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In a medical emergency, two things matter most – the quickest route to the hospital and a medical staff trained to handle a crisis. It’s what we want for all the members of our family, including those with paws and claws. University of Florida Pet Emergency Treatment Services provides after-hours, emergency care for pets right here in Ocala. Affiliated with many veterinary hospitals in Ocala, UF PETS is staffed by UF veterinarians who specialize in critical care.

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Caring for others begins with caring for yourself. With all you do, taking care of yourself can be challenging. That’s why RAO’s women’s imaging centers feature board-certified radiologists specializing in breast MRI, breast ultrasound, stereotactic breast biopsy, DEXA bone density testing, and more. We also offer self-referral screening digital mammography appointments that fit your schedule, because when breast cancer is caught in its preliminary stage, it is nearly 100% curable. Our experience, technology and caring for patients have placed both our women’s imaging centers among the select few to be designated Breast Imaging Centers of Excellence by the American College of Radiology.

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August2012

Vol14 No8

Features A Cloth of Legends p24

You’ll never find any breadcrumbs or beverage stains on Walter Light’s Irish linen tablecloth. What you will see are nearly 700 autographs by cinema stars, presidents, sports heroes, crooners and more. BY MARY ANN DESANTIS

Ridin’ & Ropin’ for a Good Cause p26

At first glance, it seems an unusual partnership. Yet every Labor Day weekend, hard-riding, competitive cowboys and a group of brave children battling an array of physical challenges come together in a memorable gathering filled with laughter, enthusiasm and more than a little pride. BY CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

A Home on the Water p30

What if there was a way to get away from the crowds and enjoy every aspect of the Sunshine State’s natural charms… while cooking in an actual kitchen, taking real showers and sleeping in a comfortable bed in air-conditioning? Good-bye campground… hello houseboat!

From Prom To Pampers p40

Sitting on the edge of the high school bathroom sink is a thin white stick. Upon closer inspection, the stick reveals two very visible pink lines. A positive pregnancy test. Somewhere in that school a young girl just found out she’s pregnant. BY KARIN FABRY-CUSHENBERY

In The Nick Of Time p56

Sudden cardiac arrest. The words alone are chilling, but even more so when connected with a victim who is barely old enough to drive and, in many cases, even younger. BY CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

Salute Your Salad p74 Salads may be touted as that stereotypical dish that women on a date choose while the men scarf down a juicy rare steak, but now’s the time to squash that stereotype and spear so-called rabbit food with your prongs proudly. BY AMANDA FURRER

Photo by John Jernigan

BY CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

p34

ON THE COVER

Sticks and Stones

Bullying has gained national attention in recent years, with some of the most extreme cases earning top billing on countless news broadcasts. But what is bullying? Who gets bullied, who does the bullying and what can we do to combat it? BY BONNIE KRETCHIK Locker Photo by Jose Gil / Shutterstock.com. Photo illustration by Jason Fugate.

ocalastyle.com AUG’12

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p80

August2012 Vol14 No8

Departments The Publisher p11 An inside look at this month’s issue.

The Buzz p13 The real people, places and events that shape our community. BY KEVIN CHRISTIAN, AMANDA FURRER, BONNIE KRETCHIK AND NOLAN MCCASKILL

p18 p54

ONTHESQUARE p14

Hardhats are hard at work. ONEONONE p18

Kids Central continues to succeed in the community. CLASSACTS p20

Stay informed with information concerning the upcoming school year.

The Pulse p45 Ideas to keep you fit and healthy all year long. BY JOANN GUIDRY & BONNIE KRETCHIK

BEINGWELL p46

Learn about lupus. FEELINGWELL p48

High temps? Hydrate!

p48

p68

EATINGWELL p50

Gluten-free is a healthy way to be.

The Dish p65 Our best recipes, restaurant news and culinary quick bites. BY AMANDA FURRER, BONNIE KRETCHIK AND CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

QUICKBITES p67

Fisherman’s turns 21 and Little Joey’s offers three ways to dine.

p14

DININGGUIDE p69

Our area’s finest dining establishments.

The Scene p79 Your guide to what’s happening in and around Ocala. BY BONNIE KRETCHIK

AQUICKQ&A p82

Listen up all you chili fans! Ocala Style has the scoop on registering for Ocala’s Chili Cook-off. SOCIALSCENE p90

Photos from our area’s most popular events.

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p50


Let us help you create or restore the smile of your dreams.

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August2012

Vol14 No8

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PUBLISHER

KATHY JOHNSON / kathy@ocalastyle.com

My Designer’s Attic

OFFICE/PRODUCTION MANAGER CYNTHIA BROWN / cynthia@ocalastyle.com

We’re Not Your Average Furniture Consignment Store!

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801 N. Magnolia Ave - 8 Blocks North of the Historic Square Home to The Attic’s Cafe! www.MyDesignersAttic.com • Mon thru Sat 10am - 5:30pm

EXECUTIVE EDITOR KARIN FABRY-CUSHENBERY karin@ocalastyle.com

MANAGING EDITOR MELISSA PETERSON melissa@ocalastyle.com

FOOD EDITOR AMANDA FURRER amanda@ocalastyle.com

WE DO IT ALL!

couples massages, skincare, hair, nails, gel polish, retail products available, Redken∙OPI∙Dermalogica Newly expanded! 16 pedicure chairs to make for the ultimate group experience for you and your friends. We can accommodate large birthday/bridal parties! Mon - Sat 10am-9pm / Sunday - Noon - 6pm

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HEALTH EDITOR BONNIE KRETCHIK bonnie@ocalastyle.com

CREATIVE DIRECTOR JASON FUGATE jason@ocalastyle.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNER KRISTEN NETHEN kristen@ocalastyle.com

PHOTOGRAPHERS SHEILA HARTLEY sheila@ocalastyle.com

JOHN JERNIGAN jernigan@ocalastyle.com

BRANDON SCRAMBLING art@ocalastyle.com

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT MACKENSIE GIBSON mackensie@ocalastyle.com

EDITORIAL INTERN NOLAN McCASKILL CONTRIBUTING WRITERS KEVIN CHRISTIAN kevin@ocalastyle.com

MARY ANN DESANTIS maryann@ocalastyle.com

JOANN GUIDRY

DIRECTOR OF SALES DEAN JOHNSON deanjohnson@ocalastyle.com

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES LORI TANI lori@ocalastyle.com

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES TANYA JONES

joann@ocalastyle.com

tanya@ocalastyle.com

DEBBIE INGRAM

SHARON MORGAN

debbie@ocalastyle.com

sharon@ocalastyle.com

CYNTHIA MCFARLAND

CECILIA SARCO

cmcfarland@ocalastyle.com

cecilia@ocalastyle.com

MITZI WELCH mitzi@ocalastyle.com

ACCOUNTING LISA CONNOLLY billing@ocalastyle.com

COLLECTIONS DOREEN ROCKWELL doreen@ocalastyle.com

WeÕ ve Moved!

SCAN HERE WITH YOUR SMARTPHONE TO VISIT OUR FACEBOOK PAGE

dave@ocalastyle.com

OFFICE PHONE 352.732.0073

NOW AT 3035 SE MARICAMP ROAD, SUITE 114 ( IN PARKVIEW COMMONS PUBLIX PLAZA )

352-671-3288

STAY TUNED FOR MORE DETAILS ABOUT OUR COLLEGIATE TAILGATING EVENT! 10

DISTRIBUTION DAVE ADAMS

AUG’12

ocalastyle.com

Ocala Style Magazine, August 2012. Published monthly by Ocala Publications Inc., 1007 E. Fort King Street, Ocala, FL 34471. (352) 732-0073. All contents copyright 2012 by Ocala Publications Inc. All rights reserved. Nothing may be reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. For back issues or advertising information, call (352) 732-0073. Return postage must accompany all unsolicited manuscripts and artwork if they are to be returned. Manuscripts are welcomed, but no responsibility can be assumed for unsolicited materials. “Promotional” and “Promotional Feature” denote a paid advertising feature. Publisher is not responsible for claims and content of advertisements.


the

Publisher

Communication Is Key

T

housands of kids will be making the trek back to school this month, and no doubt decisions are being made about new wardrobes and cool supplies. And while these “tough” choices are important to your child, we’ve catered this year’s Back To School issue to a few topics that are a bit more hard hitting and difficult to discuss. The goal? To encourage you, as parents and grandparents, to create an open line of communication with your child, regardless of their grade level. Bullying is something that often goes unnoticed by parents. We took a look at what Marion County schools are doing to combat the issue, creating a safe and welcoming learning atmosphere for our children. If you’re not concerned with your child getting bullied themselves, don’t forget to talk to them about the importance of treating other people with kindness and respect. Perhaps you can stop a potential episode of bullying before it even starts. Is your child going to play a sport this school year? If so, maybe you should consider going beyond the basic athletic physical—it could be a potentially life-saving decision. Did you know that it’s estimated that a student athlete dies of sudden cardiac arrest every three days?

&

KATHYJOHNSON

COMING SOON The World’s largest musical instrument retailer

Did you also know that the conditions leading up to the arrest are very likely to go undiagnosed? A routine ECG could save your child’s life. Finally, we’re tackling the subject LESSON SPACE IN OCALA of teen pregnancy. According to The Campaign to Prevent Teen and 3920 SW 42ND ST ■ OCALA, FL 34474 Unplanned Pregnancy, three out of 10 EMAIL: JARRET.KNUTH@GUITARCENTER.COM girls will become unexpectedly pregnant GUITARCENTER.COM before they turn 20. We visited one local maternity home that caters to pregnant girls with nowhere else to turn. 7/23/12 These are issues that no parent GCS_Ad_Ocala_Fla_4.25x3.5.indd 1 wants to face when concerning their own child. In order to protect our kids, we can’t ignore the tough topics, though. Whether it’s talking to your child’s doctor about medical testing or meeting with their teacher on parent• No Waiting teacher day, it’s • Fun & Caring Atmosphere important to • Thorough Exams, Consultations & Adjustments communicate • Latest Technology & Treatments with the people • Elimintate Pain & Keep it Gone who help shape our children’s lives. And above all, talk to your kids.

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Celebrating our relationships with

We’re Mobile! Heading out but have to leave the magazine put? Scan this tag and take us with you! Works with Android phones, iPhones and iPads, too!

How To Use Microsoft Tags Throughout this issue, you will find Microsoft Tags, like the one you see above. Follow these easy directions to get started and join in the scanning fun!

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Using the browser on your smartphone, go to gettag.mobi.

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Follow the steps to download the free Microsoft Tag Reader application.

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our clients. The dedication and trust our clients have shown drives us to deliver the kind of quality service we TM

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From Silver Screen to Mystery Machine

Buzz

the

GOING PLACES talks dinner theather p16

The Last Summer Jam p14

Foster The Children p18

Back To School Cool p20

and more!

TAKING STEPS

FOR A GREAT

Asphalt w/ Shoes © Mordechai Meiri; Heart in Hands © Patryk Kosmider / Shutterstock.com

CAUSE H

eart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases claim more than 813,804 American lives a year, and this year, Ocala Style is doing something to combat this problem by taking part in the American Heart Association’s 2012 MARION COUNTY HEART WALK. The walk is a non-competitive 5K and takes place Saturday, October 6 at the Baseline Road Trailhead. Ocala Style has formed its own team, and we encourage you—yes, you—to join us in the fight against heart disease, America’s No. 1 and No. 4 killer. The event begins at 8am, with the kickoff presentation starting at 8:30am. The walk begins at 9am, and everyone is encouraged to come out and take steps toward a brighter future. Visit our team website at marionheartwalk.kintera.org/ocalastyle to find out how you can become a part of Oct

6

Ocala Style’s team—I Style!—and begin fundraising. Team members who reach specific fundraising goals will be entered into a drawing for prizes, such as restaurant gift certificates, mini refrigerators, flatscreen TVs and more! Register today at MarionHeartWalk.org! Please contact the Marion County Heart Walk Team at (800) 257-6941 ext. 8018 or MarionCounty@heart.org with questions or for more information. To find out more about joining Team Ocala Style, contact Melissa Peterson at (352) 732-0073, ext. 104,or melissa@ocalastyle.com.

Scan here with your smartphone to learn more and register to walk!

WANT TO GO? 2012 Marion County Heart Walk Saturday, October 6 Event begins at 8am Walk begins at 9am MarionHeartWalk.org

ocalastyle.com AUG’12

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Buzz

the

ONTHESQUARE

SITE UNDER CONSTRUCTION B

locked roads, detour signs, closed off sidewalks; it’d be an incredible feat to travel through town these past months and not notice the construction taking place. Since early March, hardhats have been at work on the downtown community development project, renovating City Hall and landscaping the new CITIZENS’ CIRCLE. “But that’s only a piece in a large puzzle,” says Janie Pope, public communications coordinator for the City of Ocala. The grand master plan of the project is to enhance the culture of the downtown area with a focus on economic development. “We want more people to come and visit,” says Pope. “There’s a vintage downtown feel that drives people here, and we want to create more

OH, WHAT A

FEELING! SCAN WITH YOUR SMARTPHONE FOR ACCESS TO FEELDOWNTOWNOCALA.COM

14

AUG’12

ocalastyle.com

opportunities, generate businesses and revenue, and put Ocala on the map.” The Citizens’ Circle, which will be completed in August, will serve as a gateway between downtown Ocala, the White Challis redevelopment and City Hall plaza. A stage platform will serve for upcoming outdoor concerts, and a grassy knoll provides an ideal spot for picnicking. Bike trails and walkways are also a part of the park’s layout. Eventually, the downtown area will become all parts residential, commercial, urban and green within a 5-year span. The White Challis Redevelopment Company plans to erect The Millworks on Fort King Street, which will provide 19 industrial row-house style townhomes with twocar garages and private rooftop gardens.

BUDDY MARTIN, talk show host on “The Voice of Ocala,” became mystified when he walked onto the square last winter, which was illuminated with decorative lights. The feeling that came over him. City Councilman Daniel Owen is the kind of spark they hope to inspire with the Feel Downtown marketing campaign. The campaign involves a partnership with the Save The Marion Theatre group, the City of Ocala and the Downtown Business Alliance. Tito Comas,

Jackie McCleaf and Brenden Martin came up with the campaign’s marketing concept. The Feel Downtown website is the go-to place for the latest events, entertainment and best eateries in the downtown area.

For an events calendar and more information, visit feeldowntownocala.com. Get the latest downtown happenings at your fingertips by scanning the Microsoft Tag to the left with your mobile device.

Guy with Guitar © Viorel Sima / Shutterstock.com; Ferris Wheel © FeelDowntownOcala; Citizen’s Circle © City of Ocala

JAM SESSIONS In 2011, the DOWNTOWN SUMMER JAMS summer concert series kicked off, showcasing the raw talent of local young artists from June through September on the downtown square. The series’ first season was met with popularity and success, resulting in Downtown Summer Jams 2012. “Last year, we weren’t expecting the turnout,” says Stan Creel, special events and athletics supervisor at City of Ocala Recreation and Parks. The concert program usually features three bands and an acoustics performance. Youth in their late teens and mid-20s come out to play all genres. “I’ve never seen such a cohesive group of people,” says Creel. “They’re focused, punctual and represent themselves and the city very well.” The last two summer jams will be August 17 and September 21 from 7-10pm.


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GOINGPLACES

STAGE, SCREEN & CUISINE! If you’re tired of the same ol’ dinner and a movie routine, then you’re in luck! There are a variety of venues within driving distance that put a twist on eating and entertainment. Whether you like stage, screen or getting right in on the action, check out some of these top choices.

BIG NAMES & FINE DINING

ALHAMBRA THEATRE AND DINING 12000 BEACH BLVD., JACKSONVILLE (904) 641-1212 / ALHAMBRAJAX.COM

We may be over 1,000 miles away from New York City, but that doesn’t mean we need to travel up the East Coast for quality theater. The Alhambra Theatre and Dining, located in Jacksonville, is the nation’s longest running professional dinner theater. This historic landmark opened in 1967 and has hosted the likes of Tony Curtis, Sid Cesar and many other notable headliners and has also launched the careers of many up-and-coming stars. Guests of the Alhambra can expect an elegant evening of first-class live

BIG SCREEN AND BISTRO

CINÉBISTRO

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Forget popcorn and gumdrops, CinéBistro gives a whole new meaning to the term “dinner and a movie.” This unique movie-going experience combines a luxurious theater airing a combination of first-run and independent films with a first-class dining experience. The digital cinema is equipped with the latest advances in sound technology and 3-D capabilities. Guests can relax in the ultra-comfortable oversized

theater accompanied by some of the best cuisine in Jacksonville. Renown Chef Dejuan Roy prepares each meal fresh in the theater’s on-site kitchen. Tickets for Sunday through Thursday performances are $45, and it’s just $49 for Friday and Saturday performances. Shows include your choice of any of the unique performanceinspired entrées for the evening. Upcoming performances include Hank and My Honky Tonk Heroes, Remember Me, Phantom and White Christmas.

rocking chairs and enjoy bistro dining at its finest. The eclectic menu features a wide range of offerings to tantalize every palate. Whether you prefer to feast on the Lavender and Black Pepper Fillet or snack on flatbreads and brie, you’re sure to find something to enjoy during the show. Come early or stay after and enjoy the stylish lounge complete with a full bar, extensive wine list, specialty cocktails and the full unique bistro menu.

GET IN ON THE ACTION

SLEUTHS MYSTERY DINNER SHOWS 8276 INTERNATIONAL DRIVE, ORLANDO (407) 363-1985 / SLEUTHS.COM

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If you enjoyed “Clue” as a kid, then Sleuths Mystery Dinner Shows is the place for you! Sleuths is the longest running mystery dinner show in Orlando and offers guests 2 1/2 hours of food, fun and… murder, all in good fun, that is. As the guests assemble and the salad and rolls make their way from the kitchen, be on the lookout for any suspicious funny business. As dinner

proceeds, the mystery unravels as your “hosts” present a 45-minute improv comedic mystery. Gather clues and look for evidence throughout the night to find out who dun it! This kid-friendly venue is fun for all ages, and no two shows are ever alike. Tickets include your choice of entrée, the “mystery dessert” and beverage, including beer, wine and soft drinks.

KEEP IT LOCAL Don’t forget about our own theater-going experience right here in Ocala. THE MARION THEATRE shows first-run films in its newly renovated, state-of-the-art yet historic atmosphere. Moviegoers can order all the traditional snacks and goodies, and the 21-andover crowd can also order beer, wine or wine coolers. carmike.com or (352) 390-2731.

Wine Glass © Alexandr Vlassyuk; Mask © Smit; Letters © Carsten Reisinger / Shutterstock.com

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ONE-ON-ONE

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KID CENTRIC Danielle Damato Doty and her staff at Kids Central are champions of child welfare. By Amanda Furrer

WANT TO HELP? 18

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pproximately 1,700 children are in the child welfare system under the supervision of Kids Central in Circuit 5, but thousands more are served each year with prevention and diversion services. KIDS CENTRAL, INC., a private non-profit, was selected by the Department of Children and Families (DCF) to serve as the lead agency for child welfare in Circuit 5 in 2003. Danielle Damato Doty, the director of community development and public information officer, has been working for Kids Central since 2007. Danielle, who grew up in Citrus County, speaks passionately about her organization’s mission. “We focus on prevention and diversion services. We keep families and children safe,” she says. “We are not government operated nor are we the DCF. If a call is made, the police will investigate. If it is determined something needs to be done, the case gets turned over to Kids Central.” Because of the struggling economy, there has been a spike in child abuse calls and investigations. According to Danielle, the harsh reality is that abuse is more prevalent than people think. “A lot of people don’t understand what they’re doing is neglect. Our philosophy is to strengthen families and communities. We’re not just trying to put kids in foster care. We want to help families get back on their feet. We get them food from the food pantry and offer parenting classes. If the child must be removed, our first course of action is to contact any outside relatives.” But if foster care is the only option, Kids Central has potential families go through a stringent process that involves orientation,

classes and home studies. All counties of Circuit 5—Citrus, Hernando, Lake, Marion and Sumter—are in need of quality foster parents. Kids Central is also trying to build community partnerships and obtain business sponsors. Foster families are given a modest amount of money to take care of children, but a normal childhood with extracurricular activities and sports exceeds that payment. Consider senior year of high school, a year that correlates to what adults say is supposed to be “the time of your life.” Class rings, yearbooks, prom—these activities and mementos are all a part of the high school experience, and the monetary cost for them is great. “That’s what’s great about community-based care,” says Danielle. “We partner with businesses and organizations and have the freedom to ask for things we need. The people in our community are very giving.” Youth growing out of foster care also pose a need for help. The resource center at corporation headquarters in Ocala is a clientonly shop where necessities such as furniture, housewares, linens and toys are available for youth transitioning into adulthood. Kids Central solely relies on community donations for these items. The independent living program offers life skills training and a monthly stipend for youth who continue their education after high school. “These kids are committed to making something of themselves,” says Danielle. “We try to give them support. Many of them are superstars. They set big goals. They overcome. They take advantage of this program.” To learn more information, contact Kids Central, Inc. at (352) 873-6332 or stop by at 2117 SW Hwy 484, Ocala FL

To become a superstar yourself, visit kidscentralinc.org for donations, volunteer applications and information on how to become a foster parent.

Building Blocks © VladimirV / Shutterstock.com

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CH_OS_Aug2011 Ad_CH_OS_Aug2011 Ad 7/22/11 1:22 PM Page 1

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Visit us at ChildrensHealthofOcala.com

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CLASSACTS

BACK TO THE BOOKS By Kevin Christian

A

lready! Can you believe it? It’s August and the start of school. For Marion County’s projected 41,847 students, that first day comes Monday, August 20. For the district’s 2,906 teachers, their first day back is one week prior on August 13. First-time teachers–those new to local classrooms–report even earear lier on Thursday, August 9, for a full day of orientation. The 2012-13 school year has many changes in store–some behind the scenes, many out front. Despite a “C” district grade by the state’s Department

of Education, there are no “D” or “F” schools. The district recently received statewide and nationwide attention for its “Be There” parent campaign, its “Sunny” award for website transparency and its Financial Accountability Award for 12 years running, the highest award possible from the government finance sector. Above this, students stand to benefit most from a district ranked at the top for providing the highest percentage of dollars to the classroom than any other district in Florida.

BUDGET

Despite Florida’s infusion of $1 billion back into public education this year, districts state-wide are continuing to slash spending by cutting costs and not filling vacant positions. Marion County is no exception. Latest word pegs our best-case scenario at $8-$10 million in cuts, a figure that regularly slides based on Tallahassee numbers. Regardless, expect our local public school district to continue freezing budgets, avoid funding certain positions, forego technology refresh projects and cut costs even more. It will be tough considering the district’s $51 million in cuts over the last five years.

Prices remain the same despite an increase of students eligible for free and reduced meals. Over 67 percent of local students now qualify for federal help for their meals, a number significantly higher over the last three years based on the economy. The application is now available on the district’s Web page. Breakfast prices are $1 across the board, while lunch prices are $1.60 for elementary and $1.75 for middle and high school. New USDA nutrition standards hit the serving lines, promoting a healthy diet in order to combat obesity, including fruits and vegetables every day of the week and more whole-grain foods and only fat-free or low-fat milk. Portion size and calorie count will also be limited. Finally, a reminder that online meal pay is a great option for parents to ensure their child’s account is always sufficient.

LOOKING FORWARD

Marion County Public Schools will have a new superintendent come this November when Jim Yancey, a mainstay in public education, retires. Two new members will also join the Marion County School

Board after departures from Jackie Porter and Judi Zanetti. Additional components of the FCAT will be tested on computer instead of traditional pencil and bubble sheets, and finally, digital textbooks continue trending forward until they’re required by the state in 2014.

Don’t Forget The Details 20

AUG’12

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School Lunch © Mike Flippo; Flying Books © LessLemon / Shutterstock.com

CUTS SCHOOL MEALS


7TH GRADE SHOTS

NEW PRINCIPALS This year, nine local schools are seeing a change in leadership. Here’s the breakdown.

By law, students must have required immunizations or they are not allowed in class with other students. Seventh-graders must have additional shots above and beyond their typical childhood requirements. Parents should speak with their family physician or the Marion County Health Department for more information. Last year, 495 seventh-graders were held out of class because of this.

KINDERGARTEN REGISTRATION

School Bus © Digital Storm; Clock © Sean Reilly; Medicine © Africa Studio; Illustrated Schoolhouse © Ziven / Shutterstock.com

EXTENDED DAY

Register your child for extended day services, offered before and after school, by contacting your child’s school prior to the first day of class. Prices remain the same this year with the exception of a $10 late payment fee. The current flat-rate fee is $48 each week per child for morning and afternoon care.

Ken McAteer

Delbert Smallridge

Want to avoid those long lines on the first day of school? The best way to do this is by registering your child for school early! You can do so by visiting the district’s website, clicking on the early-K registration link on the left and then completing your form online. Print it out, and take it to school now before those long lines start forming.

Sharon Dudley

ORIENTATIONS & OPEN HOUSES Most students benefit from knowing the “lay of the land” when it comes to their school’s campus layout, classroom locations and cafeteria procedures, not to mention bus pick-up times and such. Schools offer orientations before the first day, then open houses a few weeks later, to make students (and parents) more comfortable with their new campus. Stay tuned in to school marquees and newsletters for specific dates and times.

Jennifer Beck

Dr. N.H. Jones: Cheryl Laffey Dunnellon High: Ken McAteer* Dunnellon Middle: Delbert Smallridge* Liberty Middle: Michelle Lewis MTI (Marion Technical Institute): Isaac Burgess Oakcrest Elementary: Sharon Dudley* Reddick-Collier Elementary: Jeannine Mills Romeo Elementary: Jane Ashman Saddlewood Elementary: Jennifer Beck* *first-time principals

District Website: marion.k12.fl.us | Parent Portal: Register in-person at your child’s school (Don’t forget to bring your ID.) Transportation Hotline: 671-7050 (Be patient the first two weeks of school until bus schedules adjust.)

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PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

Hometown girl turned family dentist, Aleesha Freimuth, DMD welcomes children and adults to FREIMUTH FAMILY DENTAL at its new office location.

One Big Combined

DENTAL FAMILY Aleesha Freimuth, DMD

Y

oung or old, a visit to the dentist can cause goose pimples on your arms and make your teeth chatter, not to mention send shivers down your spine. But that’s not the case at Freimuth Family Dental. Cheerful and accommodating, Dr. Aleesha Freimuth will make you feel at ease, causing your pearly whites to unclench into a healthy smile. The practice on 17th Street was transferred to Dr. Freimuth in April by Fletcher & Fletcher. Upon retirement, Dr. Charles Fletcher and Dr. Walter Fletcher executed a lengthy and intensive search for someone to take their place. They chose Dr. Freimuth for her commitment to quality dental care and dedication to her patients. Most of the Fletcher & Fletcher staff stayed on, merging with Dr.

Freimuth’s team and creating a warm and inviting environment for incoming patients. The friendly and knowledgeable staff has over 30 combined years of experience in the field. “Most of the Fletcher & Fletcher team agreed to stay on board,” says Dr. Freimuth. “Along with my staff, we’ve become one big combined dental family.” Dr. Freimuth kept her maiden name to retain a sense of familiarity with patients. Born and raised in Ocala, residents may already be familiar with her family name. As a young Ocalan, Dr. Freimuth was involved in several community activities, including 4-H. In 1998, she graduated from the University of Florida with a Bachelor of Science in human nutrition. After


Back Row, L-R: Cynthia Kline; Cynthia Short, RDH; Kathye Ziegler, RDH; Melanie Waters, CDA; Lynn Twyman, Office Manager Front Row, L-R: Kimberly Sakowski, CDA; Dr. Aleesha Freimuth; Jennifer Roberts, Charlotte Trout, RDH Not Pictured: Barbara Andrews

Everyone who works here is very family oriented; we have kids and grandkids. —DR. ALEESHA FREIMUTH

receiving her degree, she continued her education at the University of Florida College of Dentistry, where she became a Doctor of Medical Dentistry in 2002. Dr. Freimuth has practiced in Ocala for 10 years and wishes to continue serving her established patients while welcoming new clients into the Freimuth family. The practice provides comprehensive dental care for all ages. While adults may be nervous in “the chair,” a dental visit can seem like a frightening experience for young children. Fortunately, Dr. Freimuth is no stranger to the sensitivities of children and neither is her staff. “Everyone who works here is very family-oriented; we have kids and grandkids,” she says. “We make sure it’s a good experience

and let children get a good feel. We don’t push.” A mother of two young boys herself, Dr. Freimuth wants to make kids and adults feel comfortable, putting their fears of the dentist to rest. She also understands how dental work can be a great expense for many clients. To curb dental costs, the practice offers in-office insurance plans as well as financing with low monthly payments with approved credit. The practice also runs monthly specials where clients associated with different industries can receive 20 percent off all treatments. Last month, in honor of Independence Day, the office gave all active and veteran military patients a 20 percent discount. This month, to coincide with the start of the school year, Freimuth Family Dental will offer the discount to

education providers. It’s a way for the practice to reach out to the community and help support patients who may find dental care too costly. “We hope to make dentistry less expensive for families or a cheaper expense if possible,” says Dr. Freimuth. Maintaining proper dental upkeep is crucial to living a long and healthy life. Dr. Freimuth stresses that dental care isn’t exclusive to the mouth; the entire body benefits from dental hygiene and checkups. To ensure her patients’ health isn’t subpar, Dr. Freimuth administers complete, comprehensive periodontal evaluations so that periodontal disease (gum disease) won’t go undetected. Periodontal evaluations are a double-edged sword because they prevent the spread of bacteria by detecting periodontal disease at its earliest stage and help patients avoid paying for expensive dental work down the road after the disease progresses. Periodontal disease is commonly linked to tooth infections. However, the disease is also connected to uncontrolled diabetes and body-wide infections. Left untreated, periodontal diseases may cause tooth loss and even pose

a risk for strokes and heart disease, which is why early detection isn’t only a convenience but a lifesaver. Besides periodontal evaluations, Freimuth Family Dental also conducts general cleanings and other dental services, including fillings, crowns and bridges, dentures and extractions. The office is open Monday through Friday, with same-day emergency treatment available. “We have had a very smooth transition moving into the office,” says Dr. Freimuth. “Right now, we plan on making some updates and remodeling. Things have settled wonderfully; the patients have been welcoming, and the staff is more than I could I ask for.” 20% OFF all treatment for the month of August for all educators and childcare providers.

Freimuth Family Dental 2509 SE 17th St, Ocala (352) 732-5646 freimuthfamilydental@gmail.com

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Ronald Regan

John Travolta

George Burns

You won't find any breadcrumbs or beverage stains on Walter Light’s Irish linen tablecloth. What you will see are nearly 700 autographs by cinema stars, presidents, sports heroes, crooners and more. A hobby that began with his mother in 1929 continues as the Ocala resident fills the few remaining spots on his legendary cloth. By Mary Ann DeSantis

W

alter Light of Ocala is no ordinary autograph hound. Instead of a store-bought autograph book, he carries a piece of history that began with his own family. His father, Walter Sr., was a successful motion picture film salesman on “Film Row” in St. Louis, Missouri. His mother, Joy, attended a dinner party where guests had signed a tablecloth, and she decided the idea would be a perfect way to capture autographs of performers who came to St. Louis on personal appearance tours. “She bought the finest Irish linen tablecloth she could find,” says Walter. “She originally wanted only movie stars to sign it, but she was such a baseball fan that it wasn’t long before she began including St. Louis Cardinals players. Next were heavyweight-boxing champions, including Joe Louis, Jack Dempsey and Jess Willard, who all signed between 1935 and 1937.” One of Walter’s first memories of the tablecloth is the day he accompanied his mother to get Katharine Hepburn’s signature.

Tony Bennett

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A Cloth of Kenny Rogers

Dolly Parton

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Muhammed Ali

“He’s too pretty to be a boy,” the actress said as she ruffled the little fellow’s hair. “I didn’t take to that very well,” he says with a chuckle. “It was a long time before I ever liked her movies.” Joy Light collected 77 autographs on the tablecloth before her death in 1944. The heirloom was stored in a drawer for the next 40 years, except for a brief moment when Walter had it in the back seat of his car as he was moving away from home for the first time in 1946 to pursue a musical career. “My mother left it to me, and without thinking, I threw it in the backseat,” he remembers. “My father saw the tablecloth as I was about to pull out, and he suggested that he keep it until I got settled. It was a blessing I left it with him because I would have probably lost it.” Music and performing have played an important role in Walter’s life. He began studying piano at age 5. As an adult, his band, Lucky Light, played Las Vegas and other venues around the country, and he was a drummer for Eddy Howard, Del

George Carlin

Millvina Dean, Titanic Survivor

Courtney and other big band performers. Since moving to Ocala 10 years ago, he has sung with the First United Methodist Church choir. He also is a volunteer pianist in the lobby at Munroe Regional Medical Center on Tuesdays.

In 1983, Walter decided to resurrect

the tablecloth from a drawer when comedian George Gobel came to St. Louis. By then, he and his wife, Julie, had returned to St. Louis permanently, and he rediscovered his mother’s unique treasure. He wanted to continue her dream of filling the tablecloth with signatures of people who were legends in their time. He discovered, however, that dream was not always easy. He learned early on that autograph seeking takes a lot of patience and persistence, and success isn’t always guaranteed. He missed adding actor Cary Grant by one day and singer Sarah Vaughn by less than a minute. Nevertheless, Walter has added 620 signatures to the rectangular tablecloth

Mikhail Gorbachev

Neil Diamond


Legends

Jimmy & Rosalynn Carter

Dale Evans & Roy Rogers

since 1984, bringing the total just three shy of 700. “I might be able to fit another 100, but not many more,” he says. “I would love to add Steven Spielberg, Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman. I have spots reserved for them.” To gain access to celebrities, Walter deals with secretaries, agents, backstage managers and theater personnel. He is on a first-name basis with many of them, including Jeffrey L. Hartzog, operations director for Ruth Eckerd Hall in Clearwater, who helped Walter get Woody Allen’s and pianist Yanni’s signatures. “Walter’s enthusiasm is infectious,” says Jeff. “Most of the celebrities are amazed at the uniqueness of the tablecloth, just as I was the first time I saw it. “I think this is a piece of history that is absolutely Smithsonian worthy,” continues Jeff. “I don’t think even Walter realizes the impact this piece has, especially in terms of Americana. It’s

Dick Clark

not just movie stars, but presidents, first ladies and other historical figures.” Walter’s blue eyes twinkle as he describes some of the most notable signatures, including one from the last survivor of the Titanic, Millivina Dean. “I flew to England to meet her in 1998,” he remembers. “She was the youngest passenger aboard the Titanic in 1912 and just delightful.” His favorite autograph is that of the late President Ronald Reagan, who signed the tablecloth when Walter mailed it to the White House. Reagan was so impressed that he invited Walter to visit his California ranch. “I went a few years later, and I was one of the last people to see him before he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease,” he says. “We spent more than an hour talking, and he called in his photographer. It’s a day I’ll never forget.” To preserve the autographs, Walter’s mother embroidered over them, and his late wife, Julie, embroidered more

than 300 before her death in 1991. Since then, Walter has hired friends to continue the needlework over the signatures that are written with simple felt-tipped pens. Hanging in his small Ocala home are photos of Walter with almost every celebrity as they signed the tablecloth. The tablecloth is kept in a bank safety deposit box, but Walter hopes it will someday be displayed in a museum so that others can enjoy it. That is, after he’s finished collecting famous signatures. “And as long as I can walk and get there, I’ll keep going after autographs for the tablecloth,” he says with a smile. “I am blessed to have such an exciting challenge.”

Want to know more?

Find out if your favorite celebrity signed Walter Light’s tablecloth by visiting thetablecloth.com for a complete list.

The Tablecloth's Who's Who

Some of the most noteworthy signatures on Walter Light’s tablecloth include: » John Barrymore Actor » Sinclair Lewis Author » Carol Channing Singer, actor » Woody Allen Screenwriter, director, actor » Harry Connick, Jr. Singer » Laura Bush Former First Lady » Pete Sampras Tennis champion » Mickey Rooney Actor » Ringo Starr Musician » Jimmy Stewart Actor » Kirk Douglas Actor » Norman Vincent Peale Minister, author » Itzhak Perlman Violinist » Walter Payton Former football player » Yo-Yo Ma Cellist » Paul Newman Actor

Carol Burnett

Willie Nelson

Bill Cosby

Johnny Carson

» Joanna Woodward Actress

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RIDIN’ ROPIN’ &

for a

GOOD CAUSE

The Ocala Shrine Rodeo celebrates 30 years.

By Cynthia McFarland Rodeo Photos by Robert Crawford

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Approximately 50,000 children have been treated at the Tampa

hospital since it opened in 1995.

Demas notes that for the past five years, over 1,100 children from Marion, Lake and Sumter counties have received medical care from Shriners Hospitals. This same group of children had 3,256 hospital visits. “It’s because of the people of Ocala that we’ve been successful,” says Barry Decker, first vice president of Ocala Shrine Club, which began in 1947.

Shriners have a long history in the United States, as the first Shrine Temple was formally organized in New York in 1872. The organization began its philanthropic outreach through Shriners Hospitals for Children with the opening of the first facility in Shreveport, Louisiana, in 1922. The first hospitals were established for treating children who contracted polio, but the Shriners’ mission has expanded far beyond that original goal. Today,

Leave it to a cowboy to come up with the idea of using a rodeo to

help children. “When I became a Shriner in 1980, the Shrine Club didn’t have any events as fundraisers,” recalls Ruben Lamb. Long known in Ocala as “Mr. Rodeo,” Lamb puts on the Southeastern Pro Rodeo every spring in addition to the Ocala Shrine Rodeo each Labor Day weekend. “With my background as a ranch cowboy, I got involved in helping the high school rodeo get

“We usually have more cowboys than kids, because the cowboys want to be part of it and support the program.”

Photo by John Jernigan

A

t first glance, it seems an unusual partnership. Yet every Labor Day weekend, hard-riding, competitive cowboys and a group of brave children battling an array of physical challenges come together in a memorable gathering filled with laughter, enthusiasm and more than a little pride. This year marks the 30th annual Ocala Shrine Rodeo, a unique hometown event that has raised nearly $1.5 million for Shriners Hospitals for Children. “The Ocala Shrine Rodeo is a wonderful family event with a 30-year history of supporting Shriners Hospitals for Children,” says Bethanne Demas RN, ONC, director of public relations, marketing and outreach services at Shriners Hospitals for Children-Tampa. “The Shriners who plan and work so hard to make the rodeo a success and the community members who come and enjoy it are supporting the children from their area who receive care at Shriners Hospitals for ChildrenTampa,” she adds. “The Shriners do a fantastic job of raising awareness for our hospitals. What they’ve done as far as helping our mission financially is incredible.”

—RUBEN LAMB

there are 22 hospitals throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico providing advanced care for children with orthopaedic conditions, burns, spinal cord injuries and cleft lip and palate. The hospitals rely heavily upon the generous donations of the general public and fundraising by Shriners. One million children

have benefited from treatment at

Shriners Hospitals for Children. Decker points out that whatever age patients are when treatment starts, all services are provided regardless of the patients’ ability to pay. “They’ve helped thousands of children from this area,” he adds.

started, which is held in conjunction with the Southeastern Youth Fair,” says Lamb. “Paul Kimbrough, who was in charge of the high school rodeo and is a good friend of mine, suggested doing a pro rodeo as a fundraiser. The Shrine Club turned it down at first, but I kept talking about it, and in 1983, Jim Lowry, who was then the president, said, ‘go ahead.’ We did our first Shrine Rodeo in 1983, and after the dust settled, we made believers out of the non-believers. We turned in $30,000 to the Shriners Hospitals from that first rodeo.” The unexpected success of that initial event made it easier to get sponsors for the rodeo in the

following years. Sponsorships start at $300; the Shrine Club uses the money donated for sponsorships to pay for the costs of putting on the rodeo. All monies generated by ticket sales, food and beverage concessions go directly to Shriners Hospitals.

Contestants from all across the southeastern U.S. arrive in Ocala to compete for approximately

$35,000 in prize money in the Ocala Shrine Rodeo. The Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) divides the country into circuits, and the Southeast, with nine states, makes up one of the largest circuits. “This is one of the only professional sports in which a participant pays to participate,” says Lamb. “I call it ‘pay to play,’ but it’s not play to them. They’re serious about it because they’re competing for prize money and points, which qualify them for the Southeast Circuit Finals in November. Some of these cowboys will also qualify for the National Finals Rodeo, which is held in Las Vegas in December.” As many as 300 cowboys and cowgirls have entered the Ocala Shrine Rodeo each year. They compete against the clock—and each other—in seven different events: bull riding, barrel racing, saddle bronc riding, bareback bronc riding, tie-down roping, steer wrestling and team roping. “The two most popular events in rodeo are bull riding, followed by barrel racing,” notes Lamb. “Bull riding is the most dangerous eight seconds in any sporting event, while women’s barrel racing is the event that draws the most participants. It pays out more money because of more entry fees.” Lamb says that barrel racing is one of the easiest events for spectators to understand, even if they’ve never been to a rodeo before. Each horse-and-rider team races against the clock, running

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Want To Go? Ocala Shrine Rodeo Aug. 31-Sept. 1 Gates open at 5:30pm; rodeo action starts at 7:30pm. $14 advance/$16 at gate. Kids 5 and under are free either day. Friday Family Night Ticket 4-pack $30: Good for 2 adults and 2 children 11 and under. (Must be purchased in advance at an outlet, RCC Western Stores, Seminole Stores, Russell’s Western Wear.) SOUTHEASTERN LIVESTOCK PAVILION 2200 NE Jacksonville Rd. (352) 402-8808 ocalashriners.com

a cloverleaf pattern around three barrels while trying to cut the turns as sharp as possible without knocking over a barrel, as that means a five-second penalty. Although the rough stock events (bull and bronc riding) are typically the domain of cowboys attempting to score with an eightsecond ride, Lamb says this isn’t always the case. “We don’t discriminate. If there’s a cowgirl who wants to compete in any of the events (other than barrel racing), she can. Back in the spring, we had a girl enter the saddle bronc riding and bull riding events in the Southeastern Pro Rodeo.”

Gates open at 5:30pm, and on Saturday, you’ll be able to watch

the Special Rodeo featuring children who are Shriners Hospital patients, along with their siblings. Cowboys and cowgirls taking part in the actual rodeo partner with the kids as they participate in events like stick horse races, simulated bull rides and “dummy” steer roping. Last year, about 25 children took part (for various physical reasons, not all patients are able to participate), and each one walked away with a cowboy hat, trophy and a real contestant number like the actual rodeo cowboys wear. “We usually have more cowboys than kids, because the cowboys want to be part of it and support the program,” says Lamb. “The last several years, we’ve started giving the kids a ride on a real horse; that’s probably the most popular thing.” “It’s very touching and a whole lot of fun,” Decker adds. “It’s a way of giving back to the kids and having them come out and have a good

time. We also do a Christmas party for them at the end of the year, which is when we choose a buckaroo and a princess for the rodeo.”

Eagerly awaiting the rodeo is Tyler Snow, 7, this year’s buckaroo.

Tyler, who attends Greenway Elementary, has osteogenesis imperfecta, a genetic bone disorder also known as “brittle bone disease.” His parents, John and Tiffany Fullbright of Ocala, have been working closely with Shriners Hospitals since Tyler had his first bone fracture at age 4. “With his condition, it’s really expensive with the patching, X-rays and hospital visits,” says Tiffany. “Thankfully, with Shriners, you don’t have to worry about paying for all that out of pocket. The doctor specializes in this disorder, so it’s nice to have confidence in the doctor. “It’s hard to put into words what the Shriners have done for our family,” she adds. “It’s been amazing. They do so much for the families who need support. They are a wonderful organization, and we’re blessed to have them in our lives to help with our son’s genetic disorder.”

This year’s rodeo princess is 11-year-old “JuJu” Julieanna

Gray Dennis of Ocala, who has been treated since age 2 at Shriners Hospitals because of her cerebral palsy. Despite her physical limitations, JuJu gets around well by using hand crutches. Having taken part in the special rodeo last year where she was thrilled to ride a real horse, JuJu is looking forward to this year’s event. “She was telling everyone, ‘I’m the rodeo princess!’ She’s so

happy,” says Tommy Dennis, JuJu’s father. “One of her favorite things is watching bull riding; she watches PBR events on television and counts to eight when they’re riding.” All of JuJu’s treatments have taken place at the Tampa hospital. In addition to being a patient, JuJu is an ambassador for Shriners Hospitals for Children, which means she may appear at events or have her photo used for promotional purposes. One

Rodeo Princess Julieanna Gray Dennis

unforgettable part of being an ambassador was that JuJu and her parents, Tommy and Stephany, along with brother and sister, Emye and Noah, were extras in the movie A Dolphin Tale. “The Shriners have been so kind and giving and willing to help. We so appreciate the Shriners for all they do, not just for Julieanna but for all the kids,” says Dennis. “The things they do are so needed and appreciated. I don’t think they get the recognition they deserve. I really do thank God for Shriners.”

If you know of a child who needs pediatric orthopaedic care,

call (888) 665-KIDS or visit shrinershospitalsforchildren.org. To donate, visit donate2shc.org.

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Houseboat © Tyler Olsen / Shutterstock.com

C

amping is a popular way to experience Florida, but let’s face it, there are some serious drawbacks to spending the night outdoors during the summer—namely bugs, heat and humidity. Plus, because we’re being honest here, camping tends to be the most fun for those who don’t have to do all the work. Sorry guys, sorry kids, but when it comes to camping, a lot of women “grin and bear it” in order to spend quality time with their families. There’s nothing glamorous about cooking over a campfire’s uneven flame, washing dishes in a bucket of lake water, bathing in the creek, sleeping on hard ground and battling mosquitoes until you fall asleep. But what if there was a way to get away from the crowds and enjoy every aspect of the Sunshine State’s natural charms… while cooking in an actual kitchen, taking real showers instead of creek sponge baths and sleeping in a comfortable bed in air-conditioning? Good-bye campground…. hello houseboat!

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A HOME

ON THE

WATER

“IT’S THE ABSOLUTE BEST. THIS WAS OUR 13TH YEAR IN A ROW. We think

it’s well worth a trip to Florida every year,” says Diane Wemyss of Rockport, Massachusetts. Every spring, Diane and her husband Gary take a two-week houseboat vacation on the St. John’s River. “I picked up a Holly Bluff Marina brochure many years ago when we were in Florida. Our kids were young then, so I kept it until I felt they were old enough to go out on a boat,” recalls Diane. After the children got a little older, the family fell in love with houseboating. Those “kids” are now in college and “doing their own thing,” says Diane, but she and Gary savor their annual river vacation more than ever.

Having a luxury houseboat to call home for two weeks makes it a dream getaway. “It’s like a mini floating condo. You have a full kitchen and an inside sitting area, and the whole top of the boat is a big sun deck. The back deck has a grill with table and chairs. Star watching from the deck is beautiful. We never want for anything; it has everything you need,” notes Diane, who’s already booked a boat for their 2013 vacation. “We cruise the river and watch the scenery. We tie up early every afternoon off the main river, settle in and watch nature. That’s really what we go for. It’s Florida with no Disney World,” says Diane, adding that her friends assume a Florida

vacation means doing the usual crowded tourist attractions. “I tell them, ‘No, I was on a houseboat for two weeks.’ There’s a place for Disney, I’m sure, but this is just you and the river and the animals. We’ve had manatees come right up to the boat!”

bedrooms; some sleep eight to 10 comfortably. The cabins are climate controlled thanks to a trusty onboard generator. But don’t worry, these generators are quiet, unlike the old models that would keep you awake at night. There’s a bathroom and shower on board, so you can play in the river all day if you like and still take a refreshing shower before slipping between cool, clean sheets at night. All bedding—even towels—is provided. Truly a home away from home, your houseboat has a fully equipped kitchen, complete with dishes, pots and pans, utensils and everything you’ll need to prepare meals—all you have to bring are the groceries. Most boats have a

IT MAY SEEM HARD TO BELIEVE, ESPECIALLY FOR ANYONE WHO’S SPENT TIME CAMPING the traditional way, but literally, the only things you need to bring on board are food, drinks, clothing and personal toiletry items. As Diane points out, these houseboats are like mini floating motel rooms in the best sense of the word. Boats vary in size from 40 to 60 feet, ranging from one to four

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A HOME

ON THE

microwave, full-size refrigerator and coffee maker, just like your kitchen at home. Some come with a gas charbroiler on the deck, so you can relax with a cold one while a sizzling steak cooks to perfection on the grill. Dine up on the deck as the sun drops below the horizon, then lean back in your chair and do a little star-gazing. Away from city lights, you’ll be amazed at the brilliance—and abundance—of stars scattered across the night sky. Of course, you don’t have to cook every night. Along the river, you’ll find fish camps and river communities where neighborhood restaurants often serve up fresh gator tail, locally caught fish and even fresh blue crab.

IN OUR AREA OF FLORIDA, THE ST. JOHN’S RIVER is one of the most popular places to rent a houseboat for your getaway on the water. Most of the world’s major rivers flow south; the St. John’s River is an exception. Flowing north, the St. John’s gently winds its way through northeastern Florida, roughly parallel to the Atlantic coast, until it angles east and meets the ocean just north of Jacksonville. Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings, Florida’s esteemed authoress, spent time exploring the St. John’s River early in the last century. She and a friend traveled the river, camping along its banks, and Rawlings later described their adventures in her popular book Cross Creek. Rawlings wrote of the St. John’s with such tenderness, you’d think she was speaking of a beloved friend. Even today, in our hectic world of technology and haste, time on the St. John’s still resembles the era when Rawlings spent time there. “There’s not a lot of development on the St John’s, so it’s a nice place to vacation. You can get an idea of how Florida looked 100 years ago,” says Judy Armstrong, co-owner with husband Rick of Holly Bluff Marina.

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One of the reasons for this step-back-in-time feeling is the fact that portions of the land bordering the river are national forest property and, as a result, cannot be developed. While the scenery changes as you serenely navigate the river at laid-back house-boat speeds of about 5mph, you’ll see statuesque oaks veiled in silvery Spanish moss, along with towertower ing pines and palms. In some places, thick stands of palmetto appear to create an almost impenetrable buffer, but look closely and you’ll find they are teeming with wildlife. Cypress trees, their knobby “knees” often visible above the quiet waters, contribute to the sense of “old Florida.” In addition to cypress swamps, you’ll see stretches of marshland in places along the St. John’s and its tributaries. These natural settings are tranquil havens for wildlife, which makes spotting wild creatures a favorite happening along the river. Birds are found in abundance, ranging from stately great blue herons to the ubiquitous egrets ever in search of a meal. Along with these and other water birds, the skies above are home to numerous birds of prey, including magnificent eagles and ospreys. “The wildlife is just beautiful. Occasionally, someone will even see a bear swimming across the river, and of course, there are manatees and alligators,” says Judy, adding that it’s not unusual to see deer crossing the river, as well. You’ll lose count of the turtles and alligators sunning themselves on exposed logs and along the river banks. If you venture into Blue Springs State Park, a manatee protection area, you’ll see anywhere from a few manatees to large numbers, depending on the time of year. “People come to town and think they just have to go to Disney World, but this is old Florida,” says B.B. McNerney. “It’s very relaxing.”

WaterBend © Arkorn; Background © Alien-tz; Compass © Vasilius; Canal © abstrand / Shutterstock.com

WATER


A HOME

ON THE

WATER WA TER Andy and B.B. McNerney have owned St. John’s River Adventures Houseboat Rental Company in Georgetown since 2000, but they’ve been house boating themselves for decades. In fact, it was their love for being on the water that prompted them to buy the business when it became available. Because the McNerneys enjoyed renting houseboats when their own children were young, they appreciate that many families find this the perfect vacation. Not everyone who rents a houseboat feels like fishing, but if you do, you’ve definitely come to the right place. Bring your poles, and try your luck at catching catfish, perch and crappies, maybe even a bass. Some boats come with slides—a favorite with kids of all ages. “You get up on the top deck, throw a bucket of water on the slide and down you go,” says B.B. “You splash into the river at the back of the boat.” If you feel like exploring, talk to the rental company ahead of time. They can arrange for kayaks so you can leave the houseboat and venture along the river. “You can pull a boat up to 22-feet long behind the houseboat,” B.B. adds. “If you want to anchor in Silver Glen, you can take the smaller boat exploring in Salt Springs or Juniper Run; there are all kinds of cool places you can go see.” The beauty of a houseboat vacation is that you don’t “have” to do anything, but you have plenty of options. Even if you choose to stay right on the boat, the scenery is always changing (providing you’re cruising). There’s also something spectacular about sunrise and sunset when you’re right on the water. B.B. & A n McNem dy ey

MANY PEOPLE COMPARE PILOTING A HOUSEBOAT TO DRIVING AN RV,

but there’s one major difference: In a houseboat, you’re moving less

than 10mph. Still, if you’re nervous about playing boat captain, the rental companies are happy to help. “We do an orientation, and we have an instruc instruc-tor who will work with you personally. He’ll take you out on the river and work with you until you feel comfortable driving the boat,” explains Judy. “My son Michael is my captain, and he does our orientation. If people aren’t comfortable driving themselves, he’ll actually take them on the boat and get them anchored at Silver Glen spring,” says B.B. Companies typically have a minimum of two days/one night rental, so ask about weekend, weekly and mid-week rentals. Fuel costs are in addition to the rental fee; expect to burn approximately five gallons of fuel per hour if you’re running the boat motors and generator.

A WEEK-LONG HOUSEBOAT VACATION IS THE PERFECT ANTIDOTE for the hectic pace of everyday

life, according to Ken Lockhart of St. Augustine. “My girlfriend Pam and I have rented a boat for a week every spring for five years in a row,” says Ken, a long-distance truck driver. “For us, it’s a pleasure week. I drive 3,000 miles every week, so this is just a real pleasant way to not work. It’s calm and quiet, and the St. John’s River is beautiful.” Ken and Pam enjoy spending leisurely days fishing, drinking coffee on the deck and watching the scenery. “You see lots of herons, egrets, eagles and alligators. Often, we’ll see osprey flying by with fish in their talons,” Ken adds. “We love it. When we retire, we’re thinking of living on a houseboat; it really does fit our lifestyles very well.”

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ARN MORE

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?

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r Adventures Houseboat Rental Com pany (866) OURBOAT stjohnsriverad ventures.com riveradventur esinc.com

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Stiandcks

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A

ik By B onnie Kretch ernigan Photos by John J

sick feeling takes over Jake* as he realizes tomorrow ise school,” so moaf yobnethe in id k th Monday—w s it. He’s kindat could t’ a th e th start of a n. Every heavy side, so heard them k s ee e’ w H l . o to , schoo it e b is d they morning whs,ena hsense call him “fatty,”luannch . Jake’s alarm sounpds over often steal haiss a janitor, dad works tty sure he’s of dread creeg what he’ll in and he’s pre ord “poor” him, know that day, heard the wwhen they’re have to faceces every day. and “loser” cils, trash and what he faered taunts as p flicking pense they can find The whis own the hall he walks d ntional shoves anythingHele doesn’t know at him. one to deserve and the intelder are bad, u o what he’s d does know of the sh ats and the re this, but he tnumbered, but the th eling of dread that he’s ou nd he’s alone. constant ferst. He never are the wo n they’re going he’s hatehdaas to deal with And he ngle day. Jake knows wheim, when h r this every sihe doesn’t really to corne g to push him is 12, and t in trying they’re gointhe wall, take up against rass him. Jake’s see the pboainck anymore. his stuff, hahat he’s done to to fighta bullied kid. not sure w . He’s the “new Jake is be so hated ocalastyle.com AUG’12

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STICKS AND STONES CAN BREAK YOUR BONES, BUT WORDS… WORDS CAN DO FAR MORE DAMAGE. TURN ON THE NEWS AND THE HEADLINES ARE SHOCKING. “BULLIED TEEN COMMITS SUICIDE” OR “AREA CHILD ATTACKED BY BULLIES ON SCHOOL BUS.” THE MOST DEVASTATING OF ALL ARE THOSE CASES—AND THE ONES THE NEWS MOST OFTEN REPORTS ON—THAT END IN THE BULLIED CHILD RETALIATING WITH VIOLENCE—OR WORSE, COMMITTING SUICIDE. BULLYING HAS GAINED NATIONAL ATTENTION IN RECENT YEARS, WITH SOME OF THE MOST EXTREME CASES EARNING TOP BILLING ON COUNTLESS NEWS BROADCASTS. BUT WHAT IS BULLYING? WHO GETS BULLIED, WHO DOES THE BULLYING AND WHAT CAN WE DO TO COMBAT IT?

Today’s

parents may recall the bully of their youth as the big kid who threatened to feed them a “knuckle sandwich.” And although we might imagine bullies taking on the personas of iconic TV bullies—all while providing comic relief—bullying today is real and it’s no laughing matter. Stopbullying.gov, a website managed by the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and dedicated to educating and eliminating bullying among today’s youth, reports that two factors must come into play for a true bullying situation to occur. First, there has to be an imbalance of power, and physical size is not the only determining factor. Lead Behavior Analyst for the Marion County School Board Adrienne Heruth-Ascierto explains that children can create a power imbalance in other ways, such as using their popularity to make another child feel like an outsider. “When one child exhibits power over another, there is a risk that bullying can occur,” says Adrienne, who also points out the difference between bullying and typical childhood name-calling. “If two kids in the same grade, the same size with the same amount of friends call each other names, it’s not nice, but it’s not CHILDREN AT RISK FOR BEING BULLIED CAN HAVE bullying since there isn’t ONE OR MORE OF THE FOLLOWING RISK FACTORS: an imbalance of power,” she says. » Being considered “different” (for example: Along with that being over or underweight, wearing glasses imbalance of power, or clothes that aren’t “cool,” being new to the the second criterion for area or school, etc.) an act to be considered » Suffers from anxiety or depression bullying is that the » Has few friends behavior has to be » Doesn’t seem to socialize well or easily with repeated over time. their peers “If one child makes a mean CHILDREN WHO ARE MOST LIKELY TO BECOME comment to another BULLIES CAN HAVE ONE OR MORE OF THE one or two times, FOLLOWING RISK FACTORS: once again, it’s not » Are aggressive or easily frustrated nice, but it’s still not » Place a high regard on power or popularity bullying—even if there » View violence in a positive way is an imbalance of » Have less parental involvement or have power because it did family issues at home not occur repeatedly » Have friends who bully others over a period of time,” Source: stopbullying.gov Adrienne says.

IS YOUR CHILD AT RISK?

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Of course, to a parent whose child comes home in tears after being called “ugly” or “fat,” the criteria doesn’t matter. Being teased or harassed even once is one time too many. Advocates against bullying encourage parents to keep an open line of communication with their children from a young age and be supportive of their feelings and concerns rather than dismissing them as “typical” childlike behavior. Mark Vianello, the executive director of student services for the Marion County Public School System, explains that bullying and any signs of potential bullying or harassing is not something that local schools take lightly. Unfortunately, most children will experience some form of name calling and the traditional teasing that goes along with growing up. But true bullying, even at its most trivial stage, is not something that parents or students should brush aside. “Name calling and teasing isn’t nice, but it happens, especially with younger kids. But when it’s repeated over and over, it’s bullying, and that we don’t stand for,” he says, pointing out Marion County’s zero tolerance policy regarding the issue. And though true bullying must occur repeatedly, it only takes one time, one name-calling incident, one embarrassing moment to have a lasting psychological effect on a child. Mark explains that the goal of the Marion County School Board is to create a positive climate that promotes learning. According to the Florida Department of Education, children who are bullied can suffer more than just hurt feelings. Depression, avoidance of social situations, loss of sleep, changes in eating patterns and declining grades are all signs that something serious is going on in your child’s life. “Bullying can be subtle,” explains Adrienne. “You don’t always hear or see what’s going on. You have to look for the warning signs.” It’s the whispers, the jeers, the silent, condescending stares that go on out of view or earshot of teachers that do the most psychological damage. Adrienne and Mark agree that the school environment plays an important role in how kids deal with the issue.


WHAT TO WATCH FOR

committee to provide feedback through surveys that establish where and when the most instances WARNING SIGNS A CHILD IS BEING BULLIED: of bullying take place in different schools and » Inexplicable injuries among what age groups. Computer modules » Lost or destroyed property were implemented to gather data from students » Frequent illnesses or pretending to be sick in who may not feel as comfortable discussing such order to miss school issues face to face. » Changes in eating habits, such as missing “Any time we get the sense from a student meals or coming home hungry because they that there is an issue, whether it be from answers didn’t eat their lunch in a survey or through a computer module, » Loss of sleep we address it,” explains Mark. He feels that the » Declining grades on-campus support system in a school is the » Loss of interest in social activities best way to help kids find a solution. “It sounds » Depression or self-destructive behaviors simple, and it is,” he says. “Building relationships with the students is the most important thing we WARNING SIGNS THAT A CHILD can do. We need to let them know they can come IS BULLYING OTHERS: to us and that someone cares.” » Fighting frequently Schools across the nation have taken a hard » Getting into trouble at school stance against bullying. With the number of » Displaying aggression reported cases of anxiety, depression, violence » Has unexplained money or new belongings and even suicide as a result of bullying escalating » Has an increased interest in popularity in recent years, the idea that kids will “grow out Source: stopbullying.gov of it” or “get over it” is no longer an acceptable mindset when dealing with the issue. One program that has been extremely successful both locally and on a national level is the voluntary Positive “Safety is our No. 1 priority,” Mark says. “Parents trust us to create a Behavior System (PBS). The system employs a “token economy” in which safe environment for their children to learn in, and kids have to feel safe students are rewarded for good behavior rather than being punished for coming here and comfortable coming to us if there is a problem.” bad behavior. Locally, Horizon Academy instituted the program during the 2011-12 academic school year and has reported a positive response. “PBS has transformed our campus,” says Assistant Principal Paige Zadnik. For Horizon Academy, their expectation system became known as “The Big 3: Do what’s right, do your best and treat others the way you want to be treated.” The motto is posted throughout campus with very clear examples of how to implement these behaviors. PBS rewards the students who do live up to these the past few years, the school board has implemented a standards. “We want to catch you doing good,” explains Principal Troy Sanford. number of techniques to address the issue of bullying. “If we see a student helping another or holding a door for someone or The goals are to reduce the number of disruptions among students and be inviting someone to sit with them at lunch, we reward them with our proactive in eliminating possible occurrences of bullying before they begin. version of the token,” he says. The token is physically nothing more than a Along with various presentations in the community to educate the piece of paper, but for Horizon students it’s as good as gold. Students can public on the subject of bullying, the school board has formed a bullying

Jake feels like he can’t tell anyone what’s going on. He has no friends. The few kids he hung out with when he first started school here jumped ship as soon as he became a target. He can’t blame them. No one wants to hang out with a loser. But today, someone tripped him in the hall, and he hit his nose on the ground. With blood on his face, he ran to the restroom, away from the taunting masses in the hallway. He tried telling his dad, but he told him to “be a man, not a sissy.” If he tells a teacher at school, he’ll just look like a tattletale.

Over

HOW PARENTS CAN HELP

28% 1/3 OF KIDS IN GRADES 6-12 EXPERIENCE BULLYING

OF THOSE BULLIED NOTIFY AN ADULT

THE MOST IMPORTANT THING PARENTS CAN DO IS TALK TO THEIR CHILDREN AND SUPPORT THEM. DON’T MAKE THESE COMMON MISTAKES: » » » »

Tell them to ignore the bully Punish them or blame them Encourage them to work it out on their own with the bully Contact the other parents, which can make matters worse; it’s best to contact the school to act as mediators

Source: stopbullying.gov

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STOP CYBERBULLYING CYBERBULLYING IS THE USE OF ANY ELECTRONIC DEVICE BY A MINOR TO TEASE, THREATEN, HARASS OR HUMILIATE ANOTHER MINOR. CYBERBULLYING CAN OCCUR 24 HOURS A DAY, SEVEN DAYS A WEEK WITH OR WITHOUT THE VICTIM’S KNOWLEDGE. WHAT CAN YOU DO?

» Monitor your child’s online activity, and search » Print out any evidence of cyberbullying. Content can easily be deleted, and you will their names regularly on a search engine. need evidence for your case. » Don’t threaten to take the computer or cell » Educate yourself about the technology your phone away. It won’t stop the problem, and child is using. they won’t report bullying to you again for fear of losing their devices. Source: stopbullying.gov

redeem them for everything from school supplies and snacks to special events and activities. “We want students to feel good about doing the right thing and let them know that we notice when they are doing good instead of only punishing them for doing bad,” explains Parent Liaison Sara Llerena. She explains that, often, kids don’t even realize the ramifications of their behavior. “Kids can have a mean sense of humor, and they hurt each other without realizing it, but PBS has been a vehicle to form relationships with our students and for the students to form relationships with each other,” she says. And while true bullying was never a major issue at Horizon Academy, PBS has helped both students and parents become more aware of the behaviors that lead to bullying and the effects they can have on the targeted kids. The best piece of advice school officials offer to parents is to listen to their kids and take notice if they seem anxious or depressed. “Today, kids have access to so much more information than we did years ago,” says Troy. “Parents need to communicate with both their children and us at the school.”

Corporal Ocasio has been with the Marion County Sheriff ’s Office for 15 years and has worked as an SRO for the past five years. He explains that when using the legal definition, true bullying doesn’t occur very often in Marion County schools, but similar charges of harassment or battery do take place and can be just as damaging. “Not everything fits the criteria for bullying, but just because it’s not bullying doesn’t mean it isn’t just as bad and can’t have the same emotional effect on a kid,” he says, pointing out that with the recent attention bullying has received in the media, people are more aware of the issue than ever before. Cyberbullying goes beyond Facebook, and for parents who don’t know an iPad from an Android or a poke from a tweet, cyberbullying is a foreign concept. The worst part about cyberbullying, cyber-harassment, cyberstalking or any other type of cyber-related incident is that kids can’t escape it. It follows them home, it attacks them when they’re in their bedrooms, it haunts them before they go to sleep at night and it greets them when they wake up in the morning. Kids can begin to feel like there’s no escaping the tormenting. “Kids are plugged in all of the time,” says Dan Kuhn of the Marion County Sheriff ’s Office. “They can’t go home to get away from it. It’s on their phones; it’s everywhere.” He also notes that cyberbullying is a crime and can bring about criminal charges if warranted. Cyberbullying can include direct attacks, such as sending threatening emails or text messages, or indirect attacks, such as posting embarrassing or lewd photos or comments of the victim without their knowledge, whether true or fabricated. Other incidents include stealing passwords, hacking into accounts or creating “bashing sites” where kids vote for the “ugliest” or “dumbest” student.

Jake just can’t seem to escape the bullying. If these guys were only at school, he could probably handle it, but now, they have his cell phone number. They send him texts throughout the night. And now he’s found out that they’ve hacked into his Facebook account and posted lies about him for the entire school to see. Tomorrow is going to be the worst day yet.

The

evolution of social media and technology has impacted the means by which students interact. Kids today have access to information that previous generations never dreamt of having. But with that advancement also comes a downside. “Facebook is a big issue,” says Corporal Juan Ocasio, student resource officer (SRO). “Kids take to heart what is put up there, and rumors can spread to hundreds of people in a matter of seconds.” SROs are certified law enforcement officers, and every middle and high school in Marion County has SRO officers present. The officers work with the students both in the classroom and as counselors. They also investigate any criminal violations that take place in the school.

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SROs

are in the school to help educate students and their parents about all aspects of bullying and harassing and the consequences to both the bully, the victim and their families. “We want to promote a safe environment for kids to learn in, and the best way to do that is to build relationships and rapport with the students so they feel comfortable talking to someone about it,” says Corporal Ocasio. Together, the Sheriff ’s Office, the Ocala Police Department and the Marion County School Board have combined efforts to establish a protocol for handling bullying issues.


“We prefer it be handled at the lowest level first with parents and teachers. We don’t want to put a mark on a student’s record,” Kuhn says. At the first instance of a problem, an official warning is issued, and the signatures of the student, parent, school official and SRO officer are all required. “We step in at the onset of a problem, and everyone knows the student has been officially warned and what the consequences are,” says Kuhn. He agrees with Mark Vianello that one of the best ways to address the bullying issue is to be proactive and stop problems before they start.

CHECK IT OUT

13,000,000

THE NUMBER OF KIDS WHO WILL BE BULLIED THIS YEAR. BULLYING IS THE MOST COMMON FORM OF VIOLENCE EXPERIENCED BY YOUNG PEOPLE. THE DOCUMENTARY BULLY MADE NATIONWIDE HEADLINES WHEN IT WAS RELEASED EARLIER THIS YEAR. THE POWERFUL FILM FOLLOWS FIVE BULLIED KIDS AND THEIR FAMILIES THROUGH

HORRIFIC REALITIES THEY FACE AS VICTIMS. GRAPHIC AT TIMES, THIS REAL-LIFE GLIMPSE INTO THESE INDIVIDUALS’ LIVES POIGNANTLY ILLUSTRATES THE THREATS OUR YOUTH FACE TODAY AND PROVIDES A WAY FOR PARENTS TO OPEN THE LINES OF COMMUNICATION. FOR MORE INFORMATION, VISIT THEBULLYPROJECT.COM.

SPECIAL THANK YOU TO MODELS HARRISON KNIGHT, BRITTANY SHEA, KAELA SAPP AND ASHA THOMPSON TALENT/MODELS PROVIDED BY OCALA MODELS & TALENT *The story featured throughout this article is fictional and not based on any particular person or events.

Jake’s decided the best way to deal with the threats is to just take it. The shoves against the wall don’t hurt that bad… He really doesn’t need to eat lunch at school. He can just eat when he gets home… He doesn’t need friends. He’s fine alone. And he might as well get used to it—he’ll probably be alone forever.

Although

Jake’s story is fictional, it’s a story countless children experience daily. No one, especially children, should feel like they have to go through life alone. While extreme cases of bullying like ones often seen in the media are indeed real problems for some school districts, Marion County does not have the same issue, thanks to the combined efforts of the school board, sheriff ’s office and police department. Mark points out that of the 42,000plus students in the district, there have been 276 substantiated bullying cases reported in the last year. He also adds that the number of bullying cases has been on a downward trend in recent years. The professionals all offer the same advice to parents: Look for the warning signs, talk to your kids, talk to their teachers and monitor their online activity. Get involved in their lives, regardless of what they say. Ask them questions about what’s going on. In many cases, they are going to be embarrassed and deny anything is wrong, but don’t give up. Being proactive is the best way to ensure that your child never feels like there’s no way out.

NEED MORE INFO? STOPBULLYING.GOV | STOPBULLYINGNOW.COM | KIDSHEALTH.ORG | CYBERBULLYING.INFO FLDOE.ORG | CYBERBULLYING.US | STOPCYBERBULLYING.ORG | NCPC.ORG/CYBERBULLYING

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PROM PAMPERS

From

to

EVEN

though, according to the National Institutes of Health, teen pregnancy rates in the United States have seen a slow and steady decline in recent years, teen pregnancy is still a nationwide concern. More than 85 percent of teen pregnancies are unplanned, and with that, negligent or nonexistent prenatal care is more likely to occur. Teens who are pregnant are also more likely to

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drink alcohol or use drugs than older pregnant women and are more susceptible to issues like pregnancy-induced hypertension, which can lead to premature birth. Despite the scary what-ifs of teen pregnancy, a new government report states that the teen pregnancy rate in the United States “dipped to its lowest recorded level since 1976,” falling 40 percent from 1990 to 2008, the last year complete data is available. Even so, using that data, three

Sitting on the edge of the high school bathroom sink is a thin white stick. Upon closer inspection, the stick reveals two very visible pink lines. A positive pregnancy test. A quick look around yields an empty bathroom. The teacher that found the test contemplates her next step. Somewhere in that school a young girl just found out she’s pregnant. And she probably feels alone and scared. No, this isn’t a scene from a cheesy afterschool special, it’s a scene that recently played out in one of Marion County’s own local high schools. BY KARIN FABRY-CUSHENBERY TEEN MOTHER & HOME PHOTOS BY JOHN JERNIGAN

out of 10 girls will experience an unintended pregnancy before their 20th birthday. And according to the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy, there are about 733,000 teen pregnancies and more than 400,000 teen births annually. These statistics include girls from all walks of life, all ethnicities and all socioeconomic standings. And while some may be fortunate enough to have a built-in support system to turn to for help and

guidance, others do not. For girls who may already be in the DCF system, whether through foster care or a similar program, there is a place they can turn to for help. HOME. Hands of Mercy Everywhere is one of only five licensed teen maternity homes in the state of Florida. The facility opened under the guidance of CEO Diane Schofield in 2004. HOME is a not-for-profit facility and is run through church, private and business donations, grants and state funding.


“We need our girls to find a balance between being a teen and being a teen mom.”

—DIANE SCHOFIELD

“I was with a group of ladies at a Bible study, and we were discussing the book The Purpose Driven Life, and a short time later, someone approached me about doing this home,” Diane says. “I knew it was something I needed to do. I was an event planner in a former life; but God had a different plan for me.” State licensed for a mix of 22 kids, the girls who end up at HOME are placed there by DCF. The two-story Victorian house

in Belleview truly becomes their home as they make friends with the other girls and learn the life skills necessary to lead a successful life once they turn 18 and age out of the foster care system. “There are two key points we like to bring up with people in regards to HOME. One is that we are a Christian, teen, parentingstyle boarding house. The other is that we need our girls to find a balance between being a teen and being a teen mom,” Diane says.

While consensual sex with a boyfriend may have been the cause of many of the teen moms’ pregnancies, others were abused or worse. All have been turned away from their previous living arrangements. Despite the reasons for ending up at HOME, once there, the girls form a sisterhood, looking out for one another, helping one another and leaning on one another. “I don’t care where the girls go in the future, they will often be

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“I tell myself that it’s going to be OK, to look at all the positive things that have come into my life.” —NISHA, 14

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judged for being teen moms,” Diane says. “Here, they get a reprieve from that and form a bond with one another. And while we do allow them to have a balance between being a normal teen and a teen with a baby, they all must comply with strict rules and regulations, including finishing high school or completing GED requirements with a 2.0 or greater average.” During the day while the girls are at school, their children are in daycare. After school, baby and homework responsibilities, each of the girls must also complete regular chores around the house, including meal preparation. They have the opportunity to earn up to $100.00 a month for completed chores. “My No. 1 goal for these girls is to get them thinking about their

future and dreaming big,” Diane says. “The idea is for them to achieve a successful, productive life with their baby and not get pregnant again until they are ready to in the future.” Diane points out that, without guidance and structure, one in four teen mothers will get pregnant again within 18 months of giving birth—a sobering statistic considering many of these babies will end up in the care of DCF, just like their mothers. A mother of three and grandmother of five, Diane provides

the girls and their children with a very home-like atmosphere, saying that what these girls need most is a sense of continuity and normalcy in their lives. And Diane is on-site quite a bit, calling HOME her home away from home, literally, four days a week. She splits duties with the other house mothers. “We don’t parent their children,” Diane adds. “But we will sit with the girls and help them when their babies are sick or up all night, but


ultimately, caring for the babies is their responsibility, and our staff is there for support.” But Diane, along with the help of her caring staff, does make sure that the girls have the necessary training and tools to successfully care for their children by providing them with mandatory life skills and parenting classes, including classes on nurturing your newborn and toddler, proper discipline techniques, stress management, finances, peer pressure, Bible studies and dozens of other topics. “As our girls near their 18th birthday, we also work on what we call ‘building their wallets.’ It’s a selfesteem issue for them to have their documents in order, including a driver’s license, social security card, medical papers and all the other necessary documents to create a life. This is a great responsibility to take on, and by the time the girls leave here, they each have a large binder with all their records and documents in order.” Nisha was just 14 when her baby was born. A problematic home life landed her in DCF care, and she eventually found her way to HOME. Now nearly 18 and about to start her junior year in high school, Nisha has a positive outlook on her future. “I tell myself that it’s going to be OK,” she says, “to look at all the positive things that have come into my life. When I’m feeling down, my daughter always cheers me up.” “And she’s amazing with her daughter,” Diane adds. “She’s very caring and attentive, and her baby always has new bows in her hair.” After graduating from high school, Nisha hopes to study cosmetology and business in college. For now, though, as she nears her 18th birthday, she is searching online for her next home and preparing herself for what life on her own will be like. Once a girl reaches the legal age of 18, she can no longer live at the maternity home, but through a special readiness program and the

state’s Independent Living Services, these girls have a good chance of creating a successful life for themselves and their little ones. “The girls who age out of the foster care system receive $600-$1,200 a month through the Independent Living Services,” Diane says. “Of course, they think that’s a lot of money, but once we teach them about rent, groceries, utilities and baby needs, reality begins to set in.” Ebby, 17, recently finished her GED requirements and is also planning for her future. She was removed from her family’s care when her daughter was just 10 months old. Pregnant at 15 by her boyfriend, Ebby’s little one is now an active toddler. “I really enjoy being a mom,” she says, “But I know the hardest thing will be to live on my own. In five years, I hope to have a stable career and be in college. My life is good right now. All you can do is want more for your child than you had yourself.” Samantha, 17, on the other hand, is a new mom dealing with the often grueling schedule of a newborn. Her young son is just 4 months old. She was brought into foster care due to abuse and has been staying at HOME for a year now. “When I got pregnant, I was terrified,” she says. “But I had to realize that it was going to be OK. I had to trust myself, put all the bad things in my life aside and start a new life with my baby.” Samantha has plans to become an RN in the future. Over the last seven years, Diane has taken in 201 girls. Not one girl is married to her baby’s father. Of those 201 girls, Diane says only three have chosen to put their babies up for adoption, further proof that proper education and counseling are a must for these young mothers in order to achieve a successful future. Diane and the rest of her staff were recently awarded an impressive state grant to construct 10 more bedrooms and four additional

bathrooms, allowing HOME to help even more teen girls with children transition into caring adults. “The community as a whole is so supportive of our program,” Diane says. “We have volunteers from The Villages who come and rock the babies and plenty of others provide infant clothes and other necessities.” In addition to the maternity home in Belleview, Diane and her staff also run a prevention office in downtown Ocala called Faithfully Guided.

“All you can do is want more for your child than you had yourself.”

“We provide a place to teach abstinence, yes,” Diane says, “But we also provide a place where newly pregnant teens can go with their families for counseling, support and guidance.” Raising a child can be difficult no matter what the age, but to help make the process a little easier, Diane encourages an open line of communication between parents and their children. Let your kids know they can talk to you about anything. Teen pregnancy, while not a topic any parent wants to face, isn’t a disease, Diane adds. We need to remember that there’s a second, very innocent life involved in the process and get pregnant teens the guidance and support they need to maintain a strong pregnancy and deliver a healthy baby.

“I had to trust myself, put all the bad things in my life aside and start a new life with my baby.”

—EBBY, 17

—SAMANTHA, 17

FAITHFULLY GUIDED 606 SE 3RD AVE., OCALA HANDS OF MERCY EVERYWHERE 6017 SE ROBINSON RD., BELLEVIEW (352) 347-4663 TEENMOTHERSHOME.ORG

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27 Years.

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Wash On, Rinse Off

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Are antibacterial soaps really making you germ-free p52

Profiling Lupus p46

Thirst Quencher Header p48 pXX Gator Header Juice pXX p48 Header Your Guts pXX vs.Header Gluten pXX p50

and more!

Source: American Optometric Association

Photo © wavebreakmedia ltd / Shutterstock.com

A

UGUST IS CHILDREN’S EYE HEALTH AND SAFETY MONTH, SO ALONG WITH SCHEDULING THOSE BACKTO-SCHOOL PHYSICALS AND STOCKING UP ON NOTEBOOKS, DON’T FORGET TO SCHEDULE AN ANNUAL EYE EXAM FOR YOUR CHILD. ACCORDING TO THE AMERICAN OPTOMETRIC ASSOCIATION, 80 PERCENT OF CHILDREN’S LEARNING IS DONE WITH THEIR EYES, SO UNDETECTED AND UNTREATED VISION PROBLEMS CAN LEAD TO A HOST OF LEARNING PROBLEMS. IN FACT, MANY CHILDREN ARE INCORRECTLY DIAGNOSED WITH ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER WHEN, IN REALITY, THEY ARE SUFFERING FROM POOR VISION. IF YOUR CHILD HAS ANY OF THESE SYMPTOMS, IT MIGHT BE TIME TO SCHEDULE AN EXAM: » Frequent eye rubbing or blinking » Short attention span » » » »

Frequent headaches Covering one eye Head tilting Holding reading materials close to their face

FOLLOW THESE STEPS TO MAKE SURE YOUR CHILD IS READY TO ROLL ON THE FIRST DAY OF SCHOOL! Schedule an eye exam. The vision screening offered by schools may only test for distance visual acuity, but other vision problems can still be present, even if the child has 20/20 vision. Make sure your child has the proper sport-specific eyewear before they take part in any sports. Eyes need to be protected from UV rays, so make sure your child has proper-fitting sunglasses for any outdoor activities. To maintain good vision, make sure your child is eating a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables.

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L I V I N G W I T H L U P U S L

UPUS IS A CHRONIC AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE THAT CAN AFFECT, EVEN DAMAGE, VARIOUS PARTS OF THE BODY, ESPECIALLY THE SKIN, JOINTS, BLOOD AND KIDNEYS. AUTOIMMUNE MEANS YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM, WHICH NORMALLY PROTECTS US FROM VIRUSES, BACTERIA AND GERMS, CANNOT TELL THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THESE FOREIGN INVADERS AND YOUR BODY’S HEALTHY TISSUES, RESULTING IN YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM ATTACKING YOUR HEALTHY TISSUE, CAUSING INFLAMMATION, PAIN AND DAMAGE THROUGHOUT YOUR BODY. ALTHOUGH NO GENE OR GROUP OF GENES HAS BEEN PROVEN TO CAUSE LUPUS, RESEARCH FINDINGS STRONGLY SUGGEST THAT GENETICS ARE INVOLVED. DIAGNOSING LUPUS IS DIFFICULT BECAUSE ITS SYMPTOMS OFTEN MIMIC THOSE OF MANY OTHER ILLNESSES. A COMBINATION OF PHYSICAL SYMPTOMS AND LAB TESTS ARE USED TO ELIMINATE OTHER DISEASES BEFORE A DIAGNOSIS OF LUPUS IS MADE.

Forms of Lupus

lesions, including discoid rashes and a butterfly rash on the cheeks and across the bridge of the nose.

SYSTEMIC: The most common form of lupus, which can cause inflammation of the kidneys, nervous system and brain, as well as coronary artery disease and pulmonary hypertension. CUTANEOUS: This form of lupus affects the skin, causing many types of rashes and

DRUG-INDUCED: A lupuslike disease caused by certain prescription drugs, similar to systemic lupus, but that rarely affects any major organs. The drugs most commonly connected to drug-induced lupus are hydralazine (hypertension), procainamide (irregular heart rhythms) and isoniazid

(tuberculosis). Not everyone on these drugs develops drug-induced lupus, and symptoms usually disappear within six months of stopping the medication.

Zurijeta / Shutterstock.com

BEINGWELL

1.5 MILLION

KNOW YOUR RISK:

» Women of color are 2-3 times more likely to develop lupus » Women of childbearing age (15-44) » People of African, Asian, Hispanic/ Latin, Native American, Native Hawaiian or Pacific Island descent

Number of Americans the Lupus Foundation of America estimates have lupus

16,000

Number of new cases of lupus reported annually in the United States

NEONATAL: A rare condition that affects infants of women who have lupus, but symptoms disappear completely after several months with no lasting effects. Most infants of mothers with lupus are born healthy.

Extreme fatigue Headaches Painful swollen joints Fever Anemia Swelling in feet, legs, hands and/or around eyes » Butterfly rash across cheeks/nose » » » » » »

DOCTORS WHO TREAT LUPUS

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» Sunlight sensitivity » Hair loss » Abnormal blood clotting » Fingers turning white/blue when cold » Mouth ulcers/nose bleeds

» Lupus is not contagious. » Lupus is not like or related to HIV or AIDS. » Lupus is not related to cancer. » Lupus is not just a woman’s disease and can develop in men, children and teenagers. » Lupus can strike people of all races and ethnic groups.

RHEUMATOLOGIST (joints/muscles) CARDIOLOGIST (heart problems) NEPHROLOGIST (kidney problems) NEUROLOGIST (brain/nervous system) DERMATOLOGIST (rashes/lesions) PERINATOLOGIST (high-risk pregnancy)

ocalastyle.com

LUPUS TREATMENTS

» » » »

Anti-inflammatories Corticosteroids Immunosuppressives Anticoagulants

Sources: Lupus Foundation of America (lupus.org); webmd.com

THE SIGNS & SYMPTOMS JUST THE FACTS


What should I look for in a breast imaging center?

Ocala Health System combines the latest technology with a full spectrum of medical specialists for women and their families. From state-of-the-art breast imaging to bariatric surgery, cancer care, cardiology and much more — we provide the highest quality care for every patient, through every stage of life. We are accredited by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer, and also by the Joint Commission.

First, be sure that the facility you choose meets or exceeds quality assurance, safety guidelines and nationally accepted standards. In addition, the staff should be well qualified through training and certification to perform all procedures. It’s also important that the most advanced technology be available, such as the digital mammography services offered by Ocala Health System. For more information about breast imaging centers or the breast health services we offer, visit WomensHealthClick.com or call Consult-A-Nurse at 1 (800) 530-1188. When you have questions, we have the answers.

Join our local online community for women.

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HYDRATION HELP A

TE ELEC T ROIALYL S ES SEN T

ELECTROWHATS?

Electrolytes are essential minerals like potassium, sodium and magnesium that our bodies need to maintain normal cellular activity in our bodies. In commercial sports drinks, look for a formula that contains up to 80 grams of potassium, 45 grams of sodium and up to 25 grams of magnesium. Most sports drinks also include a carbohydrate formula (glucose, sucrose and fructose) to maintain blood sugar levels.

E DRINK

RECIPES

rink DIY Electrolyte D

ed fruit packet of sweeten drink m) ½ tsp salt (sodiu ce (potassium) jui ½ cup orange (carbohydrates) ½ cup of sugar ts in 2 qts of Mix all ingredien Drink Up! te. era frig Re . water

1

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UGUST IN FLORIDA IS HOT, HOT, HOT WITH TEMPS NEAR 100 AND A HEAT INDEX TO MATCH! SPEND ANY TIME OUTDOORS EXERCISING, GARDENING OR PLAYING SPORTS AND YOU’RE GOING TO GET HOT AND SWEATY. THE SWEAT RESPONSE IS HOW OUR BODIES COOL US OFF, BUT IN THE PROCESS, ESPECIALLY DURING EXERCISE IN EXTREME HEAT, WE ALSO LOSE ESSENTIAL ELECTROLYTES AND CAN BECOME DEHYDRATED. DEHYDRATED. THE LATTER CAN CAUSE FATIGUE, DRY MOUTH, LOW BLOOD SUGAR AND BLOOD VOLUME, NAUSEA, MUSCLE CRAMPS AND, IN RARE CASES, KIDNEY FAILURE. YOU CAN ALSO SUFFER DEHYDRATION DUE TO VOMITING AND DIARRHEA. DRINKING PLENTY OF WATER WHILE OUT IN THE HEAT OR WHEN YOU’RE ILL IS A GOOD WAY TO STAVE OFF DEHYDRATION. BUT THERE ARE ALSO SPECIALLY FORMULATED DRINKS, LIKE GATORADE, THAT JUST MIGHT GIVE YOU A LITTLE EXTRA INSURANCE FOR STAYING HYDRATED AND HEALTHY.

Pedialyte: An electrolyte drink often used for infants and elderly people suffering from dehydration due to illness that causes vomiting and diarrhea.

Coconut Water: A natural beverage that’s becoming a popular alternative to sports drinks because of its high levels of potassium. Now easily found in health food stores and supermarkets.

GATORADE NATION

Man © 78076102 / Shutterstock.com

FEELINGWELL

M

any people don’t know that Gatorade gets its name from the Florida Gators mascot and former UF researcher Dr. Robert Cade, who with several other researchers developed the sports drink on the Gainesville campus in the mid-1960s. Cade was approached by a UF assistant football coach who wondered why the players lost so much weight during practices and games but urinated so little. Cade, who then headed the UF College of Medicine’s renal and electrolyte division, quickly realized that this puzzle was because the players were sweating so much that they were losing electrolytes and upsetting the body’s chemical balance. Cade and his colleagues began experimenting on the players with a formula of water mixed with salt and sugar. Lore has it that it was Cade’s wife who suggested adding lemon juice to the drink to make it more palatable. By the 1966 season, Gatorade, as it was now dubbed, was a staple on the Gators’ sideline during football season. In 1967, Stokely-Van Camp Co. secured the rights for Gatorade from Cade and his fellow researchers and the sports drink went national. After several lawsuits, the University of Florida, as well as the sports drinks’ original inventors, also began to receive royalties. Today, Gatorade continues to dominate the sports re-hydration drinks market.

Sources: ehow.com; research.ufl.edu

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Gluten-Free G

MANIA

LUTEN-FREE PRODUCTS LIKE BREAD, CHIPS, CRACKERS, COOKIES AND PASTAS HAVE BECOME UBIQUITOUS ON STORE SHELVES. DOMINO’S PIZZA RECENTLY BEGAN SELLING GLUTEN-FREE PIZZA. CELEBRITIES TOUT GLUTEN-FREE DIETS AS THE LATEST WAY TO LOSE WEIGHT AND GET HEALTHY. BOOKSTORE SHELVES ARE LINED WITH GLUTEN-FREE DIET BOOKS. SO WHAT THE HECK IS GLUTEN, AND WHY IS IT GETTING ALL THIS ATTENTION? AND WHY IS IT A PROBLEM FOR SOME PEOPLE AND NOT OTHERS?

GLUTEN SENSITIVITY/ NON-CELIAC GLUTEN INTOLERANCE:

An autoimautoim mune disease in which a person can’t tolerate gluten, causing damaging intestinal inflammation, malnutrition, weight loss, diarrhea and abdominal pain. It can take years to correctly diagnose celiac disease because the condition is often mistaken for irritable bowel syndrome or other gastrointestinal diseases.

GLUTEN INTOLERANCE DIAGNOSIS:

Blood test to detect presence of gliadin-

sensitive antibodies, including IgG and IgA. Elimination and then reintroduction of gluten; gluten-free diet for 2-4 weeks to see if symptoms improve.

GLUTEN INTOLERANCE TREATMENT: Gluten-free diet.

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A protein found in many grains, including wheat, rye and barley. It is often present in processed products, including cold cuts, sauces, salad dressings, soy sauce and beer. It’s also used as a binder in certain medications and supplements.

CELIAC DISEASE:

The immune system attacks the gluten as a foreign invader, causing intestinal inflammation, fatigue, brain fog, and joint pain and disease, including leaky gut syndrome.

GLUTEN-FREE GRAINS

GLUTEN:

jwblinn / Shutterstock.com

EATINGWELL

Rice Quinoa

1% 30%

of Americans are estimated to be affected by non-celiac gluten intolerance, according to the American Medical Association. Corn Buckwheat

Millet Amaranth

of Americans are estimated to be affected by celiac disease, according to the American Medical Association.

Teff Sorghum

Wild rice Oats*

CELIAC DIAGNOSIS:

Blood test to detect anti-tissue

transglutaminase (tTG), as well as gliadinsensitive antibodies IgG and IgA. Genetic test (swab inside of cheek) to determine genetic predisposition for celiac disease. Endoscopy biopsy of the small intestine lining to look for celiac-related damage.

CELIAC TREATMENT:

Strict adherence to a gluten-free diet.

*Although oats don’t contain gluten, it’s often processed in facilities that handle gluten-containing products and, therefore, becomes contaminated. Bob’s Red Mill Oats are generally considered the cleanest oats available.

Sources: webmd.com; experiencelife.com; celiac.org

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LIVINGWELL

HOW TO STAY HEALTHY DO use soap and water to wash your hands.

DO wash hands thoroughly for 1-2 minutes. DO use 70 percent alcohol hand sanitizers. DO use disinfectant products on household surfaces.

Bar Soap © Avdeenko, Bottle © Atiketta Sangasaeng / Shutterstock.com

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DON’T share bar soap. DON’T share hand/other towels. DON’T use/overuse antibacterial products.

N

EWS OF SUPERBUGS AND FLESH-EATING BACTERIA IS ENOUGH TO SEND YOU RUNNING TO THE STORE TO STOCK UP ON ANTIBACTERIAL PRODUCTS. HOWEVER, YOU MAY WANT TO SLOW DOWN, TAKE A DEEP BREATH AND RETHINK THAT STRATEGY. RESEARCH AT THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN FOUND THAT ANTIBACTERIAL SOAPS WERE NO BETTER AT REMOVING GERMS OR PREVENTING DISEASE THAN GOOD OL’ SOAP AND WATER. AND ACCORDING TO RECENT RESEARCH AT COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY, PEOPLE WHO USED ANTIBACTERIAL SOAPS WERE NO HEALTHIER THAN THOSE WHO DIDN’T.

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“Most products advertised as antibacterial don’t contain true antibacterial agents,” says Dr. Lennox Archibald, an infectious disease doctor with the University of Florida College of Medicine. “Most use low- to mediumlevel antibacterial agents. So you’re not exactly getting what you think you’re getting.” And then there’s the fact that not all bacteria are bad. Dr. Archibald says that “there are actually good bacteria on your skin that keep out the really nasty bacteria, so you don’t want to be compromising those with unknown chemicals in some of these products.” So what does Dr. Archibald recommend? “In my opinion, antibacterial products aren’t necessary,” he says. “Properly washing with soap and water will get you as clean as you need to be. When it comes

to washing your hands, lather up well and wash for one to two minutes, with two minutes being the gold standard.” In a yet unpublished study done by Dr. Archibald and a colleague, more than 400 people were observed washing their hands in public restrooms. Here’s a scary piece of the study data: The average hand-washing time was a mere nine seconds! Dr. Archibald also prefers “liquid soap over bar soap” because the latter can “transfer bacteria from one person to another.” But if you do use bar soap, “don’t share it with anyone else.” He also doesn’t recommend sharing hand or other towels. In lieu of soap and water, Dr. Archibald also recommends “70 percent alcohol hand sanitizers.” For household surfaces, he says good choices are “disinfectant wipes and sprays.”

!CKY

TRI TRICLOSAN Triclosan: a synthetic chemical and active ingredient in many antibacterial products. Some animal studies show that triclosan may disrupt normal endocrine function, as well as contribute to antibiotic-resistant bacteria, aka superbugs. Triclosan is, at this writing, currently under review for safe use by humans by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). “The FDA is reviewing all available evidence and currently awaiting more published data to review,” says Dr. Archibald. “They may release a report concerning triclosan and human use later this year.”

Sources: webmd.com; health.howstuffworks.com; experiencelife.com

GERMOPHOBIA


S P E C I A L

A D V E R T I S I N G

F E A T U R E

Back pain?

Not ready for surgery?

See Dr. Zhou

a n d

A s s o c i a t e S

Every patient with back pain wants to avoid surgery or use surgery as a last resort. How can you do it? The answer is right here in North Central Florida! Last year, Dr. Zhou of the Florida Pain and Rehabilitation Center published an expert editorial article: “Back Pain, How to Avoid Surgery” in the British Journal of Medical Practitioner. It summarized the current scientific evidence regarding the subject and Dr. Zhou’s daily practice in an attempt to help thousands of patients relieve their back pain without surgery. Being a leading pain specialist and neurologist, Dr. Zhou’s most recent book chapter “Principle of Pain Management” for Neurology in Clinical Practice, 6th edition was released in May 2012. This book presents current knowledge and recent advances in the field of pain medicine and neurology and provides guidance for all practicing neurologists worldwide.

YiLi Zhou, MD, PhD.

Harvard Trained Pain Specialist Author of numerous articles and book chapters for pain management Distinguished Physician Award by Florida Medical Association 2004, 2006 Physician Recognition Award by American Medical Association 2003 Former Director of Jackson Memorial Hospital Pain Clinic, University of Miami BOARD CERTIFIED BY: American Board of Pain Medicine American Board of Interventional Pain Physician American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

Many of Dr. Zhou’s patients feel very lucky to have such a top-notch scholar and practitioner in North Central Florida. Traditionally, people need three epidural steroid injections to feel sciatica relief. You may only need one or two from Dr. Zhou. With his accurate diagnostic skills, high moral ethics and high success rate, Dr. Zhou always tells his patients after treatment, “You do not have to come back if you do not have pain,” and many of his patients find there really is no need to return because they are pain free. However, they refer many of their closest family and friends to his practice. Along with Dr. Zhou, his associates Dr. Warycha and Dr. Vu have already helped many people suffering from chronic pain. Dr. Warycha is a board-certified physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist. His area of expertise is nerve function study, and he excels at using ultrasound-guided joint injections. “This technique is more accurate and allows me to treat the exact pain site instead of the general area,” he says. Dr. Vu is a board-certified physical medicine and rehabilitation specialist and pain specialist. Together with other team members, Dr. Vu offers a comprehensive approach to treating pain using minimally invasive non-surgical treatment. FLPRC has had an outstanding record in treating and eliminating pain. Dr. Zhou and his staff offer an honest and compassionate approach to pain management and have become one of the most popular groups of practitioners in the area. For the last serveral years, many residents in The Villages have traveled to Ocala and even Gainesville to see Dr. Zhou. These patients now can receive convenient comprehensive pain care with Dr. Zhou and his new office in The Villages! Now open!

Just listen to what some of his patients have to say: “I am very pleased with the treatment and the results of the treatment I received at Dr. Zhou’s office. I can rest easier knowing that there is a doctor who cares and can help me with the treatment. It is worth it to travel hundreds of miles to see him. I will happily refer anyone I know that is having problems with pain to Dr. Zhou’s office.” Consult with this outstanding team today, and learn how you can begin leading a pain-free life without surgery!

YOU DESERVE THE BEST!

L to R: Angela Luo, PA-C, MS; Matthew Barnes, PA-C; Bohdan Warycha, MD; Yili Zhou, MD, Ph.D.; Hoang T. Vu, DO; Asha Vishnagara, PA-C, MMS, MS

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Pulse

the

THEDOCTORSAREIN

HEALTH BREAKTHROUGHS THAT

BY

KNOCKED OUR SOCKS OFF

., OIZEN, M.D.D. R L E A H C I M HME T O Z , M & ME

R

ecently, we were to totally blown away by five medical breakthroughs we think you should know about. These exciting developments aren’t quite ready for prime time, but they’ve got us psyched about the future.

1. THE “NEW” GOOD FAT! You’ve al-

ready heard plenty about DHA, the great-for-you omega-3 fatty acid in fatty fish and algae or fish-oil capsules. Now, research from Harvard Medical School, the Cleveland Clinic and universities in Hawaii and Japan show that omega-7 fatty acids found in purified palmitoleic acid have amazing powers, too. They squelched heart-threatening LDL cholesterol and triglycerides, boosted ticker-friendly HDLs,

decreased fatty livers and improved cells’ ability to take in blood sugar in several well-designed studies. Our take: Four studies are better than one, but we need more human trials before recommending omega-7s unconditionally. But we’re intrigued—enough so that at least Dr. Mike is taking 200 milligrams of purified omega-7 in capsule form along with the 900 milligrams of DHA we each take daily. (Always tell your doc about the supplements you take!)

2. STREAMLINED EXERCISE. If you’re trying to fit in cardiovascular exercise (walking, pedaling your exercise bike, etc.) and strengthtraining, you, like us, may have wondered if it’s OK to do them

STRESS MAY BE A BIGGER HEALTH THREAT THAN PLAYING FOOTBALL WITHOUT A HELMET.

both on the same day. Now, docs from Canada’s McMaster University and Sweden’s Karolinska Institute have studied this question the correct way—in randomized, double-blind human studies that put volunteers on a variety of routines then analyzed their muscles. The result: Cardio and strength routines, when done on the same day, are good and good for you! Our take: Two studies are good, but we’d like to see four in humans, with results lining up on the same side of the issue, before we say, “Do this and stay younger.” Still, we’re doubling up. We do stamina routines for 21 or more minutes at 80 percent of our age-adjusted max heart rate, followed by strength exercises for 10-20 minutes on the same day three times a week.

3. SAY “AHHHH” AND SAVE YOUR DNA. Stress doesn’t just ding your genes, it stunts them. A Duke University study shows that family violence, watching disturbing movies or experiencing disturbing events shortens kids’ telomeres, the protective caps on the ends of DNA. That boosts the risk for health problems later in life. Our take: Stress may be a bigger health threat than playing football without a helmet. Avoid these DNA changes (remember, you can control how well your genes work) with this feel-good

technique. Just tense and relax muscle groups, starting with your feet. Move on to your legs, stomach, back, neck, arms, face and head. To melt stress, breathe in as you tense, out as you relax.

4. CERAMIDES AND CANCER PROTECTION. This accidental discovery could lead to a cure for pancreatic cancer and glioblastoma—a very bad-behaving brain tumor. In mice experiments, fatty acids called ceramides acted like a Trojan horse. Tumor cells invited them in (they like an acidic environment), and then the ceramides told lysosomes (tiny recycling centers inside cells) to burst, killing the cancer cell. Our take: Someday, ceramides could be the basis for a gentle, effective, integrative cancer treatment. Will they work against other cancers and not just in mice? We’re watching the science closely.

5. BEXAROTENE AND ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE. This skin-cancer drug

is showing huge promise against Alzheimer’s disease. Mouse studies were a triumph. The first reports from other scientists trying to get the same results (an important research step) are due out soon.

Our take: When results are in, you’ll hear the news from us!

Mehmet Oz, M.D. is host of The Dr. Oz Show, and Mike Roizen, M.D. is Chief Medical Officer at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute. For more information go to www.RealAge.com.

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PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

DR. ANAND KESARI, M.D. at Gastro-Colon Clinic understands how gastrointestinal ailments come with embarrassing side effects. He and his team offer caring, compassion and top-notch treatment.

Facing Embarrassing Conditions With

CARING COMPASSION COLONOSCOPIES SAVE LIVES

L

etâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s face it. There are some bodily functions that we would just rather not talk about. And most of these somewhat embarrassing aspects of the human body incorporate the approximately 6 feet of intestine known as the colon that wraps itself up into a neat package inside our abdomens. And while in a perfect world we would prefer to ignore that part of our bodies and hope everything runs smoothly, that is not always the case.

The entire gastrointestinal tract can be up to 20 feet long in an adult male. Because of its sheer size, there are a number of conditions that can occur, leading to both painful and often embarrassing symptoms. And though patients are not alone in their experience, they are not always willing to come forward and talk about the problems openly or comfortably. That is where Dr. Anand Kesari, M.D., has already helped many patients in Marion County and the

Back Row, L-R: Olga Cabrera, Billing Manager; Rose Mercado, Marketing & Case Manager; Krishna Kesari, IT; Anand Kesari, MD; Shalini Kesari, Administrator Front Row, L-R: Jennifer Lewis, Front Office Manager; Kelsey Tucker, MA

surrounding area since he opened his practice in 2009. Dr. Kesari is board certified in both internal medicine and gastroenterology. He completed his residency from the State University of New York (SUNY) at Buffalo in New York and his Fellowship in gastroenterology from SUNY Health Science Center at Brooklyn in 2001. His experience includes acting chief of gastroenterology and assistant professor of medicine at the Salem Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Roanoke, Virginia, before moving to Florida. He understands the concerns patients have when it comes to addressing gastrointestinal issues. He dedicates his practice to helping patients feel comfortable with him as a physician so he can adequately diagnose and treat their conditions. Along with a location in The Villages and satellite offices in both Leesburg and Clermont, Dr. Kesari

also recently opened a new stateof-the-art office in Ocala. Gastrointestinal conditions come with a wide range of side effects. These can include constipation, diarrhea, bloating and several others. If left untreated, a relatively small problem requiring minimal treatment can advance into something far worse. That is exactly the scenario that Dr. Kesari wants to avoid. He invites his patients to discuss their symptoms and concerns with him and his staff openly and encourages continuous dialogue regularly throughout treatment and follow-up care. He specializes in colonoscopy procedures, which serve as a means of discovering and treating colon cancer, polyps, colitis, lesions and many other conditions. He also performs several other endoscopic procedures, such as sigmoidoscopy and EGD among others, and treats a wide range of gastrointestinal, digestive and liver ailments. He also provides a painless, non-surgical treatment for hemorrhoids called Infrared Coagulation Technology, which employs the use of infrared light as a means of treatment rather than traditional surgery. Dr. Kesari understands that gastrointestinal conditions are not comfortable for people to talk about. He and his staff offer the utmost professionalism and compassionate care available and encourage anyone experiencing discomfort to investigate it. His goal is to keep things running smoothly for his patients.

Dr. Anand Kesari, M.D. Gastro-Colon Clinic 7535 SW 62nd Court, Ocala 1400 US 441 N, #930, The Villages 801 E Dixie Ave, Ste. 101, Leesburg 1735 B East Hwy 50, Clermont (352) 237-1253 gastro-colon.com

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By Cynthia McFarland

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W

es Leonard had just made a game-winning layup in overtime, ensuring

an undefeated 20-0 season for his high school basketball team. Moments later, the 16-year-old junior collapsed on the gym floor, and the overjoyed shouts of the home crowd at Fennville High School in Michigan quickly turned to stunned horror. He died a short time later at an area hospital. An autopsy report confirmed the cause of death as cardiac arrest due to an enlarged heart. Leonard’s devastating story made national news because of how and where he died, but that same weekend in March 2011, at least four other high school athletes in towns across the country also died of the same cause.

Basketball Players © 46170160 / Shutterstock.com

est. The worda s cardiacso arr Sudden connected with when ing, but even more

alone are chill in many cases, victim who is barely old enough to drive and, even younger. approximately The facts are sobering. Each year in the U.S., high school the at ts even tic athle 5 million students compete in from dies te athle nt stude level. Some sources estimate one s related death most with , days sudden cardiac arrest every three rican Ame The . ition cond to an underlying cardiovascular are no rock solid Heart Association reports that, although there in 200,000 high one ately oxim numbers, it is believed that appr cardiac arrest. en sudd from year school-aged athletes die each s among death en sudd atic The majority of non-traum ities. Young rmal abno ac cardi g athletes are related to pre-existin ght to be thou rate a at death d athletes suffer sudden unexpecte While . peers ctive less-a their two to three times greater than ion can exert ical phys ts, defec ac exercise itself doesn’t cause cardi re. endu can it what nd beyo t hear push an already compromised g youn in death of ent) perc (36 e The most common caus M), a condition athletes is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC can lead to and le musc t hear that causes thickening of the nal Heart Natio the to rding heart rhythm disturbances. Acco condition, the have ren child 500 Lung and Blood Institute, 1 in young all in death en sudd of e and HCM is the leading caus

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12-Point Screening Process The following screening recommendations were proposed by the American Heart Association in 1996 and are still endorsed as an effective strategy to discover unsuspected heart conditions. Screening includes 12 questions about personal and family medical history and a physical examination to uncover aspects of a potential athlete’s health that could signal a cardiovascular problem. However, All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg, Florida, reports that a new study found less than half of doctors are following these guidelines and that only 6 percent of high school athletic directors even knew about the existence of such guidelines. Study results also revealed that it’s common for doctors to skip some of the questions listed in the screening guidelines. A startling 67 percent of doctors in the study didn’t ask about a family history of heart disease, while 28 percent didn’t ask student athletes if they ever experienced chest pain while exercising.

Personal History 1. Chest pain/discomfort upon exertion 2. Unexplained fainting or near-fainting 3. Excessive and unexplained fatigue associated with exercise 4. Heart murmur 5. High blood pressure

Family History 6. One or more relatives who died of heart disease (sudden/ unexpected or otherwise) before age 50 7. Close relative under age 50 with disability from heart disease 8. Specific knowledge of certain cardiac conditions in family members: hypertrophic or dilated cardiomyopathy, in which the heart cavity or wall becomes enlarged; long QT syndrome, which affects the heart’s electrical rhythm; Marfan syndrome, in which the walls of the heart’s major arteries are weakened; or clinically important arrhythmias or heart rhythms.

Physical Examination 9. Heart murmur 10. Femoral pulses to exclude narrowing of the aorta 11. Physical appearance of Marfan syndrome 12. Brachial artery blood pressure (taken in a sitting position)

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If any of the 12 screening elements has a “yes” answer or positive finding, the participant would be referred for further cardiovascular evaluation, which may include one or all of the following: ELECTROCARDIOGRAM (ALSO KNOWN AS ECG OR EKG): Used to identify irregular heart rhythms or other problems. The test records a readout of the heart’s electrical activity by attaching electrodes to the chest. ECHOCARDIOGRAM (ALSO KNOWN AS AN “ECHO”): A moving ultrasound of the heart, which can detect atrial fibrillation, murmurs, enlargement, weakness or stiffness in the heart muscle. CARDIAC CT SCAN: A high-tech series of X-rays that form a detailed image of the heart. Source: American Heart Association, All Children’s Hospital

cent) is cardiovascular cause (17 per people. The second leading anomalies. congenital coronary artery cardiac of teens who suffer sudden ity jor Sadly, the great ma their do er ith Ne e a heart problem. arrest have no idea they hav families.

ict the n preestddue ctors ca Certaofina teefa to a arr n suffering sudden cardiac

likelihood rnal of the a study published in the Jou genetic defect, as noted in s include tor fac t n. Those significan American Medical Associatio ual ivid ind the whether or not childhood fainting episodes, l. rva inte QT and length of the was going through puberty ount of am the to rs rdiogram, this refe (Measured by an electroca ically ctr ele to rt hea chambers of the time required for the lower reset after each beat). r times greater risk than Males were found to have fou orize that 10 and 12. Researchers the females between the ages of say that but ed olv puberty may be inv hormones associated with den sud of nce ide . Overall, the inc additional research is needed and s ale fem n her in males tha cardiac arrest tends to be hig ites. wh n higher among blacks tha m ically occurs just as the ter typ est Sudden cardiac arr ses lap col tim vic t warning. The implies: suddenly and withou . In ing ath bre no re is no pulse and and loses consciousness; the se. lap col ore bef ns display some sig some cases, the victim will st che , ess zin diz , fainting, blackouts These may include fatigue, g. itin vom or s tion akness, palpita pain, shortness of breath, we there are no warning signs. es, cas ny Unfortunately, in ma rt attack, blood flow to When someone suffers a hea ting. h it typically continues bea the heart is blocked, althoug ause it bec ps sto ly the heart actual With sudden cardiac arrest, ich can wh ia, hm hyt , known as arr develops an abnormal rhythm be fast, slow or irregular. g, time is of the essence. Once the heart stops beatin r to six death can occur within fou Permanent brain damage or scene the at e eon al increase if som minutes. The odds of surviv sa use and R) (CP y resuscitation administers cardiopulmonar . l heart rhythm defibrillator to restore norma omated external ars, autnew In reorsce(AEnDs)t ye s because they save have made the

defibrillat as in many public places, such lives. AEDs are now found sent in pre are y The malls and more. schools, airports, shopping 200, $1, ut abo ts cos ools. Each unit all Marion County high sch not including the cabinet. are ommended that the AEDs “In our policy book, it’s rec and n aso -se pre ry eve at the site of present and available for use rela lic pub , ers Sob test,” said Corey regular season athletic con n atio oci Ass c leti Ath a High School tions specialist for the Florid ” nt. eve ry eve at y tor they are manda (FHSAA). “For postseason,


A compute rized medic a standard al device th AED can ch e size of an eck a perso average lap when a sho n’s heart rh top, ck is needed y th m . It and recogn can be use According ize d o n to an the AHA, th y person o extremely ver age 8. e devices ar accurate. Id e easy to use eally, you sh portable defi and ould be trai brillator, b ned to use u t the device and lights a to instruct itself utilize a rescuer. s voice pro But just hav mpts ing an AED isn’t enoug in a sc hool—or o h. ther public Fennville H place— ig h School, th collapsed aft e sc h ool where er his gam Wes Leonar e-winning not in the d shot, had an gymnasium AED, but it . Someone where Leo was ra n nard lay, bu to get it an d brought t his would AED’s batte it -b to e rescuers th ry was dea en discover d. As this case ed the shockingly maintenan proved, AE ce are critic D a cc essibility an al. d

“These are life-saving d evices,

Soccer Player © Aptyp_koK; Students © .shock; Defibrilator © jannoon028 / Shutterstock.com

but they do n’t work on their own. know how They only to use them work if peo and can get Anderson, ple to them,” sa who found ys Martha ed Saving Y “An AED sh Lopez o u n g Hearts in ould not b 2006. to be publi e installed cly accessib in a locked le. There sh office; it ha people kno ould be pro s w what it is per signage and where or restroom so it is, just lik s,” she add e water fou s. “Any tim AED shou ntains e there’s a p ld be on th ra ctice or gam e sidelines. Anderson ” e, the started her in memory Ocoee, Flo rida-based of her son, organizatio Sean Alexan sudden card n der Anderso iac arrest w n, who died hile rollerb 2004. By th of lading in th e time param eir neighbo edics with minutes late rhood in an AED ar r, it was too ri ved on the late. Sean w Saving You scene 10 as ju st 10 years ng Hearts fo old. placement cuses on ed of AEDs. To ucation, aw date, the org areness and 68 AEDS in anization h the public sc as donated and placed “A lot of peo hools and other youth -centered lo ple just thin is limited to cations. k this happ older or ob en s to other p ese people let them kn eople and ,” Anderso ow that’s n n says. “Ou ot the case r job is to .”

art health tion also holds he da un . Although fo n’s so er And led for October 20 du he sc t en ev xt the ne 59 different screenings, with ea, students from ar o nd rla O e th t. ld in nded the last even screenings are he o hours away atte tw as r fa as d an schools in some a High School ng to the Florid di or cc A s. ie ed trag ing cause student athlete illness is the lead ed at el -r at he n, tio FHSAA has Athletic Associa ol athletes. The ho sc gh hi in h at s to follow “a of preventable de l member school al g in ir qu re , es elin r all sports that updated its guid covery model fo re d an n io at iz at preseason acclim eing.” t athlete’s well-b en ated deaths. ud st a e enhanc ward off heat-rel to n ke ta be n ca of practice Definite steps n and intensity tio ra du e th ng iti enough to These include lim re students are fit su g in ak m d an er tions may not during hot weath er, these precau ev ow H . ns io ss se handle practice cardiac arrest. en law requires dd su t preven notes that state A SA FH e th of n medical Corey Sobers pre-participatio a o rg de un to es to a physical all student athlet arts. In addition st on as se e th re an extensive evaluation befo titioner, there is ac pr al ic ed m d se dent. This list exam by a licen by the parent/stu ed et pl m co be to t during or list of questions u ever passed ou yo e av “H as s ie er includes such qu

s culprit u io v b o n a is t a He

Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most com common cause of sudden death in young athletes. The individual may or may not have symptoms. If present, symptoms typically increase with physical exertion. Common symptoms include: • • • • •

Shortness of breath on exertion Dizziness Fainting Chest pain Abnormal heart rhythms

Left: Martha Lopez Anderson

after exercise?” and “Has any family member or relative die d of heart problems or sudden dea th before age 50?” But even if the answers to these and other heart-related questions on the form are “no,” that’s no guarantee of a healthy heart. Even more disturbing is the fact that the majority of cases of sud den cardiac arrest are caused by a pre -existing genetic condition that cannot be detected during a rou tine physical exam. However, these life-threatening heart conditions can typically be found through screening test s, such as an electrocardiogram (ECG). Once diagnosed, these conditions can be addressed and the individual can often enjoy a normal lifestyle and life span. In fact, the American Heart Ass ociation (AHA) has announced that “a 12-point scre ening process could help reduce sudden cardiac death in high school and college competitiv e athletes.” The process involve s a personal history on the stud ent, family history and a physical exam.

If testing is so successful, why

aren’t all student athletes tested? After all, screening is required by law in some countr ies. Italy, for example, require s that all athletes have a manda tory ECG. Students in Japan have an ECG in grades 1, 7 and 10, while all adults over the age of 18 have an ECG every two years. Iceland and Sweden have also begun screening test s on various segments of the population. According to the AHA, it wou ld cost more than $2 billion per year to conduct ma ss screenings on the approxiimate 10 million athletes that com pete in the United States ocalastyle.com AUG’12

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e, school, collegiat dle school, high id m h, ut yo e th each year at e 30) level. actical, masters (over ag ly feasible, nor pr professional and al ci an fin t no y pl Critics say it’s sim etes. hl at h ut yo l to screen al s. Seattle disagree ted Darla Varrenti of critics of manda r patience fo the of t don’t lo I a t bu ve , ha re t “I don’ e calling it ra ar em th of e m y ms. So rdiac arrest ever screening progra dies of sudden ca ild ief ch gr e e on th if nd re ra ha consider it knows first ho w ti, en rr Va ys,” says two or three da this way. football ild ch of losing a ti, was an ardent en rr Va n ai w D las ity games Her son, Nicho and junior vars ity rs va th bo in icipated der way, player who part as just getting un w on as se ll ba practices ol. Foot k of twice-daily at his high scho ee w a in t pu d Labor Nick ha cardiac arrest on and 16-year-old en dd su of ed di until ed and ital heart defect when he collaps he had a congen ew kn e on o N . Day 2004 current it was too late. gs point out that in en re sc s as m d te lem Critics of manda indicating a prob “false positives,” of te rther ra fu r gh fo hi a ed referr tests have y the child is then sa ey Th s. ist ex . when none much as $2,000 hich can cost as cardiac testing, w

Left: Nicholas Dwain Varrenti Above: Darla Varrenti

Varrenti says this criticism isn’ t adequate. “The actual amount of ‘false pos itives’ is much lower than 25 percent, a figure which is com monly given,” she notes. “A lot of the critics are using 10-yea r-old data as arguments against mandated screenings.” Nick has been gone for nearly eight years now, but his mother created the Nick of Tim e Foundation in his honor. The non-profit organization wor ks to increase awareness and educate the public about the need for AEDs in public places . The foundation also helps pro vide free screening programs for youth athletes. In 2011 and mid way through 2012 alone, the foundation has already provid ed heart screenings for at leas t 6,000 students in the Seattle are a free of charge. “We do 10 screenings a year and average 400 to 500 kids at each. We do it for free, and it’s completely volunteer-base d,” Varrenti explains. “Our medic al teams schedule themselves out of their clinics and volunteer for us for the whole day. We hav e cardiologists reading the ECGs right there in real time. We also ask 10 very specific family-rela ted heart questions.” Varrenti notes that a surprising number of teens have high blood pressure, which can ofte n be traced to lifestyle choices and even consumption of ene rgy drinks. Any time a child in the screening process has high blo od pressure, an echocardiogra m is done right away. “We do find kids at every scre ening who need follow-up; some of them have already had surgery or a procedure. This isn’t a death sentence and doe sn’t always mean the child can ’t continue with sports. A lot of the things we find can be fixe d. It’s knowing it’s there. Just sinc e Nicky died in 2004, the medic al strides made have been amazin g,” says Varrenti. “From January 1 through Apr il 30, 2012, we had reports of 56 kids who had suffered sud den cardiac arrest and only nine survived,” she notes. “Du ring August and September, the numbers (of sudden cardiac arre sts) go up dramatically becaus e of school sports programs kick ing in.” Figures of students suffering from sudden cardiac arrest are based on media reports and not every incident is reported. The re is no accurate national databa se and no way to know exactly how many young lives are lost each year to such incidents. Organizations such as the Nic k of Time Foundation and Saving Young Hearts were fou nded by mothers who have lost children to sudden cardiac arre st. Their efforts continue to foc us on education and awareness in hopes of sparing other parent s the heartache they’ve endured. “Parents take kids to get their eyes checked and take them to the dentist, but don’t worry about what their hearts are doi ng,” says Darla Varrenti. “We’re wor king hard to get the word out.”

Lifesaving CPR When a stranger collapses in a public place from sudden cardiac arrest, observers may call 911, but be afraid to do anything else. In most cases, this is because bystanders think their actions might make the situation worse. They’re wrong. The truth is that, without emergency help, the victim will die—in mere minutes. If you happen to be present when someone suffers sudden cardiac arrest, your quick action won’t hurt the victim and could actually save his or her life. First, call 911 immediately and begin “hands-only” CPR.

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Using both hands, palms down, one on top of the other, do chest compressions in the center of the chest, about 100 compressions per minute. Push hard and fast. Think of the rate of a fast disco song such as “Stayin’ Alive,” which, when you think about it, is totally appropriate in this situation. Keep performing chest compressions until emergency medical help arrives. Lives have been saved when observers respond immediately with CPR and use an AED.

Source: American Heart Association

Learn More: fhsaa.org heart.org nickoftimefoundation.org parentheartwatch.org savingyounghearts.org


A SERVICE OF THE INSTITUTE OF CARDIOVASCULAR EXCELLENCE

PROMOTIONAL FEATURE ocalastyle.com

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A SERVICE OF THE INSTITUTE OF CARDIOVASCULAR EXCELLENCE

PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

It takes many people to provide quality, compassionate and personal medical care PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS (PA) and ADVANCED REGISTERED NURSE PRACTITIONERS (ARNP) play a critical role. PAs and ARNPs are the unsung heroes of a physician’s practice. Their mid-level medical status enables them to treat patients much as a physician would, but their schedules allow them to take the extra time with a patient that a busy physician just doesn’t have in today’s hectic world. PAs and ARNPs are licensed healthcare professionals who practice medicine under close physician supervision. Much like physicians, PAs and ARNPs perform exams, order and

interpret diagnostic tests, diagnose illnesses, initiate and manage treatment plans, counsel patients on all aspects of preventive health care, and prescribe medications. PAs may also assist the physician during surgery. They are trained to work closely with physicians and complement physician care in all respects. PAs complete medical based education that is very heavy in pathophysiology of the human body and have more advanced training from a purely scientific standpoint, while NPs have a

KevinNOON Kevin Noon started his journey into cardiology 18 years ago when he was one of Monroe Regional Medical Center’s youngest ICU nurses. He worked in the cardiac critical care unit for five years while he finished studying for his Master of Science in Nursing degree at the University of Florida, graduating in 1998 as an ARNP. Since then, Noon has worked in the fields of asthma, allergy, sleep, and obesity medicine. He joined Dr. Qamar’s practice four years ago and has been enjoying cardiology ever since. “What is so wonderful about working here at ICE is the fact that when Dr. Qamar takes on a new mid-level healthcare

BobDIPRIMIO “I had a heart bypass in 1993 following a heart attack. Dr. Qamar performed a heart and leg catheterization and concluded

deeper social science training that grows from the unique theories that are taught through the nursing programs. This gives ICE patients the best of both worlds: the latest in specialized technological medical care and a nurse’s caring and compassionate bedside manner that treats the patient as a person, not just a patient. “Our PAs and ARNPs enable us to provide the best possible integrated healthcare available today,” says Dr. Asad Qamar. “I consider the care and the expertise they provide to be on

level with that of a physician. They are very down-toearth and have such a great relationship with each patient. Many times, as a physician, I find that my time is stretched, but I have such confidence in, and work so closely with, our PAs and ARNPs that I know each one of our patients is getting just as much care from them as I am able to provide. I would trust each of my medical team’s abilities with my own family members.”

ARNP worker such as a PA or ARNP, he puts them through a rigorous training program that teaches them his “recipe” or method for treating his patients. Then the trainee does six months of rounds with Dr. Qamar that is similar to a mini-residency or an apprenticeship. Only when Dr. Qamar feels the PA or ARNP is totally ready, will he allow them to begin treating patients. Even then, there is very close collaboration between the doctor and his new worker. Dr. Qamar is very particular when it comes to his patients and makes sure each one receives the best care we can possibly give. “We, the PAs and ARNPs, become an extension of Dr. Qamar. We become his eyes, ears, and hands at his various offices. When he is in the catheterization lab, we will be in one of the other offices taking care of ICE patients

that I needed a pacemaker and the proper medications for my heart and stents to alleviate the peripheral artery disease he found in my legs. I can honestly say I am absolutely satisfied with the

just as if he was there. This allows us to reach more people while delivering the quality care Dr. Qamar brings to his practice… all the while under his indirect supervision. If we have any issues at all concerning patient care or test results, Dr. Qamar is right there with the guidance and answers we need. And that’s why I love working here at ICE.”

“Kevin Noon is my guardian angel. He walked into my hospital room, discovered me in cardiac arrest, and saved my life. You won’t find a better nurse practitioner anywhere and if it wasn’t for Kevin — I wouldn’t be here today.” — TracyDUBOIS

exceptional care I have received from Dr. Qamar and his staff. I have had several doctors through the years and this is the best heart care I have ever received.”


Jose SOCARRAS PA-C

Jose Socarras enjoyed his job at Mercy Hospital in Miami as a medical lab technician so much that he decided to attend medical school. Following graduation from Auton University at Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Socarras returned to Miami and Mercy where he gained the status of physician’s assistant and spent the next 17 years assisting in thoracic and vascular surgery. He has participated in open-heart procedures and heart transplants. Socarras’ love of horses brought

Sheila DEPAOLO PA-C

him to Central Florida when he bought a horse farm in Micanopy. He then began to work at Ocala Regional Hospital and now has taken the next step in his medical career, a position at ICE. “I love it here,” PA Socarras says. “Working with Dr. Qamar, Kevin Noon, and Sheila DePaolo is such a pleasure. We are such a great teamand everyone is so helpful.”

“My husband, Francis, recently passed away after suffering from COPD for

As a small child, Sheila DePaolo remembers her mother breaking her nose. When her mother returned home from the hospital, 4-year-old Sheila immediately took over her care, making sure she was comfortable and well cared for. Twenty-one years later, she is still taking care of people — but on a much larger scale. “I have always loved taking care of others and I am simply fascinated with the human body,” says DePaolo, now a physician’s assistant (PA) with the Institute of Cardiovascular Excellence (ICE). “Since I was young, I have known exactly what I wanted to do and I am so excited to be fulfilling my dreams.” PA DePaolo was born in Connecticut and has lived most of her life in Florida. While attending Forest High School in Ocala, she was dually enrolled at Central Florida Community College. During

many years. When he was hospitalized, Jose Socarras visited him in the hospital every day. He treated Francis with the utmost respect and kindness, while keeping us both carefully informed of every step he would take in my husband’s treatment. I am so pleased with the care and concern he afforded us through such a difficult time.” — PatDINARDI

this time, and as a prime example of her untiring work ethic, she worked as a clerical assistant in a physician’s office. It was here PA DePaolo first encountered a physician’s assistant and quickly decided to pursue it as a career. “I love the responsibility that comes with being a PA,” she says. “Physician assistants are educated and trained to know and practice all the different healthcare specialties, allowing a broad foundation of medical knowledge. PAs have the freedom to work with the entire patient and I love that.” Following community college graduation, she graduated from the University of Florida with her Bachelor’s degree in Microbiology and Cellular Science and enrolled in the physician assistant school at the University of Florida. She graduated with a Master of Physician Assistant Studies at the young age of 24 and immediately

began her career as a PA at ICE in 2011. “I have been here for one year and I absolutely love it,” she says. “As a PA, I work very closely with Dr. Qamar, who has such a passion for helping and teaching others, no matter who the individual. He has certainly passed this trait on to his mid-level providers. I enjoy being a part of such a professional team that focuses so much on the care of the patient.”

“The only word I can use to describe Sheila Depaolo is extraordinary! She is kindhearted, understanding, and she takes the time to sit and talk with me to fully explain my treatment. Extraordinary!” — ThelmaGHIGLIOTTY

THE VILLAGES 1950 Laurel Manor Dr., Building 240 The Villages, FL 32162 Office: 352.509.9295 / Fax: 352.509.9296

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The Ol' Switcheroo

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Lunch box swaps for smart students p66

A Trio Of Salsas p68

F O THE R O L

and more!

THE

TTER

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Pasta © Peter Kim; Tablecloth© Tereza Dvorak / Shutterstock.com

Re-runs & Recipes p70

MA

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Quick Bites p67

Dish

e’re familiar with the adage “the eyes are bigger than the stomach” when it comes to plate size and portion control, but could the plate’s color also determine your appetite? Restaurants use reds and oranges in their logos because they are considered appetite boosters.

If an alarming, lustful shade of red causes people to brake for french fries, can a red plate also increase your appetite? In November 2011, the Journal of Consumer Research published an article on a study at a lunch buffet serving pasta marinara. Sixty people were given a red or white plate. Subjects who were given red plates returned for more helpings at the buffet

than those who ate their food off white plates. To avoid overeating, try switching to white dishware. Blue is also an appetite suppressant. Think about blue spaghetti or blue scrambled eggs—ick.

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+ A

HEALTHY SWAPS FOR AN

LUNCH T

HE BUSES ARE MAKING THE ROUNDS, THE TEACHERS ARE PLANNING THEIR EXAMS AND THE KIDS ARE GETTING READY FOR ANOTHER SCHOOL YEAR. BUT PARENTS, YOU MAY HAVE THE HARDEST JOB OF ALL: PLANNING THE LUNCHES. ACCORDING TO THE ACADEMY OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS, LUNCH IS AS IMPORTANT OF A MEAL AS BREAKFAST. DON’T GET LULLED INTO PACKING CALORIE-DENSE, NUTRITIONALLY POOR MID-DAY MEALS. INSTEAD, TRY SOME OF THESE LUNCH BOX SWAPS THAT WILL GET EVEN THE PICKIEST OF EATERS ENERGIZED FOR THEIR NEXT TASK.

Variety Is The Spice Of Life! One of the latest trends in school lunches is the bento box. These are compartmentalized boxes that include small servings of a variety of foods. Get creative and make a new combination each day!

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LUNCH

1

PB&J on white bread Single-serving bag of chips Fruit snacks

LUNCH

2

Ham & cheese on white bread 1 pudding cup Pretzel sticks

Although the peanut butter does supply some healthy fats and protein, the main problem with this lunch is the lack of any fruits or vegetables. That dab of jelly is high in sugar, and the white bread only serves to spike blood-sugar levels, which will lead to a definite “crash” in energy before the day is out.

This lunch isn’t overly high in calories, but it isn’t overly high in nutrition either. The pudding cup and pretzels don’t provide much in terms of protein or fiber, and there aren’t any fruit or veggie servings.

THE SWAP Spread some almond butter on

THE SWAP Pick your child’s favorite cold-cuts

a whole grain English muffin or crackers and top with a sliced banana or apple.

or even leftovers along with lettuce, tomato, shredded carrots or any other veggie you can think to chop up and stuff it in a whole grain pita pocket with tangy honey mustard.

Ditch the chips, and replace with veggie crisps. They are made from veggies, and the crunchy texture with a hint of salt makes them an excellent swap. Fruit snacks are not fruit. Either swap them for the real thing or try dried fruit pieces like mango, pineapple or papaya for a sweet and chewy treat.

Replace the pudding with a low-fat Greek yogurt, and pack some extra berries for another serving of fruit. Opt for pita chips with a singleserving pack of hummus. Carrots and yellow or orange peppers also make great dippers and bring with them lots of vitamins and minerals.


This is a very high-fat lunch. And while the tuna salad does offer some protein, the saturated fat from the mayonnaise negatively outweighs the benefits.

LUNCH

4

Turkey & cheese on a Kaiser roll 1 package sandwich cookies 1 single-serving bag of nacho cheese tortilla chips

Turkey is a great source of lean protein, but the big thing missing in this lunch once again is fruit or veggie servings. And, unless the package says otherwise, many sandwich cookies are made with trans fats, which should be avoided.

THE SWAP Remember, lunch doesn’t always

THE SWAP Roll up the turkey with some

need to include a sandwich. Tuna salad can easily be spread on whole grain crackers or flatbreads. An even better option would be plain tuna packed in water or a homemade tuna salad made with low-fat mayonnaise and full of diced celery, onions and carrots.

lettuce, cantaloupe slices and some tangy honey Dijon dressing in a whole wheat tortilla.

The fruit in the fruit pie is a better source of sugar than of fiber. Instead, pack fruit skewers with a mix of your child’s favorites. Get creative! Use cherries, pineapples, strawberries or kiwis.

It’s fine to include a sweet treat, but choose oatmeal cookies with raisins, or better yet, make your own using apple sauce as an alternative to butter, and don’t be afraid to load up with some fruit bits.

With a few servings of fruit and veggies and the lean tuna salad, this lunch is pretty healthy so far. Cheese curls are a fun snack to add, but opt for the baked ones, as they are lower in fat and calories.

Ditch the chips, and make your own trail mix using raisins, lightly salted nuts, dried cranberries and a few yogurt-covered pretzels.

Add fixings like lettuce, tomato, shredded carrots or diced sweet peppers to wraps and sandwiches. Add in fruits wherever you can, like in yogurt cups, trail mixes and homemade cookies or muffins. Lunch doesn’t always have to include sandwiches. Come up with creative kabobs using meats, cheeses and fruits on a skewer. Make a pasta salad together and include diced veggies or almond slices, Mandarin oranges and cranberries for an Asian-inspired twist.

PB&J, English Muffin © BW Folsom; Ham & Cheese © Jiri Hera; Tuna Sandwhich, Turkey Wrap © MSPhotographic; Turkey © Michael C. Gray; Almond Butter © Stargazer; Bannana © Anna Kucherova; Veggie Crips © mexrix; Dried Fruit © SunnyS; Pita © Sally Scott; Yogurt © IngridsI; PIta Chips © Brooke Becker; Tuna Salad © Warren Price Photography; Fruit © margouillat photo; Cheese Curls © Odua Images; Cookies © Olga Utlyakova; Trail Mix © Oliver Hoffmann; Bento Box © jabiru; Child © Realinemedia / Shutterstock.com

3

Tuna salad sandwich 1 mini fruit-pie 1 single-serving bag of cheese curls

Make sure your child is involved in planning the lunch menu. Sit down together, and come up with ideas for the week. Make a game of trying new fruits and veggies. Getting your kids involved in trying new, healthy foods at an early age helps develop good eating habits for life. Try some of these ideas together:

Source: eatright.org

LUNCH

GOT A PICKY EATER?

QUICK BITES

Rocky’s Villa has long been a popular spot to eat in the Orange Lake area. Since buying the restaurant in 2010, owners John and Sandy Curtis have expanded the offerings. The three-section menu now features Italian, Mexican and American entrées. “A lot of people think it’s a weird combination, cartela / Shutterstock.com but it works for us,” says Sandy. Be sure to try the fried green tomatoes and end your meal with a dish of fried ice cream. Every day except Sunday, you’ll find six daily lunch specials for just $3.99 each. Happy hour is 3-6pm daily. Open for lunch and dinner seven days a week. 18505 N. US Hwy. 441, Orange Lake (352) 595-3000

QUICK BITES

El Rodeo Mexican Restaurant features a daily lunch buffet for just $6.45 seven days a week. You’ll find burritos, enchiladas, chimichangas, chile rellenos, chicken fajitas and more. You can also make your own taco salad or nachos at the buffet. There’s a full menu at lunch in addition to the buffet. Ask about the daily specials Monday through Friday. House margaritas are 2 for 1 all day on Mondays and Saturdays. On Nayashkova Olga / Shutterstock.com Thursdays, house margaritas are only $1.45 all day. El Rodeo is open for lunch and dinner seven days. Sunday through Thursday 11am-8pm. Friday and Saturday 11am-9pm. 10465 SE Hwy. 441, Belleview (352) 307-2480 Continued on page 68

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A T R IOSOF SALSA

SUMMER SALSAS O

N APRIL 22, OCALAN JULIE FAGAN DECLARED ON HER POPULAR BLOG PEANUT BUTTER FINGERS, “IF I DON’T CHOP ANOTHER VEGETABLE FOR A MONTH, I’LL BE A HAPPY CAMPER.” CHOPPING CAN BE A TEDIOUS WORKOUT FOR ANY COOK, BUT THE PROJECT WAS A LABOR OF LOVE FOR THE BLOGGER. NORTH AMERICA’S LARGEST FIELD TOMATO GROWER LIPMAN, LOCATED

IN IMMOKALEE, FLORIDA, TEAMED UP WITH JULIE AND 10 OTHER FOOD BLOGGERS FOR A NATIONWIDE COLLABORATION IN CELEBRATION OF THEIR NEW WEBSITE’S LAUNCH. JULIE CONTRIBUTED A “TRIO OF SALSAS” (RECIPES FOLLOW) FOR AN APPETIZER OPTION ON LIPMAN’S WEBSITE. VISIT LIPMANKITCHEN.COM FOR MORE TOMATO RECIPES AND PBFINGERS.COM FOR MORE RECIPES BY JULIE.

Mango Avocado Salsa Of the trio, this is Julie’s favorite! Photo courtesy of Peanut Butter Fingers, Julie Fagan

Fresh Salsa

3

Roma tomatoes, chopped (about 1 cup)

1

mango, peeled and sliced (about 1 cup)

2

tablespoons fresh cilantro, finely chopped

3

1

avocado, peeled and sliced

Roma tomatoes, chopped (about 1 cup)

2

1

teaspoon lime juice

tablespoons fresh cilantro, finely chopped

1

tablespoon lime juice

1⁄₈

teaspoon salt

1

cup sweet corn, uncooked and cut straight off the cob

Combine ingredients in a large bowl, and toss. Refrigerate for about 30 minutes. Serve on top of fish, with tortilla chips or as a side dish with your favorite meal.

1

cup black beans, rinsed and drained

This simple salsa would be great on huevos rancheros. ½ red onion, diced (about 2/3 cup) 4

Roma tomatoes, chopped (about 1 1/2 cup)

½ green pepper, chopped (about 2/3 cup) ½ cucumber, chopped (about 2/3 cup) 2

tablespoons fresh cilantro, finely chopped

1

tablespoon lime juice

¼ teaspoon salt Combine ingredients in a large bowl, and toss. Refrigerate for about 30 minutes. Serve on top of chicken, with tortilla chips, stirred into scrambled eggs or as a side dish with your favorite meal.

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Photo courtesy of Peanut Butter Fingers, Julie Fagan

Black Bean & Corn Salsa Beans and sweet corn make this salsa wholesomely irresistible. ½ red onion, diced (about 2/3 cup)

¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon cumin Combine ingredients in a large bowl, and toss. Refrigerate for about 30 minutes. Serve on top of chicken, with tortilla chips or as a side dish with your favorite meal.

Photo courtesy of Peanut Butter Fingers, Julie Fagan

Continued from page 67

QUICK BITES

Fisherman’s Restaurant celebrates its 21st anniversary this October. The Inverness eatery has made a name for itself with locals— and for good reason. Open for lunch and dinner Wednesday through Sunday, Fisherman’s Restaurant, owned by Bob and Vicki Root, is especially known for its huge, tasty shrimp, which can be ordered fried, grilled, blackened or coconut crusted. The SOMMAI / Shutterstock.com first Thursday of every month features baked stuffed fish; the second and fourth Thursdays (and the most popular) feature prime rib; and the third Thursday is the Turkey Feast. Reservations are accepted and recommended. Beer and wine served. Closed Monday and Tuesday. 12311 E. Gulf To Lake Hwy. (SR44), Inverness (352) 637-5888

QUICK BITES

Located in the Colony Plaza next to Publix, Sakura Japanese Restaurant has been open since early 2010, serving authentic Asian cuisine and specializing in Hannamariah / Shutterstock.com hibachi grill fare and sushi. There are always daily specials and house wine, and domestic beer is 2 for 1 every day during happy hour from Continued on page 70


DININGGUIDE

Tony’s Sushi & Steakhouse 3405 SW College Road, Ocala / (352) 237-3151 Mon-Thu 11a-10p / Fri & Sat 11a-11p / Sun 3p-10p Tony’s Sushi brings scrumptious sushi favorites from New York and Miami to Ocala, served in a fun, family environment. All sushi dishes are made to order—choose from a variety of specialty rolls or create your own! Whether you prefer chicken, steak or seafood, talented chefs will prepare it with dazzling showmanship on the hot grill right at your table. All entrées come with soup or salad and rice. In addition to the full Japanese kitchen, there is a full liquor bar and a beer selection, including imported Japanese beer and sake.

For the truly adventurous, try Tony’s famous Sake Bomb! We also provide catering and host private parties.

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http:/ / gettag.mobi

Tilted Kilt 3155 E. Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala / (352) 351-5458 / tiltedkilt.com Mon-Sat 11a-Midnight / Sun 11a-11p Looking for some fun with a great meal? Besides our great service, hospitality and delicious food, you’ll feel at home watching your favorite HD sporting events on the big screen TVs or enjoying live music on the patio. From poker to cruise-ins, there’s always something happening at the Tilted Kilt. Big or small, celebrate your next party or special occasion with us. Our menu features an array of options, from snacks to full meals, plus a complete bar, all served by beautiful lasses in kilts. You’ll want to make us your hometown pub. The Tilted Kilt – where a cold beer never looked so good!

Scan the code to view our complete menu and calendar of events. Or go to our website: Ocala.tiltedkilt.com

Get the free mobile app at

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The Attic’s Cafe 801 N. Magnolia Ave, Ocala / (352) 369-9300 Serving Lunch Mon-Sat 11a-3p Let’s talk about great food! Let’s talk about unique and fun! Let’s talk about the Attic’s Café! The Attic’s Café is located inside My Designer’s Attic. (You know, the “Not Your Average Furniture Consignment Store” located downtown.) Chef Andrew Dickson uses his culinary skills to create some of the best-tasting food around! Specializing in scrumptious galettes (savory crepes) and incredible dessert crepes, Chef Andrew also does a super job with his distinguished sandwiches, fresh salads and soups. Whether it’s his signature Roasted Veggi Galette with goat cheese, the Hot Night Club Sandwich or a fantastic lemon crepe, you can’t go wrong!

Located inside of My Designer’s Attic, in the heart of the old business district, 8 blocks north of the historic square! Don’t forget to explore the 8,000 sq ft of My Designer’s Attic after lunch!

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Continued from page 68

RECIPE RECAP

SUNDAYS @ 10:30A / FOX 51

THAT’S THE PREMISE OF THE COMMON CHEF. HERE, COMMON CHEF CHRIS BRACK RECAPS THEIR PAST EPISODES’ RECIPES. RECIPES MAKE THESE TASTY DISHES FOR A PARTY OF FOUR TO SIX AND THEY’RE SURE TO BE A HIT!

Rum Pineapple & Honey Glazed, Ham Threaded w/Bacon

Chicken Sausage Lettuce Wrap

Roasted Veggies

EPISODE 8

“The Most In ‘Shane’ Meal Eva!”

EPISODE 7

“The Most In ‘Shane’ Meal Eva!”

“Operation Delicious”

“The reaction to this dish was overwhelmingly good. It was a fun and hands on dish that everyone enjoyed. The crunch of the lettuce, mixed with the flavor of the chicken sausage and corn, was an unexpected hit.”

“One thing about us here at The Common Chef is that nothing is ordinary—in preparation or taste. A few of our guests were a bit worried that the veggies would turn out a bit ‘lackluster,’ and boy, were their concerns quelled quickly. Once the balsamic vinaigrette slowly cooked onto the veggies and mixed with the Krazy Salt, we made believers out of skeptics that night.”

“This dish was a hit from its conception just because of the idea. We had never attempted anything like this before, so we were unsure how the tastes would meld together. The biggest surprise came when we cut into the ham and the threaded bacon had actually melted into the center of the ham… Delicious!” 1 pineapple 1 large ham 2 cups Captain Morgan rum

70

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UYS IN A KITCHEN, THE NO PROFESSIONAL COMMON BACKGROUND, CHEF NO COOKING CLASSES—

1 head of leaf lettuce 2 pounds boneless skinless chicken breast

½ cup brown sugar

1 white onion

2 pounds thick sliced bacon

2 jalapeños

3 garlic cloves

1 teaspoon salt 1 tablespoon pepper

EPISODE 8

1 tablespoon Krazy Salt

1 green bell pepper

6 ears of corn

1 red bell pepper

1 pound red skin potatoes

1 yellow bell pepper

5 ounces extra virgin olive oil

1 red onion

5 ounces balsamic vinaigrette

Olive oil for frying

2 yellow squash

Skin the pineapple. Add ¼ of pineapple and rum into medium sauce pan. Set to medium heat. Once it starts to boil, add brown sugar. Stir to keep from burning. Sauce will start to thicken. Once it has a syrupy consistency, remove from heat and prepare to baste onto ham. Thread half a pound of bacon through ham using lard needle. Use toothpicks to wrap ham with remaining bacon. Cut half of remaining pineapple into circular slices, and attach to ham using toothpicks. Chunk remaining pineapple, and add it to the bottom of the baking pan. Cook at 325°F for 4 hours, basting with the glaze every 15 minutes.

Cut end from stalk of leaf lettuce. Separate and wash leaves, turn upside down and set to dry. Shuck and wash ears of corn. Cut kernels from cob, and place into bowl. Lightly drizzle with olive oil and Krazy Salt. Spread evenly on baking tray. Bake at 350°F for 30 minutes. Trim all fat from chicken breast and mince finely. Dice onion, garlic and jalapenos, and pan fry with a drizzle or two of olive oil. Once onions start to turn translucent, add chicken, salt, pepper and Krazy Salt. Thoroughly mix while pan frying. Take corn out of oven, and prepare to serve. Place lettuce curved side down, and put chicken mixture in the leaf lettuce and top with a spoonful of roasted corn.

DON’T MISS AN EPISODE!

GO TO THECOMMONCHEF.COM AND FLIP ON THE TUBE THIS MONTH TO WATCH THE CHEFS AT WORK ON FOX 51 AT 10:30AM ON SUNDAY MORNINGS.

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1 white onion 1 bunch green onion

3 tablespoons Krazy Salt

2 zucchinis Preheat oven to 325°F. Cut and core peppers, then slice into ¼-inch strips. Julienne onions, and mix into bowl with peppers. Cut zucchini, squash into half moons and add into mixture. Quarter potatoes, and add to mixture with oil, balsamic and Krazy Salt. Mix thoroughly to evenly coat entire mixture. Spread out on a baking tray, and bake for 35-45 (depending on how crispy you like your veggies) minutes.

Photos courtesy of PC House Productions

THE COMMON CHEF REMINISCES:

11am-6pm. Hibachi dishes feature a meat grilled with fresh vegetables and your choice of sauce. Every dish is prepared to order and spiciness can be adjusted to taste. The healthconscious will appreciate that meals are low in sodium, mildly seasoned and prepared with olive oil. Sakura is open for lunch and dinner seven days a week. 265 Colony Blvd., The Villages (352) 205-7393 (352) 205-7528 akurathevillages.com

QUICK BITES

The original Little Joey’s Italian Restaurant and Pizza, located on State Road 200 near On Top of the World, has been open for lunch and dinner for over 20 years. The Summerfield location opened eight years ago, and there’s also a third location in Citrus County. New York-style, hand-tossed pizza is a customer favorite. Family-owned, Little Joey’s specializes in consistent, fresh Italian fare in a friendly, casual setting, offering plenty of pasta entrées, veal, chicken, seafood and great combination dishes. Patrons say their antipasto salad is the best. Beer and wine are available. Open 4:008:30pm on Monday; 11am8:30pm Tuesday through Thursday. 16840 US Hwy. 27/441 (Baylee Plaza), Summerfield (352) 347-1800


DININGGUIDE

Kick n’ Back Café and Grille 14400 E Hwy 40, Silver Springs / (352) 289-4069 Tues-Sun 11a–9p / Closed Mon Take a ride out to the island in the forest at Kick n’ Back Café, where you’ll find Caribbean flare and fare. Conch fritters are a customer favorite, as well as the Cuban Mix: mojo marinated pork, Spanish ham and Swiss cheese on a special bread and pressed to perfection. Don’t miss out on our Mojo Chicken and pork entrée with black beans and yellow rice. We’re also known for our selection of seafood entrées, including fish, shrimp and scallops. Also, try the gator, served as an appetizer or entrée. Kick n’ Back offers a relaxing, casual, laidback atmosphere.

At Kick n’ Back Café, “It’s all good!” On East Highway 40, Downtown Lynne, FL - Between Ocala and the beach.

Guadalajara Mexican Restaurant 3355 SW College Rd, Ocala / (352) 671-9411 Weekdays 11am-10p / Weekends 11a-11p / Happy Hour Mon-Fri 2-7p If you crave a real taste of Mexico in a festive and colorful place accompanied by Mexican music. Guadalajara Mexican Restaurant is the best option. Delight in a variety of appetizers, meal combinations and daily specials. Lunch: Fajita Monday $7.95; Chimichanga Tuesday $5.50; Super Enchiladas Wednesday $5.49; Deluxe Taco Salad Thursday $4.95; Taco Enchilada Friday $4.95. Dinner: Tacos De Asada Monday $10.99; Super Burrito Tuesday $7.95; Chili Verde/Colorado Wednesday $9.95; #8 Two Burritos Thursday $8.50; Enchiladas Suizas Friday $7.99.

2 for 1 on all single drinks, shots, draft beer, wine, margaritas; topshelf excluded.

Iron Skillet 7401 W Hwy 318, Reddick / (352) 591-4842 Open 24 hours / 7 days a week Try the all-you-can-eat buffet at the Iron Skillet. In a hurry? Pick up some “homemade to go.” Try the famous downhome chicken-fried steak, which is skillfully cooked and served with creamy country gravy that includes a choice of one side and a trip to the soup and salad bar. Iron Skillet offers healthier options, too! Look for the “Stay Fit” symbol throughout the menu. Iron Skillet is only minutes from Ocala and The Villages. From I-75 take exit 368 (CR 318), and you’re there! Stop in, start saving and see why they’re the No. 1 Iron Skillet in the country!

Bring this ad and receive 20 percent off, and ask your server about a membership card. Wed & Sat BBQ buffet; Friday seafood buffet; breakfast buffet every day. Kids eat free with paying adult through September.

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DININGGUIDE

Bamboo Bistro 700 North Hwy 441 (In Front of Target), Lady Lake / (352) 750-9998 Mon-Thu 11a-9:30p / Fri-Sat 11a-10p / Sun Noon-9p Chef Wu and co-owner Jian Daniels have created a wonderful new Asian Fusion dining experience in town that manages to be both elegant and casual.

Celebrating one year in business! Experience the unique and unforgettable taste of Bamboo Bistro in The Villages! Offering Asian dishes from China, Japan, Vietnam and Thailand along with a full sushi bar, Chef Wu incorporates the best variety of authentic Asian ingredients while using an array of cooking techniques. Our specialties include Peking Duck, Pepper Seared Filet Mignon and Seafood Delight, along with other seafood choices. Many wok entrées and noodle dishes are available as well. A variety of Asian beers and the extensive wine list will complement any meal.

Mesa de Notte 2436 E Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala / (352) 732-4737 / mesaocala.com Mon–Fri 11a-10p / Sat & Sun 3p-10p / Additional parking in rear. Happy hour from 3-7pm House wine or Domestic Beer 2 for 1 special! 2012 Taste of Ocala 1st place winner for best presentation & peoples choice! Catering Available.

Chef Jose Moreno says “Benvenuti a Mesa de Notte” (Welcome to Table of the Night) an Italiano vero, fine dining experience you won’t forget. Traditional Italian cuisine, as well as unique specialty dishes, are all served with gourmet pasta made in-house at Mesa de Notte. Mesa de Notte uses only the freshest ingredients, including fresh seafood and vegetables, hand-cut steaks, veal, duck and more. Complete your meal with one of 13 delicious sauces, all rooted in Italy, such as livernese, puttanesca, frances, pomodoro, bolognaise, pesto, vodka, piccata, oil and garlic. Enjoy a glass of “vino” from over 80 international fine wines, many served by the glass, or maybe a nice bottle of cold beer. Come enjoy! Or let us cater your special occasions!

The Ivy House Restaurant 106 NW Main Street, Williston / (352) 528-5410 / ivyhousefl.com Sun-Wed 11a-2p / Thur-Sat 11a-8p For more information on catering, please contact Waica Huggins or Evelyn Nussel at wmhivyhouse@yahoo.com. No reservations are required, but a courtesy call for parties of more than 10 is appreciated. Full-service catering, Gift ShopBoutique. 917 E Silver Springs Blvd, Ocala ( Coming Soon! )

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Tucked comfortably in the heart of Williston, this family-owned establishment is a pleasure to visit. The restaurant has been named by Florida Trend as one of the “Top 500 Best Places to Eat in the State” for several years now. Lunch is served seven days a week and features a Southern-style daily special, and supper is served Thursday, Friday and Saturday evenings only. Specials include Southern Fried Lobster, delicious steaks and their famous Baked Krispy Chicken, along with a complete full menu.


DININGGUIDE

Cuvée Wine & Bistro 2237 SW 19th Ave Rd, Ste. 102, Ocala / (352) 351-1816 / cuveewineocala.com Mon-Thu 5p-10p / Fri & Sat 5p-11p / Happy Hour 5p-7p Experience the ultimate in fine dining with fabulous wine and culinary classics at Cuvée Wine & Bistro. Relax with a glass of wine or indulge in an elegant dinner, and let us transport you to an intimate world with impeccable service and exquisite cuisine. Embrace the age-old relationship between food and wine by sampling over 104 wines on our interactive wine system. An unforgettable experience awaits you...

Whether a beginner or a connoisseur, our knowledgeable and friendly staff will be ready to assist you. Private rooms and off-premise catering available. Happy Hour 5-7pm/Monday half priced bottles of wine/Thursday $5 Martinis

Scan here with your smartphone to access cuveewineocala.com

17th Street Deli 2506 SE 17th St., Ocala / (352) 369-DELI (3354) Mon-Sat 10a-9p / Closed Sundays 17th St Deli is a family-owned business and the perfect place to stop for a tasty lunch. All meats are roasted—corn beef, pastrami and roast beef. If it is not made in house, they exclusively carry Boar’s Head. 17th St Deli makes delicious deli salads, cold and hot sandwiches, and wraps. A standout signature sandwich is the New Yorker, which is topped with corned beef, pastrami and melted provolone cheese, with sauerkraut or cole slaw, and Russian dressing.

Home of the Supreme Free delivery (minimum $15). We accept cash and all major credit cards (no checks).

Scan here for a direct link to 17th Street Deli’s Menu

El Toreo 3790 E Silver Springs Boulevard, Ocala / (352) 694-1401 / 7 Days 11a-10p SR 200, Ocala / (352) 291-2121 / 7 Days 11a-11p Happy Hour Daily 4p-7p New lunch specials include Taco Salad on Monday, $3.95; Speedy Gonzalez on Tuesdays, $3.95; Quesadillas on Wednesday, $5.45; Chimichangas on Thursdays, $4.95; and Burrito Supreme on Fridays, $3.95. New dinner options include Fajita Mondays, $7.95; Chimichanga Tuesdays, $6.95; Alambre Wednesdays, $6.95; Tacos de Bistec Thursdays, $6.95; and Enchilada Fridays, $6.95. Don’t miss “Margarita Mondays” with $1.95 margaritas. On Tuesdays, kids 12 and under - 99¢ from the children’s menu (takeout not included). Wednesday is 99¢ margaritas and $1.95 for domestic and imported beers. Saturday is 2-for-1 margaritas all day.

Join us every day for happy hour from 4-7p and get 2-for-1 wells or drafts. Whether it’s delicious food, great drinks or a festive atmosphere, there are more reasons than ever to visit either El Toreo location today.

THE BEST MEXICAN FOOD

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alads may be touted as that stereotypical dish that women on a date choose while the men scarf down a juicy, rare steak, but now’s the time to squash that stereotype and spear so-called rabbit food with your prongs proudly.

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cardiac arrest, beer bellies and the lingering smell of sauerkraut after a Coney dog, I searched through fields of greens, bleu cheese crumbles and plump cherry tomatoes to find out what makes salad a power meal, how you can ruin a salad and how to make a hearty dish of crispy greens with the works.

By

Like a healthy version of a tall latte with a pump of vanilla syrup, drizzle of caramel and extra shot of espresso, a salad is a food you can customize and make your own. It’s almost like saying, “Caesar? Caesar who?” when you throw on a handful of this and a splash of that. Be wary, however, of the unhealthy salad (cue suspenseful music, please); a sad truth: yes, an oxymoron: no. On a quest where I don’t have to worry about beef-love-induced

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Vitamin, Mineral, Vegetable

No one wants to sound like a broken record, but here it is: Salad is good for you. But why can’t people give you a more in-depth reason besides “you should eat your vegetables”? Because they’d still be explaining salad’s health benefits long after you finish the last cucumber slice! Here is a mere appetizer of reasons why you shouldn’t pass on your greens. Fiber: You’ve seen the Fiber

One commercials, instilling how fiber is an important part of your diet. Eating a fiber-rich meal lowers cholesterol levels and helps control weight by making people feel fuller. Try getting your fiber the natural way—no hard-toopen wrapper or artificial flavor— with a delicious and nourishing salad.

Antioxidants: Dark green and orange veggies

contribute to higher blood levels of antioxidants (vitamin C and E, folic acid, lycopene and alpha- and beta-carotene), which protect your body from free radicals, thus lowering your risk of disease and cancer. Fat: You read that right! “Good fats,” or monounsaturated fats found in olive oil, avocado and nuts, help your body absorb phytochemicals, which protect against cancer and heart disease. Plus, consuming olive oil has been linked to reduced mortality. So, think twice when you consider skipping the salad course. Eating a salad with the right ingredients is your insurance for a healthier and longer life. Source: webmd.com

Sinister Salads

A salad loaded with bacon, croutons, fried chicken and drenched in creamy ranch is the picture of temptation and deception. It’s what I’d like to dub the “everything on a bed of lettuce illusion.” You figure, “What the heck? A salad’s a salad; I’ll toss in whatever I want.” But that throwing-caution-to-thewind mentality will get you nowhere. Don’t fall prey to sinister salads! Take action by following the advice below. » A half cup of croutons can contain as many as 100 calories, and bacon bits are loaded with fat and artificial ingredients. If you want that extra crunch, try adding seeds or nuts; the omega-3 fatty acids are good for your heart and nervous system, and the fiber helps your digestion. » Adding meat to make your salad a wholesome meal with plenty of protein is

a good idea—with the right meat. Fried chicken strips and processed sandwich meats will turn your herbivore delight into a carnivorous catastrophe. Try skinless, grilled slices of chicken, and remember, say baloney to bologna! » Cheese makes me melt on the spot. I always say bring on the feta! Gorgonzola! Oozing waterfall of bleu! Cheese is a great source for calcium and protein, but don’t be too generous

Salad © Anna Maltseva, Fork © Tomislav Stajduhar; Croutons © cristi180884 / Shutterstock.com

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Source: nutrition.about.com

It takes no time to make a salad, but don’t miss out on these local creations. Grab these delicious bowls on the go or share the green on a lunch date.

The Loco-if-you-don’t-tryit Salad Latinos Y Mas 2030 S Pine Ave, Ocala Want to have a salad that’ll put some spring in your salsa step? Then try the South of the Border Chicken Salad:

Getting the Skinny from Skinnytaste

Gina Homolka, author, recipe developer and photographer of Skinnytaste.com, has blogged about original, family-friendly, low-fat recipes since 2008. Gina’s recipes have been featured in national magazines, and she recently received Fitness Magazine’s 2012 Fitterati Blogger Award for Best Healthy Eating Blog. In a brief interview, Gina shares her salad tips and avocado-themed recipes. If you could choose only three ingredients to go in a salad, what would they be? Arugula, fresh shaved Parmesan and a drizzle of olive oil.

What are healthy choices for salads?

I think of color when making a salad, combining fruit, vegetables and heart-healthy nuts. To make a salad a main dish, throw in some lean protein, such as shrimp or grilled chicken, or even grains, such as quinoa or farro.

What are unhealthy salad choices?

Bacon? Fried chicken cutlets? I think everything in moderation works, but when watching calories, limit your dressing or make your own so you know what is going into it.

How can people make salads more interesting?

Think color, texture, and play around using different lettuce varieties. Photo courtesy of Gina Homolka

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romaine and iceberg lettuce, carrots, tomatoes, red onions, roasted corn, black beans, shredded Monterey Jack, cheddar cheese and tortilla chips topped with grilled chicken and served with chipotle dressing.

Skinnytaste Avocado Cilantro Buttermilk Dressing This creamy avocado dressing is low-carb, gluten-free, vegetarian and great over a grilled chicken salad. Makes 1 1/3 cups

¾ cup low-fat buttermilk 1

small jalapeno

¼ cup cilantro 1

medium Hass avocado

1

clove garlic

2

tablespoons chopped scallion Juice of 1 lime

1⁄8

teaspoon cumin

¼ teaspoon ground pepper ½ teaspoon kosher salt

Photo courtesy of Gina Homolka

» Oily and soggy leaves drowning in your salad bowl isn’t the most appetizing image. Besides keeping an eye on serving size when it comes to dressing—two tablespoons can land you 100 to 200 calories—try fresh lemon or lime juice, salsa, jam, yogurt or hummus for substitutes. Think you’re home-free with reduced-fat salad dressing? Think again! To compensate for flavor by taking away fat, sugar and salt are added, upping the amount of calories in your thousand island. It’s better to go with the regular stuff in moderation or make your own.

Oliver Hoffmann / Shutterstock.com

with your servings. Half to one ounce of any cheese is just enough.

Lettuce Eat

Combine all ingredients in blender, and blend until smooth. For thinner consistency, add more buttermilk; for thicker, add less. Remove seeds from jalapeno for a less spicy dressing. Can be refrigerated for up to a few days.

Skinnytaste Grilled Chicken Avocado Mango Salad

Avocados shouldn’t get all the street cred. Mangos are an excellent source of beta-carotene, vitamins, potassium and fiber. They also protect you against breast and colon cancer. Serves 4 1

12-ounce grilled chicken breast, sliced (from 1 pound raw)

2

tablespoons olive oil

2

tablespoons white balsamic vinegar Salt and fresh cracked pepper, to taste

1

cup avocado, diced

1

cup mango, diced (from 1 1/2 mangos)

2

tablespoons red onion, diced

6

cups baby red butter lettuce (regular baby lettuce can be used)

Whisk together first three ingredients for vinaigrette, and set aside. Toss avocado, mango, chicken and red onion together. Fill large salad platter with lettuce, top with chicken/avocado mixture and drizzle half the vinaigrette on top. Serve with remaining dressing if desired.

Visit skinnytaste.com for more recipes by Gina. Source: nutrition-and-you.com


The Fit to be Served on Mount Olympus Salad

Genesis Heaven & Health 304-C SW Broadway, Ocala Hailing from California, owner Mark Ramirez opened a tranquil little juice bar downtown where you can dine in to enjoy your

freshly made feast. From the Sensational Salad menu, consider the Hercules, a salad with crisp romaine lettuce, organic carrots and spinach, feta, their famous homemade hummus, tabbouleh and tahini yogurt sauce.

The Simply Stellar House Salad

Stella’s Modern Pantry 20 SW Broadway St, Ocala I was tempted to dub Stella’s house salad the “it’s the only salad on the menu, but I love it salad,” but that seemed a tad excessive. The

house salad is composed of mixed greens, sundried tomatoes, roasted peppers, marinated onions, Greek olives, pine nuts, shaved parmesan, homemade croutons and house dressing. I like to add artichoke hearts, as well!

Fast Food, Healthy Food

Signature Summer Salad

Ron says this salad’s a customer favorite! Makes 1-2 servings

1

¼ cup gorgonzola

cup lettuce

¼ cup mandarin oranges 1⁄3

Candied pecans for garnish

cup Gala apples, sliced

¼ cup strawberries, sliced ¼ cup red onions, sliced 21⁄3 cup smoked turkey, torn

Combine all ingredients in bowl. Serve with tortilla chips and dressing. (Crispers uses herb citrus.)

Polynesian Crab Stack Salad

Avocado Salsa

Makes 1-2 servings

½ avocado, diced

Have leftover avocado and mango? Hungry for seafood? Stop being a crab and toss!

An essential Polynesian Crab Stack Salad ingredient. ¼ cup tomatoes, diced

1

ounce lettuce

1⁄3

cup carrots, shredded

Black pepper, to taste

1⁄3

cup red cabbage, shredded

Juice of half a lemon

¼ cup cucumbers, sliced 1⁄3

cup avocado salsa (recipe follows)

¼ cup red onion, sliced 1⁄3

cup mangos, diced

1⁄3

cup crab meat Cilantro for garnish

Combine all ingredients in bowl. Serve with tortilla chips and dressing. (Crispers uses herb citrus.)

1

teaspoon cilantro, chopped

Mix all ingredients in bowl and mix gently. Keep refrigerated.

Photo courtesy of Crispers

Founded in 1989 in Lakeland, Crispers’ primary goal was to become a healthy alternative in a sea of fast food joints. The typical burger and fries menu is replaced with non-greasy sandwiches, nourishing soups and satisfying salads. “We provide a fresh alternative to the marketplace today,” says Crispers’ CEO Ron Fuller. Salads are made fresh, fast and flavorful with ingredients coming from local providers whenever possible, depending on the season. Over the course of Crispers’ history, the company has expanded its menu with flatbread salads and became privately owned in July 2011. “We’re now in the process of remodeling,” says Ron. “The Ocala location will be undergoing a new, exciting look and feel by mid-August.” Ron allowed us a few recipes from Crispers’ menu for you to make at home. No time for slicing and dicing? Order online at crispers. com, and pick-up or dine-in at their Ocala location: 2604 SW 19th Avenue Road.

Photo courtesy of Crispers

Last November, the hit TV show The Doctors rounded up the healthiest and least healthy cities in the U.S. Of the 100 metro areas they studied, West Palm Beach, Florida, took the title as Biggest Salad Lovers. But West Palm Beach shouldn’t be the only recipient of a golden salad tongs trophy; perhaps all of Florida has a weak spot for their Greek and Caesar. Florida-based Crispers, a restaurant chain with salads as its star attraction, proves there’s more to Florida than oranges—especially when we incorporate oranges into a salad.

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NOW REGISTERING FOR FALL

DANCE

Scan here for more information

CLASSES

• Ages 3 & Up • Beginner through Professional • A Higher Quality of Dance Training! • VPK Wrap-Around Care Available • FREE VPK (Summer & School Year) • Before & After School Programs • Care for 6 wks - 12 Years Like Us on • Summer Camp Facebook • Drop-In Care • Night and Weekend Care • Parent’s Night Out (Every Friday & Saturday) • Children Learn Spanish and Sign Language • Fun & Educational Curriculums for all ages • Meals are FREE: Breakfast, Lunch, Afternoon Snack and Dinner • FREE Formula & Fresh Baby Food • Staff is Certified, Background Checked and Drug Tested • ELCMC & Military Assistance Accepted • Conveniently located next to I-75, Exit 341, in plaza behind McDonalds

Offering classes in Ballet, Tap, Jazz, Hip-Hop, Breakdancing (B-Boy), Lyrical/ Contemporary, Pointe and More!

CLASSROOM VIEWING AT ALL TIMES

EXTENSIONS

License# CO5MA0061

230 3 Jac ksonvi l l e R oad | Ocala | 352. 694. 0601

Celebrating

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& A ST H M A Y G R ALLE FLORIDA

Years

F CARE O

Food Allergies?

Are you concerned about possible food allergies? School will be back in session soon, and getting tested for food allergies will help you know what to avoid.

I NFANT, TODDLER , PR E-S CHO OL, K IN DE RG A RT E N & E L E M E N TA RY

2 9 6 7 N . E . SI LV E R SP R I N G S B LV D, O C A L A , F L 3 4 4 7 0

MON T ES S OR I PREPAR ATORY S C H O OL OF O C A L A

EXTRA-CURRICULUM ACTIVITIES ■ S p a n i s h ■ C h i n e s e ■ A r t ■ B a l l e t ■

■ M u s i c ■ K a r a t e ■ S o c c e r ■ “We are not like traditional schools, but one with a dynamic and stimulating environment that prepares each individual child.”

-Martha Isaza,DIRECTOR.

Call us to make an appointment today!

352.351.3140

Why Choose Us?

Each child is an individual and we integrate a Rebecca B. Long, ARNP

G. Edward Stewart II, MD

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Physicians Board Certified by the American Board of Allergy and Immunology

We offer personal and prompt service. Same-day appointments are often available. We accept most insurance plans and payment plans are available. No referral required.

1500 SE Magnolia Extension, Suites 203 & 204 • Ocala, FL

352.622.1126 | aacfinc.com

Now Enrolling Clinical Research Studies! Call 629-2223 for info.

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comprehensive learning experience by including concrete, abstract and memorizing techniques.

REGISTER N OW! LAST SPOT AVAILA

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50% OFF

REGISTRATI ON FEE.


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Let The Combat Begin p80

Get Bowled Over! p80

Rodeo Days p80

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Social Scene p90

and more!

PENCILS, PAPER AND NOTEBOOKS,

OH MY!

P

Aug

11

ARENTS EVERYWHERE BUYING NEW SCHOOL WILL SPEND THE MONTH OF AUGUST STAPLES AND A SLEW WARDROBES, PLENTY OF LUNCH BOX PARENTS MAY BE REJO OF SCHOOL SUPPLIES. AND WHILE KIDS EVERYWHERE AR ICING ABOUT THEIR UPCOMING FREEDOM RING OF THE SCHOOL E DREADING THE COUNTDOWN TO THE FIRS, TO THE MARTIN LUTHERBELL. GET THEM EXCITED BY TAKING A TRIP T FOR THE ANNUAL BACK KING RECREATION COMPLEX ON AUGUST BACKPACKS, AND SEAR TO SCHOOL BASH. PICK OUT COOL NEW 11 FOR THOSE PERFECT PECH THROUGH A SEA OF SCHOOL SUPPLIES HEALTH SERVICES PROVNCILS AND PENS. THERE WILL ALSO BE HAND TO GET EVERYONE IDED AND SOME GREAT ENTERTAINMENT YEAR! THE EVENT RUNS EXCITED ABOUT THE START OF THE SCHO ON PRESENT WITH THEIR FROM 10AM-2PM, AND PARENTS MUST BEOL TO GET EVERYONE READCHILD. DON’T MISS OUT ON THIS FUN EVEN ARITHMETIC! (352) 40 Y FOR PLENTY OF READING, WRITING AN T D 1-5505.

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Get Packin’

CRUISE ON IN TO THE CARIBBEAN Get a glimpse of Caribbean culture at the JAMAICA/ CARIBBEAN CULTURE FESTIVAL

at the Ocala Equestrian Complex. On hand to recognize Jamaica’s 50 years of Independence will be several solo performers and music groups, including Fab 5, Allison Hinds, Danny B and the Red Eyes, and many more!

Bring the whole family, and be sure to visit the KID ZONE with the youngsters. Doors open at noon, and the music begins at 2pm. Tickets are $20 in advance, $25 at the gate and $5 for kids under 12. Proceeds benefit the American Legion and The Centers. (786) 552-2154 or

Aug

4

Help your child get a head start on the school year with a brand-new backpack full of supplies. THE NICKEL TILE FOUNDATION will host the 4th Annual Free Backpack Drive at Nickel Tile on Highway 441 in Ocala. 2,000 backpacks are stuffed with pens, pencils and a whole slew of supplies just waiting to be handed out to the children of Marion County. The gates open at 8am, and the backpacks are handed out on a first-come, first-served basis until all the packs are gone. The backpacks are available to kids in grades K-12, and they must be present to receive them. For more information or to donate supplies, contact (352) 304-0207.

(352) 812-2921.

YOU’LL BE

Aug

26

FOOD FIGHT

Well, not a literal food fight, but there will be a battle at the Hilton on August 26, as three of Ocala’s best chefs go head-to-head in the kitchen. CULINARY COMBAT IV will face reigning champion Chef James Schuman of Cuvee Wine Bistro against opponents Chef Patrice Perrone of La Cuisine and Chef Loring Felix of the Braised Onion. Each of these culinary artists will have to prepare an appetizer, entrée and dessert using the “secret ingredient” that will only be revealed to them moments before the competition begins. See who reigns supreme in Ocala’s top cooking competition. culinarycombat.com or (401) 993-7189.

RIDE EM’ COWBOYS!

AUGUST 31-SEPTEMBER 1

Grab your cowboy hats and boots, and make your way to the Southeastern Livestock Pavilion for the 30TH ANNUAL OCALA SHRINE RODEO. Watch these rough and tough wranglers bull ride, barrel race and hang on to the bucking broncos! The money raised benefits the Shriners Hospitals for Children. The doors open at

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5:30pm, and the action gets underway at 7:30pm. A special patients’ rodeo will take place at 6pm on Saturday. Advance tickets are $14, $16 at the gate and kids under 5 get in free. And don’t forget, the arena is covered, so the show will go on rain or shine! ocalashriners.com or

(352) 402-8808.

BOWLED OVER!

THROUGH SEPTEMBER 3 If you’re tired of spending your days at the pool, stop by any of the three AMF BOWLING LANES in Ocala where kids can give bowling a try for free! Kids 15 and under can register for two free games per day, every day through September 3. This offer is good until 8pm at AMF Galaxy East (352) 694-1111, AMF Galaxy West (352) 732-0300 and AMF Ocala Bowl (352) 732-7355.

Or you can register online to receive your free vouchers. freebowling.amf.com

Bowling © Losevsky Photo and Video; Tomato © Picsfive; Flag © ayzek; Hat © Lou Oates; Backpack © Kim Reinick / Shutterstock.com

Aug


PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

Students who graduate from THE SALON PROFESSIONAL ACADEMY in The Villages learn to master the latest techniques in hair design and cosmetology and are prepared to start their careers the moment they step outside the door.

To Be The Best, You Have To

LEARN FROM THE BEST I

f you want a career in the cosmetology field, you go to the best school of cosmetology you can find. The Salon Professional Academy in The Villages is one of the top cosmetology schools in the country and transforms those with an interest in beauty into top artists in their field by graduation. And

When I walked in the door, I was awestruck. It was like being in New York. —BRANDON JOHNSON

they just couldn’t compare. The energy, the enthusiasm of teachers and students, it’s just like being in a real salon.” Carey believes wholeheartedly that her education prepared her for her job today working at Disney’s Magic Kingdom’s Bibbidi Bobbidi Boutique. “When I graduated, I felt like I had been working in a salon the whole time. It gave me so much confidence,” she says, while enthusiastically encouraging anyone considering a career in to just When I graduated, beauty “go for it.” I felt like I had been “If you’re even working in a salon kind of the whole time. It considering it, go take gave me so much a tour, and confidence. you’ll be —CAREY WILLIAMS blown away,” she says. Brandon Johnson, also a “As soon TSPA graduate and owner of Royal as I walked Elegance Salon in Leesburg, feels in the door, the same way about his experience. I said, ‘This is “When I walked in the door, I it,’” she says was awestruck. It was like being in exuberantly. New York,” he says, admitting the “We checked out a few other “glitz and glam” of the Big Apple has always been a major attraction schools, but

though the curriculum spans only nine short months, the education is rigorous, providing students with the tools they need to make it in the high-energy, fast-paced beauty industry. Recent graduate Carey Williams knew she wanted to be a part of this highenergy atmosphere from the moment she took her first tour.

for him. Along with learning to work in a fast-paced, high-intensity salon atmosphere, Brandon says the techniques he learned while at TSPA were invaluable. “I learned how to cut and shape hair based on the client’s facial structure, different cutting techniques and how to create color using color levels—all of those tools shaped me into the artist I am today,” he says. He offers this advice to anyone considering a career in this field: “Dare to be different. I am the perfect example of why someone should choose TSPA. My success as a stylist is something I owe all to TSPA.” Both Carey and Brandon agree that, for those interested in a career in beauty, The Salon Professional Academy should be tops on their list of schools. The NYC-inspired facility and salon-quality atmosphere, combined with classroom instruction by experienced educators and handson experience, shape these students into top, sought-after professionals in the beauty industry.

The Salon Professional Academy 11915 CR 103, The Villages Admissions: (352) 753-5511 Appointments: (352) 259-6717 thevillagestspa.com

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Scene

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A QUICK

Q& A

CRAVIN’ CHILI?

This is the 31st year of the event. Why do you think it’s so popular?

Interview by Bonnie Kretchik

C

HILI FANS, GET READY! IT’S ALMOST YOUR FAVORITE TIME OF YEAR! REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN FOR THE 31ST ANNUAL MARION COUNTY CHILI COOK-OFF, AND IT’S TIME TO START FORMING YOUR TEAM AND COOKING UP YOUR CHILI CONCOCTION. EACH YEAR, AREA BUSINESSES, ORGANIZATIONS, CHURCH GROUPS AND ANYONE ELSE INTERESTED IN SOME GOOD OL’ CHILI-COOKING FORM TEAMS AND GO HEAD-TOHEAD TO SEE WHO MAKES THE MEANEST POT OF CHILI AROUND. PENNY TERRY HELPS MAKE THIS EVENT, WHICH BENEFITS THE CORNERSTONE SCHOOL, A SUCCESS EACH YEAR AND TOOK SOME TIME TO ANSWER SOME OF OUR QUESTIONS.

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Many reasons. The first is that we try to keep it affordable. There is something there for any age to enjoy, and we want the entire family to look forward to it every year. We have a children’s area with bounce houses and games, live entertainment and, of course, over 40 different chilies to sample. Also, it is an event you can count on whether rain or shine due to the covered arena.

adults both loved. Last year, a returning team had an Amish theme, with a working stove and refrigerator in their booth with NO electricity, and the team captain even grew a beard just for the booth. He immediately shaved it off that night after the event.

Are most of the chili recipes pretty traditional, or have you sampled some unique chilies as well?

Who can register for the competition? Absolutely anyone.

The chili that is served to the public is definitely varied. There are the traditional chilies, but we also have unique ones. Recently, white chili has become popular. We have also had some with other types of meat. And there are the chilies with that special spice that everyone tries to figure out.

How many people constitute a team?

Well, there are the judges’ awards, and the people’s choice

WANT TO SIGN UP?

The teams do more than serve up some great chili, what kind of booth-decorating ideas have you seen in the past that really wowed the judges? Who won last year, One year there was a Harry and why do you Potter theme, where every think their team team member dressed up as stood out? a character. There was also a pirate theme that kids and

awards. The People’s Choice Booth went to Brooklyn’s Original Pizzeria, and they were first-timers. They had a New York gangster-style restaurant display, and each team member dressed and acted the part. Interaction with the public is a big part of getting the votes.

A team can be from one to six people per booth.

What’s one piece of advice you offer this year’s teams? Have fun! The competition gets tougher every year with the booths and the chili. But if you set your mind to just having a great time, win or lose, you will love it.

Registration is now open, and teams can register online or by mail. Visit marioncountychilicookoff.org or call (352) 867-6929 for details. Registration is $60 if registered by September 6 or $70 if registered by October 5. Late registration is available after October 5, if space is available, for $80.

THE 31ST ANNUAL MARION COUNTY CHILI COOK-OFF

Southeastern Livestock Pavilion / marioncountychilicookoff.org / (352) 867-6929

Chili © Inga Nielsen / Shutterstock.com

W/ PENNY TERRY


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ALL DATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE, SO PLEASE CALL AHEAD TO CONFIRM VENUE LISTINGS.

WHO

WHERE

WHEN

American Idol Live

Amway Center, Orlando

08/02

Bush

The Ritz Ybor, Tampa

08/02

Rod Stewart/Stevie Nicks

Amway Center, Orlando

08/03

Jason Aldean

1-800-ASK-GARY Amphitheatre, Tampa

08/08

Jason Aldean

Jacksonville Veterans Mem. Arena

08/09

Jason Mraz

1-800-ASK-GARY Amphitheatre, Tampa

08/14

Adema

Blues Rock, Jacksonville

08/18

Santana

1-800-ASK-GARY Amphitheatre, Tampa

08/26

Creed

Saenger Theatre, Pensacola

08/31

Who Said That? Ever wonder what animals would say if they could talk? Well,

Aug

tion! He brings to life the world of dogs, cats, birds and even the tiniest of insects on stage in this hilarious comedy for the whole family. Find out why flamingos stand on one leg and what the spiders says to the fly trapped in their webs. This one-of-a-kind play comes to the Ocala Civic Theatre August 10 and 11 with performances at 7pm on Friday and 2pm and 7pm on Saturday. Tickets are $10 for adults and $6 for students. ocalacivictheatre.com or (352) 236-2274.

PERFORMING ARTS

AUG’12

Javier Brosch / Shutterstock.com

10-11 Bryan Starchman’s BORN TO BE WILD answers that very ques-

WHO

WHERE

WHEN

Wiggles

Florida Theatre, Jacksonville

08/02

Shakespeare in the Park: The Tempest

Ocala Civic Theatre, Ocala

08/03-04

Wiggles

Hard Rock Live, Orlando

08/04

Born To Be Wild

Ocala Civic Theatre, Ocala

08/10-11

George Trullinger

Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

08/11

Jim Gaffigan

Florida Theatre, Jacksonville

08/11

Legends of Doo Wop

Orange Blossom Opry, Weirsdale

08/25

Adam Carolla

House of Blues, Orlando

08/26

AIR FORCE ASSOCIATION MEMBER MEETINGS (ONGOING) The local chapter of the Air Force Association is currently looking for new members. Meetings are held at the Ocala Airport on the third Thursday of every month at 7pm. afa.org or (352) 854-8328.

Ocala will host a variety of classes throughout the month at the Cherished Bride Manor, including yoga, core strength, cardio dance, Zumba, art and others. Visit their website for specific times and dates. Pre-registration is required. thecherishedbride.com or (352) 572-7351.

APPLETON EXHIBITS (ONGOING) The Appleton Biennial 2012: Florida Installation Art will be on display through August 12. The exhibit will feature some of the most unique and thought-provoking works by Florida’s finest instillation artists. appletonmuseum.org or (352) 291-4455.

CIRCLE SQUARE COMMONS FARMERS MARKETS (ONGOING) Circle Square Commons will host a farmers market on Thursdays from 9am-1pm.

LIBRARY PROGRAMS (ONGOING) The Marion County Public Library will host a variety of programs for children and adults throughout the month. Call for a complete list or to register. (352) 368-4508. ART MINI-CAMPS AND WORKSHOPS (ONGOING) The Artist Hub of Ocala will offer a variety of camps and workshops for kids in grades K-8 this summer. Programs include watercolors, ceramics, drawing and more. Call for dates, times, prices and to register. (352) 867-9660. OCALA CIVIC THEATRE SUMMER CLASS SERIES (ONGOING) The Ocala Civic Theatre will host a number of different summer classes for kids of all ages throughout the summer months. Call for dates and registration prices. ocalacivictheatre.com or (352) 236-2274. CLASSES AT THE MANOR (ONGOING) The Artist Hub of

ADULT CONTINUING EDUCATION REGISTRATION

(Ongoing) MASTER THE POSSIBILITIES EDUCATION CENTER located in the Circle Square Commons Town Center offers over 250 classes and presentations throughout the summer months. Registration is now open for the summer programs. Visit the website or call for a catalog. masterthepossibilities.com or (352) 854-3699. Continued on page 86

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Aaron Amat / Shutterstock.com

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SPORTS

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Aug. 2

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Aug. 9

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Aug. 3

Astros

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Aug. 20

Royals

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Aug. 4

Astros

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Aug. 21

Royals

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Aug. 5

Astros

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Aug. 22

Royals

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Aug. 13

Padres

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Aug. 23

Athletics

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Aug. 14

Padres

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Aug. 24

Athletics

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Aug. 15

Padres

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Aug. 25

Athletics

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Aug. 16

Padres

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Aug. 17

Dodgers

7:35p

MIAMI MARLINS

Aug. 18

Dodgers

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Aug. 10

Dodgers

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Aug. 19

Dodgers

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Aug. 11

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Aug. 31

Phillies

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Aug. 12

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Aug. 13

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Aug. 14

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Aug. 15

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Aug. 4

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Aug. 28

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Orioles

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Aug. 29

Nationals

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Aug. 7

Blue Jays

7:10p

Aug. 31

Mets

7:10p

7:10p

FAMILY FUN NIGHT (AUGUST 2) Bring the whole family to the Jervey Gantt Aquatic Center from 7:15-9pm. There will be music, games and a good time for the entire family. (352) 401-3918. APPRAISAL-THON (AUGUST 2) The 4th annual Appraisal-thon will be held from 9am-12pm at the Queen of Peace church, located on SR 200 just west of I-75, to benefit the Ocala Honor Flight. Each item appraised is only $5. (352) 598-3720.

children for the 10am showing of a family film. The August 2 film will be Monsters vs. Aliens and the August 9 film will be Megamind. Admission includes popcorn, a drink and the movie. (352) 622-1245. PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT (AUGUST 3) Drop your kids off for an evening of science and entertainment at the Discovery Center while you enjoy a night out. Price is $15 and includes snacks. mydiscoverycenter.org or (352) 401-3900.

SUMMER FUN 4 KIDS (AUGUST 2, 9) The Marion Theatre will offer $2 admission on August 2 and 9 for adults and

DRIVE SOME

4150 N US Highway 441 Sales 888.286.7168 Service 800.278.9510

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SHALOM PARK YOGA (AUGUST 4) A free yoga class will take place the first Saturday of the month through November. Class begins at 9am. (352) 854-7950. FIRST SATURDAY CHILDREN’S ART PROGRAM (AUGUST 4) The Appleton Museum will host its First Saturday Program from

1-3pm. Children will work hands-on to create a take-home piece of artwork. Program is open to members and non-members. appletonmueseum.org or (352) 291-4455.

FREE CLOTHING EXCHANGE/ FOOD DRIVE

FAMILY FUN FESTIVAL (AUGUST 4) Bring the whole family for a day of fun to Tuscawilla Park from 10am-1pm. There will be lots of games for the whole family to play! (352) 629-8444.

(August 4) The PURPLE DOVE, KIDS HELPING KIDS,

will be giving away free school clothing at the Ocala Drive-In beginning at 7am. Kids must be present. For a list of drop-off locations, visit the Purple Dove’s Facebook page or call (352) 347-0883.

Gelpi / Shutterstock.com

UNITED IN PRAISE CHOIR CELEBRATES 10 YEARS OF MUSIC (AUGUST 3) The United In Praise Choir invites anyone interested in joining in on the 10th anniversary season to register online before August 3. Rehearsals are every Tuesday evening beginning on August 14 at the First Baptist Church of Eustis. unitedinpraise.com or (407) 832-9745.

BOOK SALE (AUGUST 4) The Friends of the Ocala Public Library will host their quarterly book sale from 10am-4pm. Hardcover books will be sold at 50 cents and paperbacks at 25 cents. friendsoftheocalalibrary.org or (352) 671-8551. Continued on page 88

LOVE TODAY CharlieManager Harper

4150 N US Highway 441 Sales 888.259.2883 Service 800.278.9510

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Tuesday&Thursday

Tee-Off Special $29 per person includes golf fees, range balls, and lunch special; Good for up to four people!

THELOCALSCENE / Continued from page 87 Expires 8/31/12

www.ocalagolfclub.com 352.401.6917

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AUG’12

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JAMMIN’ IN THE PARK (AUGUST 5) There will be a free jam session for musicians of all genres from 4-7pm at the Marion Oaks Community Center. salsaandjazz.com. TOWN HALL MEETING (AUGUST 6) The Education Task Force and Marions United For Public Education will host a town hall meeting with the candidates running for the School Board. The meeting will be held from 6-8pm at the First United Methodist Church of Ocala. For more information, email forcedu@hotmail.com. BALLROOM DANCE PARTY (AUGUST 8, 22) Dancin’ Around Studio will host a social dance party from 7-9pm. Couples and singles are welcome. The event is BYOB; however, refreshments will be served. Admission is free for students and $10 for non-students. danceocala.com or (352) 690-6637. KINGDOM OF THE SUN BAND PERFORMANCE (AUGUST 11, 12) The Kingdom of the Sun Concert Band will host two performances at the Marion Technical Institute. The August 11 performance will begin at 2pm, and the August 12 performance will begin at 3pm. Both concerts are free and open to the public. kingdomofthesunband.org or (352) 624-9291.

SCRAPBOOK FOR BREAST CANCER (AUGUST 17) Bring your scrapbooking, knitting, embroidery or any other craft to the Marion County Extension auditorium. Admission is $5, and the event runs from 6pm until the last person leaves. Proceeds benefit Making Strides Against Breast Cancer. (352) 732-5982. DOWNTOWN SUMMER JAMS (AUGUST 17) Head downtown for a free concert from 7-10pm. Musicians include local young artists of all genres. (352) 629-8444.

FREE LIVE COUNTRY MUSIC EVENT

(August 18) A free live country music event will take place off of C.R. 314A in Silver Springs from 5-8:30pm. The event will feature Robert Stewart and his Country Blend band performing live as well as a 50/50 drawing and refreshments. (352) 288-4520.

GOD BELONGS IN MY CITY (AUGUST 25) All are invited to attend a prayer walk from 9:30am-noon presented by the Central Christian Church. The walk will stretch from Veterans Park to Tuscawilla Park. (352) 615-8244.

Gelpi / Shutterstock.com

Must present coupon at check in. Reservation Required.


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THESOCIALSCENE

Taste of Ocala EWERS CENTURY CENTER

Foodies, restauranteurs and people who just love to eat raised their forks and glasses at the 24th Taste of Ocala on May 5. Formerly an outside event, Taste of Ocala took place inside the College of Central Florida’s Ewers Century Center, where food enthusiasts came dressed in formal attire. Money from the event went toward the college’s student scholarship fund.

Jordan & Jennie Weaver

PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCRAMBLING

Bill & Rita Schertz

Alana Rodriguez and Samantha Juillerat

Julie & Ryan Fagan Carla Lindsay, Mike Mazzurco, Lauren Pacheco and Rebekah Boswell

Marie & Stephane Gattacieca

Jose Moreno Angela & Mike Pye

View more Social Scene photos and purchase prints of your favorites at ocalastyle.com

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Anthony Chetock, Loring Felix and Amanda Gooding

Lisa Plappert, Jenny Chamberlin, Brooke Josephson and Summer Antoine


Shelia Brown and Faith Jenkins

Drew & Marianne Anderson

Gina & Vernon Lawter Troy & Leann Barnes

Jim & Jeanne Henningsen David & Shannon Gagnon

Don & Sue Taylor

Donna & Jim Maguire

Gordon & Elizabeth Fairbanks, Bryan Myers, Kristin Gijelaj, Therese & Brett Ortengren

Rebecca Pecca and Shane Matthews Peter & Penny Villella

ocalastyle.com AUGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;12

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THESOCIALSCENE

Savages Screening HOLLYWOOD 16

On June 30, Ocala hosted the first John Travolta red carpet movie event since 2010, beginning with a reception at the College of Central Florida and then a movie screening at Regal Cinema Hollywood 16. The charity event, which amassed over $85,000, included a preview screening of the Universal Pictures film Savages. Proceeds benefited the Boys and Girls Club of Ocala, the College of Central Florida Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jett Travolta Scholarship, the Munroe Regional Medical Center Foundation, the Ocala Police Department and Never Say Never. PHOTOS BY BRANDON SCRAMBLING

Felicia Prather Lorraine Gerrity, Stacy Sansevere and Christina Gerrity

Anthony and Nicole Vizzini

Carolee Martin, Carin Biondi, LeeLee Cruz and Patty Quartararo

Shawn & Janice Northrup

John Travolta & Kelly Preston

Rolando & Sara Sosa

John Travolta Signing Autographs

Ben Wynn, Nancy Robertson and Steven Byrne

View more Social Scene photos and purchase prints of your favorites at ocalastyle.com Leslie Brecht and Laura Williams Debbie & Brian Richards, Barbara Giles

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Weekday Mornings 5:30-10:00 AM

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ocalastyle.com AUG’12

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GIVEAWAY THE BEACH-BOUND

OCALA STYLE IS GIVING AWAY TWO FABULOUS BEACH VACATIONS:

IDEAL IMAGE

4701 SW College Rd., Ocala

A 3-NIGHT GETAWAY IN A LUXURIOUS SUITE AT TRADEWINDS ISLAND GRAND IN ST. PETERSBURG BEACH

ALPHABET LAND LEARNING CENTER

A 3-NIGHT STAY AT THE SHORES RESORT & SPA IN DAYTONA BEACH SHORES, AN UPSCALE OCEANFRONT RETREAT

POLISHED SALON

IN ADDITION, EACH OF OUR TWO WINNERS WILL ALSO RECEIVE A $100 VISA GIFT CARD WANT TO GO? TO REGISTER TO WIN, VISIT ONE OF THE FOLLOWING LOCATIONS AND LOOK FOR OUR GIVEAWAY DISPLAY. CONTEST PARTICIPANTS MAY REGISTER MORE THAN ONCE BY VISITING MULTIPLE LOCATIONS.

8045 NW Gainesville Rd, Ocala

2147 SW Hwy. 484, Ocala 1269 E Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala

FREIMUTH FAMILY DENTAL 2509 SE 17th St., Ocala

MONTESSORI PREPARATORY SCHOOL

2967 NE Silver Springs Blvd, Ocala

PADDOCK PARK ANIMAL CARE CENTER 3931 SW 42nd St., Ocala

PLUS,

ONE PARTICIPANT FROM EACH LOCATION WILL BE CHOSEN AT RANDOM TO WIN A 19-INCH FLATSCREEN TELEVISION, VALUED AT $169.99, COURTESY OF BUD LIGHT.

PARKER’S TIRE & AUTO SERVICE

THE CANYONS ZIP LINE & CANOPY TOURS UNIQUE LINGERIE

4414 SW College Rd. Suite 1930 (Market Street at Heathbrook), Ocala

SLEEP CENTERS

3055 SW College Rd., Ocala 11250 SW 93rd Ct Rd., Ocala 2255-A Parr Dr., The Villages 17950 US 441, Summerfield

SILVER LEAF BATH & CANDLE CO. 16840 S. US Hwy 441, Summerfield

EXTENSIONS DANCE STUDIO 2303 Jacksonville Rd., Ocala

GTO SPORTING GOODS 4600 Hwy 326, Ocala

3000 NW Pine Ave., Ocala

GOODRICH COLLISION 2648 NW 6th St., Ocala

THE CONTEST WILL BE OPEN JULY 1-SEPT. 30, 2012 AND WINNERS WILL BE DRAWN AT RANDOM ON MONDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2012. For official contest rules, please visit ocalastyle.com. Trips and included amenities courtesy of the TradeWinds Island Grand and The Shores Resort & Spa.

MAGAZINE 94

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Membership is open to anyone in Alachua, Marion, Lake and Sumter counties! 2

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1. Offer does not apply to existing CAMPUS loans. Offer is for new loans only. Credit approval, sufficient income, adequate property valuation (maximum LTV of 70%), and first mortgage position are required. Owner-occupied property only. Offer excludes mobile homes; certain other restrictions apply. Property insurance is required; an appraisal, flood and/or title insurance may be required at an additional expense to the borrower. If loan is paid in full within the first 24 months, closing costs paid by CAMPUS will be added to the loan payoff amount. Example: a $105,000 loan at 3.25% for 120 months would require 119 monthly payments of $1,026.27 and one final payment of $1,022.09, total finance charge of $18,343.93; for a total of payments of $123,151.93. The amount financed is $104,808.00 the APR is 3.288%. APR=Annual Percentage Rate. 2. Credit approval and initial deposit of $5 required. Mention this ad and we’ll waive the $15 new member fee. This credit union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration.

Ocala 3097 SW College Rd. East Ocala 2444 E. Silver Springs Blvd. West Marion 11115 SW 93rd Court Rd. G’ville - E. Campus 1200 SW 5th Ave. W. Campus 1900 SW 34th St. Jonesville 107 NW 140th Terrace Hunter’s Walk 5115 NW 43rd St. Tower Square 5725 SW 75th St. Shands at UF Room H-1 Springhills Commons 9200 NW 39th Ave. Alachua 14759 NW 157th Ln. Summerfield 17950 US Hwy. 441 Lake City 183 SW Bascom Norris Dr. ocalastyle.com AUG’12

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Jenkins Auto Group 2025 SW COLLEGE RD (SR 200) • Ocala

840-5911

Choose Your Ride! www.JenkinsCars.com

www.JenkinsAcura.com Check Out Our Video Online About the New ILX Use Your Smartphone To Scan

ILX

1602 SW COLLEGE RD (SR 200) • Ocala

620-2264

www.OcalaHyundai.com Check Out Our Video Online About the New Elantra Use Your Smartphone To Scan 9145 S. Hwy. 441 (Across From the Airport) Leesburg

326-3585

ELANTRA

www.JenkinsHyundaiOfLeesburg.com

1740 SW COLLEGE RD (SR 200) • Ocala

620-9000

www.JenkinsMazda.com Check Out Our Video Online About the New CX-5 Use Your Smartphone To Scan

CX-5

JENKINS COLLISION CENTER 1420 SW 12th St • Ocala 352-629-6143 www. metbyaccident .com

“The Service, quality & experience was exceptional! Looks exactly like before the accident. Wouldn’t go anywhere else.” - Dani E. • Ocala FL


11915 CR 103 // THE VILLAGES, FL 32162

WWW.THEVILLAGESTSPA.COM

352.753.5511

FACEBOOK.COM/VILLAGESTSPA Licensed By the Florida Commission for Independent Education, Lic. # 3387

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Ocala Style Aug'12  

Ocala Style Magazine. Real people. Real stories. Real Ocala.

Ocala Style Aug'12  

Ocala Style Magazine. Real people. Real stories. Real Ocala.