach and a fall Daytona tradition, under sun, in warm breezes and listening to great live music. Pro riders will compete in the Daytona International Speedway’s Motorcycle Races—always a thrill. And don’t forget about the motorcycle vendors, set up to supply needs and answer questions from riders and wannabes alike.

daytonabeach.com/biketoberfest (386) 255-0415

EPCOT CENTER, ORLANDO Through November 14 Thirty unique food kiosks provide the foundation of this fest, but there’s much more. The Eat to the Beat concert series features nightly concerts, including Living Colour, Blues Traveler, Los Lobos and Chaka Khan. There’s a festival stage hosted by ABC-TV’s The CHEW, and various one-off and continuous exhibits, including dessert and drink specials and book signings.

disneyworld.disney.go.com (407) 939-5277

Shake, Rattle and Reptile 50th Annual Rattlesnake Festival & Run SAN ANTONIO (NEAR TAMPA) October 15-16

Opa!

St. Augustine Greek Festival FRANCIS FIELD, ST. AUGUSTINE October 7-9 Looking for a celebration of all things Greek? Look no further than St. Augustine in October, where Greek food, music, dancing and heritage run throughout the weekend. Delicious homemade foods (including lamb and souvlaki) and pastries (baklava, anyone?) are keystones, as is traditional Greek music (from the Hellenic Band) and dance. But Greek Fest additionally offers an arts and crafts-based outdoor marketplace and a Kids’ Center (featuring a rock-climbing wall) with carnival rides and games. Winding up a second decade of Greek celebration, this year St. Augustine promises festivities at Francis Field that are as fun as ever.

stauggreekfest.com (904) 829-0504

There aren’t many fall celebrations with as much history behind them as San Antonio’s Rattlesnake Festival & Run. True to its name, the rattlesnake show is a core element. However, there is a lot more to do, whether taking in Cowboy Tom, Nerdy Noah’s juggling show, the Family Bike Ride, gopher races, kid’s games, food trucks, or arts and crafts vendors. Stretching back to 1979, the Rattlesnake Run takes competitors through hills, sidewalks, groves and over a bridge in Pasco County’s fresh country air; this year, there are five- and one-mile races as well as a human/dog one-mile race. Music will be provided by the Beaumont Family Bluegrass Band.

rattlesnakefestival.com (352) 588-4444

See Food

47th Annual Cedar Key Seafood Festival CEDAR KEY October 15-16 Move over New England, Florida’s second-oldest city is coming after your famous clam chowder! Cedar Key’s long-time seafood extravaganza runs from 9am to 5pm on both days and features local clam chowders, smoked mullet dip, raw and fried oysters, and corn on the cob. The fest also sells local crafts: boxes made from nearby cedar trees, egret lawn art and preserved/mounted lobsters and crabs, all from more than 200 local artists. As a bonus, this is the only time of year visitors can tour Seahorse Key, three miles away and now part of the protected Cedar Key National Wildlife Refuge; a shuttle boat travels to the island and lighthouse, which dates back to before the Civil War.

cedarkey.org (352) 543-5600

Pumpkins by the Bay 8th Annual Sarasota Pumpkin Festival SARASOTA October 28-30 The centerpiece of this fun fest is the pumpkin patch and maze, fun for kids and adults alike. The Sarasota Pumpkin Festival also boasts live bands and street performers, pie-eating contests, a carnival area with rides, “inflatable land,” face painting, a petting zoo and pony rides. Naturally, there is also a beer garden, food vendors and craft stands. Kids are encouraged to enjoy a free hayride and trick-or-treat in the vendor area.

sarasotapumpkinfestival.com (941) 219-8410

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SATURDAY, NOV. 5th, 2016

10:00am - 5:00pm rain or shine

Children’s area Over 60 different chilies Foodcourt by Mojo Grill Bake sale Craft beer tastings provided by Tri Eagle Sales

2ND ANNUAL

Hot Rods & Sweet Rides CAR AND TRUCK SHOW

Live entertainment featuring The Band 4Play Vote for your favorite chili and best decorated booth!

Southeastern Livestock Pavilion | 2232 NE Jacksonville Rd in Ocala

www.marioncountychilicookoff.com | 352-351-8840 Limited team and car registrations available. SPONSORED BY: Proceeds benefit The Cornerstone School

Opa! Greek Cruise 11TH ANNUAL

February 3-12, 2017

Come and enjoy: ARUBA, CURACAO, BONAIRE & LABADEE

Entertainment: The one and only BASILE • A NIGHT IN ATHENS • THE AEGEAN DUO (A Greek Festival at Sea, special activities, Greek food & new surprises!)

Prices start at

$999 per person

You must book with TravelGroup to attend our private events.

Sponsored by St. Mark Greek Orthodox Church of Ocala, FL

www.opacruise.com For reservations and information please call: 561-447-0750, ext. 102 • 1-866-447-0750 Email: opacruise@travelgroupint.com OCT ’16 ›

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7th Annual Stone Crab Festival

owee If Hallr fall is you t, don’t h highlig ese tricks h t s mis eats. and tr

NAPLES October 28-30 MasterChef Season 6 finalist Derrick Peltz kicks off the festivities on Friday night, and the weekend is packed from there. Enjoy tons of live music (including Little Eddie and the Fat Fingers), and activities as varied as military tributes, water cruises, Segway and trolley tours, and Everglades expeditions. Every day is centered around a block party and, of course, mind-blowingly good seafood.

BUSCH GARDENS, TAMPA Thursdays through Sundays through October 30 For more than 15 years, Busch Gardens has been scaring the pants off of visitors with Howl-o-Scream. This adult feature assaults guests with terrific illusions that spill into emotional bursts and adrenaline rushes. Plus, you can ride roller coasters in the dark!

Horror-ble Halloween

53rd Annual Florida Seafood Festival

Halloween Horror Nights

APALACHICOLA November 4-5

floridaseafoodfestival.com (850) 653-4720

Lights, Camera, Action 31st Annual Fort Lauderdale International Film Festival FORT LAUDERDALE November 4-20 Through more than three decades, the internationally acclaimed FLIFF has seen an amazing who’s who of superstars grace its red carpet: Martin Scorsese, Michael Caine, Tony Curtis, Vincent Price, Kevin Spacey, Richard Attenborough, Matt Damon, Ben Kingsley, Ed Harris and Michael Moore. This year’s fest will host more than 150 films from American independent and world cinema. The Florida Arts Council rates FLIFF as the best in the state—and at 17 days, the Guinness Book of World Records names it the Longest Film Festival in the world.

fliff.com (954) 760-9898

UNIVERSAL, ORLANDO Through October 31

Photo courtesy of Walt Disney World

It’s hard to imagine a prettier site for a festival than this one, at the mouth of the Apalachicola River, under the oak trees of Battery Park. Noteworthy events include oyster eating and oyster shucking contests, blue crab races, the 5K Redfish Run, and tonging for treasure. Also enjoy delicious seafood (of course), arts and crafts exhibits, live music, photo contests, a parade and a festival history exhibit.

Gentle Jolts

Mickey’s Not-So-Scary Halloween Party MAGIC KINGDOM, KISSIMMEE Through October 31 A kid-friendly take on Halloween features Disney characters in costume and Mickey’s nightly Boo-To-You parade, led by the Headless Horseman. There’s also a nightly Happy HalloWishes fireworks show, where families can sing along to remixes of Disney villain theme songs.

disneyworld.disney.go.com (407) 939-5277

The streets of Universal Studios come alive with monsters, maniacs and hordes of horrifying mutants. Sound like your bag? Well, then stop in to see how nightmarish a Halloween event can get. The grounds are marked with terrifying haunted houses and punctuated with original frights and authentic horror movie moments. Want scare zones? Universal’s got ’em in bunches, with creatures lurking around every turn. Additionally, live shows, rides and attractions will be active for the event.

SEAWORLD, ORLANDO Weekends in October Looking for a “fantasea” featuring trick-or-treating, sea-themed activities like arts and crafts, animal encounters and whimsical characters? SeaWorld’s Spooktacular celebration is a perfect fit for you, included with SeaWorld regular admission.

seaworldparks.com (888) 800-5447

halloweenhorrornights.com (407) 363-8000

Building Up Tension Brick-or-Treat

LEGOLAND, ORLANDO Weekends in October, plus October 31 Legoland calls Brick-or-Treat “spooky, kooky fun for kids,” and that sums it up well. The entertainment gets no more frightening than light scares, with children picking up treats on the Brick-orTreat Trail, huge LEGO models, build activities, the world’s largest LEGO jack-o-lantern, a scavenger hunt and a fireworks show in Pirates’ Cove.

florida.legoland.com (877) 350-5346

.com

Frights Under The Sea Halloween Spooktacular

Redfish Running

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Howl-o-Scream

seaworldparks.com (888) 800-5447

stonecrabfestival.org (239) 595-3962

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Shriekback Photo courtesy of SeaWorld Orlando

Crabby Snacks

ou Y r o F Boo! n

Photo courtesy of Legoland Florida

Continued from pg. 50


Celebrate the

100TH BIRTHDAY

of Tuscawilla Park!

Some of the FUN ACTIVITIES we have planned... Live Music • Modern Dance • Plein Air Painting Participatory Art Projects • Culinary Offerings

We are busy putting the final touches on the Art Park...

Hope to see you there!

FIREWORKS! at 7:45 p.m.

Bring the whole family and celebrate the Centennial Birthday of Tuscawilla Park with the opening of the NEW Tuscawilla Art Park! WHEN: October 15, 2016 • 5–8:30 p.m. (Dedication at 6 p.m.) WHERE: Tuscawilla Park, 223 NE 5th St., Ocala, FL 34470 QUESTIONS? City of Ocala Cultural Arts Office 352-629-8447 or amarcello@ocalafl.org MORE INFO & BEST VIEWING LOCATION FOR FIREWORKS:

www.ocalafl.org/tpark100years


f i D r fe t en nd a McFarla By Cynthi an g i n John Jer Photos By

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Let’s face it. We can’t all have office jobs, and the truth is, for many people, that would be tantamount to a prison sentence. There are a host of jobs that take a special skill set and definitely don’t require a suit or heels. Read on to meet four people with career choices some of us might find a bit unsettling... but that they couldn’t be happier with.


B

Forensic Entomologist

low flies don’t have to be smart to help solve crime. They just need to go about their business and leave it to a trained expert to unravel the puzzle. As a forensic entomologist, Jason Byrd, Ph.D., is that expert, and answering questions about death—thanks to insects—is something he does on a regular basis. If you were a fan of the original CSI, you’re already familiar with Byrd’s work. Not only did character Gil Grissom rely on insects to solve cases, but Byrd himself served as the show’s forensic entomology consultant for 337 episodes over 15 seasons. (A photo of the CSI cast hangs in his office.) “In most cases, the things they did on ‘CSI’ were based in science; although, it was glamorized for television,” says Byrd. “In the real world, you couldn’t solve most cases in that time frame. The negative thing was that it created unrealistic expectations of law enforcement. But on the positive side, the show made forensic science a household name, and now crime labs and forensic science programs are much better funded than when I was seeking my education.” Byrd always had an interest in natural science and wanted to be a crime scene technician. When he checked with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, he learned he could pursue that dream with a four-year science degree in entomology.

Byrd not only obtained his Bachelor of Science but went on to earn his master’s degree and did his thesis on forensic entomology. He became just the ninth board-certified forensic entomologist in North America. Byrd has been consulting on cases with law enforcement since 1995. Law enforcement relies on forensic entomology to provide a minimum post mortem interval (PMI), which tells how much time has elapsed since death. Forensic entomology also provides answers related to toxicology, trauma analysis, location of death and genetic analysis (DNA). “There are many different species of flies, and because flies are very mobile and ubiquitous, their quick growth rate is used to help determine time of death,” Byrd explains. “A three-day-old maggot (the larvae of a fly) on a body tells you the person has been dead at least three days, so we can determine minimum time very well. Aquatic insects can also tell us how long a body was in a lake, for instance.” Both adult and larval samples are ycollected at the scene. A three-da t o g g a Sometimes the larvae old m y d o b must be allowed to on a the develop into adults tells you s in order to accurately person ha t a d a e d identify the species, and been e e r h t t make no mistake: Species leas

e days, so w e n i m r e t can de e m i t m u minim . very well


Dif fer ent identification is crucial to solving a case. “In many cases, we discover maggots on a body that are not from fly species found in this area,” says Byrd. “So then law enforcement can start looking for missing persons reports in areas where we know that species is found.” Entomology ties closely into other pathology. Trauma—gunshot or knife wound, for example—will change the way insects colonize a body when they show up at the scene. Maggots can even be used to recover human DNA if there’s no soft tissue left on a body when it’s discovered. Maggots are the most common insect Byrd deals with. Beetles are a close second. Both are found at crime scenes, although beetles show up after the flies and develop more slowly. “I always thought I’d be a crime scene tech, so this is quite different, but I still go to the scene and help solve crimes,” notes Byrd, who spends about one third of his time in the field. “What I like even more is the educational aspect of teaching law enforcement how to process crime scenes.” After 23 years working on human cases, in 2009, Byrd added animal cases to his workload. About 25 percent of his cases are now animalbased. He finds it especially satisfying to help get an animal cruelty or poaching conviction when one would never have come about without the help of forensic entomology. It’s obvious Byrd enjoys his job. You also have to appreciate the man’s sense of humor. Who else could get away with a light-up maggot and giant beetle paperweight on their desk? At the time of our interview, he was working on a dozen cases. “Want to see some maggots?” he asked, as he headed to the lab. Actually, I couldn’t think of a more appropriate ending to our visit.

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Nuisance Animal Removal

ritter under the house? Suspicious rustlings in the attic? There’s someone you can call. And no, it’s not Ghostbusters. When you call a nuisance wildlife control company like Centurian Wildlife Services, they send out a trained service technician to handle the situation. (Service technician sounds much less

dramatic than “nuisance animal wrangler,” but the end result is the same.) “We get a little bit of everything, from rats to coyotes, snakes, bats and armadillos,” says Chris Hartmann, 25, general manager with Centurian Wildlife Services. “We actually get quite a few calls about roof rats in houses in the city.” Animals in crawl spaces and attics are a common call. In many cases, the culprit is a squirrel or


raccoon. The service tech catches the animal in a humane trap using whatever bait the particular species is most fond of. Junk food works in many cases; Hartmann says you can catch a lot of critters with a Slim Jim or honey bun. After safely removing the animal, the service technician also cleans up any mess left behind (urine, droppings, insects, nesting debris, etc.), identifies the access points and properly seals them off. Gable vents and loose shingles frequently serve as openings for critters determined to find entrance. Hartmann says that about 90 percent of the time, the critters are alive, which he greatly prefers over the alternative. His worst call involved a skunk that had crawled into the insulation under a mobile home and died. By the time the homeowner called, the carcass was decaying. (And in case you’re wondering, a rotting skunk smells even worse than a live one.) Here in Florida, snakes often find themselves in places where homeowners don’t want them. The largest snake Hartmann has been called out for was a 5 1/2-foot Eastern Diamondback that had taken up residence in someone’s stable. Most calls are handled during daylight hours, unless there’s something potentially dangerous like a snake in the house. That qualifies as an emergency, even if the call comes in the middle of the night. “If someone calls about a snake in their pond or on their property, it’s very difficult to trap those, especially when they’re in areas where snakes come and go. Even if we caught a dozen, there would be more,” Hartmann explains. “But if there’s a snake in a house or barn, we can set traps.” The best scenario is when the homeowner can keep eyes on the animal until the service tech arrives. Hartmann remembers one urgent call when the homeowner swore they’d seen the snake under the porch. When he arrived and searched the area, there was no snake in sight. The frightened homeowner insisted it was right Instead o there and that she could even see part of it. Hartman f writing b finally located a garden hose under the porch, which ook reports o turned out to be the offending “snake,” much to the n Harry Pott homeowner’s embarrassment. er in middle About the only nuisance wildlife call Hartmann won’t school, I w tackle is an alligator. By law, those must be handled by a s reading f Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC). ield guides on Dead skunks aside, Hartmann loves his job. things lik “I love working with animals, and I prefer being outdoors. e identifyi I like the variety, and it definitely beats sitting in a cubicle all ng snakes an day,” he says. d writing “Ever since I can remember, I’ve been catching every reports o animal I could,” laughs Hartmann. “Instead of writing book n those. reports on Harry Potter in middle school, I was reading field guides on things like identifying snakes and writing reports on those. My teachers didn’t appreciate that.”

A

Embalmer and Crematory Operator

t first glance, you might think Matt Von Ohlen’s work is about death, but for him it’s really about life. “I got into this because I really care about families,” says Von Ohlen, 28, a licensed embalmer and crematory operator, who has worked at HiersBaxley Funeral Home in Ocala since 2008. There are three mortuary schools in Florida; Von Ohlen attended the one at St. Pete College. A twoyear program, followed by a one-year internship, is required to become an embalmer. To be a crematory operator, one must be licensed through the state and trained and awarded a certificate by the company of the crematory machine used at the funeral home. “Once the family notifies us that the death has occurred, our staff responds no matter the time of day, and the body is brought to our care center,” says funeral home director Steve Tweedle. “We meet with the family and discuss different services and options. We spend a lot of time with them and use the process known as ‘Share Life’ to find out about the person’s likes, dislikes and to help develop the service,” he explains. Asking for a recent picture of the deceased helps Von Ohlen do the best job possible. Sickness can ravage a person’s body, but his end goal is always to restore dignity, creating the best “memory picture” possible for the family. The deceased remains in a temperaturecontrolled environment until all paperwork and permission from the family is complete. The actual room where the process takes place looks much like a surgical suite, which makes sense as the body’s natural venous system is used for the embalming process. Von Ohlen’s primary tasks are disinfection, so that the family can safely spend time with their loved one, and restoration so the person looks as good as possible. “We make sure their features and expression look natural,” says Von Ohlen. “This part of the OCT ’16 ›

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Dif fer ent

embalming process really does make a difference in the memory picture we’re making for the family.” In most cases, funeral services take place within 48 hours of embalming. Some families request embalming even if their loved one is going to be cremated because they still want a viewing of the body. In the case of cremation, state law requires the death certificate signed by a doctor and a cremation authorization form from the medical examiner’s office. These requirements take a minimum of three to five working days. It is also state law that the body be placed in a cremation container, which can be as simple as a fiberboard container or as fancy as a high-end burial casket. The entire container is then placed in the crematory. Family members are allowed to witness the start of the cremation. Some people might be haunted by the nagging question, is that really my loved one’s remains? “Regardless of whether the family requests burial or cremation, their loved one’s body never leaves our facility,” assures Tweedle. “When someone is to be cremated, for example, they are assigned a number and that number is on all paperwork and on a metal disk that stays with the person at all times. In the case of cremation, that metal disk goes into the crematory and then is placed in the urn with the cremated remains. We have many safeguards in place.” Ironically, the actual process of cremation takes about the same time as embalming, about three to four hours. “Matt is doing a service most people don’t even consider, but it’s a necessary and sensitive one,” says Tweedle. “The family never sees Matt, but we’re glad to know he’s back there.” “If the family is happy with the last memory picture, then what I’ve done is a success,” says Von Ohlen modestly. “That’s very important to me.”

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I got into this becau se I really care abou t families.


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Taxidermist

ood taxidermy is all about lifelike realism. If that mounted deer or elk looks like it just stepped out of the woods, the taxidermist knows his stuff. For Jay Wood, 57, owner of Tony’s Artistic Taxidermy in Hawthorne, Florida, making game animals look alive is what it’s all about. A taxidermist since 1981, Wood initially enrolled as a pre-vet student at the University of Florida. After taking his first deer to be mounted, he ended up dropping out of college, going to work for an experienced taxidermist and learning the trade from the ground up. In 1997, Wood began working for Tony Gilyard and, in 2003, bought out Gilyard, but the sign on the shop never changed. “It’s the oldest taxidermy shop in North Florida; it’s been Tony’s since 1968, so we didn’t change the name,” he explains. So what does it take to turn a hunter’s success into a mount you can proudly display? Time, for one thing. Taxidermy is not a fast process. The hunter typically brings in an unskinned head or, for a full body mount, the entire body (already gutted, of course). It’s usually frozen, so Wood’s first task is to skin it, carefully removing all the flesh with a razor-sharp scalpel. Once the hide is clean, it is salted and allowed to dry. Wood then sends it off to a tannery. Wood’s time line is completely dependent on the tannery, and it’s not unusual for a hide to be there for six months. Once the hide is sent back to Wood, it’s tanned leather with the hair on it. At this point, Wood can get to work.

The hide must be stretched over a hard foam mannequin that looks like the original animal. Taxidermy supply companies make a host of different mannequins. “We do a fair number of life-size mounts, but the most popular is the shoulder mount,” Wood notes. Before it can be glued onto the mannequin, the tanned hide must be pliable. Wood soaks it in water for a couple hours and then places it in a plastic bag overnight. Getting the hide in place is only the beginning. “The biggest thing is getting the expression right. High-quality eyes are important,” says Wood, who uses detailed glass eyes. Then it’s time for finish work, which is handled by Wood’s crew. Ronnie (She’s 85 and has been with the company over 30 years.) does pre-finish work before a mount hits the paint room. Andy takes care of the air brushing, adding final touches to the muzzle and nostrils, inside corner and rims of the eyes and gums (and tongue if the mouth is open). On a life-size predator mount, he also does the pads of the feet. Andy also mounts small animals, fish, and snakes and makes habitat bases. Because of the time a hide must be at the tannery, it usually takes seven or eight months from the time the hunter drops off the head/ body until Wood finishes the mount. A taxidermy mount will last for hundreds of years if kept in a dark vault at low humidity and a temperature of 35 to 40 degrees.

t The bigges thing is e getting th n expressio hright. Hig quality eyes are . important

Of course, you can’t enjoy it in those conditions, so your next best bet is a windowless “man cave.” “Sunlight is the biggest enemy of skin and hair, so you’ll want to keep a mount away from direct sunlight and windows. The darker the room the better,” says Wood. “Climate control is especially important. Otherwise, the changes in temperature and humidity will break it down over time.” The most unusual project Wood ever completed has to be the Dale Earnhardt goat (with the number three on its side!) he did for the Texas Motor Speedway. That particular mount was more work than usual because Wood had to make a plaster cast of the actual body, as taxidermy supply companies didn’t have a domestic goat form available. Although Wood enjoys hunting, he is a strong advocate for careful management of wild animals to maintain healthy populations. He’s also an animal lover who has two dogs and six cats. “I’m always picking up strays,” he admits with a smile.


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You’ve heard the saying “Art is everywhere.” And in Florida that’s absolutely true. For both tourists and residents alike who already flock to the state for its inspiring, colorful landscape, it makes picture-perfect sense to drop in on its equally vibrant and diverse art scene. All you art monsters can rock the finer things for free (or nearly free) with this upcoming taste of fun and funky art festivals. Now polish your trendiest specs and come take a look!

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29TH ANNUAL LAS OLAS ART FAIR

600 E LAS OLAS BOULEVARD, FT. LAUDERDALE

October 22-23

s one of the top 100 art festivals in the nation, this Ft. Lauderdale fair presents 200 top-notch exhibitors, excelling in a variety of media, including clay, digital, fiber, glass, jewelry, mixed media, painting, photography, printmaking, drawing, sculpture, wood, acrylic and oils. Known as the jewel of the city, chic Las Olas Boulevard connects the Atlantic Ocean at A1A with downtown and extends 17 blocks. For even more of a rousing treat, hop the Sun Trolley to the acclaimed NSU Art Museum or whiz through the waves aboard a water taxi. artfestival.com or (561) 746-6615

32ND ANNUAL MT. DORA CRAFT FAIR

DOWNTOWN MT. DORA

October 22-23

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Photo by Howard Alan Events—www.artfestival.com

Photo courtesy of Winter Park Chamber of Commerce

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he Mt. Dora Craft Fair features an eclectic mix of arts and crafts, including sculpture, ceramics, painting and woodwork from more

43RD ANNUAL WINTER PARK AUTUMN ART FESTIVAL

251 S PARK AVENUE, CENTRAL PARK , WINTER PARK

October 8-9

than a whopping 400 handcraft exhibitors from around the world. Snag a tasty bite, sway to some live tunes and explore the Kid Zone for a complete family-fest experience. Be sure to catch the free shuttles from Mt. Dora High School and Mt. Dora Christian Academy. mountdoracraftfair.com or (352) 217-8390

GREAT GULFCOAST ARTS FESTIVAL SEVILLE SQUARE, PENSACOLA

November 4-6

A Photo courtesy Great Gulfcoast Arts Festival

outed as the only juried fine art festival to proudly feature 180 Florida artists exclusively in 12 categories, this community-oriented sidewalk show presents quality visual art and live entertainment in scenic Central Park, located along historic Park Avenue. Or point your little Rembrandt toward the Crealdé School of Art’s free workshops for children ages 5 and up. Psst, for a days-end respite from the fray, Florida Distributing Co. invites you to check out their beer garden. autumnartfestival.org or (877) 972-4262

Photo courtesy Mount Dora Art Fair

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s an exciting extension to its fine arts collection of 220 exhibitors, Gulfcoast Arts Festival includes a Heritage Art section for intriguing demonstrations on blacksmithing, engraving, spinning, weaving and more. A simultaneous Children’s Arts Festival in Bartram Park lets the kiddies explore a multitude of free activities like face-painting, balloons, clay play, sand art, sidewalk art and creating buttons, masks, crowns, magic wands and jewelry. Here, a student art show will also display 2,000 art pieces from students of Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties. Indulge in an assortment of mouthwatering dishes; then kick back at any of the three entertainment stages for music, dance or children’s performances. ggaf.org


Photo courtesy Art Harvest

53RD ANNUAL ART HARVEST HIGHLANDER PARK , DUNEDIN

November 5-6

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54TH ANNUAL HALIFAX ART FESTIVAL

BEACH STREET, RIVERFRONT PARK , DAY TONA BEACH

November 5-6

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Photo courtesy Downtown Festival and Art Show

f its 250 artists, the Halifax Art Festival divides talent into fine arts and fine craftsmen sections along its posh waterfront. Run entirely by volunteers to benefit the Museum of Arts & Sciences, it also offers antiques and collectibles, a student art competition, live entertainment, putt-putt mini golf contest, children’s activities in the Little Van Gogh tent and your choice of classic festival snacks, international street food or fine dining festival specials at elegant Beach Street restaurants and cafes. And, hey, as long as you’re in the area, that Museum of Arts & Sciences houses yet more compelling art plus a state-of-the-art planetarium only a few miles away. halifaxartfestival.org or (866) 439-4769

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35TH ANNUAL DOWNTOWN FESTIVAL AND ART SHOW 200 E UNIVERSIT Y AVENUE, GAINESVILLE

November 5-6

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ainesville streets come alive as 240 artists display their works. Whether introspective painting, provocative photography, dramatic sculpture and ceramics, or one-of-a-kind jewelry, there’s something for everyone. University of Florida art education students have also organized a free Children’s Imagination Station where wee ones can express themselves through sidewalk chalk

drawing, painting, puppet-making, mask design or clay sculpting. Even better, keep an eye peeled for a rock climbing wall and junior fire-fighting challenge area. To satisfy the palate, 20 food booths will prepare savory blooming onions, barbecue ribs, and even Pad Thai and Cajun entreés. For a much-needed time-out, enjoy continuous live entertainment stages, especially the popular blues concert at Bo Diddley Plaza on Friday evening, November 4. For parking rates, go to gvilleparking.com. gainesvilledowntownartfest.org or (352) 393-8536

43RD ANNUAL GREAT DAY IN THE COUNTRY

299 CENTER LAKE LANE, OVIEDO ON THE PARK (NEW LOCATION), OVIEDO Photo courtesy Great Day In The Country

onsidered the largest fall art show in the Tampa Bay area, Art Harvest comprises 200 exhibitors and raises money for local community efforts through its 500 women-strong Junior League of Clearwater-Dunedin (JLCD). Current fundraising projects include a foster youth mentor program. Take time browsing the booths, and then head over to the Children’s Pavilion for interactive projects with your mini prodigy. Soothe all kinds of savage cravings with everything from Greek fare and gourmet coffee to kettle corn and pizza. jlcd.org/artharvest or (727) 738-5523

November 12

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ooking for a great day in the country? This festival answers that call with more than 350 art exhibitors, a student art fest, two entertainment stages and two food courts, replete with scores of tempting foods, savory baked bites and even craft beers for the oh-so-parched art admirer. As a special highlight, attendees are encouraged to grab a batch of their fan-favorite Great Day Bean Soup Mix, an exclusive recipe concocted by the GWFC Oviedo Women’s Club. The park grounds also provide a cultural center, amphitheater, children’s splash pad, playground and swan boat rides. The day’s proceeds will help fund scholarships, women’s career mentorship, schools and charities. Shuttles are available from parking lots. greatdayoviedo.org or (407) 365-9420


670 DAVE NISBET DRIVE, PORT CANAVERAL COVE AREA (NEW LOCATION), CAPE CANAVERAL

November 26-27

VAN NESS PARK , MCINTOSH

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October 22

oint your roadster toward Port Canaveral’s majestic Exploration Tower looming in the horizon where you’ll find more than 240 artists converging in this beautifully situated venue. The non-profit event also promises live entertainment, a student art show, a Young at Art activity booth for budding young-ins and award-winning student-designed T-shirts. Best of all, your stomach will be particularly pleased with the moveable feast of menu offerings provided by the Daily City Food Truck Bazaar, which is currently touring the country. For RV warriors, Carver’s Cove campground site is only four minutes south. spacecoastartfestival.com or (321) 784-3322

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eel like a trip down memory lane? Need to scratch an itch of generosity and goodwill? This communityminded festival draws upon 280 exhibitors to help raise funds for its town’s scholarships and restoration projects in historic McIntosh. The event fittingly includes antiques alongside artists and crafters in its lineup. It encompasses all things family-festive with a bounce house, face-painting and storytelling for young whippersnappers. Set your GPS dial toward this country locale that sits midway between Gainesville and Ocala on US Hwy 441, and then saunter underneath the oak canopies of this tranquil, Victorian-style town. friendsofmcintosh.org or (352) 591-4038

51ST ANNIVERSARY MARKET DAYS

50TH ANNUAL OCALA ARTS FESTIVAL

441 PAUL RUSSELL ROAD, NORTH FLORIDA FAIRGROUNDS, TALLAHASSEE

DOWNTOWN OCALA

October 22-23

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December 3-4

ct locally! Mark your calendars now for this awesome art fête as we celebrate this festival’s golden 50th year! Presented by Fine Arts For Ocala (FAFO), the event boasts 155 artists from around the nation, lively performance stages on the downtown square and Citizens’ Circle, your pick of delicious food trucks, a student art tent featuring works by our own homegrown Marion County students and kids’ activities, courtesy of the Appleton Museum of Art. The FAFO Collector’s Circle educates and stimulates discussion among serious art patrons. fafo.org/about-the-ocala-arts-festival or (352) 867-0355

Photo courtesy Market Days

Photo courtesy Ocala Arts Festival

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TOP TIP

MUCH LIKE BUYING A CONCERT T-SHIRT OR BAND MERCHANDISE, BE SURE TO SET ASIDE SOME BUCK S TO PICK UP THAT FESTIVAL’S SPECIALLY DESIGNED COMMEMORATIVE TEE OR COLORFUL AWARD-WINNING POSTER (SUITABLE FOR FRAMING, OF COURSE) AS YOUR OWN LIMITED EDITION TRIP SOUVENIR.

45TH ANNUAL INVERNESS FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS 1 COURTHOUSE SQUARE, INVERNESS

November 5-6

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oin other art enthusiasts in the heart of downtown Inverness, surrounded by the Old Courthouse Heritage Museum, Citrus County Historical Society and neighborhood eateries. Designed to attract residents and visitors to the amenities of its town center, watch 100 artists and artisans show off their stuff! InvernessFestivaloftheArts.com or (352) 476-6926, (352) 726-0366

2ND ANNUAL RAINBOW SPRINGS ART FESTIVAL 11223 N WILLIAMS STREET, DUNNELLON

November 19

ager to really cultivate Dunnellon as a notable art hub of Marion County, Rainbow Springs Fine Art Association promotes approximately 40 emerging and established local artists at this fall festival. With mediums running the gamut from paint, pottery, sculpture, glass, metal, fabric, wood and more, Dunnellon forecasts a substantial, burgeoning art movement. rainbowspringsart.com or (352) 489-0099

Photo courtesy Rainbow Springs Art Festival

E Photo courtesy Market Days

arket Days counts itself as one of the largest arts and crafts shows in the Southeast. The works of 300 talented artists and artisans fill the North Florida Fairgrounds’ six large buildings as well as outdoor plazas and meridians. Stunning fine art encompasses ceramics, sculptures, metalwork, glasswork and photography. Creative artisan selections include a distinct array of items such as clothing, clocks, dolls, stained glass and furniture. This show serves as a major fundraiser for Tallahassee Museum, the state capital’s oldest museum. Tickets: $6 for adults, $4 for children 6-12, $3 premium parking. Perimeter parking is free. A $25 Early Bird Ticket purchased online allows a Saturday shopping preview two hours before general admittance, so set that alarm clock! marketdays.org or (850) 576-1636

Photo courtesy McIntosh 1890s Festival

GOING LOCAL MCINTOSH 1890S FESTIVAL

53RD ANNUAL SPACE COAST ART FESTIVAL

OCT ’16 ›

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HONORABLE MENTIONS

20TH ANNUAL ARTWORKS EAU GALLIE FINE ARTS FESTIVAL

HIGHLAND AVENUE, EAU GALLIE ARTS DISTRICT, MELBOURNE

November 19-20

1160 E STATE ROAD 434, WINTER SPRINGS TOWN CENTER, WINTER SPRINGS

October 15-16

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Photo courtesy Rotary Club Of Maitland Arts Festival

chtung, baby! Even in Central Florida, autumn fun gets in full swing. And if quirk is right up your alley, ARToberfest’s oom-pa-pa party celebrates art with a German Oktoberfest spin, lederhosen and all. Witness the works of 125 gifted artists, and then belly up with other giddy gadabouts to a slew of Deutschland brats, brews and bakery; a kids’ interactive area; and toe-tapping polka songs wafting through the air. Pull up a chair or a blanket! wsfota.org or (407) 278-4871

40TH ROTARY CLUB OF MAITLAND ARTS FESTIVAL

641 MAITLAND AVENUE SOUTH, LAKE LILY PARK , MAITLAND

November 11-13

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he glittering night sky serves as an ethereal backdrop for the works of 135 artists at the Rotary Arts Festival on Maitland’s picturesque Lake Lily. Tagged as “Art Under the Stars,” this is the only known outdoor evening art fest in Florida, perfectly suited for hip, night dwellers. Attendees can peruse a variety of art, including fine crafts, graphics, drawing, jewelry, metalwork, mixed media, painting, photography and sculpture. The Enzian, a non-profit organization that promotes community gathering through alternative cinema, offers a short film screening at the South Lawn on Friday night. Performing Arts Maitland has also organized continuous live entertainment on two stages, with a special Saturday night appearance by the Maitland Stage Band. Parking is $5. maitlandrotaryartfestival.com or (407) 777-8515

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6TH ANNUAL ART, CRAFT AND WINE FESTIVAL 274 CRANES ROOST BOULEVARD, CRANE’S ROOST PARK , ALTAMONTE SPRINGS

November 19-20

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ine and art create a fabulous mix. In fact, this free festival of more than 150 artists and artisans rolls out some extra swank with a de rigueur Wine Stroll. For $25 online tickets, aficionados can sip a wide range of vintages at several select wine tents. And also for $25 online, a Saturday chili cookoff area invites you to taste test the best of the fest. There’s also a stacked schedule of choice performers as well as a Kidz Korner with free art projects, a bounce house and trampoline. Consult the website to purchase discounted tickets online and for a list of featured wines. aacwf.com or (407) 781-9972

MIAMI VICES ART BASEL

1901 CONVENTER CENTER DRIVE, MIAMI BEACH CONVENTION CENTER, MIAMI BEACH

December 1-4

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nown in the art world as the Big Kahuna of international art shows held in the United States, Art Basel is Miami Beach’s haute happening of the year. The show, which also stages in Basel, Switzerland and Hong Kong, presents the high-caliber works of more than 4,000 artists from 200 leading galleries worldwide. Masters of modern and contemporary genres, as well as emerging artists, star at its Photo courtesy Art Basel

WINTER SPRINGS ARTOBERFEST

ecome enlightened! ArtWorks, a “plein air” show in the historic ward of Eau Gallie, stresses art in action when 100 artists demonstrate their expertise live “in the open air.” What better way to challenge your perspective and observe technique up close for a truly memorable art-going experience. The festival, located in what is called “the cultural heart of Florida’s Space Coast,” also loads up live entertainment, food and an interactive Art Outpost for kids. artworksofeaugallie.org or (321) 242-1456 Photo courtesy Eau Gallie Fine Arts Festival

Photo by Kelly Canova Photography

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Check it out: Miami Art Week

MUCH LIKE ANY GIVEN FASHION WEEK , MIAMI ART WEEK INVOLVES APPROXIMATELY 20 ART SHOWS OPERATING CONCURRENTLY WITH ART BASEL FROM MIAMI BEACH TO MIAMI. FOLLOW A HANDFUL OF THESE SMALLER, SPECIALIZED SHOWS.

TOP TIPS FOR MIAMI ART WEEK

MERIDIAN AVENUE & 19TH STREET, MIAMI BEACH

November 30-December 4

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cross from Art Basel, Design Miami is where art and commerce collide. Here the world’s most influential, cuttingedge design galleries present museum-quality exhibits of 20th and 21st Century furniture, lighting and objects d’art. Tickets: $25. Offered through Art Basel, two-show Art Basel and Design Miami package, $60. Consult websites for further price breakdown. miami2016.designmiami.com

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ART KIDS PLAYROOM LETS PARENTS ROAM FREELY AT THE SHOW WHILE THEIR CHILDREN DELIGHT IN CRAFTS, ART HISTORY AND STORY TELLING. RESERVE SPACE BY EMAILING arodriguez@miamichildrensmuseum.org OR BY CALLING (786) 276-4762 .

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INK MIAMI ART FAIR

RIFLE THROUGH THE SHOW’S BOOK STORES FOR AN ARMLOAD OF STRIKING COFFEE TABLE BOOK S AND TAKEHOME MEMENTOS.

November 30-December 4

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MIAMI RIVER ART FAIR

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1850 COLLINS AVENUE & 19TH STREET, SUITES OF DORCHESTER, MIAMI BEACH

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ocated a few blocks from Art Basel, the focal point of this free art fair is to offer collectors a complete survey of works strictly on paper, from 20th century to newly published editions. inkartfair.com

400 SE SECOND AVENUE, JAMES L . KNIGHT INTERNATIONAL CENTER, DOWNTOWN MIAMI CONVENTION CENTER, MIAMI

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ub classy elbows with other culture fanatics at this fifth edition fair set indoors at Riverfront Hall and also featuring an outdoor Riverwalk Sculpture Mall along the banks of the Miami River. Tickets: $20; $10 for seniors and students miamiriverartfair.com

main exhibition hall. Ambitious, eyepopping, large-scale works dot Collins Park and Soundscape Park, transforming the city’s skyline. Sit in on Conversations and Salon forums to hear dynamic panel discussions. To round out an even richer, art-filled weekend, tour nearby art shows, galleries and renowned museums featuring special Art Week exhibits. To navigate Art Basel, check online to book a guided tour or to pick your

CATCH NUMEROUS FREE SHUT TLES, THE MIAMI TROLLEY, OR THE NEW MIAMI-DADE ART E XPRESS METROBUS ROUTE AND METROMOVER ELECTRIC RAIL SYSTEM TO CONNECT WITH OTHER ART SHOW VENUES IN MIAMI BEACH AND MIAMI.

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DESIGN A VIP LUXURY VISIT WITH CONCIERGE SERVICES MIAMI AT conciergeservicesmiami.com .

favorite sectors: Galleries, Nova for newest works, Positions for rising talent, Edition for editioned art, Survey for works with an art history bent, Public for large-scale installations Film for outdoor and indoor screenings, and Magazines for art publications. Tickets: $47 (estimated price). Consult website for further price breakdown. artbasel.com Photo courtesy Art Basel

December 1-4

BOOK YOUR HOTEL ACCOMMODATIONS EARLY AS MIAMI ART WEEK ANTICIPATES VERY HIGH NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL AT TENDANCE FROM INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS AND MUSEUM GROUPS.

Photo courtesy Pinta Miami

DESIGN MIAMI

PINTA MIAMI

318 NW 23RD STREET, MANA WYNWOOD, MIAMI

November 30-December 4

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inta distinguishes itself from the crowd by specifically growing Latin American, Spanish and Portuguese art markets, making it a sure fit with Miami’s prominent Latin presence. Tickets: $20; $15 for seniors and students ages 12-18. Consult website for further price breakdown. pintamiami.com


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Apple cider vinegar has everyone talking in the health community. So what’s all the buzz about? Touted for its health benefits for everything from weight loss to digestion, this is one trend we can get behind. Here are just five reasons to add apple cider vinegar to your grocery list this week:

1. Lowers cholesterol. 2. Clears sinuses and helps

prevent colds thanks to its antibacterial properties.

3. Alleviates sore throats. 4. Prevents diabetes by lowering blood sugar levels.

5. Boosts energy levels with

amino acids that combat lactic acid buildup.

Cran-Apple Cocktail 1-2 2 11⁄2 2

tbsp apple cider vinegar tbsp cranberry juice cups water tsp grade B maple syrup

Unfortunately, apple cider vinegar has a bad rep for being hard on the taste buds. If it’s too bitter for you, give this recipe a shot.

OU R B E ST R E C I PE S , R E STAU R ANT N E WS AN D CU LI NARY QU I C K B ITE S

A Side of Cider

Sources: mamavation.com, webmd.com, prevention.com

Stir, shake and drink!

OLIVE OBSESSION S IZE MAT TE R S E AT IT, OR TOS S IT ? COOKING LIKE THE PROS

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THE

Dish Rotini with Shrimp and Olives Recipe courtesy of olive grower Pablo Nerey

1 2 2 3 1 1⁄2

pound rotini pasta tablespoons butter tablespoons olive oil tablespoons chopped garlic pound large shrimp, peeled and deveined teaspoon garlic salt pepper, to taste cup heavy cream cup grated Parmesan cheese, plus extra for garnish tablespoons prepared pesto can (2.25 ounces) sliced California Ripe Olives

1 1⁄2 2 1

Bring large pot of lightly salted water to a boil. Add pasta, and cook 8-10 minutes, or until al dente; drain well and set aside. › In large skillet, heat butter and olive oil over medium heat. › Add garlic, and stir until golden, being careful not to burn. › Add shrimp to skillet, and season with garlic salt and pepper. Cook about 5 minutes or until shrimp are pink, stirring frequently. › Reduce heat to medium-low, and add cream to skillet; simmer until thick. › Add cooked pasta to sauce, and stir in Parmesan cheese, pesto and olives. › Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese.

Eat Like a Farmer

Across the United States, farmers are working hard to bring high-quality foods from their fields and groves to grocery store shelves and, ultimately, to your pantry. Sometimes foods you may not even think about coming from a farm have been grown with the most tender, loving care.

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ne example is olives, which are typically bought in cans, far removed from the produce section people more typically associate with farms. In California, hard-working, multi-generational farming families produce more than 95 percent of the olives grown and consumed in the United States. The farms—groves, to be exact—are home to thousands of trees that bear olive fruit for harvest each fall.

It should come as no surprise that these families have fine-tuned some of the most appetizing olive recipes by passing them on from one generation to the next. These farmers don’t just grow olives, they cook with them, too, and are sharing some of their favorite recipes— from snacks to salads and pasta—using California Ripe Olives. Find more farmer-approved recipes at calolive.org.

Cowboy Caviar

Recipe courtesy of olive grower Natalie Jameson

2 3 1 1 1 1⁄2

cups chopped tomato green onions, sliced avocado, peeled, pitted and cut into small cubes can (15 ounces) black beans, rinsed and drained can (6 ounces) large California Ripe Olives, drained and coarsely chopped cup prepared vinaigrette dressing corn chips

In medium bowl, stir together tomato, green onions, avocado, black beans and olives. › Toss with dressing and serve 068

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Red Potato and Olive Salad Recipe courtesy of olive grower Carolina Burreson

Dressing

1⁄2 3 2 1⁄2 1⁄2 1⁄4

cup olive oil tablespoons lemon juice tablespoons red wine vinegar teaspoon ground pepper teaspoon kosher salt teaspoon sugar

Salad

1⁄2 1⁄2 1⁄4 1⁄4 11⁄2 1 1⁄4

cup sliced California Ripe Olives, drained cup grape tomatoes, halved cup chopped fresh Italian parsley cup chopped celery pounds small red potatoes, quartered and boiled until tender jar (6 ounces) marinated artichoke hearts, drained and coarsely chopped medium red onion, thinly sliced

In sealable jar, mix together dressing ingredients, and refrigerate at least 4 hours. › When ready to serve, place all salad ingredients in large bowl. Drizzle with dressing, and toss lightly to coat.


› DINING GUIDE

Book your party at Tony’s today. Gift cards available.

Tony’s Sushi & Steakhouse

3405 SW College Road, Ocala › (352) 237-3151 › tonysushi.com Mon-Thu 11a-10p › Fri & Sat 11a-11p › Sun Noon-10p With abundant menu choices and over 100 off-menu rolls, you certainly won’t run out of options at Tony’s Sushi. If you can’t decide, the waitstaff is excellent at suggesting items you’re sure to enjoy. Every roll and sushi dish is made to order from the freshest ingredients. In the steakhouse area, highly trained chefs prepare a memorable meal as they cook on the tableside grills, preparing chicken, steak or seafood just the way you like it. Entrées include soup or salad and rice. Family-friendly, casual atmosphere, along with a full bar, including imported Japanese sake and beer selections.

Join us for live jazz each week, Friday evenings, from 6-9p.

Braised Onion Restaurant

754 NE 25th Ave, Ocala › (352) 620-9255 Tue-Thu 11a-9p › Fri & Sat 11a-10p › Sun 11a-8p › Closed Mon Braised Onion Restaurant, where you’ll experience “Comfort Food with Attitude” in a fun, warm and colorful but casual atmosphere, is open for lunch and dinner. Winner of Culinary Combat and Taste of Ocala for three years. From country-fried tenderloin and Kentucky hot brown melt to the eggplant parmigiana or the frenched pork chop, the menu options are plentiful and guaranteed to make your taste buds explode with happiness. And they didn’t forget the vegetarians and the gluten-free among us. Happy hours Tuesday through Friday from 4-7p. Having an office or family gettogether? They have a room for that, or they can bring catering to you. Visit our website at braisedonion.com.

• All-you-can-eat jumbo snow crab legs and fish every day. • Plan any party, social event, business lunch or celebration. Ask for Murphy! • Enjoy monthly specials while watching your favorite sporting event on the many TVs. Like them on Facebook at Murphy’s Oyster Bar

Murphy’s Oyster, Steak & Seafood Restaurant 3821 NW Blitchton Rd., Ocala › (352) 236-5656 Open 7 days a week 11a-Midnight

Welcome to Murphy’s, where you’ll dine on delicious seafood, oysters, choice steaks, fresh wings and much more served in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. The restaurant’s extensive menu offers something for everyone, from tasty Philly cheese steaks and steamed clams to snow crab. Try the authentic gyros, too. A special menu for the kids features dishes like the hot dog platter and the chicken strips platter. Come take advantage of the massive outdoor tiki bar with flatscreen TVs. Murphy’s is open seven days a week for lunch and dinner. Bring the whole family for an experience you’ll want to relive again and again.

OCT ’16 ›

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Here are some helpful tips he recommends for choosing the right size grill.

1.

UNDERSTAND THE TRUE SIZE OF THE COOKING SURFACE. Total cooking area for grills is measured in

square inches. This figure often includes the warming rack and cooktop areas, so do a little digging to identify the square inches of the primary grill grates alone. A minimum of 450 square inches is a good starting point to meet the needs of most people. For example, a 500-square-inch grill grate can accommodate about 24 hamburgers at one time.

2.

THINK ABOUT INDIRECT COOKING. When you envision cooking on the grill, you probably think about grilling the food right above the fire. This is called “direct heat” grilling, which is good for small or thin foods The magic really happens when you than can be cooked quickly. Larger combine direct and indirect techniques, foods, such as whole chickens, Faulk said. Some call it “sear and slide” potatoes or roasts, are best cooked cooking, which is an indispensable method for with “indirect heat.” This means the grilling a thick steak. Sear it over high, direct burners below the food are actually heat, and then move it to indirect heat to slow turned off. You need a grill large down the cooking. A grill with at least 700 enough for the active burners to square inches is recommended for cooks who generate the right amount of heat frequently embrace indirect grilling techniques. and have enough space left over to place the food in an indirect zone.

Get Grillin’

If you’re shopping for a new gas grill, one of the most important aspects to consider is its size.

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here are more things to think about than simply how many hamburgers you want to cook at once,” said Russ Faulk, grillmaster and chief designer for Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet, maker of outdoor kitchen equipment. “To a great extent, more size offers more cooking flexibility. Few people need a giant grill, but most people can take advantage of having a bit more cooking space.”

4.

STAY IN CONTROL. Most gas grills have multiple, individually controlled burners. Larger grills tend to have more burners. For indirect grilling, you will need at least two burners, but more control zones offer increased cooking options. Individual temperatures can be set for grilling different kinds of food simultaneously. At least three burners are recommended for the best control and flexibility. DON’T CROWD THE GRILL. When you try to squeeze too much food onto the grill at once, it can become difficult to manage the cooking. You need room for turning and flipping. Faulk also recommends maintaining a low-heat “safety zone” to move food to when the action gets a little too hot and fast. A good rule of thumb is to keep at least 25 percent of your grill grates clear at all times.

FOR MORE TIPS ON FINDING THE RIGHT GRILL FOR YOUR COOKOUTS, VISIT kalamazoogourmet.com.

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Sources: cnn.com, lifehacker.com, foodsafetymagazine.com

3.


› DINING GUIDE PROMOTIONAL

Cultured, Creative Dining

Tony’s Sushi brings flavor and foodie trends to Ocala—on and off the menu.

A

t Tony’s Sushi, you might taste a Chicago-inspired recipe or a cocktail reminiscent of Miami. If you’re truly adventurous, try the Japanese vendor staple, takoyaki (octopus-filled dough balls). Or maybe you’d rather keep it light with the peppered tuna or sushi salad appetizers. That is, if you know to order them. “There’s probably more off the menu than on it,” laughs Jade Chun, general manager at Tony’s Sushi. And that’s the trick to not only trying new, delicious sushi rolls, cocktails and appetizers but also getting the feeling that, yes, you’re a VIP here. You can thank Jade and the owners, Tony and Jane Li, for their constant dedication to bringing culture, quality and ultimate service to you, their honored guest. “We all travel,” Jade says. “I try to bring whatever’s popular in other areas back to Ocala.” That explains the inspiration behind the impressive Ginger Mango Mojito and the Lucky Cat cocktail. One sushi favorite, the G Roll—named so, “because it hits the spot,” Jade says—recently landed on the menu because of its widespread popularity as an off-menu item.

Just as popular, the hibachi grill tables are perfect for entertaining the kids at an early bird dinner between 2:30 and 6pm or for birthdays and celebrations of all kinds. Birthdays are a big deal at Tony’s, and a parade of servers bangs a large gong to make sure everyone knows it. “It makes everyone look over and embarrasses the birthday guest,” Jade says, adding that there’s a birthday hat involved and a gift card presented to the special guest. “It’s a thank you to them.” That’s not all, though—not even close. There’s more intimate seating in the bar area and a sushi bar. An outdoor patio area covered with string lights has high-tops and lower lounge tables where you can share lunch from 11am to 2:30pm, happy hour from 2 to 6pm or dinner with friends and even your pet. Tony and Jane will make your experience one you won’t soon forget, with trendsetting flavors and tasty off-menu favorites to match.

Tony’s Sushi › 3405 SW College Rd, Ocala › (352) 237-3151 › tonysushi.com

Stop in for happy hour every day between 2pm and 7pm at either Mi Tierra Latina location! Try a $9.99 dinner combination, or enjoy a lunch special from 11:30am3pm Monday through Friday. Ask about our catering! ALL DAY LONG Bucket Special – domestic beers $12.00. Imports $15.00.

Mi Tierra Latina

3131 SW College Rd. Suite 303, Ocala › (352) 237-4042 2105 SW Hwy 484, Ocala › (352) 307-0888 Sun-Thu 11:30a-9:30p › Fri & Sat 11:30a-10p › mi-tierra-latina.com Peruvian food is a cuisine with a heritage as unique as its flavors, and Ocala residents don’t have to travel far to try it themselves. Mi Tierra Latina aims to delight the palate and provide balanced nutrition with their traditional Peruvian and Mexican dishes. Seafood lovers will enjoy the ceviche of corvina fish and the choros a la chalaca (mussels topped with corn, tomatoes, lime and cilantro). Choose a delicious Peruvian dish like Lomo saltado or a Mexican favorite such as fajitas, pollo con mole and many more.

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Safety First!

Frequently, we face the battle of whether or not we should throw out our food based on its “expiration” and “sell-by” date. Who wants to serve their family spoiled food? Gross! But have you ever wondered how accurate these dates actually are? How do food manufacturers really know the correct date for when food will expire?

Before we start, here is a breakdown of the types of expiration dates you might see on products and what they actually mean. SELL BY: This date tells the store how long to keep the item on their shelves. You should buy the product before the date expires.

BEST IF USED BY (OR BEFORE): It’s recommended that the food be consumed by this date for best flavor or quality. The food is still safe to eat after this date. USE BY: This date is the last date recommended for use of the product while at peak quality. The manufacturer of the product determines this date.

Customer Knows Best Even after conducting lengthy tests, it is ultimately up to the consumers to determine whether their food is safe to eat. If a product has a use-by or best-if-used-by date, it’s probably in your best interest to eat the food before that, just to be on the safe side. For foods with a sell-by date, you have a pretty set amount of time before your food will go bad. Food products like milk will usually go bad a week after the sell by date, while other products like eggs can last for about three to five weeks after. Common sense is also key! If something has visible mold, odors or any other alarming signs, it’s time to toss it. If you’re still unsure, just use the “if in doubt, throw it out” rule.

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Sources: food.com, alwaysorderdessert.com

Expiration Date: IDK

Safety and quality play a huge role in determining the life expectancy of a food product. Certain things help foods last longer, such as lower moisture content, higher acidity and salt content. Regardless of the ingredients and additives, however, no food lasts forever. Most larger food companies conduct “microbial challenge studies” on food products, where food is injected with microorganisms to determine whether the organisms would present a health hazard or spoilage risk. The food is then stored in conditions it's likely to experience, such as transportation, at the store or in someone’s home. After a typical storage time for the product, the company is then able to label the product with an accurate “use-by” date.


› DINING GUIDE

Be sure to visit us at the Canopy Oaks Center. Pavarotti’s also caters. Mon: All-You-Can-Eat Spaghetti and Meatballs $6.99 Tue: 16” Cheese Pizza $7.99 Wed: 10 Chicken Wings $5.

PAVAROTTI’S

Pavarotti’s Pizza & Restaurant

8075 SW HWY 200, Canopy Oaks Center, Ocala › (352) 291-9424 Mon-Thu 11a-9p › Fri-Sat 11a-10p › Sun 11a-8p

Pavarotti’s Pizza and Restaurant in Ocala is known for its famous, old-fashioned pizzas, hand-tossed and baked on a stone deck oven as well as an array of classic Italian entrées, fresh salads and subs, and hearty pasta dinners. Veal or chicken is served Parmigiana, Marsala or picatta style, and the seafood dishes are served fresh over linguini. Pizza lovers can’t get enough of the homemade pies, and don’t forget about the subs, stromboli and calzones!

Pizza & Restaurant

We cater! Let them create an unforgettable menu for your next event. Check out new items on the menu. Enjoy one of the specialty drinks at their new backyard tiki bar. Live music on Fridays. Family owned and operated. Brooklyn’s Backyard—Good Beer, Better Food!

For Alberto, Peruvian food is all about the flavors really popping. And if you can take the heat, he can make any dish as spicy as you’d like. For something different but delicious, Off The Hook’s the place to eat!

Brooklyn’s Backyard

2019 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Suite #102, Ocala › (352) 304-6292 brooklynsbackyard.com Sun 11a-8p › Mon-Wed 11a-9p › Thu-Sat 11a-whenever Head down to the “Yard” for fresh food and fun in a relaxed, backyard atmosphere. Whether you’re looking for finger foods or something more exotic, they’ve got it and it’s delicious! Try one of their unique burger creations. In the mood for wings? Get the best from the 2014 & 2015 King of Wings. Want pizza? They got it, NY style, plus a full range of fresh salads, sandwiches and entrées sure to suit everyone! There’s beer, wine and a full liquor bar in the “Yard,” too—over 40 craft beers, craft cocktails and a great selection of wines, all sure to perfectly complement your meal!

Off The Hook Bar and Grill

Tues-Sun 11a-9p › 10901 S US Hwy 441, Belleview › (352) 307-0661 Alberto and Melanie Benvenuto opened Belleview’s newest addition, Off The Hook Bar and Grill, in April to serve fresh, homemade Peruvian food. When you walk in, the first thing you’re served is canchita, which is like a Peruvian popcorn. Browse the menu and choose from different appetizers, stir-fries, ceviches, soups and so much more. Order from the newly discounted $9.99 lunch menu or come for dinner. Complement your meal with a Peruvian beer or juice, and enjoy the lounge atmosphere decorated in bold colors and filled with modern Peruvian music.

OCT ’16 ›

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Channel Your Inner Cook

Are you a whiz in the kitchen? Neither are we. Poaching, braising, searing. What the heck does it all mean? We break down some popular cooking methods here, and explain the best time to use each. Grab your tongs—you’re about to get inspired! POACHING. We’ve all heard of a poached egg, right?

Poaching is a cooking method typically using seasoned hot water between 140°F and 180°F. The key here is that the water should not be bubbling on the surface. Poaching can also be used for other delicate food, such as certain fish. Poaching cooks your food at the same temperature throughout the process and is gentle on the food, causing no agitation.

PRO TIP: When poaching eggs, a splash of vinegar in the water will help the eggs hold together nicely.

2.

SEARING. Ever taste that perfectly crisp crust on

your steak dinner? Yep, that meat was seared. Searing caramelizes the proteins and sugars in the cut of meat, locking in the flavors and making a nice brown, crispy outside. You can add salt and pepper or other spices to your oil before searing. Make sure your pan is good and hot before you begin the process or your meat may stick. Once one side is browned, turn the meat to sear the whole thing. Don’t forget that even though the outside looks done, chances are the inside of the meat is still raw. Finish up by roasting your meat in the oven or your Crockpot.

PRO TIP: The drippings left behind by your seared meat are called fond. Deglaze your pan (Look it up!), and use the fond to make a delicious sauce or gravy to accompany your dish. 074

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3.

SAUTÉING. This method uses a super-hot pan and a little bit of fat (oil or butter) to cook food quickly. The surface of your food will brown as the inside cooks. Naturally tender food, like veggies, chicken, beef tenderloin or fish filets are good choices for sautéing.

PRO TIP: When you sauté, you’ll need to keep your food moving to ensure it cooks thoroughly and evenly.

4.

BROILING. Just like grilling, broiling (done in

the oven) uses high, direct heat to cook your cut of meat. This dry heat method of cooking is best for tender cuts of beef or steak that are less than 1 ½ inches thick. Lots of chicken and turkey, plus fish and shellfish will work well, too. (A quick Google search will let you know what to broil.) The result will be browned, caramelized entrées that take just a few minutes to cook. The distance between the rack and the heating element will determine how fast your food cooks, so keep a close eye on it and adjust accordingly.

PRO TIP: You can even broil fruit and veggies. Just make sure to follow the directions for cooking times, etc.

5.

BRAISING. Once your meat

is seared, it’s time to braise it. Braising involves large cuts of meat that are partially submerged in liquid (broths, fruit juices, wines) over low heat for a long time. Think of grandma’s pot roast. The purpose of braising is to make a tough cut of meat, such as flank or brisket, tender. Make sure your cut of meat reaches the appropriate cooking temperature before taking it off the heat.

PRO TIP: A Dutch oven works really well for braising.

Sources: food.com, alwaysorderdessert.com

1.


› DINING GUIDE

Come enjoy our brand-new tapas menu available exclusively at the bar. Monday through Saturday, 3-7pm for $7.

Beer and wine are available, and the Sandbar is just steps away for specialty drink orders.

Mesa de Notte

2436 E Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala › (352) 732-4737 › mesaocala.com Mon-Thu 11a-9p › Fri & Sat 11a-10p › Closed Sun Planning a special event? The professionals at Mesa de Notte specialize in full-service catering. They offer amazing Italian, Spanish and American cuisine and can customize a menu to fit any budget, for any size event. Nothing is too big or too small. Mesa also offers full liquor service on and off premise. Reserve their private dining room for your next special event. Book now, before the holidays arrive! Now taking reservations for Thanksgiving Dinner.

Eaton’s Beach Sandbar & Grill 15790 SE 134th Avenue, Weirsdale, FL (352) 259-2444 › eatonsbeach.com 12-8pm Mon-Sat, 12-7pm Sunday

The Steam Shack at Eaton’s Beach is all about casual dining, a beachside atmosphere and fresh, delicious food. Sure, they have tasty sandwiches and appetizers, but the main focus is on the steamed shrimp, crab legs, crawfish and other seafood offerings. After spending a hot day on the beach or in the water at Lake Weir, guests can feel comfortable ordering in flip flops and a bathing suit. Or are you headed to Eaton’s Beach for an evening out with friends after work? Stop at the Steam Shack first for a drink and appetizer while waiting for your table.

Come enjoy our Fall Menu and try a Pumpkin Martini with us! For more information on catering, contact Waica Huggins or Evelyn Nussel at wmhivyhouse@yahoo.com

The Ivy House Restaurant

917 E. Silver Springs Blvd, Ocala › (352) 622-5550 Sun & Tue 11a-2p › Wed & Thu 11a-8p › Fri & Sat 11a-8:30p › Closed Mon 106 NW Main St, Williston › (352) 528-5410 Sun-Wed 11a-2p › Thu-Sat 11a-8p › ivyhousefl.com “Come on home, it’s suppertime!” is our motto. We want you to feel you have come to our house to eat. The family-owned Ivy House Restaurant now has two locations, Williston and Ocala. The downtown Ocala location has added several specialty items, and the restaurant has been named by Florida Trend as one of the “Top 500 Best Places to Eat in the State” for several years. Specials include Southern Fried Lobster, delicious hand-cut steaks and our famous Baked Krispy Chicken. Trying our delicious homemade desserts like the Key Lime Pie or Chocolate Midnight Cake is a must when dining here.

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Blue Highway Pizza

2130 E Silver Springs Blvd, Ocala › (352) 629-5555 bluehighwaypizza.com › Sun-Thu 11:30a-9p › Fri & Sat 11:30a-10p We take pride in sourcing much of our produce from local, organic farms. In addition to keeping our footprint small, it just tastes better. Fall is here, and beautiful greens are back in season. You’d be surprised how much of a difference locally sourced food makes. Have a salad and see what we mean. The freshest ingredients, artfully prepared and lovingly served. That’s our culinary culture, and that’s what you’ll get at Blue Highway.

Get Happy at the Highway, Mon-Thu 50% off draughts & house wines $5 select appetizers Take-Out Tuesday 25% off carry out (pizza & calzones) Family Wednesday 50% off bambino menu (kids 12 & under) Wine-Down Thursday $10 off all bottles of wine

Eat well, live well…

El Toreo

3790 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala › (352) 694-1401 › 7 Days 11a-10p SR 200, Ocala › (352) 291-2121 › 7 Days 11a-11p New lunch specials include Taco Salad on Mondays, $4.45; Speedy Gonzalez on Tuesdays, $4.95; Quesadillas on Wednesdays, $6.45; Chimichangas on Thursdays, $5.95; and Burrito Supreme on Fridays, $4.95. New dinner options include Fajita Mondays, $8.95; Chimichanga Tuesdays, $7.95; Alambre Wednesdays, $7.95 and Tacos de Bistec Thursdays, $7.95. Plus $1.95 margaritas on Mondays. On Sunday, kids 12 and under can enjoy 99¢ children’s meals (takeout not included). Wednesday is Special Margarita Day, 99¢ all day. Saturday is 2-for-1 margaritas all day. Happy Hour daily, 3-7pm. Everything is 2-4-1 (exceptions may apply).

Trivia Night every Thursday, 7-9pm (Silver Springs Blvd. location) Mariachi band every Thursday at the 200 location, 6-9pm Happy Halloween Everyone!

THE BEST MEXICAN FOOD

Harvest Market Deli

3751 SE 36th Avenue, Ocala, FL 34471 (352) 624-2636 › Harvestmarketdeliocala.com Mon-Fri 11am-4pm › Sat 11am-2pm › Closed Sunday–Gone Fishing If you’re looking for the best selection of subs and burgers, look no further. Always fresh and never frozen, Harvest Market Deli is the place to go for a great, filling meal. Enjoy a leisurely lunch in the cool shade of their one-of-a-kind tiki hut. Lacking time but craving a home-cooked dinner? Call ahead by 4pm and place an order for their famous Spaghetti Pie, complete with zesty garlic bread and a fresh salad. We got you in the mood for a salad? Try the Ivy League. This chicken salad is perfectly mixed with cheddar, apples, pears, grapes and walnuts and then served on a bed of lettuce with a tasty poppy seed dressing. Can you say yum?

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Let Harvest Market Deli cater your next event or party.


› DINING GUIDE

Eat pizza your way: dine in, delivery or buffet!

Five Star Pizza

4414 SW College Rd., Bldg. 1740, Ocala › (352) 861-5555 › fivestarpizza.com › Sun-Thu 11a-1a › Fri & Sat 11a-2a Feed that pizza craving with specials offered at Five Star Pizza’s new College Road location. Enjoy two large, one-topping pizzas for $22.99; one large, one-topping pizza and 10 wings for $18.99; one 24-inch, one-topping piezilla for $19.99; and one large, two-topping pizza, garlic rolls and a two-liter soda for $19.99. It’s the first dinein Five Star restaurant ever, and it’s open late for you night owls. Go with the barbecue chicken (one of the owners’ favorites), or choose from nine other specialty pizzas. And don’t forget to feed your sweet tooth—CinnaSticks or brownie bites will do the trick.

Early Bird daily 4:30-7pm Check out our sushi bar. Serving Ocala since 1986! Ask about our lunch specials!

Kotobuki Japanese Restaurant

2463 SW 27th Avenue, Ocala › (352) 237-3900 › kotobukiocala.com Lunch: Tue-Fri 11:30a-2p Dinner: Tue-Thu 4:30-9:30p › Fri & Sat 4:30-10:30p › Mon & Sun 4:30-9:30p For an authentic Japanese meal in an award-winning restaurant that has been serving Ocala since 1986, try Kotobuki. Enjoy traditional Japanese favorites like tempura, teriyaki and broiled seafood and vegetables. For a memorable experience, gather around the hot grill and watch as your chef prepares steak, chicken and seafood favorites right before your eyes. Get the VIP treatment. Check out our specials!

Happy Hour Specials: 2-7p every day, $3 Draft Beer $4 House Wine & Premium Cocktails $5 Super Premium & Signature Cocktails Every Tuesday is Fat Tuesday at Harry’s. Happy Hour all day long!

Harry’s Seafood Bar & Grille

24 SE 1st Avenue, Ocala › (352) 840-0900 › hookedonharrys.com Mon-Thu 11a-10p › Fri & Sat 11a-11p › Sun 11a-9p Located in the heart of downtown Ocala, Harry’s offers traditional Louisiana favorites like Shrimp and Scallop Orleans, Crawfish Etouffée, Jambalaya, Shrimp Creole and Blackened Red Fish. Other favorites, like Harry’s Signature Crab Cakes and Bourbon Street Salmon, are complemented with grilled steaks, chicken, burgers, po’ boy sandwiches and salads. Their full bar features Harry’s Signature Cocktails such as the Harry’s Hurricane, Bayou Bloody Mary or the new Southern Mule. They also feature wines by the glass and a wide selection of imported, domestic and craft beer. Harry’s menu is sure to have something for everyone!

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› DINING GUIDE

Latinos Y Mas

2030 S. Pine Avenue, Ocala › (352) 622-4777 › latinosymas.com Mon-Thu 11a-9p › Fri-Sat 11a-10p › Closed Sun If you’re looking for consistently delicious food with a Latin flair, look no further. Begin your Latinos Y Mas dining experience with one of our special offerings. Remodeling has been completed. Thank you to our customers for their loyalty. Come see our new look! Same great food, same great service!

Tilted Kilt

3155 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala (352) 351-5458 › ocala.tiltedkilt.com Mon-Thu 11a-11p › Fri-Sat 11a-Midnight › Sun 11a-10p

Become a member of the Latinos Y Mas Family Club and receive exclusive offers, discounts, special birthday surprises and more! Catering is available for any size event. Please call to schedule your upcoming event.

HAPPY HOUR Daily 3-7. Thu, Fri & Sat 3p to close Ask about Carry-Out Catering.

Next time you’re in the mood for a taste of Ireland, look no further than Ocala’s very own Tilted Kilt Pub & Eatery. Their classics will have you convinced that you’ve just taken a one-way flight to Dublin. Favorites such as fish & chips, shepherd’s pie and Gaelic chicken in an Irish whiskey cream sauce all served by beautiful lasses in kilts will leave you wanting more! Menu items as low as $6 from 11am-3pm make The Tilted Kilt the perfect place for a quick bite to eat during lunch. Stop by with the whole family to enjoy TV on the big screens, games, good service and great food! Scan this QR code to see our calendar of events.

Ipanema Brazilian Steak House

2023 South Pine Avenue, Ocala › (352) 622-1741 › ipanemaocala.com Dinner: Tue-Thu 5-9p, Fri & Sat 5-10p, Sun 4-9p › Lunch: Fri 11a-2:30p Brunch: Sun 12-3p › Happy Hour Tue-Fri 5-7p › Closed Monday A Churrascaria (Portuguese for barbecue) is a dining experience where roaming Gauchos slice and serve fire-roasted meats from skewers in a continual fashion. Ipanema Brazilian Steak House boasts 12 of the finest cuts of meat complemented by an opulent salad and vegetable bar, delectable desserts, and delicious wines, beers and cocktails. Brazilian native and Executive Chef Ortencia DeAlmeida invites you to embrace the flavors of her homeland and experience the magnetism of Ipanema for yourself. Become a fan of Ipanema on Facebook at facebook.com/ipanemasteakhouse.

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Happy Hour Tue-Fri, 5-7p. $5 premium cocktails, $3 house wine, 2-4-1 beer and $5 tapas.


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Celebrating our 38th Anniversary

TOO YOUR

SPA

Thank you,

Marion County, for allowing us to do what we do best for the past 37 years. We are sincerely grateful to our past, present and future members that have and will allow us to be a part of their fitness goals in Marion County. We have scheduled major improvements to all Too Your Health Spa facilities to pursue the most intense renovations that we have ever undertaken. Should you have any suggestions, please contact Fred at (352) 237-6149 or by emailing ktooyourhealthspa@gmail.com.

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Single Memberships $119.50 each plus tax Now accepting various insurances – Call for details

to oyo u r h ea lt h s p a .yo l a site.co m Spa I 694-1141

Spa II 237-6149

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28 41 SW 20th St. (Behind CFCC) Ocala 24HOUR ACCESS AVAILABLE!

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OCT’16

YOUR LOCAL GUIDE TO HOMES, FARMS AND LAND FOR SALE IN MARION COUNTY

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF


The Right Agent Makes All the Difference In The World 2709 SW 27th Ave., Suite 103 | 352-789-6746 | www.ocalarealtyworld.com

BUFFINGTON ESTATES, COUNTRYSIDE ESTATES, DALTON WOODS Many beautiful homes in these well-established neighborhoods. Prices starting in the $200,000’s. Call Jenni Kennedy for details @ 352-775-0078.

Expert in out-of-town buyers, selling, and investment properties, 4/3’s starting at $100,000. 3/2 homes with plenty of acrage starting at $150,000. Anything is possible, why miss the opportunity? Call Miguel Rodriguez for details @ 352-598-9693.

IAL C R ME COM

ORANGE LAKE & MICANOPY — All of North Marion County Lake Front Properties. Prices Starting in the $200,000’s. Call Ashley Smith for details at 352-426-1266.

FANTASTIC LOCATION — Highly traveled SW 38th St. Land use intended for heavy industry. Property has C&D permit. Plus 1 million yards of sand for asphalt & other uses. This property holds great opportunity! Call Edward Rogers at (352) 414-5876

Not making enough money? Life out of balance? Want 2016 to be different?

HOW ABOUT A CAREER IN REAL ESTATE! Make $30,000-$40,000 a year. Only part-time. Guaranteed*

CALL (352) 427-0749 Real Estate classes starting soon. Only a few spots left. *Restrictions apply.

Elisha Lopez Owner/Broker

Luis Lopez Realtor

• Guaranteed Sale Program – if we don’t sell your home in 120 days, we will waive our commission* • 5% commission program – Call for more info • Find out what your home is worth in today’s hot market • Call for a FREE, no obligation 20-minute appointment *Conditions apply.


WE AT BWC BELIEVE THAT

NO DETAIL SHOULD GO FORGOTTEN • • • • • •

New Custom Home Construction  Design-Build Services Complete Home Remodeling & Additions Custom Equestrian Barns Commercial & Industrial Construction  Other services we offer: 6” Aluminum & Copper Seamless Gutters, Soffit & Fascia, Siding, Concrete and more...

SERVING OCALA AND CENTRAL FLORIDA. Contact us today for a complimentary construction consultation.

Bryan W. Caracciolo (General Contractor)

(352) 304-1323 • 4095 S.E. 45TH CT. #101 Ocala

info@BWC-Construction.com • www.BWC-Construction.com CGC#1522862


Save the Date!

The 8th Annual

Event

TAILGATE PAR T Y

OCTOBER 7, 2016 @ 6PM Presented by the Young Professionals Network

EVENT LOCATION: THE OCALA/MARION COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® 3165 NE 14TH STREET, OCALA 34470

TICKETS ONLY

$20.00! EVEN T OPEN TO ALL!

PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT THE MARION COUNTY BOYS & GIRLS CLUB

Ages 18+

BEER, WINE, FOOD, LIVE & SILEN T AUCTION & MORE!

Join us on October 7, 2016 for the 8th Annual Chair-ity Event! Live auction items, Silent auction items, food trucks, complimentary beer and wine! Tickets are available for a $20.00 donation. Proceeds to benefit Boys & Girls Club of Marion County. Email YPN@omcar.com for more information.


2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

Carolyn ROBERTS

115 NE 8th Ave 16910 S. Hwy 441, Ste. 204 Ocala, FL 352-351-0011 Summerfield, FL 352-245-3388

BROKER/REALTOR ®

ckr@robertsflorida.com www.robertsflorida.com | mail@robertsflorida.com

TURNING HAWK RANCH • • • • •

6 bedrooms 5 full and 3 half baths 4 car garage In –law apartment Breathtaking 4.80 acres • Complete with beautiful stairway and Fireplace.

• Exercise room, grand study, and theater room. • Amazing pool with slide and outdoor shower • Summer kitchen with sand volleyball court and a half basketball course with lights.

$974,000 ML#435939

COUNTRY CLUB OF OCALA • Brand new never lived in. • 4 bedrooms & 3 baths w/study • 3 car garage • Custom kitchen w/ stainless & granite $495,000

• Family room & formal dining w/teak flooring • Spacious master & gorgeous master bath. • Covered lanai w/ pavers ML#432561

MAGNIFICENT ESTATE HOME • Main residence 4 bedrooms and 4.5 bath • Guest house 2 bedrooms and 2 baths • 6.68+/- acres close to downtown Ocala • 2 gracious porches

• Palatial master suite, elevator and multiple fireplaces • Solarium, library and breathtaking pool • Hardwood floors and cathedral beam ceilings

$3,250,000 ML#502575

DEVONSHIRE • Located in gated community • 3 bedroom & 3 baths w/study & built-ins • 2 car garage • Gourmet kitchen w/ Quartz countertops $395,000

• Family room w/ fireplace & entertainment center • Breakfast nook w/ Mitered glass • Screen enclosed lanai w/pavers ML#438376

mbelliott1@aol.com

GOLDEN OCALA GOLF & EQUESTRIAN CLUB • 4 bedrooms 4 baths • Prestigious gated golf community • Grand master suite with sitting area • Wall slider that leads out to lania.

• Summer kitchen and screen enclosed pool and hot tub • 4-car garage makes for plenty of room • Beautiful views of golf course and the 2nd hole

$919,999 ML#502725

DALTON WOODS • Located in SE on .50 acres • 3 bedroom & 2 baths w/study • 2 car garage w/add’l storage • Family rm w/triple sliders lead to screened lanai $329,900

• Master suite w/sitting area • Heated salt system pool w/separate hot tub • Fenced yard w/built-in fire pit

ML#506154


THE

Homefront

Get everyone on board

Organize Your Way To A ClutterFree Kitchen

A kitchen must be many things for the average family: a cooking center, social hub and, most importantly, a central command station for the entire household. Unfortunately, organization sometimes takes a backseat to the chaos of daily life, which means kitchens and pantries aren’t living up to their full potential as spaces that make our lives easier to manage. Make your kitchen and pantry meet your family’s needs with these tips:

Any effort to get organized will only be effective if the approach works for the whole family. Get the little ones involved with the kitchen’s daily organization by giving them a specific place to find their favorite snacks. Keep shelving at a height kids can reach so they can take charge of packing their own school lunches. Organize groceries by relevance. For example, store the most commonly used items at eye level.

Make the most of your space

It can be easy to transform your pantry into a beautiful and functional space. Think practical and start with the basics by upgrading your storage with practical wire shelving, like a ClosetMaid ShelfTrack system, featuring Close Mesh shelving that prevents items from tipping or falling through. The adjustable shelves come in a variety of depths to store bulkier items and accessories such as wire baskets and

bins and help maximize every inch of storage space.

Move the pantry elsewhere

Kitchen pantries often become a catchall for more than just groceries and kitchen accessories. If your home’s layout permits, relocate your pantry to a larger space to stow less frequently used items and day-to-day things that tend to accumulate.

Keep counters clutter-free

Kitchen counters typically suffer the most daily overflow, but redirecting some of that excess elsewhere can give your kitchen a less cluttered appearance. Stop the clutter before it starts by assigning each family member a container for miscellaneous odds and ends. An option such as ClosetMaid’s Chalkboard Fabric Drawers lets you choose from three different colors and notate what items are tucked away in each bin.

A kitchen and pantry makeover might be just what you need to freshen up the organization in your home. Whether you simply want to spruce up your kitchen space or give your pantry an overhaul, your finished project will inspire and streamline organization throughout the whole house.

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Homefront

Get Inspired To Get Outdoors

Kid-friendly tips to encourage more outside play

EDIBLE ENTERTAINMENT. Dining al fresco

is one of the greatest ways to enjoy the outdoors. Invite family, friends or neighbors over for a barbecue, and be sure to save room for dessert with the gooey goodness of marshmallows roasted over a fire pit (add graham crackers and chocolate for a timeless campfire favorite in your own backyard).

DELIGHT AFTER DUSK. Streetlights were once

the signal that it’s time to head indoors, but once kids are safely home, take them out back to explore the outdoors at night. Stargaze under the open night sky, watch for nighttime critters or pitch a tent for a backyard campout. Ask the neighbors to join you, and organize a game of flashlight tag or enjoy a movie under the stars.

HOME-GROWN EXPERIENCE.

Even many adults don’t fully understand where food comes from. Help foster a greater understanding by encouraging kids to plant a mini garden they can tend themselves until the produce is ready to harvest. Inspire the project with a trip to the local farmers market, where together you can wander outdoors while selecting fresh produce to prepare for dinner.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

PHYSICAL FUN. If you don’t

I

n today’s digital world, creating memories with loved ones and experiencing the joys of Mother Nature are some of the best reasons to turn off the TV, put down the tablet and get outdoors. From picnics to wild adventures to simple backyard games, there are dozens of ways to help kids explore all the exciting ways to live life outside. A generation ago, 75 percent of American children played outside daily, but according to the National Recreation and Park Association, only 25 percent do the same these days. From camping in your backyard to planning a scavenger hunt, these tips from the outdoor experts at TruGreen can help provide inspiration to get your family on track toward living life outside more often.

already have them, take kids along on a quick shopping trip to gather the items they need for more physical activity outside. Bikes, helmets, bats, balls—the possibilities go on and on.

ARTISTIC EXPRESSION.

Turning the imagination loose outdoors can result in magical artistic creations. Pull out a tub of oversized chalk, and watch a masterpiece emerge on the sidewalk, or let the sun’s rays melt old crayons into funky new colors and shapes. And, for a fun arts and crafts project, try making homemade bird feeders.

IMAGINATIVE PLAY. Away from all the digital distractions, kids’ minds are free to wander. Let them set their imaginations free by assembling their own backyard games. Make water toys with sponges, create a “river” out of rocks or dirt where homemade boats can sail or plan a scavenger hunt to explore every corner of the yard.

For more outdoor activity ideas, visit TruGreen.com and Pinterest.com/TruGreen.


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Homefront

Window Coverings

When you’re decorating the nursery, it’s easy to get wrapped up in all the little touches that make the room feel complete. However, adding too much flair can create some safety concerns, especially when it comes to windows. The crib may look just right centered under the window, but once your little one can reach the curtains, you may be in for some problems. Curtains are a temptation most young children can’t resist. They’re perfect for peek-a-boo and pretend forts but can also pose a suffocation hazard, and if tugged on too hard, bring the whole rod ensemble crashing down. That’s why it’s a good idea to skip floor-length curtains and opt instead for valances or bolsters that still add a decorative touch but are well out of reach of curious hands.

Door Blinds

For new parents desperate for sleep, blocking the light to create a darkened room may be a top priority. However, some light-blocking options also pose a risk to children. Window and door blinds are a common solution because they allow the versatility of being raised or lowered and opened or closed to create different looks and lighting filters as needed. However, many blinds have exposed cords, which not only present a strangulation and choking hazard but also can cut off circulation and cause permanent damage if wrapped tightly around extremities and limbs. Look for cord-free styles or opt for a semi-permanent film or tint instead. Another concern is window-paned doors, which pose a similar challenge to windows when it comes to managing privacy and light. An option such as ODL AddOn Blinds for Doors is a low-maintenance and easy solution. The blinds are easy to install and use, efficiently block light and don’t have any exposed cords.

Furniture

Oh Baby! Smart ways to baby-proof your home

F

irst-time parents quickly discover how little they know, especially when it comes to critical tasks like baby-proofing the home. When a tiny tot’s safety is at stake, the entire house can seem like one giant danger zone. Before you pull out the hard hats and safety “bubbles,” take some time to sit down and assess where changes can be made. Tackle the project room by room and you’ll be surprised how quickly the chore grows more manageable. Be sure to give special attention to common safety pitfalls like open stairways, electrical outlets and cords.

Find more information on safety options for your doors at odl.com/FFAOB16.

For most families, it’s not practical to re-furnish your home before a baby arrives. Fortunately, there are ways you can baby-proof the items you already have and, as your little one grows, work on teaching boundaries to ensure safety. Options like adhesive foam can soften the sharp edges of coffee tables, while anchors help prevent large, heavy items from being tipped or pulled over.


A Rare Find

This EXQUISITE 24+ acre property

is a rare find this close to town! Welcome home to this waterfront (stocked large pond w/ fountain) acreage with three huge paddocks, citrus trees and an 8,439-square-foot, center-aisle barn! The barn has a full bath in the center aisle and a 2/1 manager’s or in-law apartment. Barn also has several tack rooms and a huge bar room (man cave) with 28-foot ceilings, plus an industrial kitchen... perfect for entertaining. Each of the 20 stalls has automatic watering for your horses. The spacious home boasts 4 bedrooms (1 w/ French doors used as an ofc), wood and tile floors, decorative ceilings and elegant columns in the formal living room. The rear of this property has a natural spring-fed creek! Bring your cattle and/ or horses or just enjoy relaxing country living just 6 min from town!

Michelle Dinkins, Real Estate Broker 352-208-3705

FLHomes1@gmail.com • FLHomesInOcala.com


THE

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Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Clean It Up

6 tips to protect the things you love indoors and out

W

hether the family dog gets his muddy paws on the couch, an ice cream cone melts all over the backyard hammock or a sudden storm soaks your new patio cushions, life is filled with unexpected messes. Here are some simple steps you can take to protect the things you love both indoors and out, so they last well beyond the season:

Outdoors WATERPROOF OUTDOOR FABRICS: Protect your favorite outdoor cushions with the Scotchgard Outdoor Water Shield— moisture and liquids just roll right off.

CARE FOR YOUR CAR: From muddy boots to coffee spills, messes often make it to car seats and floor mats when we least expect it. To clean these surfaces, mix 2 tablespoons of dish soap with 2 tablespoons of hot water and baking soda. Use a cleaning brush to lightly work through the stain in a circular motion. Wipe the area with a cloth, and let the space air dry. To help prevent future stains, use an auto interior fabric protector.

Indoors CLEAN UPHOLSTERY: Sofas and chairs are vulnerable to surface stains, so cleaning upholstery on a regular basis is important. Start by vacuuming the furniture to remove as much surface debris as possible. Then use a damp, soapy cloth to gently spot treat the fabric, allowing it to soak in, reaching dirt beneath the surface. Once dry, protect the material with Scotchgard Fabric & Upholstery Protector, which helps repel liquids and stains, preventing future messes.

REMOVE RUG AND CARPET STAINS: Whether it’s red wine, tomato sauce or berries, spills and dropped food can create unwanted stains, damaging your rugs and carpet. Tackle these messes as soon as they happen with a quick and easy DIY recipe. First, sprinkle the spot with baking soda, let it sit for 10 minutes and then vacuum. Mix a tablespoon of dish soap, a tablespoon of vinegar and two cups of warm water. Blot with a clean sponge until it disappears. CLEAN YOUR CURTAINS: After using your curtains as a barrier

between the outdoors and your living space all summer long, they likely collected dust. Most curtains can be steam cleaned, but taking them down and putting them back up again can be a hassle. To limit this, dust or vacuum your curtains frequently as part of your cleaning routine. You can also use a lint roller to remove embedded dirt and grime that the vacuum can’t handle.

Find more tips for protecting the things you love at Scotchgard.com.


R E S I D E N T IA L | C O M M E R C IA L | VAC A N T L A N D | S P E C IA L I Z I N G I N E Q U E S T R IA N P R O P E RT I E S

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THE

Homefront

Color Is Key

Bold and Blended

Upgrade your home without a full renovation

R

emodeling your home can be a big, and often overwhelming, project, but it doesn’t always have to be. Sometimes all you really need is a fresh coat of paint or smaller upgrades. If you’re not looking to do a whole home renovation and just want to give your interior a little pick-me-up, consider revamping colors, textures and your home appliances with these simple tips from Mitsubishi Electric Cooling & Heating.

Daring patterns and color combos are gaining favor in homes across the country, especially in the most used room in the house—the kitchen. Give your kitchen a fresh, new look by taking a multi-toned cabinetry approach. Apply different shades to your upper and lower cabinets to create a completely new feel. Opting for colored cabinets, as opposed to a stain, helps develop a broader palette for the space and produces an identifiable color scheme. A similar approach can be taken for kitchens with islands. Make your island the focal point by opting for a vibrantly colored base or countertop.

Blend In

Whether your style is big and bold or clean and minimalistic, creating a cohesive look for a space is important. Often, outdated home appliances get in the way of an otherwise seamless home design. A simple home appliance upgrade can easily change the overall style of a room for the better. With more homeowners tuned into online and televised DIY resources, manufacturers are challenged like never before to deliver high-end products that blend flawlessly into the background of a living space. One example is Mitsubishi Electric’s Designer Series indoor units. These units are sleek, stylish, slim and

available in three different colors—glossy white, matte silver and glossy black— making matching the appliance to the style of a space effortless. In addition to the aesthetic benefits, these units give homeowners the ability to choose their desired room temperature for each zone in their home, while using 30-40 percent less energy than traditional cooling and heating systems, and providing better indoor air quality. Learn more at mitsubishicomfort.com.

A Little Texture Goes a Long Way

Also take into consideration textures and materials—tile and stone are the norm, but unexpected pairings such as brick and butcher block can lend a whole new level of style. These simple details can make a drastic difference in the feel of your home, no matter what room in the house you’re sprucing up. In the kitchen or bathroom, choosing the right style and material of countertop can make or break your intended design. For example, the beauty of granite’s natural patterns make it a one-of-a-kind look for your home, while a newer kitchen design trend, stainless steel, provides a distinctive look. Most importantly, consider balance when seeking out different textures. Overdoing it can detract from your attempts to liven up your home, making it instead feel cluttered or disorganized.


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Appleton At Night

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The popular Appleton After Hours socials start up again this month. To kick off the season on October 6, the Paul De Ritter Quintet will perform. These fun events feature live performances by area artists along with dancing, tasty samplings from top dining establishments and special displays of artwork by members of the Ocala Art Group. The doors open at 5pm, and the concerts kick off at 5:30pm. Admission is free for members and $10 for non-members.

Upcoming After Hours Dates: DECEMBER 1 › Marion Civic Chorale FEBRUARY 2 › Soulbase Band APRIL 6 › Saratoga Band FIND OUT MORE › Appleton After Hours › appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455, ext. 1831

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OCT

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Downtown To Dos

It’s A-MAZE-ing!

OCTOBER 1: Prayer Walk, downtown Ocala, 9am-2:30pm OCTOBER 7: Parking Garage Grand Opening, downtown Ocala, 4-6pm OCTOBER 7: Cultural Festival Movie, Citizens’ Circle, 7pm OCTOBER 7: First Friday Art Walk, downtown Ocala, 6pm OCTOBER 13: Florida Fallen Firefighter Memorial, downtown Ocala, 8-9:30pm OCTOBER 14: Jeeptoberfest, downtown Ocala, 5-8pm OCTOBER 14: Worship Service, Citizens’ Circle, 7-8pm OCTOBER 15: Thrill The World, downtown Ocala, 4-10pm OCTOBER 28: Ocala United, Citizens’ Circle, 11am-3pm OCTOBER 29: Superhero 5K, Citizens’ Circle, 7:30am

Opa At Sea (Through February 3)

These 10 days at sea will have you adding an “Opa!” to your vocabulary. The St. Mark’s Greek Orthodox Church announces their 11th Annual Opa Greek Cruise. Departing from Miami, this Greek-themed cruise will take guests to spectacular ports of call, including Aruba, Curacao, Bonaire and Labadee. Days on board can be spent tackling the rock climbing wall, ice skating or lounging poolside, while each night will feature live Greek entertainment, meals and activities for a true Greek celebration at sea. This one-of-akind vacation is sure to book up fast, so don’t wait to reserve your spot! stmarksgoc.org or (352) 245-0499.

Open Air Art

Back by popular demand, the second annual MAX Paint Out will bring artists of all genres together as they express their visions of Historic Ocala Union Station and Tuscawilla Park through their work. The event celebrates the newly formed Magnolia Art Xchange and will run in conjunction with the official opening of the Tuscawilla Art Park. Artists will have the opportunity to keep, donate or sell their work to visitors. The official Paint Out begins at 3pm with the Art Park opening celebration kicking off at 5pm. maxocala.org or (352) 615-4629. OCT

15

Hustling Through The Harvest

Race No. 2 of the Big Hammock Race Series—Season 2, presented by Prime Mortgage Group, is slated to take place later this month. The Harvest Hustle includes a 5K, 10K and duathlon course through beautiful Silver Springs State Park. This is a “Super Race,” meaning runners can earn even more valuable points toward those coveted season-end medals. Finisher medals are guaranteed for the first 400 runners to cross the finish line in the 5K and 10K events, even more incentive to get your speed on and hustle on to the finish line. For more information about the Big Hammock Race Series—Season 2, presented by Prime Mortgage Group, and to register for the Harvest Hustle, visit bighammockraceseries.com or check out their Facebook Page for more details. OCT

22

FrogS PlaIdRESO URCE CREA TIVE

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.com

Nothing says fall like wandering through a good old-fashioned corn maze. Timberline Farm’s 6th Annual Corn Maze Festival pays homage to this annual tradition with its unique twisty turny corn maze and fun family festival, open to the public all month long. The festival features food, face painting, pony rides and more. Spend the day and experience what country living is all about! Festival days are Fridays 4-8pm, Saturdays 10am-8pm and Sundays 12pm-8pm. Proceeds benefit St. Theresa’s Soup Kitchen and the Marion County Juvenile Detention Center. timberlinefarms.net or (352) 454-4113. OCT

14

Pass The Bourbon

Although some top-shelf bourbons age eight to 10 years in oak barrels before they can be tasted, the organizers of the 2016 Bourbon Invitational have managed to secure some of the rarest bourbons around. This one-of-a-kind dinner event features an exquisitely prepared fourcourse meal paired with a variety of different bourbons. Attendees will have the rare opportunity to purchase their favorites of the evening while supporting the Marion County Literacy Council. The evening also serves as an introductory taste to what the Ocala Culinary Festival will offer in March 2017. The event will be held at La Cuisine French Restaurant at 6:30pm with a private concert to follow the dinner. Tickets are limited. (352) 342-4911 or (352) 804-1507.

OCT

29

Sipping And Sprinting

What better way to start off a 5K run than with a sip of sangria! The Island Grove Wine Company will present its 3rd Annual Fall Festival and Sangria 5K where fellow runners and wine connoisseurs can commingle under the shade of the Winery’s Live Oaks. The Sangria 5K will take runners and walkers on a tour of the blueberry plantations and end at the authentic 1897 homestead where the Fall Festival will kick off. Each participant will receive a celebratory glass of sangria along with a finisher medal. Enjoy various vendors, sample tasty treats and, of course, sip some of the winery’s signature blends. The race gets underway at 8am followed by the festival opening at 9am. A car show will also take place from 11am-3pm. islandgrovewinecompany.com or (352) 481-WINE.


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A Quick Q

&

Ongoing Events

A

Free Yoga for Veterans › Wednesdays at Bliss Yoga at 12:15pm,

With Ryan Lilly

(352) 694-YOGA

Free ESL Classes › Wednesdays at First Baptist Church of Ocala at

Interview by Bonnie Kretchik

6pm, (352) 629-5683

Free ESL Classes › Wednesdays at College Road Baptist Church at 6pm, (352) 629-5683 Chair Yoga › Wednesdays at Bliss Yoga at 10:30am,

(352) 694-YOGA

Out In The Open

The Ocala Downtown Market is a staple Saturday event for many of the area’s vendors and residents. It’s a place you’ll find community members out for a stroll, browsing the merchants’ wares. But recently, the Market made a big move—literally. Its new location features a number of upgrades that will improve the experience for shoppers and sellers alike. Ryan Lilly, director of business creation for the Ocala/Marion County Chamber and Economic Partnership, took a few minutes to explain why the Market switched to a new location and what attendees can expect.

Where did the Market move to? The new location is on the corner of SE 3rd Ave and SE 3rd Street to what used to be a maintenance shed. Why change locations? There are plans in the works for a new sixstory hotel to go up where the old site was, plus there were a number of issues shoppers and merchants dealt with at the old location, so it really was time to move. What are some of the improvements the Market will now see as a result of the move? This new location has a covered portion with fans, permanent bathrooms, water hookups for vendors and a water bottle refilling station. It is open air on three sides with room for tents to be set up on the lawn and space for four food trucks. Plus, there is the ability to

accommodate 80 vendors, many more than could be accommodated in the old location. Have you had positive feedback so far? Absolutely! The first week we had 48 vendors, the second week we were up to 60 and each week we get more people interested. Is there a price increase for vendors? No, we kept the pricing the same at $25 for a covered space and $20 for a grass space. The facility is also available for rental to host special events or weddings. Has attendance improved at the new location? Yes, this is a unique space with nothing else like it in Ocala. We really want to make this a destination that outsiders will travel to. Growing the Market will improve the economy and help area vendors.

Free Yoga › First Saturday of the month through October at Sholom Park at 9am, (352) 854-7950 Garden Workshop › Second Sunday of each month at Silver Springs State Park at 1pm, (352) 236-7156 Survivors Support Group › Last Tuesday of the month at

1pm in the chapel at Ocala West United Methodist Church (room 235), (352) 291-6904

Arts, Crafts and Culture Upcoming Exhibits At The Appleton › John Raimondi,

Drawing to Sculpture will feature the dynamic drawings of John Raimondi, whose works are showcased in more than 25 museums, nine colleges and universities, three airports and dozens more public and private locations throughout the United States and Europe. The exhibit will be on display through October 30. Survival Architecture and the Art of Resilience will showcase how science, technology, architecture and art converge to examine what it takes to live amid a changing climate. The exhibition includes commissioned largescale and portable interactive architectural installations, photography and drawings. The exhibit will be on display through November 13. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455.

On Top of The World Performance (October 1,2) › The On Top of the World Cultural Center will host an original comedy written by local playwright James J. Jenkins. Performances of Dancing Beneath A Paper Sky will be held at 7pm on October 1 and 3pm on October 2. Tickets are $10 for residents and $13 for non-residents. ontopoftheworldcommunities.com or (352) 509-4033. Making a Primitive Fish Trap (October 1) › The Fort King National Historic Landmark will host a crafting event, guiding participants in making their own primitive fish trap baskets. The event begins at 10am, and registration is $5. ocalafl.org/recpark or (352) 368-5533. CF International Film Series (October 11, 25) › The College of Central Florida and the Appleton Museum present the International Film Series airing films of cultural and historic significance. This month’s selections include Brooklyn on October 11 and Rams on October 25. The films are aired at the Appleton Museum at 2pm and are free for members and included with the price of admission for nonmembers. appletonmuseum.com or (352) 291-4455.

Gourd Artist Meeting (October 15) › The Marion County

Gourd Artist Group will hold a monthly meeting at the Cherokee Park Recreation Center in Belleview at 10am. All are welcome. marioncountygourdartists.com or (352) 245-7203.

WANT TO GO? › Ocala Downtown Market › Saturdays, 9am-2pm, rain or shine › Corner of SE 3rd Ave. and SE 3rd St., Ocala › ocaladowntownmarket.com or (352) 629-8051 084

› Ocala

.com

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CF Murder Mystery Dinner (October 22) › The CF Visual and

Performing Arts Department presents Politics Can Be Murder. This murder mystery dinner will include a catered meal with performance. Performances are at noon and 6pm at the Webber Center. Tickets are $45 per person or $360 for a table of eight. tickets.cf.edu or (352) 873-5810

Concerts

Trips ’N’ Tours (October 27-30) › The program will take guests to

Ticketmaster › (800) 745-3000 › ticketmaster.com

Boston for a tour of several locations, including the Boston Museum of Fine Art, Fenway Park and a walking tour of the historic Freedom Trail. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455.

All dates are subject to change without notice. Please call ahead to confirm venue listings.

Remembering Conway Twitty Charlie Puth K Country Presents Trace Adkins John Fogerty Tribute Garth Brooks Ludacris Alessia Cara Sia Classic Country Fitz & The Tantrums Chris Young Carrie Underwood Cole Swindell Dolly Parton Lauryn Hill

Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

Oct. 1

House of Blues, Orlando

Oct. 3

Reilly Arts Center, Ocala

Oct. 7

Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale Amway Center, Orlando CFE Arena, Orlando Hard Rock Live, Orlando Amway Center, Orlando Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale House of Blues, Orlando CFE Arena, Orlando Amalie Arena, Tampa House of Blues, Orlando Amalie Arena, Tampa House of Blues, Orlando The Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages

Oct. 8 Oct. 6-9 Oct. 13 Oct. 29 Oct. 30 Nov. 5 Nov. 5 Nov. 10 Nov. 16 Nov. 18 Nov. 26 Dec. 8

Five Finger Death Punch

Amalie Arena, Tampa

Dec. 9

The Beach Boys

The Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages

Dec. 17-18

Trans-Siberian Orchestra: The Ghosts of Christmas Eve

Amalie Arena, Tampa

Dec. 18

The Oak Ridge Boys

Marion Civic Chorale Concert (October 30, November 6) › The

OCT

6-9

Marion Civic Chorale will present A Salute To Veterans, a tribute to the courage, dedication and sacrifices of American veterans on the battlefield and on our home front. The concert will take place at Ocala West United Methodist Church on October 30 and First Presbyterian Church in Ocala on November 6. Both performances begin at 3pm and admission is free. (262) 227-6495.

Quilt Show (November 4-5) › The Country Road Quilters of Ocala

present their annual quilt show, Down a Sunny Country Road of Quilts. The event will take place at the College of Central Florida from 9am4pm. Admission is $7. countryroadquiltersocala.blogspot.com or (352) 638-6747.

NOV

16

Dec. 9

Art and Craft Festival (November 5-6) › The 20th Annual Spanish Springs Art and Craft Festival will take place at Spanish Springs Town Square in The Villages. The two-day fair-style festival features the finest artisans in the country showcasing their works. The festival is open 10am-5pm with free admission. artfestival.com or (561) 746-6155.

Outdoor & Athletic Endeavors DEC

17-18

Group Bike Rides (Ongoing) › Brick City Bicycles offers

several group bike rides throughout the week and weekend. brickcitybicycles.com or (352) 369-9400.

Kayak Outings (Ongoing) › The Marion County Parks and

Recreation Department will host several kayak outings for children and adults. marioncountyfl.org or call (352) 671-8560.

Signature Sinatra

(October 6-9) › The velvet voice of Frank Sinatra

changed the face of the music scene decades ago. Today, the icon’s songs are considered classics and Frank, a legend. Relive some of his top hits of days gone by with a musical tribute performed by vocalist Michael Mathews at the Ocala Civic Theatre. The concert, “Seriously Frank,” will feature favorites such as “Come Fly With Me,” “The Way You Look Tonight” and, of course, “New York, New York” just to name a few. Tickets are $25 for adults and $12 for students. ocalacivictheatre.com or (352) 236-2274.

Parks and Recreation Programs (Ongoing) › The Marion County Parks and Recreation Department will host a variety of new programs this fall, including archery, yoga and martial arts. marioncountyfl.org or (352) 671-8560. Sportsability (October 1) › The City of Ocala and the Florida Disabled Outdoor Association will host Sportsability, an event showcasing different sports for those with disabilities. The event will be held at the E.D. Croskey Recreation Center from 10am-3pm. ocalafl.org/recpark or (352) 368-5504. Fishing Adventure (October 14-15) › Come to the Fort King Historic Landmark for a fishing adventure. Participants will make a fishing rod the first day and take a field trip to one of the area’s fishing spots for a fishing adventure the second day. Registration is $10. ocalafl.org or (352) 368-5535. Ocala Ladies First 1/2 Marathon (October 30) › The Ocala

Ladies First 1/2 Marathon and 5K will take place at the Ocala Hilton. The race is open to both men and women, and Halloween costumes are optional for a costume contest. The race begins at 7:30am. ladiesfirstocala.itsyourrace.com or (678) 222-8744.

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The Local

Scene Continued from p.86

Performing Arts Blue Man Group

Blue Man Group Theatre at Universal CityWalk, Orlando

Cirque du Soleil: La Nouba

Downtown Disney, Orlando The Hippodrome State Theatre, Gainesville Sonnetag Theatre at the IceHouse, Mount Dora Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, Gainesville Ocala Civic Theatre Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts, Gainesville The Hippodrome State Theatre, Gainesville Amalie Arena, Tampa

Stage Kiss Corpse! RENT Seriously Frank Bill Burr

Whatever Happened to Baby Jane Amy Schumer Live Kellogg’s Tour of Amalie Arena, Tampa Gymnastics Champions The Mousetrap Ocala Civic Theatre Tracy Morgan Hard Rock Live, Orlando Sonnetag Theatre at the The Man of La Mancha IceHouse, Mount Dora Gainesville Community Little Women Playhouse, Gainesville The Hippodrome State A Christmas Carol Theatre, Gainesville Dance Alive National Curtis M. Phillips Center for the Ballet presents Performing Arts, Gainesville Sugar Plum Tea

Fun Fundraisers Chair-ity Event (October 7) › The 8th Annual Chair-ity Event to raise

funds for the local chapter of the Boys and Girls Club will take place at Ocala/Marion County Association of Realtors office in Ocala. This year’s theme is “tailgate party” and will include a live and silent auction, entertainment and more. Tickets are $20, and the event begins at 6pm. omcar.com or (352) 629-2415.

Oct. 1-Dec. 27 Oct. 1-Dec. 27

Sep. 16Oct. 9

Community Yard Sale (October 22) › The Friends of Marion County Parks and Recreation will be holding a Community Yard Sale at Liberty Park from 8am-noon. All proceeds will help benefit scholarships for youth in recreation camp programs and assistance with park amenities. marioncountyfl.org or (352) 671-8560.

Oct. 4-5

Marion County Chili Cook-off Registration (Through

Sep. 2-25

November) › Registration is now open for the 35th annual Marion

OCT

Oct. 6-9

County Chili Cook-off to benefit The Cornerstone School. This muchanticipated event will be held November 5 at the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion. marioncountychilicookoff.com or call (352) 351-8840.

7

Oct. 7 Oct. 14Nov. 6 Oct. 16

Greater Ocala Woman’s Club Fundraising Event

(November 5) › The Greater Ocala Women’s Club will host Shell We Have Lunch?, a fundraising luncheon at the Druid Hills Methodist Church. The event will include a jewelry sale, door prizes, 50/50 raffle and more. Attendees will have the opportunity to create their own shell crafts. (352) 236-0029.

Oct. 30 Nov. 3-27 Nov. 13 Nov. 18Dec. 11 Nov. 25Dec. 18 Nov. 26Dec. 22

Other Fun Stuff! Prayer Walk (October 1) › A prayer walk will take place beginning

Dec. 17

at Veterans Memorial Park at 9:30am. The walk will end at Citizens’ Circle with worship music and prayer. Transportation from Citizens’ Circle back to Veterans Park will be provided. godbelongsinocala.com or (352) 615-2366.

DEC

17

Sports

Paws & Pages Pet Expo (October 1) › Local vendors and exhibitors provide information and resources for every pet owner. Stop by the photo booth to enter the pet photo contest. All pets must be leashed. Bonus: There will be story time and crafts purr-fectly suited for children! The event takes place at the Marion County Public Library main branch headquarters from 10am-3pm. marioncountyfl.org/library or (352) 368-4507.

Don’t miss a single big game this year. Here are the home schedules.

NCAA Football

NFL

NBA

University of Florida LSU Oct. 8 TBA Missouri Oct. 15 TBA

Tampa Bay Buccaneers Denver Oct. 2 4:05p Oakland Oct. 30 1:00p

Florida State University North Carolina Oct. 1 TBA Wake Forest Oct. 15 TBA Clemson Oct. 29 TBA

Jacksonville Jaguars Indianapolis Oct. 2 9:30a Oakland Oct. 23 1:00p

Orlando Magic San Antonio Oct. 12 Indiana Oct. 14 Atlanta Oct. 16 New Orleans Oct. 20 Miami Oct. 26

7:00p 7:00p 6:00p 7:00p 7:00p

Miami Heat Brooklyn Orlando Philadelphia Charlotte San Antonio

7:30p 7:30p 7:30p 8:00p 6:00p

University of Central Florida Tulane Oct. 7 8:00p Temple Oct. 15 TBA University of Miami Florida State Oct. 8 TBA North Carolina Oct. 15 TBA 088

› Ocala

.com

Miami Dolphins Tennessee Oct. 9 1:00p Pittsburgh Oct. 16 1:00p Buffalo Oct. 23 1:00p Atlanta Falcons Denver Oct. 9 4:05p Seattle Oct. 16 4:25p

Design, Decorate, Discover (October 6) › United Way of Marion

Oct. 11 Oct. 18 Oct. 21 Oct. 28 Oct. 30

County’s Women’s Leadership Council, “Women of Worth,” will host this series that includes expert insights, hands-on activities and fun ways to connect with women in our community. Ocala Health, the women’s series health partner, will provide a short presentation before each event. All proceeds benefit ReadingPals, a program that provides mentors for at-risk kindergarteners. “It’s a Wrap” will be Thursday, October 6 from 5:30-7:30pm at Gateway Bank. This session will focus on orthopedic health and attendees will create and take home a wreath and learn how to make bows. Other events will follow in November and January. Sessions range from $25-$45, and can be purchased at uwmc.org through PayPal. You may also reserve your ticket with a credit card by calling (352) 732-9696.

Saturday Science (October 8) › The Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition will host a free monthly educational event for students in grades three through five. This month’s topic is computer game design. Sessions are at 9am and 11am. Pre-registration is required two weeks in advance. ihmc.us or (352) 387-3050.


Girls Inspired To Try Science (October 8) › The Discovery

Serving the Ocala & Gainesville areas

Center will host a program for girls 8-12 years old in an effort to foster an interest in science. The event runs 10am-1pm, and registration is $25. mydiscoverycenter.org or (352) 401-3900.

NO EVENT TOO SMALL OR TOO LARGE CUSTOMIZED TO MEET YOUR NEEDS CASH DISCOUNTS • PACKAGES AVAILABLE

Oktoberfest (October 8) › Tuscawilla Park will play host to an

Oktoberfest celebration from 3-7pm. The event features live music, authentic German cuisine, food trucks, a polka band and more. The event is family friendly and open to the public. Admission is free. reillyartscenter.com or (352) 351-1606.

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Dining in the Dark (October 22) › Florida Center for the Blind,

bloomingeventsfl@gmail.com

www.bloomingeventsfl.com

Inc. will host their annual Dining in the Dark event at the Jumbolair ballroom in Ocala. The event will feature a full-course meal prepared by The Mojo Grill & Catering Co. and live entertainment. The event will be in the complete darkness to simulate what blind people experience every day. Tickets are $75 per person and $140 per couple. flblind.org or (352) 873-4700.

McIntosh 1890s Festival (October 22) › The 42nd Annual

McIntosh 1890s Festival will take place in downtown historic McIntosh from 8am-5pm. Over 280 arts, crafts and antique vendors will be on-site along with demonstrations of basket weaving, spoon chime crafting, glassblowing and more. For more information, visit the festival’s Facebook page or (352) 591-4038.

Fun in the Park (October 23) › A family event will be held at Sholom Park from 1-4pm. Attendees will be treated to live entertainment, music, games and more. The event is free and open to the public. (352) 875-4428. Pumpkin Run and Fall Festival (October 28-30) › The 6th

Annual Ocala Pumpkin Run will feature a classic car show and fall festival at Castro Farms in Ocala. Several vendors will be on-site, and there will be numerous family-friendly activities throughout the festival. The event is open 8am-4pm daily, and tickets are $12 in advance or $15 at the gate. ocalapumpkinrun.com or (352) 620-9998.

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Dinner Dance (October 29) › The St. Mark Greek Orthodox Church of Belleview will hold a dinner dance from 5:30-11pm. The evening will also feature the comedic talent of Basile. stmarksgoc.org or (352) 245-0499.

Senior Health Fair (November 2) › Brookdale Senior Living Center will host a senior health fair from 9am-2pm. Complimentary screenings will be available, and health experts will be on-site offering advice. Admission is free. (352) 368-7710.

COME HOME TO YOUR LAKEFRONT APARTMENT COMMUNITY

TEDxOcala (November 5) › The second annual TEDxOcala will

take place at the Ocala Civic Theatre and feature a host of speakers discussing the theme, Cultivating Imagination. The central theme encourages individuals to imagine ideas that inspire change. General tickets are $40, and student tickets are $25. tedxocala.com.

To have an event considered for Ocala Style Magazine’s The Scene, send a short description (and a color photo, if possible) 60 days in advance to calendar@ocalastyle.com, fax us at (352) 732-0226 or by mail: Ocala Style Magazine, The Scene, 1007 E. Fort King St., Ocala, FL 34471

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THE

Scene

› SOCIAL SCENE

VIEW MORE SOCIAL SCENE PHOTOS AND PURCHASE PRINTS OF YOUR FAVORITES AT OCALASTYLE.COM

Young Professionals Ocala Black & White Gala Young Professionals Ocala, more commonly known as YPO, recently hosted its largest event of the year at the Ocala Ballroom in the historic Magnolia Building in downtown Ocala. › Written And Photographed By Ronald W. Wetherington

W

Brittany Bishop, Kristin Nast and Kara Tumbleston

ith “Black and White Gala” as this year’s theme, everyone came dressed to impress in various combinations. This year’s event was presented by Angie Lewis State Farm and also was made possible by various other local businesses that sponsored the event. This annual gala is coordinated by YPO board members to celebrate current members as well as give potential members an opportunity to learn more about the organization so that they can become members as well. YPO is a program of the Ocala/Marion County Chamber & Economic Partnership (CEP.) The goal of YPO is to provide young professionals of Ocala/Marion County with a forum for influence to greater understand community issues, develop leadership skills, give back to the community and promote the growth of Ocala and all of Marion County. This program is dedicated to making the community a better place to live by connecting, engaging and empowering each other both personally and professionally.

With a full ballroom of 150 attendees, this year’s Black & White Gala was a huge success. The guest list was almost evenly split between members and nonmembers. Guests were able to enjoy a live band, appetizers, dinner and desserts, and take pictures in a photo booth. After walking down the red carpet upon entry, guests then browsed and bid on silent auction items. Proceeds raised benefited Interfaith’s Food 4 Kids program, which provides children in need with backpacks full of food to take home on weekends. YPO raised a considerable sum for such a worthy program at the gala. Also, the “I am YPO” campaign was launched at this event to give the community a more recognizable YPO brand through armbands, magnets and a traveling sign. This campaign aims to put a face to current YPO members, hoping others in the community will see someone they know or recognize and want to become a member as well. In addition to the annual gala, the YPO holds an event each month alternating between leaders’ lunches and an after-hours networking event. YPO also hosts several other annual events, such as C-Suite Perspectives where members get a first-hand look into large, local businesses by meeting with a panel of the company’s executives for an open dialogue. There are also “Candi-dating” events where members sit down in a small setting for a questionand-answer session with each person running for elected office in Ocala/Marion County. Additionally, YPO is involved annually in community-based events such as the Mayor’s Spring Clean Up and the Giving Tree. At all their events, these young professionals seek to make an impact on the community with their strong presence. For more information, contact Bart Rowland at Bart@OcalaCEP.com. Interested young professionals can also find the group on Facebook at their Young Professionals Ocala page.

Angie Lewis and Alex Moy

Lois Bukns, Emily Cummins and Hilary Hoover

Ronald W. Wetherington SOCIAL SCENE EDITOR

090

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.com


Nikki and Marlon Awuma

David Barnes, Danielle and Ben Marciano

TC Cougill and Megan Whittaker

John and Jennifer Toms, Casirdi Hudson

Cathy Cooper and Erin Thomas

Jerry Furlong and Kevin Nast

Kara Tumbleston and Chantae Cook

Andrea Maxwell, Nicole Musick, Lindsay Jones

Joe Reichel, Billy Gilchrist and Cortnee Alexander

Lauren and Luke Gibson

Jenifer and Joel Raney

Anthony and Olivia Ortiz

Malvina Paluski, Cece Griffin and Liz Sanchez-Ortiz

Lisa and Kevin Sheilley

Davida and Shannon Johnson, Lacey and Eric Anderson OCT ’16 ›

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› SOCIAL SCENE

VIEW MORE SOCIAL SCENE PHOTOS AND PURCHASE PRINTS OF YOUR FAVORITES AT OCALASTYLE.COM

MCBIA Dinner and Parade of Homes Banquet

Photos by Crys Williams @ Klein Conference Center

The Marion County building community came together in April to toast the industry and the success of the recent Parade of Homes. The evening included a full meal, bar services, door prizes and plenty of camaraderie.

Terry and Jacki Carlson

Steve Burroughs and Jerrell Bass

Kim Belmont, Keith Fritch and Valerie Dailey

Tim and Lu Petty

Patrick Fenny and Pam Bohanon Mike Finn and Roger Sandor

Brenda Banks, Chas and Kim Hafey

Brian and Liz Smallwood

Diane and Jim Thomason

De Monroe and John Thorman

Mike and Jennifer Rose

092

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.com

Monica, Michael and Linda Plunkett

Pal and Jim Bennett, John Celebre


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Scene

THE

› SOCIAL SCENE

VIEW MORE SOCIAL SCENE PHOTOS AND PURCHASE PRINTS OF YOUR FAVORITES AT OCALASTYLE.COM

Trashy Fashion Show Photos by Crys Williams @ Circle Square Cultural Center

One man’s trash is another’s ... couture? In April, On Top of the World Lions Club encouraged environmental awareness and giving back during their Recycled “Trashy” Fashion Show at Hilton Ocala. Proceeds benefited veterans, children and those with visual and hearing impairments.

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Be kind. Be gracious. Be giving. is celebrating the spirit of giving. And you can, too, in our December

Healthy Giving issue. Support and highlight your favorite charitable organization. Recognize volunteers who have made your organization succeed. Honor friends or family who have impacted our community.

Charities and volunteers make our community better for everyone. Show your support today. To be a part of Healthy Living Magazine’s Healthy Giving issue,

contact Sharon Morgan at sharon@ocalastyle.com • (352) 209-4159 or Penny Miller at penny@healthylivingmagazines.com • (352) 895-8074 OCT ’16 ›

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