Page 1


BOARD CERTIFIED

in Colon & Rectal Surgery Laparoscopic and Robotic Colon Resections / Cancer treatment

3-D Rectal Ultrasound Performed in Office

MARCH IS COLON CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

COLON & RECTAL SURGERY • Hemorrhoid Procedures Infrared Coagulation (in office) Banding (in office) • Stapled Hemorrhoidectomy • Hemorrhoidectomy • Rectal Prolapse Repair Flex Focus 500 High Resolution Rectal Ultrasound Imaging

• • • • • •

Fecal Incontinence Treatment Ulcerative Colitis Crohn’s Disease Diverticulitis Colon and Rectal Cancer Colonoscopies

• Laparoscopic Colon Cancer Surgery • Anal Fistula • Anal Fissure • Rectocele

LAPAROSCOPIC SURGERY

GENERAL SURGERY

• • • •

• Breast Cancer and Other Breast Conditions • Bowel Obstruction • Peptic Ulcer Disease

Gall Bladder Disease Appendicitis Colon Resection Colostomies and Reversal of Colostomies • Hernia Repairs

“The greatest honor one human can bestow on another is to entrust them with their life in their greatest moment of need (illness). The least a surgeon can do in return is exhibit diligence, skill and, above all, compassion.”

- Christian O. Oraedu, M.D.

Ocala Office in Deerwood II 1830 SE 18th Ave, Suite #3 | Ocala

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CHRISTIAN O. ORAEDU, M.D., FACS, FRCS (Edin),

FRCSI Board-Certified Colon and Rectal Surgeon Board Certified in General Surgery by the American Board of Surgery Board Certified in Colon and Rectal Surgery by the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery Fellow of the American College of Surgeons Member of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

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March2014

Vol16 No3

Features Festival de Silver Springs p24 It may not be Cannes—yet—but the inaugural Silver Springs International Film Festival has attracted the attention of scores of world-class filmmakers close to home and from around the globe. BY JIM GIBSON

The Raddest Parks Around p30

<

Hey, kids! Put down the gadgets, head outside and check out these venues in our roundup of all places totally wicked. You may just find yourself an awesome new hobby. Thumb © Stepan Kapl; Leaves © Thampapon / Shutterstock.com

BY KATIE MCPHERSON ON THE COVER

p34

Green Thumb Success

Four local Master Gardeners share their favorite gardening tricks and tips to make your garden grow. BY CYNTHIA MCFARLAND Cover photo by John Jernigan. Models: Shelby Wilson and Casey Allen. Fence © Krivosheev Vitaly; Landscape © Elenamiv

All In The Family p40 From lion taming to aerialist stunts, the Stephenson family has generations of experience entertaining others as part of the Greatest Show on Earth. BY LORI CARTER

Departments The Buzz p13

The Pulse p45

The Dish p55

The Scene p65

The real people, places and events that shape our community.

Ideas to keep you fit and healthy all year long.

Our best recipes, restaurant news and culinary quick bites.

Your guide to what’s happening in and around Ocala.

BY MADELINE CALISE, KEVIN CHRISTIAN, CYNTHIA MCFARLAND, KATIE MCPHERSON & JUDGE STEVEN ROGERS

BY JOANN GUIDRY & KATIE MCPHERSON

BY MADELINE CALISE, AMANDA FURRER, CYNTHIA MCFARLAND & KATIE MCPHERSON

BY BONNIE KRETCHIK

HORSIN’AROUND p14 FROMCITYHALL p16 CLASSACTS p18 BENCHMARKS p20 BUSINESSBRIEFS p22

LOOKINGWELL p46 BEINGWELL p48 LIVINGWELL p50

QUICKBITES p57 DININGGUIDE p59

AQUICKQ&A p68 SPRINGFESTIVALS p70 THESOCIALSCENE p76

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urc e: T he M 2 edia Audit 201

MA

1 MAGAZIN S#

COUNT ON Y’ RI

Still

E

So

March2014

Vol16 No3

ocalastyle.com

PUBLISHER

KATHY JOHNSON / kathy@ocalastyle.com OFFICE/PRODUCTION MANAGER CYNTHIA BROWN / cynthia@ocalastyle.com

EXECUTIVE EDITOR KARIN FABRY-CUSHENBERY karin@ocalastyle.com

MANAGING EDITOR MELISSA PETERSON melissa@ocalastyle.com

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT KATIE MCPHERSON katie@ocalastyle.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS LORI CARTER KEVIN CHRISTIAN kevin@ocalastyle.com

AMANDA FURRER amanda@ocalastyle.com

CREATIVE DIRECTOR JASON FUGATE jason@ocalastyle.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS CASEY ALLEN casey@ocalastyle.com

CHRISTINA GEIGER PHOTOGRAPHERS SHEILA HARTLEY sheila@ocalastyle.com

JOHN JERNIGAN jernigan@ocalastyle.com

RON WETHERINGTON ron@ocalastyle.com

JOANN GUIDRY

DIRECTOR OF SALES DEAN JOHNSON

joann@ocalastyle.com

deanjohnson@ocalastyle.com

LESLEY JONES BONNIE KRETCHIK bonnie@ocalastyle.com

CYNTHIA MCFARLAND cmcfarland@ocalastyle.com

EDITORIAL INTERN MADELINE CALISE ADMINISTRATIVE/ ACCOUNTING LYNSEY JOHNSON lynsey@ocalastyle.com

DISTRIBUTION DAVE ADAMS

SALES MANAGER SHARON MORGAN

| TOTAL RV REPAIR | HORSE TRAILER LIVING QUARTERS | You can count on us for quality work and great service at competitive prices.

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TAGLINE & ARROW

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Ocala Style Magazine, March 2014. Published monthly by Ocala Publications Inc., 1007 E. Fort King Street, Ocala, FL 34471. (352) 732-0073. All contents copyright 2014 by Ocala Publications Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written TRADEmust GOTHICaccompany BOLD permission from the publisher. For back issues or advertising information, call (352) 732-0073. Return postage all unsolicited manuscripts and artwork if they are to be returned. Manuscripts are welcomed, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. “Promotional” and “Promotional Feature” denote a paid advertising feature. Publisher is not responsible for claims and content of advertisements. OCALA / MARION COUNTY

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The Advanced Prostate Cancer Institute is dedicated solely to treating prostate cancer. The center is designed for patient comfort and convenience with innovative technology and the highest standards of quality. There are many ways prostate cancer may be treated. Our team of board-certified urologists, pathologists & radiation oncologists personalizes treatment based on each patient’s unique needs. Adjacent to The Villages, the Advanced Prostate Cancer Institute offers a variety of techniques and treatments including: • RapidArc IMRT with IGRT Utilizing ConeBeam CT • Hormone Therapy • Watchful Waiting • Minimally Invasive Surgery using the da Vinci Surgical System (performed by our urology team at local hospitals) Together, our clinical team is dedicated to finding the best prostate cancer treatment option for you.

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Hey, Horse-Lovers!

Jump on over to Live Oak International p14

From The Steps of City Hall p16

Buzz

the Class Acts p18

Mistrial Mishaps p20

Business Briefs p22

and more!

E N I L N I T E G T

Hand © vita khorzhevska; Tree © kosam; Landscape © Aleksandar Mijatovic / Shutterstock.com

Man © Robert Kneschke / Shutterstock.com

HE CITY OF OCALA UTILITY SERVICES WILL HOST THE FLORIDA MUNICIPAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION’S 14TH ANNUAL FLORIDA LINEMAN COMPETITION MARCH 28 AND 29. WATCH 25 LINE TEAMS AND 40 APPRENTICES AS THEY HAVE SOME COMPETITIVE FUN DOING WHAT THEY DO EVERY DAY: THEIR JOBS. The competition sets up real-world scenarios, and spectators will watch these professional linemen take them on one at a time. Individual contenders will showcase their skills, but it’s also a day of teambuilding, as linemen groups practice procedures and reinforce good safety habits. Everyone is encouraged to attend and watch as their community’s service employees show off their day-to-day work.

Mar

28,29

WANT TO GO?

14th Annual Florida Lineman Competition Ocala Regional Sports Complex publicpower.com/florida-lineman-competition

ocalastyle.com MAR’14 ocalastyle

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Buzz

the

HORSIN’AROUND

THE LOWDOWN ON LIVE OAK INTERNATIONAL

BY CYNTHIA McFARLAND

O

N A CLEAR SPRING MORNING, SPECTATORS FIND THEIR PLACES BENEATH THE ENORMOUS MOSS-DRAPED OAKS SCATTERED ACROSS GENTLY ROLLING FIELDS. THE REFRAIN OF HOOF BEATS RINGS OUT AS A TEAM OF FOUR BURNISHED BAYS APPEARS ON THE WINDING PATH BETWEEN THE TREES.

Heads high, each horse in the team moves in harmony, surging forward in a powerful, ground-devouring trot. The horses approach the hazard, a challenging obstacle consisting of a wooden bridge, tight turns and a curving creek bed. Undaunted, the team picks up speed as the marathon carriage rattles over the bridge. Hooves echo on the wooden planks, and the horses plunge into the water on the other side. The driver shouts a word of encouragement, and crew members lean sharply to one side off the back of the compact carriage, helping to keep it balanced as the four horses break into a gallop and

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charge through the water. A chorus of cheers and applause erupts from the spectators as the horses explode from the churning water and race on to the next obstacle. It’s cross-country marathon day at Live Oak International, a world-class competition featuring both combined driving and show jumping, the only event of its kind in North America. Join the spectators on March 20-23 and discover why so many people return each year to be part of the action. In combined driving, horses and drivers compete in three phases: dressage, marathon and cones. Dressage takes place in a manicured arena in which the driver must complete a test consisting of a prescribed sequence of maneuvers. The fast and furious action of the cross-country marathon is largely responsible for the sport’s growing interest, as teams of horses tackle challenging obstacles at high speed over a course of several miles. During the cones competition, an obstacle course tests the precise accuracy of drivers who must negotiate a complicated course without

disturbing the cones or going off course. Show jumping was added to the Live Oak event in 2012. An Olympic sport since 1912, it remains a crowd favorite because it’s all about jumping high and going fast. At the Grand Prix level, fences can reach 5 feet 3 inches tall and are up to 6 feet wide. Horses receive penalties (faults) for knocking down a rail, refusing a fence or going over the time limit. When several riders complete the course without faults, a timed “jump off ” determines the winner. Live Oak International takes place Thursday through Sunday from 9am until about 4pm daily at Live Oak Plantation off Highway 40, about six miles west of I-75, the private 5,000-acre farm of the Weber family. The event is produced by nine-time winner of the USEF Four-In-Hand Driving Championship Chester C. Weber of Ocala and his sister, Juliet W. Reid, who leads the Washington International Horse Show as president of the board. Catch driving action each morning, dressage on Thursday and Friday, cross-country marathon on

Saturday and cones competition on Sunday. This year, Live Oak International offers the highest amount of prize money of any driving event on the continent and hosts the USEF National Four-In-Hand Driving Championship, so expect to see the world’s best drivers in action. Show jumping follows the driving competition Friday through Sunday afternoons, with courses designed by two-time Olympic show jumping course designer Leopoldo Palacios of Venezuela. The world famous Budweiser Clydesdale hitch will be at the event on Thursday and Sunday. Enjoy on-site concessions and the vendor village. (Dogs allowed on leash only.) Admission is $10 per person and $5 for seniors and children under 12, with proceeds benefiting the Marion County Therapeutic Riding Association. Tickets are available online and at the gate.

Want To Go? MARCH 20-23, 9AM-4PM LIVE OAK PLANTATION, OCALA For more information, visit liveoakinternational.com.


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ocalastyle.com MAR’14

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FROMCITYHALL

NEWBRIDGE COMES TO OCALA

DO YOU FEEL IT? FEEL DOWNTOWN LIVE 2014

kicks off in March with Eddie Money and Sister Hazel! Gates open at 6pm, and the show begins at 7:15pm. Admission is $10 per person, and children under 10 get in free. VIP tickets are available for $30 and include a free drink, light appetizers and a guaranteed seat front and center. Visit feeldowntownlive.com for more information and the full 2014 lineup. EDDIE MONEY / Saturday, March 8

The official visit of the delegation from the NEWBRIDGE/ OCALA TWINNING GROUP

from Newbridge, Ireland to Ocala took place February 1825. Many members of OPD and OFR, along with members of the community, worked to plan and set up a great visit for the delegates.

SISTER HAZEL / Saturday, March 29

OPD RECERTIFIED

SCULPTURE STROLL Don’t miss the March 15 TUSCAWILLA SCULPTURE STROLL CELEBRATION from 1-4pm at Tuscawilla Park. The community is invited to join us in celebrating the power of public art and vote for their favorite sculpture to receive the People’s Choice Award, all the while enjoying live entertainment, free family art activities, and food and beverage vendors. The sculpture competition’s award ceremony will occur at 3:30pm, so make sure to vote by 3pm to have your voice heard!

A ‘POWER’FUL CELEBRATION This May, the CITY OF OCALA UTILITY SERVICES will introduce its inaugural Public Utilities Week. This is a celebration of over 100 years of public ownership of the local utilities. The week will feature educational information and fun activities the entire family can enjoy. To find more information on activities taking place, visit ocalafl.org/us.

CALLING ALL CONCERNED CITIZENS The CITIZENS ACADEMY is a free, educational, seven-week program that touches upon virtually every facet of city government. Sessions are held every Thursday between April 3 and May 15, from 6-8pm, at various city locations. Sessions include visits to the Ocala Police Department, Ocala Fire Department, Ocala International Airport, Tuscawilla Park, the water treatment plant and other sites. Participants will receive live demonstrations, educational discussions on what is being done to promote economic development in our community and the opportunity to hear from top city administrators and elected officials. To apply and learn more, visit citizensacademy.ocalafl.org. The deadline to apply is Friday, March 14.

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The OCALA POLICE DEPARTMENT received the official Certificate of Accreditation for the Department. OPD went through the accreditation process and assessment in November 2013 and was recommended for re-accreditation.

THE WHAT AND WHY ON WEATHERIZING In January, OCALA UTILITY SERVICES conducted their annual Weatherizations Project. Two low-income homes are selected to demonstrate the impact of easy, cost effective projects that can be done by most customers to make their homes more energy efficient. Included is the installation of weather stripping, caulking, attic insulation and compact fluorescent lights by OUS employees. This project also includes an outreach element where employees canvass the immediate neighborhood to hand out conservation kits and information.

Bolt © SoRad / Shutterstock.com

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ocalastyle.com MAR’14

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BENCHMARKS

MS. TRIAL BY

JUDGE ERS G STEVEN RO

I

t was over before it started. After selecting the jury for a criminal case on Monday, the trial was scheduled to begin on Wednesday morning. The jurors arrived on time and were waiting downstairs for the bailiff to bring them to the courtroom. Unfortunately, the inmate elevator was broken and a separate bailiff decided to use the judge’s elevator to transport the defendant upstairs. The judge’s elevator was also the choice for the bailiff assigned to transport the jury. On Monday, the jurors’ last image of the defendant was of him sitting in the courtroom wearing a nice suit and tie. But when the elevator doors opened on Wednesday morning, the jurors were face to face with the defendant— still wearing his jail uniform and handcuffs. After interviewing the jury and learning their opinion of the defendant had changed, I had no choice but to declare a mistrial before even the first word of opening statements was spoken. Mistrials are every judge’s nightmare. Conducting a jury trial requires a judge to guide lawyers, jurors and witnesses through a legal minefield. The task of avoiding taboo questions, statements, etc. is often daunting. The most common reason for a mistrial is simply the jury’s failure to reach a unanimous verdict. Before a

And just that quickly, the trial crumbled like a house of cards. Not every prohibited comment merits a mistrial. Judges have the discretion to give a “curative instruction” and proceed with the trial. I always thought this was a strange concept because it forces the judge to remind the jury of the improper comment and then disregard it. It’s like telling a person not to think about a pink elephant. There’s also a term for when it’s acceptable to overlook no-nos committed during a trial. This is called “harmless I HAD NO CHOICE BUT TO DECLARE A error.” Yours truly MISTRIAL BEFORE EVEN THE FIRST WORD is referenced in an OF OPENING STATEMENTS WAS SPOKEN. appellate decision from a trial I did years ago as a prosecutor. It was a robbery case, and of mistrials. I was once the defendant denied committing the conducting a criminal trial crime. During closing arguments, where the police officer was I told the jury: “The defendant said testifying as the prosecutor’s he didn’t commit this crime. But, he first witness. The transcript never told you where he was that night. would read something like this: Did he?” The appellate court said I Prosecutor: Do you remember improperly shifted the burden to the defendant to prove his innocence. where the defendant was when But, this was “harmless error” and the you arrived at his residence? defendant’s conviction was affirmed. Officer: Yes, he was sitting on The silver lining to a mistrial his back porch. (if any) is it gives the attorneys an Prosecutor: And how do you opportunity to re-group and discuss a recall that? resolution of the case before the next Officer: Because that’s also trial date. Jury trials are often a gamble. where he was the last time When the chips are down and you I arrested him. are holding a bad hand, who wouldn’t Defense: Objection! appreciate the opportunity to re-shuffle Motion for a mistrial. the deck? Judge: Granted.

mistrial can be declared for this reason, the judge must give an “Allen charge.” Also known as the “dynamite charge,” this instruction tells the jury to go back in the jury room and give it another try. The Allen charge is based on the 1896 United States Supreme Court decision Allen v. United States, 164 U.S. 492 (1896). That’s a 118-year-old legal precedent for telling a jury to try harder. Unexpected statements from witnesses cause plenty

Judge Steven G. Rogers currently serves as a circuit court judge. He lives in Ocala with his wife, three children and an extremely spoiled Australian Shepherd.

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Woman © Piotr Marcins / Shutterstock.com

Buzz

the


ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS 3105 SW 13th Street

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Left to Right: Greg King, Jarrod King and Charles Nervine

ocalastyle.com MAR’14

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BUSINESSBRIEFS

UNBRIDLED CHARITY

MED CENTER REBOOT On Thursday, January 30, a ribbon-cutting ceremony was held for the rededication of OCALA REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER. The 9.2 million dollar redesign included a two-level parking garage with nearly 100 additional parking spaces, a new emergency services entrance and a resurfaced exterior. At the event, CEO Randy McVoy spoke to supporters, including ORMC board of trustee members, physicians, employees and visitors. He also announced a $45 million investment by the Hospital Corporation of America for expansion projects at both Ocala Regional and West Marion Community Hospitals.

NEW OFFICER JOINS HOSPICE TEAM In January, RE-TECH SMARTPHONE CENTERS representatives met with the Marion Therapeutic Riding Association staff at their Greenway facility to donate $1,000. The association utilizes the healing power of horses for those who face physical and mental disabilities. MTRA was voted Ocala’s favorite nonprofit in Re-Tech’s #GivingSeason Contest. The contest and donation was a way for the community to show gratitude for MTRA’s service.

THE HOSPICE OF MARION COUNTY’S new fund

development officer is Anne R. Favre, MBA. Favre formerly served at the Florida Horse Park as the foundation’s executive director. With over 20 years of non-profit and business experience, Favre is tasked with fostering donor and sponsor relationships. Since 1983, the non-profit Hospice of Marion County has provided end-of life home care to local patients.

YMCA MAKES BIG PLANS

Over the last two years, YMCA volunteers raised 4.8 million to expand their current facilities. The center has been renamed the Frank DeLuca YMCA Family Center, and the overall project will add 18,000 square feet to the current facility, bringing the total to 54,000 square feet. Although the entire facility will be renovated, the first phase of the expansion will include the addition of two racquetball courts, improvements to the main workout area and the main group exercise room, and added parking. The YMCA will still be open and operational during construction phases, which began in January under the supervision of Fabian/Dinkins Construction. Along with the new design, the YMCA is also forming a partnership with Munroe Regional Medical Center to cooperatively foster personal health and disease prevention programs.

CONDITIONER THAT CARES THE SALON PROFESSIONAL ACADEMY, SHEAR EXPRESS, INC. and TENAJ BEAUTY GROUP teamed up to make a $5,000 donation

to the St. Paul Parish, located in Belleview, Back Pack Program. The program seeks to assist homeless children in Marion, Lake and Sumter Counties by providing hygiene and care products. Company employees also donated travel-sized products totaling more than $4,500.

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A NEW VETERAN BIKE RACK On December 16, the GREATER OCALA WOMEN’S CLUB and PIONEER GARDEN CLUB donated $400 to the Ocala Ritz Veteran’s Village. The money will be applied to a new bike rack for the veterans.

OCALA AIRPORT CLEARED FOR LANDING On December 13, the OCALA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT underwent its annual FAA inspection. Safety inspector Jack McSwain approved the airport by Federal Aviation Administration standards. As part of the inspection, Ocala Fire Rescue demonstrated their ability to meet operations and emergency standards. Throughout the year, the capable Airport Operations three-person staff maintains FAA standards, with at least one member on duty every day of the week.


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CLASSACTS

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS AND DISTRICT NEWS THAT SHAPE MARION COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS.

BY KEVIN CHRISTIAN Going for the Gold / Ocala Star Banner

Buzz

the

GOING FOR THE GOLD The Marion County 2014 Teacher of the Year was announced on February 21 at the 24th Annual Golden Apple Gala, held at the Circle Square Cultural Center at On Top of the World and presented by the Public Education Foundation of Marion County. Congratulations go out to DAVID STEFFEY, an intensive-reading teacher from Osceola Middle School, who snagged the coveted award. The event celebrates Marion County’s finest teachers and the impact they have on students. The other four finalists include (in alphabetical order by school): 1. GRACE DALEY, kindergarten, Fessenden Elementary 2. DEBBIE MCNALL, math, Horizon Academy at Marion Oaks 3. ROBIN KOPER, language arts, Lake Weir Middle 4. KIM MERRITT, kindergarten, Shady Hill Elementary

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Along with the Golden Apples, the caravan also surprised SARAH LINN by naming her Marion County’s 2014 Rookie Teacher of the Year. Rookies have three years or less experience. Linn is a fourth-grade teacher at Legacy Elementary, Marion County’s newest public school.

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ZANETTI SHINES FOR SUNSPRA JUDI ZANETTI (left), the executive director of the Public Education

Foundation of Marion County, was surprised beyond words when she received the Margie Davidson “Leading Light” award from SUNSPRA, the Sunshine State School Public Relations Association. Zanetti was named because of her outstanding support to public education. She received the honor in Tampa at the 68th Annual Joint Conference of the Florida School Boards Association and the Florida Association of District School Superintendents. Marion County School Board’s CAROL ELY and BOBBY JAMES were on-hand to celebrate the surprise with Zanetti, herself a former Marion County School Board member.

SEARCHING FOR SOMETHING It was an interesting day for thirdgraders at Belleview-Santos Elementary when they came into direct contact with owl pellets. What’s an owl pellet? Non-digested regurgitated food the animal leaves behind after a meal. Would-be forensic specialists carefully picked the pellets apart using tweezers and other science lab tools. What they experienced was an incredibly visual exercise teaching them how to match bones, shapes and sizes with the diets of owls. Teacher JUDY VAUGHN has coordinated this special day of learning for years.

EXPO EXPOSES MAGNET PROGRAMS Hundreds of parents and students showed up for the eighth annual Magnet EXPO, showcasing magnet schools and programs from all over Marion County. Students got up close and personal with science experiments, robotic projects and all sorts of magnet life experiences. Meanwhile, parents gained reassurance from principals, teachers and current magnet students that the extra effort to apply and gain admittance is well worth it!


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Wonderful people and an awesome environment with great amenities, who could ask for more? Life here is great! —KAREN GOOL

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eyond the busy streets of Highway 200 and past the commotion of nearby Leesburg sits a tranquil haven. Rolling Greens is an active retirement community tucked away, yet it’s only miles from Ocala’s best restaurants, shopping centers, hospitals and attractions. The picturesque setting is something to behold, with miles of tree-lined roads wrapping around an expansive community. Although the serene community is the perfect place to relax, there’s never a dull moment at Rolling Greens. “I don’t think you could ever find a better place to live than in Rolling Greens; it’s a beautiful, happy place to call home,” said Rolling Greens’ Social Director

Karen Gool. “Wonderful people and an awesome environment with great amenities, who could ask for more? Life here is great!” Golfers enjoy a beautiful 18hole executive course; handymen make their dreams a reality in the wood shop; crafters mold clay, knit scarves and learn new techniques; fitness gurus find their niche in water aerobics, pickleball and at the fitness center. There are activities and amenities for every lifestyle at Rolling Greens. “It’s always nice in paradise!” said residents Mike and Barbara Critchfield. “Rolling Greens is the warmest, kindest, friendliest and nicest place we have ever lived.” While Rolling Greens has been a hidden treasure for over

30 years, it will soon become even more valuable. Managers John and Vickie Winn are thrilled to announce expansions and upgrades coming in spring 2014. Set to break ground by the end of March, the 17,000-square-foot expansion will include various upgrades to the community, such as new therapy and lap pools, a computer lab and coffee bar, and an updated fitness room and sauna. It’s not just the community getting a makeover, the homes are as well. Many are being refurbished to feature granite countertops, stainless steel appliances, custom cabinets and more. These remodeled homes are truly breathtaking, and offer a tremendous value, all for under $50,000.

“We are catering to the growing number of new retirees who are looking for a place to call home in Florida,” says Vickie. “We are a friendly and active community with something to offer everyone.” And for the residents of Rolling Greens, there’s no better place to call home. “I would not live anyplace else,” said Carol Henderson, a resident of the community. “We have it all here.”

Rolling Greens 5907 Cherry Road, Ocala (352) 624-0140      rollinggreensocala.com

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FESTIVAL de •MARION THEATER•

•APRIL 3-6•

It may the in not be Cann Intern augural S es—yet—b F YO U L I S T u a i t t l i v W onal F e attrac HILE FLOAEN CLOSELY r S p r il TING in t of wor ed the atten m Festival h gs SILVEDROWN THE PEACEFU to hom ld-class f tion of sco as SILVER SRIVER IN SCENIC L This f e and from arilmmakers cl res PARK, YOUPRJIUNGS STATE o S some o ur-day even ound the glo ose PHI EAR THE DISTATNMT IGHT , f th ERCIN t wi be. the fi e best cinem ll showcase THE APE GMAYNELL OF TARZAN lm i , AND ati W while helpin ndustry has c talent TO ONUOLD BE BEST ADVYISOU ED TD g t arts t hrough promote the o offer FEET IN THAENGWLE YOUR out Ma rion C visual TYHOU JUST MIGHATTFEER OR ounty. E SLIMY G EL R A S P T H O E CR F •

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GIBSO

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Monster Hand © Lightspring; Film Strip Background © Flas100; Burst Background © More Images; Clapperboard © Alex Staroseltsev; chairs © bluehand \ Shutterstock; Vintage Photograph © ERBzine.com

Park gs State reen n i r p S r Silve er sc entury, e to silv g Olymc m a o h t s n o e m e ave b rrin For al la area h arzan series sta , Reba c O e h t and he T ller such as t r Johnny Weissmu s c mes i s s a cl nne throb Ja ai t w r a l e a h d e g m n derw pic gold a Cause showcasi orted un ich s s a d t n u a ch a r el Witho ames Bond films aving su H ld J . s o r w e t h ala shou y ot c n Dean, O a m t a g h n t o ural s, am only nat ter film s ’ t t i , y tor ’s newes s y i r h t n m u l o i c f e te for th l. be the si nal film festiva io internat

Take One!

T

he inaugural Silver Springs International Film Festival, which will take place April 3 through 6, is spearheaded by Laurie Zink and Greg Thompson. Zink is the executive director of the Ocala Film Foundation and owner of the Z-Group, a project development and media relations firm located in Ocala. Thompson is the festival director. He is an award-winning theater and film artist who has directed several highly lauded plays at the Ocala Civic Theatre. He lives in Los Angeles and is a member of the Screen Actors Guild and the Actor’s Equity Association. “Knowing the local filmmaking history, our goal is to initiate a revival of interest in film in the Silver Springs area, Ocala and throughout Marion County,” says Zink. “At one time it was a thriving industry here, and we want to not only bring back some of the magic from the past, we want to create a brand-new magic for the future. This area has so much to offer filmmakers from around the world: We have a mix of natural beauty, urban excitement, a flourishing horse industry and thousands of acres of peaceful rural countryside. We really do believe we offer a bit of whatever a filmmaker might need to produce a successful film in practically any genre.” But this event is not designed to just showcase filmmaking talent—it’s also meant to foster local talent as

well. As organizers developed the idea of an international festival, they began to look for ways to tie it in closely to the local community, especially young people interested in a career in the film industry. This led to the formation of the Ocala Film Foundation, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization designed to provide scholarships, classroom equipment and supplies, and educational opportunities for Marion County students. “As awareness of the festival increases over time and it is embraced locally, nationally and internationally, the foundation will use a portion of the proceeds to make available educational materials and opportunities in the film industry for many of our area students,” says Zink. “We are very excited to have this chance to expand education for our young people while fostering an appreciation of the visual arts throughout the county.” The Ocala Film Foundation is not only the presenting partner of the Silver Springs International Film Festival but will also produce a “Fantastical Film Festival” to be held over Halloween weekend later this year. This is the first year for both festivals, and organizers have a three-to-five-year business plan in place to help insure these will be events future generations will also be able to enjoy. The Silver Springs festival is planned to coincide with April’s First Friday Artwalk in Downtown Ocala and features an art walk and pub crawl following the April 4 screenings. According to Zink, organizers designed the festival to incorporate many aspects of the arts throughout Marion County, such as the Artwalk, the Brick City Center for the Arts and the Horse Fever project.


MOVIES FILMED AT SILVER SPRINGS OR IN MARION COUNTY

Behind The Scenes

T

hompson says he is extremely pleased with the attention festival organizers have garnered from filmmakers around the world. “We have had an amazing response from filmmakers, considering this is our first festival,” he says. “We have submissions from 37 countries, 12 states and every continent on Earth except Antarctica. Many of the submissions have won esteemed awards at various other prestigious festivals, and their participation is a prime example of the incredible level of talent we have attracted to our festival. One of the entries won an Oscar, and several films are making debuts onto the world stage. This is a juried festival, and a panel of film industry veterans will judge all the entries to determine winners in each category of film.” According to Thompson, the event has a lot to offer everyone, including established filmmakers, aspiring filmmakers, those who love to watch movies and even those who are just curious as to what an international film festival has to offer. “Besides elevating awareness of the area and bringing the ambiance of big-time international filmmaking to a local audience, we hope to foster the growth of area filmmakers at all levels,” he says. “Following the opening night festivities and the screening of the first feature film at the theater on Thursday evening, we will start the day Friday morning with our first “Filmmaker Seminar” at 9am. This first seminar, which is to be held at the Brick City Center for the Arts in downtown Ocala, is a seminar highlighting what goes on behind the scenes in film production. It will be taught by several big-name veterans of the film industry, and admission is limited to all current

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students and anyone with a festival ticket stub or pass. “On Saturday morning from 10 to 11am, we will present our second seminar, also at the Brick City Center for the Arts, and this one will be performance-based. For this session, we will have seasoned actors and agents on hand to deliver expert advice on the performance aspect of filmmaking. These two seminars should provide excellent educational opportunities for locals who want to enter the film production and direction arena. It gives all involved a chance to mingle and share their experiences and knowledge.”

e Seven Swans 1916 Thstarring Richard Barthelmess and Marguerite Clark The Ape-Man 1932 Tarzan starring Johnny Weissmuller and Maureen O’Sullivan and His Mate 1934 Tarzan starring Johnny Weissmuller and Maureen O’Sullivan Escapes 1936 Tarzan starring Johnny Weissmuller and Maureen O’Sullivan Finds a Son 1939 Tarzan starring Johnny Weissmuller and Maureen O’Sullivan Secret Treasure 1941 Tarzan’s starring Johnny Weissmuller and Maureen O’Sullivan

1942 1943 1946 1951 1953 1954 1955

Glimpses of Florida documentary directed by James A. FitzPatrick Moon over Miami starring Don Ameche and Betty Grable Tarzan’s New York Adventure starring Johnny Weissmuller and Maureen O’Sullivan Water Wisdom narrated by Pete Smith The Yearling starring Gregory Peck and Jane Wyman Barefoot Mailman starring Robert Cummings and Terry Moore Distant Drums starring Gary Cooper The Frogmen starring Richard Widmark and Dana Andrews Jivaro starring Fernando Lamas and Arlene Dahl Creature From The Black Lagoon starring Richard Carlson and Julia Adams Jupiter’s Darling starring Esther Williams and Howard Keel Underwater starring Jane Russell and Richard Egan Rebel Without A Cause starring James Dean and Natalie Wood Revenge Of The Creature starring John Agar and Lori Nelson


Photo by John Jerigan

Source: springsfilmfest.com Tarzan, Doc Hollywood and Creature / Wikipedia.org; Rebel / blog.incipeindustries.com; Woman / Bmovieblitzkrieg.blogspot.com; Movie Border © Dinga / Shuttersock.com;

1958

The Wild Women of Wongo starring Jean Hawkshaw and Mary Ann Webb Counterspy starring Don Megowan and Brad Johnson Don’t Give Up the Ship starring Jerry Lewis Thunderball starring Sean Connery Blindfold starring Rock Hudson and Claudia Cardinale Sam Whiskey starring Burt Reynolds and Clint Walker Zaat starring Marshall Grauer and Wade Popwell 99 and 44/100% Dead starring Richard Harris and Edmond O’Brien Moonraker starring Roger Moore Cross Creek starring Mary Steenburgen and Rip Torn Smokey and the Bandit Part 3 starring Jackie Gleason and Jerry Reed Never Say Never Again starring Sean Connery Legend starring Tom Cruise Doc Hollywood starring Michael J. Fox Jeepers Creepers starring Eileen Brennan Hoot starring Jimmy Buffet The Celestine Prophecy starring Jürgen Prochnow Swimming to the Moon award-winning short Down A Dark Road award-winning short IMAX Film of the Louisiana Wetlands

1959 1965 1966 1969 1971 1974 1979 1983

1985 1991 2001 2005 2006 2007 2008 2005 2013 Signal Lost 909

The Silver Screen

A

ll film screenings will be held at the historic Marion Theatre in downtown Ocala. The theater has two screens, one viewed from the ground floor and one viewed from the balcony, allowing festival organizers to present two separate screenings simultaneously. Ground floor seating accommodates 316 patrons, while the balcony seats 94. Thompson says that, almost primarily, features will be screened on the main ground floor, and short films will be screened in the balcony, but there will be exceptions. Screenings will take place in scheduled two-hour blocks with the vast majority taking place on Friday and Saturday. Although most film submissions are considered “general submissions,” the festival is showcasing three “Special Interest Blocks” that are theme-specific to Ocala and the surrounding area. The “Horse Fever” block of films ties in to the Horse Fever project that presently displays more than 80 artfully decorated life-size horses in Ocala. The project is an iconic fundraising tool that has raised more than $1 million for the Marion Cultural Alliance and other local charitable agencies. “The films submitted for this block are equinethemed, and the subject matter highlights horses and horse lovers,” says Thompson. “Since this area is known as ‘The Horse Capital of the World,’ we wanted to honor this local heritage that is so much a part of community life here in Marion County.”

The “Cinemagic” block, which will be held Saturday from 11am to 3pm, is comprised of familyfriendly films the entire family will enjoy. Knowing that many films worthy of international attention usually address serious or adult matters, festival organizers wanted to provide a genre of film that parents and grandparents would be able to enjoy with children of all ages. The “Green Screen” block is designed to celebrate a love and care for the Earth’s environment. Films presented in this block will reflect the natural beauty inherent in Ocala, Silver Springs and Marion County. It will be screened at the same time as the Cinemagic block. One screening will take place on the ground floor while the other will be a balcony screening. “Since the area is well-known for its rivers, lakes, woodlands and natural surroundings, we thought it was important to focus a block of films on what really drew the film industry here almost a century ago,” says Thompson. “We feel this is one of the strengths that the industry can utilize locally now and in the future, and it is one that all county residents treasure. We also feel the films presented in this block will help raise awareness for environmental concerns worldwide.”

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And The Winner Is…

R

ecently, festival organizers began the search for an award design that would be unique to the Silver Springs International Film Festival. In an effort to utilize home-grown talent, the call went out to resident sculptors and artists to create an award that has a distinct local flavor, yet also maintains an international feel. Local artisans have been hard at work creating the design they hope will be chosen to represent the festival for many years to come. According to Thompson, organizers will soon choose the design they feel meets the high standards of the festival. Awards will be presented Saturday evening to the festival winners in seven categories: feature, short, documentary feature, documentary short, student, audience choice feature and audience choice short. “We have a beautiful awards banquet planned that will take place on the street in front of the Marion Theatre,” says Thompson. “Following a unique evening of dining and décor and the presentation of the awards, we will host a festive street party replete with live music, dancing and a chance to mingle and get your photo taken with the award winners. It should be an evening filled with fun and great entertainment. The dinner and street party are ticketed events, but we want to invite the public out to be a part of the festivities throughout the downtown area that evening. There will be plenty of room behind the barricades where visitors can come and be a part of the energy and excitement of the festival.”

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DOWNTOWN DINNER TOUR, OPENING FESTIVITIES AND SCREENING (6-11PM)

Ocala’s downtown eateries and

retailers welcome festivalgoers with eclectic food choices and unique beverages. Follow this delectable path for several blocks to the Historic Marion Theatre and help open the festival with a champagne toast and chocolate treats. The featured opening screening will take you on a trip down memory lane to a different film-making era while celebrating Marion County’s unique film history. There will be a screening of a feature film whose title will be announced soon.

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FILMMAKER PRODUCTION SEMINAR (9-10AM) SCREENINGS OF THE FESTIVAL’S “OFFICIAL SELECTIONS” BEGIN AT THE MARION THEATRE (10AM-10PM) DOWNTOWN ART WALK AND PUB CRAWL (6PM-UNTIL THE FUN ENDS) This event is not a ticketed event and is open to the public. Fifteen city blocks come alive with open air spaces hosting visual and performing artists. Experience Ocala’s amazing pool of creative talent while enjoying the ambiance of the city’s historic downtown district, a host of outstanding restaurants and distinctive boutique shops. For your listening pleasure, Tampa jazz-funk band Seratonic will be performing at the downtown square. For late-night libations, patrons may visit local bars and nightclubs as they celebrate the creativity of visiting filmmakers.

W

ith such a storied history of filmmaking for almost a century, the Ocala and Silver Springs areas are not new to the magic of the silver screen—although, admittedly, interest has waned in the last few decades. The annual Silver Springs International Film Festival could be the spark that rekindles the fires of interest, not only throughout film centers around the world but here at home where aspiring directors, actors and actresses can be inspired by film talent from afar. If you hear the distant yell of Tarzan or see a strange creature swimming about in the Silver River, don’t be alarmed—it simply means the Ocala Film Foundation and the Silver Springs International Film Festival have done their job—and Hollywood has come back home to stay.

Apr

5

FILMMAKER PERFORMANCE SEMINAR (10-11AM) CINEMAGIC FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY (11AM-3PM)

Parents, grandparents and kids of all ages can enjoy an entire block of family-friendly films. The event will take place the Marion Theatre.

SCREENINGS OF THE FESTIVAL’S “OFFICIAL SELECTIONS” BEGIN AT THE MARION THEATRE (11AM-7PM) FESTIVAL AWARDS CEREMONY AND CLOSING FESTIVITIES (7:30–11PM) Following our final screening, we will announce our inaugural festival award winners! Festivalgoers can congratulate the winners, celebrate the fun and join the paparazzi for photos with the filmmakers and their crews. Then, sit down to a unique evening of food design and table décor, and dance the night away under the stars with our stars of the Silver Springs International Film Festival ‘14.

Apr

6

BEST OF THE FEST ENCORE SCREENING (1-5PM)

Screenings of all awardwinning films at the Marion Theatre located at 50 South Magnolia Avenue in Ocala. Seating is limited. First come, first served.

GO? WANT TO Tickets can bnee at purchased onli M. ST.CO SPRINGSFILMFE ore

For m information, call. (352) 433-1933

Light © Bata Zivanovic; Ticket © OSIPOVEV; Sign © zayats-and-zayats / Shuttersock.com

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kids: up, Listen If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got time to burn after school or on days off, you

might as well burn it on a board, bike or somewhere like Boing! Trampoline Park. Put down the gadgets, head outside and check out these venues in our roundup of all places totally wicked. You may just find yourself an awesome new hobby. We also caught up with some track veterans and owners to get the inside scoop on their upcoming events.

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FAT TI RTES

FAC

ountain biking at Santos Trail guarantees some beautiful scenery and a great workout, so grab a map, a helmet and a biking buddy to stir up some dust. In 2006, the Santos Trail System was dubbed one of 40 elite “Epic Rides” by the International Mountain Bicycling Association. There are a variety of mountain biking terrains for all skill levels and a skills development area to help new kids get the hang of things. The freeride area is full of daring drops and challenging obstacles to appeal to more advanced riders. There are also covered and open picnic tables and grills available at the trailhead, so packing a lunch is highly recommended. The Ocala Mountain Bike Association (OMBA) organizes plenty of events for all ages, so keep an eye out for newly released events on their online calendar at omba.org. If you like them enough—and we’re sure they don’t bite—you can join the club and enjoy the company of fellow cyclists.

OUN AND AVID M E FESTIVAL IS R U E T A M A L TIR CALLING AL ANNUAL SANTOS FAT WE CAUGHT UP WITH . H 7 T H H C THE EIG IDAY, MAR NEY TO SEE WHAT’S IN R F N O IN A B AC K A G E C T O R R E N E E B L A . IR FESTIVAL D HIS YEAR’S VISITORS T STORE FOR

WHAT’S GOING ON AT THIS YEAR’S EVENT? The main trailhead from noon on Friday until the afternoon Sunday is a bike expo. There are over 30 trucks from bicycle manufacturers to local bike shops, anything bicycle related. Trek Bikes is coming with some custom bikes this year. If you have a license, they’ll loan you a bike and you can sample it on a marked trail, which is a really rare opportunity. This is the only place you’ll see this many trucks and shops all open to the public.

gs n i r nto r i t S Sa ead Upailh Tr

M

t a F s o Sanet Festival S: Tir TAIN BIKER

WILL THERE BE ANY SPECIAL DEMOS? On Saturday afternoon, on the Vortex side, there will be guys jumping on the biggest features from noon to 3pm for some big-time entertainment. There are also special classes. We’ve hired a guy to give one-hour lessons all weekend. For the littlest kids, we have a company coming in with Strider bikes, which have no training wheels, so they can learn, too. WANT TO GO? Santos Trailhead is located at 3080 SE 80th Street in Ocala. Visit omba.org/santos-trailhead for more information and trail maps. If Santos isn’t your scene, you could always drop into one of these other Cross Florida Greenway trailheads instead. With over 115 miles of trails to traverse, you can have a new adventure on every ride.

49TH AVENUE TRAILHEAD 12555 SW 49th Ave., Ocala BASELINE TRAILHEAD SR 35 N of SE Maricamp Rd., Ocala LANDBRIDGE TRAILHEAD Co. Hwy 475a, Ocala ROSS PRAIRIE TRAILHEAD 10660 SW Hwy 200, Dunnellon VORTEX FREERIDE AND TRAILHEAD 9150 SE 25th Ave., Ocala

WHERE DO THE FUNDS GO? OMBA is a non-profit; we’re the group the state contacts to maintain the cyclist trails, so the funds go toward that. For example, where it gets sandy, we’re getting special lumber to improve those areas. We also have a gift basket raffle that funds Christmas bikes for kids. WHY SHOULD KIDS TRY OUTDOOR TRAIL CYCLING? It’s free, exciting and a great way to make friends. It’s something you can do your whole life just about anywhere. It also makes you see where you live differently, and you see how much fun it is to be outdoors. It’s great for the whole family, too. You can be at any level because we have trails for every level. CAN YOU GIVE US ANY INSIDE INFO ON THE PLANS FOR NEW TRAILS? We’re trying to build westward to Dunnellon and connect to Palatka. Trail connectivity is a huge thing in Ocala and statewide right now. There will be experts at the expo explaining this and taking people’s input as well. For the kids, we have developed a really nice pump track to teach them to ride a bike. WHAT EVENTS HAPPEN REGULARLY AT THE TRAIL? We do Wednesday night social rides, and you just have to meet in the parking lot. We also do workdays the first Saturday of the month, so we do maintenance projects and a local shop buys us lunch. We’re always looking for workday volunteers.

Want To Know More?

VISIT OMBA.ORG TO SEE THE FAT TIRE FESTIVAL EVENT SCHEDULES.

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ardrock Off Road Park, located at 6849 NW Gainesville Road in Ocala, boasts 100 acres of off-road awesomeness with quite possibly the best variety of tracks in Florida. The star of the show is Hardrock’s two-mile, national-caliber motocross track stacked with various elevations and obstacles, including an extreme half-mile portion just for the pros. Novice riders should feel right at home on the Outback Track. Baby racers can hit up the Pee Wee Track to put some miles under their size-small belts, as well. The sports facility also includes four racetracks and three off-road trails, each catered to riders of varying experience levels. Jeeps and other large 4x4 vehicles have a section all to themselves loaded with hill climbs, rock crawls and all those other hard-to-findin-Florida features. Racing-type

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ATVs are also welcome to take a spin on the motocross tracks. Give ‘em a call at (352) 732-6697 or visit hardrockmx.com for more information.

OUT AT THE TRACK If you’re looking to spend a day at the races, check out Florida Vintage Motocross’s online calendar at flvmx.com. Here are a few of their upcoming races, all of which start at 10am: 3/30 AT SUNSHINE MOTOCROSS 4300 126th Ave. N, Clearwater 4/13 AT NORTH FLORIDA MOTOCROSS 28422 Liberty Trail, Hilliard 5/04 AT HARDROCK OFF ROAD PARK 6849 NW Gainesville Rd., Ocala 5/25 AT SUNSHINE MOTOCROSS 4300 126th Ave. N, Clearwater

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n an extra energetic day, grab some friends and check out one of these sweet trampoline parks.

$12 PER HOUR 13,000 SQ FT OF TRAMPOLINES, DODGEBALL ROOM, TUMBLE TRACKS WITH AIRBAG COLLEGE NIGHT TUESDAYS 8-9:30PM ORLANDO.BOINGJUMPCENTER.COM

dl e r Shntraa Ceorid Fl

hese parks are dedicated to athletes on wheels of all sizes, so break out your boards, blades and bikes and start tearing up the nearest venues.

PRACTICES EVERY TUESDAY AND THURSDAY AT 7PM FOR $5 AND EVERY SATURDAY AT 6PM FOR $7. (904) 584-8364, FIRSTCOASTBMX.COM

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SKY ZONE INDOOR TRAMPOLINE PARK 2510 S Hwy 27, Clermont 30-MIN JUMP: $10, 60-MIN JUMP: $14, 90-MIN JUMP: $18, 120-MIN JUMP: $20 DODGEBALL TOURNAMENTS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY NIGHTS FROM 9-11PM (352) 404-4134, SKYZONE.COM/CLERMONT

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FIRST COAST BMX 1600 Allen Nease Rd., St. Augustine

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$14 FIRST HOUR, $10 EVERY ADDITIONAL HOUR 24,000 SQ FT INCLUDES TRAMPOLINES, FOAM PIT, DODGEBALL, BASKETBALL SLAM ARENA (407) 704-6723, REBOUNDERZORLANDO.COM

BOING! JUMP CENTER 532 S. Econ Circle, Suite 120, Oviedo

BMX TRACKS

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REBOUNDERZ 6725 South Kirkman Rd., Orlando

ORL BMX PARK 4801 W Colonial Dr., Orlando PRACTICES EVERY MONDAY FROM 6-8PM, $4. RIBBON RACES EVERY WEDNESDAY. REGISTRATION AT 6PM WITH FEE OF $6; START TIME AT 7:30PM. TROPHY RACES EVERY FRIDAY. REGISTRATION AT 6PM WITH FEE OF $8; START TIME AT 7:30PM. (407) 297-3589, ORLBMX.COM

HIGH SPRINGS BMX 1050 NW 2nd St., High Springs

SARASOTA BMX 1500 North Tuttle Ave., Sarasota

PRACTICES EVERY TUESDAY AND THURSDAY AT 6:30PM AND EVERY SATURDAY AT 10AM. LOCAL RACES HELD SUNDAYS. REGISTRATION AND PRACTICE TAKE PLACE FROM 2:30-4PM WITH A FEE OF $8. (352) 514-9735, HSBMX.RKORSON.COM

PRACTICES EVERY TUESDAY AND THURSDAY FROM 6-8PM FOR $3 AND EVERY FRIDAY FROM 6-7:30PM WITH RACE AT 8PM FOR $5. (941) 957-4393, SARASOTABMX.NET

JACKSONVILLE BMX 1946 Ray Greene Dr., Jacksonville

ST. CLOUD BMX 2401 Peghorn Way, St. Cloud

PRACTICES EVERY TUESDAY FROM 6:30-8:30PM, FRIDAY PRACTICES AT 6:30PM AND RACES AT 8:30PM (904) 314-9520, JACKSONVILLEBMX.COM

PRACTICES EVERY FRIDAY 6-8PM WITH RACE AT 8PM AND EVERY SUNDAY FROM 11AM-1PM WITH RACE AT 1PM. (321) 624-1751, FREEWEBS.COM/STCLOUDBMX


Behind the BMX Scenes ORL BMX HAS BEEN AROUND FOR DECADES, AND CLERK OF THE COURSE THERESA CAVENDER IS GIVING US THE INSIDE SCOOP ON EVERYTHING COMING UP AT THE TRACK. WHAT SETS ORL BMX APART? We’re a nonprofit park, so all the money here goes back into the riders and the tracks, and it’s run entirely by volunteers. Florida has 17 tracks, but we were the home track for the BMX Worlds back in the ‘80s, and we used to regularly hold the Disney Cup before it moved to Kissimmee. We are among the top five tracks in the state, ranked No. 5 for membership and rider count.

WHAT EVENTS ARE COMING UP AT THE TRACK? Saturday, April 6 is our state championship race. Saturday, June 14 is a district Race for Life, which is a fundraiser race for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society we do once a year. Our annual Warnicke Race is a race for the Bob Warnicke Memorial Scholarship Fund, which helps students and families meet their needs for undergraduate and trade school. There is also a local pro race, and they’re pretty cool because things get competitive when they’re racing for money.

DOES THE TRACK OFFER LESSONS OR OTHER SPECIAL SERVICES? We are open for practice every Tuesday, a practice and race every Thursday and Saturday, and we open at 6pm all of those days. We have an Olympic Day on June 28 when you don’t have to have a membership to race. It’s neat because kids that aren’t sure they like it can still come out. On occasion, we have clinics with a large number of pros that come to the track and teach. We rent out the track and even do birthday parties.

HOW CAN BEGINNERS GET STARTED? All they need is a bike. It doesn’t have to be anything special, just a regular Walmart bike, but no pegs, kickstands or reflectors. Then show up with long pants, long sleeves and a parent to sign a waiver. We rent full-face helmets, and then they can come out and ride. We offer a one-day free trial. They get to see everything on the track, and often a pro will take them around the track. Tuesdays are the best nights for trying it out. It’s all practice, all night, and most times we have more pros there. Our website has everything they need to know about the sport and getting started.

WHEN CAN SPECTATORS WATCH? We’re always free for spectators to come check it out. A Saturday night would be great to come watch a race, which starts around 8pm. We’re really laid back; we have a full concession stand open all the time and real bathrooms, too. We keep our schedule on Facebook and our webpage, and they’re updated consistently with our race days.

Check it out: ORLBMX.COM TAVARES SKATE PARK 12106 Woodlea Rd., Tavares 12,000 SQ FT, OUTDOOR, CONCRETE FREE OPEN 9AM-10PM 7 DAYS A WEEK

SKATE PARKS BICENTENNIAL SKATE COURT

POSSUM CREEK SKATE PARK

501 N. Baseball Pt., Crystal River

4009 NW 53rd Ave., Gainesville

SKATELITE SURFACE, OUTDOOR FREE OPEN DAWN TO DUSK, 7 DAYS A WEEK (352) 527-7677, CITRUSCOUNTYPARKS.COMV

18,000 SQ FT, CONCRETE, OUTDOOR FREE OPEN DAWN UNTIL DUSK, 7 DAYS A WEEK (352) 692-1802, CITYOFGAINESVILLE.ORG

ALBERT "RAY" MASSEY SKATE PARK 1001 NW 34th St., Gainesville

METRO SKATEBOARD ACADEMY 4624 LB McLeod Rd., Orlando

CONCRETE, OUTDOOR FREE OPEN DAWN UNTIL DUSK, 7 DAYS A WEEK (352) 334-5067, CITYOFGAINESVILLE.ORG

SKATELITE SURFACE, INDOOR $10, PADS REQUIRED 2:30-9:30PM MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, 10AM-11PM SATURDAY, 12:30-7PM SUNDAY DAY CAMPS AND LESSONS OFFERED (407) 650-8171, METROSKATEBOARDACADEMY.COM

ROBERT-LARYN SKATE PARK IN TREATY PARK 1595 Wildwood Dr., St. Augustine 28,000 SQ FT, OUTDOOR, CONCRETE FREE 2-9PM MONDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, 12-9PM SATURDAY & SUNDAY (904) 209-0385, ST-JOHNS.FL.US

(352) 742-6319

WHAT IS

SKATELITE?

ORLANDO SKATE PARK 400 Festival Way, Orlando CONCRETE, OUTDOOR $8, PADS REQUIRED 2-10PM MONDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, 2-11PM FRIDAY, 9AM-11PM SATURDAY, 9AM-9PM SUNDAY DAY CAMPS AND LESSONS OFFERED (407) 246-2800, CITYOFORLANDO.NET/SKATEPARK

NORTHEAST COMPLEX SKATE PARK 1100 NE 14th St., Gainesville SKATELITE SURFACE, OUTDOOR FREE OPEN DAWN UNTIL DUSK, 7 DAYS A WEEK (352) 334-5067, CITYOFGAINESVILLE.ORG

A DIALECT SKATER LINGO IS, BUT THIS ALL ITS OWN GAINING NEW SURFACE IS SKATE TRACTION IN THLIETE IS A WORLD. SKATE ATERIAL COMPOSITE M LED AND MADE OF RECYCARVESTED SUSTAINABLY HOTH FINISH PAPER. ITS SMOTION FOR A REDUCES FRIC E AND LESS SMOOTHER RID INGS. PARKS ABRASIVE LANDURFACE ARE WITH THIS S A RIDE. DEFINITELY WORTH


SUCCESS FOUR LOCAL MASTER GARDENERS SHARE THEIR FAVORITE GARDENING TIPS AND TRICKS TO MAKE YOUR GARDEN GROW. WRITTEN BY CYNTHIA M FARLAND / GARDENER PHOTOS BY JOHN JERNIGAN C

Spring comes early in North Central Florida—at least when compared to many other parts of the country. It’s time to pay a visit to your local nursery, pull on those gardening gloves and start digging in the dirt.

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But wait. Do you know where to get started? Maybe you’d like to plant a vegetable garden and a few potted herbs. Perhaps you love roses, but don’t have any because you’ve always heard they’re difficult to grow. Take heart, the experts are here to help. Marion County Master Gardeners are not only dedicated gardeners but also highly educated in all things green and growing. Plus, they’re eager to share their knowledge with anyone who wants to learn more about gardening in our area. To greatly increase your odds of green thumb success, read on to meet four local Master Gardeners who share their practical gardening tips.

Thumb © Stepan Kapl; Leaves © Thampapon / Shutterstock.com

Green Thumb


W HERBS

When it comes to herbs, Pat Greenfield wrote the herb grower’s “Bible” for Marion County Master Gardeners. This native of Pennsylvania moved to Marion County in 2006 and became a Master Gardener the following year. “I studied horticulture at Penn State, and my love for it has always been there,” says Pat, who lives near Salt Springs. Although her first interest in herbs was culinary, her curiosity increased when she developed health issues and didn’t want to use traditional medicines. When asked to take over the Master Gardeners’ herb garden, she found herself studying herbs and learning as she went. There are both medicinal and culinary uses for herbs, and they can also be used for insect control. Depending on the herb in question and the particular

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Parsly © Maks Narodenko; Tomatoes © Anna Sedneva / Shutterstock.com

use, you may use its leaves, flower, root and/or the entire plant. “Some of the most common culinary herbs are basil, bay, chives, cilantro, dill, fennel, ginger, lemon grass, marjoram, mint, oregano, parsley, rosemary, sage, tarragon and thyme,” says Pat. “If you are new to using herbs and are interested in learning more about cooking with them, refer to a good reference book on herbs or a gourmet cookbook.” Almost all herbs require soil rich with compost and good drainage. Most herbs can be grown in containers, making it easy to move them to a protected area during cold weather. If you’re new to herbs, a few easy ones to get started with include basil, chives, cilantro, dill, fennel and parsley.

PAT’S HELPFUL HERB TIPS

leaves should be stripped from the stems and then chopped.

» When using fresh, soft-stemmed herbs like parsley, dill or basil, the leaves do not need to be stripped from the stems. Just chop or mince the entire leaf and stem. » When cooking with fresh, woodystemmed herbs like marjoram, thyme, sage and rosemary, the

» Herbs are easy to dry or freeze. Preserving them in these forms makes them available throughout the year. Prepare the herb the same way you would if cooking fresh, and then put it into small freezer bags and freeze or put into a dehydrator for drying.

basil, pennyroyal, santolina, southernwood, scented geraniums (citronella) and wormwood. You can even rub the leaves on your skin as a natural repellent. » Leaves of pennyroyal and tansy will repel ants inside the house. » Bay leaves deter weevils in flour, grains, rice and pasta.

» To discourage mosquitoes, fill containers with the leaves of

A VEGETABLES

Although Josephine (“Jo”) Leyte-Vidal wasn’t born in Ocala, she’s lived here 41 years and considers this her hometown. A Master Gardener since 2003, Jo specializes in soil science and growing vegetables. Although it’s just her and her husband at home now, she grows plenty of veggies… enough to feed her extended family and to donate regularly to area soup kitchens. “Totally organic is my thing, and it’s not hard to do. It’s just a mindset and learning how to do it,” says Jo. “I don’t buy any chemical fertilizers; I use soil amendments like bone meal, blood meal, manure,

» Leaves of feverfew, southernwood and wormwood and the flowers or leaves of lavender and santolina will repel moths. » Leaves of catnip and tansy repel mice and rats. » Lemon balm and monarda (bee balm) attract bees, and if planted in or near your garden, they will help encourage pollinators.

compost, ashes and fish emulsion. I get the satisfaction of knowing what’s in my soil, and the food tastes clean with no metallic aftertaste. “One of the things about organic gardening is timing,” she adds. “I want to plant early enough that I’m not dealing with pests; this way I’m harvesting by the time the bugs wake up! I use no chemical sprays, but I will spray with soapy water.” Jo strongly recommends raised beds for gardening for several reasons “You can improve and build good soil this way. You just add to the top and the soil is contained within


the sides,” says Jo, who uses stakes to hold the side boards in place. “Raised beds are a lot less work than tilling up a garden plot. They’re easier to weed and care for. You can also build raised beds high enough that a disabled or compromised person can sit by it and garden.” “The easiest way to get started is with a book called Square Foot Gardening by Mel Bartholomew,” she advises. Before you waste time and money planting the wrong thing, realize that March is actually too late for such veggies as broccoli and cabbage. “They’re winter garden items and very prone to insects, so if you plant them now, you’ll be fighting bugs,” Jo explains. Good things to plant now include carrots, lettuces, eggplant, tomatoes, peppers, chard, bok choy, collards and onions. When it comes to

onions, make sure to plant “short day onions,” which are sweet. Jo starts seeds in her greenhouse in early January, grows them under lights to get a good start and then plants the seedlings in her garden on February 15. When the temps drop, she protects young plants by covering them with portable cloches she makes by cutting the bottoms out of gallon plastic milk jugs. Remove the caps so air can circulate and place them over small plants to keep from freezing. If you don’t have a greenhouse, you can make your own inexpensive “grow box” with a clear plastic storage box. Just fill it with soil and cover with clear plastic for protection. Of course, you can skip the whole seed stage and just buy young plants to plant directly in the garden, but you will spend more than if you start from seeds.

JO’S HELPFUL VEGETABLE-GROWING TIPS » Buy from a local farm/garden store that stocks the best plants for our area. » Rotate! Don’t plant the same plants in the same bed two years in a row. A leafy plant takes a lot of nitrogen from the soil, while root plants (carrots, etc.) use a lot of phosphorus. Rotating keeps the soil more

balanced and also helps keep the bug population down. » Save your egg shells, let dry and then grind them in a food processor. Add the ground shells to the soil when planting tomatoes. This adds calcium to soil and helps prevent blossom end rot.

» Save wood ashes from your fire place, and add lightly to soil to increase potassium. (Don’t use ashes from treated wood, as it contains chemicals.) » Try Jo’s organic pest recipe: add 1 tablespoon dish detergent to 1 gallon water and spray plants to deter bugs.

F

FLORIDA NATIVE PLANTS

Florida native Leslie Jones has lived in Marion County for 45 years. She became a Master Gardener in 2008 and volunteers an average of 250 to 300 hours per year. Leslie works with the Florida Yards & Neighborhoods team, which is part of the Florida Friendly Landscaping™ program with the University of Florida. “This is basically about gardening with our climate’s unique soil and conditions,” says Leslie, who teaches a four-part class to help residents learn what and how to plant in our area. She recommends native plants because they work together with Florida’s unique environment while promoting the preservation of our natural resources, especially our water. “Native plants are naturally adapted to our environment. They survive our high summer temperatures and humidity as well as our sudden, quick cold snaps in the winter,” she explains. “They manage to thrive in our sandy, nutrient-deficient soil without being fertilized and support many more insects than non-native plants. The more native plants in a landscape, the more insects. The more

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» Put the right plant in the right place. Plants that are happy in their location will thrive and require less maintenance. » Water only when plants and lawns need it. Operate irrigation systems manually, especially during the rainy season. » Fertilize appropriately and only when necessary. Follow package directions and use slow release, granular fertilizer. » Use organic mulch. It decomposes and improves the soil, inhibits weeds, helps retain moisture and moderates soil temperature. » Use plants and trees that provide shelter and food for birds, bees, butterflies and other creatures. Be sure to include a water source. » Use the least toxic means of pest control. Chemicals are non-discriminate. There are “good bugs” that naturally take care of the “bad guys.”

insects, the more birds. The more birds, the more bio-diverse a landscape becomes. A habitat—or mini-ecosystem—will develop.” If you’d like to plant a garden that will attract butterflies, bees and birds, Leslie recommends the following native plants: » » » »

Scarlet Sage Blanket Flower Purple Coneflower Black-Eyed Susan

JUST WHO ARE THESE MASTER GARDENERS, ANY WAY?

» » » »

Coral Honeysuckle Passion Vine Firebush Beautyberry

The Master Gardener Program is a statewide training program offered through each county’s local Extension Service. Master Gardeners are “regular” people who are avid gardeners, but there’s more to it than just having a green thumb.

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» Simpson’s Stopper » Yaupon Holly

» Recycle yard waste like grass clippings, leaves and pine needles as mulch, or consider turning these into compost to use later as a soil amendment. » Minimize storm water runoff. Water that runs straight to the storm drain carries pollutants. Water that is allowed to percolate into the ground will be naturally “filtered.” » Protect the waterfront. If your home is on a body of water, establish a fertilizer- and pesticide-free buffer zone between the yard and the shore.

Here in Florida, to become a certified Master Gardener, you must attend an orientation class, submit your application, pass the interview process and background check, attend a 13-week training class (there’s a fee to cover course materials) and complete 85 volunteer hours within one year of the training program. Having completed their training, Master Gardeners volunteer to work under the county horticulture agent in numerous garden-related activities. They are not paid for their time or mileage. “In Marion County, we have 100 active members who put in 75 or more hours per year. Our big thrust is to educate the public,” says Mona Majors, a Master Gardener since 2007. “Our group won the 2013 International Master Gardener Award for Excellence in Community Service. We were chosen from thousands of groups throughout the United States, Canada and Great Britain. We’re one of the more active groups in the state and have people from all walks of life. It’s not a bunch of old ladies with nothing else to do! We do have retired people, but we also have professionals with full-time careers.” If you’re interested in becoming a Master Gardener, call the Marion County Extension Service at (352) 671-8400. Check out their Facebook page at facebook.com/ MarionCountyMasterGardeners.

Purple Coneflower © Elena Elisseeva; Roses © Albo003; Thumb © Robert Kneschke / Shutterstock.com

LESLIE SHARES THE FOLLOWING FLORIDA-FRIENDLY LANDSCAPING™ PRINCIPALS:


R ROSES

Raised on a farm in Alachua County, Mona Majors is a Florida native who comes by her interest in gardening naturally. In 2007, she decided to put that experience to good use and became a Master Gardener. Mona volunteers an average of 400 hours annually and has been the director of the spring festival for several years. Mona adores roses, and some of her personal favorites include Belinda’s Dream, Double delight, Rio Samba, All-American Beauty, Angel Face, Dolly Parton and Abraham Lincoln. She’s eager to share her knowledge, especially with people who are concerned about growing roses in Florida. “We hear a lot that roses are hard to grow, but that’s absolutely not true,” she notes. “They love to be on a schedule, and it’s not a rigorous one, by any means. In my largest bed, I have 42 hybrid tea roses. I might spend an hour a week on them.” Mona adds that although hybrid teas, minis, floribundas and all climbing roses benefit from a schedule, knock-out roses don’t need much care at all. If you’re new to roses, Mona recommends the month-bymonth rose care routine on the website of the Marion County Rose Society (marioncountyroses.org).

MONA’S HELPFUL TIPS FOR GROWING ROSES IN MARION COUNTY: » Before you go shopping for roses, you should know that, in Florida, roses grafted on “Fortuniana” rootstock (Rosa fortuniana, ‘Double White Cherokee’) grow larger, are more vigorous, produce more flowers and live much longer than plants grown on any other rootstock. » Roses like moist, well-drained, nutrient-rich soil, so our Florida soil must be amended. » Add organic material such as compost, manure or peat to increase the water- and nutrient-holding capacity. Soil amendments should be added to the entire bed, not just to the planting hole. Add 2 to 4 inches of organic material, and mix amendments evenly to a depth of 12 inches. If soil is poorly drained, create a raised bed.

» Plant roses where they will receive a minimum of six hours of sunlight daily. » Plant bushes 3 to 3.5 feet apart to allow for growth and to cut down on the spread of disease. » When planting, dig a hole as deep as the root ball or slightly more shallow. Remove the root ball from the container and gently loosen circling roots. Plant the rose at the same depth that it was growing in the container. Leave any grafted area just above ground. » Fill the hole with soil, build a water basin with the remaining soil and water thoroughly. » Apply a 2- to 3-inch layer of mulch (compost, oak leaves, wood chips, pine needles, mini pine bark nugget, etc.) around each plant, keeping the mulch an inch away from the main stem. » Irrigate frequently for 6 to 8 weeks to establish, and then water twice a week, spreading the days out for a total of one inch of water per week per rose bush. Modify according to rainfall.

» Remove spent blooms (“deadhead”) twice a week, making sure to cut at least below the first set of five leaves. Deadhead after the dew dries to avoid spreading any disease. Cut off any suckers that come up from the very bottom and trim off any excess blooms. » Spray with a rose fungicide once a week religiously. Soak the bush completely until the leaves are dripping, and remember to get under the leaves. » Fertilize with a granular rose fertilizer regularly according to package directions. Every two weeks, also fertilize with a water-soluble rose fertilizer. Twice a year, add about 1/3 cup of manganese sulfate to each bush to encourage stronger canes. » Prune bushes right around Valentine’s Day. Cut any canes that are not the circumference of a No. 2 pencil. Prune total bush height to about 1.5 to 2 feet.

MARION COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS SPRING FESTIVAL March 8- 9 8am-5pm Saturday, 9am-4pm Sunday UF/IFAS Marion County Master Gardeners extension office and garden site, 2232 NE Jacksonville Road, Ocala

As the area’s largest all-in-one plant sale and garden expo, the spring festival provides the perfect place to buy plants and learn helpful gardening tips from the experts. There’s also a huge kids’ zone, making it fun for the whole family. Admission is just $1 and children 12 and younger are free. (Please, no pets allowed.) For more information, call (352) 671-8400.

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ALL IN THE

FAMILY FROM LION TAMING TO AERIALIST STUNTS, THE STEPHENSON FAMILY HAS GENERATIONS OF EXPERIENCE ENTERTAINING OTHERS AS PART OF THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH.

BY LORI CARTER

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Top: Ann’s father, Swede Johnson Bottom: Ann Stephenson in one of her many glamorous costumes. She had as many as nine costume changes in one show.

A

Ann Stephenson, 61, remembers it like it was yesterday. She was a 7 year old living in Mobile, Alabama, with her parents, whom she thought were regular people with regular jobs. “One day my dad came in and said, ‘I’m going to California to buy some lions and an elephant.’ Until then, I didn’t know we were in the circus,” Ann says. “Next thing I knew here came two trucks—one with seven lions and another with an elephant. And we were off to Florida. I thought it was great.” Her late father, Swede Johnson, came to the United States from Denmark in 1918. He had already traveled with his family in their own circus throughout the Scandinavian countries. He went to work at 15 in the Hagenbeck Zoo in Germany and then came to the United States as an assistant to Alfred Court, a wild animal trainer. Swede was fourth generation circus. Ann’s late mother, Mabel Johnson, was first generation. “In those days you did whatever you could to make money,” she says. “He [Swede] trained animals, rode horses and clowned. My mom did some circus; she was an aerialist at the time.” Swede practiced for hours upon hours with the cats. “Dad would get hurt sometimes with the lions— bitten or scratched,” she says. “My mom had as much medicine as Waterman. She had her own ER.” When he joined the Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus in 1959, Ann was interested as well. “Dad went on the road,” she says. “Mom wanted me to go to school. They gave me the best of both lives, school in the winter and on the road in summer.” Summertime was spent in the northeast. Ann began her circus career working in concessions. Three years

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T Ann trained elephants at a very young age. She had faith in the trainer and trust in the elephant.

later, she helped train the family elephant by putting her through her seven- to eight-minute routines. “I adored Pinky,” she says, “but she hated the sight of me. If she would’ve gotten the chance, she would have killed me.” The truck had living quarters in the front. The elephant lived in the middle, so to get out of the truck Ann had to run past Pinky. A lot of times she says she tried to “bluff her out” and stood quietly and then ran like the dickens before the animal “could turn around and whip me.” “One time she knocked me out of the truck, and I landed in elephant urine,” she says. “And I loved her so; I just adored her so.” Because the family had its own act, they were responsible for their expenses, including gas, lodging and feeding the elephant grain and the lions 100 pounds of meat every other day. Ann’s father decided to get off the road. He sold the animals to another circus and assisted in training for a short period of time. “That retirement lasted two days,” Ann says. After his short-lived retirement, her father went to speak to a friend at Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, which by then was owned by the Feld family. The meeting led Swede back to clowning, and he was clowning boss from 1969 to 1976. He died a year later.

Ann performed in the center ring, which has always been designated as the best.

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That first year at Ringling, Swede took his daughter to a rehearsal in Venice, Florida, winter headquarters for the circus. Ann, in her junior year of high school in Punta Gorda, sat on a bench and dreamed of a circus career. The only problem was her mother wanted her to graduate. In the end, her mother conceded as long as Ann did the correspondence work, so she got on the blue train and stayed on it for five years. Ann points out that the train is “its own little town.” “We’d start on one side of the country and go to the other and then back again,” she says. “We’d get some real vistas, wonderful views. The train goes where cars can’t go.” Ann’s first room on the train was shared with another, but soon she had her own room. It was so small that she had to stand out in the hallway when she took the bed out of the wall. The room was comfortable, though. She had a television and a small refrigerator. The cost was $7 a week and included a laundered set of bed clothing weekly, plus a porter, who swept and washed the floors and cleaned the bathrooms. There was an extra room that was used as a closet, and three women shared it. Ann alone had anywhere from five to seven costume changes in each show. You can imagine all the clothes lying around! “For years I cooked and entertained in it,” she says of the room. “And I lived to tell about it.” Ann was part of several acts, including an aerialist, an acrobat who performs in the air on a suspended apparatus, and in the ring with elephants. As an aerialist, she performed with a total of 36 girls in the Spanish Web, which is performed with a canvas rope with hand loops and foot loops doing a contortionist-type routine while spinning. Executed 30 feet in the air, the routine lasted nearly five minutes. “We used to touch our foot to our head, which I’m paying for now,” she says. Showtime was “glam and glitz.” The elephant act was one of Ann’s favorites. She was in the center ring, the best of the best. She rode “Rahni” and was carried around by her leg by “Siam.”

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Part of the act included an elephant foot coming within inches of her face. She never feared. “I had a lot of faith in the trainer and a lot of faith in the elephant,” she says. “Just another day in the park.” Ringling Bros. & Barnum and Bailey ran about 46 weeks a year. There were two shows daily and three on Saturdays. There were travel days in between, but some shows, such as Madison Square Garden, lasted 12 weeks. The Houston Astrodome show lasted three months. It took about 300 people to pull off the circus and make it a success. “It’s not phony,” she says. “People go out there and risk their lives every performance.”

L

Life changed for Ann in 1974. She married Frank Stephenson, “a gorgeous bareback rider,” whom she dated off and on for years. “I’m the one who caught him,” she adds. They joined his family’s dog act (mother, two sisters, a brother and nephew) at Circus Circus Casino in Las Vegas. It was the best dog act in the business and was inducted into the Circus Ring of Fame in 2009. The eight- to nine-minute routines included poodles and wirehaired terriers. They performed 12 shows a week for two years. In 1976, the couple welcomed their first child, Georgia. The family and his sister bought two chimpanzees and a dog act; trained for six weeks and went to work for Ringling. Eventually, they were sent to Circus World in Haines City, Florida. The dog act included as many as 40 canines at a time. Tricks included rolls, jumps, somersaults on the backs of ponies and a high-diving dog, which leaped from 25 feet above. “We’d call out to them,” she said. “Sometimes it took six weeks to train a dog to do just one trick.” When the dogs got too old to perform, the family kept them as pets. In 1981, Liam, the couple’s second child, was born. They came to Lake County and bought a restaurant, which remained in the family for years. Eventually, Ann, with child and baby in tow, joined

her husband and sister-in-law at Circus Circus in Las Vegas. Other stints included Gatti Charles Circus, a theme park in Fukuoca, Japan, and the last in Florida with the Tommy Hanneford Circus. It’s then that they left Georgia behind with Ann’s mother, so she could attend school. “We’d see lights on in homes and say how they [the family inside] would be sitting down to eat dinner and how nice that would be,” she says. “We’d be trucking down the highway. I was tired of traveling, tired of sitting at home doing the same thing over and over again.” In 1987, Ann, her husband and their son came back to Lake County. The family was together again, and Frank and his two brothers opened a tent rental business together that they ran for several years. Eventually, both of the children graduated from Tavares High School—Georgia in 1995 and Liam in 2000. “We never would have seen or done the things we did if it hadn’t been for the circus,” Ann says. “It really keeps a family close.” Retired life didn’t set well with Ann, who today resides in Eustis. She sat around for about six months and then saw an ad for a school bus driver and applied. She’s been driving special needs children from Mount Dora and Mount Plymouth for 14 years for the Lake County School District. Her husband Frank passed away in 2007. “If I hadn’t had to get up for that job,

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“PEOPLE GO OUT THERE AND RISK THEIR LIVES EVERY PERFORMANCE.” — ANN STEPHENSON

Frank Stephenson, in the center ring, trained animals his entire life.

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1973

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I’m not sure what I would have done,” she says. “We did everything together.” Even though Ann has moved on from circus life, the family tradition continues. Georgia Stephenson, 37, traveled with her parents up until the age of 11 or 12, participating in the dog acts with Ringling. As a child, she dreamt of being a trapeze artist and did some work with it offstage. “We were always together,” she says of her family during her childhood. “We’d always have our meals together. It may have been at odd hours. The lifestyle lends itself to being a close family. I’m really thankful for growing up in the circus.” At first, Georgia says she went to college to pursue another career and worked in the hotel/motel industry. After seeing a Ringling show, though, she was inspired to go back in 2004. This time, Georgia was behind the scenes as an assistant production manager. She and a few others oversaw the show quality along with other responsibilities, including public relations work and organizing the animal walk from the trains to the arena. There were typically 10 elephants and 18 to 24 horses among the animals. “I really miss life on the train,” she says. “I loved living on the train. I miss the animals. It was such a privilege to always have them around and work so closely with them.” In 2010, Georgia was the production manager for Apple Circus in New York City and two years later joined Cirque du Soleil. She’s been on tour as the

assistant artistic director with the show Totem for a number of years. The North American tour wraps up this July and then heads to Australia and New Zealand. “I really don’t have a home,” she says. “I live on the road with a suitcase.” Liam Stephenson, 32, has been traveling on the red train with Ringling for just over a year. He’s the assistant sales coordinator, which means he runs all the concessions on the concourse. There’s a crew of about 65 people who work with toys, food tables, food factories, photographers and a face painter. “We’re in a city every six days,” he says. “We have 64 engagements this year, and there were 368 shows this past year.” When Liam got out of high school, he became an independent professional wrestler, doing that for eight years and traveling the state of Florida. “It’s funny. I fought very hard not to get into the family business for many, many years,” he says. “When my dad died, it kind of started my change of heart on the family legacy.” Liam has fond memories of growing up in the circus. He recalled that one of the ringmasters taught him to read at an early age. Then there was the experience of growing up with Russians, Brazilians, Canadians, Lebanese, Japanese, etc. “Looking back on it, it was a very unique childhood. It’s what I knew,” he says. “It’s an experience where you learn the world is a much smaller place and we’re all part of the bigger picture. It afforded me a world view.” Today, Liam says he plans to see the world. “I intend to be in the business a very long time,” he says. “I love the circus. It’s in me.” As for Ann, she does miss the circus days but prefers to take on a new view. “I’ll just let my kids do it,” she says. “I’ll be in the audience.”

Top: Frank Stephenson with his sister, Diana Stephenson (at that time), performing together. Bottom: Frank and Ann with one of the dogs.

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1985

1995

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2004

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Scar Solutions

Our bodies’ natural Band-Aids explained p50

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Sources: cnn.com

Pills © StockThings / Shutterstock.com

Header pXX Anti-Aging Header Options pXX p46 Header A CKD pXX Checklist Header pXX p48

and more!

T

HE FDA IS BEGINNING NEW REGULATORY ACTIONS AGAINST COMBINATION DRUGS, CAPSULES CONTAINING OPIOIDS AND ACETAMINOPHEN. ACCORDING TO EXPERTS, PATIENTS TAKING PRESCRIPTION PAIN MEDICATIONS AND ACETAMINOPHEN AT THE SAME TIME MAY BE TAKING MORE OF THE DRUG THAN IS SAFE, AS SOME IS ALREADY HIDING IN THE COMBINATION CAPLETS. In this case, too much of a good thing can lead

to significant damage and even death in extreme cases, according to the National Institute of Health. The FDA recommends a maximum of 4,000mg of acetaminophen daily for healthy adults, but beware, because this number is easy to reach. For example, one Extra Strength Tylenol pill packs a solid 500mg. Be sure to keep an eye on the numbers, and ask a doctor about any hidden acetaminophen in your next prescription.

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LOOKINGWELL

T

HE MULTITUDE OF SKIN CARE PRODUCTS IN ANY STORE’S COSMETIC SECTION LEAVES LITTLE DOUBT THAT MANY ARE SEEKING THE FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH IN A JAR OR BOTTLE. EVERY PRODUCT PROMISES THE FACIAL HOLY GRAIL OF ERASING FINE LINES AND WRINKLES, MAKING YOUR SKIN AS BEAUTIFUL AS A NEWBORN BABY’S. SO WITH SO MANY CHOICES, WHAT’S A WOMAN, OR MAN FOR THAT MATTER, TO DO?

Woman © Syda Productions; Oil © Chursina Viktoriia / Shutterstock.com

SEEKING AN AGELESS FACE “The most important thing is to have your face professionally evaluated before you start any skin-care regimen,” says Martha Finklestein, a licensed esthetician with Ocala-based INFINITE NATURAL DAY SPA. “This will save you a lot of hit-and-miss, money and possibe damage to your skin. A customized skin-care program will address any allergies or other sensitivities you may have, target your specific needs and deliver the best overall results.” Finklestein prefers natural products over synthetics, saying, “Natural products, particularly in serum form, are more powerful, so you have to use less, and they are more readily absorbed by the skin. And usually even people with sensitive skin have no problems with the naturals.” The skin industry is not a stagnant one, and Finklestein is most excited about the innovation of phytotherapy, which uses plant-cell based products. “Phytotherapy skin products actually help preserve the facial skin cells, so you’ll age at a much slower rate,” she says. “We’re using a topical apple stem cells product that we’re seeing great results with.” With any skin care product, Finklestein advises starting with the lower concentrations and applying every other day initially to see how your skin reacts.

SKIN CARE INGREDIENTS 101

not abrasive and very good for people with sensitive skin,” says Finklestein. “We use these, particularly glyolic acid, for people with acne-prone skin.” Always use a sunscreen product with AHSs, as they cause sun sensitivity.

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BETA-HYDROXY ACID (BHAS): The most well-known BHA is salicylic acid, which is derived from aspirin or naturally from white willow bark. It penetrates oil-laden hair follicle openings, making it a go-to for acne-prone skin. Salicylic acid also exfoliates skin, improving color and texture. Finklestein says, “We like

the BHAs for overall skin rejuvenation.”

RETINOL: A vitamin A derivative,

the key with retinol is the strength you use, according to Finklestein.

“It’s like making lemonade. The more lemons you use, the stronger your lemonade is going to be,” she says. Retinol

is effective because the vitamin A is able to be absorbed into the lower layers of the skin. It also improves pigmentation, skin texture, fine lines, wrinkles and skin’s hydration levels. Plumper skin is good! Retina-A and Renova contain tretinoin, a stronger counterpart to retinol that can be too harsh for some skin types.

ALPHA-LIPOIC ACID (ALA): An ultra-

potent antioxidant, which is soluble in both water and oil, allowing it to enter the skin cells. Appears to repair and fight skin damage, diminish fine lines and give skin a healthy glow. “It’s all natural,

so ALA works very well,”

says Finkelstein.

Sources: skincare.about.com, my.clevelandclinic.org

ALPHA HYDROXY ACIDS (AHSS): These include lactic (milk), tartaric (grapes), citric (oranges & lemons), malic (apples & pears) and glyolic (sugar cane) acids, which may help with age spots, pigmentation, fine lines and decreasing enlarged pores. “The natural AHSs are


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BEINGWELL

N ATION AOLN T H K IDNE Y M

CKD: M A RCH

NOTHING TO KID ABOUT

A

CCORDING TO THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION, CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE (CKD) AFFECTS MORE THAN 26 MILLION ADULTS IN THE UNITED STATES. THE MARION COUNTY KIDNEY FOUNDATION ESTIMATES THAT MORE THAN 10,000 MARION COUNTY RESIDENTS ARE DEALING WITH CKD. Decreased kidney function

and damage that lasts longer than three months is labeled chronic kidney disease. Diabetes, both types 1 and 2, and high blood pressure (hypertension) are the most common causes of CKD. Without early detection and medical treatment, CKD can lead to kidney failure and the need for dialysis or even a kidney transplant. “Most people with early chronic kidney disease will not have noticeable symptoms,” says Dr. Izu Nwakoby, a boardcertified nephrologist with Ocala Kidney Group. “The symptoms don’t start to manifest themselves until the later stages of the disease. Usually by that time, kidney function is down to 15 percent and dialysis becomes necessary.” Nwakoby, who is on the Marion County Kidney Foundation board, adds, “It is very important to include a blood test to measure kidney function as part of your annual physical exam. This is the most reliable test.”

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CDK CHECK LIS T

 Nausea/vom iting  Passing only a small amount of urine

Man © CLIPAREA l Custom media; Doctor © Bevan Goldswain / Shutterstock.com

KUDOS TO OUR KIDNEYS We have a pair of kidneys, each about the size of your fist and located just below the rib cage on either side of the spine. These little dynamos filter approximately 200 quarts of blood, sifting out about four quarts of waste products and excess fluid during the course of a day.

MORE SPECIFICALLY, OUR KIDNEYS:

MAINTAIN

a balance of water and concentration of minerals, such as sodium, potassium and phosphorous, in the blood.

REMOVE

waste by-products from the blood after digestion, muscle exertion and exposure to medications or chemicals.

PRODUCE PRODUCE PRODUCE

 Swelling, parti cularly in ankles and puffiness aro und eyes  Unpleasant tas te in mouth; urine like odor to breath  Persistent fatigu e and shortness of brea th  Loss of appetite

erythropietin, which stimulates red blood cell production. calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D needed for bone and immune system health.

 Increasingly hig her blood pressure

renin, an enzyme that helps regulate blood pressure. renin

Causes of CDK

 Muscle cramps , especially in leg s  Pale skin  Excessively dr y, itchy skin

TAKE THE TEST

Cardiovascular disease

Autoimmune disorders, such as lupus, arthritis or Hashimoto’s disease Chronic viral illnesses, such as HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and hepatitis C Polycystic kidney disease, the most common form of inherited kidney disease Inflammation in kidneys following strep infection Pyelonephritis, urinary tract infections within the kidneys Drugs/toxins, including overuse of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories such as ibuprofen

BLOOD PRESSURE: A reading over 140/90 is considered high blood pressure; a good target rate is 120/80.

URINALYSIS: Checks for protein-tocreatinine ratio and albumin-tocreatinine ratio in urine.

GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE (GFR): Results

from a blood creatinine test tell how well kidneys are removing waste from your blood.

BE KIND TO YOUR KIDNEYS DON’T SMOKE. Smoking damages kidneys, leading to damaging creatinine protein buildup in urine.

GO EASY ON PAIN KILLERS. According to the National Kidney

CDK TREATMENTS MEDICATIONS: Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors; angiotensin II receptor blockers; erythropoietin (EPO)

Sources: kidney.org, webmd.com, cdc.gov

DIALYSIS: Life-supporting procedure that filters harmful wastes, salt and excess fluids from the blood; necessary for people with the loss of 85-90 percent of kidney function, end-stage kidney disease or permanent kidney failure. Two primary types of dialysis are hemodialysis, which filters blood using dialysis machine and is generally done several times a week, and peritoneal dialysis, which filters waste through the abdominal cavity via a catheter and can be done at home by patient, usually four to five times a day.

KIDNEY TRANSPLANT: An option for those with less than 15 percent kidney function; transplant can come from living or non-living donor. To prevent organ rejection, immunosuppressant medicine must be taken for rest of life. Nearly 3,000 new patients are added to the national kidney waiting list each month, and 17,000 kidney transplants took place in the United States last year, according to the National Kidney Foundation.

Foundation, as much as 3-5 percent of new cases of CDK may be caused by long-term use of non-steroidal antiinflammatories (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, which reduce blood flow to kidneys.

SKIMP ON SALT. Diets high in sodium increase blood pressure levels, which damages kidneys.

BAN THE SODA. A Loyola University study showed that those who drink just two cans of soda, regular or diet, a day are nearly twice as likely to develop early signs of kidney disease, such as excessive proteins in urine, than those who don’t drink soda.

DRINK WATER. Aim for 48-64 ounces of water a day to help your kidneys do their job!

35 30%

all chronic % ofkidney disease is

caused by diabetes (both types 1 & 2) of all CDK is caused by high blood pressure

Want To Know More? MARION COUNTY KIDNEY FOUNDATION (352) 671-5013 marioncountykidneyfoundation.org kidney.org donatelife.net

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Scar © Artem Furman; Band Aid © Claudio Divizia / Shutterstock.com

LIVINGWELL

THE SKINNY ON

SCARS P

EOPLE TEND TO THINK OF SCARS IN A NEGATIVE WAY, BUT THEY’RE ACTUALLY A RESULT OF OUR BODY’S SUPER HEALING POWERS. WHEN THE DERMIS, OUR SKIN’S PROTECTIVE LAYER, IS DAMAGED FROM A CUT, SCRAPE, BURN OR SORE, OUR BODY GOES TO WORK TO REPAIR IT. THE SIGNAL GOES OUT TO PRODUCE EXTRA COLLAGEN PROTEIN FIBERS TO MEND THE BREACH TO THE SKIN, LEADING TO WHAT WE CALL A SCAR AFTER THE WOUND IS COMPLETELY HEALED. Some

scars are hardly noticeable, while others, depending on the nature of the wound, are more pronounced. For instance, surgical scars or those from acne can have a deep, pitted look because skin tissue-supporting muscle and fat have been lost. The stretch marks women get during pregnancy are actually a form of scarring due to the skin stretching too rapidly, causing damage. How a scar eventually looks depends on the type, location and healing time of a wound, as well as skin pigmentation and age.

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TYPES OF SCARS KELOID Raised scars that extend beyond original location of wound and may compromise flexibility of area; most common among those with dark skin pigmentation.

CONTRACTURE Formed on burned skin, usually deep and affect muscles and nerves, impairing movement.

HYPERTROPHIC Raised, red scars similar to keloid, but do not extend beyond wound boundary.

ACNE Can range from wavelike to angular to deep pits.

SCAR TREATMENTS SURGERY: Can be used to make a scar less noticeable or alter its shape but cannot remove it. Not recommended for keloid or hypertrophic scars because of risk of more severe or recurring scars. SILICON GEL SHEETING: Daily use

may help fade scar or minimize hyperpigmentation.

STEROID INJECTIONS: May help soften and flatten keloid or hypertrophic scars.

DERMABRASION: Useful for raised

scars but not for deep, sunken ones.

FILLER INJECTIONS: Collagen or fat fillers used to temporarily raise sunken scars. RADIOTHERAPY: Superficial,

low-dose radiotherapy used to prevent recurrence of severe keloid and hypertrophic scarring.

LASER RESURFACING: Newer lasers

can remove surface layers of scars.

OTC TOPICAL TREATMENTS: Products containing such ingredients as coca butter and vitamin E claim to minimize scars but are generally considered not very effective.

DIY WOUND CARE & SCAR PREVENTION WASH: Clean out a wound with plain, cool water, and then gently wash around the wound with soap and a washcloth. Do not use hydrogen peroxide, harsh soap, iodine or even alcohol, all of which can damage skin and delay the healing process. COVER: Always cover your wound

to prevent bacteria and dirt from causing an infection. Use an antibiotic cream or ointment to help keep the wound moist, encouraging healing and reducing scarring.

LEAVE SCABS ALONE: A scab is part

of the healing process, sort of your skin’s version of a Band-Aid. So don’t pick at it! If you break the scab, infection-causing bacteria could seep in, slowing the healing process and maybe leading to scarring.

Sources: webmd.com, nlm.nih.gov/medline

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150 SE 17th St, Suite 604 Ocala, FL 34471

11223 N Williams St, Suite I Dunnellon, FL 34482

Mon-Fri 8am-7pm & Sat 8am-12pm, closed Sun

Mon 8a-5p, Tues 8a-12p, Wed 8a-5p, Thurs 1p-5p, Fri 8a-12p, closed Sun, & Sat

Tues 1p-5p, Thurs 8p-5p, Fri 8a-5p, closed Sun, Mon, Wed & Sat

352.671.6741 352.512.0466

www.ecocala.com

352.522.1862

The family put their faith and trust in The New Cunningham Funeral Home under the personal care and direction of Mr. O’Donald B Clark III, owner, LFD. Mr. Clark has two years experience as a trained employee at Hiers-Baxley. He is now the new owner and licensed funeral director at Cunningham Funeral Home.

O’Donald B. Clark III, L.F.D.I.C Owner & Licensed Funeral Director

Services: Traditional Funeral Services | Direct Cremations | Pre-Needs | Bereavement Services | Hospitality services Notary Public | Monument Service | Funeral Program Design & Printing | Domestic & International shipping

434 NW Martin Luther King Jr. Ave Ocala, FL 34475 | 352.368.2198 www.CunninghamFHocala.com

“Serving you with Dignity and Integrity when it Matters Most” ocalastyle.com MAR’14

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HAPPY St. Patty’s DAY!

We make your SMILE

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We welcome the whole family!

L to R: Barbara Andrews (Receptionist), Jennifer Roberts CDA, Melanie Waters CDA, Dr. Aleesha Freimuth, Lynn Twyman (Office Manager), Charlotte Trout RDH, Betsy Hollington RDH & Cynthia Kline Insurance Specialist.

Financing with LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS available with approved credit • • • • •

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LIVING WELL LIVING STRONG MY NAME IS CAROL, AND I AM A SURVIVOR.

now I was also gaining weight. I could not see a way out of my situation. I prayed for help.

Six of my close family members have been diagnosed with cancer and died within a few months. So imagine my horror when, in May 2013, I was diagnosed with Breast Cancer.

A friend of mine told me about the LiveSTRONG program at the YMCA. I hoped this was the answer I'd prayed for. I got clearance from my doctor and arrived at the YMCA early on October 29. It was the first day of the rest of my life.

The cancer was believed to be contained in the ducts and very treatable: lumpectomy followed by radiation and chemo were recommended. With my family history, I was not willing to fiddle with treating the cancer when I knew there was a chance for a cure. I opted for bilateral mastectomy with sentinel lymph node biopsy. The surgery was June 21 and went well. They ended up taking more lymph nodes than expected, but every single one was clean and clear of cancer. I went home after just one night in the hospital. The removal of the lymph nodes combined with cervical neck surgery earlier in the year left my left arm very weak with a limited range of motion. In July, my oncologist gave me the unbelievable news that I was cancer free! I had hope that I would not die like so much of my family had. In August, I was cleared by my surgeon to begin physical therapy, and look into reconstruction. Then I lost my insurance. I felt very lost. I was a survivor, but no longer able to do a lot of simple activities because of the loss of use of my left arm and pain across my chest. I didn't know what I could do and feared hurting myself. Between the emotional roller coaster and the lack of activity, I found myself falling in to a pit of despair. My body image was bad enough with the loss of my chest, but

A month later, I received a letter from my employer stating that he was “going through the process to release me from work.” I was sad, but not surprised. It had been months since I had worked. If the letter arrived before I started LiveSTRONG, I would have taken it to the Social Security Administration and given up. But, thanks to the selfconfidence I'd built through the Y’s LiveSTRONG program, I was able to keep my job.

LiveSTRONG is an answer to a prayer for me.

ABOUT LIVESTRONG: WHAT: 12-week program for adult cancer survivors. The program is designed to help participants build muscle mass and strength, increase flexibility and endurance, and improve functional ability. WHY: Research shows physical activity decreases recurrence and increases survivorship for cancer patients.

ABOVE: Carol Sowards, LiveSTRONG participant BELOW: Carol and YMCA Coach Tiffany Crumrine

COST: Free, along with full use of the YMCA facility for survivors and their families.

COME IN TODAY AND LET’S GET STARTED. This ONE-WEEK pass will allow you to experience everything the Y has to offer. From personalized wellness coaching to youth and family activities, the Y has programs to keep you and your family connected so that you can enjoy time growing stronger together. Expires 3/31/14

Valid Photo ID Required

FRANK DELUCA YMCA FAMILY CENTER 3200 SE 17th St. Ocala, FL 34471 352 368 9622 www.ymcacentralflorida.com/y-locations/marion Facebook.com/MarionCountyYMCA

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Pop!

the

Everything you need to know about the perfect movie treat p56

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and more!

RED LIGHT GREEN LIGHT A

MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL CAFETERIA PLAYED GUINEA PIG TO AN INNOVATIVE STUDY AIMED AT IMPROVING HEALTHY CHOICES. HEALTHY FOODS WERE MARKED WITH GREEN STICKERS AND PLACED IN PRIME LOCATIONS, MODERATE FOODS RECEIVED A YELLOW AND UNHEALTHY FOODS WORE RED. THE STUDY SHOWED AN INCREASE IN ‘GREEN LIGHT’ FOODS PURCHASED AND A DECREASE IN UNHEALTHY FOODS.

Researchers could not tell if it was the stickers or the placement that caused healthier choices, but by the end of the study, hospital visitors and employees were making more conscious food decisions. The results persisted even 24 months after the change, demonstrating the effectiveness of a simple rearrangement and labeling system. Stickers can’t replace nutrition labels, but they certainly work in a pinch. The colorful concept lends itself well for at-home use; parents can position ‘green’ snacks in easy-to-reach places, and leave those red snacks as special permission only treats.

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LIGHTS! CAMERA!

POPCORN! AN A-MAIZE-ING HISTORY

POP CULTURE

Popcorn became a movie staple in the late 1920s when the urge to munch on a snack while watching “talkies” resulted in moviegoers grabbing a snack from vendors outside theaters before they entered the cinema. At 5 to 10 cents a bag, popcorn was an affordable luxury during the Great Depression. Despite the initial worry of theater upkeep and popcorn mess, cinema owners soon caught on that selling the snack would be an industrious business move. Thousands of bags of popcorn could be made from a hundred pounds of kernels, which theater owners could buy for $10. Today, the average cost of a small bag of popcorn is $5—100 times its original cost in the Roaring Twenties. The reason why popcorn and that fizzy soft drink cost so much is because movie theaters make 85 percent of their profit from concession stands. No wonder you become the object of scorn when you try to sneak in food from the dollar store! Outside of the theater, popcorn’s cheapness was not lost on a pop princess in the 1980s. Before she became the Queen of Pop, Madonna was a fledgling artist in New York who survived on popcorn while she was trying to make a living as an entertainer. Living on popcorn did not make Madonna steer clear of the snack when she became a breakout star, though. “I still love popcorn,” she said in a 2008 interview with Q Magazine. We do, too—with some added zing for variety.

Popcorn may have become synonymous to Plymouth Rock, where supposedly American Indians brought the food to the first Thanksgiving dinner, but its history dates back long before even Columbus sailed the ocean blue. The earliest evidence of popcorn was discovered from archaeological sites in Peru that date back as far as 4700 B.C. With no microwaves or stoves, the cobs were most likely roasted over coals or flames. In the 16th century, Aztec Indians made headdresses, necklaces and ornaments out of popcorn. Spaniard accounts from this period describe how natives used popcorn in religious ceremonies. A crowning achievement in popcorn history was made It’s incredibly easy Watching popcorn around 300 A.D. by inhabitants to prepare. pop in slow motion (type “slow mo of Peru’s northern coast. The popcorn” into your ancient “popper” was a shallow online search engine) vessel with a handle and a hole is like watching a flower blossom or a on top. Over a thousand years snack ballet. later, the popcorn machine was introduced at the Chicago World’s Fair in 1893.

OTHER REASONS WE LOVE POPCORN:

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It can be healthy or indulgent depending on your personal preference. Given the above statement, popcorn is a super versatile food that you can season with whatever’s in your kitchen cabinet.

Sources: history.com, popcorn.org, oscars.org, business.time.com, preferredpopcorn.com, Q Magazine (May 2008), sparkpeople.com

S

OME SOUNDS BRING TO MIND MEMORIES OF CHILDHOOD AND CAREFREE DAYS—THE SQUEAK OF A SWING SET, THE MUSIC OF AN ICE CREAM TRUCK ON A NEARBY STREET, THE POPPING OF POPCORN—A NOISE TANTALIZINGLY DELICIOUS TO THE EARS. LIKE PEANUTS AT A BALLGAME OR COTTON CANDY AT THE CIRCUS, POPCORN IS AN ESSENTIAL FILM SNACK ON FRIDAY NIGHTS, WHETHER YOU’RE COVERED WITH AN AFGHAN ON THE COUCH AT HOME OR IN THE MIDDLE ROW SEAT AT THE CINEMA.


JUS T LIK E THE MOVIE

Stovetop Pop corn

QUICK BITES

S…

This cornucopia of information is surely making hungry for a nice your inner film evening with a buff good movie and easy recipe from tasty snack. Her The Popcorn Bo e’s an ard for stovetop want to take the popcorn in case fancy route inst you ead of relying on Important rule the ‘ol microwav of thumb: one ou e. nce of un-poppe equals one quar t popped. d popcorn Equipm

Girl © Asier Romero; Popcorn Box © Vinicius Tupinamba;Loose Popcorn © xpixel; pot © aspen rock; Chocolate and Cayenne © M. Unal Ozmen / Shutterstock.com

FROM KERNEL TO POP!

ent and ingredie nts: 3-4 quart pan with a loose lid that allows ste am to escape Popcorn kernels Cooking oil (not butter), 1/3 cup for every cup of kernels Heat oil 400-46 0° a couple of kern F, making sure it does not sm oke. Test oil with els. When they bottom of pan, pop, add enou gh kernels to co making the he lid, and shake ig ver ht on ly one kern pan remove pan fro to evenly spread oil. When po el deep. Cover with m stovetop. Al pp ing begins to slo low after popping. w, Store in an airtig remaining kernels to pop. Add salt ht container at room tempera ture.

How does a kernel become the fluffy but crunchy popcorn we know and love? A kernel is made up of three parts: the germ, endosperm and hull. There are four common types of corn: sweet, dent (or field), flint and popcorn. Because the hull is thick enough to burst open, popcorn kernels are the only type of corn that can become—you guessed it—popcorn! An important element that makes corn pop is moisture. Inside a popcorn kernel is a small drop of water that is stored inside a circle of soft starch, which is surrounded by the kernel’s hard outer surface. Once heat is introduced into the equation the water expands, transforms into steam and causes the hull to burst open. The soft starch from inside the kernel inflates and spills out. What results is one of two types of popped popcorn: butterfly or mushroom. A mushroom popcorn resembles a baseball and is favored for coating with caramel, chocolate or cheese because of the surface area. Both types are great for eating.

QUICK BITES

SEASONINGS OF LOVE Buttery, salty popcorn is the classic film food of choice, but you can spruce it up with spices and other ingredients if you so desire. You won’t find these at your local multiplex! Pop Chip: Add chocolate chips (or butterscotch, peanut butter, white chocolate, etc.) to a bowl of warm popcorn and toss to melt. Mexican Chocolate: Drizzle popcorn with melted butter and sprinkle on cinnamon, cayenne and cocoa powder.

The Courtyard on Broadway opened this past October and has since undergone some exciting changes. Located between Pi on Broadway and A Taste of Everything, this cozy establishment is a great spot for evening relaxation with a glass of wine, craft beers and tapas. “Soul Food Nights” take place weekly, and speed dating events are also planned. Catch brunch on the weekends with unlimited mimosas and a tasty Silberkorn / Shutterstock.com waffle bar. On Wednesdays, ladies drink free domestic house wine and specialty drinks from 4-10pm. Open seven days from 4pm2am and for lunch/brunch on select days. Check out their Facebook page for the latest happenings and specials. 120 SW Broadway St. Ocala (352) 354-2029 facebook.com/ TheCourtyardOnBroadway

Pizza Popcorn: Sprinkle on Parmesan cheese, oregano and red pepper flakes. Other ideas: Maple syrup (sparingly, as popcorn will become soggy), caramel, any candy like Junior Mints or mini Reese’s peanut butter cups, sprinkles, nuts, marshmallows, let your creativity pop!

Coach’s Pub & Eatery has locations in Dunnellon and Inverness, both serving lunch and dinner, with a wide menu to choose from. There are wings, of course, but the menu isn’t limited to typical “bar and grill” fare. You’ll find a 16-ounce, HLPhoto / Shutterstock.com center-cut T-bone, “surf and turf,” baby back ribs, tilapia, char-grilled pork chops, Chicken Cordon Bleu, salads Continued on page 58

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ORGANICS E

VERYWHERE YOU TURN, ORGANIC FOODS AND PRODUCTS ARE ALL THE RAGE. WE’VE ALL HEARD THE BENEFITS OF GOING ORGANIC, BUT HOW DO YOU START WITHOUT BREAKING THE BANK? GETTING GUNG HO AND JUMPING IN CAN FAIL AND BE EXPENSIVE, SO BEFORE YOU DIVE IN, CHECK OUT OUR BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO ORGANICS.

Ever noticed organic products seem a little pricier? That’s because organic operations have to hire more employees to hand-weed, remediate water pollution and do the rest of the work of cheap, mass-produced chemicals. The natural manure organic farmers use as fertilizers is more expensive, and they don’t have space to produce their crops in huge numbers. The best way to avoid costlier produce is to visit a farmers market and buy straight from the source. At the very least, this will eliminate the cost of shipping the fruits and veggies, and probably a little more. Which foods are most important to buy organic? The Environmental Working Group says these are the top 15 produce products to buy conventionally because they have the lowest levels of pesticides. Pocket the leftover change for organic versions of other, less clean foods. Visit ewg.org for the complete Clean Fifteen and Dirty Dozen Plus lists. On the other hand, the Dirty Dozen Plus would be a great place to start when choosing organic.

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These fruits and vegetables contain high amounts of pesticides and chemicals, so better safe than sorry. To get started with organics, inspect your kitchen, take note of your family’s essentials and start with those. Key ingredients like milk, peanut butter and potatoes are eaten regularly but are chock-full of artificial hormones, pesticides and fungicides respectively. Apples and ketchup top the organic naughty list as well. Recognize which foods disappear fastest in your home, and find an organic alternative. Even if the chemical levels are low, they’ll build up from constant consumption. Once you hit the store, look for the supermarket’s private organic line (like Greenwise at Publix) to save a little moo-la. It

Clean Fifteen 1. Asparagus 2. Avocado 3. Cabbage 4. Cantaloupe (domestic) 5. Corn 6. Eggplant 7. Grapefruit 8. Kiwi

9. Mangoes 10. Mushrooms 11. Onions 12. Papayas 13. Pineapples 14. Sweet peas (frozen) 15. Sweet potatoes

Dirty Dozen Plus 1. Apples 2. Celery 3. Cherry tomatoes 4. Cucumbers 5. Grapes 6. Hot peppers 7. Nectarines 8. Peaches (imported)

9. Potatoes 10. Spinach 11. Strawberries 12. Sweet bell peppers 13. Kale/collard greens+ 14. Summer squash+

and more. Burger lovers will want to try Coach’s famous half-pound cheeseburger, where you pick the toppings. Wash it down with a brew! There’s a huge selection of bottled and draft beers of the world available. Both locations open seven days a week. 11582 N Williams St. Dunnellon (352) 489-1484 114 W Main St., Inverness (352) 344-3333 coachspubandeatery.com

QUICK BITES

Sources: foxnews.com, ewg.org, livestrong.com

EASING INTO

will keep you from stopping at a second specialty store on errands day, plus they are all USDAcertified organic. For most frozen foods, there are organic alternatives, even TV dinners and frozen pizzas. If you won’t eat all the produce before it spoils (and remember that organic versions will go bad faster), organic frozen options are available instead to be eaten on your schedule. Continue using regular pantry staples like sugar until they run out and then replace them with organic versions. This means no wasted products and no major splurge on replacing everything in the kitchen. Even condiments and seasonings have organic options. Organic meat and poultry can be expensive unless you buy a bird in bulk. One whole organic chicken usually costs the same as a few conventional chicken breasts, so you’re getting more meat and less chemicals for your money. Most stores have an on-site butcher who will portion it for you, too. Take the time to shop around at multiple stores and compare prices. Also note when certain fruits and vegetables are in season, which will minimize their cost.

Avocado © Hong Vo; Salad © Subbotina Anna; Organic © er ryan / Shutterstock.com

Continued from page 57

Crunchies & Munchies has been an Ocala tradition for years. Don’t let the casual appearance fool you—this place is known for their buffalo-style chicken wings. One thing that makes their wings and fries so tasty is their famous original sauce, available in various heats and flavors. If you don’t want sauce on the wings, order them “dry,” and dip them yourself in Brent Hofacker / Shutterstock.com the sauce of your choice. The buffalo wing meals include fries and cole slaw. Chicken tenders are also on the menu. Take-out only. Call ahead if you don’t want to wait. Open seven days a week for lunch and dinner. 1431 NE 25th Ave. Ocala      (352) 622-2963


DININGGUIDE

Tony’s Sushi & Steakhouse 3405 SW College Road, Ocala / (352) 237-3151 / tonysushi.com Mon-Thu 11a-10p / Fri & Sat 11a-11p / Sun Noon-10p With abundant menu choices and over 100 off-menu rolls, you certainly won’t run out of options at Tony’s Sushi. If you can’t decide, the waitstaff is excellent at suggesting items you’re sure to enjoy. Every roll and sushi dish is made to order from the freshest ingredients. In the steakhouse area, highly trained chefs prepare a memorable meal as they cook on the tableside grills, preparing chicken, steak or seafood just the way you like it. Entrées include soup or salad and rice. Family-friendly, casual atmosphere, along with a full bar, including imported Japanese sake and beer selections. Like us

Book your party at Tony’s today. Gift cards available.

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Wayne’s Brick City Café 10 NE 1st Street, Ocala / (352) 629-4700 Mon-Fri 7a-2p / Delivery Downtown Area 9a-1:30p

Wayne’s Brick City Café is a local favorite. Find out why! The specialty salads, including chicken, pasta and taco salad are out of this world, and guests can create their own salad plate, served with their choice of salad combinations. Also on the menu are a tasty variety of burgers and dogs and a great selection of sandwiches. For the early birds, breakfast is served from 6:30-11a. A great start to any day with menu items ranging from omelets and eggs benedict to French toast and sausage gravy and biscuits. Dine indoors or out in the secluded courtyard area. Brick City Café is known for its friendly service and cozy environment.

Call ahead for takeout, and delivery is available to the downtown area.

El Toreo 3790 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala / (352) 694-1401 / 7 Days 11a-10p SR 200, Ocala / (352) 291-2121 / 7 Days 11a-11p Happy Hour Daily 4-7p New lunch specials include Taco Salad on Monday, $4.45; Speedy Gonzalez on Tuesdays, $4.95; Quesadillas on Wednesday, $6.45; Chimichangas on Thursdays, $5.95; and Burrito Supreme on Fridays, $4.95. New dinner options include Fajita Mondays, $8.95; Chimichanga Tuesdays, $7.95; Alambre Wednesdays, $7.95; Tacos de Bistec Thursdays, $7.95. Plus $1.95 margaritas on Monday. On Sunday, kids 12 and under can enjoy 99¢ children’s meals (takeout not included). Wednesday is Special Margarita Day, 99¢ all day. Saturday is 2-for-1 margaritas all day. Live Mariachi Band every Thursday 6-9pm at our Hwy 200 Location.

Join us every day for happy hour from 4-7p and get 2-for-1 wells or drafts. Whether it’s delicious food, great drinks or a festive atmosphere, there are more reasons than ever to visit either El Toreo location today.

THE BEST MEXICAN FOOD

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Braised Onion 754 NE 25th Ave, Ocala / (352) 620-9255 Tue-Thu 11a-9p / Fri-Sat 11a-10p / Sun 11a-8p Easter Brunch Buffet 11a-6p We would like to WELCOME HITS riders and participants!

Welcome to Braised Onion, where you can experience a fun, colorful meal in a casual atmosphere as your taste buds dance away with the many exciting flavors of our “comfort food with attitude.” Make your reservations for Easter! Chef Felix will be making a very special Easter Brunch Buffet serving from 11am to 6pm on Sunday, April 20! Chef Felix was recently the winner of Culinary Combat Iron Chef 2012-13! Also, the winner of Taste of Ocala 2013 and Best of the Best Chef 2013. Live Jazz Wednesday and Friday at 6:30p, and live entertainment Saturday at 6:30p.

Harry’s Seafood Bar & Grille 24 SE 1st Ave., Ocala / (352) 840-0900 / hookedonharrys.com Mon-Thu 11a-10p / Fri & Sat 11a-11p / Sun 11a-9p Happy Hour Specials Monday – 1/2-price bottles of wine. Tuesday (“Fat Tuesday”) all items half price. Wednesday – 1/2-price martinis. Plus a daily happy hour from 2-7pm with plenty of 2-for-1 deals.

Located in the heart of downtown Ocala, Harry’s offers traditional Louisiana favorites like Shrimp and Scallop Orleans, Crawfish Etouffée, Jambalaya, Shrimp Creole and Blackened Red Fish. Other favorites, like Harry’s Signature Crab Cakes and Bourbon Street Salmon, are complemented with grilled steaks, chicken, burgers, po’ boy sandwiches and salads. Our full bar features Harry’s specialty drinks, such as the Hurricane or Rajun Cajun Bloody Mary, as well as wines by the glass and a wide selection of imported, domestic and craft beer. Harry’s menu is sure to have something for everyone!

La Cuisine French Restaurant 48 SW 1st Ave., Ocala / (352) 433-2570 / lacuisineocala.com Tue-Fri Lunch 11:30a-2p / Dinner daily starting at 5:30p / Happy Hour Mon-Thu, 5:30-7p Live Piano Dinner Tues 6:30-9p / Thu 6-9p March Wine Tasting Wednesday, March 26th at 6:30p.

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Looking for a romantic escape, a quiet spot for a business lunch or dinner, a cozy place for a friend or family reunion? Or simply craving hearty, quality food and dedicated service? Located at the heart of beautiful downtown Ocala, La Cuisine with its unique French bistro atmosphere, award-winning menu alongside world-class food, full liquor bar and extensive selection of wines, is worth a closer look! Our specialties include Escargots in Garlic Butter, Traditional French Onion Soup, Beef Bourguignon, Braised Pork Shank in Honey Sauce, Duck a l’ Orange, Blue Crab Stuffed Filet Mignon, Ratatouille and our genuinely authentic Creme Brulée, to mention just a few!


DININGGUIDE

Blanca’s Café Ocala Palms Golf & Country Club / 5000 N US Hwy 27, Ocala / (352) 867-0001 Mon-Sat Lunch & Dinner 10:30a-9p / Sun 11a-4p WELCOME, H.I.T.S.! Tucked in among the rolling greens of the Ocala Palms Golf & Country Club, Blanca’s Café is a gem of a find for diners looking for excellent food served in a warm, friendly environment. Italian dishes and delicious homemade desserts are the café’s specialty. Patrons enjoy a full-service bar and live entertainment weekly as well as spacious seating for up to 150. Try one of the weekly dinner specials Blanca’s offers, or schedule catering for your next event through the café. Whether you’re a newcomer in town or a local looking for somewhere new to dine, Blanca’s Café offers something to please every palate.

Each Friday, we are offering 1 ½-pound Maine lobster. Reserve by Wednesday. Homemade pizza served daily. Lunches now feature Beef on Weck & Monte Cristo Sandwiches. Weekly entertainment, call for details. St. Patrick’s Day - Corned Beef & Cabbage Dinner 4p and 6:30p seating. Entertainment will be provided at 6:30 seating. By Reservation Only.

Kotobuki Japanese Restaurant 2463 SW 27th Avenue, Ocala / (352) 237-3900 / kotobukiocala.com Lunch: Tue-Fri 11:30a-2p Dinner: Tue-Thu 4:30-9:30p / Fri & Sat 4:30-10:30p / Mon & Sun 4:30-9:30p For an authentic Japanese meal in an award-winning restaurant that has been serving Ocala since 1986, try Kotobuki. Enjoy traditional Japanese favorites like tempura, teriyaki and broiled seafood and vegetables. For a memorable experience, gather around the hot grill and watch as your chef prepares steak, chicken and seafood favorites right before your eyes.

Happy Hour daily 4:30-6p Check out our full sushi bar. Celebrating 26 years!

Ipanema Brazilian Steak House 2023 South Pine Avenue, Ocala / (352) 622-1741 / ipanemaocala.com Lunch Fri 11a-2:30p / Dinner Tue-Thu 5-9p, Fri & Sat 5-10p, Sun 4-9p Brunch Sun 12-3p / Happy Hour Tue-Fri 5-7p / Closed Mon A Churrascaria (Portuguese for barbecue) is a dining experience where roaming Gauchos slice and serve fire-roasted meats from skewers in a continual fashion. Ipanema Brazilian Steak House boasts 12 of the finest cuts of meat complemented by an opulent salad and vegetable bar, delectable desserts, and delicious wines, beers and cocktails. Brazilian native and Executive Chef Ortencia DeAlmeida invites you to embrace the flavors of her homeland and experience the magnetism of Ipanema for yourself. Become a fan of Ipanema on Facebook at facebook.com/ipanemasteakhouse. Great discounts online!

Dine with us in the most elegant and elaborate dining room in Ocala–for an experience to remember. Taste Brazil! Happy Hour Tues-Fri 5-7p, Wednesday nights Live Music with Gosia and Ali!

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Pasta Faire Italian Ristorante 10401 US Hwy 441, Belleview / (352) 347-3100 Mon-Sat 11a-10p / Sun 11a-9p “New”Zia Pasta Day. Thursdays-AUCE, four different pastas and sauces, with salad $7.99. Monday all you can eat rotisserie chicken with two sides just $7.99.

Welcome to Pasta Faire! Owner Kathy Funk invites you and your family to enjoy the unique flavors of Italy. Come relax and enjoy the fabulous menu items, such as Veal Marsala or Picatta, Homemade Lasagna, Seafood Lovers Delight. Gourmet wood oven pizza’s and authentic NY-Style pizzas. Happy Hour is every Monday through Saturday 11a-6p. Looking for an authentic Italian caterer? We offer full-service catering for any occasion and a catering facility in Belleview that can accommodate up to 150 guests. Home of 2-4-1 large pizzas everyday for take out. Gift certificates available!

Tony’s Sports Bar & Grill 2711 SW 27th Ave., Ocala / (352) 390-8188 Mon-Thu 4p-2a / Fri-Sun 11-2a Ask about our 1/2 off Happy Hour specials.

Tony’s Sports Bar & Grill is the place for hungry sports fans to go. With 32 high-definition televisions lining the walls, including a 133-inch and a 70-inch 3-D screen, airing every televised game, you won’t miss a minute of the action. A great menu and an incredible selection of 40 beers on draft means Tony’s can cater to any appetite. Not into the big game? Not a problem. With a pool table, dart boards and video games, patrons are sure to find plenty of entertainment. Visit Tony’s Sports Bar & Grill and Tony’s Sushi within 48 hours and receive a free domestic beer when you show the receipt.

Ker’s WingHouse Bar & Grill 2145 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala / (352) 671-7880 Sun 11a-Midnight / Fri-Sat 11a-1a winghouse.com Daily lunch specials are offered Monday-Friday, 11a-4p. Happy Hour 4p-8p & 10p-close.

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If you’re looking for a fun, casual environment to enjoy the next big game or fight, look no further! Ker’s Winghouse Bar & Grill is it! A full liquor bar, 12 draft and bottled beers, 25 televisions, not to mention a 110-inch monster TV, and a menu that will leave you wanting more. Try their famous “Naked” Chicken Wings. These skinless drumettes are marinated, baked and tossed in your choice of award-winning sauces. Catch all PPV & UFC events throughout the year and you won’t miss a second of the action at the Winghouse. But let’s face it, Ker’s Winghouse Girls may just be the biggest draw. Make Ker’s Winghouse Bar & Grill your new favorite hangout.


DININGGUIDE

Cody’s Original Roadhouse 2505 SW College Road, Ocala / (352) 237-8182 / codysamerican.com Doors Open at 11a. Serving Lunch and Dinner Daily. “Where Quality and Value Come Together!” Hand-cut, USDA Choice, certified Angus steaks, rotisserie chicken, BBQ baby back ribs, chops, fresh fish, half-pound burgers, salads and more! Kids eat free Mondays and Tuesdays. buy-1-get-1-free Fajita Wednesdays, $11.98; Steak-Out Thursday with steak specials starting at $9.98! Daily 2-4-1 happy hour, 11a-7p, includes draft beer, wine and all liquors (top shelf, too). Lunch from 11a-3p, and early bird from 3p-6p MondaySaturday. Sunday after-church specials starting at $8.99 with free dessert. Hand-cut steaks and “Just Plain Good Food” made from scratch...daily! St. Patty’s Day Special: Corned Beef & Cabbage with Irish Potatoes & Carrots only $13.98, while it lasts!

Take-Out Service Available. Locations also in Gainesville at 3100 SW Archer Road and The Villages at 1041 Lakeshore Drive at Lake Sumter Landing, and our new location in Tallahassee.

Pavarotti’s Pizza & Restaurant 8075 SW HWY 200, Canopy Oak Center, Ocala / (352) 291-9424 Mon-Thu 11a-9p / Fri-Sat 11a-10p / Sun 11a-8p Pavarotti’s Pizza and Restaurant in Dunnellon is known for their famous, old-fashioned pizzas, hand-tossed and baked on a stone deck oven as well as their array of classic Italian entrées, fresh salads and subs and hearty pasta dinners. Their newest location in the Canopy Oak Center means Ocala residents can now enjoy Pavarotti’s famous fare. Veal or chicken is served Parmigiana, Marsala or Picatta style, and the seafood dishes are served fresh over linguini. Pizza lovers can’t get enough of the homemade pies, and don’t forget about the subs, stromboli and calzones!

Be sure to check out the new bar area and expanded dining room. Pavarotti’s also caters.

PAVAROTTI’S Pizza & Restaurant

Crossroads Country Kitchen 7947 W Highway 40, Ocala / (352) 237-1250 Mon-Thu 6a-8p / Fri-Sat 6a-9p / Sun 7a-3p Located west on Highway 40 in Ocala, the Crossroads Country Kitchen is a must for anyone craving down-home, country cooking. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, menu items range from a wide variety of homemade soups and chili to prime rib, fresh salads, seafood, prime steaks and burgers. If you’re in the mood for a real treat, try the Prime Rib Dinner For Two for $25.95. Make sure to leave room for one of the tasty home-baked desserts, too! In the mood for a fresh fish fry? Tuesdays and Fridays are all-you-care-to-eat catfish. Big screen televisions will allow you to enjoy your meal without missing one second of the big game or race.

Located at the crossroads of NW 80th Ave. and Hwy 40 West. No matter what you have a taste for, Crossroads Country Kitchen is sure to become a new favorite. Former owners of The Spiced Apple restaurant in Ft. Lauderdale

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Fat Tire Fun

Golfer © Lichtmeister / shutterstock.com; Golf Course photo by Nile Young

GMO OMG! p68

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The Fat Tire Festival is one of the largest cycling events in the Southeast p66

Spectacular Spring Festivals p70

Ocala’s Concert Series Kick-off p72

The Social Scene p76

and more!

GET OUT AND

GOLF! I

Apr

3-6

F YOU HAVEN’T YET VISITED THE TOP-RANKED GOLF COURSE AT THE OCALA NATIONAL GOLF CLUB, FORMERLY GOLDEN HILLS GOLF AND COUNTRY CLUB, NOW IS THE TIME. COMING UP THE FIRST WEEK OF APRIL, THE NGA TOUR WILL HEAD TO OCALA TO PLAY A 72-HOLE CHAMPIONSHIP ROUND FOR WHAT IS CONSIDERED ONE OF THE TOUR’S TOP STOPS. The one-of-a-kind course winds through majestic, century-old oak trees and challenges golfers with dramatic slopes, challenging bunkers and fantastic vistas. Once only open to members, the Ocala National Golf Club now welcomes the general public to experience one of the most beautiful and challenging courses around.

WANT TO GO?

For more NGA Tour information, visit ngatour.com or contact the Ocala National Golf Club at ocalanational.com or (352) 629-7981.

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FUN WITH FAT TIRES One of the biggest bicycling events in the Southeast will be taking place at the Santos Trailhead in Ocala. Cyclists from all over the country will come bearing bikes for the annual FAT TIRE FESTIVAL weekend. The event features a top cycling competition and over 40 cyclingrelated vendors showcasing the latest and greatest components of the bicycling world. Watch as these athletes maneuver the trails on two wheels; then stay for the food, fun and entertainment. omba.org or (352) 804-7204. Mar

8

GRAB A BOWLFUL Save your appetite, the 5TH ANNUAL CHAMBER CHILI COOK-OFF will take place once again at City Hall Park in Belleview from 11am-4pm. For the chili-lover, there will be plenty to sample, as the best cooks will battle it out head to head to see if they have what it takes to bring home the grand prize. The event will include plenty of vendors, arts and crafts displays, a car show, petting zoo and kiddie area. Admission is only $1, and with chili tastings costing only 50 cents, you can get your fill without breaking the bank. (352) 245-2178.

DOO-WOP FOR THE DOGS! Have A Heart for 8 Companion Animals invites you to dust off your saddle shoes for a night of doo-wop dancing to benefit man’s best friend. The annual JOHNNY MELLO Mar

SHOW DANCE AND FUNDRAISER

will take place at the Spruce Creek South Community Center and will feature a full lineup of 50s- and 60s-inspired performances. There will also be door prizes and drawings for cash prizes. Tickets are $15 and include a hotdog or hamburger, chips and a drink. The event is BYOB, and doors open at 5pm. Attendees are asked to bring a bag of dry dog or cat food. haveaheart.us or (352) 687-1776.

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20-23

HORSE POWER! One of Ocala’s premier equine events returns again this year to the pristine grounds of Live Oak Plantation in Ocala. This first-rate combined driving event features three days of driving competition, plus the ever-popular and always exciting hazards event. There will also be an exclusive World Cup qualifying show jumping competition featuring some of the top horse and rider teams in the country. Bring the whole family to dine, shop, tailgate and meet the famous Budweiser Clydesdales who will be making an appearance. The competition begins at 9am each morning and runs through the late afternoon. General admission is $10 for adults and $5 for children and seniors. liveoakinternational.com or (352) 207-3615.

Mar

21-22

RIDE ‘EM COWBOY It’s time for some rough ridin’ as the SOUTHEASTERN PRO RODEO returns to the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion for two days of non-stop cowboy action. This exciting event features top ropers, riders, broncos and bulls all vying for top prizes. Admission is $14 in advance or $16 at the gate. Doors open at 5:30pm, and the action begins at 7:30, rain or shine. ocalarodeo.com or (352) 843-1616.

TANTALIZE YOUR TASTEBUDS Foodies get ready! The annual TASTE OF OCALA is slated for April 5th this year and boasts an impressive lineup of the best of Ocala’s culinary talent. Now in its 26th year, this annual scholarship fundraising event will take place at the College of Central Florida Ocala Campus and feature samplings from Ocala’s finest restaurants, live music, entertainment and more. The black tie-optional event will run from 6:30-10pm, and tickets are $100 per person or $150 per couple. tasteofocala.org or (352) 873-5808. Apr

5


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THELOCALSCENE

A QUICK

Q& A JEREMY SEIFERT & DR. DAVID KUHN

GMO

OMG!

Dr. David Kuhn

IN T ER VIEW B Y BONNIE KRETCHIK

T

HE MARION THEATRE WILL HOST AN ENTERTAINING AND EDUCATIONAL EVENING FEATURING THE SCREENING OF THE INDIE DOCUMENTARY GMO OMG. THE EVENT WILL INCLUDE RAFFLES, PRIZES AND ENTERTAINMENT BUT WILL ALSO AIM TO EDUCATE THE PUBLIC ON GENETICALLY MODIFIED FOOD AND ITS EFFECTS ON HUMAN HEALTH. WE SAT DOWN WITH AWARD-WINNING HEALTH CONSULTANT AND WRITER DR. DAVID KUHN AND FILMMAKER JEREMY SEIFERT, BOTH OF WHOM WILL BE AT THE EVENT, TO DISCUSS WHY THE TIME IS RIGHT FOR THIS DOCUMENTARY TO PREMIER IN OCALA. For those who may not be aware, what are GMOs?

JS: GMO, or genetically modified organism,

is the common term for engineered crops. In short, scientists are able to take a gene from one organism and insert it into the DNA of another organism. Over 90 percent of corn, soybeans, canola, cotton and sugar beet crops are MG genetically modified in the GMO O United States. GMOs can be found in up to 80 percent of processed foods and are behind most of the meat and dairy in this country that isn’t organic. DK: There is mounting scientific evidence that GMOs are a legitimate health A film by

Jerem

y Seifer

t

t us: Contac .com mofilm info@g

GMO OMG SCREENING

Jeremy Seifert

concern. Since the introduction of GMOs in the mid-1990s, we have seen a significant increase in food allergies, autism, digestive problems, asthma and chronic illnesses.

Tell us a little about the documentary.

JS: I started this documentary almost three

years ago, and we had the world premiere at the Berlin International Film Festival. The film brought me to Haiti, Norway and France but mostly all through the United States to many “conventional” and organic farms, seed banks and the halls of power in Washington.

Tell us about your event in Ocala.

DK: I’m honored to be the host of Central Florida’s premier screening of Jeremy’s film. The event is designed to bring awareness to a significant public health issue while supporting downtown Ocala’s cultural revival. Attendees will enjoy a red carpet-style reception with media coverage, photos and paparazzi, prize giveaways and an audience Q&A with Jeremy and I after the film. What do you hope people will take from this experience?

JS: We all have to reconcile our daily living and

eating with this fact from Wendell Berry: “How we eat determines, to a considerable extent, how the world is used.” DK: What Jeremy describes is a model for cultural and environmental sustainability. The realization of his vision begins with public awareness. I hope this exciting event will bring crucial information about our food to the citizens of this great community.

MARION THEATRE / March 7 Admission and seating is donation based

AFTER THE FILM: Prize giveaway, Q&A session,

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS:

To see the film trailer, visit: gmofilm.com/official-trailer.aspx

7:15pm: Red carpet reception 8pm: Film screening

after party at Pi on Broadway

For donation and ticket information, visit mariontheatre.org or (352) 629-6300.

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UPCOMING EXHIBITS AT THE APPLETON (ONGOING) The Appleton will host the work of children’s book illustrator R. Gregory Christie through April 27. The Gathering of Legends exhibit will feature an Irish linen tablecloth with over 700 autographs through May 4. [In]justice: Art and Atrocity in the 20th Century will feature works by 20th century artists and will be on display through May 11. Canstruction Ocala is a creative design and build competition featuring sculptures created entirely out of canned goods, which will ultimately be donated. The exhibit will be on display through March 9. Very Special Arts is a collection of children’s art that will run through March 23. Industrial Nature: Work by Michelle Stitzlein features a collection of moths created from recycled materials and will be on display through July 6. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455. CALLING ALL ARTISTS (THROUGH MARCH 9) A juried and judged art show will take place on March 30 and is currently accepting submissions. The show, Heaven and Earth, presents works based on two of Earth’s elements, air and earth. Submissions can focus on one or both elements. The deadline for submissions is March 9 with the show being presented on March 30 at Interstate Commerce Center in Ocala. lisa-russo-art.com or (352) 288-0207. OCALA ART GROUP EXHIBIT (THROUGH APRIL 30) The work of the Ocala Art Group will be on display through the end of April at Gateway Bank in Ocala. (352) 237-8161. FREE FALL TENNIS PLAY DAYS (THROUGH MAY) On the last Saturday of each month, the Ft. King Tennis Center will host free Continued on page 70


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THELOCALSCENE / Cont’d. THELOCAL play for kids 10 and under from noon-1pm at Tuscawilla Park. (352) 598-0353.

HAS SPRUNG!

Artful Events In The Villages

S

PRING IS IN THE AIR, AND THIS CHANGE OF SEASONS BRINGS WITH IT A WHOLE SLEW OF FUN FAMILY FESTIVALS. WHETHER YOU ARE A FOODIE, CAN’T GET ENOUGH CRAFTS OR WANT TO JAZZ IT UP A BIT, WE’VE HIGHLIGHTED SOME OF THIS SEASON’S TOP FESTIVALS.

Florida Strawberry Festival (THROUGH MARCH 9) Plant City hosts this annual festival that celebrates spring in Florida with plenty of family fun. flstrawberryfestival.com or (813) 752-9194.

Epcot International Flower and Garden Festival (MARCH 5-MAY 18) This Disney tradition includes hundreds of topiaries, demonstrations, outdoor dining, concerts and more. disneyworld.disney.go.com or (407) 939-6244.

Winter Park Sidewalk Art Festival (MARCH 21-23) Voted America’s Top Art Fair in 2013, this premier event hosts top artists from around the country. wpsaf.org or (407) 644-7207.

music and BBQ all day long.

reddickbbqfestival.com or (352) 258-4604.

Springing The Blues Music Festival (APRIL 4-6) Held in Jacksonville and dubbed the largest free music festival in Florida, this event features some of the top names in blues music and is voted one of the top 50 music festivals in the world. springingtheblues.com.

Santa Fe College Spring Arts Festival (APRIL 5-6) Gainesville hosts this celebration of the arts that draws a crowd of approximately 130,000 visitors each year. springartsfestival.com or (352) 395-5355.

50th annual Cedar Key Fine Arts Festival

Lakeland Craft Festival

(APRIL 12-13) This weekend-long festival showcases (MARCH 29-30) A wide variety of handmade arts and award-winning artists, vendors, entertainment and the delicious crafts will be available for purchase. seafood the town is known for. Admission is free. artfestival.com or (561) 746-6615. cedarkeyartsfestival.com or (352) 543-5400.

Jazz on the Green (MARCH 29) This jazz festival/dance party includes great food, vendors and more. The event is held at Jumbolair Estates in Ocala. jazzonthegreenocala.com or (239) 246-5643.

Reddick BBQ Festival (MARCH 29) Over 3,000 attendees flock to the quiet town of Reddick each year. Enjoy live

Florida Blueberry Festival (APRIL 12-13) This annual festival, held in Brooksville, features arts and crafts, live entertainment, vendors and, of course, plenty of blueberry-inspired treats. floridablueberryfestival.org or (352) 754-4173.

(APRIL 19-20, MAY 3-4) The Villages Craft Festival in Brownwood Paddock Square celebrates its 18th year this April, while the fifth annual Craft Festival takes place in La Plaza Grande in May. (561) 746-6615.

Florida Music Festival (APRIL 24-26) Over 200 bands and 25,000 attendees make this Orlando festival a must-see for music fans. floridamusicfestival.com.

Florida Folk Festival (MAY 23-25) Held at Stephen Foster Folk Culture Center State Park, this event celebrates Florida’s heritage with food, dance, music and more. floridastateparks.org or (877) 635-3655.

Blue Crab Festival (MAY 23-26) A favorite for seafood lovers, this annual Palatka festival features a seafood cook-off, parade, entertainment, vendors and more. bluecrabfestival.com or (386) 329-0100.

Zellwood Sweet Corn Festival (MAY 24-26) This family-friendly festival returns in 2014 with plenty of country music, vendors, activities and plenty of corn!

zellwoodcornfestival.com or (407) 886-0014.

Chiefland Watermelon Festival (JUNE 7) This annual event features arts and crafts, vendors, melons and more. chieflandchamber.com or (352) 493-1849.

KAYAKING (ONGOING) There will be several kayaking opportunities available throughout the month for all experience levels. marioncountyfl.org or (352) 671-8560. DISCOVERY CENTER EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS (ONGOING) The Discovery Center’s children’s programs combine fun with learning. Several programs are available for children of all ages. mydiscoverycenter.org or (352) 401-3900. GALLERY AT EGGS OVER BASELINE (ONGOING) Eggs Over Baseline will host a gallery event featuring the works of local artists. There will also be an all-day cruise-in the fourth Friday of each month. (352) 351-3447. MOTORCYCLE GIVEAWAY TICKETS ON SALE (THROUGH MAY) The annual Hog For Hope Bikes, Brews and BBQ will raffle off a 2014 Harley-Davidson StreetGlide motorcycle. Tickets are on sale now for $100 each, and the winner will be announced during the May event. hogforhope.com or (352) 351-2479. STRAWBERRY FAMILY FESTIVAL (MARCH 1) The Habitat for Humanity Strawberry Family Festival on the Ocala downtown square will feature plenty of food, fun and entertainment for the entire family. The festival runs 8am-5pm. habitatstrawberryfamilyfest.com

or (352) 351-3081. FIRST SATURDAY ART PROGRAM (MARCH 1) The Appleton Museum will host a children’s program from 1-3pm. The Continued on page 72

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*At Del Webb communities, at least one resident must be 55 years of age or older, no one under 19 (18 in certain communities) in permanent residence, and additional restrictions apply. Some residents may be younger than 55. Offer valid on new purchase agreements accepted by Del Webb from 2/1/14 until 12/31/14. At closing of home purchase, buyer will receive a certificate for 50 free rounds of golf at the Stone Creek Golf Club. Golf cart fee not included which includes a $10/cart fee. No golf cart fee for residents who own their own cart. If certificate is not redeemed within three years of closing, certificate will expire and have no value. Certificate may not be redeemed for cash and has no other value. Buyer is responsible for any taxes. See a sales associate for complete details of the offer. This incentive may affect the amount of loan for which a buyer may be eligible, check with your lender for details. Offer is subject to change or withdrawal without prior notice or obligation and may not be available in conjunction with other offers, incentives, or promotions. This material shall not constitute a valid offer in any state where prior registration is required or if void by law. Some conditions, limitations, and restrictions apply. Certificate for free rounds are not transferrable and are intended for use by Purchaser(s) of qualifying home in Stone Creek, as shown on Purchase Agreement. All fees, prices, programs and discounts described herein are valid on new purchase agreements from 2/1/14 until 12/31/14, while supplies last. Offer is subject to change in future, with or without prior notification. CGC1519936. ©2014 Pulte Home Corporation. All rights reserved

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CONCERTS

program is free for members and included in admission for non-members. appleongmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455.

TICKETMASTER | (800) 745-3000 | TICKETMASTER.COM

ALL DATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. PLEASE CALL AHEAD TO CONFIRM VENUE LISTINGS.

WHO

WHERE

WHEN

PENSACOLA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Pensacola Saenger Theatre

3/01

TONIC & VERTICAL HORIZON

House of Blues, Orlando

3/01

NAPPY ROOTS

Sports Page Live, Satellite Beach

3/07

BEGINNINGS: THE ULTIMATE CHICAGO TRIBUTE BAND

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

3/08

2014 FEEL DOWNTOWN LIVE

Downtown Ocala

3/8 & 3/29

CONCERT SEASON HAS BEGUN! Spring is officially in the air, and with the change of temperature comes the SPRING 2014 FEEL DOWNTOWN LIVE concert season. First up is Eddie Money bringing his unique rock and roll style to Ocala’s downtown venue. He’ll be followed by the alternative rock group Sister Hazel on March 29. Originally from Gainesville, Florida, these chart-topping artists return to their roots to wow the Ocala crowd. The concert kicks off at 6pm, and general admission is $10 and free for kids under 10. VIP seating is $30 and includes one free drink and light hors d’oeuvres from Mojo Grill and Catering Company. For a complete concert schedule, visit feeldowntownlive.com or call (352) 401-3980.

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MICHAEL BOLTON

Florida Theatre, Jacksonville

3/14

JASON ALDEAN

Amphitheatre at The Wharf, Orange Beach

3/15

PAUL SIMON & STING

Amway Center, Orlando

3/16

RACHEL BARTON PINE

University Auditorium, Gainesville

3/16

MILEY CYRUS: BANGERZ TOUR

Amway Center, Orlando

3/24

PENTATONIX

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

3/25

TURNSTILES: THE ULTIMATE TRIBUTE TO BILLY JOEL

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

3/29

BADFISH: A TRIBUTE TO SUBLIME

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

3/30

AMERICA

Circle Square Cultural Center, Ocala

4/04

UCF JAZZ BAND

The Abbey, Orlando

4/06

SONGS FOR A NEW WORLD

CF Dassance Fine Arts Center, Ocala

4/11-13

WJRR EARTHDAY BIRTHDAY

Central Florida Fairgrounds, Orlando

4/12

DARIUS RUCKER

CFE Arena, Orlando

4/24

JOHNNY ROGERS

Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

4/26

MAR’14

ocalastyle.com

SILVER SPRINGS LECTURE SERIES (MARCH 1) Silver Springs State Park will host Biologist Tom Morris for a lecture focusing on the Floridan Aquifer at 3pm. floridastateparks.org or (352) 236-7148. OCALA OUTDOOR ROUNDUP (MARCH 1) The Ocala Outdoor Roundup will take place on the football field of Trinity Catholic High School and feature a sportsman’s expo, demonstrations and displays of fly-casting, archery, ATVs and outdoor gear. Dinner will be served and will be accompanied by dancing, auctions and raffles. Proceeds benefit Brother’s Keeper. (352) 502-2510. OCALA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (MARCH 1, 2) Heroes: Bond and Beyond will feature music from the James Bond franchise as well as a performance by the winners of the Young Artists’ Competition. Performances will be held at 7pm on March 1 and 3:30pm on March 2 at the Ocala Breeders’ Sales Auditorium. ocalasymphony.com or (352) 351-1606. OSCAR VIEWING PARTY (MARCH 2) The Marion Theatre will host an Oscar viewing event that will begin with a red carpet street party from 6:30-8pm, followed by the awards show presentation in the theater. Tickets are $15 per person or $25 per couple. feeldowntownocala.com or (352) 629-6600. CHARITY GOLF TOURNAMENT (MARCH 3) The Kids Central Open Golf Tournament will take place at the Golden Ocala Golf and Equestrian Club. Players can either register a foursome or raise funds for the opportunity to play

for free. The tournament benefits Kids Central. kidscentralinc.org or (352) 387-3474. MURDER MYSTERY DINNER (MARCH 4) The Seven Sisters Inn will host a murder mystery dinner featuring a four-course dinner. The event begins at 6pm, and dinner is served at 7:30pm. Tickets are $65 per person. sevensistersinn.org or (352) 433-0700. FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK (MARCH 7) Hit the streets of downtown Ocala from 6-9pm to see artist displays, indoor and outdoor vendors, restaurants and much more. (352) 401-3900. ST. PATTY’S DAY 5K (MARCH 8) The fourth annual St. Patty’s Day 5K will take place in downtown Ocala. There will also be a costume contest and awards. The race begins at 8am. uwmc.org or (352) 732-9696. BENEFIT TRAIL RIDE (MARCH 8) The Sun Country Trail Blazers Poker Ride will take place at the Shangri-La trailhead. The event will feature a trail ride, raffles, prizes and poker. The ride kicks off at 8:30am. (352) 245-2837 or (352) 362-9527. ART SHOW (MARCH 8-9) Artists from Gallery East, the Florida Artists Gallery and the Ocala Art Group will come together for a fundraising art show at Rainbow Springs State Park. The show runs 9am-4pm. (352) 245-2781 or (352) 789-5239. INSOMNIAC THEATRE AUDITIONS (MARCH 8, 9) The Insomniac Theatre will host open auditions for their upcoming performances of The Vagina Monologues. The performances will be held at the Brick City Center for the Arts March 21-23. insomniactheatre.com or (352) 897-0477. Continued on page 74


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PERFORMING ARTS WHO

WHERE

WHEN

WAR HORSE

Bob Carr Performing Arts Center, Orlando

2/25-3/02

DISNEY JUNIOR LIVE ON TOUR!

Tampa Bay Times Forum

3/01-02

UNCORKED!

The Abbey, Orlando

3/04

TAKE ME HOME: THE MUSIC OF JOHN DENVER

Citrus Learning and Conference Center, Lecanto

3/09

RON WHITE

Times Union Center for Performing Arts, Jacksonville

3/14

DISNEY’S BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

Pensacola Saenger Theatre

3/14

JULIUS CAESAR

Orlando Shakespeare Theatre

3/19-4/20

ON GOLDEN POND

Art Center of Citrus County, Hernando

3/21-4/06

PBR TOURING PRO DIVISION

Tampa Bay Times Forum

3/22

PEKING ACROBATS

Phillips Center for Performing Arts, Gainesville

3/23

EVITA

Bob Carr Performing Arts Center, Orlando

3/25-30

NOISES OFF!

Gainesville Community Playhouse

3/27-4/13

OVER THE RIVER AND THROUGH THE WOODS

IceHouse Theatre, Mount Dora

3/28-4/20

BEYOND THERAPY

CF Dassance Fine Arts Center, Ocala

4/02-4/06

AN EVENING WITH GROUCHO

CF Dassance Fine Arts Center, Ocala

4/06-4/07

MIKE EPPS: AFTER DARK TOUR

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

4/12

GALA OF THE ROYAL HORSES

Tampa Bay Times Forum

4/13

THE RED SILK THREAD

Phillips Center for Performing Arts, Gainesville

4/17-19

98ROCKFEST

Tampa Bay Times Forum

4/25

YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN

Mary McLeod Bethune Performing Arts Center, Daytona Beach

4/25-29

CF DANCE ENSEMBLE

CF Dassance Fine Arts Center, Ocala

5/01

THE ADDAMS FAMILY

The Peabody, Daytona Beach

5/03

GHOST: THE MUSICAL

Bob Carr Performing Arts Center, Orlando

5/13-18

THELOCALSCENE / Continued from page 72 CIVIL WAR RE-ENACTMENT (MARCH 8-9) The Nature Coast Civil War Reenactment Committee will host a Civil War reenactment at the Kirby Family Farm in Williston, featuring a full-sized historic locomotive, food vendors and infantry cavalry battles. naturecoastcivilwarreenactment.com.

TRIPS ‘N’ TOURS (MARCH 12, 29) On March 12, The Appleton’s Trips ’N’ Tours program will head to Tampa Bay for a day at the races. Price is $65 for members and $75 for non-members. On March 29, they will head to the Dali Museum of Art in St. Petersburg. Price is $85 for members and $95 for non-members. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455. BRIDAL SHOW (MARCH 13) Beautiful Moments Party Rental will host a bridal show to benefit the United Way of Marion County. Admission is $10, and the show runs from 5-9pm. uwmc.org or (352) 307-8180. MARLIN BROTHERS CONCERT (MARCH 14) Village View Community Church will host the Marlin Brothers for a live concert. The concert begins at 7pm; a $10 donation is requested. (352) 307-7303. SCRAPBOOK FOR BREAST CANCER (MARCH 14-15) The 8th annual Scrapbook for Breast Cancer two-day event will take place at the Marion County Extension Auditorium from 6-11pm on Friday and 8am-4pm on Saturday. Food will be available as well as demos and vendors. Admission is $30 in advance or $35 at the door. Proceeds benefit Making Strides Against Breast Cancer. (352) 732-5982. CHARITY BIKE RIDE (MARCH 15) We Bike For Kids charity bike ride will take place at

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the SeaBreeze Recreation Center in The Villages. There will be a 62-, 30- or 10-mile option. The event proceeds benefit Project Legacy and the Sumter County Youth Center. webikeforkids.com or (352) 430-2189. BLESSED TRINITY RED AND WHITE DINNER AUCTION (MARCH 15) The annual Blessed Trinity Red and White Dinner Auction will take place at the Ocala National Golf Club beginning at 6:30pm. The evening will feature dinner and both a live and silent auction. (352) 622-5808. SEEKING TALENTED TEENS (MARCH 15) The Marion Civic Chorale is looking to reward a student with a $500 scholarship. The scholarship is awarded to a high school or community college student who intends to further their education in the music field. The winner will perform with the chorale in May. Application due to the Marion Civic Chorale by March 15. marioncivicchorale.tripod.com

or (352) 812-0666. MUSEUM PRESENTATION (MARCH 16) The Marion County Museum of History and Archeology will host a presentation entitled “Ma Barker and the Shootout at Oklawaha” at 2pm. Admission is free for museum members and $5 for guests. (352) 236-5245 or (352) 236-2790. SOUNDART (MARCH 16) The finale of the SoundArt series at the Appleton Museum will feature four of the Ocala Symphony’s feature players. The program begins at 3pm, and admission is $15. ocalasymphony.com or (352) 351-1606. SPRING BREAK CAMP (MARCH 24-28) The Appleton will host a spring break camp for children ages 7-12. The program runs 10am12:30pm daily. Cost is $25 for


SPORTS PLAN AHEAD FOR THE NEXT BIG GAME. HOME SCHEDULES

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6:00p 2:00p

UNIVERSITY OF CENTRAL FLORIDA Mar. 7

Houston

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ORLANDO MAGIC Mar. 2 Mar. 5 Mar. 12 Mar. 14 Mar. 25 Mar. 28 Mar. 30 Apr. 2 Apr. 5 Apr. 9 Apr. 11 Apr. 16

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6:00p 7:00p 7:00p 7:00p 7:00p 7:00p 6:00p 7:00p 7:00p 7:00p 7:00p 8:00p

Mar. 1 Mar. 3 Mar. 10 Mar. 12 Mar. 14 Mar. 16 Mar. 21 Mar. 24 Mar. 31 Apr. 2 Apr. 4 Apr. 6 Apr. 8 Apr. 11 Apr. 16

Orlando Charlotte Washington Brooklyn Denver Houston Memphis Portland Toronto Milwaukee Minnesota New York Brooklyn Indiana Philadelphia

7:30p 7:30p 7:30p 7:00p 7:30p 3:30p 7:30p 7:30p 7:30p 7:30p 7:30p 1:00p 8:00p 7:30p 8:00p

the day or $90 for the week for members and $30 for the day or $125 for the week for non-members. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455.

at 5pm; music begins at 5:30. The event is free for members and $10 for non-members. appleongmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455.

“FOOD FOR THOUGHT” (MARCH 25) Our Redeemer Lutheran Church will host a luncheon at 11:30am featuring guest speaker Dr. Amruth Bapatla, who will be discussing sleep disorders. RSVP required. (352) 368-4028.

3RD ANNUAL EARLY CHILDHOOD FESTIVAL (APRIL 5) Celebrate children at the CF Learning School Lab at the College of Central Florida campus through dance, song, dress-up, exploration, music, art, face painting and prizes. The event is free and open to the public. 9:30am-1pm. (352) 854-2322.

ROLLER DERBY (MARCH 30) The Ocala Cannibals will host a bout at Skate Mania. Admission is $8 in advance or $12 at the door. Doors open at 6pm; bout begins at 6:30pm. ocalacannibalderby.com. APPLETON AFTER HOURS (APRIL 3) The Appleton Museum will host an after-hours event featuring live music, tapas and presentations from the Ocala Art Group. Doors open

To have an event considered for Ocala Style Magazine’s The Scene Send a short description (and a color photo, if possible) 60 days in advance to: email: calendar@ocalastyle.com fax: (352) 732-0226 mail: Ocala Style Magazine The Scene, 1007 E. Fort King St., Ocala, FL 34471

ocalastyle.com MAR’14

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THESOCIALSCENE

Annual Medical Expo of North Central Florida

Rolando Sosa, Tina & Ravi Chandra, and Roland Sosa

INDIA ASSOCIATION CULTURAL CENTER

The 14th annual Medical Expo of North Central Florida was held in late January at the India Association Cultural and Educational Center. The event serves as a tradeshow and cultural festival for the area’s medical professionals. PHOTOS BY SHEILA HARTLEY

Anju Singh, Rayna Chandra and Archane Singh

Continued on page 78

Ketan Doshi and Rum Moorthy

Christina Mohammed, Shah Neha and Rama Balaraman Luis Carrascosa and Izu Nwakaby

Bala Krishnan, Vipul Patel, Jay & Sadrana Panchel

Suresh Patidar, Anil Gogineni and Prabhakar Rumalla Stew Licalzi and Mike Patel

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Nita, Ram & Anju Vasuderan Nira Colyn and Christopher Pead

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THESOCIALSCENE

Continued from page 76 Kimberly Scudder and Kit Peerboccus

Annual Medical Expo of North Central Florida

Nita Vasudevan, Aarsh Shah, Karen Joy Vinluan, Haseeb Khan and Soha Afzal

INDIA ASSOCIATION CULTURAL CENTER

The 14th annual Medical Expo of North Central Florida was held in late January at the India Association Cultural and Educational Center. The event serves as a tradeshow and cultural festival for the area’s medical professionals.

Anuj Sharma, Hima Mikkilineni, Jay Panchal, Tina Chandra and Srisha Rao

PHOTOS BY SHEILA HARTLEY

Ron Shelley and Selena Fink

Dr. Sivakumaran and Lisa Ross Anju Vasudevan, Prbhakar Rumalla, Bala Krishnan snd Jay Panchal

Tony Chisolm, Dr. Suresh and Dr. Chandrasekhar Karen DeWeese

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MAR’14

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Dr. Gaudier, Vijay Mittal and Rakesh Prashad


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THESOCIALSCENE

Evening at Ipanema Giveaway Dinner

James & Susan Church Nancy & Lee Leffingwell

IPANEMA BRAZILIAN STEAKHOUSE

On January 13, Ocala Style Magazine’s 50 facebook contest winners and guests joined the Style team for the full Ipanema Brazilian Steakhouse dining experience. Thank you to manager Fabian Gomez and his amazing staff for a wonderful evening. PHOTOS BY RONALD W. WETHERINGTON

Stephanie Mzhickieno and Tangela Mayr

Continued on page 82

Andy & Karin Cushenbery

Angela & Louis Wild Lisa Hudson and Levi Bennett Kyle & Cara Domincio

Daniel & Melissa Peterson

Mathew & Jessica Capelli Brandon Siegfried and David Barnes

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Heather Schwerin and Bert Rivera

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THESOCIALSCENE

Continued from page 80

Evening at Ipanema Giveaway Dinner IPANEMA BRAZILIAN STEAKHOUSE

Felipe Fiorillo, Raphael Rivas and Juan Valladarez

Fabian Gomez and Ortencia de Almeida

On January 13, Ocala Style Magazine’s 50 facebook contest winners and guests joined the Style team for the full Ipanema Brazilian Steakhouse dining experience. Thank you to manager Fabian Gomez and his amazing staff for a wonderful evening.

Robbi Crim, Angela Green, Elanor & James Gilliam

PHOTOS BY RONALD W. WETHERINGTON

Kyle & Jodie Mowery, Jennifer & Russell Mollett

Bill Fry, Emily Wilson, Amanda & David Reeves Brian Austin and Landie James

Amanda & Tony Scacchi

Samantha Crawford, Samantha Jameson, Josh & Amanda Perry David & Lisa Gustafson Jim & Marian Wittemauer

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Judy Platt and Crystal Driggers Patricia Belair, Terry Ericksen, Lauri Pierce and Beth Griffee


Free Open House on April 3rd! OCALA FAMILY MEDICAL CENTER

OFMC AESTHETICS & LASER Deborah Scott, LPN, LE Dermatological Nurse - Esthetician Over 25 Years of Experience

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Ocala Style Magazine Mar'14  

Ocala Style Magazine. Real people. Real stories.

Ocala Style Magazine Mar'14  

Ocala Style Magazine. Real people. Real stories.