Page 1

AUG’16

Ocala

WHAT’S FOR DINNER? MEAL PLANNING MADE EASY | ARTIST’S LANE THE FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK RETURNS

TEACHER TALK TIPS & POINTERS FOR A SUCCESSFUL YEAR

HIGHER LEARNING FROM EMIT TO AICE, MARION’S HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM S


Considering Ocala?

GOLDEN ACRES For Sale or Lease

Majestic English Tudor Custom Estate with 6 bedrooms, 6 full baths plus 2 half baths sitting on 4.71 acres of beautifully landscaped and gated acres with English Gardens, playhouse and croquet court. Guest house is a tastefully appointed train caboose. You are practically in the city yet enjoy the feeling of spacious living.


COUNTRY CLUB OF OCALA

Exquisitely landscaped backyard complete with pool, spa, full summer kitchen with wet bar and various lounging areas. Beautiful 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath home features chef ’s kitchen open to gathering room with fireplace, dining room and library/den. Living room with 20’ ceilings with French doors leading to the covered brick lanai with fireplace and views of the 7th green and signature 8th green with scenic pond.

For this and other properties, visit JoanPletcher.com for information, videos and more choices. Due to the privacy and at the discretion of my clients, there are additional training centers, estates, and land available that are not advertised.

Joan Pletcher REALTOR ®

352.347.1777 | Cell: 352.266.9100 | 352.804.8989 | joanpletcher@aol.com


You Will Love Your New Smile! Chandra Smile Designs is a oneof-a-kind haven for your smile transformation. Your smile and oral health are very important. If you are thinking of enhancing your smile, you owe it to yourself to seek out the best. Beautiful results take an expertly trained dentist/artist. Dr. Chandra is uniquely qualified and has earned the highest level of achievement from the Las Vegas Institute for Advanced Dental Studies. Let

her change your life by transforming your smile. TINA CHANDRA, D.D.S. Cosmetic, Neuromuscular and Sleep Dentist, LVI Fellow

l!

cia e p S r e Summ Angie Lewis Zoom whitening by Dr. Tina Chandra

BEFORE

AFTER

0 0 1 e v $ a S ning White om ils! on Zo or det1a 3 st) f st u ll g u Ca(Through A

a beautiful smile begins here cosmetic veneers smile makeovers zoom! bleaching TMJ disorder

bite problems sleep apnea sedation dentistry botox + juvederm

(352) 861-1500 chandrasmiles.com


DON’T MISS OUT ON THE

SOUNDS OF LIFE

Monthly Payment Plan

Our Most Popular INVISIBLE SoundLens is Still Available...

On Sale Now Xino 20 Completely-In-Canal

995

$

(reg. $1,995)

Lifetime hearing aid care to all patients—established or not!

Trade In Those Old Hearing Aids for $500!*

DOCTOR

Owned & Operated You will be seen and cared for by Dr. Shon Murray, Au.D. Doctor of Audiology Over 15 Years Experience

Medicare Provider - All Insurances Accepted *on any Muse-series hearing aids

See Our Website For SPECIALS & Video Testimonials

352.732.EARS (3277) Laurel Run Professional Center 2100 SE 17th St., Suite 202, Ocala

www.HearingBalance.net


TS A E B Y D O B NO R PRICES! OU

2016 NISSAN

TITAN

“I SAID GOODBYE TO MY FORD AND SILVERADO 2500. THE NISSAN TITAN IS MORE MODERN THAN ANY TRUCK OUT THERE. THE TECHNOLOGY IS VERY UP TO DATE AND INCLUDES AN AWESOME SOUND SYSTEM. I LOVE THE TURBO BOOST! TOO MANY GREAT FEATURES TO LIST HERE, BUT I WON’T GO BACK TO A CHEVY OR DODGE!” —CUSTOMER REVIEW ON EDMUNDS.COM FROM ROBERTO ACEVEDO

“You cannot have a better buying experience!” “The New Leader in Customer Service”

—Ted Lindsay

Doing Business The Right Way, Every Day! Serving Our Community For Over 33 Years!

Sales Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-8pm, Sun 12pm-6pm | Service Hours: Mon-Fri 7:30am-6pm, Sat 8am-5pm 2060 SW College Rd, Ocala, FL 34471 | 352-622-4111 or Toll Free 800-342-3008

www.pearsonnissanofocala.com


COLON AND RECTAL SURGERY SPECIALIST BOARD CERTIFIED • Fifteen Years Experience

Specializing in Laparoscopic and Robotic Colon and Rectal Resections Laparoscopic and Robotic Colon Surgeries are proven to have faster recovery times with less pain. Small incisions allow for less chance of wound infection and a better cosmetic outcome.

Also providing treatment for Hemorrhoids, Anal Fissure, Anal Fistula, Fecal Incontinence, Rectal Prolapse, Rectocele and other rectal conditions. CHRISTIAN O. ORAEDU,

M.D., FACS, FASCRS, FRCS (Edin), FRCSI

Board Certified in Colon and Rectal Surgery by the American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery. Fellow of the American College of Surgeons Fellow of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons

Deerwood II 1830 SE 18th Ave, Suite #3 | Ocala

352.690.6000 w w w. o c a l a s u r g e r y. c o m


UKNEEQUE

Just like fingerprints, no two knees are the same. You deserve a knee procedure customized just for you. Mako™ partial knee replacement is the only truly patient-specific procedure, planned from a 3-D model of your knee and performed with proven, highly accurate Mako™ robotic-arm assisted surgery. Compared with manual Oxford® procedures, Mako™ partial knee replacement offers: • Less post-op pain from Day 1 up to 8 weeks 1 • Increased knee functionality at 3 months post-op1 • 9 times lower failure rate at 2 years2 Mako™ partial knee replacement is available at Ocala Regional Medical Center.

Contact Dr. Derek Farr today. Dr. Derek Farr

2640 SW 32nd Place, Ocala, FL 352-369-1099 | twinpalmortho.com

For more information on Mako™ robotic-arm assisted surgery or to reserve a seat at an upcoming educational seminar, please call 800-530-1188. Friday, Aug 26 at 2:30pm • Ocala Health Senior Wellness Community Center Thursday, Sept 8 at 2pm • Comfort Suites, The Villages Thursday, Oct 27 at 2pm • Comfort Suites, The Villages Thursday, Dec 1 at 2pm • Comfort Suites, The Villages

1. Blyth MJ, Smith J, Jones B, MacLean AD III, Anthony I, Rowe P. Does robotic surgical assistance improve the accuracy of implant placement in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty? AAOS 2013 Annual Meeting, March 19-23, 2013, Chicago, IL. 2. Roche MW, Coon T, Pearle AD, Dounchis J. Two year survivorship of robotically guided medial MCK onlay. 25th Annual Congress of ISTA, October 3-6, 2012, Sydney, Australia. Oxford ® is a registered trademark of Biomet, Inc. Individual results may vary. There are risks associated with any knee surgical procedure, including Mako™ partial knee replacement. Your doctor can explain these risks and help determine if Mako™ partial knee replacement is right for you. © 2013 MAKO Surgical Corp. 208820 r00 05/13


WE CARE

THIS MUCH

MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING RAO offers advanced high-field and open MRI technology to maximize detail for quicker discovery of disease and injury to bones, tendons, menisci and other musculoskeletal tissues. Quicker discovery can lead to better treatment, placing health and vitality back within reach.

RADIOLOGY ASSOCIATES OF OCALA, P.A.

(352) 671-4300 | www.RAOcala.com BOARD CERTIFIED, MUSCULOSKELETAL FELLOWSHIP TRAINED RADIOLOGISTS (left to right): John D. Boon, IV, MD • Ryan K. Tompkins, MD Edson G. Cortes, MD • Brian Cartwright, MD Not Pictured: D. Mark Allen, MD We are proudly contracted with a variety of insurances and file all claims with the exception of non-contracted HMO's. Please visit our website for a detailed list of who we are contracted with. Contracted insurances are subject to change.


kevin costner &

modern west LIVE IN CONCERT

SATURDAY,AUGUST 27,2016 • 7PM

Kevin Costner & Modern West’s show is a blend of the compositions of Costner & Modern West, “music from friends, some famous and some who probably should be”.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW $110-$140 VISIT CSCULTURALCENTER.COM

OR CALL 352-854-3670

TICKET OFFICE HOURS

Mon-Sat: 11 am - 2 pm Day of Show: 11 am - Showtime 8395 SW 80th Street, Ocala, FL 34481

Refreshments available for purchase at events. To arrange for handicap seats, call or visit the ticket office. *Online tickets subject to a convenience fee. ALL TICKET SALES FINAL. 11429-7/16


Contents AUGUST ’16

In This Issue

036 Making Meals Easier.

You’ve no doubt heard about meal planning, which is all the rage right now, but you may not be sure how—or if—it’s relevant for you. Chances are, it is. › By Cynthia McFarland

040 Get With The Program.

Area public high schools prepare students for postsecondary education and life in the workforce. › By Jim Gibson

AUG’16

Ocala

WHAT’S FOR DINNER? MEAL PLANNING MADE EASY | ARTIST’S LANE THE FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK RETURNS

TEACHER TALK TIPS & POINTERS FOR A SUCCESSFUL YEAR

HIGHER LEARNING FROM EMIT TO AICE, MARION’S HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM S

046 State Of The Classroom. We reached out to some of Marion County’s finest educators to tap into their experience, learn their approach and get their best advice for students at every grade level. › By Cynthia McFarland

056 Artist Tales.

Four local artists bring talent and inspiration to this year’s First Friday Art Walk. › By Cealia Athanason

AUG ’16 ›

09


Contents Continued

017

029

063

077

020

030

064

080

022

032

066

082

026

034

070

086

In Every Issue

017

077

THE BUZZ The real people, places and events that shape our community.

THE HIVE Dedicated to enriching the lives of local families.

029

063 T H E

DISH Our best recipes, restaurant news and culinary quick bites.

THE SCENE Your guide to what’s happening in and around Ocala.

By Cealia Athanason, Kevin Christian, Laurel Gillum, Bonnie Kretchik and Katie McPherson

By Laurel Gillum & Molly Norman

By Laurel Gillum & Molly Norman

By Grace Cali, Bonnie Kretchik and Katie McPherson

018 O N T H E S Q U A R E Ocala Main Street is back in business. 020 A R O U N D T O W N A Pokémon Go primer. 022 G O I N G P L A C E S Plan a visit to discover Florida’s caves. 024 G R E A T O U T D O O R S Engineers at UF are making homes safer during hurricane season. 026 C L A S S A C T S Find out what’s new for the 2016-17 school year.

010

› Ocala

.com

030 G A D G E T S & G I Z M O S Homeworks helpers every parent needs.

064 B O N K E R S F O R B E N T O S There’s a new lunchbox in town.

082 A Q U I C K Q & A US 102.3 has new music for your ears.

032 P A R E N T I N G P O I N T E R S Start a chore routine for your family.

066 G O T J U I C E ? On-the-go juices to stay healthy.

086 L E T ’ S K I C K O F F A fall football preview.

034 S N A P S H O T S Having fun, making memories.

067 D I N I N G G U I D E What’s on your menu for tonight?

088 T H E S O C I A L S C E N E Photos from our area’s most popular events.

070 D R I N K U P ! When plain water just won’t cut it.


Sin ce 1

91 9

PIN US ON


We are proud to welcome Bill Hollister to our hometown banking team!

Vice President, Commercial Lender Bill.Hollister@MyCitizensFirst.com NMLS # 1461782

1050 Lake Sumter Landing The Villages

352-259-3247 www.MyCitizensFirst.com

NMLS # 469329

• TILE • WOOD • LAMINATE • VINYL • CARPET • GLASS • MOSAICS • TRAVERTINE • MARBLE • BACKSPLASHES • BATHROOMS • MURALS

352-368-2838

2400 NW 10th St. (HWY 27), Ocala

Serving Marion County and surrounding counties for over thirty years 012

› Ocala

.com

www.italiantileimports.com MON-FRI 7:30a-5:00p | SAT 8:00a-12:00p


Ocala Magazine PUBLISHER

Kathy Johnson kathy@ocalastyle.com

OFFICE/PRODUCTION MANAGER

Cynthia Brown

cynthia@ocalastyle.com Editorial EXECUTIVE EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR

Karin Fabry-Cushenbery Melissa Peterson

karin@ocalastyle.com melissa@ocalastyle.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Katie McPherson Cealia Athanason

katie@ocalastyle.com cealia@ocalastyle.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Brett Ballantini Kevin Christian Jim Gibson Laurel Gillum

JoAnn Guidry Bonnie Kretchik Cynthia McFarland Judge Steven Rogers

EDITORIAL INTERNS

Grace Cali Molly Norman Art

CREATIVE DIRECTOR ART DIRECTOR

Jason Fugate Jessi Miller Castro

jason@ocalastyle.com jessi@ocalastyle.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNER SOCIAL SCENE EDITOR

Christina Geiger Ronald W. Wetherington ronald@ocalastyle.com

PHOTOGRAPHERS

Sheila Hartley

sheila@ocalastyle.com

John Jernigan

jernigan@ocalastyle.com

Crys Williams fotolia.com Sales

DIRECTOR OF SALES

Dean Johnson

deanjohnson@ocalastyle.com SALES MANAGER

Sharon Morgan

sharon@ocalastyle.com SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Lori Tani

lori@ocalastyle.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Dawn Anderson

dawn@ocalastyle.com

Liza Fritz

liza@ocalastyle.com

Skip Linderman

skip@ocalastyle.com

Peggy Sue Munday

peggysue@healthylivingmagazines.com

Cecilia Sarco

cecilia@ocalastyle.com

Tammy Walters

tammy@healthylivingmagazines.com DISTRIBUTION

Dave Adams

dave@ocalastyle.com

Debra McQueen Rick Shaw

OCALA PUBLICATIONS, INC.

o: 352.732.0073 › f: 352.732.0226 1007 E. Fort King St., Ocala, FL 34731 ocalastyle.com OCALA STYLE MAGAZINE / AUGUST 2016 / VOL. 18, NO. 8

Published monthly by Ocala Publications, Inc. All contents © 2016 by Ocala Publications Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. For back issues or advertising information, call (352) 732-0073. Return postage must accompany all unsolicited manuscripts and artwork if they are to be returned. Manuscripts are welcomed, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. “Promotional” and “Promotional Feature” denote a paid advertising feature. Publisher is not responsible for claims and content of advertisements. OCALA / MARION COUNTY

FONTS

OCALA / MARION COUNTY

CHAMBER & ECONOMIC PARTNERSHIP

OCALA / MARION COUNTY

CHAMBER & ECONOMIC PARTNERSHIP OCALA / MARION COUNTY

CHAMBER & ECONOMIC PARTNERSHIP

TAGLINE & ARROW

OcalaPublications

GREYSCALE LOGOS

CHAMBER & ECONOMIC PARTNERSHIP

MOVING FORWARD MOVING FORWARD MOVING FORWARD MOVING FORWARD

MAIN FONT:

TRADE GOTHIC BOLD (Kerning 50pt) TAGLINE FONT:

TRADE LIGHT OBLIQUE (Kerning 50pt)

AUG ’16 ›

013


THE

Happenings

What’s Up With Us?

Y WIH VING

G GOOGYD Each December, ISPSYCH LS OF Healthy Living gives THE IND AC T LTRUISM BEH ESS & A N KIND local businesses, nonI profits and community YOUR LIBRARY ATEE MAN A organizations the MIGRATION LTHY HEA opportunity to recap their JOINTS, HEALTHY BODY big accomplishments of the year and thank their staff and volunteers. It’s only August now, but our Healthy Giving issue fills up fast. If you’d like to get ahead by saving a spot now, get in touch with Penny Miller at (352) 732-0073 or penny@healthylivingmagazines.com. I

I I

We love keeping you up to date on what’s happening in the community, but here’s a peek at what’s going on inside the OS office.

Get Ahead And Give

US MAR ION&CITR

Guess Who’s Back, Back Again

Well, who do we have here? Our most vivacious salesperson, Cecilia Sarco, is in the building once again. We sure missed her while she was away, and we’re excited to see her smiling face every day at the printer once again. Welcome back, Cecilia!

It’s Bridal Time! Is 2016 the year you become a bride? No? A groom perhaps? Bridesmaid, best man, or mother of the bride, maybe? No matter your role in the big day, everyone is invited to the 2016 Ocala Style Bridal Showcase. We’ll have vendors to fill any remaining gaps in your wedding planning and plenty of fairy tale inspiration to add some sparkle to your big day. The event will feature over 80 wedding professionals and include live music and a DJ, fabulous giveaways and complimentary cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, and cake and cupcake samples. All of this is happening on Thursday, September 22, from 5-8:30pm at the Klein Center at the College of Central Florida in Ocala. If you’re a photographer, planner, baker, dressmaker or wedding guru of any sort and would like to be a vendor at this year’s event, get in touch ASAP to reserve your space. Vendor spots are selling out quickly! Contact Sharon Morgan at (352) 732-0073 or sharon@ocalastyle.com.

1st Place, Second Season

The Big Hammock Race Series’ second season kicks off in September, and just like last year, they offer a family-friendly environment for racers of all levels. They’ve got distances from 5Ks to full marathons and everything in between, and it all starts with the Cornerstone Leads the Way 5K on September 24. Ocala Style and Healthy Living Magazines are proud sponsors of Big Hammock, and we can’t wait to see even more community members get their race on this season. Visit bighammockraceseries.com to sign up and like their Facebook page to get updates right in your timeline.

Instagram Fam

Hey OS family! As of this moment, we’re nine followers away from hitting 600 on our Instagram account! Thanks for helping it grow and grow so far. Could you pretty-please-with-a-cherry-on-top follow us so we can reach our next milestone? It’s ocalastyle_ healthyliving. Thanks. We owe you one.

CAN’T GET ENOUGH? › We don’t blame you. › Get our newsletter sent straight to your inbox at ocalastyle.com or scan here 014

› Ocala

.com


BUY

Local

Freshen Up Your Summer With Permanent Makeup BEFORE

AFTER

PERMANENT MAKEUP

$150

per procedure

Not valid with any other offers.

AFTER

BEFORE

Your Center For Anti-Aging Advanced Skincare Center Permanent Make-Up Cosmetics Facials & Body Treatments Body Waxing Brow & Lash Tinting

Jennifer Kyle, C.P.C.P.

Licensed Medical Esthetician & Certified Permanent Makeup Artist Physician Supervised (For Pain Control)

352-438-0242

Downtown Ocala 1015 East Fort King St., Ocala

www.SACentralFloridaMedSpa.com

HAIRCUTS STARTING AT

25

$35 Off

NEW CLIENT DISCOUNT ★ ALL SERVICES ★

Schedule an appointment today! 507 SW 1st Ave., Ocala, FL 34471 properteasesalon@gmail.com

352.351.1771 AUG ’16 ›

015


BUY

Local Walts Brake & More

Local is personal.

“Guardian of Your Safety Since 1965”

The Nation Group offers insurance for everything in your life, locally.

Auto-RV-Truck-Repairs & Storage Gas & Diesel-Covered & Uncovered

Walt Krumm Jr walt@waltsbrake.com

www.waltsbrake.com cell 352.843.6215 3890 NW Gainesville Rd fax 352.867.1911 Ocala, FL 34475 shop 352.629.3134

• Personal Insurance • Auto Insurance • Recreational Vehicle Insurance (Motorcycle, Watercraft, RV) • Home Insurance • Life Insurance • Health Insurance • Personal Umbrella • Boat Insurance • Flood Insurance (Certified) • Homeowners Insurance • Business Insurance • Workers’ Compensation • Commercial Insurance • Contractor’s Liability Insurance

Locally owned and operated in beautiful154093-waltsbrakebc.indd Ocala, Florida, The Nation Group has the knowledge, skill, and expertise you need in a local insurance agency. We will work with you to

create a custom tailored policy to suit your needs. This attention to client needs is what makes us the preferred choice when you are looking for a Florida Insurance Company.

The Nation Group 420 SE 8th Street, Ocala, FL, 34471 Phone: 352.732.3881 Mon-Fri 8:00am - 5:00pm

www.nationinsurance.com

1

2225 SW College Rd / 352-622-4433 12/22/2014 10:10:10 AM 2162 E. Silver Springs Blvd / 352-867-1255

Quick, Convenient, No Appointment Necessary Oil Change www.superlube.com

$7.00 OFF $14.00 OFF Any Full Service

Oil Change

Code: STYLE

*Not valid with other oil change offers. Expires 8-31-16

Any Synthetic

Oil Change

Code: STY4

*Not valid with other oil change offers. Expires 8-31-16

(352) 789-3364 • www.ocalamuscle.com • Ocala, FL Automatic • 6-Speed Manual • 0 to 60 mph in under 3 seconds Available Colors: Black • Red • Orange • Yellow • White • Blue • Grey • Silver • Green We ship anywhere in the USA and most foreign countries We take brand new 5.0 V8 Coyote Mustang GT's & F-150’s straight off the dealer lot and give them the full Modern Muscle Cars treatment. Our Street Fighter GT package consists of a Roush Supercharger, an Eibach performance and handling suspension kit, 20” custom KMC rims, and a custom leather interior. In addition, we add our patented high performance axle back exhaust so that it sounds as bad as it is! We include a 3 year 36,000 mile powertrain warranty as provided by Roush. Special order one today and take delivery in approximately 2-3 weeks. Finished 2016 Street Fighters available now for only $54,900.

Our “Street Fighter GT" has 670HP that puts 584HP to the rear wheels! 4528 W. Hwy 40 • Ocala, FL 34482

016

› Ocala

.com

2016 Ford Mustang 2015 Ford Mustang GT 2016 Ford Mustang GT Supercharged Street Fighter 670HP Supercharged Street Fighter 670HP Supercharged Street Fighter 670HP

2015 Ford Mustang GT Supercharged Street Fighter GT Drag Pack 780HP

2016 Ford F150 Roush Supercharged 600HP 3/36,000 Warranty

2016 Ford F150 Supercharged Vengeance SC-650HP Available at $77,456


THE REAL PEOPLE, PLACES & EVENTS THAT S HAPE OU R CO M M U N IT Y

the

SEP

2-3

Boots N’ Barrels Nothing says country like some good, oldfashioned barrel racing and calf roping. The 34th annual Ocala Shrine Rodeo brings the best of the best on the rodeo circuit to our own horse country. Complete with bucking broncos and the biggest, baddest bulls around, the riders on this circuit promise two nights of jam-packed action. The action gets under way at 7:30pm both nights at the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion, but be sure to come early for the highlight of the event on Saturday when the Shrine Hospital For Children’s own buckaroos will be the rodeo kings and queens for the night with their own patients’ rodeo at 6pm. Advance tickets are $15, and tickets are $18 when purchased the night of the event. Gates open at 5:30pm. Proceeds benefit the Shrine Hospital For Children. For more information, visit ocalarodeo.com or call (352) 402-8808.

B U Z Z page

017

A MAIN REVIVAL

018

POKÉMON POINTERS

020

ROCKY ROAD TRIPS

022

BUILDING MADE BETTER

024

BACK-TO -SCHOOL BASICS

026


THE

Buzz

ON THE SQUARE

Headed In The Right Direction It’s just the beginning for Ocala’s downtown. › By Cealia Athanason

I

f you think downtown Ocala has come a long way, you’re right—it has. But fasten your seatbelts, there’s more on the way. Ocala now has an active board of business leaders dedicated to reviving something called Ocala Main Street—and, with it, the whole downtown area. Ocala was one of the first five cities in Florida to be part of the Main Street program, the statewide initiative that stems from the National Main Street organization, in 1984 and 1985. It wasn’t that the initial effort failed, but once the director found a new position, progress plateaued. “We never lost its designation. It was more of a hiatus,” says Diana Schwartz, newly appointed Ocala Main Street director.

018

› Ocala

.com

The downtown is at a monumental moment where things will begin to expand rapidly. Will it ever end? I don’t think so. › Diana Schwartz

The board has already met the criteria necessary to receive certification from the state, and now they’re working with the City of Ocala to look at funding options. What really put this effort in motion was the hiring of a director back in January. Diana Schwartz, the director of business retention for small and medium businesses at the Ocala/Marion County Chamber and Economic Partnership for the past three years, not only has a background in working with small businesses in the community, but she also has more than 10 years of experience working with nonprofits—she owned a nonprofit business to boot. Throw her event management experience in the mix, and that’s just what an organization like OMS needs to get going again. Ocala was still technically recognized as being part of the Main Street program because of the steps that were taken the first time around. Basically, OMS will follow and build committees for the program’s four guidelines: economic vitality, downtown design, civic organization and social promotions. Diana’s role is essential in setting a strongly established foundation, recruiting committee members and working on funding. She’s put together a plan for the year that will act as a guide for the organization, and she expects to promote OMS through a website, brochures and more in the near future. Two annual downtown events are in the works now, along with other events like Small Business Saturday and historic walking tours. The organization will also be updating information about historic properties. As Diana sees it, this is the perfect time to revive OMS, especially with the recent additions of the downtown parking garage, apartments, Reilly Arts Center and Magnolia Art Xchange. “We’re actually already well on our way,” Diana says. “The downtown is at a monumental moment where things will begin to expand rapidly. Will it ever end? I don’t think so.” So far, the initial response has been overwhelming, and the board members are extremely dedicated. They’re working to get the word out, recruit volunteers and encourage community donations. “The health of a downtown reflects the health of the community,” Diana says. And if that’s the case, things are only going to get better from here, for downtown and the community as a whole.

TO VOLUNTEER, DONATE OR LEARN MORE › Ocala Main Street › Diana Schwartz › (352) 629-8051


BUY

Superior Air Conditioning & Heating

Call Today! 352-237-5535

Local

Quality service to make your home cool and comfortable in the Florida summer heat. • Air-conditioning service and repairs for most makes and models. • Replacement A/C and airflow consultation. • Second opinions. • Established 1993. • Licensed and insured #CAC056685.

AFTED H A NeDerC&RW i ne B Enjoy wine and beer in a warm and friendly farm setting. Food & Entertainment Summer Hours- Thur: 4-10p • Fri-Sat: 4-11p • Sun: 12-6p 1945 E County Rd 462, Wildwood 352.418.7887 Like us on Facebook!

www.backyardbarnwinery.com

opening soon

Services: massage therapy facials body treatments waxing manicures/pedicures injectables

Featuring: Skin Authority Eminence GloMinerals

1720 SE 16th Avenue • Suite 303 • Ocala (352) 304-5995 www.sparevolutionofocala.com morgan@sparevolutionofocala.com

AUG ’16 ›

019


THE

Buzz

AROUND TOWN

Catch ‘Em All

Non-gamers, this one’s for you. › By Cealia Athanason

Pokémon Don’t Exist… Right?

OK, you’re about where we were when we first opened the app. Let’s catch you up. Pokémon is short for pocket monster (one CNN article really helped us out here). There are lots of different species of these pocket monsters. Think of them like you would other animals. Cows, rabbits, lions, sloths—they’re all animals, just different types. Pikachu is one of them. Technically, they don’t exist. But in the game, they totally do. This new-fangled concept called augmented reality will have you walking all over town to find them. It’s what led one gamer to stumble upon a dead person floating in a river and set up a few more unfortunates to get robbed at a PokéStop. (Fortunately, none of that happened here in Ocala. But please, don’t be a lone wolf—bring the whole pack. Safety first, of course!) Oh, wait. You’re confused now. Let’s rewind.

020

› Ocala

.com

Poké Whats?

PokéStops, Gyms and Poké Balls are all part of the fun. But before we get into that, you need to download the app and follow these steps. After signing in, you’re given an avatar—it’s you, just sexier and digital—that you can personalize. Pick a username. Because more than 5 million people have already claimed, let’s see, all of them, it’s time to say goodbye to your signature gaming username. It’s a numbers game now. Get over it. Pay attention to the tour guide. You’ll immediately find your first Pokémon—we had a few in our editorial office. (Not creepy at all.) The app opens your camera, and you’ll see the creature through it. Yes, it’s really there. Touch the red Poké Ball on your screen and flick it toward the creature to capture it. Points: scored. The game works with your GPS, so you’ll see blue diamonds and big swirly structures across the game’s map at real-life destinations. The diamonds are PokéStops, where you can stock up on Poké Balls, and the swirly things are Gyms. Face your collected Pokémon against other nearby gamers’ Pokémon for points and more— once you hike over to the

destination, of course. You’ll find churches, parks and shops are typically PokéStops or Gyms. Please keep in mind that some stops, like Washington, D.C.’s Holocaust Memorial Museum or your neighbor’s backyard, are ethically worth skipping. There’s a line, people.

What’s The Point?

You’re sensing the theme now, right? There seems to be an underlying agenda for fitness here. (We smell what you’re cooking, Niantic Labs.) For example: To hatch Pokémon eggs acquired at PokéStops, you have to walk a certain distance with the app running in the foreground. Think it’s a coincidence that Google Trends saw an abrupt spike in search queries for “5km in miles” in early July? Nah. The entire premise of the game is to get you off your butt and walking around. All we’re asking for is a few extra points for having to walk through this 100-degree Florida heat. But wait, there’s more. You can level up, join teams, earn rewards and even purchase a techy wristband. Still not into it? S’all good. Learning what a Pokémon is might be just enough for one day.

Source: cnn.com, wsj.com

J

ust five days after Pokémon GO’s world takeover, my editor and I took the plunge. We became Pokémon trainers. Now we aren’t allowed to hate on the craze anymore, and neither are you. Even if you don’t know what a Pokémon is, that’s all about to change.


BUY

The Peacock Cottage Ocala’s New Plant Shop! • Unique Houseplants • Fun Classes

home decor and unique gifts Ginger Snap Jewelry Mia Sol Jewelry Simply Southern T-Shirts Tyler Candles Swan Creek Candles

Fairy • Garden Gifts Gardens • Supplies

Located in Chelsea Square 3243 East Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala 352-624-0116 • thepeacockcottage@gmail.com Like us! facebook.com/thepeacockcottage

Mon-Fri:12-5:30pm Sat:10am-5pm

Corkcicle Tumblers Lily Grace T-Shirts Mona-B Bags

25% off

your purchase!*

*Some exclusions apply. Must present ad at time of purchase. May not be combined with any other offer or sale. Limit one per customer.

3790 SE 58th Ave, Ocala, Fl.

www.dandypot.com

352-694-1888

www.countrymemories.net

Glen Cove Metal Sculptures Home of the Weeping Willow Sculpture

• Copper and brass sculptures by local artists • Items can be customized • Each sculpture has a protective coating so it is maintenance free for many years

Local

Call today! Paul Tester 352.201.3107 facebook.com/ glencovemetalsculptures

FREE EXAMS TO NEW PATIENTS

352-629-PAWS (7297)

www.midtownanimalclinicocala.com midtownanimalclinicocala COSMETIC & FAMILY DENTISTRY ALL OF YOUR DENTAL NEEDS IN ONE PLACE!

Ocala’s Premium 20% Frozen Yogurt and OFF Ice Cream Shop! with this ad

• IV Sedation • Implants (Placement & Restoration) • Emergency Same-Day Appointments • Root Canals • Dentures/Partials (Traditional or Implant Retained) • Oral Surgery (Extractions/ Wisdom Teeth) • Crowns/Bridges • Digital X-Rays • Teeth Whitening

“AMAZING” NEW PATIENT SPECIAL

$89

Exam (DO150) X-Rays (DO210) Consultation (D9310)

FREE IMPLANT CONSULTATION/X-RAY + 10% OFF Treatment Consultation (D9310) X-Rays (DO330)

Cesar A. Caceres D.M.D.

*Offers intended for patients without dental insurance.

Se habla español

Most insurance accepted.

No interest options available upon approval.

352-629-1314

www.amazingsmilesdentistry.com th 10230 SW 86 Circle, Suite 100, Ocala, FL 34481 (Turn right at 103rd After Steeplechase)

AUG ’16 ›

021


THE

Buzz

GOING PLACES

Caving Checklist: What to bring

› Three

sources of light, plus extra batteries › Helmet › Boots › Food and water › Markers, to indicate

the route you came in on (if exploring without a guide)

Tips For The Trip › Stick together, and

never cave alone. Having a group is power in numbers and will make it easier to navigate your way back.

Underground Adventures

› Have an emergen-

cy plan. Safety comes first. Always let someone on the outside know when you head in and when you plan to return.

In the mood for a little adventure? You’ve come to the right place. Sure, Florida is known for beaches and theme parks. But we also have caves, cliffs, you name it. Fellow Floridians, get ready for some serious cave exploring. Florida Caverns State Park Brick City Adventure Park Withlacoochee State Forest 3345 Caverns Road, Marianna (850) 482-1228 › floridastateparks.org

1211 SE 22nd Road, Ocala (352) 671-8560 › marioncountyfl.org

15003 Broad Street, Brooksville (352) 797-4140 › freshfromflorida.com

Guided cave tours are offered throughout the week (except Tuesdays and Wednesdays). Tours of the Florida Cavern last 45 minutes and are considered to be moderately strenuous. An audiovisual program about touring the cave and other natural areas of the park is available at the visitor center. Reservations are required.

“You will get dirty,” says recreational leader and guide Bill Birdsall. Marion County Parks and Recreation Department’s Basic Wild Caving experience offers a chance for beginning potholers to channel their inner daredevil as they shimmy through tunnels. If you would like to participate, the fee is $30 and includes a helmet and elbow and knee pads. You must be 8 years or older and reservations are required.

Withlacoochee State Forest is currently the third largest state forest in Florida and is divided into several distinct tracts of land. Explore the caves at your own leisure and enjoy other activities, including hiking, biking and birding. Contact the forest office for specific information.

022

› Ocala

.com

Are there a lot of mosquitoes where you plan to hike? If so, you should probably bring some repellent. › Be respectful.

Caves are thousands of years old. Don’t touch or deface formations in any way, watch your step and properly dispose of your trash.

Sources: nemoequipment.com, nationalgeographic.com

› Do your research.


BUY

Local

CHAMPION

Paint & Body Shop, Inc.

HEATING AND COOLING

Foreign | Domestic | Exotic Trucks | SUVs | RVs | Vans | 4x4s Motorcycles | Tractor Trailers

AMERICAN QUALITY INSTALLED BY SENSIBLE AIR & HEAT

COME SEE THE EXPERTS!

(352) 288-3663 CAC057404

Gold Certified Custom Paint & Body Computerized ert Exp Insurance Claims Welcome Paint Matching Frame Straightening One-Day Jobs Available Hail Damage Experts Restorations Full Detail Service Alignments Lovebug Removal Lifetime Warranty l ova Rem t Den s tles Pain Shuttle Service Available r erio Sup for k Dec t Largest Pain Paint Matching Any repa ir Se Habla Español ov

ES & STIMAT S 6319 SW 38th St, Ocala, FL 34474 FREE ER DISCOUNT www.defiospaintbodyshopinc.com SENIO

er $3

Free Head 50 REstoratlight ion

352.854.2220

Make it Unique, Make it Yours, Make it! Everything you need to make your ride uniquely yours!

We carry all major brands of head units, speakers and amps. We have the lowest pre-grand opening prices in Ocala! Guaranteed!

Complete sound & alarm systems expertly installed & guaranteed Come on by! We are in our pre-grand opening phase, so you’ll get even better deals while we set up our showroom and shop.

The best installation team in Ocala!

29 30 Off

TIME SENSITIVE OFFERS - ACT NOW!

$ Detailing Expert Auto

CUSTOM VEHICLE INSTALLATIONS LED LIGHTING BLUETOOTH SATELLITE RADIO WINDOW TINTING BACK-UP CAMERAS & SENSORS VIDEO & AUDIO ALARMS & ACCESSORIES AUTO & TRUCK DETAILING PRE-OWNED TIRE INSTALLATION

.95

(FREE with any $125.00+ purchase)

%

Audio Systems & Accessories Price match guarantee + 5% off! Ask us. Mention this ad.

352.390.6440 / 603 N. Magnolia Ave. / Ocala AUG ’16 ›

023


Buzz

GRE AT OUTDOORS

Facility photos by John Jernigan

THE

Wind Hazard Heroes

Florida natives know how destructive hurricanes can be. Tornadoes aren’t known for being gentle either. That’s why the Wind Hazard Damage Assessment Team at the University of Florida is tirelessly researching methods to mitigate the damage done by extreme weather. › By Katie McPherson

T

he Wind Hazard Damage Assessment group was started in November 2012 by Dr. David Prevatt and a team of Ph.D., graduate and undergraduate students interested in wind engineering. Its main focus? Improving tornado and hurricane wind resilience for residential structures across the nation and educational outreach. David Roueche is one of those Ph.D. students. He says the group specializes in creating wind hazard reports following major weather events. “We get a report together within 48 to 72 hours describing what happened—wind speeds, damage, any other storylines—and get it to news outlets, community members and local officials of the affected areas to give them some engineering perspective on what happened,” he explains. Their research happens as much outside of the lab as inside—the group has gone on multiple trips to survey structures firsthand following weather damage. “You research in the lab testing roofing and building components

or doing some work on the computer works with the Federal Alliance for Safe characterizing tornado loads, but then you go Homes (FLASH). into the field and see the effects tornadoes or “They take the engineering we’re doing and hurricanes have on the world and you realize put it in a palatable form people can use when it affects peoples’ lives and something needs they’re remodeling or buying a new home,” to be done,” he says. Roueche says. UF is also home to the Natural Hazards David and his team are currently Engineering Research Infrastructure developing a website and accompanying app, (NHERI), a recent addition that allows called ResilientResidence.com and ResRe, outside researchers to create a proposal and respectively, so homeowners everywhere can be approved to use the labs assess their home’s safety using to conduct their own wind the Wind Hazard team’s findings. research. Roueche says this Most of the country A user can input their home’s is a big win for the future doesn’t even location, building materials and of wind engineering and consider tornadoes roof type. Utilizing an engineering structure safety. in the design of model created by the team, the app “Most of the country doesn’t new buildings, develops a “crash rating” for the even consider tornadoes in so when the home to estimate the effects of a the design of new buildings, damage happens, hurricane of any category. It also so when the damage happens, it ought to happen makes suggestions to improve the it ought to happen because because we don’t house’s resilience. we don’t think about it. What “If you put new shingles on and think about it. › David Roueche used a better garage door, we could is an appropriate design for tornadoes because of how rare show quantitatively how much they are but how devastating the damaged could be reduced,” they can be? We could have a says Roueche. “Instead of $50,000 more resilient society than we of damage, you’d have $15,000 or do now,” he says. $20,000 after retrofits. We’re only One issue the Wind Hazard a few months into the project right group faces is disseminating now. It started as a pilot program their research results to the in Hillsborough County, and we’ll public for their education. To refine that model and start it help with outreach, the team around Florida in the near future.”

LEARN MORE › Wind Hazard Damage Assessment Team › windhazard.davidoprevatt.com and resilientresidence.com 024

› Ocala

.com


BUY

Local

Is Your Student Insured Properly?

Hadley Brown & Paulk

Auto | Home | Business | Life | Health | Dental | Medicare | Accident

Covered.

Wheeler Insurance Agency Saving Customers Thousands since 1997

10941 S. US Hwy 441, Belleview • wheelerinsurance@earthlink.net

(352) 307-6666 or (352) 307-7776 WheelerInsuranceAgency.com

FUNERAL HOME

Providing Unparalleled Service and Compassion in Your Time of Need Locally Family Owned • Bilingual 127 NW 20th Street, Ocala, FL 34475

352.620.0573

LOCALLY GROWN SOD by

GRANDVIEW FARMS

· · · ·

St Augustine, Zoysia & Centipede Direct-from-the-farm pricing! We cut fresh to order. Delivery Options Available.

352-369-TURF (8873)

20% OFF $50 OFF Delivery Fee

Your Sod Purchase or

(5 pallets or more)

Must mention coupon at time of order. Expires 9/30/16.

www.grandviewinc.com

summer FLOORING Treating: Auto Injuries, Lower Back and Neck Pain, Sciatica, Disc Problems, Numbness, Headaches

» Flexible Hours » Personalized Therapy Treatments » Friendly, Knowledgeable Staff » 17 Years Experience » Massage Therapy On-Site » Sports Injury Specialist » School and Sport Physicals » Spinal Decompression

Swinson Chiropractic 5481 SW 60th St., #302, Ocala Located on SR 200, 2 miles west of I-75. Directly across from Publix, Heath Brook Commons

352-840-0444

Dr. D.L. Swinson

Chiropractic Physician

CALL TODAY! Mention this ad for your FREE consultation We Accept Most Insurances

18 months

carpet

hardwood

vinyl tile

ceramic

SPECIAL FINANCING AVAILABLE* *See Store for Details

Summer’s here, and the savings are heating up at Carpet One. From the cool, classic look of tile to the silky, smoothness of super soft carpets, Carpet One has the right floor at the right price.

THE ONE STORE FOR YOUR PERFECT FLOOR, WITH 2 LOCATIONS.

2615 SE 58th Ave. (Baseline Rd.) 352-624-2010

www.CarpetOneOcala.com

940 Bichara Blvd. (Spanish Springs) 352-350-7006

www.CarpetOneTheVillages.com

Mention ad for FREE upgrade to our Healthier Living Installation System. www.HealtheirLivingInstallation.com

AUG ’16 ›

025


Buzz

THE

CLASS ACTS

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS AND DISTRICT NEWS THAT SHAPE MARION COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS. › By Kevin Christian, APR, CPRC

Students Hungry No More

Every student attending public school in Marion County can receive breakfast without charge every day of class. The Food and Nutrition Services Department makes meals available so students don’t go hungry. Thanks to reimbursement from the federal government, this program provides breakfast at no cost to the student or parent. Every middle and high school now joins elementary schools for 100 percent participation in what’s called the Provision Two program.

Fresh Computers

Students head back to class August 10, and with just a few days until then, Marion County Public Schools has plenty of news to share—new students, new principals, new rules, new calendar and more. Here’s a look at the highlights for the upcoming 2016-17 school year.

Family Access

By The Numbers

42,700 2,900

7 million: square feet of space operated by MCPS

462

67%

projected eligibility for free/ : reduced meals

16

college scholarship dollars earned by MCPS Class of ’16 graduates

:

consecutive annual highest ratings for government transparency

$506 million: budget (2015-16)

40K+

number of phone calls : daily district-wide

%

projected teachers

: number of portable classrooms (not all used for academics)

$20.5 million:

32

:

:

projected students

273 projected buses daily

$110K

: price of a new school bus

80.7

:

teachers with master’s degrees

:

graduation rate

Summer is busy for computer technicians throughout the school district. They installed 4,061 new computers to replace outdated ones. The district’s five-year technology plan calls for refreshing 19,311 student and teacher computers. Why? State testing software requires updated technology, and computers more than eight years old can usually no longer run common software programs.

%

:

26K + number of networked computers

1.4%

: dropout rate

marionschools.net Parents, you can update your contact information and communication preferences by logging in to this online service giving parents complete access to grades, test scores, attendance, contact info, lunch balances and so much more. To register, simply visit your child’s school with a valid photo ID. You can register all your children at one time at just one school.

Health Updates

Listen up, seventh-graders—get your shots now! Don’t wait until school starts. In addition to all other compulsory vaccinations, state law requires incoming seventh-graders to receive an additional dose of the Tdap vaccine for tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis. Schools must have appropriate paperwork on file by the first day of class; otherwise, students are not allowed in class until the issue is resolved. Last August, this happened to 549 seventh-graders.

Different Faces, Different Places

The following schools will welcome a new principal this school year. 026

› Ocala

.com

Anthony Elementary

John Williams

Belleview Elementary

Dr. Stacey Varner

Dr. NH Jones Elementary

Dawana Gary

Dunnellon Elementary

Karen English

Dunnellon High

Stephen Ayres


Going Green With Peachjar

All schools have Peachjar service this year, a new platform putting e-flyers in the palm of your hand. Parents subscribe with their email address (via Family Access mentioned earlier) and download the free app on any mobile device. They can then receive automatic alerts and links to the latest e-flyers approved by their school. Peachjar offers a green alternative to thousands of paper-based flyers.

Calendar Highlights

Crisis Information

› DO expect a notification from the school/district with a

Skylert® phone and/or text message when the school is able to provide accurate information or the incident is resolved. › DO cooperate with school and/or district directives. › DO consult marionschools.net, Twitter

@MarionCountyK12, the SchoolWay app, local media and other communication channels for updates. › DO NOT call the school. Phone lines are busy and

Conduct Changes

The 2016-17 Code of Student Conduct changes this year to include the following major items: › Expands discipline reach to include the bus stop as an

extension of the school bus when it comes to behavior › Spells out repercussions for simulating a weapon on campus

may be restricted to emergency use. › DO NOT go to the school. Roads may be closed,

doors locked and campuses off limits to anyone other than authorized personnel. › DO NOT call your child’s cell phone. They may

not be able to answer.

› Adds alternative placement or expulsion for bringing alcohol

on campus

Channels Of Information

Aug. 10 Aug. 31 Sep. 5 Sep. 28 Oct. 17-18 Nov. 2 Nov. 16 Nov. 23 Nov. 24-25 Dec. 7 Dec. 19 Jan. 3 Jan. 4 Jan. 16 Jan. 25 Feb. 8 Feb. 20

You can stay on top of all the important information this school year by utilizing a variety of informational sources, including:

Mar. 13-17 Mar. 24

› Teachers

Apr. 14

› Principals

May 23-25

› Skylert (phone, email, text) › marionschools.net

May 25 May 26

› Twitter: MarionCountyK12

May 30

› Family Access (online)

› School Web pages

School Times

› SchoolWay mobile app (free) › YouTube (MCPSmedia channel) › “k12 connection” weekly video program

Most Elementary Schools: 7:50am-2:05pm Eighth Street: 8:15am-2:30pm Madison Street: 8am-2:20pm Oakcrest: 7:50am-2:10pm Middle: Varies from 7:45am-3:45pm High: Varies from 8:35am-3:45pm (except MTI – 7:45am-4:15pm)

› Marion Education Channel (Brighthouse 496, Comcast 199,

Cox 12, 7.1 over-the-air) › Local media

Class Ratios

K-3 1:18 | 4-8 1:22 | 9-12 1:25 (core classes)

Emerald Shores Elementary

Stacy Houston

Evergreen Elementary

Wayne Livingston

School Starts Early Release Day Labor Day (district closed) Early Release Day Teacher Work Days (no students) Early Release Day Early Release Day *Weather Emergency Make-Up Day (if needed) Thanksgiving Break (district closed) Early Release Day Christmas/Winter Break begins Teachers return Students return MLK Day (district closed) Early Release Day Early Release Day Presidents Day (district closed) Spring Break (district closed) Teacher Work Day (no students) *Weather Emergency Make-Up Day (if needed) Semester Exams / Early Release Days Last Day of School Teacher Work Day *Weather Emergency Make-Up Day (if needed)

Check with your child's school to verify school times.

Lake Weir High

Jennifer Beasley

Liberty Middle

Renee Jones

Sparr Elementary

Gay Street

West Port High

Ken McAteer AUG ’16 ›

027


BUY

Local Taking the name “Thrift Store” to an entirely different level! The Dusty Rose Room The Magnolia Room ❁ ❁ UPSCALE RESALE BOUTIQUE – Vintage APPAREL JUST FOR MEN – Huge selection

Ave., Ocala

-0075 9 2 6 ) 2 5 y! (3 Call Todeahourocala.com www.on 7th 2441 SW 5

$25 OFF

SERVICE CALL New customers only.

Peter G. Shutters, Esq. Former Insurance Defense Attorney

NOW REPRESENTING THE INJURED

(904) 777-7777

Cell: (904) 347-8501 | Toll Free: (888) 262-4520 1837 Hendricks Avenue • Jacksonville, FL 32207 WWW.HARRISGUIDI.COM

luxury labels for less, such as Chanel, Gucci, St. John, Tory Burch, Christian Dior, Judith Leiber, Michael Kors and so much more!

of T-shirts, jeans, knitwear, golf wear, shoes, suits, accessories and much, much more!

The Gardenia Room ❁ HUGE SELECTION OF FASHIONABLE,

The Garden Room ❁ OVER 4,000 SQ. FT. OF FABULOUS

trendy, even name-brand clothes for women. Why buy retail? Shop resale! Gently used items are in great condition. Don’t be surprised if you find items that have never been worn!

items for everyone! Household items, indoor and outdoor furniture, kitchenware, lamps, appliances, pictures, rugs, outdoor items, knickknacks and much more!

Donations Accepted❁ PICK UP❁ DROP OFF

We are always in need of donations and are very appreciative of your generosity. Your donations allow us to continue our outreach ministry as well as provide affordable household items and clothing to the community. To schedule a pickup on your large items, please call (352) 245-7407. We are happy to provide you with a receipt for your tax-deductible donation.

352.245.7407 7655 SE 126th Place, Suites 2 & 3 / Belleview, FL (0.2 Miles North of Market of Marion on 441) www.thegardenworshipcenter.com

Weeknight Rate Specials

FIND EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KICK OFF THE SCHOOL YEAR!

PADDOCKMALL.COM

028

› Ocala

.com

For Every Occasion

• Dive Shop on Property • Guided Scallop and Fishing Trips Available • Boat Ramp

• Free Breakfast • Outside BBQ grills • Pet friendly

Crystal River Resort 614 NW HWY 19, Crystal River, FL 34428 352-795-3171 • bestwestern.com


P.

029

D E D I C ATE D TO E N R I C H I N G TH E LIVE S O F LO C AL FAM I LI E S

A Heavy Issue

A recent study showed that children who are told they are overweight as 4 and 5 year olds by their parents often gain a significant amount of weight as they reach age 13. factor to weight gain, doctors feel it’s important for parents to communicate the health risks of being overweight with their children. Encourage plenty of exercise and play time and have healthy food options in the house. According to Dr. Jian Zhang, associate professor of epidemiology at Georgia Southern, “As parents, we should foster a pro-health family environment rather than be pre-occupied by weight watching.”

Source: cnn.com

The reason? It’s believed that parents who think their children are overweight will often limit their child’s food intake, making the child more likely to rebel and eat more by sneaking food or making poor food choices. Shaming a child about his or her weight also plays a part in overeating and a lack of physical activity. Although it’s unclear whether a parent’s perception is a contributing

A HOMEWORK HELPER

030

IT'S CHORE TIME

032

SNAPSHOTS

034


THE

Hive

› GADGETS + GIZMOS

iHomework

Think you are smarter than a fifthgrader? Do you ever get stumped when helping with homework? It’s your job, after all, to make sure your kid did that long division or verb conjugation correctly!

T

hanks to technology, parents aren’t alone. There are countless apps and educational websites designated to help with homework and reinforce lessons learned in the classroom—for both you and your child. Here are a few of our favorites.

REFLEXMATH.COM: Perfect for students in first grade or above who understand basic math operations such as adding and subtracting or multiplying and dividing. WHY KIDS LOVE IT: It is game-based, highly motivational and easily accessible at anytime and continuously monitors each student’s performance, creating the best experience for each child. 30-day free trial or $35 per student.

IXL.COM: Aimed toward children in Pre-K to

12th grade, this website focuses on math, language arts, science and social studies.

WHY KIDS LOVE IT: Ixl is the perfect combination of learning and fun. Not only will your child master any fraction that is thrown their way, but they will also receive online rewards for their progress. For example, with IXL math, children earn rewards based on their favorite animals, food and hobbies. $9.95 per month or $79 per year.

ABCMOUSE.COM: Designed for children ages 2-7 with a full online curriculum, including math, reading and science.

SHEPPARDSOFTWARE.COM: This website is for children in grades Pre-K through high school. It offers countless educational games, activities and quizzes, and it’s all free! WHY KIDS LOVE IT: Making learning fun and memorable, this website designs games with different difficulty levels so that each child is constantly challenged. The site includes brainteasers, painting activities, puzzles and more.

Benefits Of Mobile Learning Apps

› Constant availability

› Interactive elements › Helps with classroom performance › Becoming tech-savvy › Alternative modes of learning › Fun and informal › Systematic learning › Portability › Prepares kids for the future and for

future online test taking › Gives kids a head start on learning

030

› Ocala

.com

KHAN ACADEMY: This non-profit

organization claims to provide a “free, worldclass education for anyone, anywhere.” The information is always free, and you can log in via computer or by downloading an iPhone or Android app.

WHY KIDS LOVE IT: The site features short lectures in the form of YouTube videos on plenty of subjects, from pre-school math to physics and microeconomics. khanacademy.org

Sources: reflexmath.com, abcmouse.com, ixl.com, sheppardsoftware.com, khanacademy.org

WHY KIDS LOVE IT: Plenty of learning games with great themes, including planets, sports, music and more, helping your child get a better understanding of these subjects. You even have the option to print out additional work in certain subjects your child may struggle in, encouraging them to continue their learning offline. 30-day free trial or $7.95 per month.


CH_AUGUST 2016_A.pdf

7/19/16

N E W B O R N

4:53:17 PM

T H R U

A D O L E S C E N C E

C

M

Y

CM

MY

“We treat your children like our own ”.

CY

CMY

K

––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––– NEW PATIENTS WELCOME Chris N. Okonkwo MD FAAP

Susan Lakatos ARNP

Katie Falco ARNP

Visit us at: www.ChildrensHealthofOcala.com

G R AC E C H R I STIAN S C H O O L 59 Years of Academic Excellence Our mission is to prepare our children for life, to honor and glorify God, in a Christ-centered environment of academic excellence.

K-3 through 8th grade Accredited by Florida Council of Independent Schools and Florida Kindergarten Council since 1973

Limited openings 2016-17 school year Call to schedule a tour of our campus or visit our website at

www.gcsocala.com

GRAC E C H RI STIAN SC HOOL - (352) 387-3090 - 4410 S E 3RD AVE N U E - OCALA, FL 34480

Today’s Students, Tomorrow’s Leaders. Grace Christian School does not discriminate on the basis of race, religion or gender.

AUG ’16 ›

031


THE

Hive

› PARENTING POINTERS

Reward System THOUGH WE AS PARENTS ARE FULLY CONVINCED THIS WHOLE CHORE THING IS A GOOD IDEA, WE WOULD VENTURE TO GUESS THAT MANY KIDS ARE NOT ON BOARD. TRY THESE FUN INCENTIVES FOR HOUSEHOLD DUTIES. WE PROMISE THEY’LL BE DONE IN HALF THE TIME! 1.

“Is your room clean?” is probably the most dreaded and frequently asked question in a household with children. Usually followed with a grimace of some sort, parents may start to wonder themselves if they are a broken record.

C

hores. Are they really that important? According to an article published by The Wall Street Journal, giving children household chores at an early age helps build a lasting sense of mastery, responsibility and self-reliance. Marty Rossmann, a professor emeritus at the University of Minnesota, followed 84 children across four periods in their lives. She found that young adults who had responsibilities around the home, starting at age 3, were more likely to achieve academic and early career success.

HERE ARE SOME JOBS TO DIVVY UP BETWEEN YOUR TEENS AND TOTS. KEEP IN MIND, THERE ARE PLENTY OF OTHER CHORES OUT THERE; IF YOU NEED MORE IDEAS, A QUICK INTERNET SEARCH WILL YIELD LOTS OF OPTIONS. AGES 2-3

AGES 6-7

AGES 12-13

AGES 16-18

› Assisting in making

› Making their bed daily

› Changing bed sheets

› Responsible for earning

› Folding laundry

› Keeping their room

their beds › Picking up toys

with supervision › Taking dirty laundry to

the laundry basket › Pulling weeds

with supervision › Emptying indoor

trash cans › Clearing the kitchen table

after meals

AGES 4-5

AGES 8-11

› Making their beds with

› Keeping their

minimal parental help › Matching socks in

clean laundry

bedroom clean › Waking up using an

alarm clock

› Hanging up towels in

the bathroom › Sanitizing door handles

and light switches

.com

› Responsible for

putting them away › Preparing an occasional

family meal AGES 14-15 › Completing

assigned housework without prompting

washer and dryer

› Preparing food with

curb for pickup wood floors

› Ocala

› Folding clean clothes and

› Yardwork as needed

› Sweeping the tile or

032

tidy, including dusting and vacuuming

› Learning to use the › Taking the trash to the

spending money › Responsible for

adult supervision › Washing windows with

supervision

purchasing new clothes maintaining any car they drive (gas, oil, tire changes, etc.)

2. Make it a game. Fill a mason jar with colored Popsicle sticks. Write out a chore or task on each of the sticks. The sticks they pick are the chores they have to do. Make sure to be appreciative when the tasks are finished! 3. Let your kids choose their jobs for the week. Have a magnetic board full of what chores need to be accomplished throughout the week. A little ownership in what needs to get done just may motivate your clan to get busy cleaning. 4. If you really want to encourage your kids, hide a dollar in the room they are meant to clean. If they clean well enough, they’ll find it. Or, set up a small allowance system so they can begin to save and spend their own money.

Sources: wallstreetjournal.com, parents.com, tidewaterparent.com

Chore Challenge

Have a basket filled with fun goodies, stickers or special snacks from The Dollar Store. After a hard day’s work, allow your young child to pick a special treat from the “in-home” store.


STUDENTS GROWING IN

Mind, Body & Spirit

352-854-2999

Find out what

www.RedeemerLions.com

t Terrace 819 SE 1s 4471 3 Ocala, FL -5 6 7 8 7 (352) 23 cala.com pac@paco

!

ACoca www.P

la.com

AUG ’16 ›

033


THE

Hive

› SNAPSHOTS

THESE LOCAL KIDS KNOW HOW TO HAVE FUN! CHECK OUT THEIR PHOTO-WORTHY MOMENTS.

William, 6, Leylani, 7, and Gianna, 3, enjoying a day at SeaWorld

Jameson saying hello to the world

Layla, 2, enjoying the pool

Austin, 11, at God & Country Day

Trevor, 9, Nicholas, 13, and Katelyn, 7, cooling off in the wave pool

Trinity, 9, at God & Country Day Addelynn, 2, at Farm Days at Coon Hollo Madison, 17, at a horse show with her pony, Pippy Long Stocking

Leandre, 3, with his animal friends

Isabella, 9, with her honor roll certificate and medals for earning As and Bs all year at Dunnellon Elementary

Colton, 4, and Hannah, 2, at the Baseline Greenway Park

WANT TO SEE YOUR KIDS ON THE PAGES OF OCALA STYLE? Send your photos from around town and local events to melissa@ocalastyle.com. Yours might just get picked! 034

› Ocala

.com

Charlie, 6, with his mom, Jodie, at Seminole Feed


'S #1 VY  2016 FALL MINI-CLUB

REGISTER AT OPU REGISTRATION DATES:

August 13th: 9am signups, 10-11am evaluations August 20th: 9am Sign ups, 10-11am evaluations

Celebrating Our 38th Year of Dance REGISTRATION DAYS August 8th – returning students August 9th – new students

LAST CHANCE SIGN UPS:

August 25th: 5pm signups/evaluations

CLASSES RESUME August 15th Please join us for our

Dance Party

Saturday, August 13th • 5:30-7:30 at the studio to celebrate the new season!

OPU-Required Club Season documents and other general information can all be found on our website at: WWW.OCALAPOWERUNITED.COM.

Check our website or call 352-732-2030 for more info.

352-351-4837 www.ocalapowerunited.com 1433 SW 15th Ave Ocala, FL 34471

maryellenschoolofdance.com maryellenschoolofdance@gmail.com

3650 NE 25th St., Ocala

AUG ’16 ›

035


PAGE

36


You’ve no doubt heard about meal planning, which is all the rage right now, but you may not be sure how—or if—it’s relevant for you. Chances are, it is.

Meal planning could be the answer if you: Want your family to eat better Intend to stick to a grocery budget Are interested in trying new dishes Have a challenging, busy schedule Want to simplify decisions about what to cook Are tired of not knowing the answer to that timeless question, “What’s for dinner?” If you answer in the affirmative to any or all of these questions, why not give meal planning a try? We can help you get started.

Things To Consider

The beauty of meal planning is that it can work in a variety of situations. That’s because you create the plan that works best for you. We’ll give you proven ideas and helpful suggestions for how to create and stick to a plan, but ultimately, you’re in control. Even better, you can “tweak” and customize the plan as you go along, making it work better for your family. A meal plan doesn’t have to be the same every week. If your kids have extracurricular activities certain nights of the week or your work schedule fluctuates on specific days, take commitments and schedules into account as you create the plan. And remember: The goal is to simplify, not complicate! For hectic weeks, it can help to choose recipes that can be prepared in a slow cooker or made ahead of time and just popped into the oven when you walk in the door. For meal planning to be successful, it helps to think of it as a puzzle. By choosing recipes that have similar and/or overlapping ingredients each week, you can streamline the process. Let’s say you want to make lasagna as one of your meals. Look over the recipe and then choose a second recipe you can make with some of the same ingredients. For example, make lasagna one night and chili pie another night that week, as both recipes call for ground beef, cheese, onion and some of the same seasonings. This makes it easier to stick to the plan but also prevents waste and controls the budget because you’re not buying completely different ingredients for each recipe. You’ll also want to consider what’s in season and on sale when looking for recipes and deciding what to make. Look at your individual family’s needs and preferences. If you pack lunches, choose recipes that will provide leftovers or at least part of the next day’s lunch. Tonight’s roast chicken can become tomorrow’s chicken salad. Start thinking of meals as being connected to one another instead of stand-alone.

AUG ’16 ›

037


Make It Happen

For starters, if you can spare some time to be sucked into the online vortex that is Pinterest, you’ll find a wide variety of posts about menu and meal planning. It’s an incredible way to find inspiration and resources. If you haven’t done it already, allocate a grocery budget so you know how much you can spend. Once you know what the week holds, write your schedule on a calendar and note which days you need meals for. Some people start meal planning for just a couple dinners a week and expand from there. Others start big and plan for every night of the month. There is no right or wrong plan, but it’s always easier to

expand than downsize, so you may want to be less ambitious in the beginning and then add more scheduled meals to the calendar as you get the swing of things. If you’re the sort that likes ready-made forms, just go online and search “meal planning calendars.” You’ll find numerous ones available for free download. Check out:

• • • • •

plantoeat.com cooksmarts.com tipjunkie.com/post/meal-planner moneysavingmom.com/downloads/meal-menu-planners gymbagsandgladrags.com/how-to-meal-plan-for-beginners-free-meal-planner

Don’t over think the calendar part of the process! Use whatever is easiest for you, whether that’s a legal pad, a collection of 3x5 note cards, a digital version or printable template you download.

Now, it’s time to gather and organize recipes. This is the fun part. You can go online or peruse your cookbooks and magazines, or a combination of both. Good online sources for recipes include:

• • • • • • • •

cookinglight.com foodnetwork.com cleaneatingmag.com eatingwell.com simplyrecipes.com allrecipes.com thechicsite.com/category/table thegingerbreadmum.com

If you’re specifically searching for healthy recipes, check out:

• • • • •

skinnyms.com skinnytaste.com eatingbirdfood.com katheats.com fannetasticfood.com

038

› Ocala

.com

When you find recipes online, they can be added to an online “recipe box.” You can also use a note-clipping app on your smartphone; Evernote is one such app. Or, you can go “old school” and print out the recipes and start saving them in a three-ring binder, tucking them into plastic sleeves, if you like. As you prepare each recipe, you may want to jot notes in the margin. If the kids love it, it’s a keeper. The goal is to begin building a master list of go-to meals. The more you do this, the easier meal planning becomes over time. Eventually, you can pull from the master list of tried-and-true recipes each week and also work in one or two new recipes to try. Recipes typically include prep time and cooking time. Because efficiency is likely one of your goals in meal planning, aim for recipes that take an hour or less to cook. Make your grocery list, making sure you have the necessary ingredients for each recipe. Check your pantry beforehand to see what you already have. Go shopping. You can shop for a few days at a time or a week or more. It’s up to you. Decide which meals to cook first. A simple way to do this is to make recipes with the most perishable ingredients first. Opting for “theme nights” also helps determine when to make certain meals. For example, one family I know always designates Tuesday as “Mexican food night.” It might be tacos one week and burritos the next, but it’s always the same theme. You might want Friday to be “pizza night” or “soup night,” even though you vary the type of pizza or soup from week to week. Prepare ahead as much as possible. Think like a restaurant chef. Prep food by chopping, slicing and dicing the night before after you’ve put the kids to bed. Let’s say Tuscan Bean Soup is on the menu for the next day. You

can chop the onions and potatoes, slice the sausage and store overnight in the fridge in airtight containers. Then, tomorrow evening, just add the prepped items and remaining ingredients to your stock pot and cook. If you’ve chosen a slow cooker recipe, you can still prep the night before. Just place the ingredients in the slow cooker the next day, turn it on and head to work, knowing dinner is taken care of. You can let the family know what’s cooking by displaying the week’s meals on a weekly menu board. This can be as basic as a blackboard in the kitchen, or you can get crafty and create a unique menu board like those you’ll find on Pinterest. If yours is a “techy” family, you may prefer making a sub-calendar in a calendar app, such as Google or Outlook. Share it with each family member so they can access the app on their smartphones and know what’s for dinner without asking. Finally, savor the fruits of your labor. Preferably, with the whole family sitting down at the table together. You’ve taken the time to make a home-cooked meal for people you love—enjoy it!


SPEECH, LANGUAGE and OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY SERVICES

SPEECH/LANGUAGE THERAPY SERVICES Treatment of children with communication deficits related to • Articulation Disorders • Cognitive/Linguistic Disorders • Hearing Impairment • Language Impairments • Oral Motor/Apraxia • Reading Disabilities • Social/Pragmatic Disorders Treatment of children with communication deficits related to • GROUP THERAPY available for Private Pay Clients • Articulation Disorders • Cognitive/Linguistic Disorders • • Hearing Impairment Language Impairments • Oral Motor/Apraxia • Providers for Medicaid, CMS, Early Steps, Ped-I-Care • PRIVATE INSURANCE call •for information • Reading Disabilities • Social/Pragmatic Disorders

GROUP THERAPY available for Private Pay Clients

Providers Peavy, for Medicaid, SLP CMS, Early Steps, Ped-I-Care • PRIVATE INSURANCE call for information Jean Merchant, SLP | Julia

521 NE 25th Avenue, Ocala mail@protherapyslp.com

521 NE 25th Avenue, Ocala

(352) 401-7916 mail@protherapyslp.com

protherapyslp.com | (352) 401-7916 protherapyslp.com Jean Merchant, SLP | Julia Peavy, SLP

CALL US FOR A FREE INITIAL SCREENING | AVAILABLE BY APPOINTMENT

CALL US FOR A FREE INITIAL SCREENING | AVAILABLE BY APPOINTMENT

Let your children play in a safe and inventive environment while you relax! • • • •

Bounce House Rock Wall Indoor Jungle Gym Arts & Crafts Room

• • • •

Birthday Parties Group Events Free Wi-Fi Weekly Specials

Mon-Thu 9am-6pm / Fri-Sat 9am-9pm / Sun 9am-4pm 352.732.9739 / www.monkeymadnessofocala.com 2023 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala

ST. JOHN LUTHERAN SCHOOL A Tradition of Excellence K3-12th Grades • Comprehensive Athletic Program (beginning in 5th Grade) Arts, Music & Drama • Leadership and Service Opportunities

Mark your calendar for these events to learn more about the SAINTS! HIGH SCHOOL PREVIEW NIGHT OCTOBER 6 AT 5:45PM

Open to all students and families interested in our high school.

Spend the day on campus! Schedule to be a “Saint for a Day” To learn more, please email saints@stjohnocala.org or call 352-622-7275 x6.

St. John Lutheran School does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national or ethnic origin.

Trust in the Lord forever, for the Lord God is an everlasting rock. ~Isaiah 26:4

AUG ’16 ›

039


Get With The

040

› Ocala

.com


Area public high schools prepare students for post-secondary education and life in the workforce.

Program

AUG ’16 ›

041


A

ttaining the American Dream—success and prosperity through hard work and personal initiative—has become highly dependent on the job of the dreamer. And that job has become highly dependent on the dreamer’s level of education. In today’s world of global economics, where more than 40 million American jobs are tied directly to international trade and job competition is now an international challenge, a college education has become a virtual necessity for anyone who wants to truly realize this elusive dream. Recognizing this need, area public high schools have stepped up to provide the programs, curricula and accompanying support necessary to prepare local students for the rigors of a successful post-secondary education and/or skills to be successful when entering the workforce. Here are some of the programs available to local students that will provide them the proper tools to achieve continued academic and real-world success.

The Marion County Center for the Arts (MCCA) at West Port High School is a visual and performing arts program attended by more than 850 students from Marion County and the surrounding area. According to program coordinator Laurie Reeder, the mission statement of MCCA is “to prepare artistically talented students for post-secondary arts education and/or employment in the arts, while aspiring to the highest quality arts and academic instruction possible.” “Philosophically, this program helps prepare our students for life,” Reeder says. “MCCA students learn

042

› Ocala

.com

a multitude of life lessons, including teamwork, sacrifice, commitment, work ethic and time management… the arts create in them a passion that is there for the rest of their lives.” Reeder says the program includes 2-D art, 3-D art, acting, chorus, dance, digital imaging, directing for theater, electronic music, guitar, instrumental music, keyboarding, orchestra, photography, visual ensemble, rock ensemble, technical theater and television production. Students applying for the program, like any other magnet program in Marion County, must have a minimum 3.0 GPA and have passing scores on their Florida Standards Assessments. Eva Schore, a graduating senior at West Port, has been accepted into the School of Music at Florida State University and credits the MCCA program with her success. “MCCA gave me an outlet within school hours to practice and gain experience playing the oboe while in orchestra,” she says. “This experience will help me as I enter Florida State University this fall.”

Don Slocum was well-prepared to take over the Power Generation Academy at Dunnellon High School four years ago. Slocum was an experienced business owner and had a prior career as a master machinist. “I run the program like a business,” he says, “so the students learn employability skills, such as how to get and keep a job, and the technical skills necessary to become an electrical maintenance technician. The Power Generation program prepares students for jobs in the power and energy industry, such as plant operator, electrician, instrument and control technician, and maintenance mechanic. “This is a very well-rounded program,” says Slocum. “The curriculum is from the National Center for Construction Education and Research, and by the time a student leaves here, he or she can do practically anything the industry requires of them—electrical theory, industrial safety, tool use, hard work—they learn it all. Our students can go into a major shop and practically rebuild any machine in the place.” “I learned so much over the four years of the program, from basic safety all the way to motor controls and everything in between,” says program graduate Roberto Webb. “Power Generation Academy provided a great four years of hands-on work in a shop environment, and it taught me a lot—most importantly it taught me to always work hard.”

International Baccalaureate (IB) International Baccalaureate (IB) is an internationally based educational program designed to fully prepare motivated students for post-secondary education. The IB curriculum is academically rigorous and classes include: English, mathematics, arts, foreign language, experimental sciences, and individuals and societies. Students earning an IB diploma can receive up to 30 hours of college credit. “The program was designed in the 1980s to create an internationally regulated educational curriculum that is uniform worldwide,” says IB program director Susan Ferguson of Lake Weir High School. “The IB program here at Lake Weir is identical to the IB program you would find in Spain, France, Africa, Australia or Japan.”

Lake Weir high school has offered IB classes for five years and presently has more than 200 students enrolled in the program. Vanguard High School also offers an IB program. “The program is very, very appealing to colleges and universities. When they accept a student who has graduated with an IB diploma, they are getting a student who is well-versed in leadership and community service, a student who already knows how to perform experiments, do lab work and how to perform research,” Ferguson says.

Photo by Kevin Christian

Marion County Center for the Arts (MCCA)

Power Generation Academy


Engineering and Manufacturing Institute of Technology (EMIT)

Photo by Kevin Christian

For more than 20 years, the EMIT program at Forest High School has been preparing students for a post-secondary education in engineering. “Today we have more than 225 students in the EMIT program,” says program coordinator and mathematics instructor Raymond James. “EMIT has a strong engineering curriculum that includes classes in drafting, mathematics and English, and it also allows our students to take honors or AP classes simultaneously. One highlight of the program is our annual TLA, or thematic learning activity, where student teams design, build and present a STEM-driven project that encompasses all aspects of the EMIT learning program. Students also participate in the FIRST robotic competition each year.” Robert Strickland, a graduating senior who will be attending the University of Florida feels that the program has helped him better prepare for the rigors of college. “Throughout high school I have been involved in the EMIT program. In this STEM-oriented program, students are required to participate in TLAs and the EMIT Open,” he says. “Being in the program has allowed me to become an involved student in my school and in my community.”

“The AICE Program has been at North Marion High School for nine years, and we love it,” says AICE coordinator Dana Spencer. “It offers great flexibility for our students while providing a rigorous academic curriculum that is unsurpassed when it comes to preparing them for post-secondary education.” Spencer says AICE is an international preuniversity program designed by the University of Cambridge in England and is for students in grades nine through 12. Students in the program can receive an AICE diploma, which affords them up to 45 hours of college credit and the top Bright Futures scholarship. According to Jeffery Brewer, the AICE coordinator at Belleview High School, the program includes four areas of study: mathematics and science; language arts; arts and humanities; and global perspectives. “Students are required to take and pass a minimum of seven exams in the four areas of study in

order to earn the AICE diploma,” says Brewer. “Last year 78 of our students earned the Bright Futures Florida Academic Scholar award.” The AICE program has earned great respect in the academic community. “Belleview and North Marion High Schools are ranked No. 1 and 2 in Marion County on the Washington Post’s ‘Most Challenging High School’ list, and we firmly believe this is because the AICE Program in our schools provides such a well-rounded and demanding curriculum for our students,” says Spencer.

Photo by Kevin Christian

Cambridge Advanced International Certificate of Education (AICE)

Teachers at North Marion High School played a critical role in developing Florida’s Industrial Biotechnology Program, which is now offered at their school, as well as throughout the state. “Ten years ago, we participated in the NSF funded project through the University of Florida, helping write the standards for the high school and college programs,” says North Marion’s Industrial Biotechnology Program coordinator, Carla Reedy. “Our program is well-established and works closely with UF’s biotility program at the Center of Excellence for Regenerative Health Biotechnology.” According to Reedy, Industrial Biotechnology involves using processes that already exist in nature to develop usable products. The classic example is human insulin, a biopharmaceutical that is now produced by genetically engineered yeast. “Students who complete our program and pass the Biotechnician Assistant Credentialing Exam are certified biotechnician assistants,” Reedy says. “We are also expanding our Biotechnology program to include agricultural biotechnology. There are 47 students in the program, and Reedy says it readies them for a future career in the field AUG ’16 ›

043

Photo by Kevin Christian

Biotechnology and Biomedical


044

› Ocala

.com

Early College Ginger Cruze, now also assistant principal of instruction, has been the coordinator of the Early College program at West Port High School for five years, and she’s just as excited about the program today as she was her first day on the job. “We just graduated 76 seniors who received their Associate of Arts degrees along with their high school diploma,” she says. “I think that’s wonderful, and this program is such a great opportunity for our students. West Port is a satellite campus of the College of Central Florida, and we teach the same exact classes here as the students would be taught on the college campus… and one of the greatest parts of the program is that it is free. This makes a two-year college education available for every student regardless of their family income.” Although the Early College program is open to juniors and seniors, Cruze says the school also offers an Early College Magnet program that is available for all area freshmen and sophomore students. “Students are accepted into the Early College program if they have an unweighted GPA of 3.0 or

higher, have no disciplinary problems, have good attendance records and have sufficient scores on the PERT, ACT or SAT tests,” says Cruze. Trent Salmon graduated from West Port with his AA degree from the College of Central Florida through the Early College program. Trent was accepted into the University of Florida, University of South Florida, University of Central Florida, Florida State University and Florida Atlantic University. He will be attending the University of North Florida, where he was awarded a $4,000-persemester scholarship. “The Early College program gave me the opportunity to pursue higher education while still in high school,” he says. “The best thing about the program is that it provides students with the opportunity to challenge themselves through the rigorous coursework assigned by the teachers but does not allow for the students to be left behind or overwhelmed.”

Logistics and Supply Chain Management “The community approached us with a need, and we are filling it,” says John Conway, internship coordinator at Marion Technical Institute (MTI). “Local companies such as R+L Carriers, Cheney Brothers, Kmart distribution and others approached us with a need for students capable of filling logistics positions. To meet their need, we created our Logistics and Supply Chain Management Academy.” According to Conway, logistics involves getting the right product to the right place at the right time. For large companies that move a massive amount of products, logistics is a major concern, and local job opportunities should be numerous. “We have a great academy instructor in logistics with business veteran David Ayala, we have a tremendous business-community need and we have had outstanding community support,” says Conway. “Following graduation from the program, students can become certified and enter the workforce at well-paying, entry-level positions or they can attend the College of Central Florida where they can pursue an associate or bachelor’s degree in logistics.” Conway says students who decide to forego a degree can earn from $10 to $13 per hour at entry-level positions, and students with degrees can expect to earn $50,000 to $60,000 per year. “We have some great local businesses who have a need, and with FedEx Ground coming to Ocala, job opportunities are only going to increase,” Conway says. “The Logistics Academy has prepared me for my career in the military as a 92Y Unit Supply Specialist,” says graduating senior Frank Sanchez. “The Logistics program has given me a better understanding of all the processes, from receiving to shipping.”

Editor’s note: We made several attempts to contact each area public high school. Unfortunately, we were unsuccessful in our attempts.

Photos by Kevin Christian

of scientific research by familiarizing them with all aspects of working in a science lab. John Galyen is one of those students. “The Biotech Program has really opened my eyes to possible career choices in science,” he says. “The program as a whole has helped me learn to conduct experiments properly as well as the variety of techniques that can be applied to various problems in science.” West Port High School Biomedical Science Program coordinator, Blake Atkinson, says their curricula is provided by Project Lead The Way (PLTW), a nonprofit educational program that focuses its efforts on the fields of computer science, engineering and biomedical science. “The curriculum is very hands-on and is computer based,” says Atkinson. “It is a three-year program that prepares students for virtually any job in the medical field. This is a very comprehensive, medically based program.” Atkinson says that, like the Biotech Programs at North Marion, this magnet program also enables students to become certified biotechnician assistants. “Ideally, students begin the program in the ninth grade and complete it in their junior year,” he says. “They can then pursue a variety of certifications in their senior year or take classes such as anatomy and physiology to better prepare for college. And another plus is that if they have their Biotechnician Assistant certification, they can possibly work in the research labs of whatever college they attend.” West Port Senior Matthew Blaize, who has received his Biotech Assistant Certification, has taken full advantage of the program. “The Biomedical Science Program sparked my love and interest in biomedical engineering,” he says. “It’s what taught me how to do research on my own. It’s what got me into the UF summer research program last year, and it’s the reason I’ve been accepted into the Biomedical Engineering Program at Vanderbilt University.”


STATE of the

AREA TEACHERS TELL IT LIKE IT IS. By Cynthia McFarland

TEACHEING INCLUDES MANY OF THE SAME CHALLENGES FACED BY PARENTS. You can have the highest hopes and dreams for your students but the daily grind—not to mention the current obsession with technology—makes it more difficult to negotiate the academic and social maze of childhood and teenage years.

,


We reached out to some of Marion County’s finest educators to tap into their experience, learn their approach and get their best advice for students at every grade level. (Notice the emphasis on reading for all ages!) Let their wisdom help you guide your own children along the path to success.

Pre-K

ROZINA

ALI

{teacher since 1996} MONTESSORI PREPARATORY OF OCALA

“T

he greatest achievement in the first six years of a child’s life, in my opinion, is directed by their absorbent minds when a child gathers knowledge from his or her observations,” says Rozina Ali. That includes both “conscious” and “unconscious” learning. During the first three years of their child’s life, a parent’s task is to provide a safe, rich environment. “After age 3 until age 6, the task of parents increases,” says Ali. “They should let the child lead in accomplishing tasks independently with limited guidance. Although parents may supply the desired help needed, the obstacle between the child and his experience should never be crossed.”

Ali explains that it’s vital for parents and teachers to understand that every child learns differently. Some are audible learners, while others are more hands-on and visual. Adjusting teaching methods according to each child will be very beneficial to development. Ali finds that the toughest adjustments confronting her young students are the lack of parental involvement and the excessive use of technology.

HER TEACHING PHILOSOPHY “EACH CHILD IS UNIQUE AND LEARNS DIFFERENTLY, SO THE TEACHER’S METHODS AND IDEAS SHOULD ADAPT TO THE CHILD’S NEEDS. INSTEAD OF BECOMING THE ‘PERSON IN CHARGE,’ I CONSIDER THE ROLE OF TEACHER AS THAT OF FACILITATOR, BY PROVIDING PROPER MOTIVATION AND SHOWING THE RIGHT DIRECTION.

Continued

> AUG ’16 ›

047


Kinderga

e rt

n

HER TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

SANDRA

“I BELIEVE IN A STUDENTCENTERED CLASSROOM WHERE CHILDREN LEARN BY CREATING, COLLABORATING AND BEING CHALLENGED. I BELIEVE IN CREATING AN ENVIRONMENT THAT ALLOWS STUDENTS TO TAKE CONTROL OF THEIR LEARNING AND GIVES THEM HANDS-ON EXPERIENCES TO GAIN KNOWLEDGE.”

DAILEY

K

{teacher since 1987} EIGHTH STREET ELEMENTARY

indergarten is a milestone grade, and young students face some tough adjustments, including learning to focus and work independently. The goal is for all students to leave kindergarten being able to read, so Sandra Dailey encourages parents to help their children transition into this grade by making sure kids begin the school year with a solid ability to identify and name letters, as well as knowing how those letters sound. Beyond academics, children of this age also experience many social changes. Parents should see their children becoming more independent in all areas, from tying their own shoes to taking care of their school supplies. Extracurricular activities are vital for children of this age, especially when it comes to socialization and exercise. “I think organized sports are fantastic to help build friendships, follow directions and for learning to win and lose,” says Dailey. She adds that parents can do a lot at home to make school and learning in general easier. “Make it a fun, family time. Build up the child and read to them as much as possible!” 

MICHELLE

1st Grade

1s

DONALDSON {teacher since 2013} DUNNELLON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

T

ransitioning into first grade can be challenging, but Michelle Donaldson finds parents can help tremendously by reading to their children every night. This activity increases the child’s vocabulary and word bank, while instilling a love for reading. She’d like all her students to read Stand Tall, Molly Lou Melon, by Patty Lovell, because it’s about being proud of who you are. “I hope my students always have a book in their hand because they love to read. I also hope they have developed a set of self-reliant skills to attack words they don’t know and problems they cannot solve,” says Donaldson. “First-graders are expected to write more, read longer and perform more difficult critical thinking tasks than ever before. This can be overwhelming, but I’ve found if we raise our expectations our students will meet them.” Parents can help by understanding that learning should continue at home—not stop when the bell rings. “You are their teachers through life. Develop a relationship with their teacher, ask for help if you need it and attend school functions and trainings.” First-graders are old enough to understand that their actions affect others, learn to compromise, be patient and have empathy.

2nd

Grade

SUSAN

BRUEGGER {regular education teacher since 2002} ANTHONY ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

HER TEACHING PHILOSOPHY “I BELIEVE THAT ALL STUDENTS CAN BE SUCCESSFUL NO MATTER THEIR ABILITIES. I WANT ALL STUDENTS TO LEAVE MY CLASS LOVING SCHOOL AND FEELING PROUD OF WHAT THEY HAVE LEARNED.”  048

› Ocala

.com

t Gr de a

S

econd-graders face plenty of challenges, according to Susan Bruegger. Not only must they read much longer passages than in first grade, but they’re expected to answer more open-ended questions and learn to work more independently. To that end, Bruegger hopes to see her students work in cooperative groups with classmates, while staying on task. “I would like them to be kind to each other and become fluent, independent readers, creative writers and able to reason mathematically,” she notes.


3rd

Gr

ade

R

eading skills are a must for students in this grade. “If a student has difficulty reading coming into third grade, the student is going to struggle the rest of the year,” says Andrea Lockley, who hopes all of her students read the Magic Tree House series and How to Be Cool in the Third Grade. Among the most important milestones for third graders is the development of cause and effect reasoning skills and mathematics reasoning. For example, understanding that 8+2=10 so 10-2=8. Lockley urges parents to make use of the online Parent Portal, which is utilized in Marion County Public Schools. “Set up a routine for coming home and doing homework and reading. Talk with your children about what they are learning. Allow your child to make mistakes; they’re a part of learning. Don’t ever take the ownership and responsibility for learning away from your child by doing it for them.” Lockley’s best study tips? Have a set schedule and place for homework and reading “EVERY CHILD CAN at home. Don’t wait until the LEARN WITH EFFORT AND A GOOD ATTITUDE last minute. TOWARD LEARNING.” Third-graders are evolving socially, as well. Friendships may change frequently as children’s viewpoints expand and change. Extracurricular activities are a great way to use skills learned in the classroom. Lockley recommends all manner of sports activities in order to {teacher since 2005} encourage physical activity, teamwork, cooperation OAKCREST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL and sportsmanship.

   

KELLY

HUBNER {teacher since 1994} DR. N.H. JONES ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

4th Grade

F

ourth-graders in Florida public schools have to take the FSA ELA Writing test, so it’s crucial they understand how to read and comprehend related texts and make connections between the texts. They also have to write their own essay using evidence they pull from the texts.

HER TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

ANDREA

LOCKLEY H E R T E ACH I N G PH I LO S O PH Y

“MY GOAL IS TO GE EXCITEMENT FOR NERATE AN LEARNING AND TO HELP PLAN OF RESPONSIBILIT T THE SEEDS DEPENDABLE CITI Y THAT GROW ZENS OF THE FUTURE.”

A regular homework routine will help, including reviewing homework with their parents, even if they completed it in an after-school program. Bruegger encourages her students to read on their own 20 to 30 minutes a day and also read with their parents. One book she highly recommends is Enemy Pie, thanks to its affirming life lessons. Scouting, soccer and anything to do with the arts are great extracurricular activities, within reason, as they provide challenge and

help build confidence, sportsmanship and listening skills. “Parents should read to their children, be good role models, help build their child’s confidence and communicate with their child’s teacher. See that your child is at school on time and has good attendance,” urges Bruegger, adding that parents should provide fun learning experiences outside of school.

Kelly Hubner’s best advice for students? Read everything from fiction, non-fiction and short stories to magazines and newspapers. She encourages every Florida fourth-grader to read A Land Remembered by Patrick Smith (youth version). “Students love it, and it’s the best example of Florida historical fiction I’ve found,” she says. Although extracurricular activities are important, Hubner emphasizes the value of non-structured time. “I think we, as parents, tend to over-plan. Out of school, there has to be time for kids to be kids.” Parents must stay involved, she adds. “Talk to your child, not just about academics but about relationships. Do not AUG ’16 ›

049


5th

Grade

A

HER TEACHING PHILOSOPHY “IT IS MY JOB TO HELP THE STUDENTS IN MY CLASSROOM TO BE SUCCESSFUL. IT IS MY JOB TO BEND, FLEX, RESEARCH AND DIG UNTIL I FIND HOW TO HELP THEM BE SUCCESSFUL.” try to fix everything for them, but listen and ask more questions. Let them make connections to what is the right thing to do. Provide an environment that makes education important, and hold them accountable when they do not take care of their responsibilities.” 

ANGELA

LITTON

{teacher since 1989} THE CORNERSTONE SCHOOL

s a language arts and social studies teacher, Angela Litton enjoys seeing her students learn to convey ideas in a strong personal voice. She strives to foster creative, independent, autonomous learners who develop a good command of grammar, including revision and editing techniques. “Thoughtfully planned integration of technology into the curriculum is undoubtedly a powerfully effective learning tool. However, our children are bombarded with unfiltered information that developmentally they may not be prepared to deal with. Learning to discriminate useful information is challenging.”  Children at this age are increasingly interested in fostering and cultivating friendships. “Fifth-graders need a lot of sleep and exercise. Their homework should be done in a quiet, organized setting. Provide your child with a lot of healthy snacks. Brain breaks every 30 minutes help concentration, even in a home setting,” notes Litton. She says parents can help their children by setting definite boundaries for what is school/study/homework time and what is free time. “Limit decisions that children make “I HOPE TO CHALLENGE in the home environment,” she adds. STUDENTS IN “In fi ft h grade, children still need a lot A CREATIVE, of support, direction and very clear SAFE ENVIRONMENT.” guidelines for success.”

HER TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

6th Grade

RACHEL

KELLY

“F

{teacher since 1989} GRACE CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

or sixth-graders, the transition from a self-contained class to a middle school setting takes time,” says Rachel Kelly, adding that organization and healthy social interactions are learned behaviors. “At Grace, our model for the proper treatment of others is the “UTILIZING AND Fruit of the Spirit, INSTILLING CHRISTIAN which teaches nine VALUES TO PROMOTE attributes of living a SELF-CONFIDENCE AND Christian life.” INDEPENDENCE, WHILE There is HELPING STUDENTS REACH THEIR ACADEMIC tremendous growth POTENTIAL. A LOT OF during the formative STRUCTURE AND A middle school years. LOT OF LOVE GO A Kelly wants to see LONG WAY!” her students engage

HER TEACHING PHILOSOPHY

050

› Ocala

.com

in class discussions, hypothetical thinking and problem solving—both academic and social. Becoming more confident and independent are also encouraged. Extracurricular activities are an integral part of a child’s well-being. Kelly finds they aid development of social skills and provide routine. “Success comes to those who are organized and have a routine outside of school,” she adds. “The second key to success is being creative, both in the classroom and at home, to unlock individual learning styles, which lessens frustration.” Kelly has found that two-way communication between teacher and parents is vital and can help solve problems before they become bigger issues.


DIANE

SWARTZ

7t

hG rade

{teacher since 1988} ST. JOHN LUTHERAN SCHOOL

M

iddle school comes with its own set of unique challenges, with some of the toughest adjustments being that students must become more responsible for their own education and completing assignments. “The most important developmental milestone I hope to see in my students is that they grow from being dependent children to independent teenagers,” says Diane Swartz. “Middle school is an important time where many life-long habits are made, and it is important for these habits to be positive ones. I hope that all of my students are academically successful,

8 t h G r a d e

GAVIN

DUNN

A HER TEACHING PHILOSOPHY “ALL CHILDREN NEED TO BE TAUGHT WHERE THEY CURRENTLY ARE IN THEIR ABILITY TO LEARN AND ENCOURAGED TO MAKE ADVANCEMENTS IN THEIR UNDERSTANDING.”

so that by the time they complete eighth grade they are academically ready for high school.” Swartz encourages her students to review their notes every day for five to 10 minutes, asking questions whenever they don’t completely understand a concept.  “I recommend that parents set a routine with their child as soon as he or she enters school,” she says. “Make homework a learning opportunity rather than a chore each evening. Encourage their child, but allow the child to complete their assignments with minimal help. The most important thing a parent can do for their child is pray for them.”

{teacher since 2016} HOWARD MIDDLE SCHOOL

s a language arts teacher, Gavin Dunn wants his students to be able to read—not just a story but also between the lines. That includes understanding the author’s point of view and literary elements, such as symbolism and themes. He’s all for studying, not cramming. “Don’t study just the night before the test. Studying about 30 minutes a night at least a week in advance will probably lead to a better test score. “Taking more personal responsibility for their education is a tough adjustment for this age group, but they need to realize they are the masters of their own educational destinies. This is already a tumultuous time in the life of a young adult,” says Dunn, adding that it’s a big help if parents stay actively involved in their child’s education. “Discuss school with them. Make sure they’re doing homework, support and encourage them, offering guidance when needed, but don’t do their work for them. Don’t be afraid to contact teachers. You both want the student to succeed, and often, communication is the easiest way to coordinate that success.”

HIS TEACHING PHILOSOPHY “TO HELP STUDENTS DISTILL CONCEPTS INTO THE SIMPLEST FORMS POSSIBLE AND TO EXAMINE THOSE CONCEPTS FROM MORE THAN ONE POINT OF VIEW. TO HELP STUDENTS DIG DEEPER, I LIKE TO ASK THEM, ‘WHAT WOULD YOU DO IF YOU WERE IN THIS CHARACTER’S POSITION?’” Continued

> AUG ’16 ›

051


9th Grade

CHERYL

TOMLINSON

“A HER TEACHING PHILOSOPHY “ENGAGEMENT INCREASES DRAMATICALLY WHEN STUDENTS KNOW YOU ARE VESTED IN THEM PERSONALLY AND THEIR ACADEMIC SUCCESS. KIDS ARE NOT GOING TO REMEMBER THE CURRICULUM YOU TAUGHT AS MUCH AS HOW THEY FELT ABOUT THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT YOU CREATED IN YOUR CLASSROOM.”

10t

h Grad

{teacher since 2007} TRINITY CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL

big adjustment for freshmen is understanding that grades earned throughout the freshman year can have a permanent effect on college admissions,” says biology teacher Cheryl Tomlinson. “It takes most students the first quarter or so to realize the academic behaviors that may have led to excellent grades in middle school do not always bring the same results in high school.” Learning how to balance commitments and responsibilities is an important developmental goal. At this age, students want more space, and parents should expect this. They crave more independence and privacy, so when parents “overshare” about their teen’s personal life, this can be highly upsetting. Although Tomlinson recommends extracurricular activities that foster personal or academic development, she’s also seen those commitments take time away from proper academic focus and just plain rest. “Students have told me they feel an unreasonable amount of pressure to continue in activities they no longer enjoy due to the possibility of obtaining a college scholarship or adding to a college résumé. Parents can help their teens prioritize commitments by having honest discussions about what activities are truly enriching their lives and which activities may be best to discontinue,” she advises.

e

SCOTT

PROVOST

A

{teacher since 2002} LAKE WEIR HIGH SCHOOL

s a world history teacher (mainstream and AP), Scott Provost finds that the most important skill his students work on is writing. Using questions based on passages they read, students focus on refining writing skills and adjusting to more of a college level and style. He encourages students to study by making connections with previously learned knowledge and applying the lessons of history to current events. “Memorization will only you get you so far; it is an elementary/middle school study skill,” he says. “High school students need to be able to take it to the next level and independently apply what they have memorized to similar situations and content.” Students must take responsibility for their own education,

he adds. They need to know that history is told from multiple perspectives and that there are always two sides to every story. He emphasizes the value of “gaining knowledge,” not just “getting information” by searching something on the Internet. Despite his students’ busy schedules, Provost considers extracurricular activities—both team and individual—hugely important and believes they play a vital role in the development of the whole child.

CH I N GY A E T S H I I LO S O PH PH

, BUT L. LEARNATED EQUA N A C E ID R K C Y T “EVER ONE IS NO CHILD ISN’T ’T Y A R ESN E E S V U E ECA T, THAT DOMY GOAL B T S JU TUDEN ILURE. EIR AN A STHEM A FA REACH TH M E E K A H T M HELP IAL.” IS TO T N E T O FULL P

Continued 052

› Ocala

.com

>


OC A LA ST Y LE A U G 2 0 1 6 _ C SC LM. p d f 1

7 /1 5 /2 0 1 6

1 1 :2 5 :2 6 A M

You Seek. We Find.

C

M

Y

C M

MY

C Y

C MY

K

Get schooled in HIRE education Whether you’re ready to make your next career move, hit the books to train for a new opportunity, or are seeking re-employment, we’re ready to help. All at no charge to you. 352.732.1700 | 800.734.JOBS careersourceclm.com

CareerSource Citrus Levy Marion is an Equal Opportunity Employer/Program. Phone numbers may be reached via Florida Relay Service at 711. Upon request, auxiliary aids/services are available to those with disabilities; program information is also available in Spanish. For accommodations, please call 800-434-5627, ext. 7878 Member: CareerSource Florida.

Montessori P R E PA R ATO R Y S C H O O L O F O C A L A

INFANT • TODDLER • PRESCHOOL • KINDERGARTEN • ELEMENTARY

EXTRACURRICULAR ACTIVITIES: SPANISH, BALLET, MUSIC, PIANO, ART, SOCCER 2967 NE SI LVER SPRINGS BLVD OCAL A, FL 3447 0

352-351-3140

STEP UP SCHOLARSHIP FOR KINDERGARTEN THROUGH 5TH GRADE

A cce pti n g R e g ist rati f o r 2 016 - 17

AUG ’16 ›

on

053


11th

Grad

e

ELIZABETH

DAVIS

{full-time teacher since 2012} VANGUARD HIGH SCHOOL

“W

ith knowledge there is power, and with power, endless opportunities,” says Elizabeth Davis, who teaches 11th grade U.S. History. “I hope to build confidence and self esteem in each student, to show them they are capable of bigger and better things. Teaching is much more than facts and figures; I believe that it is about building trust and confidence.” Davis finds that lack of motivation and confidence are big concerns for students at this age. “They are taking far too many tests and are burned out by the end of testing season,” she adds. She hopes parents encourage their teens to develop acceptance and respect for all cultures and differing groups. “Not to judge but to understand everyone is different and that is OK.” Along those lines, a book she’d like all her students to read is The Kite Runner. Her best study tip? Review material from the day before for the first 10 minutes of class.

MARY

FILLION {teacher since 1987} WEST PORT HIGH SCHOOL

S HER TEACHING PHILOSOPHY “IT’S OK TO MAKE MISTAKES AND NOT KNOW EVERYTHING; THAT IS HOW WE LEARN. I’M HONEST ABOUT NOT BEING PERFECT. THEY LEARN TO NOT ONLY TRUST ME, BUT THEY BUILD TRUST WITHIN THEMSELVES AND OPEN UP TO LEARNING THROUGH MAKING MISTAKES.”

054

› Ocala

.com

enior year is all about helping students develop the practical skills they’ll need to compete in the workplace and at the collegiate level. To help them transition seamlessly from high school to college, West Port has a unique affiliation with College of Central Florida through their Early College Program. Because of this, 78 seniors received their Associate of Arts Degree 13 days before graduating from high school in May 2016. Mary Fillion encourages her students to attend classes regularly, read the content material and complete all assignments, but she realizes that this can be a tough time in their lives. “Seniors are challenged with a balancing act of academics and extracurricular activities, while

12

th G ade r

HER TEACHING PHILOSOPHY “I STRIVE TO ENGAGE MY STUDENTS IN THE SUBJECTS THAT I TEACH, WHILE ENDEAVORING TO MAKE CONNECTIONS TO THE PRESENT DAY THROUGH CURRENT EVENTS. AN UPBEAT FRAME OF MIND CREATES AN ATMOSPHERE IN WHICH THAT LEARNED IN PLEASURE WILL NEVER BE FORGOTTEN.” using their time to the best of their advantage,” says Fillion. “Many seniors are sentimental about making memories and taking those memories with them into the future as they realize this is their final year in high school. Graduation represents a rite of passage in our society. Graduates face both the promise and the uncertainty of the future.”


Local Foster Parents

speak from the heart

“There are children who need your help.” “you can help an older child and their siblings for a lifetime.” “Every child deserves a chance.” Hundreds of abused, abandoned and neglected children

in Citrus and Marion Counties need a safe, loving home.

These foster and adoptive parents had the heart to help. do you? change a life for good

Foster or Adopt an Older C hild

Kids Central, Inc. is the nonprofit organization charged with preventing and treating child abuse and selected by the State of Florida to coordinate child protection services in Citrus, Hernando, Lake, Marion and Sumter Counties (Circuit 5). No person shall be discriminated against on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, disability, sexual orientation, martial status or any other characteristic protected by federal, state or local law. Funded via Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Administration for Children and Families Federal Opportunity Announcement, Diligent Recruitment Families for Children in the Foster Care System: HHS-2013-ACF-ACYF-CO-0593. Award #: 90C01112-01-00

KidsCentralFosterParents.org 352-873-6332


Artist Tales BY

CE

PH

AL

OT

IA

OG

AT H

RA

AN

PH

Y

AS

BY

ON

JO

H

N

JE

RN

IG

AN

Four local artists bring talent and inspiration to this year’s First Friday Art Walk.

T

he arts community in Ocala continues to grow—new arts-focused organizations, events and projects prove it. The First Friday Art Walk began in 2010 as an early effort to connect residents to local artists in downtown Ocala. The Art Walk gets bigger and better with each season, and we’re not about to let the talent of the Art Walk artists go unnoticed. We hung out with four of them and listened to their stories about art, community and giving back—and now we’re sharing them with you.


It takes a steady hand to keep the brazing torch’s flame exactly where he wants it.

Something From Nothing

June 1 was a hot, sunny day not unlike most Florida ones that time of year, and Bob Kuperberg dons his safety goggles, grabs a brazing torch and arranges four metal rings and two large concrete nails together to make the face of one of his newest creations—he fondly calls her “Shovella.” Bob first got into metal sculpture about 40 years ago when he saw the sculpture of a skier selling at an art show for $80. Instead of paying the $80, he decided to make a skier of his own. He used concrete nails to make an almost exact replica for himself, and that was just the beginning. “It’s exciting to make something out of nothing,” Bob says. If there’s something Bob can be credited with besides his skill at brazing and soldering, it would be innovation. An example would be the simple way he bends Shovella’s wire hair in perfect curves—but he swore us to secrecy on that one. Bob shops antique stores and flea markets to find old shovels, and he often endures funny looks from other shoppers when he raids the button stash at Michael’s, which he uses for unique eye pieces. He finds other materials like wire, concrete nails and metal washers or rings at Tractor Supply Company, Home Depot and Lowe’s.

Bob can find a use for almost anything, and one of his friends jokes about hiding his tools when around Bob. They just might turn up in Bob’s workshop or even in one of his sculptures. Shovella, though exciting and new, is only one of Bob’s many sculptures. Flower bouquets cut from roofing metal, snails made out of gears and elaborate wire wall accents fill his living room’s mantle and back wall from floor to ceiling. He’s rarely without ideas for the next project. “I’m always looking for things,” Bob says. “People in the community have been very helpful with giving me ideas.” It takes a steady hand to keep the brazing torch’s flame exactly where he wants it when he feeds the brazing rod between Shovella’s eyeball and socket to secure them. But Bob’s hands have proved steady over the years, and just a few years ago, he took several of his sculptures to the First Friday Art Walk. On average, he sells two pieces at each Art Walk, some weeks selling just one and others as many as five. “The Art Walk downtown has done wonders. It’s an exciting Friday night,” Bob says. “Every year it gets bigger and bigger.” When Bob first started making these metal sculptures, he would just give them away. The people he gave them to would always want to pay him, but

that didn’t feel right to Bob. So he decided to sell his work and donate the money to Interfaith Emergency Services’ Food 4 Kids program. “Interfaith has been very supportive; they appreciate everything,” Bob says. “I’m just happy to donate my money to them.” From whimsical, metal butterflies traced from a card he received to tiny statement seagulls made with concrete nails, his sculptures are made with others in mind, and he’s excited to share them with the community again this season. AUG ’16 ›

057


Feelin’ The Blues

One of Ocala’s grooviest artists, John Yakulevich, paints blues-inspired folk art. He’s been selling his paintings professionally for about four years and has been an artist of the First Friday Art Walk for about three years. Along with blues-style paintings, he paints artists of other genres, too. Tom Petty and Jimi Hendrix have been some of his most popular ones lately. John grew up around artists as a child—his mother and grandmother painted as hobbies, and his uncle was a sign painter, pinstriping and painting vans back in the ‘70s. But, he didn’t learn as much as you’d expect about painting from them. “I think one of my early influences were comic books,” John says. He considers it all part of the “stew” that brought him to where he is today. And up until about five years ago, John actually considered himself more of a sculptor than a painter. That changed one day when he was working with his art students at Forest High School on analogous color paintings, and while they got busy, he did, too—but on something a little different than usual. He found himself painting

058

› Ocala

.com

Chester Burnett, a.k.a. Howlin’ Wolf, in a folk-artsy kind of way. “It was just too much fun,” John says. He was hooked. “I’ve always been envious of the people who have the one thing, and I just think it’s been a good fit for me.” John points to that day as the day he found his true passion in art, and his work is now almost exclusively pop art/folk art. Ironically, the one defining factor of folk art is that it’s art without any technical or fine arts skill. That’s something John isn’t lacking—he’s taught art at Forest High School for 27 years and has his master’s in art education. But that’s what makes his work stand out. At first, John started selling his blues paintings on a friend’s website. They were large and hard to ship, so he explored other options and finally made the switch to smaller sizes using reclaimed wood slats, pallets and plywood for canvases. “I like the whole recycle angle. In truth, a lot of it comes from being a cheapskate. I’ve stopped on the side of the road to pick things up,” he laughingly admits. John also switched to selling his work locally. When he heard about the First Friday Art Walk three years ago, he got involved halfway through the season.

“There’s no high like someone enjoying what you’re doing.” The Marion Theatre sponsors him, and you’ll find him set up in front of it with his paintings on display. “There’s no high like someone enjoying what you’re doing,” John says. At May’s Art Walk, he had several prints for sale thanks to his partnership with Grafito Advertising & Marketing, Inc. John started working with them because he wanted to offer a more affordable product. He credits Grafito for steering him in the right direction and producing prints of his originals. “You can buy an original for $75, so I figured a print could sell for $30,” John says. He does a lot of commission work, too, and his creativity comes out when he highlights aspects of the musicians. He’ll pull out a song lyric or something the artist is known for and add it to the painting. He’s looking forward to the Art Walks this season and hopes more of the public will take advantage of it.


Once she gets going, this night owl will sometimes stay busy until 4am.

Art: Inspired

Joanna Jones admits she’s not one who paints from emotion. She paints a vision she sees in her head, puts an imaginative spin on a photo or creates a scene from something she’s read. She won’t paint something and leave it as is. If it’s not up to par with what she pictured, she’ll continue working on it until it gets there. She’s more of a perfectionist, and her scenic landscapes and fantasy art have a precise style. “It’s not abstract, that’s for sure,” Joanna says. “It’s like the other end of the scale from abstract.” Three years ago, Joanna Jones’ mom, Marian Rizzo, told her about an Art Walk ad she saw in the Star-Banner. They decided to go check it out before Joanna decided to get involved. Not long after, Joanna was setting up at the Art Walk with paintings of serene landscapes, animals and imaginative fantasy scenes in tow. Joanna grew up painting, learning how to paint with acrylics at 7 years old from local art teacher

Mischa Krumm. Now with twin 8-year-old daughters, a 5-year-old son and side jobs, the only time for her to paint is at night. It’s her preference anyway, and one that often postpones her own shut-eye for several hours. Once she gets going, this night owl will sometimes stay busy until 4am. Joanna thinks back to when her father used to paint, and credits his art for inspiring her own. She’s been painting most of her life, from those early acrylics classes to a few art classes at the College of Central Florida. At that point though, she was studying to be a vet and put her art on hold for a while. Then she noticed how much she missed it. It took some time, but eventually she got back into art. “The more you do it, the more you want to do it,” Joanna says. “Sometimes I get stuck… and then you kind of have to wait for the inspiration to come.” She often finds inspiration from what she sees. Just going to the Ocala Comic Con this past summer sparked several new ideas. Then, once she gets to the Art Walk, she’ll set up a few originals, several

prints and lots of painted rocks—the kids love them. What Joanna loves most about the Art Walk, besides sharing her art, is meeting different people and chatting with the other artists. “It seems like each year there’s more people that attend the Art Walk,” Joanna says. So far, Joanna’s best sellers have been her animal paintings and sketches. The one that most people go for is a sketch of two horses facing each other nose to nose and forming a heart. She sells it in four different color schemes and calls it Horse Hearts, for obvious reasons. On the wilder side, she’s also made a dragon version—featuring one dragon and its long tail—calling it Dragon Hearts. “I guess on average I would sell two or three prints and maybe four or five of the painted rocks,” she says. “If it’s a good night, I sell an original, but that doesn’t always happen.” Besides the Art Walk, Joanna sells and displays her paintings in BD Beans Coffee Company, a small coffee and breakfast shop in Belleview. AUG ’16 ›

059


Renzo barely edits his photos, due mostly to the techniques and tools he employs.

Picture Perfect

A simple flick of the camera, a twist of the lens, a quick rotation. That’s what Renzo Seravalle does, cleverly using his camera to produce amazing photos. He holds up the photo of a multi-colored drop of water as an example of drip photography, a process he’s set up on his worktable. Through camera settings and a colorful backdrop, he captures

the exact moment a drop of water hits the surface of more water. He floods the background with light and explains that the water takes on the color of the backdrop. It’s a beautiful manipulation of light and reflection. Renzo stresses: “It’s all about the lighting.” He finds another photo, one of trees that looks like an abstract painting. The trunks appear to be merely brushstrokes up from a green cloud of ferns below. He confirms that yes, it is a photo and that, more unbelievingly so, it was simple to take. The secret is in the flick of his wrist. He swiftly jolts the camera up in a controlled arc to achieve the swiped motion of the trees. Renzo barely edits his photos, due mostly to the techniques and tools he employs. Some of the photos you’ll see at the Art Walk are nature and landscape photos. Others are the products of macro photography, and he uses that technique to capture tiny bugs in uncanny detail. But birds are his favorite. “I have an album on Facebook. It’s called ‘Our Backyard Birds,’” Renzo says. “I love birds.” You could say photography runs in Renzo’s genes. He grew up in the Dominican Republic, and his

father and grandfather were skilled photographers. Renzo’s father gave him his first camera, which looks like a small black box and sits above the worktable in his office on one of three shelves dedicated to displaying old cameras. Growing up, he took private photography lessons, and he finally went professional about 10 years ago. Lately, he’s been printing photos onto aluminum, giving the photos a finished, urban appeal. One indemand photo captures the detail of a blueish-purple feather against a solid black background. Renzo dropped the feather, letting it float through the air— all the while snapping his camera—until he got what he wanted: the front-facing, slightly angled wave of a feather fluttering to its resting place. “Sometimes I reprint the same one, like the blue feather,” he says of his preparation for the Art Walk. Stationed in front of Harry’s Seafood Bar & Grille at May’s First Friday Art Walk, Renzo’s table displayed photos of all different shapes and sizes. And this season, you’ll see more of them printed on aluminum.

Learn more › First Friday Art Walk › Ocala’s downtown square › First Friday of each month, September through May, 6-9pm › ocalafl.org/artwalk

060

› Ocala

.com


Free Delivery

Committed to Patient Care We Do Compounding

Treatment of Common Ailments such as Bunions, Hammertoes, Heel Pain, Fractures, Sprains, Athlete’s Foot, Neuromas, Tendonitis Ankle Arthroscopy • Laser Foot Surgery • Sports Related Injuries Children’s Foot Care • Custom Orthotics

Free Antibiotics*, Metformin* & Lisinopril*

Generics: $3.79/30 days & $9.79/90 days *Call for details, conditions may apply.

Free MultiDrugs Packaging Available

WE NOW HAVE DIGITAL XRAY ON PREMISES Family Foot and Ankle is now located in South Pine Medical Park. We have on-site digital X-ray as well as 3-D scanning for custom orthotics and perform diabetic shoe fittings. In addition to our comprehensive conservative therapies, both doctors are on staff at all the hospitals and perform surgery on the foot and ankle as well.

Transfer 3 or More Prescriptions and Earn 500 Reward Points Value up to $25.

DAILY PROMOTION 15% Discount on All OTC

Best Prices

Fast

Belleview

Ocala

P: 352-245-3961 F: 352-245-7035

P: 352-680-9500 F: 352-680-9700

5909 SE Abshier Blvd. 9309 SE Maricamp Rd.

Dr. Noroozi

Dr. Amin

Sheila Noroozi, DPM, FACFAS Family Foot and Ankle, LLC Diplomate, American Board of Podiatric Surgery Board Certified in Foot & Ankle Surgery

2825 SE 3rd Ct. Ocala, FL 34471

352.867.0024

Great Services

Friendly Williston

219 S. Main St.

P: 352-529-6966 F: 352-529-6968

Reddick

15320 NW Gainesville Rd.

P: 352-591-1116 F: 352-591-3003

All Insurances Accepted

We welcome United, Prestige, StayWell and Florida Blue Insurance.

www.FamilyFootAnkle.org

Call for Store Hours • Se Habla Español

What will you CreatE Today? For Children & Adults

NEw Classes The Appleton Museum of Art offers a full schedule of studio art classes and workshops for children and adults. Practice your favorite medium or try something new in a fun, hands-on learning environment. For more information visit AppletonMuseum.org. First Saturdays|Half-day Happenings|After-school Explorations Art 101|Calligraphy Guild|Dig Into Clay Become a Docent|The Art of Yoga

Beginning Tuesday, August 2 the ARTSpace is open to the public! The ARTSpace is designed to engage adults and children in hands-on art experiences through activity stations and projects that relate to the understanding of art. Make a mosaic with magnets, build with LEGO® or draw on our glass wall. The ARTSpace and all supplies are free for children and members and included in the cost of admission for nonmembers. Museum, Appleton Store and ARTSpace Hours Tuesday-Saturday: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday: Noon-5 p.m. 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd. AppletonMuseum.org | 352-291-4455

062

› Ocala

.com


063

Bitter= Danger?

When you taste something bitter, your first instinct is to stop eating it, right? Come to find out bitter tastes aren’t just unpleasant, it could be your body’s way of telling you that the food is harmful.

Sources: washingtonpost.com, thewire.in

Early organisms used taste to detect nutrients and to avoid toxins, so when you’re eating or drinking something bitter, your body may naturally go on the defensive. Along with recognizing danger, bitter taste may also offer hints about someone’s personality. In a recent study, 1,000 Americans were given standard personality and taste-preference questionnaires. They found that people who enjoyed bitter foods, such as grapefruit or coffee, were more likely to admit they enjoyed tormenting or manipulating people. Crazy, right? So the next time a new love interest asks you to “go get coffee,” we suggest taking a rain check.

BENTO IS BETTER JUICE IT UP WATE R WITH A K ICK

OU R B E ST R E C I PE S , R E STAU R ANT N E WS AN D CU LI NARY QU I C K B ITE S

PAGE

THE

Dish

064 066 070


THE

Dish

Bonkers for Brown paper bags step aside, there’s a new lunchbox in town.

R

emember when literally “brown bagging” your lunch was considered “cool?” Those were the days, right? Except your lunch looked less than appetizing by lunchtime. A mushy PB&J. broken pretzels and a brown banana. Who wants to eat that? As the years went on, parents searched for a way to keep their children’s lunch edible, while also supplying them with healthier, nutritious options they would actually eat. Enter the bento box. This everyday lunchbox was designed to reduce waste and increase the desire to eat less processed food and more whole foods. It’s time to say sayonara to that boring old sandwich.

Bring On The Bento Box

The Japanese transformed the idea of the bento box into a symbol of packed meals. Packed lunches in Japan date back to around the fifth century, when people going out to hunt or work took food with them to eat on the job. They brought lunches with them because they often did not have time to go home for meals. Practical and long lasting, a bento box features sections for different sized containers plus a section for utensils. There are multiple companies marketing their own brands of boxes, but our favorite is Bentology, founded by California moms Amy Hemmert and Tammy Pelstring. (You can check it out at bentology.com or amazon.com.) .) The products feature individual compartments and storage containers for various foods. And let’s face it, plenty of kids don’t like their foods to touch, so score! A little bit of this, a little bit of that is the philosophy behind the bento box.

A Healthy Push

People often need a nudge in the right direction when it comes to adapting a healthier lifestyle. Young children are usually unaware of what is good and bad for them in terms of food. With the help of the bento box, parents can give their children the right amount of fruits and vegetables, while also making it look tasty. And sure, you can include a special treat like a cookie or brownie with each lunch as well. The trick is to include the good stuff, too!

064

› Ocala

.com

The 2 Ps Picky Eaters

Did you know that research shows that children need to be offered a new food about 10-15 times before they will finally try (and hopefully like) it. Those around them also can influence their eating habits. If my brother didn’t eat his broccoli, there was no way I was going to either. A few ideas to break this picky eating habit could be to put new food next to food your child already likes. Introduce a little bit at a time and encourage them to try it. Don’t be pushy, or


›› Hard boiled egg s (can eat

as is add mayo to make into egg or salad) ›› Zucchini and ba nana mini muffins ›› String cheese ›› Goldfish cracke rs ›› Blueberries

Building A Better Lunch

Having trouble getting started? Here are a few menu suggestions for filling your next lunchtime bento box.

›› Bite-sized turkey and che

ese

roll ups

›› Popcorn ›› Cucumber slices (add

for dipping!)

hummus

›› Sliced grapes

Fun With Food

›› Cheese quesadil la

›› Strawberries

›› Chopped avocad o

›› Salsa and sour cream

for dipping

›› Triple-decker ha m and

cheese sandwich cut into easy-tomanage squares ›› Carrots ›› Whole grain cra ckers

›› Apple slices wit h a side of

almond butter for dippin

Sources: blog.vickybarone.com, bentology.com, ipacklunch.com, justbento.com, japanesestyle.com, zerotothree.org, brandongaille.com, web-japan.org

g

Just For The Health Of It ›› Spinach salad

with strawberries, cucumbers, grilled chicken, feta cheese and all-natural poppy seed dressing

Of course, lunchtime isn’t just for kids. Skip the fast-food line, and check out these grown-up lunch options.

›› Tuna salad sandwich on

›› Sliced apples ›› Snap pea crisps

whole wheat bread ›› Pretzel crisps ›› Strawberries (add side of almond butter if your sweet tooth is really aching that day)

›› Turkey, lettuce and

cheese wrap ›› Carrots ›› Whole-wheat crackers

›› Grilled vegetable and

cheese quesadilla ›› Chopped avocado and tomato for DIY guacamole ›› Side of black beans and brown rice

Not your cup of tea? A quick Internet or Pinterest search will get you plenty of other inspirational ideas.

your little one will push back. Just stick to it, Mom! Also, try using dips such as yogurt, hummus or ketchup to encourage your children to eat fruits, vegetables and meats. Involving your children in preparing a meal could also get them excited to taste new dishes as well.

Portion Control

Portion size can be tricky, but the bento box gives you an accurate idea of how much to eat of what. Controlling portion sizes allows you to introduce your children to a variety of food. This way they aren’t forced to eat an entire plate of green beans. Instead include three to four pieces of a vegetable, fruit and starch. Don’t be afraid to add in a dessert, too. Giving them a small treat will teach them that sweets are OK in moderation.

BentOLOGY

creative lunch gear and accessories. Shop at bentology.com

To make lunchtime more of an enjoyment instead of a chore, try using the fun accessories offered. A creative lunch is only as limited as your imagination. Food picks shaped like flowers and animals could be a fun way to get your child excited for lunch (not to mention they’re super cute). You could use these tools to put mini sandwiches or pieces of fruit together. Kebobs, anyone? They also come in facial expressions, sea creatures and more. A quick Amazon search will yield plenty of results. Food cutters shaped in stars and hearts (plus plenty of other shapes) can make any ordinary sandwich stand out. Think about it: animal shaped food cutter, $2.99; the expression on your child’s face when they open up their lunchbox, priceless. We say, go for it! Plus, check out the mini cutters for items like cheese, fruit slices and more. We can’t forget about sandwich stamps. They come in an infinite variety, ranging from television-themed ones, such as Sesame Street, to your daughter’s newest Hello Kitty obsession. There are also robots, animal shapes, inspirational words and more. Stamp their favorite character on a ham and cheese, and it’s sure to put a smile on their face. AUG ’16 ›

065


THE

Dish

Got Juice

Water is always a good idea. In fact it can’t be beat. What happens, though, when you want to spice up your waterlogged diet and stay on the healthy side of things? Don’t fret. There are several juices here to keep you healthy and hydrated.

A

lthough Minute Maid and Tropicana are quite tasty, the nutritional aspects of these sweet drinks are somewhat iffy. So what are we to do? Pick an orange ripe from the tree and juice it right then and there? Unfortunately, the cons may also outweigh the pros in this scenario as well. According to nutritionist Heather Bauer, “Juices are a great way to get the

vitamins and nutrients that you’re not getting on a regular basis through diet.” It’s true that most people don’t get their daily recommended amount of fruits and vegetables, so why not sip them through a straw? The same yummy flavor in half the time? We’re in. Here are five store-bought juices that should be on this week’s shopping list—and the next.

1915 Bolthouse Farms Strawberry

They’re organic, non-GMO and usually come in under $4 a bottle—what’s not to love? Choose from strawberry, pear, apple or lemon juice, all with a coconut water base. There is also a “packed-with-greens” option. The coconut water is a great source of potassium and also lowers the overall sugar content. A perfect grab-and-go snack before hitting the gym, this 90-calorie boost is just what you’ll need. 1915organic.com.

Naked Juice Kale Blazer

Breakfast, lunch or dinner, this no-sugar-added juice is said to be a “nutritional powerhouse.” As the brand’s bestselling juice, Kale Blazer weighs in at under 200 calories and is just as delicious as high fructose corn syrup. nakedjuice.com.

Suja Twilight Protein

Vegans, listen up—this one is for you. With a base of pea protein and almond milk, four grams of fiber and far less sugar than the leading fruit juices, you just may fall in love. As an added bonus, it’s all organic and non-GMO. sujajuice.com.

You may have spotted this one at your local Starbucks—or any supermarket for that matter. We recommend Evolution’s Sweet Greens and Ginger. It’s organic, non-GMO and good on the calorie and sugar fronts. For dessert, try Evolution’s Organic Coconut Matcha for a quick fix. evolutionfresh.com.

Odwalla Original Superfood

Although some may not find kale and juice to be an appetizing duo, the sweetness from the juice makes it much easier (even enjoyable) to drink. With 250 calories, this smoothie is the perfect shake before a morning jog. odwalla.com.

066

› Ocala

.com

Sources: realsimple.com, wellandgood.com, treehugger.com

Evolution Fresh Sweet Greens and Ginger


› DINING GUIDE

Book your party at Tony’s today. Gift cards available.

Tony’s Sushi & Steakhouse

3405 SW College Road, Ocala › (352) 237-3151 › tonysushi.com Mon-Thu 11a-10p › Fri & Sat 11a-11p › Sun Noon-10p With abundant menu choices and over 100 off-menu rolls, you certainly won’t run out of options at Tony’s Sushi. If you can’t decide, the waitstaff is excellent at suggesting items you’re sure to enjoy. Every roll and sushi dish is made to order from the freshest ingredients. In the steakhouse area, highly trained chefs prepare a memorable meal as they cook on the tableside grills, preparing chicken, steak or seafood just the way you like it. Entrées include soup or salad and rice. Family-friendly, casual atmosphere, along with a full bar, including imported Japanese sake and beer selections.

Don’t forget that Mesa can handle all of your catering needs, regardless of venue choice or size of event. Call today for a quote on your upcoming event.

Get Happy at the Highway, Mon-Thu 50% off draughts & house wines $5 select appetizers Take-Out Tuesday 25% off carry out (pizza & calzones) Family Wednesday 50% off bambino menu (kids 12 & under) Wine-Down Thursday $10 off all bottles of wine

Mesa de Notte

2436 E Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala › (352) 732-4737 › mesaocala.com Mon-Thu 11a-9p › Fri & Sat 11a-10p › Closed Sun Ocala’s finest Italian restaurant, Mesa de Notte is now offering “Tapas Happy Hour.” Choose from five mouthwatering dishes all priced at $7 each. Ceviche de camaron, Latin meatballs, shrimp and andouille latkes, seared tuna piadinas and sweet-spicy Thai pepper Calamari. Served Monday through Saturday from 3-7pm exclusively at the bar. Mesa de Notte is the perfect spot for a quick bite and a cocktail after your busy workday comes to a close. Stop by and see for yourself what all the buzz is about.

Blue Highway Pizza

2130 E Silver Springs Blvd, Ocala › (352) 629-5555 bluehighwaypizza.com › Sun-Thu 11:30a-9p › Fri & Sat 11:30a-10p Perfect for an intimate lunch or dinner, and great for large groups, too. Whether you sit at the bar, with a bird’s eye view into the display kitchen, in the spacious dining room or out on the patio, the atmosphere is fun, funky and family-friendly. Blue Highway has the best pizza in Ocala and more, including delicious, handcrafted pizza and calzones; seasonal, fresh salads with house-made dressings; paninis, sandwiches and piadines made from breads baked fresh daily; and decadent, homemade desserts. Eat well, live well…

AUG ’16 ›

067


THE

Dish PROMOTIONAL

Five-Star Favorite Dine in at Five Star Pizza’s newest location.

T

he new pizza shop in town is already booming with business. On Wednesday, July 6, Five Star Pizza opened its first dine-in/buffet location in Market Street At Heath Brook, right next to Dick’s Sporting Goods. Now, less than a month later, it’s a favorite among college students—the College Road locale scores convenience as well as open-late hours. The three most popular pizzas are the pepperoni powerhouse, chicken bacon ranch and deluxe. And along with the great pizza comes great options—dine in, order delivery or eat all you want from the buffet. Because the dine-in aspect of this restaurant is brand-new, service is at the top of the list. Owners Terry Place, Joe Stein, Sean Braz, Rodney Cumbus and Jason Holbrook, along with 32 employees, focus on keeping their service clean, nice, professional and attentive. “We want our employees to be attentive to customer needs and requests,” says Place, who also serves as the managing partner.

Five Star Pizza › 4414 SW College Rd., Bldg. 1740, Ocala

The idea for opening this restaurant location came up when four owners sat around a table at Crazy Flats, the restaurant that previously occupied Five Star’s building. They noticed most of the infrastructure was in place, and the equipment they would need was already there. “So, we approached the owner about it,” Place says, and they sealed the deal. Now, the partners split up the shifts so one of them is always there. The Five Star Pizza franchise has restaurants throughout Florida, and this branch is the 18th one. Right now, Five Star’s specials include two large, one-topping pizzas for $22.99; one large, one-topping pizza and 10 wings for $18.99; one 24-inch, one-topping piezilla for $19.99; and one large, two-topping pizza, garlic rolls and a two-liter soda for $19.99. Fuel everything from lunches to late nights, and be sure to check their website for new specials.

› (352) 861-5555 › fivestarpizza.com › Sun-Thu 11a-1a › Fri & Sat 11a-2a

068

› Ocala

.com

Beat the Heat It’s summertime, which means it’s time to get out and enjoy the sunshine. But be warned, with the sun comes the heat. Staying properly hydrated doesn’t have to be difficult. Try this smoothie for a refreshing and delicious way to hydrate. For more information and recipe ideas, visit milklife.com.

Super Food Smoothie Servings: 2

11⁄2 1 1 2 1 1 1⁄2

cups frozen blueberries cup lowfat or fat free milk banana, sliced tablespoons honey tablespoon vanilla extract teaspoon lemon juice cup ice

In blender, blend all ingredients until smooth. › Pour into two glasses and serve.


› DINING GUIDE

Eat pizza your way: dine in, delivery or buffet!

Five Star Pizza

4414 SW College Rd., Bldg. 1740, Ocala › (352) 861-5555 › fivestarpizza.com › Sun-Thu 11a-1a › Fri & Sat 11a-2a Feed that pizza craving with specials offered at Five Star Pizza’s new College Road location. Enjoy two large, one-topping pizzas for $22.99; one large, one-topping pizza and 10 wings for $18.99; one 24-inch, one-topping piezilla for $19.99; and one large, two-topping pizza, garlic rolls and a two-liter soda for $19.99. It’s the first dinein Five Star restaurant ever, and it’s open late for you night owls. Go with the barbecue chicken (one of the owners’ favorites) or choose from nine other specialty pizzas. And don’t forget to feed your sweet tooth—CinnaSticks or brownie bites will do the trick.

Beer and wine are available and the Sandbar is just steps away for specialty drink orders.

Eaton’s Beach Sandbar & Grill 15790 SE 134th Avenue, Weirsdale, FL (352) 259-2444 eatonsbeach.com 12-8pm Mon-Sat, 12-7pm Sunday

The Steam Shack at Eaton’s Beach is all about casual dining, a beachside atmosphere and fresh, delicious food. Sure, they have tasty sandwiches and appetizers, but the main focus is on the steamed shrimp, crab legs, crawfish and other seafood offerings. After spending a hot day on the beach or in the water at Lake Weir, guests can feel comfortable ordering in flip flops and a bathing suit. Or are you headed to Eaton’s Beach for an evening out with friends after work? Stop at the Steam Shack first for a drink and appetizer while waiting for your table.

Become a member of the Latinos Y Mas Family Club and receive exclusive offers, discounts, special birthday surprises and more! Catering is available for any size event. Please call for a quote on your upcoming event.

Latinos Y Mas

2030 S. Pine Avenue, Ocala › (352) 622-4777 › latinosymas.com Mon-Thu 11a-9p › Fri-Sat 11a-10p › Closed Sun If you’re looking for consistently delicious food with a Latin flair, look no further. Begin your Latinos Y Mas dining experience with one of our special offerings in August: • 50% off select salads (Mon-Thurs only) • 2 for 1 house margaritas (Mon-Thurs only) • 2 for 1 house wines (Mon-Thurs only) • Kids eat free with an adult meal (Tuesdays only)

AUG ’16 ›

069


THE

Dish

CUCUMBER AND LEMON. The

basic cucumber recipe is just two ingredients: water and cucumber. But don’t let its simplicity fool you—it tastes great. Add in some lemon and you will feel rejuvenated, as the water helps flush and detox your body. Cucumbers are a great source of vitamin B and are rich in potassium and magnesium.

A

nd you thought drinking a glass of H2O was good enough. Turns out you were mistaken. Besides tasting great and having zero calories, fruit-infused water has many additional benefits. From flushing dangerous toxins out of your body to reducing the amount of muscle fatigue you experience while working out, it may be that a strawberry or two in your water is all you really need. Try out these sweet recipes for all day sippin’.

070

› Ocala

.com

blackberries and raspberries have the highest levels of antioxidants. They have anti-aging properties and aid in disease prevention, too. Oh, and they’re yummy. Consuming berries may also assist in the deterrence of some cancers.

PEACH, PLUM AND PEARS.

We knew we could throw one more alliteration in there for you. Aside from its literary flow, this trio has reason to brag. The peaches alone contain 10 different vitamins, including vitamin A, which is good for eyesight. The plums and pears are equally as impressive. Plums are known for regulating digestion, and pears are recommended for weight loss.

WATERMELON AND MINT.

Though it’s true that watermelons are mostly water, this refreshing juice is also overflowing with nutrients like vitamins A, B6 and C, so get ready to fill up your cup.

Bitters image by Didier Descouens, wikipedia.org

Healthy, heavenly, hydrating, homemade, hip. Mostly because we ran out of alliterations, we present with no further adieu: fruitinfused water. You’re welcome.

BLACKBERRIES AND RASPBERRIES. Out of all fruit,

Sources: winefolly.com, bbcgoodfood.com, epicurious.com, wine.about.com

Drink Up!

LEMON, LIME AND ORANGE. A PERFECT SUBSTITUTE FOR SODAS, THIS WATER HAS THE SWEET TASTE OF ORANGE JUICE WITHOUT THE ADDED SUGAR. BOTH LEMON AND LIME HELP TO STIMULATE AND REGULATE THE DIGESTIVE TRACT AND THIN OUT AND ENCOURAGE BILE PRODUCTION. BILE IS PRODUCED BY THE LIVER AND ULTIMATELY ENDS UP IN THE SMALL INTESTINE WHERE IT BREAKS DOWN LIPIDS AND FATS THAT WE’VE CONSUMED.


› DINING GUIDE

Trivia Night every Thursday, 7-9pm (Silver Springs Blvd. location) Mariachi band every Thursday at the 200 location, 6-9pm

El Toreo

3790 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala › (352) 694-1401 › 7 Days 11a-10p SR 200, Ocala › (352) 291-2121 › 7 Days 11a-11p New lunch specials include Taco Salad on Monday, $4.45; Speedy Gonzalez on Tuesdays, $4.95; Quesadillas on Wednesday, $6.45; Chimichangas on Thursdays, $5.95; and Burrito Supreme on Fridays, $4.95. New dinner options include Fajita Mondays, $8.95; Chimichanga Tuesdays, $7.95; Alambre Wednesdays, $7.95 and Tacos de Bistec Thursdays, $7.95. Plus $1.95 margaritas on Mondays. On Sunday, kids 12 and under can enjoy 99¢ children’s meals (takeout not included). Wednesday is Special Margarita Day, 99¢ all day. Saturday is 2-for-1 margaritas all day. Happy Hour daily, 3-7pm. Everything is 2-4-1 (exceptions may apply).

THE BEST MEXICAN FOOD

Summer menu now available! The Thai Chicken Salad is back by popular demand. For more information on catering, contact Waica Huggins or Evelyn Nussel at wmhivyhoue@yahoo.com. Enjoy your favorite drink from our full liquor bar.

Let Harvest Market Deli cater your next event or party.

The Ivy House Restaurant

917 E. Silver Springs Blvd, Ocala › (352) 622-5550 Sun & Tue 11a-2p › Wed & Thu 11a-8p › Fri & Sat 11a-8:30p › Closed Mon 106 NW Main St, Williston › (352) 528-5410 Sun-Wed 11a-2p › Thu-Sat 11a-8p › ivyhousefl.com “Come on home, it’s suppertime!” is their motto. The Ivy House wants you to feel you have come to a friend’s house to eat. The family-owned Ivy House Restaurant now has two locations, Williston and Ocala. The downtown Ocala location has added several specialty items, and the restaurant has been named by Florida Trend as one of the “Top 500 Best Places to Eat in the State” for several years. Specials include Southern Fried Lobster, delicious hand-cut steaks and our famous Baked Krispy Chicken. Try the delicious homemade desserts like the Key Lime Pie or Chocolate Midnight Cake when dining here.

Harvest Market Deli 3751 SE 36th Avenue, Ocala, FL 34471 (352) 624-2636 Harvestmarketdeliocala.com

If you’re looking for the best selection of subs and burgers, look no further. Always fresh and never frozen, Harvest Market Deli is the place to go for a great, filling meal. Enjoy a leisurely lunch in the cool shade of their one-of-a-kind tiki hut. Lacking time but craving a home cooked dinner? Call ahead by 4pm and place an order for their famous Spaghetti Pie, complete with zesty garlic bread and a fresh salad. We got you in the mood for a salad? Try the Ivy League. This chicken salad is perfectly mixed with cheddar, apples, pears, grapes and walnuts, and then served on a bed of lettuce with a tasty poppy seed dressing. Can you say yum?

AUG ’16 ›

071


THE

Dish

› DINING GUIDE

Brooklyn’s Backyard

2019 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Suite #102, Ocala › (352) 304-6292 brooklynsbackyard.com Sun 11a-8p › Mon-Wed 11a-9p › Thu-Sat 11a-whenever Head down to the “Yard” for fresh food and fun in a relaxed, backyard atmosphere. Whether you’re looking for finger foods or something more exotic, they’ve got it and it’s delicious! Try one of their unique burger creations. In the mood for wings? Get the best from the 2014 & 2015 King of Wings. Want pizza? They got it, NY style, plus a full range of fresh salads, sandwiches and entrées sure to suit everyone! There’s beer, wine and a full liquor bar in the ‘Yard,” too—over 40 craft beers, craft cocktails and a great selection of wines, all sure to perfectly complement your meal! Come join them for Sunday Brunch, every Sunday from 11a-2p.

Crossroads Country Kitchen 7947 W Highway 40, Ocala › (352) 237-1250 Mon-Thur 6a-8:30p › Fri-Sat 6a-9p › Sun 7a-3p

Located west on Highway 40 in Ocala, the Crossroads Country Kitchen is a must for anyone craving down-home, country cooking. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, menu items range from a wide variety of homemade soups and chili to prime rib, fresh salads, seafood, prime steaks and burgers. If you’re in the mood for a real treat, try the Prime Rib Dinner For Two for $26.95. Make sure to leave room for one of the tasty home-baked desserts! In the mood for a fresh fish fry? Tuesdays and Fridays are all-you-careto-eat catfish or whitefish. Enjoy an Italian special on Wednesdays. Big screen televisions will allow you to enjoy your meal without missing one second of the big game or race.

Murphy’s Oyster, Steak & Seafood Restaurant 3821 NW Blichton Rd., Ocala › (352) 236-5656 Open 7 Days a Week 11a-Midnight Welcome to Murphy’s, where you’ll dine on delicious seafood, oysters, choice steaks, fresh wings and much more served in a relaxed and friendly atmosphere. The restaurant’s extensive menu offers something for everyone, from tasty Philly cheese steaks and steamed clams to snow crab. Try the authentic gyros, too. A special menu for the kids features dishes like the hot dog platter and the chicken strips platter. Come take advantage of the massive outdoor tiki bar with flatscreen TVs. Murphy’s is open seven days a week for lunch and dinner. Bring the whole family for an experience you’ll want to relive again and again.

072

› Ocala

.com

We cater! Let them create an unforgettable menu for your next event. Check out new items on the menu. Enjoy one of the specialty drinks at their new backyard tiki bar. Live music on Fridays. Family owned and operated. Brooklyn’s Backyard—Good Beer, Better Food!

Located at the Crossroads of NW 80th Ave. and Hwy 40 West. No matter what you have a taste for, Crossroads Country Kitchen is sure to become a new favorite. Former owners of “The Spiced Apple” restaurant in Ft. Lauderdale. We accept all major credit cards.

• All-you-can-eat jumbo snow crab legs and fish every day. • Plan any party, social event, business lunch or celebration. Ask for Murphy! • Enjoy monthly specials while watching your favorite sporting event on the many TVs. Like them on FB at Murphy’s Oyster Bar


› DINING GUIDE

Stop in for happy hour between 4pm and 6pm at either Mi Tierra Latina location! Try a $9.99 dinner combination or enjoy a lunch special from 11:30am-3pm Monday through Friday. Ask about our catering!

Mi Tierra Latina

3131 SW College Rd. Suite 303, Ocala › (352) 237-4042 2105 SW Hwy 484, Ocala › (352) 307-0888 Sun-Thu 11:30a-9:30p › Fri & Sat 11:30a-10p › mi-tierra-latina.com Peruvian food is a cuisine with a heritage as unique as its flavors, and Ocala residents don’t have to travel far to try it themselves. Mi Tierra Latina aims to delight the palate and provide balanced nutrition with their traditional Peruvian and Mexican dishes. Seafood lovers will enjoy the ceviche of corvina fish and the choros a la chalaca (mussels topped with corn, tomatoes, lime and cilantro). Choose a delicious Peruvian dish like Lomo saltado or a Mexican favorite such as fajitas, pollo con mole and many more.

Be sure to visit us at the Canopy Oaks Center. Pavarotti’s also caters. Mon- All You Can Eat Spaghetti and Meatballs $6.99 Tue- 16” Cheese Pizza $7.99 Wed- 10 Chicken Wings $5.

PAVAROTTI’S

Pavarotti’s Pizza & Restaurant

8075 SW HWY 200, Canopy Oaks Center, Ocala › (352) 291-9424 Mon-Thu 11a-9p › Fri-Sat 11a-10p › Sun 11a-8p

Pavarotti’s Pizza and Restaurant in Ocala is known for its famous, old-fashioned pizzas, hand-tossed and baked on a stone deck oven as well as an array of classic Italian entrées, fresh salads and subs, and hearty pasta dinners. Veal or chicken is served Parmigiana, Marsala or picatta style, and the seafood dishes are served fresh over linguini. Pizza lovers can’t get enough of the homemade pies, and don’t forget about the subs, stromboli and calzones!

Pizza & Restaurant

Happy Hour Tue-Fri, 5-7p. $5 premium cocktails, $3 house wine, 2-4-1 beer and $5 tapas.

Ipanema Brazilian Steak House

2023 South Pine Avenue, Ocala › (352) 622-1741 › ipanemaocala.com Dinner: Tue-Thu 5-9p, Fri & Sat 5-10p, Sun 4-9p › Lunch: Fri 11a-2:30p Brunch: Sun 12-3p › Happy Hour Tue-Fri 5-7p › Closed Monday A Churrascaria (Portuguese for barbecue) is a dining experience where roaming Gauchos slice and serve fire-roasted meats from skewers in a continual fashion. Ipanema Brazilian Steak House boasts 12 of the finest cuts of meat complemented by an opulent salad and vegetable bar, delectable desserts, and delicious wines, beers and cocktails. Brazilian native and Executive Chef Ortencia DeAlmeida invites you to embrace the flavors of her homeland and experience the magnetism of Ipanema for yourself. Become a fan of Ipanema on Facebook at facebook.com/ipanemasteakhouse.

AUG ’16 ›

073


THE

Dish

› DINING GUIDE

Off The Hook Bar and Grill

Tues-Sun 11a-9p › 10901 S US Hwy 441, Belleview › (352) 307-0661 Alberto and Melanie Benvenuto opened Belleview’s newest addition, Off The Hook Bar and Grill, in April to serve fresh, homemade Peruvian food. When you walk in, the first thing you’re served is canchita, which is like a Peruvian popcorn. Browse the menu and choose from different appetizers, stir-fries, ceviches, soups and so much more. Order from the newly discounted $9.99 lunch menu or come for dinner. Complement your meal with a Peruvian beer or juice, and enjoy the lounge atmosphere decorated in bold colors and filled with modern Peruvian music.

Tilted Kilt

3155 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala (352) 351-5458 › ocala.tiltedkilt.com Mon-Thu 11a-11p › Fri-Sat 11a-Midnight › Sun 11a-10p

For Alberto, Peruvian food is all about the flavors really popping. And if you can take the heat, he can make any dish as spicy as you’d like. For something different but delicious, Off The Hook’s the place to eat!

HAPPY HOUR Daily 3-7. Thu, Fri & Sat 3p to close Ask about Carry-Out Catering.

Next time you’re in the mood for a taste of Ireland, look no further than Ocala’s very own Tilted Kilt Pub & Eatery. Their classics will have you convinced that you’ve just taken a one-way flight to Dublin. Favorites such as fish & chips, shepherd’s pie and Gaelic chicken in an Irish whiskey cream sauce all served by beautiful lasses in kilts will leave you wanting more! Menu items as low as $6 from 11am-3pm make The Tilted Kilt the perfect place for a quick bite to eat during lunch. Stop by with the whole family to enjoy TV on the big screens, games, good service and great food! Scan this QR code to see our calendar of events.

Braised Onion Restaurant

754 NE 25th Ave, Ocala › (352) 620-9255 Tue-Thu 11a-9p › Fri & Sat 11a-10p › Sun 11a-8p › Closed Mon The Braised Onion Restaurant, where you’ll experience “Comfort Food with Attitude” in a fun, warm and colorful but casual atmosphere, is open for lunch and dinner. Winner of Culinary Combat and Taste of Ocala for three years. From countryfried tenderloin and Kentucky hot brown melt to the eggplant parmigiana or the frenched pork chop, the menu options are plentiful and guaranteed to make your taste buds explode with happiness. Happy hour is Tuesday through Friday from 4-7p. Visit our website at braisedonion.com.

074

› Ocala

.com

Join us for live jazz featuring Rudy Turner every Wednesday and Friday from 6:30-9:30p and live entertainment every Saturday with Bobby Blackmon, Gosia & Ali, Rick & Paige and many others beginning at 6:30p.


Bridal SHOWCASE SEPTEMBER 22, 2016

BRIDAL VENDOR

REGISTRATION BEGINS NOW

Hurry, space will ямБll up fast! HUNDREDS OF BRIDES WILL BE ATTENDING!

CALL TODAY 352.732.0073 OR SHARON MORGAN @ 352.209.4159


REBUILDING CONFIDENCE WITH EVERY STROKE Growing up in Jamaica, water was a natural part of Barbara’s life. She enjoyed spending time in the ocean until she moved to New York, where she continued to swim with her granddaughter. Swimming was one of their favorite activities to do together.

Three years ago, Barbara had a stroke, which temporarily slowed her down. She used a wheelchair at first, but eventually moved to a walker, and then to a cane. Her doctors insisted that she would always require assistance with at least one of those devices, however Barbara’s determination proved them wrong. Much to their amazement, she began walking without the cane about a year ago and is happy to have that independence back! Now, Barbara enjoys spending part of her day at the YMCA, where she's able to socialize and participate in some of the programs the Y has to offer. When she needs to rest, she enjoys watching the kids play in the water in the pool. Often she will wade into the calf-deep water of the Y’s Water Park so she can cool off. As Barbara continued to use the Y, she experienced another turning point. She met Deb, a certified swim instructor, and she told her about how she missed being able to swim. Deb encouraged her to get back in the water each time they crossed paths. Deb’s goal was to get Barbara back in the water again to experience being in the pool. It took about a month to convince her, but finally, Barbara said, "Let's do it. I'm ready!" On what would be just a regular Thursday for anyone else, Barbara came dressed in her swim suit and she carefully stepped in the shallow end of the pool with Deb's assistance, and flotation devices for added caution. They tiptoed slowly to some deeper water and when Barbara's feet could no longer touch the bottom, she again was able to experience the freedom and joy of being weightless in the water. With some light kicking and small strokes, Barbara was back in the water! It was a great day for both Barbara and Deb to be at the YMCA!

SWIM LESSONS AT THE Y REGISTER TODAY FOR AUGUST SESSIONS TWO-WEEK SESSIONS Dates: August 1-11 (Mon.—Thurs.) Member Cost: $75 Potential Member Cost: $150 SATURDAY SESSIONS Dates: August 27-September 24 Member Cost: $45

PRIVATE SESSIONS Dates: Available year-round, flexible schedule Ages: 3 and older Member Cost: $150 Potential Member Cost: $300 SEMI-PRIVATE SESSIONS Dates: Available year-round, flexible schedule Ages: 3 and older Two Members Cost: $200 Two Potential Members Cost: $400

FRANK DELUCA YMCA


AUG’16

YOUR LOCAL GUIDE TO HOMES, FARMS AND LAND FOR SALE IN MARION COUNTY

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF


Considering Ocala? COUNTRY CLUB OF OCALA

Beautiful 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath home features Chef’s kitchen open to the gathering room with fireplace, dining room and library/den. The living room has 20’ ceilings with French doors leading to the covered brick lanai with fireplace. Exquisitely landscaped back yard complete with pool, spa, full summer kitchen with wet bar and various lounging areas. Views of the 7th green/signature 8th green and scenic pond. $950,000

COUNTRY CLUB OF OCALA

Experience the sensational setting of this luxurious pool, spa with waterfall, firepit, various conversation areas and summer kitchen. Master suite features French doors opening to the pool and lanai. Family recreation room opens to screen enclosed balcony overlooking pool with access to pool and golf course. Magnificent kitchen with island and bar seating opens to family room with fireplace. $897,000

GREAT LOCATION CLOSE TO OCALA’S AMENITIES!

Private! Gated 1+ acre sports elegant custom 4 bedroom, 2.5 bath home with high ceilings, gourmet kitchen with granite countertops. Solar heated, screen enclosed salt water pool, covered lanai with separate covered deck and summer kitchen. Extra deep garage and outdoor storage building. Master is on main level and there are 3 bedrooms and gathering area on second level. Picture Perfect! $399,000


GREENWAY GREENWAYCROSSINGS CROSSINGS

Stunning Stunning views! views! This This grand grand 4 bedroom 4 bedroom estate estate sitssits onon 3+3+ acres acres in in gated gated equine equine community. community. Elegant Elegant foyer foyer opens opens to to living living room room with with fireplace. fireplace. Offi Offi ce,ce, chef’s chef’s kitchen kitchen with with walkwalkin in pantry pantry plus plus butler’s butler’s bar. bar.Screen Screen enclosed enclosed covered covered outdoor outdoor living living room room with with fireplace, fireplace, summer summer kitchen kitchen plus plus pool pool and and spa. spa. Separate Separate building building forfor man man cave, cave, sports sports cars, cars, oror guest guest home home with with fullfull bath. bath. $769,000 $769,000 Additional Additional 33 Acres Acres available. available.

GREAT GREATMINI MINIFARM FARM––15 15ACRES ACRES Great Great Mini-farm Mini-farm adjoins adjoins Padua Padua Stables. Stables.4 Bedroom, 4 Bedroom, 33 bath bath home home plus plus detached detached 3-car 3-car garage garage with with apartment apartment oror artist artist studio. studio. Main Main residence residence features features great great kitchen kitchen with with walk-in walk-in pantry, pantry, island island and and opens opens to to family family room. room. Spacious Spacious master master suite. suite. For For thethe horse horse enthusiast enthusiast you you have have (2)-14-stall (2)-14-stall barns barns with with offioffi ce,ce, feed feed room, room, A/C A/C tack tack room, room, paddocks, paddocks, gallop gallop track track and and equine equine swimming swimming pool. pool.$995,000 $995,000

27TH 27THAVE/ AVE/HWY HWY475A 475A

Location! Location! Location! Location! Location! Location! Prestigious Prestigious Equestrian Equestrian Property. Property. 5 Bedroom 5 Bedroom main main residence residence features features expansive expansive master, master, kitchen kitchen with with barbar seating, seating, breakfast breakfast nook nook opens opens to to family family room room with with fireplace-all fireplace-all overlooking overlooking pool pool and and large large paddock. paddock. 7 Stall 7 Stall CBCB stable stable with with a/ca/c offioffi ce,ce, tack tack room, room, dressage dressage ring, ring, jump jump area, area, riding riding areas, areas, and and lush lush green green paddocks paddocks onon 2020 acres. acres. Nice Nice 2/12/1 and and aa 1/11/1 guest guest home. home. $1,299,000 $1,299,000

ForFor this this and and other other properties, properties, visit visit JoanPletcher.com JoanPletcher.com forfor information, information, videos videos and and more more choices. choices. Due Due to the to the privacy privacy andand at the at the discretion discretion of my of my clients, clients, there there areare additional additional training training centers, centers, estates, estates, andand land land available available which which areare notnot advertised. advertised.

Joan JoanPletcher Pletcher L ILCE I CE N SE N SE D DR EA RELA LE SETATE S TATEBROK BROK ERER

352.347.1777 352.347.1777 | Cell: | Cell: 352.266.9100 352.266.9100 | 352.804.8989 | 352.804.8989 www.joanpletcher.com www.joanpletcher.comjoan@joanpletcher.com joan@joanpletcher.com


Save the Date! OCTOBER 7, 2016 @ 6PM

The 8th Annual

Event

TAILGATE PAR T Y Presented by the Young Professionals Network EVENT LOCATION: THE OCALA/MARION COUNTY ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS® 3165 NE 14TH STREET, OCALA 34470

TICKETS ONLY

$20.00!

PROCEEDS TO BENEFIT THE MARION COUNTY BOYS & GIRLS CLUB

FOR SPONSORSHIP, DONATING A CHAIR FOR THE LIVE AUCTION, DONATING A SILENT AUCTION ITEM, OR GENERAL EVENT INFORMATION, CALL OMCAR AT (352) 629-2415


2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU

Carolyn ROBERTS

115 NE 8th Ave 16910 S. Hwy 441, Ste. 204 Ocala, FL 352-351-0011 Summerfield, FL 352-245-3388

BROKER/REALTOR ®

ckr@robertsflorida.com www.robertsflorida.com | mail@robertsflorida.com

TING NEW LIS

TING NEW LIS

MAGNIFICENT ESTATE HOME • Main residence 4 bedrooms and 4.5 bath • Guest house 2 bedrooms and 2 baths • 6.68+/- acres close to downtown Ocala • 2 gracious porches

• Palatial master suite, elevator and multiple fireplaces • Solarium, library and breathtaking pool • Hardwood floors and cathedral beam ceilings

$3,250,000 ML#502575

ICE NEW PR

GOLDEN OCALA GOLF & EQUESTRIAN CLUB • 4 bedrooms 4 baths • Prestigious gated golf community • Grand master suite with sitting area • Wall slider that leads out to lania.

• Summer kitchen and screen enclosed pool and hot tub • 4-car garage makes for plenty of room • Beautiful views of golf course and the 2nd hole

$919,999 ML#502725

TURNING HAWK RANCH • • • • •

6 bedrooms 5 full and 3 half baths 4 car garage In –law apartment Breathtaking 4.80 acres • Complete with beautiful stairway and Fireplace.

• Exercise room, grand study, and theater room. • Amazing pool with slide and outdoor shower • Summer kitchen with sand volleyball court and a half basketball course with lights.

$974,000 ML#435939

LEGENDARY TRAILS

COUNTRY CLUB OF OCALA

Stunning former parade of homes model, this beautiful home has 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, (1 bedroom & 1 full bath in attached 640 sq ft guest house). A welcoming front porch greets you as you enter the foyer leading to study/den & formal LR & DR. Top of line kitchen w/ custom cabinetry & stainless appliances, opens to breakfast nook w/floor to ceiling window, bringing the outdoors in. Kitchen opens to family rm w/sliders, which lead to pool & lanai. Master suite has sitting area & master bath has seamless glass shower, garden tub & double vanities, surrounded by granite. The highlight of the home is the home theater w/stadium seating. Guest home, perfect for in law quarters or bonus room, has its own bath, laundry & closet. This home is perfect for entertaining friends & family, either around the fire pit or enclosed pool, with 3 waterfalls. Many upgrades including wood flooring in most living areas, crown moulding & pavers in all outdoor spaces. Located in Legendary Trails with easy access to the Greenway Trails. $574,000 MLS#503703

Surrounded by beautiful oak trees & lush landscaping, this beautiful 4 BR, 4.5 bath home w/study offers pretty views of golf course. The foyer invites you into the formal LR & formal DR, which leads to spacious kitchen. Wood cabinets, stainless appliances & newer granite round out this custom kitchen, opening to family room w/fireplace & breakfast nook, w/views of sparkling pool w/hot tub. Master suite has wood flooring & double sided fireplace, which can be enjoyed from the master bedroom & master bath. Master bath has jetted tub, double vanities & walk-in shower. This home offers a split bedroom plan, along w/built in work station & built-in bookcases & wood flooring in many areas of the home. This home has the perfect flow for friend & family gatherings & has been very well maintained. $549,900 ML#501529

mbelliott1@aol.com


THE

Homefront

Demystifying Composite Decking 5 common misconceptions about composite material

F

irst introduced in the late 1980s, composite decking quickly gained acceptance among builders and homeowners who recognized and appreciated being able to achieve a natural wood look without the ongoing hassles of upkeep. Although most people today understand the main benefits of composite decking—durability and minimal maintenance—the material itself is still new enough to raise questions, confusion and some skepticism among homeowners who grew up with wood decks. To help set the record straight, Trex Company, the world’s No. 1 decking and railing brand and leader in high-performance, low-maintenance outdoor living products, has teamed with backyard design experts Paul Lafrance and Kate Campbell of HGTV’s acclaimed Decked Out series.

MISCONCEPTION NO. 3:

Composite decking is maintenance free.

MISCONCEPTION NO. 1:

Composite decking looks “fake.”

“Composite decking has evolved tremendously since its beginnings more than 20 years ago,” Campbell said. “The latest generation of products, such as Trex Transcend, look more natural than ever, featuring high-definition wood grain patterns and rich, saturated colors ranging from warm browns and pristine grey to spicy reds.”

“Anything that sits outside in the elements for years on end is going to need some type of MISCONCEPTION NO. 2: maintenance,” Campbell said. “When it comes to decking, the difference lies in how much upkeep is required. Maintaining “Since composite decking wood decking is a was invented in the downright chore with all early 1990s, the market the scrubbing, sanding has been flooded with and staining that wood competitive offerings requires—not to mention varying widely in quality, the replacement of aesthetics and value,” splintered, warped and Lafrance said. “For my rotten boards. Highprojects, I use what is performance composite categorized as ‘highdecking, on the other performance’ composite hand, calls for just wiping manufactured with an up spills when they integrated, three-sided happen and a simple shell or ‘cap.’ Capped soap-and-water cleaning boards feature an added twice a year—once in layer of protection against the spring when you’re severe weather, heavy getting it ready for foot traffic, fading, mold outdoor living season and and staining.” again when you close up your outdoor living space for the winter.”

All composite decking materials are the same.

MISCONCEPTION NO. 4:

MISCONCEPTION NO. 5:

“Over time, wood decking actually ends up being more expensive than composite,” Lafrance said. “Sure, the initial cost of pressure-treated lumber is less than wood alternatives, but because a deck is a long-term investment, it’s important to consider the longterm costs, such as all the materials you’ll need for seasonal stripping, staining, painting and sealing. Add to that the time and cost involved in repairing and replacing wooden deck boards that will inevitably warp and splinter over time—even if they are well-maintained.”

“Because it is made primarily from recycled content, composite decking is remarkably eco-friendly,” Campbell said. “In fact, Trex composite decking is made from 95 percent recycled content. By using plastic and industrial wood scraps that would otherwise wind up in landfills, they use more than 400 million pounds of recycled material each year in the making of their deck boards.”

Composite decking is too expensive.

For more information, visit trex.com.

Composite decking is not eco-friendly.


WE AT BWC BELIEVE THAT

NO DETAIL SHOULD GO FORGOTTEN • • • • • •

New Custom Home Construction  Design-Build Services Complete Home Remodeling & Additions Custom Equestrian Barns Commercial & Industrial Construction  Other services we offer: 6” Aluminum & Copper Seamless Gutters, Soffit & Fascia, Siding, Concrete and more...

SERVING OCALA AND CENTRAL FLORIDA. Contact us today for a complimentary construction consultation.

Bryan W. Caracciolo (General Contractor)

(352) 304-1323 • 4095 S.E. 45TH CT. #101 Ocala

info@BWC-Construction.com • www.BWC-Construction.com CGC#1522862


THE

Homefront

High-End Home Upgrades

For most people, their home is their family’s most significant asset. Upgrading is a smart approach to protecting and growing the value of that investment. Home Security

Whether you’re aiming for a stronger sense of personal safety or extra protection for your valuable possessions, today’s security systems take home monitoring to a whole new level. Basic keypad alarms have been replaced by a host of features, such as silent alarms that allow authorities to catch a burglar in action; cameras that allow you to monitor the premises from inside the home or while you’re away using a connected device; motion detectors that simultaneously trigger exterior and interior lights while activating security cameras and more. There is no one solution for every home, but a home security expert can talk through your concerns and guide you to the system that best fits your needs.

Standby Generators

When seasonal weather or other circumstances cause power outages, the impact on a home and family can range from inconvenient to unsafe. A standby generator system keeps a household humming even when the power is out—automatically. An important feature to look for is power management technology, which manages the power balancing act that is your home’s appliances. For example, Briggs & Stratton Fortress standby generators are equipped with Symphony II Power Management, which lets homeowners prioritize what in their home they need powered by proactively monitoring and managing the home’s backup power needs, allowing for whole-house power with a more affordable generator. This power management system also uses remote power-switching modules that are installed directly to a home’s existing wiring, to help reduce installation costs. For more information about standby generator systems and their features, visit powernow.com.

Wireless Automation

You may think of it as just a phone, but the tiny computer you carry every day packs the power to control an ever-growing segment of your home. Using an app on your smartphone, tablet or computer, you can control everything from your locks and lights to the temperature setting on your thermostat. What’s more, you can create settings that integrate multiple functions to set the perfect ambiance for whatever you have in mind. Planning a movie night? Cue the movie setting, with dimmed lights, blinds lowered and the TV powered on. Hosting a party? Count on your custom entertaining setup, with lighting in all your guest-friendly rooms, lively music playing on your whole-home sound system and a lower temperature to keep things cool as the party heats up.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

H

ome upgrades come in all shapes and sizes, from minor landscaping projects to large-scale security installations. When looking to make an impact, it’s smart to opt for high-end upgrades such as those that boost security or enhance the technological features of your home. These upgrades not only lend an upscale feel but can bring families peace of mind while enhancing the ways to enjoy their home.


The Right Agent Makes All the Difference In The World 2709 SW 27th Ave., Suite 103 | 352-789-6746 | www.ocalarealtyworld.com

BUFFINGTON ESTATES, COUNTRYSIDE ESTATES, DALTON WOODS Many beautiful homes in these well-established neighborhoods. Prices starting in the $200,000’s. Call Jenni Kennedy for details @ 352-775-0078.

EQUINE PROPERTIES — 3 TO 30 Acres close to all equine facilities. Prices starting $249,000 to $1,390,000. Call Marco Mariti, Horse Farm Specialist @ 352-274-6224

WESTBURY — Lakefront property with indoor pool and 1786 sqft guest house on almost 4.5 acres for $1,575,000. Call Ibia Paradello for details @ 352-433-9531.

MARION OAKS and THE SHORES — Newer 3/2/2’s starting @ $79,900 & 4/2/2’s starting @ $ 90,000 Call Miguel Rodriguez for details @ 352-598-9693.

HERNANDO PROPERTY — Beautiful Spring Hill 3/2/2 Pool Home. Close to Weekie Wachee and beautiful beaches. Priced at $159,900 Call Linda Profita for details @ 352-286-3636

FOX HOLLOW — Move-in ready 3/2/1 at a great price. Close to everything. Asking: $109.500. Call Ileana Del Rio Tiana for details @ 352-361-8676

RETIRE IN STYLE AND LUXURY! Golf course views, clubhouses, amenities galore. Move into a home that looks better than a model. Summerglen homes starting in the $170,000’s Call Edward Rogers at (352) 414-5876

Not making enough money? Life out of balance? Want 2016 to be different?

HOW ABOUT A CAREER IN REAL ESTATE! Make $30,000-$40,000 a year. Only part-time. Guaranteed*

CALL (352) 427-0749

ORANGE LAKE & MCANOPY — All of North Marion County Lake Front Properties. Prices Starting in the $200,000’s. Call Ashley Smith for details at 352-426-1266.

Real Estate classes starting soon. Only a few spots left. *Restrictions apply.


THE

Homefront

Kitchens are moving outside. And they’re doing it in a big way. According to a recent study from the National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA), outdoor kitchens are expected to be a top design trend in 2016.

“A

n outdoor kitchen can drastically improve the value of a home,” said Alana Busse, designer and NKBA Central Coast and Valleys chapter president. “They also bring people together. Whether, it’s simply your neighbors coming over for a weekend barbecue or a big family gathering, everyone loves being outside.” Big or small, the basic principles of outdoor kitchen design remain the same. Get started by understanding these basics.

Get The Right Heat

It all starts with the grill—the centerpiece of the outdoor kitchen. Russ Faulk, chief designer and head of product for Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet, which makes outdoor kitchen equipment, suggests basing your selection on the cook you aspire to be, not the kind you are now. Remember that there are no uniform depths, heights or widths when it comes to grills, so future upgrades can be a challenge.

Assess The Space

Conversely, a fully independent outdoor kitchen with refrigeration, warming cabinets and cabinetry is more self-reliant but will require more space and connections for gas, water and electricity. Grill placement is also a key decision. If you entertain often, Faulk recommends keeping the cook in the party by positioning the grill perpendicular to the dining area.

In The Zone

You’ll get the most out of your outdoor kitchen when you have different functional zones

designated, Faulk said. Plot out where you will position four key zones—wet, cold, hot and dry—to make prepping, cooking, serving and cleaning much easier. The cold zone should be next to the wet zone. This will simplify moving food from the cold zone refrigerator to the wet zone sink to wash and get ready for grilling in the hot zone. Also plan for uninterrupted counter space, or landing areas, for placing platters and utensils while cooking. Grills should have at least 24 inches to one

Faulk recommends thinking about how you envision the relationship between your indoor and outdoor kitchens next. If they are relatively close together, an outdoor kitchen can utilize the indoor kitchen’s capabilities, such as prep space and storage.

For more design tips, visit kalamazoogourmet.com.

side and 12 inches to the other. Sinks should have 18 inches on both sides for room to wash food or place dirty dishes.

Left Outside

Being outdoors means your refrigeration and cabinetry will need to be equipped to handle the elements. When considering refrigeration for an outdoor kitchen, Faulk stresses food safe-rated options. With these products, meats won’t go bad and drinks will stay cold, even when it’s above 95 degrees outside. Cabinetry should be equipped to handle rain and protect the items inside. Weather-tight cabinets have seamless rain gutters around the door and drawer openings to help divert water.

Photos courtesy of Kalamazoo Outdoor Gourmet. (Main image) Outdoor kitchen with Kalamazoo Hybrid Fire Grill. (Secondary) The functional zones of the outdoor kitchen, from left: hot, dry, wet and cold.

Smart, Stylish Designs for Outdoor Kitchens


The Genuine. The Original. Overhead DoorCompany of Ocala “Many garage door companies may say Overhead Door in their name, but unless you see the Overhead Door Company logo, you’re not getting true Overhead Door Company products, installation, services and support.”

n this Mentdioreceive ad an

f f O % 15 e Call ServPiacrts dneodt. inclu

Whether you need an attractive, insulated door for your home or a specialty automatic door for your business, we can meet your requirement.

Winner of Best of Home Advisor Award Overhead Door Company of Ocala

352-622-5737www.overheaddoorocala.com Overhead Door Company of Gainesville 352-468-2733 www.overheaddoorgnv.com

The Carriage House Collection

YOUR SOURCE FOR FIREPLACES, GRILLS AND MUCH MORE.

FINANCING

NOW AVAILABLE

0% INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 12 MONTHS OR 9.9% APR.

S P E C I A LT Y F I R E S 352 629 1475 / 5320 S PINE AVE, OCALA SALES, SERVICE, INSTALLATION / MON-FRI 10-6 SAT 10-4

NAPOLEON QUALITY FIREPLACES & GRILLS


THE

Homefront

Easy Home Upgrades Add style, function to interior, exterior spaces.

W

hether you recently purchased a new house and are looking for ways to add your own style and personal touches or are looking to upgrade your longstanding home, it’s essential to add style and function when completing any home improvement project. From adding light and ventilation to updating your home’s safety, closets, facade or backyard, you can take advantage of these ideas to enhance the aesthetics of your house and improve its livability and capabilities.

Combine Safety With Style

Home safety has never been so stylish—or convenient. First Alert’s easy-to-install Atom Smoke and Fire Alarm packs all the power of an advanced photoelectric smoke alarm into a miniature, non-intrusive design and features an advanced smoke entry system designed to reduce the chances of false alarms along with a loud, penetrating siren. The 10-year sealed-battery Atom provides added home protection and eliminates the need to replace the batteries for the life of the alarm. For more information, visit firstalert.com.

Upgrade Your Home With Natural Light

There’s no better way to breathe new life into interior spaces than decorating with light. Velux Energy Star-qualified, solar-powered fresh air skylights bring natural light and ventilation into the home and carry a 10-year, no-leak installation warranty. Along with available solar powered blinds, the skylights operate by remote control, closing automatically in case of rain. Costs will vary, but a new solar skylight installation typically ranges from $1,800 to $2,400 after a 30 percent federal tax credit. To find dealers and certified installers, visit whyskylights.com.

Enhance Your Storage Space

Whether it’s a lack of space, too many shirts or pairs of shoes, or simply not enough time to get organized, you can eliminate the mess and enhance your closet’s storage space in a weekend with ClosetMaid’s SuiteSymphony line. The DIY system, which is available in multiple finishes, adds stylish organization to both walk-in and traditional closets and is customizable with accessories such as drawers, door fronts, shoe shelves and expandable hang rods. Find more organization solutions at ClosetMaid.com.

Looking to upgrade and instantly enhance the look of your home? Install a new front door, such as one from the extensive line of fiberglass exterior doors from Feather River Doors. Hand-stained oak and mahogany doors are among the most popular, accentuating elegant wood grain details that instantly improve a home’s curb appeal. They’re energy efficient, low maintenance, secure and available in custom sizes and colors, exclusively at The Home Depot. Check out the options at featherriverdoor.com.

Boost Your Backyard Appearance

Every backyard requires that special finishing touch. If your outdoor living quarters are missing that unique “something,” install and decorate a pergola to bring it all together. A pergola is the perfect spot for hanging plants, setting up a shaded canopy or creating an exquisite entrance to your personal garden. Research the different types of pergolas available before deciding what’s best for you and customize it to fit your needs—it’s the ultimate creative space for the outdoor artist in you.

House exterior and pergola photos courtesy of Getty Images

Refresh Your Home’s Curb Appeal


THE

Homefront

Plan Ahead for Power Outages

“S

torm season often motivates homeowners to start thinking about how to keep the power on and avoid the costs and inconvenience associated with power outages,” said Dan Roche with Briggs & Stratton. Get ready for the chance of inclement weather ahead with these tools and resources.

FIRST AID. Assemble a basic first aid kit with assorted sterile, compression and adhesive bandages, rolled gauze, adhesive tape, disinfectant, antibiotic ointment, tweezers, scissors and instant cold packs. Add pain relieving medications (including children’s strength, if applicable) and a few days’ worth of any regular medications you take.

Photo courtesy of Getty Images

Summer storms are often accompanied by damaging hail, high winds, heavy rain and lightning that cause widespread power outages affecting homeowners’ peace of mind—and their pocketbooks. Homeowners can prepare for possible power outages by establishing an emergency plan for their families.

light, battery-powered weather radio, bottled water, non-perishable snacks and personal hygiene items. Don’t forget extra batteries that fit your devices, and keep a portable cell phone charger on hand. The compact Rayovac Phone Charger, which is compatible with most USB-powered devices, holds enough power to recharge a mobile phone up to three times (depending on device) and holds its charge up to four months. Find more devices ideal for your emergency kit at rayovac.com.

Briggs & Stratton’s Storm Responder Portable Generator is equipped with a digital control panel that provides everything owners need to know, including the amount of power being used, total lifetime hours of the generator and maintenance reminders. Ideal for first-time buyers, the Storm Responder features step-by-step startup, shutdown and storage instructions as well as a safety guide printed directly on the unit. Be sure you have a transfer switch installed in your home so you are ready to safely restore the power in the event of an outage. To learn more, visit briggsandstratton.com. While portable generators can provide users with flexibility and comfort, homeowners and renters should only use portable generators outside in order to avoid carbon monoxide poisoning. Visit TakeYourGeneratorOutside.com to learn more about portable generator safety.

COMFORT ITEMS. What constitutes

INFORMATION GUIDE. In the aftermath of

EMERGENCY KIT. Include items such as a flash-

comfort likely varies depending on your family composition but may include things like stuffed animals, soothing blankets or small toys for little ones and more practical items, including pillows and sleeping bags, for older family members. Remember that a storm may leave you huddled in a confined space or without power for an extended period, so diversions such as travel-size games and cards can help pass the time.

BACKUP POWER. Portable generators provide a solution during an emergency power outage to power essential items, such as refrigerators, sump pumps and lights. An option such as

a storm, having emergency information at your fingertips is one less stress to fight. Compile contact information for family members, friends and close neighbors, along with your insurance agent. Also include any relevant medical contacts or information. Stash your guide along with your emergency and first aid kits so it will be within easy reach if you need it. Seasonal weather can bring unpredictable dangers to your home and family, but assembling the right materials ahead of time will help ensure your family is well prepared to ride out the storm.


4 Locations in Central Florida

Suzanne Alcorn (352) 216-6178 Residential

Mike Bleau (352) 857-4421 Residential

Carol Castineira & Bob Bunny Cooney Niedzwiecki (352) 361-8575 (352) 445-4953 Single Family Residential Specialize in Del Webb

June Cordova (215) 500-8964 Residential

WE STRIVE TO BE THE BEST! 500 400 300

MILLIONS

#1

2

200 Chuck Cusick (352) 572-0813 Residential

Hope Deszell (352) 817-0459 Marion County & The Villages since 1993

Sandy Dingler (352) 427-6044 Residential

Donna Eastman Lori Eubanks (352) 843-1542 (352) 875-4464 Residential, Residential/Waterfront 55+ Communities, Farms

100

3 4

5

6

0

Jim Head (352) 615-8234 Residential / Land

Donna Knox (352) 216-5495 Residential/Farms

Marion Ladd (352) 245-4525 Residential/Golf Course Comm.

KathyMalone (352) 816-6978 Residential/Rural

Sheila McKathan (352) 895-8648 John Whipple (352) 598-3570

Active Adult Communities

OVER

40

YEARS OF Julia McPherson (352) 895-0722 Residential/Farms

Donna Phillips (352) 843-1988 Homes/Investments

Conrad & Dania Melancon Tom Murvin (352) 208-4924 (352) 362-0473 55+ Community Experts Investment / Residential

Jennifer Ramotar (352) 274-0250 Residential

Lindsay Paolillo (352) 237-0252 55+ Communities

Paul Perez (352) 342-2831 Residential

LEADERSHIP FIND AN EXCEPTIONAL PROPERTY BY SCANNING THIS CODE!

David Rector Linda Roddenberry Nicki Schwartz (352) 216-1183 (352) 816-6607 (352) 209-9963 Residential/Investment Farms/Residential/Land Residential/Relocation

Exceptional Agents... Exceptional Results!

Get the free mobile at app to view all of Use your smartapp phone

listings, tours, info, and much more! http:/ /our gettag.mobi

www.foxfirerealty.com


the

Scene YOU R GU I D E TO W HAT’ S HAPPE N I N G I N & AROU N D O C AL A

AUG

20

Just Glo With It

Lace up those glow-in-the-dark running shoes you’ve been dying to test out! The annual Glo With The Flo 5K is slated to kick off under the stars in just a few short weeks. Each year this nighttime race attracts runners and walkers of all ages and abilities to the brightly lit streets of downtown Ocala. Come decked out in your wildest and brightest running attire for a 5K run like no other around. The first 300 preregistered participants are guaranteed a swag bag complete with neon accessories and a T-shirt. Online registration is available until 9am on August 19. Race day registration is $35 and begins at 6:30pm at Barrett Liner and Co. The race kicks off as the sun goes down at 8pm from the Citizens’ Circle, and proceeds benefit the Marion County Children’s Alliance and the Drayton Florence Foundation. For more information, visit the Glo With The Flo’s Facebook page or glowiththeflo5k.itsyourrace.com or call (352) 438-5996.

GET ACTIVE FOR AUTISM

078

A NEW TUNE

080

FOOTBALL FEVER

084

THE SOCIAL SCENE

088

PG.

077


PRO M OTI O N AL FE ATU R E

10 Years Of CSCC

› By Rick Allen

C

arol and Bernie Locklear are what you might call venue fans. It doesn’t matter who’s on stage at the Circle Square Cultural Center, they’re there front and center. “We haven’t missed a show here since it opened,” Carol said. “Well, there was one show that was rescheduled, but I was sick.” Bernie, however, did go. “And we’ve never walked out on a show, so that should say something,” he added. That’s nearly 10 years of shows. The Circle Square Cultural Center marks its 10th anniversary in January, a decade as Marion County’s largest and classiest indoor performing and multiuse center. Over the decade, a galaxy of stars have sparkled inside the elegant facility with its distinctive colonnade veranda out front. Few stars have been bigger than Willie Nelson four years ago—unless it’s Kevin Costner, the Oscar-winning director and actor who will bring

078

› Ocala

.com

We bought the first ticket and we’ve purchased since then every ticket that has reserved seating. › Bernie Locklear

Carol and Bernie Locklear

his contemporary country Modern West band to the center this month. The Locklears will be there, as they have been going since Gary Lewis and the Playboys inaugurated the facility in January 2007. “We bought the first ticket,” Bernie said. “And we’ve purchased since then every ticket that has reserved seating.” They like to ensure their front-row seats. “This is close by, we love the entertainment,” he added. “And when it’s finished, we’re five minutes from home.” The center was an immediate hit. A patron in the opening night sellout crowd, Mary Battenfeld, gushed to the Ocala Star-Banner about the facility: “It’s new, it’s beautiful and it’s full for opening night. What more could you ask?” Until the venue opened, the Locklears had to travel to Jacksonville or Orlando to catch the stars. “We’re thrilled,” Carol said. “Every place we’ve lived we always had to go somewhere else to see decent shows. I feel like here they come to entertain me; we don’t have to go to them. “We can’t be entertained any better than here,” she added. Which is exactly what Kenneth D. Colen, President and CEO of On Top of the World Communities, wanted when he and his staff decided to build the center. “We’d been considering cultural activities for residents for years,” he said. Among the options: a first-class entertainment venue large enough to attract “quality, big-ticket shows.” Seating up to 930—in chairs “so comfortable I can fall asleep in them,” Colen chuckled—the center has drawn the likes of


Judy Collins Kevin Costner and Modern West

A Galaxy Of Stars Performers who’ve appeared at the Circle Square Cultural Center include:

Don McLean Kevin Costner

2007: Gary Lewis and the Playboys, Melissa Manchester, Bob Eubanks, BJ Thomas 2008: Ricci Martin, John Davidson, Charo, Tommy Cash 2009: Gary Puckett, The Vogues, Gary Lewis and the Playboys, Lovin’ Spoonful, The Association, The Lettermen, Jay Seigel & The Tokens 2010: Johnny Maestro, Bowzer’s Rock & Roll, Jim Stafford, The Smothers Brothers, Drifters with Charlie Thomas, Herman’s Hermits with Peter Noone, Bobby Goldsboro

BJ Thomas, The Association, The Letterman, the Smothers Brothers, Frankie Avalon, Martha Reeves, Three Dog Night, Lee Greenwood, Charlie Thomas and the Drifters, Jim Stafford and so many more! Bigger names are coming: After Costner, the legendary Judy Collins and Don “American Pie” McLean are scheduled for October. Colen was quick to praise Jo Salyers, Circle Square Commons general manager, and her staff for the professionalism and high profile of the center. “We couldn’t do this without them,” he said. “The center is an opportunity to enhance the lifestyle of On Top of the World residents,” Salyers told the Star-Banner when the center opened. And though there are more options available today, it’s still just as true. As most shows are open to more than OTOW residents, she added, “It is a very positive thing for Marion County.” One of the early questions about the 9,000-plussquare-foot facility was theater seating or multipurpose. Colen said by choosing multi-purpose, it expanded opportunities. Behind the 43-foot-wide stage is a pair of dressing rooms and a spacious staging area for catering banquets, weddings, receptions and meetings.

Susan and Jeff Miller have been hosting the Coastal Conservation Association fundraising banquet for 350 every February since the center opened. “We wanted something that had enough facility to handle our live and silent auctions,” Susan said. “We’d been all over. When the Cultural Center opened, we decided to make the move. “It was an awesome move for us,” she added. Events Manager Gary Pierre, she said, knows what they want. “When we get there everything is set up; I don’t want to have to set up anything.” Further, “Gary is right there to make sure the sound is right, to handle any technical issue.” She recommends the Circle Square Cultural Center. “You’re not going to find a better facility or team of professionals in Ocala,” Susan said. “Trust me, I’ve looked.”

2011: The Lettermen, Frank Sinatra Jr., Tony Orlando, Frankie Avalon, Jay and the Americans, Martha Reeves, The Amazing Kreskin 2012: The Lovin’ Spoonful, Willie Nelson and Family 2014: Lee Greenwood, Maxine Nightengale 2015: Restless Heart, Three Dog Night, Peter Yarrow of Peter, Paul & Mary, Peter Noone and Herman’s Hermits 2016: The Texas Tenors, Kevin Costner and Modern West, Don McLean and Judy Collins

Circle Square Cultural Center › 8395 SW 80th St. Ocala › (352) 854-3670 › csculturalcenter.com AUG ’16 ›

079


THE

Scene AUG

13

A Non-runner’s Run

Ever dream of running a 5K but don’t really want to pound the pavement for 3.1 miles? Well, we’ve got you covered! The Marion Cultural Alliance’s Faux 5K has all the perks of a real 5K, including a race bib and a photo at the finish line, all without ever having to break a sweat. Come dressed in your craziest, most colorful shorts and singlets to the Brick City Center for the Arts from 7-9pm and join all the other nonrunning runners for this fundraising event. Proceeds benefit the Marion Civic Theatre, and registration is $25. feeldowntownocala.com or (352) 236-2274.

Downtown To Dos AUGUST 20: Glo With The Flo 5K, Citizens’ Circle, 8pm AUGUST 27: Girl Scouts Membership Rally, Citizens’ Circle, 11am-2pm SEPTEMBER 2: First Friday Art Walk, Downtown Ocala, 6pm

AUG

13

AUG

26-27

080

› Ocala

.com

It’s Kinda Corny

Nothing says summer like some classic corn hole. Try your hand at this beanbag toss game at a corn hole tournament to benefit the Saving Paws and Hooves in Central Florida, a soon-to-be non-profit organization. Whether you’re all about corn hole or have never even heard of the game, the tournament is open to all, young and old alike. There will be free food and drinks along with raffles, prizes and more. The tournament will take place at the Maricamp Animal Hospital at 5pm. (352) 624-0300.

Acing It!

Whether you’re game for golf, a hot shot on the courts or you just simply like to get all dolled up on a Friday night, the 4th annual Aces For Autism has an event for you. Benefiting the New Horizon Academy for Exceptional Students, this two-day event kicks off with a golf scramble on Friday hosted by the Country Club of Ocala. Later that evening, a gala will take place featuring a BBQ buffet, live music, silent auction and more. But don’t stay out too late! Saturday morning a tennis tournament will pit players against each other all day on the courts. Come to one, two or all of the events. (352) 207-2347 or (352) 804-3777.

AUG

31

How To Spend Half a Day

Just as kids are getting back in the swing of reading, writing and arithmetic, it’s already time for a break! Don’t let a few days off interrupt their creative flow. Send them to the Appleton for Half Day Happenings. Kids can pick up an “assignment” at the front desk, enjoy the exhibitions and then visit the ARTSpace for a fun, hands-on art making experience. The event opens at 1:30pm and is free for members and children and included with admission for adult nonmembers. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455.


s s a l g n u S y e l l A 000 OVER 10, ND A READING ES S SUNGLAS

FASHION $5.95 | POLARIZED $7.95 | GOLF $5 & $8.95 SHATTERPROOF LENS FOR SPORTS $7.95

KIDS $4 | CLIPON $5 & $6.95 | READING GLASSES $5.95 & $6.95

STYLISH READING GLASSES

$5.95

See Us at et of Marionut!h

The Mark

So on Aisle D

SUNGLASSES WITH BIFOCAL READERS OR TINTED READING GLASSES

$6.95

12888 SE US HWY 441 BELLEVIEW, FL 34420 8 MILES NORTH OF THE VILLAGES | US 441 FRI, SAT & SUN 8AM3PM

352.245.6766

Fri - 8am-3pm Sat-Sun - 8am-4pm themarketofmarion.com

12888 SE US HWY 441, Belleview, FL 34420 AUG ’16 ›

081


THE

Scene

The Local

Scene

Ongoing Events Free Yoga for Veterans › Wednesdays at Bliss Yoga at 12:15pm, (352) 694-YOGA

Free ESL Classes › Wednesdays at First Baptist Church of Ocala

at 6pm, (352) 629-5683

Chair Yoga › Wednesdays at Bliss Yoga at 10:30am,

A Quick Q & A

(352) 694-YOGA

Free Yoga › First Saturday of the month through October at Sholom

With Ben Burris

Park at 9am, (352) 854-7950

Interview by Bonnie Kretchik

Garden Workshop › Second Sunday of each month at Silver

Springs State Park at 1pm, (352) 236-7156

Country Meets Rock

Turn on your radio and you’ll more than likely be met with a slew of country music stations. But one station separates itself from the rest. US 102.3, a popular country music station broadcasting to both the Ocala and Gainesville areas, recently made a change in format. After listening to their audience, the station broadened its music library to include Southern rock. Operations Manager Ben Burris took a few minutes to describe the heart of the new station.

What’s new about US 102.3? We’ve always been the traditional country music station. But we’ve expanded to now include music that is the soul of our heritage here in North Central Florida: Southern rock. What prompted this change? We built this station for the hardworking people of North Central Florida, so we listened to what they had to say. They didn’t want another cookie-cutter country music station. They wanted more Southern rock classics combined with the country music they love. What are some examples of the new music you’ll be playing? You will still hear your favorite country music hits and classics, but you’ll also get music from Lynyrd Skynyrd, The Eagles, The Allman Brothers Band and especially Tom Petty, as he’s from Gainesville.

Will anything else change in terms of your hosts or broadcasts? Not at all. We still have all the same hosts and everything else that our audience loves about our station. We just wanted to give the people what they wanted in terms of music. They asked, we answered. When did the crossover take place? We officially became US 102.3 The Crossroads of Country and Rock on June 29. Since then, we’ve had incredible feedback from the audience. People call in left and right telling us how much they love it. We talked to listeners and this is what they told us they wanted, so this was what we did.

FIND OUT MORE › US 102.3 › To request a song or check out what’s playing, tune in or visit the station’s website at us1023.com. 082

› Ocala

.com

Survivors Support Group › Last Tuesday of the month at 1pm in the chapel at Ocala West United Methodist Church (room 235), (352) 291-6904

Arts, Crafts and Culture Upcoming Exhibits At The Appleton › John Raimondi,

Drawing to Sculpture will feature the dynamic drawings of John Raimondi, whose works are showcased in more than 25 museums, nine colleges and universities, three airports, and dozens more public and private locations throughout the United States and Europe. The exhibit will be on display August 6 through October 30. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455.

Marion County Chili Cook-off Registration (Through November) › Registration is now open for the 35th annual Marion

County Chili Cook-off. This Marion County tradition will be held on November 5 at the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion. For registration details, visit marioncountychilicookoff.com or call (352) 351-8840.

Call to Artists (Through September 1) › The Second Annual Rainbow

Springs Art Festival is slated to take place this November, and organizers are calling artists for submissions. This daylong festival takes place in downtown Dunnellon with the goal of showcasing the work of both emerging talent and established veterans. The deadline for submission is September 1, and all mediums are welcome. rainbowspringsart.net or (352) 489-0099.

Gourd Artist Meeting (August 16) › The Marion County

Gourd Artist Group will hold a monthly meeting at the Cherokee Park Recreation Center in Belleview at 10am. All are welcome. marioncountygourdartists.com or (352) 245-7203.

Trips ’N’ Tours (August 17) › The program will take guests to

the Epping Forest Yacht Club followed by a visit to “The Sweetest Destination on Earth,” Sweet Pete’s Candy Shop in Jacksonville. Registration is $98 for Appleton members and $108 for nonmembers. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455.

Webber Gallery Exhibit (Through August 19) › The College

of Central Florida Webber Gallery presents CloseUp: Eight Contemporary Cuban Artists. Each work evokes naturalism and realism and is representative of Cuban artists living in Miami. cf.edu or (352) 873-5809. Continued on p.82


YOUR DREAM... OUR MORTGAGE

MAKE YOUR DREAM A REALITY WITH A MORTGAGE FROM INSIGHT! Whether you’re buying your first home, your second home, or looking to refinance your current home loan from another financial institution, you’ve come to the right place. Call us at 407.426.6000 or Toll-Free 888.843.8328, or visit one of our convenient locations to take advantage of low mortgage rates* today!

COME HOME TO

Offices in Crystal River, Inverness, Ocala and Maricamp

Come live in Marion county’s premier apartment community. CARLTON ARMS OF OCALA offers our residents country club style living with outstanding services and value. Visit us today to select your apartment as your next home to live, work and play.

INSIGHTCREDITUNION.COM *Mortgage rates subject to change. Your actual rate will be customized based on your credit characteristics. Offer valid in the State of Florida only. Loan subject to normal underwriting guidelines. Interest accrues from the date of disbursement. Appraisal fees due prior to ordering. Other restrictions and fees may apply. Offer may be withdrawn at any time. Federally Insured by NCUA.

YOUR LAKEFRONT APARTMENT COMMUNITY

• FREE Water Utility • FREE WiFi at 2 Sparkling Pools • FREE Valet Trash Removal • FREE Pest Control • Large Private Patios/Balconies • Rapid Response Maintenance • 2 Private Party Clubhouses • Fitness Center w/ Steam Showers

• Lighted Tennis & Basketball • Fresh Water Fishing • Children’s Playground • Pet Friendly / Dog Park • Car Care Center

5001 SW 20th St. Suite 100 Ocala, FL 33474

866.927.6819 CarltonArmsofOcala.com AUG ’16 ›

083


THE

Scene

The Local

Scene Continued from p.80

Concerts

Themed Tour at The Appleton (August 25) › The Appleton

will host an in-depth tour depicting workers in their respective fields. The tour meets in the museum lobby at 2pm and is free for museum members and included with the cost of admission for nonmembers. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455.

Ticketmaster › (800) 745-3000 › ticketmaster.com All dates are subject to change without notice. Please call ahead to confirm venue listings.

Classic Albums Live: Led Zeppelin’s Zeppelin II Bayside Motion City Soundtrack: So Long, Farewell Tour Still Surfin’ Beach Boys Tribute Drake feat. Future Goo Goo Dolls A Tribute to Merle Haggard Flume Maroon 5 Bad Boy Family Reunion Tour

Reilly Arts Center, Ocala

Aug. 4

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

Aug. 12

House of Blues, Orlando

Aug. 13

Outdoor & Athletic Endeavors AUG

Group Bike Rides (Ongoing) › Brick City Bicycles offers

30

Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

Aug. 20

several group bike rides throughout the week and weekend. brickcitybicycles.com or (352) 369-9400.

Amalie Arena, Tampa Hard Rock Live, Orlando

Aug. 27 Aug. 30

Kayak Outings (Ongoing) › The Marion County Parks and

Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

Sep. 3

Recreation Department will host several kayak outings for children and adults alike. marioncountyfl.org or call (352) 671-8560.

House of Blues, Orlando Amway Center, Orlando

Sep. 8 Sep. 9

Reading With A Ranger (Throughout August) › The City of Ocala

Amalie Arena, Tampa

Sep. 11

Recreation and Parks Department, in partnership with the Marion County Public Library System, presents “Reading with a Ranger.” These stories in the park will take place every Friday in August at 11am: Aug. 5, Citizens’ Circle; Aug. 12, downtown square; Aug. 19, Chazal Park; Aug. 26, Poinciana Tot Lot. ocalafl.org/recpark or (352) 368-5535.

SEP

9

Performing Arts Sonnetag Theatre at the IceHouse, Mount Dora The Gainesville Community Playhouse Blue Man Group Theatre at Universal CityWalk, Orlando

Anything Goes Oklahoma! Blue Man Group Cirque du Soleil: La Nouba Louis Prima Jr. and the Witnesses Howie Mandel Stage Kiss

Disney Springs, Orlando The Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages The Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages The Hippodrome State Theatre, Gainesville

Animal Tracks and Learning To Read The Wild

(August 6) › The City of Ocala Recreation and Parks Department

Through Aug. 7 Through Aug. 14 Aug. 1 Oct. 30 Aug. 2 Oct. 29

presents this program from 10-11am at the Fort King National Historic Landmark. Participants will learn techniques to identify animal tracks in nature by learning to read the natural signs of the wild and more. This program is complimentary for all ages. Registration is required and is open now through Aug. 6. ocalafl.org/recpark or (352) 368-5535.

Adaptations In Nature (August 20) › The City of Ocala Recreation and Parks Department presents this program from 10-11am at the Heritage Nature Conservancy. Participants will learn how animals, like owls, alligators and wolves, learn to adapt to their environments and survive in the wild. This program is complimentary for all ages. Registration is not required. ocalafl.org/recpark or (352) 368-5535.

AUG OCT

2

29

Aug. 3

Pack Walk (August 28) › The Marion County Animal Services will host a ranger-led walk through Silver Springs State Park with homeless dogs. All shelter dogs will be available for adoption and can come home the same day. Walkers can bring their own dogs as well. Park admission is $8 per carload or $5 for a single person. Walk is free, takes place rain or shine and begins at 10am. marioncountyfl.org/animal or (352) 671-8700.

Aug. 5 Sep. 2 - 25

9 to 5: The Musical

Ocala Civic Theatre

Sep. 8 Oct. 2

Rhapsody & Rhythm: The Gershwin Concert Experience

The Sharon L. Morse Performing Arts Center, The Villages

Sep. 10

AUG

5

The Kevin Costner You Didn’t Know Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ve probably seen at least one film the icon Kevin Costner has starred in. But how many of you knew he was the lead singer and guitarist of a band? Nope, this isn’t one of his film roles. Kevin Costner has been performing with Modern West since 2007, a group that has released two albums, Untold Truths in 2008 and Turn It Up in 2010. He, along with his fellow band mates, will be performing live at the Circle Square Cultural Center for one night only. And, of course, an evening with Kevin Costner wouldn’t be complete without film clips from his expansive movie career. Doors open at 6pm, and the show starts at 7pm. csculturalcenter.com or (352) 854-3670.

084

› Ocala

.com

AUG

27

Kevin Costner and Modern West


Fun Fundraisers Southern Sportsmen Whitetail Foundation Annual Banquet (August 6) › The annual banquet will be held at National

Guard Armory at 5:30pm. The event will feature food, hundreds of prizes and a silent auction. Proceeds benefit veterans, disabled veterans and disabled children of Marion County. Tickets are $40 per person, $20 per child and $60 per couple. (352) 207-7118 or (352) 237-5499.

Walk to End Alzheimer’s (September 10) › The annual Walk to End Alzheimer’s will take place at Tuscawilla Park from 6am-12pm. The event raises funds for and awareness for Alzheimer’s disease. ocalafl.org or (407) 951-7993.

Other Fun Stuff!

Remember When... Dad beamed with pride?

Family Social/Candidate Meet and Greet (August 6) › The

Marion County Democratic Party will host a family picnic and candidate meet and greet at Tuscawilla Park from 11am-2pm. ocalafl.org or (352) 209-3094.

Enough is Enough (August 6) › A peaceful gathering at the Martin Luther King Jr. Recreation Complex to promote non-violence in the community will take place from 8am-5pm. The event will include food, music and a march. ocalafl.org or (352) 433-8457. Girl Scout Membership Rally (August 27) › The Girl Scouts will host a membership rally at the Citizens’ Circle from 11am-2pm. The event will include information, games, Girl Scout Fashion Show and Zumba. ocalafl.org or (352) 484-9384. Ocala Carnival (September 4) › The North Central Caribbean

Carnival Association will present the 2nd Annual Downtown Carnival at the Martin Luther King Jr. Park Recreation Complex. The event will feature several aspects of Caribbean Culture, including food, dance, music and more. nccca.org or call (352) 470-7799.

To have an event considered for Ocala Style Magazine’s The Scene, send a short description (and a color photo, if possible) 60 days in advance to calendar@ocalastyle.com, fax us at (352) 732-0226 or by mail: Ocala Style Magazine, The Scene, 1007 E. Fort King St., Ocala, FL 34471

He was our hero! Dad’s service to our country is something we’re all proud of. He made a difference and set a great example for all of us. Now, it’s our turn to honor the sacrifices he made for his family…and his country. As Veteran’s funeral specialists, it’s a privilege for Hiers-Baxley Funeral Services to help celebrate Dad’s one-of-a-kind life and recognize his patriotic service in a special way.

When you need us, We’re here for you. Hiers-Baxley Funeral Services

Ocala, The Villages, TimberRidge, Belleview

(352)433-4305 433-4305 (352) www.hiers-baxley.com www.hiers-baxley.com/serve

HiersOcala 4.25” 4C


THE

Scene

Results are typical and do vary.

Let’s Kick Villages Facelift Off: 2016 alistFootball You Can Trust Preview

al or Non-Surgical. n’t settle for less. Ready for high school Friday night lights, college ball Saturdays and NFL Sundays? Here are the home schedules for your favorite teams.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers Los Angeles Sep. 25 4:05p Denver Oct. 2 4:05p Oakland Oct. 30 1:00p Atlanta Nov. 3 8:25p Chicago Nov. 13 1:00p Seattle Nov. 27 4:05p New Orleans Dec. 11 1:00p

High School Football

Double Belleview Board Certified Facial Plastic Surgeon as seen on: The Villages Chtr. Weeki Wachee Lake Weir Keystone Heights Eastside

Aug. 26 Sep. 2 Sep. 30 Oct. 7 Oct. 14

7:00p 7:30p 7:00p 7:00p 7:30p

Dunnellon Lecanto Belleview Belleview Umatilla South Sumter West Port

Sep. 2 Sep. 9 Sep. 16 Oct. 14 Oct. 21 Nov. 4

7:30p 7:30p 7:00p 7:30p 7:30p 7:00p

Forest North Marion Leesburg Eastside Hernando Lake Weir

Sep. 2 Sep. 16 Sep. 23 Oct. 7 Oct. 14

7:30p 7:30p 7:30p 7:00p 7:30p

Lake Weir Santa Fe Lake Highland Umatilla Gainesville CFL Christian Vanguard 086

› Ocala

Aug. 19 Aug. 26 Sep. 2 Sep. 16 Sep. 23 Oct. 21 .com

7:30p 7:30p 7:30p 7:30p 7:30p 7:30p

North Marion Blanche Ely Aug. 26 7:30p Vanguard Sep. 9 7:30p Chaminade-Madonna Oct. 14 Belleview Oct. 21

7:30p 7:00p

Ocala Christian Jupiter Christian Sep. 23 7:00p Christ’s Church Oct. 14 7:00p Trinity Catholic Jesuit Sep. 2 Lake Weir Sep. 9 South Sumter Sep. 23 Clearwater Central Oct. 7 Trinity Prep Oct. 28 Vanguard West Port Lakewood Buchholz Gainesville Forest

Sep. 2 Sep. 16 Sep. 23 Oct. 14 Oct. 28

7:00p 7:00p 7:00p 7:00p 7:00p

7:00p 7:30p 7:30p 7:30p 7:30p

West Port Forest Hagerty Ocoee Lake Minneola Umatilla

Y IN

NFL

Aug. 26 Sep. 23 Oct. 7 Oct. 21 Oct. 28

7:00p 7:00p 7:00p 7:00p 7:00p

St. John Lutheran Faith Christian Aug. 26 Triumph Christian Sep. 9 St. Joseph Sep. 23 Canterbury Oct. 7 All Saints’ Oct. 14 Lake Mary Prep Oct. 21

7:00p 7:00p 7:00p 7:00p 7:00p 7:00p

NCAA University of Florida Massachusetts Sep. 3 Kentucky Sep. 10 North Texas Sep. 17 LSU Oct. 8 Missouri Oct. 15 South Carolina Nov. 12 Presbyterian Nov. 19

7:30p 3:30p 7:30p TBA TBA TBA TBA

Florida State University Ole Miss Sep. 5 8:00p Charleston So. Sep. 10 12:30p North Carolina Oct. 1 TBA Wake Forest Oct. 15 TBA Clemson Oct. 29 TBA Boston College Nov. 11 7:30p Florida Nov. 26 TBA University of Central Florida South Carolina St. Sep. 3 7:00p Maryland Sep. 17 7:00p FIU Sep. 24 7:00p Tulane Oct. 7 8:00p Temple Oct. 15 TBA Cincinnati Nov. 12 TBA Tulsa Nov. 19 TBA University of Miami Florida A&M Sep. 3 FAU Sep. 10 Florida State Oct. 8 North Carolina Oct. 15 Pittsburgh Nov. 5 Duke Nov. 26

6:00p 6:00p TBA TBA TBA TBA

Jacksonville Jaguars Green Bay Sep. 11 1:00p LIMITED QUANTITIES Baltimore Sep. 25 1:00p IndianapolisAVAILABLE Oct. 2 9:30a Oakland Oct. 23 1:00p Houston Nov. 13 1:00p Denver Dec. 4 1:00p Minnesota Dec. 11 1:00p Tennessee Dec. 24 1:00p

Miami Dolphins Cleveland Sep. 25 1:00p Tennessee Oct. 9 1:00p Pittsburgh Oct. 16 1:00p BuffaloFREE IMAGELIFT Oct. 23 BOOK 1:00p for first 20 New York Nov.callers! 6 1:00p (Retail Nov. $14.95) San Francisco 27 1:00p Arizona Dec. 11 1:00p

June 2nd

Atlanta Falcons June 16th Tampa Bay Sep. 11 CarolinaJune 23rd Oct. 2 San Diego JulyOct. 23 7th Green Bay Oct. 30 Arizona July 14th Nov. 27 Kansas City Dec. 4 San Francisco Dec. 18

Free in Ap

Seminar at th Filler Lunche 1:00p 1:00p Seminar at th 4:05p Filler Lunche 1:00p Seminar at th 1:00p 1:00p 4:05p

THE VILLAGES /


Combination ImageLift and Long-term facial fillers. Results are typical and do vary.

STOP Wasting Money on Temporary Fillers

YOU’RE NVITED! r e m Sum ials! Spec

Now Get Breakthrough Long-Term Filler Treatments by The Villages #1 Bellafill® Injector and

Save up to 75%

Compared to Recurring Costs of Temporary Fillers, based on current ImageLift pricing.

Are You a Candidate?

Free ImageLift seminars held atlocations the following locations in August and September. e ImageLift seminars are being held atare thebeing following Meet the the doctor andand enjoy free food, free books, drawings and door prizes. pril and May. Meet doctors enjoy free food, free books, CALL NOW TO RSVP LIMITED SEATING drawings and door prizes.

CALL NOW TO RSVP - LIMITED SEATING

Aug 16th ImageLift Office, The Villages CODE Inn, The Villages AugPROMO 30th Waterfront “STYLE” Sept 13th ImageLift Office, The Villages Sept 27th Waterfront Inn, The Villages he Waterfront Inn, The Villages eon at The Villages ImageLift office he Waterfront Inn, The Villages eon at The Villages ImageLift office he Waterfront Inn, The Villages

Dr. Castellano

Patient and any other person responsible for payment has a right to refuse to pay, cancel payment, or be reimbursed for payment for any other service, examination, or treatment that is performed as a result of and within 72 hours of responding to ad for the free, discounted fee, or reduced fee service, examination or treatment.

// 8630 East County Road 466


THE

Scene

› SOCIAL SCENE

VIEW MORE SOCIAL SCENE PHOTOS AND PURCHASE PRINTS OF YOUR FAVORITES AT OCALASTYLE.COM

An Evening in Memphis

Recently a crowd of over 200 guests passed through the Trinity Catholic High School gates to be greeted by student ambassadors who were there to welcome guests and answer questions. Photos by Ron Wetherington Penny Baird, David McKenzie and Alexandra Sexton

T

he occasion was An Evening in Memphis, which was the third of its thematic kind in as many years and is Trinity Catholic’s annual fundraising gala. This year over $45,000 was raised for tuition assistance. Memphis Beale Street’s famous rock n’ roll and blues music was admirably performed and set the musical tone for the evening by Mark Smythe who helped the guests jam the night away. The courtyard was hopping as guests socialized during the cocktail hour, enjoyed the savory hors d’ oeuvres and perused the silent auction tables containing a wide selection of over 50 items. The evening honored the memory of Mrs.

Char Strack who helped grow this event into such a success. Seen enjoying the sumptuous Southern fare prepared and served up by Rondo Fernandez and the crew of Mojo Grill were Board of Trustees members: Mrs. Penny Baird, Mrs. Carol Brinati, Dr. James B. Duke, Mr. Henry P. Fortier, Dr. Frank Hildner, Trinity Catholic President David K. McKenzie and Chairman of the Board Father Ed Waters. The goal of Trinity Catholic High School is to have students who excel academically, have skills for lifelong learning, learn good citizenship and devote themselves to lives of serving others. David K. McKenzie states: “We foster a community environment in which there is love, respect and acceptance of each person. A unique partnership between talented students, supportive parents and a gifted and dedicated faculty and support staff makes such a family environment possible.” Likewise, Principal Lou Pereira believes: “Together, as the Trinity Catholic family, we will progress, working hard to make sure that our school is the very best it can be. As principal, I welcome this partnership and know how vital it is to our successes in the classroom, on the field and everywhere that our wonderful and talented students share their gifts.” The live auction was especially popular during An Evening in Memphis. The bidding was very competitive for Livin’ the Live Oak Dream, which offered the experience of the beautiful and private parts of the over 4,000 acre Live Oak farm on a scenic carriage ride for four with International Driving Champion Chester Weber. Following the carriage ride, Chester will host a lunch at his residence. All parties concerned agreed that this was an once-in-a-lifetime experience. Another sought-after live auction item was by the Skylighters of Florida for a professional Silver Level fireworks display with the duration of six minutes. After live auction, guests lingered into the evening enjoying live music by “Elvis.” The 2017 themed annual gala by Trinity Catholic High School will be There’s So Much World to See! Plans for an even bigger bash are now underway. Keep an eye on Trinity Catholic’s Facebook page to stay current on 2017 party plans.

Taina Pierre, Callen camp, Megan Zinnie and Alexandra Sexton

Jorge and Angela Redondo, Nesha and Stan Salser

Omeni and Sarah Osian

Ronald W. Wetherington SOCIAL SCENE EDITOR

088

› Ocala

.com

Lorri Silver, Amanda Harding and Elaine McClain


Ken and Phyllis Marino

Karl and Tammy Kunz, Holly and Jame Peachey, Lisa and Adam Lombardo

Tommy and Sunny Bond

Elodie and Patrice Perron

Sasha Koenig, Reagan Guertler and Victoria Allison

Al and Judy Dunlap

Anneli Fernandez and Michael Serrano

Christopher Florimonte, Hope Stephens, Carlie Hellmann, Cassie Sombat, Matthew Garlessi and Eric Dean

Fred and Sue Latarrn, Pam and Terry Bovaird

Yvette Gaya, Ann Redgate and William Gaya

Christopher and Emma Luetgert, Linda and Sal Farina

Justin and Jinny Grabelle

Herg Agle and Candy Quigley

Joe and Virginia Sturdivant AUG ’16 ›

089


Scene

THE

› SOCIAL SCENE

VIEW MORE SOCIAL SCENE PHOTOS AND PURCHASE PRINTS OF YOUR FAVORITES AT OCALASTYLE.COM

Taste of Ocala

@ Ewers Century Center at the College of Central Florida Photos by: Ronald W. Wetherington, Social Scene Editor, Ocala Style Magazine

The 28th annual Taste of Ocala gala was held on Saturday, March 5 at the Ewers Century Center. Guests enjoyed a “Wave of Culinary Flavor” from various local dining establishments. Over $61,000 was raised to benefit a new scholarship program for promising fifth-grade participants from the Boys and Girls Club of Marion County. The scholarship offers each deserving student a $4,000 scholarship to CF upon their graduation from high school.

Continues on p.92

Evelyn Hale Nussel and Marge Felix

Beth and Chris Knife, Ron and Phyllis Ewers

Liza Lyan and Liz Owens

Jay Wheeler, Mimi Hale, Waica Micheletti, Evelyn Hale Nussel and Astrid Guerra

Mayor Kent and Sandra Guinn

Fred Roberts, Sr. and Joe Mazur

Bonnie Clark, Patti Moring and Matthew Greene

Cyndi Felton Clifford, Doris and Dawn Felton

090

› Ocala

.com

Marty and Carol Smith, Fred Roberts, Jr.


Working Responsibly

To Protect OUR EARTH When you choose All American Air you can feel confident that you’re getting the highest quality in both products and service. We’re committed to delivering 100% customer satisfaction in everything we do. Here are some of the features and services we offer:

Specializing in:

CUSTOMER APPRECIATION

Service Upgrades Power Distribution

REFERRAL PROGRAM

Safety Inspections Gates & Barn Wiring

$ / 50 50

$

Site Lighting Computers/Data Generator Installation Medical Equipment Landscape Lighting

24 HOUR

$50 For You & $50 Off The First Service Call For A Family Member or Friend No Expiration, First-Time Customers Only, One Offer Per Customer

• • • • • • • • • • •

Established 1996 Fully Licensed & Insured EPA-Certified Technicians Radio-Dispatched Trucks Satisfaction Guarantee Free Indoor Air Quality Analysis Duct Sanitizing UV Protection Maintenance Agreements Saturday & Evening Appointments Free 2nd Opinion on Condemned Compressors

SERVICE

ALL AMERICAN AIR & ELECTRIC

Through August 7th

Marion 352-629-1211 • Lake 352-750-9080 • Citrus 352-795-9686 • Sumter 352-330-2242 St. Lucie 772-878-5143 • Indian River 772-567-1135 • Brevard 321-733-7809

www.AAAEinc.com All Major Credit Cards Accepted • Financing Available • #ECO002438 • #CACO57965 AUG ’16 ›

091


Scene

THE

› SOCIAL SCENE

VIEW MORE SOCIAL SCENE PHOTOS AND PURCHASE PRINTS OF YOUR FAVORITES AT OCALASTYLE.COM

Taste of Ocala

@ Ewers Century Center at the College of Central Florida Photos by: Ronald W. Wetherington, Social Scene Editor, Ocala Style Magazine

The 28th annual Taste of Ocala gala was held on Saturday, March 5 at the Ewers Century Center. Guests enjoyed a “Wave of Culinary Flavor” from various local dining establishments. Over $61,000 was raised to benefit a new scholarship program for promising fifth-grade participants from the Boys and Girls Club of Marion County. The scholarship offers deserving students $4,000 scholarships to CF upon their graduation from high school.

Continued from p.90

Elizabeth and Kaylee Schor

Sagi and Rangaswamy Asokan

James and Jeanne Henningsen

Shanna Stevens, Beth Eiland and Jill Schuck

Francesco Esposito and Jill Phillips

Lt. Col. Frank and Naida Rasbury, Sue and Randy Keuntjes

Antonio Saudiosi

George and Barbara Tomyn

092

› Ocala

.com

Michelle and Frank DeLuca

Sarah Moeller and John Christini


Be kind. Be gracious. Be giving. is celebrating the spirit of giving. And you can, too, in our December

Healthy Giving issue. Support and highlight your favorite charitable organization. Recognize volunteers who have made your organization succeed. Honor friends or family who have impacted our community.

Charities and volunteers make our community better for everyone. Show your support today. To be a part of Healthy Living Magazine’s Healthy Giving issue,

contact Sharon Morgan at sharon@ocalastyle.com • (352) 209-4159 or Penny Miller at penny@healthylivingmagazines.com • (352) 895-8074

TOO YOUR

2

SPA

Limited Offer

Can Join

FOR 12 Months For Just

$99

. .50

each plus tax

Single Memberships $119.50 each plus tax

Spacious, 2-level free weight room • over 150 group classes weekly, including Zumba + aquatic classes cardio kick boxing & yoga • indoor heated pool, racquetball & whirlpool We offer tanning, personal training and child care.

w w w. t o o y o u r h e a l t h s p a s .o r g

Spa I 694-1141

Spa II 237-6149

Spa III 245-2800

Spa IV 489-3383

3643 NE 8th Pl (Off 36 Ave.) Ocala

28 41 SW 20th St. (Behind CFCC) Ocala 24HOUR ACCESS AVAILABLE!

5300 SE 110th St. (Behind Sonny’s BBQ) Belleview

2174 W. Dunnellon Rd. Dunnellon

7 Days

24 Hours

Now Open 7 Days

Now Open 7 Days

Spa V 775-4975 The Villages Now Open! SPECIAL PRICING AUG ’16 ›

093


THE

Scene

› SOCIAL SCENE

VIEW MORE SOCIAL SCENE PHOTOS AND PURCHASE PRINTS OF YOUR FAVORITES AT OCALASTYLE.COM

Rendezvousing at DeLuca Toyota

Those in the know rendezvoused this afternoon at the official grand opening of the new facility of DeLuca Toyota. VIPs from Toyota were in attendance and were duly impressed. Seen among the congenial company were Michelle DeLuca, Ocala Mayor Kent Guinn, Ocala Police Chief Greg Graham and the list of Marion County Who’s Who is just too long to list here. Many congratulations to Frank DeLuca on his prestigious new Ocala landmark.

Photographer @ Ronald W. Wetherington, Social Scene Editor, Ocala Style Magazine

Lois and Lt. Col. Ed Johnson, Charlie Stone

Frank and Nadia Rasbury

David McTierman, Frank DeLuca and Wayne Crater

Dennis Baxley Phyllis and Ronald Ewers

Chuck Henderson, Cynthia DeSimone, Beth Ramsay and Steve Bethea

Angie Umpleby, Rocky Ramirez, Jane Moerlie and Sunny McHaffey

094

› Ocala

.com

Frank and Michelle DeLuca

Michelle DeLuca, Jewelianna and Tyla Kennedy

Jim Henningsen and Mayor Kent Guinn

Quay Neach and Michelle DeLuca


Crippen_Ad_OcalaStyle_1-2pgH_8.75x5.375_Color_PRINT.pdf

1

12/14/15

10:44 AM

Accounting. Simplified. C

M

Y

IT DOESN’T HAVE TO BE OVERWHELMING. LET US HELP.

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

OUR FOCUS IS ON YOUR SUCCESS Not only do we provide the highest level of service and expertise – we know our clients by name and are sincerely invested in helping them succeed.

Strategic. Innovative. Accountable.

Accounting Services | Tax Preparation | Tax Planning | Audits & Reviews

Ocala | The Villages | Leesburg 352-732-4260 | www.CrippenCPA.com

Estate & Trust Planning | Business Consulting

ARE YOU READY TO LOOK & FEEL your best THIS SUMMER? Dr. Jay Panchal, MD Sherri Morrison, RN BSN

OneOn Week-One Coun ly selin g

MEDICALLY SUPERVISED

Beyond Weight Loss Be fore

After

Tony los t 35 lbs in 2 months

 Appetite Suppressants (Prescription & Natural)  Fat-Burning Amino Acids Vitamin B Injections  Botox/Restylane  Juvederm/Radiesse (Dermal Filler)

WE ALSO OFFER:

 B12/LIPO Injections  Sclerotherapy (for spider veins/varicose veins)  Latisse  High Quality Isotonix Health Supplements

Hablamos Español • Visit us on Facebook

2654 SW 32nd Place, Suite 100, Ocala

352.387.0090 AUG ’16 ›

095


!

S

KE A M A T TOYO

ES K A AM C U L .. DE

IF D E TH

. R A C THE

“TREATING CUSTOMERS WITH HONESTY AND INTEGRITY FOR OVER 37 YEARS! STOP BY TODAY AND EXPERIENCE THE DELUCA DIFFERENCE.” – FRANK DELUCA, PRESIDENT/OWNER

ONE OF FLORIDA’S LARGEST AND MOST LUXURIOUS TOYOTA DEALERSHIPS.

OVER 94,500 TOYOTAS SOLD SINCE 1978! WITH A STATE-OF-THE-ART SERVICE DEPARTMENT, A FULL-SERVICE SALON AND A CAFÉ. WE’RE JUST A SHORT DRIVE FROM THE VILLAGES. PLEASE CALL FOR DIRECTIONS.

DELUCATOYOTA.COM 352.553.2198 / 1719 SW COLLEGE RD. OCALA Featuring a no-cost maintenance plan with roadside assistance.

WWW.

E C N E FER


CHILDREN'S MIRACLE NETWORK • BUMP, BABY, AND BEYOND JUNIOR LEAGUE OF OCALA VANGARD HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL THE PUBLIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION OF MARION COUNTY • KIWANIS FLORIDA CENTER FOR THE BLIND JUNIOR LEAGUE OF OCALA FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES • YMCA PUBLIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION OF MARION COUNTY • CHILDREN'S MIRACLE NETWORK • MARCH OF DIMES FLORIDA C ENTER FOR THE BLIND • BUMP, BABY, AND BEYOND • ARNETTE HOUSE YMCA • VANGARD HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL • THE PUBLIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION OF M MARCH OF DIMES • JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT • KIWANIS • TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN ARNETTE HOUSE • UNITED WAY • JUNIOR LEAGUE OF OCALA • FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES THE PUBLIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION OF MARION COUNTY TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN • FLORIDA CENTER FOR THE BLIND FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES • YMCA • VANGARD HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL CHILDREN'S MIRACLE NETWORK • MARCH OF DIMES • BUMP, BABY, AND BEYOND • ARNETTE HOUSE • UNITED WAY VANGARD HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL • THE PUBLIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION OF MARION COUNTY JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT • KIWANIS • TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN • FLORIDA CENTER FOR THE BLIND UNITED WAY • JUNIOR LEAGUE OF OCALA • FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES PUBLIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION OF MARION COUNTY • CHILDREN'S MIRACLE NETWORK • MARCH OF DIMES STOC K IN CHILDREN • FLORIDA CENTER FOR THE BLIND • BUMP, BABY, AND BEYOND • ARNETTE HOUSE FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES • YMCA • VANGARD HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL • THE PUBLIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION OF M CHILDREN'S MIRACLE NETWORK • MARCH OF DIMES • JUNIOR ACHIEVEMENT • KIWANIS • TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN BUMP, BABY, AND BEYOND • ARNETTE HOUSE • UNITED WAY • JUNIOR LEAGUE OF OCALA • FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES THE PUBLIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION OF MARION COUNTY TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN • FLORIDA CENTER FOR THE BLIND FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN ATHLETES • YMCA CHILDREN'S MIRACLE NETWORK • MARCH OF DIMES BUMP, BABY, AND BEYOND • ARNETTE HOUSE VANGARD HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL • THE PUBLIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION OF MARION COUNTY KIWANIS • TAKE STOCK IN CHILDREN JUNIOR LEAGUE OF OCALA PUBLIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION OF MARION COUNTY • CHILDREN'S MIRACLE NETWORK FLORIDA CENTER FOR THE BLIND • BUMP, BABY, AND BEYOND VANGARD HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL MARCH OF DIMES • UNITED WAY THE PUBLIC EDUCATION FOUNDATION OF MARION COUNTY


Breast Augmentation Tummy Tuck Facelift Liposuction Eyelid Surgery Hair Transplant Botox & Injectable Fillers Spider Veins Chemical Peels

Board Certified Plastic Surgeons James Rogers DMD MD • Navinderdeep Nijher MD Leonik Ahumada MD FACS MEMBER OF American Society of Plastic Surgeons

MEMBER OF American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery

C A L L U S T O D AY

(352) 629-8154 REQUEST A FREE CONSULTATION

www.OcalaPlasticSurgery.com OCALA/PADDOCK PARK LOCATION 3320 SW 34th Circle, Ocala, FL 34474

THE VILLAGES/DANA CENTER LOCATION 11950 CR 101, Suite 205, The Villages, FL 32162

Profile for Magnolia Media Company

Ocala Style Magazine Aug'16  

Real people. Real stories. Real Ocala.

Ocala Style Magazine Aug'16  

Real people. Real stories. Real Ocala.