Page 1

Kelly of Kelly’s Garage will be performing a

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01 | 19 | 2013 VOLUME 18 | ISSUE 03

HONOURED FOR A LIFETIME OF ACHIEVEMENTS LIVING HERE PAGE 24

COMMENT PAGE 8

REALLY STARTING TO MIND THE INCOME GAP

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com

No cuts or debate as Woolwich starts budget meeting

Councillors give smooth ride to budgets proposed for four township departments, make no concessions to infrastructure STEVE KANNON There was no indication of a line-by-line review – or scrutiny of any kind – of Woolwich’s 2013 budget as councillors met last week in the first of

three special sessions. The budgets for four departments – chief administrative office, council and information services, finance, and fire – were approved January 10 as presented by staff, with barely

a question from councillors. Combined spending in those departments is expected to hit $4.3 million in 2013. Overall, the township budget currently sees operating expenses of $13

in 2012. The budget reflects a planned tax hike of 1.5 per cent, with an additional 0.5 per cent in a special levy for infrastructure. That 2 per cent increases in property taxes would

million, up 4.1 per cent ($515,000) from the $12.5 million in last year’s budget. On the revenue side, Woolwich is forecasting $6.02 million, up 1.2 per cent over the $5.9 million

amount to an additional $12.68 on the average home assessed at $269,000, director of finance Richard Petherick told councillors. The tax bill on such a BUDGET | 4

Provincial cash to fund new school to replace St. Boniface in Maryhill, expansion at Breslau PS

CUBS GET THEIR CARS IN MOTION

ELENA MAYSTRUK A new Catholic school for the Breslau/Maryhill area and improvements to Breslau Public School will be funded by part of the $30 million on its way to Waterloo Region’s school boards, the province announced this week. Part of the $18.7 million to be received by the Waterloo Region District School Board (WRDSB) will be spent on a major addition to Breslau Public School, while a portion of the $11.5 planned for the Waterloo Catholic District School Board (WCDSB) will go towards building a new school in the Maryhill and Breslau area. Other uses for WRDSB

Cub Scouts Connor Maxwell, 10, Gavin McLean, 9, Monique Bertrand, 9, and Brendan Marshall, 10, participated in the Elmira Kub Kar races at John Mahood Public School in Elmira on Tuesday evening. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

2013

funds will include a new school in south Kitchener and extensions to the city’s Mackenzie King Public School. In addition to a new Catholic school in Woolwich, Waterloo Catholic will build additions for St. Aloysius and Blessed John Paul II schools. The projects were strategically chosen in order to accommodate the institutions as well as students in the future, representatives from both boards say. WRDSB manager of planning Dennis Cuomo said this week the current plans at Breslau PS came out of a previous Breslau/ Stanley Park elementary schools accommodation FUNDING | 2

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2 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

ELMIRA CUBS PARTAKE IN ANNUAL TRADITION OF KUB KAR RALLY

Max Campbell, Brendan Marshall and Zach Vale watch with excitement as their cars race. [MIKE VALE / SUBMITTED]

Scout and volunteer at the event Owen Fulcher, 11, with one of the cars participants later released down the makeshift runway. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

OM

The grand champions of the 2013 Elmira Kub Kar rally are Brendan Marshall in first, followed by Max Campbell and Connor Maxwell. Monique Bertrand won first place in the design category with her creation of an Olympia ice resurfacer. [MIKE VALE / SUBMITTED]

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review. It determined that some Kitchener students would be transferred from Breslau PS to Mackenzie King PS in the future with the recommendation that both schools be expanded. Breslau PS is also slated for the addition of a full-day kindergarten program, which will require more space. “There was a need there anyway. We combined that in a request to the Ministry [of Education] for another addition that would help accommodate the number of students,” Cuomo said. So far the additions will consist of new classrooms, said WRDSB manager of capital Ron Dallan, adding, however, that during such construction projects

the board will often take the opportunity to replace or fix certain equipment. In that case the extra cash will be taken out of the board’s school renewal funds. “It’s a good economical way of getting things done while you are at the school doing a major construction job.” The additions in Breslau and Kitchener are set to open to students in 2014, while the new Kitchener school is scheduled to open in 2015. The Catholic board’s planning department says the new location in Woolwich will replace St. Bonifice in Maryhill. “In this case the facility condition at St. Bonifice was below what our normal standards are. In essence

we look at the replacement cost of the school versus the cost of the repairs required,” said superintendant of corporate services Shesh Maharaj. The location of the new facility will be decided upon at a later date, following a consultation period with local families, but will still be within the current school’s boundary, which includes the Maryhill and Breslau areas. Kitchener-Conestoga MPP Michael Harris said investments in local schools are always welcome, especially in burgeoning areas like Breslau. He views this move by the province as an “attempt to change the channel,” in the midst of continuing labour disputes with the teachers’ unions.

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NEWS | 3

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

Labour dispute forces cancellation of winter sports at high schools ELENA MAYSTRUK Winter sports at the region’s high schools are the latest casualty of labour disruptions by teachers. With not enough teachers taking part in extracurriculars, the decision was made last week to cancel the Waterloo County Secondary School Athletics Association (WCSSAA) winter game schedules. There have been no

WCSSAA sports since the beginning of December due to the conflict between unions and the Ontario government. Sports affected by the decision include hockey, basketball, volleyball and alpine skiing. WCSSAA president Darcy Mintz said the decision was made January 11 after the association reviewed forms collected from the 16 public high schools detailing their

as they worry about their athletic futures, while nonathletes mourn the loss of other extracurricular activities. “I play sports a lot and it’s a big part of school. It helped to get more people involved,” said Caitlin Ditner, a Grade 10 student and basketball player at Elmira District Secondary School. In most cases, student athletes have already paid the required fees needed to

stance on winter sports commitment. He said WCSSAA did see some teaching staff come forward with the wish to continue the season but in the end the numbers just didn’t add up. “We sat down with those numbers, it wasn’t unanimous but there weren’t enough coaches in any sport to run a league,” he said Tuesday. The disappointment from students is palpable

participate in their respective winter sports. Whether students can look forward to getting some money back is still to be determined but a decision on refunds will be made by the senior administration at a later date. Local Catholic school students play for the District 8 Athletic Association and though it is a separate entity, there is some crossover with

WCSSAA sports leagues. According to the website District 8 officials will keep all sports uninterrupted through the public school labour disputes. EDSS student Eric Bowman, 16, plays football at the school and is concerned for the future of his sport come spring. He also says students should do their research on the SPORTS | 5

MCC looks to turn pennies into trees in Haiti Lowly copper slated to be removed from circulation can make a big difference to impoverished country WILL SLOAN The pennies weighing down your pockets won’t be in circulation for much longer, so why not unload that surplus copper on a worthy cause? The Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) is launching an initiative to collect the Waterloo Region’s loose change to help bring much-needed reforestation to Haiti. The MCC, which has been involved with charitable endeavors in Haiti since the 1940s, began its reforestation program in 1985. Over the years, the group has witnessed the urgency of the problem firsthand: in some areas, the island nation’s forests have been

depleted to five per cent of their original density. “Deforestation is just something that’s gone on for decades and decades, and now what we’re working at is saying, ‘OK, let’s bring some equilibrium and actually start to push this problem back,’” said Dan Driedger, the MCC’s resource generation director. “If you look at a satellite image of the country, you’ve got the Dominican Republic on one side and Haiti on the other side,” continued Driedger. “And the satellite images are startling in terms of the greenery you see, and how PENNIES | 4

Cheryl Schwartz donates some of her pocket change to a Haiti reforestation project at the MCC Thrift Shop on Church Street in Elmira.

[WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

Pair at Elmira RBC fundraising for cancer walk WILL SLOAN With more than 5,100 deaths and 27,000 new diagnoses of breast cancer in Canada last year, women’s cancers remain among the most pressing health issues in the world. At Elmira’s Royal Bank, two staff members are planning to fight back. Bank manager Darcy Krahn and senior account

manager Sharon Snow are working to raise $4,000 to participate in Shoppers Drug Mart’s Weekend to End Women’s Cancers in Toronto, September 7-8. The weekend’s central event is a two-day, 60-kilometre walk across the city, and every individual participant must generate at least $2,000 in donations. Now, Krahn and Snow hope

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really neat.” For Snow, who is planning her first cancer walk, the importance of the cause strikes close to home. “In 2010, three of my friends were diagnosed with women's cancer – one of them breast cancer, the other two ovarian,” said Snow. “One of them died within three months; the other one, her treatments

that Elmira’s residents will contribute to a good cause. “I did it last year for the first time, and it’s an unbelievable experience,” said Krahn of the 2012 walk. “The first day, you get to the end and man, your feet are sore, ‘I don’t know if I can do it the next day’ … But once you get to the last five kilometres and you can see the end in sight, it’s

haven’t been very successful, and right now she’s in clinical trials, because that’s sort of the last resort. The third one had breast cancer, and there’s a lot more success in that, so she’s had multiple surgeries, and we’re pretty confident she’ll actually be a survivor.” Snow continued, “But for me, two out of three is pretty powerful stuff, and

it’s just a reminder of how many people are suffering on a regular basis.” For last year’s walk, Krahn and RBC raised $2,000 from the Elmira community, generating a significant portion through raffles and a silent auction. This year, RBC is selling bracelets by jeweler Eliza CANCER | 4

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4 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

BUDGET: Councillors, Mayor voice no concerns or questions regarding budget proposals FROM | COVER

home – $2,784 – would see the township receive $633 (23 per cent), while the region would realize $1,557 (56 per cent) and school board $594 (21 per cent). While the township has yet to set wage levels – it’s just heading into negotiations with unionized workers – the fire department budget allows for a 2 per cent increase in wages paid to volunteer firefighters, who currently earn $22

an hour for responding to calls. “We’re the lowest in the region,” said fire chief Rick Pedersen, who noted the goal is to move up the ladder, with Wilmot paying the most at $27. Although Coun. Allan Poffenroth had called for the township to look at staff cuts or wage freezes earlier in the budget process, that issue was not raised at all as councillors got into the details of the budget.

Staffing costs, accounting for more than half of operating expenses, have risen significantly in recent years. There’s been no talk of eliminating unnecessary or unproductive positions, with a staff report identifying no such changes while noting the township is heading into another round of contract negotiations with its unionized workers, members of the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE) local 1542.

PENNIES: It makes cents to help Haiti FROM | 3

it turns just to black as soon as you look at the site where Haiti is.” The lowly penny may have few practical applications in today’s economy, but consider: with 33 of those pennies, the MCC is able to purchase a seedling, and provide the training to plant it. In addition, the group ensures that the change is put to proper use. “People always want to make sure the money is being well-used, so we have staff there,” said Dreidger. “We don’t just send money, we have staff on the ground who are working with local people who we hire to implement the project. So we’re not funneling it through another organization, we’re doing the work ourselves.” The initiative is timed to coincide not only with the end of the Canadian penny (the last new ones go into

Just 33 pennies can buy a seedling to plant a much-needed tree in Haiti. circulation next month), but also the third anniversary of an earthquake that devastated the country, killing some 300,000 and leaving more than one million people homeless in 2010. In the weeks following that disaster, the MCC was gratified by Waterloo Region’s response to its Haiti charities.

“It was overwhelming,” said Dreidger. “People were very supportive, they wanted to help. We’re just fortunate to be in a community where we can act as their hands and feet in Haiti in trying to respond to some of these needs there.” Now, the MCC hopes that the anniversary will remind the region’s residents of the other problems facing the beleaguered country. “People use trees, they turn them into charcoal and use the charcoal for heating,” said Dreidger. “That’s the major consumption of wood, and it’s been going on for decades. Pennies can be donated at any of MCC’s thrift stores in Waterloo Region (including those in Elmira), as well as any Mennonite Savings and Credit Union. The initiative will continue to the end of February, but the MCC will accept any donation, large or small, at any time.

Poffenroth’s suggestion a few months ago for cuts found some support from Coun. Mark Bauman, who suggested the township could find service levels that could be lowered. That subject was not broached last week. In an interview this week, Bauman said he’s prepared to review staffing levels, but would not look right now at eliminating any middle management and support positions added in recent years.

“I think that there are some efficiencies that can be found, but I’m not ready to go on a headhunting mission.” Although an advocate for setting aside money for infrastructure projects – in November, he voted against dropping the special levy to 0.5 per cent from the original 2.5 discussed earlier in the process – he said he doesn’t see freeing up $400,000 to $500,000 a year through the elimination of recent

job additions as the way to go at this point. “I’m not prepared to do that,” said Bauman, noting staffing levels should be addressed in the upcoming strategic planning session. The second budget session was held Thursday night to discuss the recreation department numbers and part of the engineering and planning services budget. Details were not available before press time.

CANCER: On the go to make a difference FROM | 3

Ray, labeled “The Many Colours of Cancer.” The bracelets, which sell for $10, connect 23 different coloured stones, each symbolizing a strain of cancer. Krahn, whose motherin-law is recovering from breast cancer, takes a broad view of the diseases affecting millions. “People keep on asking me, ‘Why do you walk? Is there a person you’re walking for?’” he said. “My first answer is, ‘No, this is affecting a lot of women in the world, and it has to be stopped.’ “But my wife, on the second day last year, sent me a letter that said, ‘Not only are you walking for your mother-in-law, but potentially for your daughters.’ I’ve got a little two-year-old, and the moment I read that, that really had an impact on me. I said, ‘Yeah, you’re right. This has to end before my daughter gets it.’”

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING #4 Woolwich & Wellesley Townships Elementary Schools Pupil Accommodation Review (School Closure Review) Thursday, January 24, 2013; 7:30 pm to 9:00 pm Elmira District Secondary School, Cafeteria, 4 University Avenue, Elmira, ON The Woolwich & Wellesley Townships Elementary Schools Pupil Accommodation Review involves the following schools: Floradale P.S., Linwood P.S., St. Jacobs P.S., Three Bridges P.S. PURPOSE OF THE PUBLIC MEETING The WRDSB is holding a public meeting to gather feedback and answer questions from parents and members of the community about the Accommodation Review Committee (ARC) draft recommendations for boundary changes and/or school closures. It is important to note that no decisions have been made by the Board and no changes are proposed to occur before the 2014-2015 school year. MEETING FORMAT The WRDSB will hold an Open House on January 24th to allow the public to review the draft recommendations made by the ARC. Copies of the ARC’s Draft Accommodation Report will also be available. Board staff can answer questions and discuss concerns to ensure that the public is informed about the process and the recommendations.

DRAFT RECOMMENDATIONS The ARC is presenting two options and associated recommendations for trustees to consider: • Status Quo (continuation of the existing situation) 1. To rebuild St. Jacobs P.S. 2. To construct a bus lay-by at Three Bridges P.S. 3. To consider a future boundary study between Floradale P.S. and Conestogo P.S. • Scenario 10a 1. To close Three Bridges P.S. 2. To modify the boundary between St. Jacobs P.S. and Floradale P.S. 3. To modify the boundary between Floradale P.S. and Linwood P.S. 4. To rebuild St. Jacobs P.S. 5. To consider a future boundary study between Floradale P.S. and Conestogo P.S.

For more information, please contact the Board’s Planning Department at 519-570-0003 ext. 4419 or visit our website at www.wrdsb.ca and search woolwich/wellesley A copy of the ARC’s Draft Accommodation Report will be available on the Board’s website after Friday, January 18, 2013.

Darcy Krahn and Sharon Snow are already in full stride preparing for next September’s Weekend to End Women’s Cancers. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

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NEWS | 5

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

Harris calls for action on extracurriculars Kitchener-Conestoga MPP Michael Harris this week called on the Liberal government to take immediate steps to restore extracurricular activities at elementary and secondary schools, after sending a petition signed by more than 340 Huron Heights students to the Ministry of Education. “For far too long, the Liberal government has idly stood by allowing teachers’ unions to deprive young

people of these essential activities, which they rely on to develop new skills and build lasting friendships,” Harris said in a letter sent to Education Minister Laurel Broten Tuesday. Students, who have already missed out on sports and other after-school programs, now fear the teachers’ unions will force their members to boycott extracurricular activities for the next two years. “The Liberals’ pleas to the unions have obviously fallen on deaf ears,” Harris said. “Statements of good intentions are not going to solve these problems. Ontarians need and expect

their government to act now. So I’m calling on the Liberal government to take immediate steps to restore extracurricular activities at our schools.”

Region approves 2.74% tax hike The regional portion of your property tax bill will increase by 2.74 per cent, as council this week approved the 2013 budget. The increase of 1.01 per cent for regional services and 1.73 per cent for police services, the largest single

expense in the $1.2-billion budget, will add $46 a year to the average home assessed at $269,000. Waterloo Region’s share of the tax bill amounts to a little more than 50 per cent. Until recently looking at an increase of almost 4 per cent, council pared back the budget, with cuts that include: reduced funding for road repairs and maintenance; second or additional blue boxes will no longer be free; elimination of the shingle diversion program at the landfill site; and reduced iXpress bus frequency from every 10 minutes to 15 minutes during the summer.

Driver involved in Floradale rollover dies of injuries A 24-year-old Kitchener man injured in a single-vehicle rollover January 1 in Floradale succumbed this week to his injuries. Jesse Taylor died Thursday at Hamilton General Hospital. A passenger in his vehicle, an 18-year-old Elmira woman, remains in a local hospital and is recovering, Waterloo Regional Police report. Emergency crews responded to the

rollover on Floradale Road at 3:50 a.m. on January 1. A Chevrolet Cobalt with five occupants was travelling southbound on Floradale Road when the driver, Taylor, lost control and the vehicle went into a field. Taylor was ejected as a result of the rollover. Taylor and the Elmira woman were transported to a local hospital. Both parties were subsequently transferred to a Hamilton area hospital for further treatment. Three other occupants were treated on scene by EMS. The collision investigation is in the process of being concluded and no charges are anticipated, police say.

POLICE BLOTTER

Police advise public to be mindful of hunters at this point in the year Police ask local hunters to be mindful of residents near areas in which they hunt, after a report of a hunter seen on a public trail approximately one kilometre from Linwood

Public School. The hunter was not breaking any laws, however police ask that residents living or working near wooded areas be aware of the presence of hunters this season.

JANUARY 7

of the spin and struck a tree. There were no injuries and no charges were laid.

4:19 PM | A two-vehicle collision occurred on Katherine Street near Weisenberg Road, north of West Montrose. The driver of one vehicle was unable to stop when traffic slowed down and struck the rear of another moving vehicle. There were no injuries. The trailer driver was charged. 6:05 PM | Blowing snow and poor road conditions caused a driver to run his vehicle into a ditch on Weimar Line between Moser-Young Road and Hackbart Road in Wellesley Township. There were no injuries. 8:32 PM | A vehicle spun out of control, on King Street North near Lobsinger Line, south of St. Jacobs. The vehicle slid into a ditch as a result

9:40 PM | A 33-year-old man was driving on Crowsfoot Road between Maryhill Road and Line 86 when his vehicle slid off the roadway. Police say the accident was due to poor road conditions. There were no injuries, but the driver was charged with driving without a license. 10:44 PM | A man driving a Nissan Xterra lost control of his vehicle and slid into a ditch, hitting a tree and a fence. There were no injuries to the driver and no charges were laid. JANUARY 9

12:59 PM | Two vehicles were involved in a collision on King Street

North near Lobsinger Line. There were no injuries as a result of the collision. 5:44 PM | Two vehicles were travelling eastbound on Line 86 between Katherine Street and Oak Street when the vehicle in front stopped to make a left turn and was rear-ended by the second vehicle. The driver of the second vehicle was charged with careless driving. JANUARY 10

9:53 AM | Two vehicles, a blue Pontiac Torrent and a brown Toyota Venza, collided on Brubacher Street near Snyder Avenue South in Elmira. There were no injuries and no charges were laid. JANUARY 11

11:35 AM | The driver of a large double tanker truck was reversing in a parking lot on Arthur Street between Listowel Road and Scotch Line Road when he struck a smaller vehicle. Police say the truck driver did not see the other vehicle. There were no

injuries and no charges were laid. 7:56 PM | A driver travelling on Three Bridges Road near Hemlock Hill Drive in Woolwich Township lost control of his vehicle, slid into a ditch and hit a hydro pole. There were no injuries, no damage to the pole and no charges were laid. 7:49 PM | A 20-year-old male driver was traveling southbound on Floradale Road approaching a curve on Yatton Side Road when his car slid into a ditch. The vehicle rolled once but landed upright. Police say the crash was caused when the driver could not navigate a proper turn due to severe fog. There were no injuries and no charges were laid. JANUARY 16

11:14 AM | A storage shed located on Lobsinger Line was broken into overnight. A snowmobile, generator, air gun and various decking tools were taken. The value of the items is estimated at $10,000. Police have no suspects. Anyone with information is being asked to contact police.

EDSS football player Eric Bowman, 16, hopes he’ll be able to get on the field this spring. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

SPORTS: Season cancelled FROM | 3

issue at hand before judging the parties involved too harshly, though he can tell that the cancellations have greatly affected his peers. “It’s really annoying to those kids; I hope it’s resolved by next football

season.” It’s too early to speculate whether the current situation will affect WCSSAA spring sports. Mintz says any decisions on that will be made following the next round of commitment reports from the schools closer to the season.

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6 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

Kings to go pink in support of antibullying campaign STEVE KANNON The Elmira Sugar Kings are in the pink. Or will be come February 10. That’s when the team will be hosting a game in support of anti-bullying campaigns, donning pink sweaters and, if the township clears it, tinting the ice to match. Meeting this week, councillors agreed to waive the rental fee at the Dan Snyder Arena, helping to increase the amount of money that can be donated to the cause. Last year, the Kings raised more than $5,000, with the proceeds going to London Military Family Resource Centre (LMFRC). As with previous years, the team will be auctioning off the special game-worn sweaters, hockey club director Ron Hackett told councillors meeting Tuesday night. He also invited councillors to take part in the pre-game ceremonies, extending an invitation to

Kitchener-Conestoga MP Harold Albrecht and his provincial counterpart, MPP Michael Harris. To help spread the word, added Hackett, area schools will be contacted, with free tickets for school kids accompanied by adults who’ve purchased tickets. Asked by Mayor Todd Cowan how the team planned to tint the ice pink, Hackett said a company specializing in such designs has volunteered to do the work free of charge. As for removing the tinting, he suggested the ice be left in place for the rest of the season as a reminder of the issue. Getting into the spirit, Coun. Mark Bauman suggested the Kings ask the players not to take stupid penalties that amount to bullying on ice, at least for duration of that game. The fundraising game is set for February 10 at 2 p.m., when the Sugar Kings take on the Brampton Bombers.

Let’s talk about...

Wellesley recognizes bylaw officer WILL SLOAN Wellesley’s municipal bylaw enforcement officer was lauded for his recent training accomplishments as township councillors met Tuesday night. Andrew Loch was recognized with an awards presentation related to the Certified Municipal Manager accreditation program. The program from the Ontario Municipal Management Institute offers training to enhance management skills, in partnership with local government associations. The non-profit organization was established by municipal associations with the support of the Ontario government. The program’s 2,000 accredited members come from all levels of management in local government, including supervisors, department heads, CEOs and front-line staff. “I think we’re very fortunate having someone of your standard of quality here to represent us,” Will McLaughlin, the township’s executive director corporate/operations, told

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Municipal bylaw enforcement officer Andrew Loch was honoured with Certified Municipal Manager accreditation at Tuesday’s Wellesley council meeting. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER] Loch. “I think there are a lot of municipalities that don’t have someone who knows property standards, so kudos to you.”

Loch was presented with two designations from council: a CMMI Property Standards Professional Designation Award from

the Ontario Property Standards Association, and the Certified Municipal Law Enforcement Professional Designation Award. After Mayor Ross Kelterborn presented Loch with a plaque enumerating the achievements, council members asked how many hours of class and homework Loch went through before receiving the accreditation. “To be honest with you, I can’t even surmise it at this moment,” replied Loch. “It’s been many years of going through all provincial certifications just separately in these individual areas to accumulate to this point. As it stands at this point for the Property Standards Association of Ontario, I’ve reached the highest level you can reach in the province, and I’ve reached the second-highest level in municipal law enforcement in the province, so it’s been a long, long accumulation.” The Wellesley bylaw officer now holds six provincially-recognized professional accreditations in municipal law enforcement, property standards and municipal management.

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In appreciation for the use of the soccer field there, Woolwich Youth Soccer this week presented cheques for $500 to St. Teresa Catholic school and St. Teresa of Avila Catholic Church. On Wednesday, WYS representative Sebastian Siebel-Achenbach (right) got into the soccer spirit with the church’s Fr. David Lewis and the school’s parent council chair Shelley Deyell. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

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Intention to Adopt a Budget TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the Township of Wellesley, after having reviewed the draft municipal budget for the year 2013, intends to pass a By-law with the intent to adopt a budget pursuant to Section 290 of the Municipal Act, 2001, as amended. The passage of the By-law to implement the adoption of the budget will be given consideration at the regularly scheduled meeting on February 4, 2013, commencing at 6:45pm in the Council Chambers, 4805 William Hastings Line, Crosshill. Should you wish to address Council or if you require further details or information, please contact Diane Lorbetski, Director of Finance, Township of Wellesley at (519) 699-4611 or email: dlorbetski@wellesley.ca


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THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

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8 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

JOE MERLIHAN PUBLISHER STEVE KANNON EDITOR

COMMENT

DONNA RUDY SALES MANAGER

ELENA MAYSTRUK REPORTER

WILL SLOAN

PAT MERLIHAN PRODUCTION MANAGER

LEANNE BORON GRAPHIC DESIGN

REPORTER PUBLICATION MAIL AGREEMENT NUMBER 1004840 | ISSN 12039578

OUR VIEW / EDITORIAL

THE VIEW FROM HERE

Shining a brighter spotlight on the income gap TEACHERS AND OTHER VERY well paid public servants may not like the spotlight being directed on their paycheques, but the revelations that most are doing significantly better than the average taxpayer – well enough to be considered above the middle class – do raise the issue of income inequality. No one would argue teachers are getting CEO rich, but the income gap is a reality, prompting a discussion about why those already enjoying an advantage continue to gain on the bulk of Canadians. Most Canadians are working harder and have less to show for it. The income gap between the rich and the rest of us has worsened over the past generation. In 2009, during the dark days of Canada's recession, the richest 20 per cent of Canadians took home a whopping 44.2 per cent of total after-tax income – in stark contrast to the poorest 20 per cent whose after-tax income share was only 4.9 per cent. The average earnings of the richest 10 per cent of Canada’s families raising children were 82 times that earned by the poorest 10 per cent of families. That is approaching triple the ratio of 1976, when the ratio was around 31 times. The aftertax income gap has never been this high in at least 30 years, and it has been growing faster than ever since the late 1990s. Essentially, we’re spending more time at work, but 80 per cent of us are getting a smaller share of Canada’s growing economy. Only the richest 20 per cent are experiencing gains, and most of those gains are concentrated in the top 10 per cent. That richest 10 per cent of Canadian families are getting richer. They enjoyed a 30-per-cent earnings increase compared to a generation ago, the only group to experience such gains. This is creating a new phenomenon in income distribution in Canada: the rich are breaking away from the rest of society, in a way not seen since such information began to be collected in 1976. The poorest 20 per cent saw their share of the earnings pie drop from 4.5 per cent from the late 1970s to 2.6 per cent in the early 2000s. In sharp contrast, the top half of Canadian families saw their share of total earnings grow to 79.5 per cent from 73 per cent during that same time period. Most of the increase went to the very richest 10 per cent of families – their share of earnings grew to 29.5 per cent from 23 per cent of all earnings by Canadian families. While still not showing the kind of inequalities seen in the United States, where the gap is the widest among all developed economies, since the mid-1990s, income inequality has been rising more rapidly in Canada than in the U.S., according to the Conference Board of Canada. In the past, income gaps were often the result of economic conditions and policies pushing more people into the ranks of the poor. In the latest boom, the rich are outpacing the pack to pull ahead. This is not automatically a bad thing, except that it increasingly comes at the expense of the poor and, to a growing extent, the middle class. It’s a worrisome trend. An Environics poll commissioned by the Broadbent Institute shows that Canadians are ready to challenge income inequality: 77 per cent believe that income inequality is a major problem for Canada, and a clear majority – including a majority of Conservative voters – are willing to protect our social programs, even if it means paying higher taxes. Nine out of 10 respondents agreed that reducing income inequality should be a priority for the federal government.

With council challenging none of the spending laid out in the budget, nor coming up with ways to save money, the rubber stamp is put into action. WORLD VIEW / GWYNNE DYER

Does intervention in Mali lead to another Afghanistan? WORLD AFFAIRS “Those days are over,” said French President Francois Hollande last month when asked if French forces would intervene in the war between Islamist insurgents who have seized the northern half of Mali and the government in Bamako. But the days in question weren’t over for very long. Last week France sent a squadron of fighterbombers to the West African country to stop the Islamist fighters from taking the capital. “We are making air raids the whole time,” said French Defence Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian. “They are going on now. They will go on tonight. They will go on tomorrow.” Some 550 French combat troops are on the ground already, with up to 2,500 more to follow. Contingents of soldiers from the neighbouring countries of Nigeria, Benin, Burkina Faso, Niger and Togo are scheduled to arrive as early as next week. It has turned

into a real war. It has also turned into a Western-run war in a Muslim country, despite the discouraging precedents of Afghanistan and Iraq. The government of Mali has asked for French help, and on Monday the United Nations Security Council unanimously supported France’s military intervention. The army of Mali, such as it is, will theoretically be in charge of the war – but everybody knows that the Malian army is useless. In fact, the presence of Mali’s army at the front is usually counterproductive, as it is brutal, militarily incompetent, and prone to panic flight. The other African armies are of variable quality, but it is obviously French troops, and especially French air power, that will decide the outcome of the war. So has France bitten off more than it can chew? Is this going to end up like Afghanistan and Iraq? The supporters of the war prefer to compare it with last year’s Western military intervention in Libya, another French initiative that was decided over one weekend. They like that analogy

better because the Libyan intervention ended tolerably well, with the overthrow of the dictator, a democratically elected government, and no Western casualties. But the differences between Libya and Mali are greater than the similarities. In Libya the rebels were trying to rid the country of Muammar Gaddafi, a loony, friendless dictator, and create a democratic future. The decision to intervene was made in Paris in only two hectic days, when it appeared that Gaddafi’s mercenary troops were about to overrun Benghazi and massacre the rebels. NATO served as the rebel air force, but no Western troops fought on the ground. And it worked. With Mali, once again it was decided in a couple of days, and once again France has taken the lead. Once again Britain is sending some help as well (transport aircraft, but no troops or combat aircraft), and the United States is providing discreet logistical support. (U.S. Air Force tankers refuelled the French fighters on their way to Mali.) But that’s where the similarities end. The West is supporting

the government, not the rebels, in Mali. That government, behind a flimsy civilian facade, is controlled by the same thugs in uniform whose military coup last March, just one month before the scheduled democratic election, created the chaos that let the Islamist rebels conquer the northern half of the country. The young officers who now run the country are ignorant and violent, and having them on your side is not an asset. The Islamist rebels are fanatical, intolerant, and violent, but they are well armed (a lot of advanced infantry weapons came on the market when Gaddafi’s regime collapsed) and they appear to be well trained. They have almost no popular support in 90-per-centMuslim Mali, whose version of Islam is much more moderate, but they have terrified the population of the north into submission or flight. The insurgents are not short of money, either, as they receive secret subsidies from several Arab monarchies in the DYER | 10


COMMENT | 9

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

THEIR VIEW / QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Climate change aside, are warmer winters a good thing?

»»Marilyn Lackner

»»Cathy Pickard

»»Linas Staciulis

»»Cristine Hibert

Yeah, it’s not too bad.

For me? Yeah. I’m not a skier.

I like it cold and crisp. I like the ice, I like to skate, I like to be outdoors during winter.

I’m thankful we have such clear weather so I Absolutely not. Because cold winters build can walk and not worry about slipping on the character. ice.

»»Phil McKee

"Sports, either team or individual, are full of passion and emotion. That’s why we play and spectate." Ray Logan | page 10 HIS VIEW / STEVE KANNON

When it comes to wages, race to the bottom is a choice, not an inevitability EDITOR'S NOTES GM Canada president Kevin Williams may have been positioning his company for future contract negotiations when declaring this week that Canada is an expensive place to make cars. “There’s no mistake that Canada continues to be the highest-cost producer for General Motors anywhere … in the world, and our labour costs are among the highest,” he told reporters at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit. Labour costs, much more an issue with a loonie at par with the U.S. dollar, were likely part of the rationale for General Motors’ recent announcement it will move production of the Camaro from its Oshawa plant to one in Michigan. As with the GM and Chrysler bailout debate, his comments shine a light on the automotive sector and its unions, the bellwether organizations of manufac-

turing health and unionization in the private sector. The decline in the fortunes of both parallels the weakening middle class in North America in the last few decades, contrasted with the vigours of the postwar era. While the Detroit Three have their detractors, the unions have taken the brunt of criticism, deserved and otherwise. There are two polarized views about unions and their impact on the economy. On the one hand, some argue the postwar boom was going to happen no matter what, and that increasingly greedy union demands eventually smothered the North American economy and forced manufacturing offshore. The other side sees unions leading to fair wages and a growing middle class, fueling the well-documented postwar expansion. As corporatism and right-wing politics attacked workers and the middle class, only then did the economy founder. Is there a direct link? Probably not, but the ongoing debate was renewed during the latest recession.

HOW TO REACH US

ny, for instance. Even the U.S. government’s own figures, as provided by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, paints a rosier picture. A report released last month compares U.S. manufacturing hourly compensation costs in 2011 to 33 other countries. In addition to Australia, Canada, Italy, and Japan, countries with higher hourly compensation costs were primarily in northern and western Europe. Countries with lower hourly compensation costs were primarily in southern and eastern Europe, Asia, and Latin America. The U.S. average hourly compensation of $35.33 was somewhere in the middle of a very diverse pack, from $64.15 in Norway all the way down to $2.01 in the Philippines. Canada was just slightly higher at $36.56. Ours was one of just three non-European countries, with Australia and Japan, with higher compensation rates than the U.S. Just two of those Eurozone countries – Ireland and Italy – are among the most troubled economies, the so-called PIIGS.

Many of these countries with higher wages routinely outperform the U.S. in both social and economic indicators, from the OECD’s better life index to the World Economic Forum’s competitiveness survey (the U.S. was ranked seventh, behind Switzerland, Singapore, Finland, Sweden, Netherlands and Germany – a telling list). With the auto industry particularly, U.S. historian and journalist Kevin Brown has chronicled the differences between Germany’s high-paying jobs and social welfare programs versus what’s going on in the U.S. In 2010, Germany produced 5.5 million cars, twice the 2.7 million built in the United States. Average compensation (a figure including wages and employer-paid benefits) for autoworkers in Germany was 48.97 euros per hour ($67.14 US), while compensation for auto work in the United States averaged $33.77 per hour, or about half as much as in Germany, he points out. Despite that pay discrepancy, the three big German automakers – Volkswagen,

Daimler and BMW – have been quite profitable even through the ongoing economic downturn. By contrast, we know how things went here, with GM and Chrysler requiring massive bailouts. Different approaches to management-labour relations – mandated cooperation in Germany, adversarial in the U.S. – play a big role in the health of the companies, more so than wages. That’s clear in looking at the U.S. branch plants of German automakers, run American-style in lowwage, right-to-work (antiunion) states. Crunching the numbers, he says, it’s clear there’s nothing inevitable about the lower wages pushed for in North American plants. “It turns out that inevitability has nothing to do with the differing conditions; the salient difference is that, in Germany, the automakers operate within an environment that precludes a race to the bottom; in the U.S., they operate within an environment that encourages such a race.”

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There is a very real fear the downturn will be used to rollback worker advances, further entrenching the stagnant wages we’ve seen for the past couple of decades. In conjunction with the exporting of jobs, particularly good ones in the manufacturing sector, some see the opportunity for fostering the race to the bottom, that being the fewdollars-a-day pay prevalent in China and other international trouble spots. That’s a race in which there are no winners. For that reason, supporters of the local economy advise not going down that road, noting the attack on workers at the Detroit Three misses the larger picture: a political and economic culture that favours capital over people, ironically, the basis of the original union movement. We’re constantly told that higher private sector wages will strangle our economy. It’s become received wisdom. But there are plenty of examples that belie that claim, as can be seen in the economies of the Scandinavian countries and neighbouring Germa-

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10 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

THE MONITOR

VERBATIM

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

Police reported over 90,000 impaired driving incidents in Canada in 2011, about 3,000 more than in 2010. The rate of impaired driving was 262 per 100,000 population, 2% higher than in 2010 and the fourth increase in five years. Prior to 2007, the impaired driving rate had been steadily declining since the mid-1980s.

“These changes are clearly unwarranted at a time when the Auditor General has questioned the overall effectiveness of the program, which costs Ontarians $30 million a year. Clearly, Drive Clean has outlived its usefulness and should be scrapped.”

An Elmira metal-fabrication business at the center of longstanding neighbourhood complaints opted to close up shop and move to Wellington County, taking 40 jobs with it. H-Y Manufacturing found a new location outside of Salem.

»»Statistics Canada

»»Kitchener-Conestoga MPP Michael Harris calls on the provincial government to

»»From the Jan. 22, 2005 edition of the Observer.

scrap the Drive Clean program rather than introducing new equipment, citing its failure to reduce emissions.

DYER: Nobody's quite sure

NATIONAL VIEW

what they're getting into here FROM | 8

Gulf that have persuaded themselves, strangely, that subsidizing radical Islamist movements in the far-flung fringes of the Muslim world is a good way to avoid being overthrown by radical Islamists at home. They are formidable opponents, and the war to free northern Mali may be long and hard. Until recently the rebels seemed to be confined to Mali’s desert north, but last week they began to advance into southern Mali, where nine-tenths of the country’s 14 million people live. The Malian army collapsed, and Western intelligence sources estimated that the Islamists would capture the

YOUR VIEW / LETTER

Hockey games are a place to bring the noise To the Editor, Last Sunday I attended the Dan Snyder Arena, as I do most weekends and have done for the past four years, to watch my son play hockey. My son and the team he plays on represent the Township of Woolwich, week in, week out, during the hockey season in exemplary fashion. I pay Woolwich Minor Hockey close to $1,200 for my son to play hockey for six months, on top of my municipal taxes. I am a great believer in having kids playing sports as it instills fundamental values such as respect, tolerance, teamwork, etc. I am also a great believer in supporting everything my son, and the team he plays on, do to the upmost of my ability. I look after the team's away jerseys, laundering them and making sure they are there for game day. Representing the Township of Woolwich has taken us all over southern Ontario, visiting other towns and arenas. Imagine my surprise this past Sunday when an offi-

capital, Bamako, within two days. That would effectively give them control of the entire country. Mali has long, unguarded borders with seven other African countries, and it is only 3,000 km. (2,000 mi.) from France. So President Hollande ordered immediate military intervention to stop the Islamist advance, and we’ll all worry about the long-term consequences later. The next Western war against Islamist extremists has already started, and the question is whether it will end up like Afghanistan. Nobody would like to know the answer to that more than the French. Except, of course, the Malians. cial from the Woolwich Memorial Centre asked me not to support the Township of Woolwich, or more specifically my son’s hockey team. A complaint had been made by someone that I was being too loud. I use a plastic trumpet/horn, the level of noise of which is controlled by how hard I blow into it, to celebrate goals scored or show approval of great saves made and good work by particular players or lines. I would like to point out that if I blow my horn for a great shot or scramble at the other team's net, I am, conversely, also acknowledging a good save or defensive play from the opposing team. I have used this trumpet/horn regularly at both arenas within the WMC Centre without issue. Other parents of boys on the team think this is great and one even went out and bought a trumpet/horn for the playoffs. I know the boys like it, because I like to give them three blasts when they score, just like they do at an NHL game. I like to think that it brings some atmosphere to the occasion and lets the boys know that we are behind them all the way. These horns are on sale at sporting stores through-

out the region for the sole purpose of making noise to support your team. Indeed, at the Kitchener Aud you are encouraged to “make some noise” on a regular basis. As I have said before, I have been to quite a few towns and arenas and never had a problem. So, I am not sure why this has become a problem in my home arena. After all, I/we are watching a hockey game, not the ballet or opera. The history of sports can be traced back to ancient times. Indeed, the Romans and Greeks built arenas for this sole purpose. Did the people who went to these games sit quietly? I think not. Sports, either team or individual, are full of passion and emotion. That’s why we play and spectate. The highs and lows, tears and laughter, are all part of the human condition. Bonds and friendships are forged that last a lifetime. It would be a great shame

on the Township of Woolwich if they try to sanitize the atmosphere at the local sports arena to the point of visiting a funeral parlour. How motivational and encouraging would that be? Don’t get me wrong, I am as much against the use of air compressor-type horns as the next guy. But a $5 plastic trumpet/horn? Come on! Lastly, I would like to advise the armchair sports fans that the noise they hear in the background when watching sports on television is not some defect with the TV but is in fact people shouting, singing, blowing and hitting all manner of musical instruments and enjoying the passion and emotion that is this thing we call sport. Try going to a game, you might like it. P.S. If you do attend a game and want to watch and not participate, bring some ear plugs.

RAY LOGAN | ELMIRA.

Sun. January 20 ’13

vs. Cambridge Winterhawks

Dan Snyder Memorial Arena Puck drops at 7:00pm

Game Sponsor: BMO Financial You’re invited to an important news conference following the game

kings.on.ca

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SPORTS | 11

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

SPORTS HOCKEY / JUNIOR C

HOCKEY / JUNIOR B

Kings lose top scorer in dropping three in a row

Another pair of wins has Jacks in second place

Brady Campbell out for weeks, others also sidelined by injuries as team looks to regroup

ELENA MAYSTRUK

ton Bombers. The game proved to be a tough struggle as the Kings outshot the Bombers 14-6, yet failed to score, giving way to Brampton instead at 7:27. In the second period, the opposition gained a two-point lead at 1:27. The rest of the frame saw a good effort from the Kings as they again dominated Brampton for shots, yet failed to score. Getting tired by the third

At this point in the hockey season it’s all about the standings and the Wellesley Applejacks are on top of their game following a tough start to the new year. After three wins last week, the Jacks took it further with Friday’s 5-4 victory over Tavistock and an 8-0 game win against visiting Norfolk Saturday night. With just two more games to go in their rather successful albeit short regular season, the Jacks are just behind Ayr in the division standings, tied for second place with Hagersville with 48 points (23-11-2). But if the Jacks want a hope of keeping the second spot in time for playoffs “this team needs to buckle down and play better,” head coach Kevin Fitzpatrick said. To his mind, the January 11 game didn’t show his team’s best efforts, as the Jacks spent the better part of two periods killing penalties. “Our goaltender Corey Tuffnail stole the game. He made some outstanding saves when we were playing very poorly. He’s the reason we got the two points,” he said. Still, the Jacks would post the first of two wins

KINGS | 13

JACKS | 13

Rob Kohli tries to evade Stratford players as he skates with the puck during Sunday’s game at the WMC. The Kings lost 4-1. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER] ELENA MAYSTRUK It was a hard-luck weekend for the Kings, as a peek at the scoreboard and the infirmary would confirm. The Kings lost three in a row last weekend, surrendering twice on the road – to Listowel 9-3 January 11, then 2-1 to Brampton Saturday – before finally falling to Stratford 4-1 in Sunday’s home game. The bad luck struck early, with an injury at the Thursday practice

and three more in Friday night’s game, sidelining key players including scoring leader Brady Campbell. “Brady will be out until playoffs, Justin Cook will be out until the second round of playoffs. James Mildon, we’re not sure when he’ll be back, probably around playoff time as well,” said head coach Dean DeSilva. What would be a blowout in Listowel didn’t start off too badly, as the Kings drew first blood courtesy of Brandon Stewart, as-

sisted by Zac Coulter and Matt Schieck, at 2:02 of the first frame. That’s where Elmira’s luck ran out, however, as Listowel took the reins for the next three goals, scoring at 5:03, 9:48 and 17:22. The Cyclones had no intention of letting up in the second, quickly potting two more, at 2:28 and 5:19. Stewart gave Elmira a glimmer of hope when he scored at 7:06 but the Cyclones were quick to smother it just seconds before the buzzer at 19:49,

giving the home team a four-goal lead – 6-2 – going into the final frame. Elmira held strong in the first half of the period, with Coulter even managing a goal at 10:58, but the Kings were just too far down the rabbit hole to clamber out. Listowel took the Kings down a few more pegs before the end with three more goals at 12:39, 17:49 and 18:07 to seal the convincing victory. On Saturday, the Kings re-grouped for a stronger effort against the Bramp-

Hericane Atoms celebrated the holidays in the spirit of giving WILL SLOAN For many of us who were once pre-teenagers, the thought of giving up even a single Christmas gift would have seemed a questionable proposition. To give up an entire stocking of pre-Yuletide presents might have been a fate too horrific to imagine. But that’s exactly what the young girls of the Twin

Centre Hericanes Atom Rep hockey team did on December 23, when they travelled to McMaster Children’s Hospital to deliver Christmas gifts to Hamilton’s sick kids. “We used to give the girls stockings on the last practice before Christmas Eve. We used to fill it with stuff and they’d get to take that home,” said Scott Dietrich, the Hericanes’

coach. “This year I just approached them and said, ‘This year, instead of where you guys get something, maybe we can give it to somebody else who isn’t as fortunate as you guys.’ They were all for it.” Team members each contributed $20 for the purchase of gifts, which included mini hockey sticks, helmets, hockey pads, several dolls and a

full set of Hericanes hockey hats. The Hericanes travelled by bus from Wellesley to Hamilton in an event that doubled as a team-building exercise (the group had recently admitted several new team members). Once there, they presented the gifts to the hospital staff, who distributed them to the children on Christmas morning. “I

talked to the nurses afterwards, and they said the mini-sticks and hockey hats that we handed out were kind of a big hit,” said Dietrich. Dietrich knew the cause would have personal relevance for the Hericanes: a teammate’s sister is currently registered there for muscular dystrophy, and four of the team’s players had stayed in McMaster at

some point. One of them was Dietrich’s daughter Kara, who received some unexpected generosity when she was hospitalized for a head injury. “While my daughter was in the hospital, she received a gift from who-knows-who, and it kinda made her day,” remembered Dietrich. “She HERICANES | 13


12 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

THE SCORE | MINOR SPORT RESULTS WOOLWICH WILDCATS

Tyke: SELECT Jan. 12 vs. Milton Woolwich: 0 Milton: 0 Shutout: Parker Collingwood Jan. 13 vs. Oakville Woolwich: 2 Oakville: 4 Goals: Dustin Good x2 Assists: Austin Schnarr, Ethan Bickerton, Sam Hacock

Novice: MAJOR A Jan. 12 vs. Owen Sound Woolwich: 3 Owen Sound: 2 Goals: AJ Shaw-McMahon, Liam Eveleigh, Ian Speiran Assists: Ian Speiran, Zack Bender, Tyler Brezynskie, Mitchell Young Jan. 13 vs. Brampton Woolwich: 4 Brampton: 1 Goals: Ian Speiran x3, Liam Eveleigh Assists: Andrew Gear x2, Sebastian Garrett, Zack Bender, Tyler Brezynskie, AJ ShawMcMahon

Novice: AE Jan. 13 vs. Orangeville Woolwich: 2 Orangeville: 4 Goals: Lucas Carson, Shelby Rempel Assists: Carter Cousineau, Jocelyn Pickard

Novice: LL #1 Jan. 12 vs. St. George Woolwich: 1 St. George: 5

Brendan Grant Jan. 13 vs. New Hamburg Woolwich: 7 New Hamburg: 1 Goals: Grayson McGirr x3, Tyler Newton, Andrew Weber, Hunter Weigel, Andrew Kieswetter Assists: Andrew Weber x2, Conner Waters, Grayson McGirr, Tanner Mann x2, Matthew Thayler, Andrew Brubacher

Jan. 11 vs. Tavistock Woolwich: 6 Tavistock: 2 Goals: Ben Fretz x3, Danny Soehner, Mac Benham, Jamie Reichard Assists: Matthew Brubacher x4, Braxten Breen, Ben Fretz Jan. 12 vs. Paris Woolwich: 2 Paris: 4 Goals: Matthew Brubacher, Ben Fretz

Jan. 6 vs. Paris Woolwich: 3 Paris: 3 Goals: Thomas Hill-Ring, Tristan Kraemer, Thomas Hill-Ring Assists: Evan Catton, Parker Alles Jan. 12 vs. Ayr Woolwich: 2 Ayr: 0 Goals: Riley Snider, Nolan Karger Assists: Thomas Hill-Ring, Cale Waechter, Daniel Kelly Shutout: John Kilgour Jan. 14 vs. Twin Centre Woolwich: 8 Twin Centre: 1 Goals: Nolan Karger x2, Riley Snider, Cale Waechter x2, Ryan Brubacher x3 Assists: Thomas Hill-Ring x3, Nolan Karger, Riley Snider x3, Daniel Kelly, Ryan Brubacher, Nolan Karger, Evan Catton, Jonathan Staken

PeeWee: MAJOR A Jan. 10 vs. New Hamburg Woolwich: 4 New Hamburg: 4 Goals: Chase Mooder x2, Austin Flaherty x2 Assists: Daniel Carr x2, Brad Hale, Brady MacDonald, Riley Runstedler

Jan. 11 vs. Orangeville Woolwich: 4 Orangeville: 4 Goals: Nolan Hislop, Eli Baldin, Brody Waters x2 Assists: Brody Waters, Mackenzie Willms, Griffen Rollins, Austin Cousineau, Eli Baldin

PeeWee: LL #2 Jan. 8 vs. Twin Centre Woolwich: 1 Twin Centre: 4 Goals: Matt Dunn Jan. 11 vs. Embro Woolwich: 3 Embro: 2 Goals: Blake Richardson, Tim Brunkard x2 Assists: Brendan Knipfel x2, Ryan Belanger Jan. 15 vs. Twin Centre Woolwich: 1 Twin Centre: 7 Goals: Ryan Belanger Assists: Tim Brunkard, Brendan Knipfel

Atom: MAJOR AA Jan. 12 vs. St. Catharine’s Woolwich: 1 St. Catharine’s: 2 Goals: Conner Bradley Assists: Isiah Katsube, Brett Allen

Atom: AE Jan. 10 vs. New Hamburg Woolwich: 2 New Hamburg: 1 Goals: Tanner Mann x2 Assists: Grayson McGirr x2,

TWIN CENTRE HERICANES

PeeWee: LL Jan. 9 vs. Kitchener Twin Centre: 3 Kitchener: 3 Goals: Kate Seip x3 Assists: Charlotte Birrell x2, Grace Kalbfleisch

Atom: LL #3 Jan. 12 vs. New Hamburg Woolwich: 3 New Hamburg: 2 Goals: Nate Curtis, Jesus FloresDyck, Cameron Martin Assists: Cameron Martin, Sam Nitsche, Nate Curtis, Gavin Wright

Bantam: MAJOR A Jan. 12 vs. Owen Sound Woolwich: 2 Owen Sound: 3 Goals: Tyler Townsend, Aaron Weigel Assists: Aaron Weigel, Tyler Townsend, Daniel Kauth Jan. 13 vs. Burlington Woolwich: 1 Burlington: 4 Goals: Tyler Martin Assists: Jake Lewis, Chace

PeeWee: REP Jan. 10 vs. Ingersoll Twin Centre: 3 Ingersoll: 0 Goals: Tyler Munro, Matt Sommerville, Wes McLachlan Assists: Josh Monk Shutout: Brett Springer Jan. 13 vs. Port Dover Twin Centre: 6 Port Dover: 1 Goals: Tyson Bolender x2, Wes McLachlan, Brett Hartin, Erik Holmes x2 Assists: Mitch Esbaugh x2, Cole Bender, Matt Temniuk x2, Erik Holmes, Aiden Krueger

Atom: LL #1

PeeWee: AA Novice: LL #2

NOVICE GIRLS TAKE SILVER IN WOODSTOCK

The Woolwich Wild Novice C girls’ team won silver in the Woodstock Tournament Jan. 4-6. Coaches: Meg Bauman, Brent Ravelle, Rebecca Veitch, Mike Ratcliffe, Steve Sabean. Third row: Ratcliffe, Maddy Savage, Brooke Remple, Amy Dueck, Haylee Clemmer, Carly Bauman. Second row: Payton Ravelle, Josie Brown, Teesha Weber, Taylor Schmitt, Annabel Musselman. Front: Maggie Sabean. [SUBMITTED] McCallum Goals: Jenna Duimering x2, Rawlinson, Adam Elliott Dunnville: 1 Novice: LL #2 Meagan Langer, Gracie Durrer Jason Cripps Tournament Game 2 vs. Port Dover Bantam: MINOR A Assists: Claire Robertson x2, Kitchener, ON – Dec. 27-28 Woolwich: 2 Jan. 5 vs. Burlington Midget: MINOR A Gracie Durrer, Dezarae Kirkey, Game 1 vs. Waterloo Port Dover: 2 Woolwich: 2 Jan. 14 vs. Caldedon Jennifer Mitchell Goals: Hayden Fretz, Kyle Woolwich: 7 Burlington: 3 Woolwich: 3 Gingrich Waterloo: 1 Goals: Owen Read, Jonah Caledon: 1 Goals: Makenna x4, Brealyn, Assists: Nathan Kocher, Daniel Boehm Goals: Cole Conlin x2, Troy Alison, Eadyn Bullock, Simon Zenker Atom: B Jan. 6 vs. Guelph Nechanicky Game 3 vs. Wainfleet Jan. 13 vs. North Halton Assists: Eadyn, Makenna Woolwich: 4 Assists: Matthew Leger, Woolwich: 1 Woolwich: 2 Game 2 vs. Stratford Guelph: 2 Nicholas Pavanel, Alex Uttley Wainfleet: 0 North Halton: 0 Woolwich: 11 Goals: Jonah Boehm, Mitchell Goals: Noah Bauman Goals: Alana, Mya Stratford Aces: 0 Newson, Jordan Gamble x2 HOCKEY Goals: Braelyn x3, Makenna x3, Assists: Mya, Maddy, Julia Assists: Cameron Rose, Jonah TOURNAMENTS Assists: Nick Lunz Gwyneth x2, Faith, Eadyn x2 Boehm, Owen Read x2, Aaron Shutout: Liam O’Brien Bantam: BB Novice: LL #3 Logan, Mitch Waters Assists: Faith, Kaitlyn, Eadyn, Richmond Hill Tournament Jan. 12 vs. West Huron Jane, Payton, Lauren, Tia, Jan. 13 vs. New Hamburg Richmond Hill, ON – Jan. 12-13 Makenna, Gwyneth Woolwich: 2 WOOLWICH Woolwich: 5 Game 1 vs. Lambton WILD West Huron: 1 New Hamburg: 3 Shutout: Alison Woolwich: 4 Goals: Jen McDonald, Brooke Game 3 vs. Grand River Goals: Jonah Boehm, Alex Novice: LL 7108 Lambton: 3 Mulder Turchan, Jordan Gamble, Mitch Woolwich: 0 Jan. 13 vs. Waterloo Goals: Coleton Benham x3, Waters, Mitchell Newson Assists: Meghan Martin, Megan Grand River: 4 Woolwich: 3 Ben Wilkie Lair, Leah Bauman Assists: Jacob Uridil x2, Waterloo: 1 Cameron Rose x2, Mitch Waters, Assists: Michael Gear, Coleton Midget: B Goals: Ayla Brubacher, Annie Benham, Turner Duldhardt Mitchell Newson, Owen Read, Orillia Tournament Midget: B Sargent, Madison Martin Ryan Conrad Orillia, ON – Jan. 11-13 Game 2 vs. Oak Ridges Jan. 9 vs. Twin Centre Assists: Emily Sargent, Ayla Game 1 vs. Twin Centre Woolwich: 1 Woolwich: 1 Brubacher, Claire Jacklin, Paige OR: 4 Woolwich: 1 Twin Centre: 2 Woods, Avery Leech Bantam: AE Goals: Corbin Schmidt Twin Centre: 1 Goals: Lindsey Bauman Jan. 12 vs. Owen Sound Goals: Claire Hanley Assists: Turner Duldhardt Assists: Kendra Harold Woolwich: 3 Novice: C Game 3 vs. Thornton Assists: Jennifer Norris, Gillian Owen Sound: 1 Jan. 7 vs. Stratford Olsthoorn Woolwich: 3 Goals: Connor Runstedler, Thornton: 3 Woolwich: 3 Game 2 vs. Grand River TOURNAMENT Connor Goss, Liam Dickson Stratford: 2 GAMES Goals: Coleton Benham x3 Woolwich: 1 Assists: Brett Henry, Gareth Goals: Haylee Clemmer x2, Grand River: 0 Assists: Ben Moyer, Ben Wilkie, Novice: C Rowland, Benton Weber, Amy Dueck Goals: Kendra Harold Mike Gear Woodstock Tournament Danyal Rennie Assists: Josie Brown, Carly Shutout: Lauren LeSage Woodstock, ON – Jan. 4-5 Jan. 13 vs. Dundas Atom: LL #2 Bauman Game 3 vs. West NorthumGame 1 vs. Sudbury Woolwich: 3 Richmond Hill Tournament Jan. 9 vs. Twin Centre berland Dundas: 0 Woolwich: 5 Richmond Hill, ON – Jan 12-13 Woolwich: 2 Woolwich: 3 Sudbury: 0 Goals: Brett Henry, Luke Game 1 vs. Oak Ridges Twin Centre: 1 West Northumberland: 0 Charter, Mathew Uhrig Goals: Haylee Clemmer x5 Woolwich: 1 Goals: Haylee Clemmer, Carly Goals: Claire Hanley x2, Lindsay Assists: Connor Goss x2, Liam Assists: Madison Savage x2, Oak Ridges: 0 Bauman Bauman Dickson, Connor Runstedler, Amy Dueck x2, Kate Ratcliffe, Goals: Simon Shantz Assists: Haylee Clemmer Shutout: Lauren LeSage Blake Doerbecker Taylor Schmitt x2, Payton Jan. 12 vs. Waterloo Assists: Tyson Kraemer Game 4 vs. Twin Centre Ravelle, Teesha Weber) Shutout: Dylan Creelman Woolwich: 1 Shutout: James Berti Woolwich: 2 Shutout: Maggie Sabean Waterloo: 7 Game 2 vs. Oak Ridges Twin Centre: 0 Game 2 vs. Sarnia Goals: Haylee Clemmer Woolwich: 3 Goals: Lindsey Bauman, Bantam: LL #1 Woolwich: 2 Oak Ridges: 6 Michelle Bauman Jan. 5 vs. Paris Sarnia: 2 Goals: Tyson Kraemer x2, Shutout: Lauren LeSage Woolwich: 1 Goals: Taylor Schmitt, Haylee Novice: LL #2 Patrick Perry Paris: 4 Clemmer Jan. 12 vs. Waterloo Game 3 vs. Point Edward Goals: Nathan Horst Assists: Annabel Musselman, Woolwich: 7 TWIN CENTRE Woolwich: 2 Assists: Max Bender, Nathan Payton Ravelle STARS Waterloo: 2 Point Edward: 2 Rawlinson Game 3 vs. Sudbury Goals: Braelyn x2, Eadyn x2, Goals: Patrick Perry x2 Novice: LL #1 Jan. 12 vs. Embro Makenna x2, Alison Woolwich: 2 Jan. 14 vs. Woolwich Woolwich: 4 Sudbury: 0 Assists: Braelyn, Faith, Tia Twin Centre: 1 Embro: 8 Goals: Haylee Clemmer, Carly PeeWee: LL #1 Woolwich: 8 Goals: Joe Hanley, Jeff Talbot, Bauman Wainfleet Tournament PeeWee: LL Luke Decorte, Ryan Diemert Wainfleet, ON – Jan. 12-13 Assists: Taylor Schmitt, Annabel Goals: Cameron Butler Jan. 12 vs. Stratford Assists: Andrew Rouble Assists: Ryan Diemert, Luke Musselman Game 1 vs. Dunnville Woolwich: 4 Decorte, Jordan Luis, Noah Woolwich: 0 Stratford: 4

HOCKEY TOURNAMENTS

PeeWee: LL

Kyla Kowalik Memorial Tournament Baden, ON – Jan. 11-12 Game 1 vs. Waterloo #2 Twin Centre: 1 Waterloo #2: 3 Goals: Janessa Pretorius Assists: Marissa Lebold Game 2 vs. Waterloo #4 Twin Centre: 4 Waterloo #4: 2 Goals: Grace Kalbfleisch x2, Charlotte Birrell, Laura Martin Game 3 vs. Grand River Twin Centre: 0 Grand River: 4

Intermediate: LL

Cambridge Roadrunners Tournament Cambridge, ON – Jan. 11-13 Game 1 vs. London Shaw Twin Centre: 2 London Shaw: 0 Goals: Stephanie Lorentz, Emily Detzler Assists: Jaide Shantz Shutout: Lindsay Dietrich Game 2 vs. Hamilton Twin Centre: 2 Hamilton: 0 Goals: Carling Cisecki, Janessa Heywood Assists: Brittany Wagner x2, Sarah Van Allen, Holly Lorentz Shutout: Lindsay Dietrich Game 3 vs. Guelph Twin Centre: 6 Guelph: 5 Goals: Janessa Heywood, Sarah Miltenburg x2, Jaide Shantz, Shannon Lorentz, Lisa Guenther Assists: Kim Finn, Shannon Lorentz x2, Sarah Van Allen, Janessa Heywood x2, Lisa Guenther, Jaide Shantz, Sarah Miltenburg, Carling Cisecki Game 3 vs. London Pileggi Twin Centre: 0 London Pileggi: 1

RINGETTE

Woolwich: U12 Jan. 13 vs. Godrich Woolwich: 4 Godrich: 5 Goals: Maddy Camm, Ava Henderson, Brianna Jacobi, Maddy Waters Assists: Rosie Martin x2


SPORTS | 13

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

NOT SO GREAT OUTDOORSMAN / STEVE GALEA

Putting slot size to work in the best possible way OPEN COUNTRY Yesterday I went fishing on a lake where a slot size was in effect. This term describes a size range – in this case, 40 to 55 centimetres. And any fish of the species designated – in this case, lake trout – whose length falls within that range must be released. The theory is that these fish are prime breeders and returning them will ensure healthy populations in years to come. In my experience, it works well too.

My only issue is that the fish I caught yesterday was ugly. As such, I didn’t think he stood much of a chance with the ladies. Don’t get me wrong, I put it back. I believe in the law. But I couldn’t help think that this guy was probably a virgin. Yes, he was awkward, gangly, shy, short of cash, physically unattractive, with big bulging eyes and a balding head. Oh, and he had bad breath, poor grooming habits and probably drove a mini-van. In short, he didn’t stand a chance as a breeder. I knew that if I kept him, I would cause no harm to the population.

Still, I have a soft spot for creatures like that. And more than anything, I believe in love. Not the love that lasts for 24-hours either. No, I believe in a strong and everlasting love between consenting fish in the slot size. A love that transcends looks. Maybe I’ve been reading too many romance novels (if A.J. McLane’s The Practical Fly Fisherman can be considered one) but even as I released that fish, I was hoping that he would swim to the deeps and run into his soul mate. Who knows? Perhaps I even played a part in this. Maybe, as he got back to

the reef looking all startled and disheveled after his brush with death, he’d bump into a female trout carrying an armful of paper. The collision would send the papers flying and he’d clumsily apologize and help her collect them. Then, she’d introduce herself and he’d awkwardly do likewise. And sweating a bit, he would take off his glasses and she’d say something like, “You have nice eyes, Steve.” I mean, “You have nice eyes.” He’d blush a little and then divulge that he’s been having a hard day – a hard life in fact and he just wishes that there was something

KINGS: Weekend more costly than just points in the standings FROM | 11

frame, a breakthrough came too late for the Kings who managed to make it a one-goal game at 15:11 courtesy of Craig Johnson. It would remain 2-1 at the final buzzer. Sunday would be the tragic cake topper as the Kings failed to overcome the Stratford Cullitons. Again, the Kings struggled to catch up to an overwhelming lead. The Kings found them-

selves on the defensive, as the puck kept finding its way back to their end until Stratford made it 1-0 at 12:06. Steven Jakiela would even up the game for most of the second frame with a goal at 3:42, but the tiebreaker would come from the Cullitons, who presented the Kings with what would prove to be an insurmountable lead, scoring at 17:48 and again at 19:36. The third frame was a struggle as Stratford fought to keep their lead

intact, and the Kings made a last desperate attempt. It was Stratford that scored the only goal of final period at 17:09 to clinch the 4-1 victory. It was a relatively clean game for the Kings who took 14 of the 34 penalty minutes. Despite the losses, the coaching staff remained optimistic. DeSilva was happy with the effort of the remaining players on the ice, he explained after Sunday’s game. “I thought we played

very well last night, we just couldn’t get a break. We played fairly well tonight, we made some mental errors, and we had too many men on the ice. It’ll come, we have a tough weekend next week, it’s going to be a lesson for them and it’ll just prepare us better for the playoffs.” The Kings are on the road in Caledonia Friday night before returning home to face Cambridge on Sunday night. Game time is 7 p.m.

more than his cats. At the mere mention of cats, she’d get all excited because – what are the odds? – she loves cats too. Next thing you know, they’d be lost in conversation and time would be flying by. Suddenly, she’d remember an appointment and run off before he ever got a chance to ask her out or get her number. This would lead to him waiting in the same spot for several weeks – which isn’t weird – for her to pass by again. Once, he’d think he caught a fleeting glimpse of her on the subway. But, other than that, no luck. Then one day while swim-

ming down the street, he’d see her walking fin in fin with her boyfriend – a fish that he knows as a huge jerk. He’d try to be noble, but eventually he’d confront her and say, “What are you doing? He’s no good for you! You deserve better! You deserve a fish who thinks you walk on water!” “Who?” she cries. “Who?” And then he’d look her in the eye and she’d see something she never saw before – a blue and silver Little Cleo jigging seductively near her. And she’d take it. Lucky for me, she’ll be a keeper. And he’ll meet her shy sister at the funeral. Yes, slot sizes work.

HERICANES: Girls eager

to help with a cause that had a personal meaning to many FROM | 11

remembers that, and she still has it.” “I kinda felt a little bit sad for all the kids that were in the hospital,” said the Hericanes’ goalie, Kylie Zacharczuk. “Then I felt happy at the same time because I was donating the presents to them.” Ah, but was there ever a small tinge of melancholy?

A moment when the team looked back longingly at present-filled stockings of years past, and coveted another bounty of Christmas gifts to put under their own tree? “Yeah… a little bit,” laughed Zacharczuk. And even still, the goalie said there are plans afoot to repeat the gesture next Christmas. Now that’s Yuletide cheer.

JACKS: Two more home games to finish off the regular season will determine seeding in playoffs FROM | 11

over the weekend. The first period yielded little for the Wellesley team, with Tavistock earning the only goal at 12:23. Going into the second frame the Jacks were not to be one-upped for long, as Reid Denstedt got his team on the board at 3:44, with

assists from Cody Tapsell and Derek Lebold. Shawn Fitzpatrick made it 2-1 Jacks at 5:45. Tavistock would restore a one-goal lead late in the frame, potting two in a row at 15:04 and again at 15:55 but the two teams went into third tied after Corey Way knocked one in sec-

onds later at 16:25. In third, a two-goal early lead and good defensive play spelled victory for the Jacks. Way got another at 0:29, followed by Devon Wagner at 0:42 with assists from Tyler Eckert and Troy Williams. Tavistock would follow suit with an early goal of their own at 4:31

but that would be the last for the home team, leaving Wellesley to collect another road win. Home again on Sunday, Wellesley made quick work of Norfolk, doing all of the game’s scoring. The visitors didn’t put up much of a fight as the Jacks outshot the Rebels 20-11 in the

first frame, claiming three goals: Wagner at 2:44 and 5:47, followed by Eckert at 8:44, both assisted by Williams. Despite what looked like an easy win, Fitzpatrick was quick to praise Norfolk’s netminder. “Their goalie is outstanding; we fired a lot of pucks at them and we scored some wonderful goals,” he said. In the second frame Wellesley eased up on the offense, managing only nine attempts on the net to Norfolk’s 11, but still managed to surge ahead with Michael Pollice knocking one in at 13:54.

Already down by four points, Norfolk decided to take their Good Samaritan spirit even further by donating a generous four goals to the winning team. Eckert got back on the board at 6:26 followed by Blake Hetherington at 8:11 and Josh Herd at 9:52 before Wagner earned himself a last-minute hat trick at 19:33. The Jacks wrap up the regular season at home this weekend, with final seeding up for grabs. Hosting Hagersville Friday night, Wellesley plays out the run against Ayr Saturday night. Both games start at 7:30 p.m.

WOOLWICH

YOUTH SOCCER

2013 REGISTRATION DATES Thurs, Jan. 24, 2013 TIME: 7-9 pm DATE: Sat, Jan. 26, 2013 TIME: 9-12 pm

DATE:

Wellesley’s Devon Wagner attacks the Norfolk net during Saturday’s home game. Wagner earned himself a hat trick as the Apple Jacks skated to an easy 8-0 win. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

5 First Street East, Elmira | (519) 669-1000 www.woolwichyouthsoccer.com

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14 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

VENTURE FOOD FOR THOUGHT/ OWEN ROBERTS

NEW BUSINESS / ON THE MEND

Predicting the future with confidence

Injuries not limited to campus Longtime SJK athletic therapist opens new clinic to extend services to the wider community ELENA MAYSTRUK Rugby is one of the riskiest sports played in high schools, followed closely by field hockey, basketball and wresting. Patching up the teams at St. John’sKilmarnock School (SJK) for the past 10 years, athletic therapist Scott Gallagher of Maryhill has seen it all, with fractures, dislocations and concussions being at the top of the list. That experience has prompted him to flex his entrepreneurial muscle with a new clinic located on the SJK campus, where he’s opening the doors to both students and the public. Gallagher presented the school with a business plan for his clinic back in 1999, when the school was not yet big enough to accept the service he offered. For a decade, Gallagher has worked at SJK on a contract basis, tending to the school’s athletes at varsity games, offering therapy and rehabilitation services. It wasn’t until this year that he was able to set up a contract with the fastexpanding school and open a private practice, continuing to offer services to his athletes but now also to the public. “Having worked clinically for 10 years I wanted to do more with teams and athletes. It’s a perfect hybrid,” he said.

Operating out of an office on campus, Gallagher Athletic Therapy @ SJK has been running for about a week and will be having its grand opening today (Saturday) 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. For students, Gallagher is a key staff member to have on the field, but his daily role is limited to high-risk situations. This leaves his services open to the public during regular hours at his office. Gallagher has a love of sports but says treatments are not limited to athletes. He can help those just trying to stay in shape and is used to healing the everyday aches and pains, treating “everybody from my 17-month-old to my next door neighbour who has a sore neck.” During his career Gallagher has assisted at various championship events such as the World Junior and Canadian Figure Skating Championships and the Canadian Road Nationals for cycling. He has also held a position at a clinic in Cambridge treating the sufferers of motor vehicle accidents and workplace injuries. The clinic consists of an office where Gallagher will conduct consultations with patients and some of the treatments he offers. He works with clients on prevention of various physical ailments and injuries, immediate care and rehabilitation.

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SJK’s athletic therapist, Scott Gallagher, now offers his services to the public with a new practice located on the Breslau-area campus. [SUBMITTED]

During treatment patients may work with specially selected equipment, and work on adapting to various activities and facilities offered. Gallagher can perform many of the treatments right in his clinic but also makes use of exercise

rooms on campus, as well as outdoor facilities. He can help patients with any braces or equipment they might need and offers athletes training advice on pushing themselves further in their sports.

VENTURE PROFILE BUSINESS: Gallagher Athletic Theraphy LOCATION: 2201 Shantz Station Rd. EMAIL: sgallagher@sjkschool.org OWNER: Scott Gallagher

THERAPY | 15

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VENTURE | 15

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

ROBERTS: Ontarians see the value of universities, opposing cuts that reduce quality of education FROM | 14

in research-intensive Ontario … and further to the point, in our highly technological region. George Dixon, event cohost and vice-president of research at University of Waterloo, describes Life in 2030 as an opportunity for researchers to connect with local people in a unique way “and share their hopes, concerns, and expectations for the next generation of Ontarians.” Indeed, research addresses all those matters – what we hope for, what we care about, and

what we expect as results. The latter is particularly pertinent. As Dixon notes, universities are publicly funded, and their work should be shared with the communities to whom they are accountable. This already occurs in several ways, including an approach called knowledge mobilization, a full-circle connection between researchers and end users. As well, universities reach people through the media, which recognizes research stories are exciting, relevant and interesting.

But with new developments occurring daily, not to mention the current environment of greater fiscal responsibility, there’s no such thing as enough transparency and outreach. To that end, Life in 2030 is another imaginative way to reach people, particularly because it’s a provincewide cooperative among 21 research-intensive universities, dedicated to relevancy. For example, at next week’s event in Kitchener, participants will hear how principles behind music

improvisation – cooperation, imagination and active listening among them – can be applied to increasing harmony inside fractious communities. Other topics concern vehicles that are programmed to avoid crashes, comprehensive approaches to helping children learn math, and how technology and biology are integrating in new ways through something called cellular nanotechnology. There’s no question Ontarians value their universities. A new poll from

the Ontario Confederation of University Faculty Associations says while most Ontarians think it’s important to reduce the provincial shortfall, more than two-thirds of them oppose cost-cutting measures that reduce the quality of education. And almost 70 per cent think universities must combine research and teaching to fulfill their mandates as educational institutions. Life in 2030 is free and open to the public. It will be held at The Tannery, 151 Charles St. W. in Kitchener,

from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Space is at a premium, so those interested in attending are asked to register at http:// yourontarioresearch.ca/ life-in-2030. As of last week seats were going fast; if you can’t make it, you can still see it streamed live from the registration address, and follow it on Twitter at #life2030. Life in 2030 is a great opportunity to take an educated look ahead. No one knows exactly what the future holds, but through research, the crystal ball gets a little clearer.

THERAPY: Having experienced injuries firsthand, he’s an advocate for boosting safety in sports FROM | 14

On the field, Gallagher continues to be a staple at SJK, assessing injuries, providing first aid and managing the physical trauma that is a risk of any contact sport. An athletic enthusiast himself, Gallagher has seen his share of concussions, a reality that’s made him a strong advocate for safety in sports. He sees concussions at the top of the list for high-risk injuries, and has worked with local physicians to get the word out on the importance of providing proper testing, treatment and prevention of brain injury. Gallagher said he knows firsthand the importance of treating physical trauma. At 26 he had an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) replacement after sustaining multiple

injuries to the knee in his youth. Evident from his current calling, his work with students didn’t end with his post-secondary education. Gallagher has a close connection with the certification program for athletic therapists at

Sheridan College and has worked with the Universities of Waterloo, Guelph and Ryerson, as well as Conestoga College. With his new venture, Gallagher hopes to gain a higher profile in the community, extending his services beyond the campus. “There are so many people that don’t know the service is here, when I start talking about what I can offer, then people are really interested. Everybody has aches and pains that they want to address, it’s a matter of having a convenient service for them,” he said. Gallagher Athletic Therapy is located on the SJK campus, 2201 Shantz Station Rd. in Breslau. For more information on the clinic, e-mail Scott Gallagher at sgallagher@ sjkschool.org.

After ten years of working with student athletes at the school, Gallagher has seen a wide variety of injuries.

[SUBMITTED]


16 | THE ARTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

THE ARTS ON STAGE / IN THE COUNTRY

The music, like the truth, will out It’s been a busy few years for Wendy Lynn Snider, who brings her band to the Commercial Tavern next weekend STEVE KANNON In her forties before making the jump to singing in front of an audience, Wendy Lynn Snider has certainly been making up for lost time in the last few years, playing a steady stream of gigs with her band. An upcoming stop will find her at Maryhill’s Commercial Tavern on January 27. She and her band will be playing a mix of classic country, new country and gospel tunes. Although she’d always sung at parties and family gatherings, it wasn’t until her new husband, Curtt Snider, came along that she was encouraged to get out on stage. In fairly quick fashion, her long-dormant musical aspirations got some new life. The Sniders wrote a number of songs together, including “Online Flower,” which appeared on her first CD, Life is Good, recorded in Nashville. She began performing again to support the album, touring all over Ontario and doing guest

Wendy Lynn Snider promises a high-energy show when her band hits the stage at Maryhill’s Commercial Tavern Jan. 27. appearances with other musical acts such as St. Catharines’ Toasted Western Band. It wasn’t until 2010 that she re-connected with high school friend and longtime music industry professional Michael Peters that she moved to the next stage of

her musical resurgence. Peters brought in industry veteran Thomas Wade to produce a new self-titled album for Snider that features a blend of traditional, new country, and country gospel songs. The CD also features CCMA award-winning players Shane Guse on

[SUBMITTED]

fiddle, Doug Johnson on steel and Wade on guitars. Today, the Wendy Lynn Snider Band – 2012 Niagara Music Award’s “Country Band of the Year” – consists of Steve Fortin on lead guitar/vocals (Toasted Western Swing Band, Walter Ostenak Band), Peter

Right for me or right for anyone?

Contact me to discuss. Joyce Reimer Vice President, Wealth Advisor 53 Arthur St. West, Elmira ON Tel: 519-669-4622 joyce.reimer@nbpcd.com

Temagami and favoured the songs of Johnny Cash – she’s partial to performing some of the classics, but includes new country and some classic rock in the mix “I just love singing.” For her third album, now in the works, she’ll be focusing on country gospel songs, so some of those may make it into the set list next weekend. “We’re going to do a lot of the classic country stuff, some stuff off of the album, and probably a few new country songs just to show what we can do,” she laughed. It promises to be a highenergy show, with plenty of toe-tapping tunes, Snider added. “It’s all the stuff close to my heart that we really enjoy doing.” The Wendy Lynn Snider Band takes to the stage at the Commercial Tavern January 27 at 3 p.m. Tickets are $10, available the day of the show at the venue, 1303 Maryhill Rd., or by calling 519-648-3644. For more information, visit www. commercialtavern.ca.

Basics Beauty & Beyond

Work with an Advisor who’ll take the time to know you.

As a dedicated professional I strive to provide a high level of service and expertise for all my clients. I can offer in-depth market understanding to help build stronger portfolios and an investment strategy that’s right for your life.

Sisk on bass/vocals (from the Good Brothers), Murad Gundaz on drums and Albert Fortney on steel. “I’ve come a long way in a very short period of time,” said Snider on the line from St. Catharines. “We’re always very busy these days.” In addition to her own band, Snider also performs with musicians/recording artists Steve Fortin, Colin Amey and Wade, among others. She’s also part of the Toasted Western Swing Band (which also features Grammy winner Walter Ostenak, Steve Kostyk and Fortin), The Tribute To The Nashville Stars Band and Jimmy Buffett Tribute Band. Busy may be something of an understatement given that she’s still doing her day job. “We do it because we love it – it’s a passion and dream, and I’m very grateful that we got a chance to do it.” A lifelong fan of country music – her father Leonard entertained at the local pubs back home in

Join us January 26 & 27 for the

Official Grand Opening of the Timber Barn! Come in for a tour of our custom design showroom.

Check out some great sales on our unique home décor!

Free on-site consultations with our Design Team!

f your o o t o s a ph nd Send u inter toes, a i tired w mani/ped ! WIN a ntine’s Day m le co for Va ser@yahoo. a nl bauma

Bauman

LASER & ELECTROLYSIS HAIR REMOVAL

Kitchens | Bathrooms | Timber Frames | Stairs | Flooring | Reclaimed| Doors ® “BMO (M-bar Roundel symbol)” and “Making Money Make Sense” are registered trade-marks of Bank of Montreal, used under licence. ® “Nesbitt Burns” is a registered trade-mark of BMO Nesbitt Burns Corporation Limited, used under licence. BMO Nesbitt Burns Inc. and BMO Nesbitt Burns Ltée are indirect subsidiaries of Bank of Montreal. If you are already a client of BMO Nesbitt Burns, please contact your Investment Advisor for more information.

Member-Canadian Investor Protection Fund

CUSTOM DESIGN SHOWROOM AND UNIQUE HOME DÉCOR

Call to book all of your appointments.

8 Spring St., St. Jacobs | 519.664.3245 | info@timberbarn.ca

35 Arthur St. N., Elmira

519-669-0237


CLASSIFIED | 17

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

CLASSIFIED

CLASSIFIED DEADLINE:

THURSDAYS BY 10AM HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

DO YOU WANT? A wide range of jobs? Welding? Millwrighting? Assembly? Blueprint reading? Inside work? Outside work? Responsibility?

Flordale, On.

LOCAL & LONG DISTANCE AZ LIVESTOCK DRIVER Contact Neil:

519.572.6784

Send Driver’s Abstract and Resume to:

Fax: 519-669-1874

Then you should be working for us.

Email: mardaletrans@cyg.net

WE’RE LOOKING FOR:

Husky Farm Equipment Limited

Fitter Welder

(minimum 3 years experience) (must be able to pass CWB welding test, G.M.A.W. F.C.A.W.)

has the following position available: PURCHASING MANAGER

Mig Welder

(must be able to pass CWB welding test, G.M.A.W. F.C.A.W.) Are you capable of: • Layout of plate and sheet metal from blueprints • Able to work with minimum supervision • High quality workmanship • Regular and punctual attendance

A full time position is available February 1st, ordering supplies and material for a complete full circle agricultural manufacturing operation.

WE OFFER: • Competitive wages • Company uniforms • Pension plan • Company benefits Apply in person between 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. OR fax or e-mail resume to:

M&G MILLWRIGHTS LIMITED R.R.#1 Reg. Rd. 19

519-669-5105

fax: 519-669-1450 email: bob@mgmill.com

INSTALLATION & SERVICE ELECTRICIAN Local firm looking to add to our service team. Work directly with customers to meet installation and service needs on computerized equipment. Must be comfortable with day travel and be able to manager time responsibly. Position offers competitive wages, full benefits and long term security for the successful applicant. APPLY TO:

HOW TO REACH US

A CAREER IS WAITING FOR YOU in the farm equipment industry. We are looking for an AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT TECHNICIAN. The products we sell and service are world class which help our farmers grow the very best food in the most efficient ways. Please apply if you want to make a difference in helping feed the world. Please send your resume to keith@stoltzsales.com or to Stoltz Sales & Service, 6805 Line 86 West, Elmira, ON. ELMIRA-BASED COMPANY LOOKING to hire an experienced float driver/heavy equipment operator on a full time basis. Must hold a valid A/Z license, be a self-starter and able to work as a team member. Job requires equipment maintenance and occasional overnight periods away from home. Please email or fax resume and references to rick@sittlergrinding.com or fax 1-877-773-8004. I NEED SOMEONE to learn my business. Must have leadership ability and a strong desire to succeed. Call 519-7484785 and ask for Don or Jan.

WORK WANTED I AM INTERESTED in cleaning your house weekly or biweekly. Please contact me at 226-820-4842.

FOR SALE COZY QUILTS WINTER Sale. 20% off all fabrics. Large selection of broadcloth, quilters and craft prints, flannels, cheater tops, and 110” wide fabric. Sat. Jan. 26 Feb. 9. 2 miles east of Drayton. 519-638-2588. MATTRESS AND BOX Spring, new, never used, still in sealed bag. Sacrifice $195. Delivery available. Temperpedic Memory Foam Mattress, new, never used, in sealed bag. Like sleeping on a cloud. No pressure points. Bankruptcy sale $595, box spring $200 extra. Delivery available. 519-635-8737. COUCH, ALL LEATHER, caramel colour, excellent condition. $300 o.b.o. 519-669-8082.

RENTALS DRAYTON - 2 Bedroom basement apartment, perfect for bachelor. Separate entrance, full bathroom, living room, shared kitchen and laundry only. Full use of outdoor space, parking available for one car, all inclusive. Call 519-638-5020 or 519-504-6959. Available immediately. ELMIRA - SMALL, well kept, 1 Bedroom, above store downtown. Available immediately. $535/ mth + utilities. Call 519-669-5431. ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT for rent. No pets, no smoking. References required. $700/month. 519669-5751. TWO BEDROOM BUNGALOW, outskirts of Moorefield. $1000/mth + utilities, natural gas heating. Double garage. Available March 1. Call 519-638-2725.

PETS PUREBRED GERMAN SHEPHERD puppies for sale, ready Jan. 30. No papers. $500. Please call 519-729-8711.

MAKE THIS SPACE YOUR HOME!

AUCTIONS AUCTION SALE OF Antiques, collectibles, old tools, miniature horse drawn wagons, household effects, JD riding mower & miscellaneous items, to be held at the K.W. Khaki Club, 2939 Nafziger Rd. 2 miles south Of Wellesley or 2 miles north of Philipsburg, for Hilda & the Late Wellington Beaver, Stratford & additions, on Saturday January 26th @ 10:00 a.m. Gerber Auctions 519-699-4451. SAT. JAN 26 at 1:00 PM - Property auction of a 3 bedroom condominium updated and ready to move in located in a sought after area of Waterloo. To be held at 101-250 Glenridge Drive Waterloo for Jane Udvarie. Jantzi Auctions Ltd., 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com WED. JAN 30 at 10:00 AM - Clearing auction sale of furniture; antiques; tools; household effects; and miscellaneous items to be held at the St. Jacob’s Community Centre for a Waterloo estate with additions. Jantzi Auctions Ltd, 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com AUCTION SALE OF Major appliances, tools, new furniture, new vanities, and a broad range of new miscellaneous items, to be held at 230 Regina St. North (near University) in Waterloo, for Factory Direct Liquidation, on Saturday, February 2nd @ 10:00 a.m. Gerber Auctions 519-699-4451.

TWINCENTRE PEEWEES SWEEP TO VICTORY

Applications may be submitted in person at Husky Farm Equipment, 7440 Wellington Rd. 17, ALMA or email: husky@huskyfarm.ca

(1540 Floradale Rd.) Elmira, ON

Glass-Pac Canada 5 Bast Place St.Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0 Tel: 519.664.2277

Qualifications include: excellent oral & written communication skills; working knowledge of purchasing in the metal industry; proficiency in organizational, time-management, administrative and computer skills; ability to work closely and co-operatively with a variety of people; attention to detail and strong public relations skills.

HELP WANTED

We thank all applicants for their interest; however only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

FIND US AND LIKE US ON FACEBOOK, FOR WEEKLY UPDATES

The Twin Centre PeeWee Hericanes went undefeated to win the championship in the Orillia Hawks Tournament last weekend. The final game was a 1-0 shootout victory over the Durham West Lightning. Back row: asst. coach Wayne Jantzi, Hannah Petrosino, Julia Dakin, Delanie Kidnie, Meghan Schnarr, head coach Mark Dakin. Middle row: Matt Dakin, Nicole Snyder, Sadie Diebold, Olivia Bolender, Briony Jantzi, Madelynn Jantzi, trainer Louise Bruns. Front row: trainer Cheryl Dakin, Tyana Bruns, Chantal McMurray, Jade Lipczynski. [SUBMITTED]

PHONE 519.669.5790 | TOLL FREE 1.888.966.5942 | FAX 519.669.5753 | ONLINE WWW.OBSERVERXTRA.COM

ADDRESS 20-B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA, ON N3B 1Z9

CLASSIFIED ADS

DISPLAY ADS

519.669.5790 EXT 0

519.669.5790 EXT 104

ads@woolwichobserver.com

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PLACING A CLASSIFIED WORD AD In person, email, phone or fax submissions are accepted during regular business hours. Deadline for Saturday publication is Wednesday by 5 p.m. All Classified ads are prepaid by cash, debit, Visa or MasterCard. Ask about Observer policies in regard to Display, Service Directory and Family Album advertising.


18 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Our Team will meet your Needs and fulfill your Dreams NEW PRICE

D L O S

$500.00 DONATION will be made with every home bought or sold by Paul, Alli or Bill in Woolwich.

$297,900

$349,950

FABULOUS HOME!

CHARMING AND UNIQUE!

Elmira - W/3bdrms, 2baths, living room & family

Elmira - Century home boasting original woodwork and hardwood throughout, 9ft ceilings, and pocket doors. spacious main bath and bedrooms with bonus room off master. Fully finished attic with skylights and gas fireplace. Within walking distance to all amenities. Detached workshop. MLS 1241191 Call Alli or Paul direct.

room. Hardwood floor in living room w/vaulted ceiling & gas fireplace. Large master bedroom. Huge recently renovated main bathroom w/separate shower & whirlpool bath. Upper floor laundry. Great yard for entertaining w/deck, shed & natural gas fire pit in fenced yard. Unfinished basement approx. w/9ft ceiling waiting for your finishing touches. MLS 1311089 Call Alli or Paul direct.

D L O S

Paul Martin SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-503-9533 www.homeswithpaul.ca

$219,900

$359,900

SPACIOUS TWO STOREY

PRIME LOCATION!

Floradale - 1866 sq.ft. home in Floradale with

Elmira - Backing onto farmland! Open welcoming front entrance to this, like new, open concept home. The main floor is bright and airy featuring: large breakfast bar, powder room, main floor laundry and is carpet free. The second floor is carpet free, master bedroom complete with walk in closet and spa like ensuite. Appliances are included. MLS 1241487. Call Alli or Paul direct.

a large lot backing onto green belt. This century home is one of Floradale's originals. This home is priced right for a young family and has great potential . Close to Floradale School and the park. 20 min to K-W. MLS 1241726. Call Alli or Bill direct.

Alli Bauman

OUTSTANDING AGENTS. OUTSTANDING RESULTS.

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-577-6248

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

Bill Norris SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Independently Owned and Operated

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-588-1348

3 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5426

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

Helping you is what we do Let us ensure your home sale is a pleasant and speedier experience.

Elmira Real Estate Services Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage

90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

519-669-3192

When you buy or sell your home with us, part of our commission supports women’s shelters & violence prevention programs.

Bonnie Brubacher *Shanna Rozema Jason Shantz Broker

Broker of Record

Broker

When you list your home with Shanna Rozema, receive a Staging Package to showcase your home!! Call for details.

OPEN HOUSE

SUN. JAN. 20, 2-4 p.m. | 20 Eldale Rd Elmira

2.94 ACRES – SHOP

ELMIRA – ½ ACRE

3000+ sq ft Beautiful family home on the edge of town offers generous sized rms throughout. Gleaming natural hrdwd and ceramic flooring. New Windows, walkouts to deck and upper patio. Cultured concrete stone fireplaces both in Sunken living/dining rm and Master Bdrm. Separate studio/media rm. The family rm overlooks the private mature yard and countryside. Double tandem style garage with rear access. Golf or curling Interests?.... you are only steps away. MLS

BUNGALOW

This will showcase your home to its maximum potential and assist in selling for top dollar!

Call for details

$899,000 Elmira Area. $649,900.

ELMIRA INDUSTRIAL 2.07 ACRES

When you list your home with Shanna Rozema, you will receive complimentary home staging with her professional home stager, Carol Kelly.

Central location to Guelph or Kitchener-Waterloo. This maturing property is bordered by farmland and the “Kissing Bridge Trail”. The 45’ x44’- 3 bay shop complete w/hoist is ideal for the hobbyist or a hobby farm. The spacious 4 bdrm family home finished from top to bottom offers many additional features. Separate walk up to the double garage, open concept kitchen with infloor heat and walk out to wrap around porch, mainfloor formal and informal entertaining rms. Please call for your additional information. MLS

$2,400,000.

21,250 sq ft attractive building complete with many updated energy efficient features. 7000 sq ft of professional office space plus an additional 3750 sq ft in the basement for training/staff area. Open warehouse offers 13,750 sq ft , 18’ ceiling height, w/2 divisible bays, loading docks and drive-in docks. Zoning is M-6 business/industrial park with an ideal location with close access to Hwy#85 and Hwy#86 at the South end of town. Also for lease option. MLS

$346,000 Elmira. Welcoming foyer into this attractive 2 bedroom brick bungalow, eye-catching kitchen with large island & pantry, hardwood and ceramic floors, living room offers a gas fireplace and walkout, main floor master with ensuite. EXCLUSIVE

Shanna Rozema

Carol Kelly

Broker

Professional Home Stager

Elmira Real Estate Services Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

519-669-3192

carol@homeswith style.ca | www.homeswithstyle.ca

519-580-8738

FOR RENT. WITH REAL INVESTMENT YOU WILL SEE A REAL RETURN. MAKE THIS SPACE YOUR NEW HOME. ADVERTISE WITH US TODAY.

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com


CLASSIFIED | 19

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

OBSERVER FAMILY ALBUM BIRTHDAY

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD.

BROKERAGE

Independently Owned and Operated 17 Church St. W., Elmira

45 Arthur St. S., Elmira Office:

wendy.taylor1@rogers.blackberry.net marylou@mmrealestate.ca

519-669-2772

Broker of Record,

JULIE HECKENDORN

TRACEY WILLIAMS

Res: 519.669.1068

Res: 519.669.8629

Cell: 519.505.0627

BRAD MARTIN MVA Residential

Broker

Sales Rep.

OPEN HOUSE: Sat. Jan. 19, 2-4 p.m. | 61 William St. Elmira AFFORDABLE home w/cathedral ceiling & lots of windows in the family room addition. Oversized dining area w/hdwd. floor. Main flr. laundry, bathrm. and master bdrm. Huge rec. rm. w/high ceiling. Gas heatstove. Newer doors, windows, furnace & deck. Long driveway. Quiet neighbourhood.MLS

$249,900

Happy 65th Birthday Fern Adele Shantz Wendy Taylor BROKER MANAGER

hrs 519-669-1544 2424hrs

‘move-in’ condition. Tastefully decorated. Oak kitchen w/ceramic floor, open to fam. rm. w/hdwd. floor. Washrm. on the main level. Walkout to lge. deck. Long driveway. Single garage. MLS

January 19, 1948

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

www.peakrealestate.com

Thinking of Buying or Selling call or email today!

New Listing! - 20 Killdeer Rd., Elmira $224,900 Great starter in mature

neighbourhood. Two storey semidetached home features 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, eat-in kitchen, walkout from kitchen to deck and fenced yard, lots of parking. Mainbath has recently been updated. Walking distance to schools and Elmira rec. centre. MLS Please call Wendy Taylor to view

LISTOWEL Spacious 3 bdrm. semi in

$189,900

Mary Lou Murray

Roly’s Best Ewe.

“You dream...We’ll work.” More on page 23

Free, no obligation, Opinions of value

STRONG DEFENCE LEADS TO GOLD FOR MIDGET SQUAD PRIVATE country setting on the edge of Linwood. Expect to be impressed with this custom built home on 12 acres overlooking the countryside & pond. Loaded w/extras. Gourmet kitchen. Open concept makes it great for entertaining! Private master suite w/fireplace. Huge walkout bsmt. w/separate entrance- 2nd kitchen, rec. rm. games rm. & 2 bdrms. 3pc. bath. TRIPLE garage. Prof. landscaped MLS

$889,900

LET OUR 50+ YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WORK FOR YOU!

www.thurrealestate.com

Bert Martin BROKER

Remax Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 OFFICE: 519-669-5426

3 Arthur St. S. Elmira

www.remaxsolidgold.biz

EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

FREE Market Evaluation OPEN HOUSE! SUN. JAN. 20, 2-4PM | 53 FALCON DR., ELMIRA

ELMIRA BACKSPLIT!

Great family home on quiet street features large kitchen with loads of cabinets, family room with gas fireplace, living room with new hardwood, dining room w/walkout to deck, patio and in-ground pool. Three bedrooms, two bathrooms, double garage and concrete double driveway. MLS. $359,900. Call Bert to view.

NEW LISTING

The Woolwich Wild Midget B took gold in Orillia last weekend, beating Twin Centre 2-0 in the final. The girls scored seven goals in four games, giving up just one.

[SUBMITTED]

PEEWEES ARE CONSOLATION CHAMPS AT WAINFLEET TOURNEY

LOG HOME!

Beautiful, private 15 acre property with trout pond, pitch & putt golf course, reforested area with a 3,250 s/f open concept home featuring a double floor to ceiling fieldstone fireplace, 3 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, walkout basement, large deck and loft overlooking the Grand River. MLS. $899,900 Call Bert to view.

Your referrals are appreciated!

FIND YOUR DREAM HOME HERE!

The Woolwich PeeWee LL1 team was the consolation champs at the Wainfleet Tournament on Jan. 11. Back row: coach Dave O’Brien, assistant coach Mark Sellars, Matthew MacDonald, Simon Zenker, Sam Sabean, Jake Good, Noah Bauman, Bryce Sellars, Hayden Fretz, head coach Chad Nicholls, assistant coach Aaron Hoffer and trainer Kevin Moser. Middle row: Liam Hanley, Nathan Kocher, Ryan Moser, Kyle Gingrich, Daniel Bullock, Nick Lunz. Front: Chad Hoffer, Liam O’Brien. [SUBMITTED]


20 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

MUNICIPAL | REGIONAL PUBLIC NOTICES

Notice of Public Information Centre PROPOSED REGION OF WATERLOO SIGN BY-LAW

The Region of Waterloo will be holding a public information centre to introduce a draft Regional By-law respecting signs on Regional roads. The proposed Sign By-law addresses all types of unofficial signs on Regional roads including election signs, business accessory signs, farm accessory signs, mailbox accessory signs, open house signs and poster signs. The proposed Sign By-law establishes requirements for unofficial signs including:

PUBLIC INFORMATION CENTRE #3

NOTICE OF PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE Maryhill Isley Watermain Replacement Project Tuesday January 22, 2013 from 5:00 pm to 8:00 pm Maryhill Heritage Community Centre 58 St. Charles Street East, Maryhill

East Side Lands (Stage 1) • Location and placement; • Size, shape, construction and content; Plan and Community Plan Master Environmental Servicing • Impacts to the function of the road;

Please join the of Region of and Waterloo, Cityofofplacement; Cambridge and GRCA at Public Information • Number signs timing and • Sign Centre #3removal. to learn about and provide your input on the preferred servicing and transportation option for the development of the Industrial Strategic Lands for Staff are also proposing an amendment to Prime the Region’s Tourism andReserve Essential Services employment Signing Policyuses. to allow tourism signage on Regional roads for agri-toursim activities. When: Tuesday, June 17, 2008, drop in 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. When: January 31, 2013 from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Place: Regional Administration Headquarters (lobby) Open House format with Presentation at 7 p.m. 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener

Where: École secondaire Père-René-de-Galinée (Cafeteria)

This public information centre is being held for the purpose of providing information and 450 Maple Grove Rd., Cambridge, ON receiving comments from the public. A copy of the draft By-law is available for review in the Clerk’s Office, Region of Waterloo, 2nd floor, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener or on the A map of the study area is shown below. Region’s website at: www.region.waterloo.on.ca - tab Newsroom, tab Public Notices If you have questions concerning the By-law, please contact Nancy Button, Manager, Transportation Engineering at 519-575-4520 or by email at bnancy@region.waterloo.on.ca If you require accessible services to participate in this meeting, please contact the above noted person by Tuesday, June 10, 2008. All comments and information received from individuals, stakeholder groups and agencies regarding this project are being collected to assist the Region of Waterloo in making a decision. Under the Municipal Act, personal information such as name, address, telephone number, and property location that may be included in a submission becomes part of the public record. Questions regarding the collection of this information should be referred to the person indicated above.

Nancy Button Manager, Transportation Engineering Region of Waterloo 150 Frederick Street, 7th Floor Kitchener, ON N2G 4J3

The Township of Woolwich is currently working with Meritech Engineering on the design of the proposed watermain replacement project in Maryhill on St. Charles Street East, Notre Dame Avenue, and Isley Drive. Construction is scheduled to commence in May 2013 and be completed in October 2013 subject to Council approval. If you would like more information please contact: Jared Puppe, C.E.T. Engineering Project Supervisor Township of Woolwich Phone: 519-669-6029 E-mail: jpuppe@woolwich.ca

Amanda Froese, P.Eng. Project Manager Meritech Engineering Phone: 519-623-1140 E-mail: amandaf@meritech.ca

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING The Chemtura Public Advisory Committee (CPAC) Meeting will be held Monday, January 28, 2013 at 6:00 p.m. in Council Chambers 24 Church Street West, Elmira

BACKGROUND The Region of Waterloo, the City of Cambridge and the Grand River Conservation Authority, in cooperation with the City of Kitchener and the Township of Woolwich, are working together to complete the background work needed to develop about 300 hectares of land in the City of Cambridge for future employment uses. The outcome of this work will be a Master Environmental Servicing Plan and a Community Plan. Work will be completed to meet the requirements of the Planning Act and the Environmental Assessment Act as outlined by the Municipal Engineer’s Association Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (October 2000 as amended in 2007) process.

www.observerxtra.com TC ATOMS POWER THEIR WAY TO VICTORY

The study findings may result in amendments to the Grand River Conservation Authority’s regulated area mapping of Ontario Regulation 150/06 made under the Conservation Authorities Act. PUBLIC COMMENTS INVITED If you have any questions or comments about this study or wish to be added to the study mailing list, please contact: Amanda Kutler, MBA, MCIP, RPP Acting Director, Community Planning Region of Waterloo 150 Frederick St. Kitchener, ON N2G 4J3 Tel: (519) 575-4818 Fax: (519) 575-4449 Email: AKutler@regionofwaterloo.ca

Elaine Brunn Shaw, MCIP, RPP Director of Development Planning City of Cambridge 50 Dickson St., 3rd Floor PO Box 669 Cambridge, ON N1R 5W8 Tel: (519) 740-4650 x 4571 Fax: (519) 622-6184 Email: brunnshawe@cambridge.ca

All comments and information received from individuals, stakeholder groups and agencies regarding this project are being collected to assist the Region of Waterloo in making a decision. Under the Municipal Act, personal information such as name, address, telephone number, and property location that may be included in a submission becomes part of the public record. Accessibility: This event is accessible for people with disabilities. Accessible parking is available. If you require assistance to attend or participate in this meeting, or to access information in alternate formats, please contact Amanda Kutler at least five days prior to the meeting.

The Twin Centre Atom Rep team were the winners of the 55th Peterborough Liftlock Hockey Tournament, sweeping through five games while scoring 25 goals and giving up none. Back row: Dylan Burton, Daniel Rudy, Easton Gowing, Brock Krulicki, Cameron Hoy, Dylan Hehn Coaches Ken Holmes, Jeff Kaufman, Kevin Kraemer, Jensen Rudy. Middle row: Nathan Brideau, Kyle Kraemer, Devon Lee, Blair Bender, Peter Holmes, William Weber, Alex Kaufman, Michael Hayes. Front row: goalies Colby Switzer, Liam Robertson. Absent: Curtis Butler. [SUBMITTED]


CLASSIFIED | 21

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

Complete Collision Service

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE. 101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

519.669.8330

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial On-The-Farm Service

FAX: 519.669.3210

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

AFTER HOURS

519-669-3232

THOMPSON’S

Auto Tech Inc.

ARE A

Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

AUTO CLINIC 21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

24 Hour Accident Assistance Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400 30 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

519.669.8917

Quality Collision Service

1-800-CARSTAR 519-669-3373

519-669-7652

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

BODY MAINTENANCE AT:

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

Call Us At (519)669-3373 33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

GENERAL SERVICES

World’s Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location

While you wait! State of the acAhinrte Sharpening M

NOW ACCEPTING

• Janitorial

NEW CLIENTS

• Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off / Pick up Service • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair

$4.99 per pair

$139 FREE Gift Offer Learn More Online At...

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ROB McNALL 519-669-7607 LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

ST. JACOBS

22 Church St. W., Elmira

669-3332

• 14 ton BoomTruck • 40 ton Mobile Crane

519-664-9999

5th pair FREE.

Chem-Dry Acclaim® 61 Arthur St., N. Elmira

www.completecarpetcare.ca

ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd.

Tel: 519-669-5537

STORE HOURS: M-F: 8-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

24 Hour Service (Emergencies only) 7 Days A Week

GENERAL SERVICES

CUSTOM MACHINING CNC LATHES • CNC MILLS CNC BRAKE • PLASMA & LASER CUTTING

MUSIC-LOVER GIFT ALERT! COUNTR Y

’s 60’s / 70

HIGH SCHOOSL BAND

GOSPEL

ROCK

MUSIC TRANSFERS FROM LPs, 45s, 78s, CASSETTES TO CD

We do small jobs with fast turnaround

Your favourite albums get a whole new life on CD after we clean up the clicks, pops and surface noise.

Martin Machining

MORE INFO | 519.669.0541

Linwood, Ontario

(519) 698-2283

EMAIL: vinylp2cd@gmail.com

Various sizes & rates

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE Call

CUSTOM TARPS, COVERS & REPAIRS (519) 698-2754

4445 Posey Line Wallenstein ON.

BAUMAN PIANO

SERVICES TUNING & REPAIRS

Sew Special Custom Sewing for Your Home

Custom Drapery Custom Blinds Free Estimates In Home Consultations

JAMES BAUMAN Craftsman Member O.G.P.T. Inc NEW PHONE NUMBER

519-880-9165

Over 20 Years Experience

Lois Weber 519-669-3985 Elmira

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada Established 2000

Steve Co.

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs. 24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

ELMIRA

519-669-3652

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

FREE BAG In troductor Offer y

> Superior Salt Products > Fast, Friendly Service > Convenient Delivery Times > Discounts for Seniors

Taking Salt to Peoples’ Basements Since 1988

519-747-2708

Waterloo www.riepersalt.com

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

F. David Reimer

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications:

519.669.5313

Mon.-Tues. 3pm-6pm | Wed.-Fri. Noon-6pm Saturday 9-5 | Sunday Noon-3pm

6376 Perth Rd. 121 Poole, ON

100% SUPERIOR QUALITY CUSTOM WOODWORKING

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

The Sharp Shop | 112-D Bonnie Cres., Elmira

519.595.4830

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

GENERAL SERVICES

● ● ● ● ● ● ●

General Repairs

HOME IMPROVEMENTS SERVICES

GRAIN/ FORAGE BOX • TRUCK • TRAILER • BOAT AWNINGS • STORAGE COVERS AND MORE!

ivan@aaronmartin.com

•Ratches, Hooks, Straps, Webbing etc. •Canvas, Vinyl, Polyester, Acrylic Fabrics

519-669-4964

GENERAL SERVICES

MAR-TARP

Boat Covers | Air Conditioner Covers | Small Tarps Storage Covers | BBQ Covers | Awnings & Canopies Replacement Gazebo Tops | Golf Cart Enclosures & Covers

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

www.reimerhbot.com For more information call:

519-669-0220

56 Howard Ave. Unit 2, Elmira, ON, N3B 2E1

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING

QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102

KENJI ORITA • Custom Kitchens • Custom Furniture • Libraries • Exotic Woods

TEL: +1 (519) 574-6734 oritakenji@gmail.com 20B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA

WE’RE AT YOUR SERVICE. We specialize in getting the word out. Advertise your business services here. Get weekly exposure with fantastic results. Call us at 519.669.5790.


22 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

AMOS

Custom Window Coverings

www.budgetblinds.ca

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

Each Franchise Independently Owned and Operated

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Decorative/Stamped and coloured concrete www.facebook.com/marwilconcrete

519-638-2699

R O O F I N G

INC

(519)746-3498

Ltd.

Shutters • Draperies Wood Blinds Honeycomb Shades Roller Shades Woven Wood and More!

Expert-Fit Measuring and Installation Included.

One stop shop for all your needs. PLUMBING, FURNACE REPAIRS, SERVICE & INSTALLATION, GAS FITTING

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches

66 Rankin St. Unit 4 | Waterloo

519.501.2405 | 519.698.2114

A Family owned and operated business serving KW, Elmira and surrounding area for over 35 years.

WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED

CALL JAYME FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE.

519-885-2828

In Business since 1973 • Fully Insured

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

$275.00/OUT

FREE ESTIMATES

pump

• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

(1800 Gallon Residential) Waterloo Region • Woolwich Township

519-896-7700

or

Home Improvements

519-648-3004

TEL:

519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

General Construction | 12 Years Experience

Wallenstein, ON

ROOFING | SIDING | SOFFIT & FACIA DRYWALL INSTALLATION

MURRAY MARTIN | 519.638.0772

7302 Sideroad 19 RR#2., Alma, ON, N0B 1A0

FREE ESTIMATES

FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

www.biobobs.com

WINDOWS & DOORS

Residential & Agricultural • Barns / Shops • Decks & Railings • Poured Concrete • Driveways & Sidewalks • Siding, Fascials, Soffits • Interior Renovations Call Lawrence Metzger (226) 789-7301

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

RA HOME COMF ELMI (519) 669-4600 ORT

WEICKERT& MEIROWSKI Concrete Foundations Limited

ď Ż WOOD ď Ż GAS ď Ż PELLET www.fergusfireplace.com

YES... WE DO RESIDENTIAL WORK!

CFB

free estimates interior/exterior painting, wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

519.669.1462 Fax: 519.669.9970

FOR ALL YOUR HOME DECORATING NEEDS.

Tel:

27 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

519.669.3658

18 KingďŹ sher Dr., Elmira

Outdoor

BACKHOE SERVICES

FOR RENT

•Tamper (Jumping Jack) •Power Drain Cleaner (Electric Snake)

6656 Sideroad 19 | RR#2 Wallenstein ON N0B 2S0

Call Clare at 519-669-1752

36 Hampton St., Elmira

SERVICES

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

Got long grass? Our tracked skid steer equipped with a forestry brush mower can handle ANY long grass!

- Trail Maintenance and Development - Wooded Lot Thinning - Pasture Reclaimation All other - Orchard Maintenance tracked skid - Industrial Lots steer services are available - Real Estate Lots

27 Brookemead, St, Elmira

KEVIN DETWEILER

P: 519-669-1188 | F: 519-669-9369

kdetweiler@rogers.com

OWNER-OPERATOR

OBSERVER PUZZLE SOLUTIONS 0 $ 0 0 $

, 9 , ( '

6 3 $ 6 0

$ / 3 + $

' ( 6 , ' ( 5 $ 7 8 0

3 $ / 0

$ 5 ( $ 6

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THE CHALLENGE

â&#x20AC;˘ Lawn Mowing Packages â&#x20AC;˘ Lawn Maintenance & Landscaping â&#x20AC;˘ Top Dressing/Overseeding â&#x20AC;˘ Mulch Delivery & Installation â&#x20AC;˘ Commercial & Residential Full Flower Bed Maintenance â&#x20AC;˘ Snow Plowing & Ice Control â&#x20AC;˘ Tractor Snowblowing

OFFERING A QUICK AND EASY WAY TO RECLAIM UNUSED LAND

Services

> Commercial & Residential > Fully Insured > WSIB Clearance > Senior Discount

Lawn Maintenance Programs | Spring Clean-up Flower Bed Maintenance Programs Leaf Clean-up and Removal | Soil & Mulch Delivery & Installation | Snow Clearing & Removal | Ice Control

CROSSWORD PUZZLER

YOUR SOURCE FOR YEAR-ROUND PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

Call Jeff Basler, Owner/Operator, today 519.669.9081 mobile: 519.505.0985 fax: 519.669.9819 | ever-green@sympatico.ca

Mini Excavator Available

â&#x20AC;˘ Specializing in farm drainage repair/installation â&#x20AC;˘ Footing / cellar / eavestrough / drains â&#x20AC;˘ Stump removal

519-669-2251

OUTDOOR

ehc@hotmail.ca (519)-669-4600

888-871-4592

877-664-3802

No job too small.

SINCE 1961

Randy Weber

1 Union Street, Elmira

519-843-4845

519-664-3800

OUTDOOR SERVICES

20 years experience

Specializing in Paint & Wall coverings

180 St. Andrew St. W.

1871 Sawmill Road

IMPROVEMENT IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

â&#x20AC;˘ Residential â&#x20AC;˘ Commercial â&#x20AC;˘ Industrial

FERGUS

CONESTOGO

6982 Millbank Main St., Millbank 519-595-2053 â&#x20AC;˘ 519-664-2914

READâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DECORATING

APPLIANCES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FURNACES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FIREPLACES AIR CONDITIONERS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WATER HEATERS SPRING SPECIAL ON AIR CONDITIONING TUNE UP $99, INSTALLED FROM $1999 FURNACES INSTALLED FROM $2499 FRIDGES $499, STOVES $399, WASHERS $399, DRYERS $369, FREEZERS $199 Come visit our show room FREE QUOTES


CLASSIFIED | 23

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

OBSERVER FAMILY ALBUM BIRTHDAY

BIRTHDAY

BIRTHDAY

Happy 15th Birthday Cassandra!

HAPPY 30TH UNCLE KEVIN

Happy 65th Fern

Love Mom, Dad, Nicole and Colin

LOVE CHARLIE & GABBY

From the Birds

BIRTHDAY

Tony Furlong

Celebrates 90 Years

On Sunday January 27th, 1-4p.m. please join the family for an Open House at the Elmira Legion 11 First St. E., Elmira, Ontario. Best Wishes only

BIRTHDAY

STAG & DOE

IN MEMORIAM

DEATH NOTICES

Happy Birthday “Sam”

Stag and Doe for

Audrey Marie Smalldon

BEARINGER, E.W. “EDDIE”|

Victoria Connors & Tim Dixon

November 9, 1922- January 18, 2010

Passed away on Friday, January 11, 2013 at KW Health Centre of Grand River Hospital, in his 92nd year, of Elmira. BRUBACHER, MAYNARD |

Maynard Brubacher, of Elmira, went to be with his Lord, suddenly on Friday, January 11, 2013, at the age of 58. DEDELS, EDWARD ORVILLE The family of Eugene George Read, alias “Sam,” invite you to help celebrate his 80th birthday on Sunday January 27. To be held at Trinity United Church, Elmira from 2-4pm. In lieu of gifts we ask that instead you consider bringing a donation to the local Food Bank. All Welcome!

Saturday Febuary 2, 2013 8pm-1am, at the Elmira Lions Hall. Dj - Dancing - Games - Raffle - Buffet $10 at the door or in advance from family or wedding party! Come celebrate and have a ton of fun with the Bride and Groom to be!

Fondly remembered by family and friends

THANK YOU

THANK YOU

OBITUARY

Gabel, Harold

Borghese, Timothy (Tim)

Esch, Hazel Elizabeth (nee Jasper) 1932 – 2013

We would like to thank our families, our special friends, Tim’s friends and coworkers for all their love and support shown during the loss of our son and brother.

Passed away at Grand River Hospital on Thursday January 10th, 2013, age 80. Loving wife of the late Stewart Esch. Caring mother of Matthew, wife Carol Esch,and Michele Esch. Grandmother of Dan (late Christine) Fries and Heather (Joe) Revere. Great grandmother of Hayden Fries; and Austin, Aralynn and Brianna Revere.Survived by sister Junne (Stu) Crouse, brother in law John Hynd and sister in law Vera (Paul) Snyder - Weber. Will be missed by many nieces, nephews and friends. Predeceased by parents Harold and Ella Beatrice (nee Watt) and parents in law Florence and Clayton Esch., brothers Doug and Stan, sisters Dorothy and Shirley (Cliff),

We wish to express our heartfelt thanks to everyone for all their condolences, prayers, cards, food, donations and flowers in the loss of our father and grandfather. Your presence, comforting words, tears, laughter and shared stories will always be remembered. Special thanks to Dreisinger Funeral Home, Reverend Dave Jagger, Trinity United Church and U.C.W. for your personal kindness, support and assistance. To Reverend Doug Kellough special thanks for being there every step of the way. Your comforting message, words, thoughtfulness and compassion will truly be forever close to our hearts. Thank you to St. Mary’s General Hospital 6th Floor doctors and nursing staff for your special care given to dad.

We extend our sincere gratitude to Pastor Hans Borch for his comforting words and family support. Also a special thank you for the masses, donations, flowers and food, and to the Ladies Auxillary of the Elmira Legion for the lunch and fellowship that followed.

Love, friendship, support are needed every day of one’s life.

To all the staff of Dreisinger Funeral Home, your kindness was most appreciated and will never be forgotten.

God Bless, Jolene, Harold, Garrett and Jaeden Shoemaker

Don, Linda & Tina Borghese

OBITUARY Taylor, Jesse Taken far too soon, leaving loving hearts broken, we regret the passing of Jesse Ernest Kyle Taylor (Mumford) on Thursday, January 17, 2013 at the age of 24 years. Mourning the loss of Jesse is his beloved partner Stacey (Martin), dearest son Brody, mother Andrea Mumford, and father Ernest Taylor. Left behind as well are many siblings, aunts, uncles, and treasured friends who desperately miss his smile and presence already. Special thanks to the amazing angels at Hamilton General ICU, Preece House, Glen and Diane Martin, and Jesse’s brothers in arms at G Force. God bless you all. Cremation has taken place. A celebration of Jesse’s life will be held on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 at 11 a.m. in the chapel at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira. A memorial service will be held in Nova Scotia at a later date. As expressions of sympathy, donations may be made to a RESP Fund for Brody Taylor.

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

A funeral service was held on Monday January 14th, 2013 at St. Matthews Evangelical Lutheran Church, Rev. Monika Wiesner officiating. Burial took place at St. Matthews Lutheran Cemetery, Conestogo. Condolences for the family and donations to the St. Matthews Evangelical Lutheran Church Building Fund or the Lung Association, may be arranged through the funeral home at www. erbgood.com or 519.745.8445. Thank you to the nurses on the 8th floor of the Grand River Hospital for their great care of our mother

| 1919-2013 Lifted up into the arms of his Lord and reunited with his beloved wife of 41 years, Eleanor, nee Merlau (2008). Edward passed away at Heritage House, St. Jacobs on January 13, 2013, in his 94th year. FORSYTH, MARLENE |

DOROTHY

It is with deep sadness that we announce the passing of Dorothy Marlene Forsyth, of Walkerton, at London Health Science Centre, London on Tuesday, January 8, 2013. She was 75. Local relatives are her son Albert Forsyth and his wife Gail of St. Jacobs and her daughter Linda Carter of Elmira.

MARTIN, ARTHUR S. |

Passed away surrounded by his loving family on Tuesday, January 8, 2013 at his home in St. Jacobs, at the age of 81 years. KAUFMAN, HAROLD EDWIN

| With dignity, at the Maples Home for Seniors in Tavistock on Wednesday, January 9, 2013, Harold Edwin Kaufman passed away, in his 94th year. Local relatives are his daughter Joan and her husband Julien Den Tandt of Heidelberg.


24 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

LIVING HERE CHEF’S TABLE/ DIERRE ACHESON

MILESTONES / ALWAYS READY TO HELP

Elmira woman honoured with life membership from the Legion Isabel Mackintosh has spent more than four decades with the Ladies Auxiliary WILL SLOAN When 85-year-old Isabel Mackintosh received a life membership award from the Royal Canadian Legion’s Elmira Branch, she was modest about her 41 years of service with the Ladies Auxiliary. For instance, in addition to serving as sergeant-atarms for the auxiliary from 1971 to 1982, she took the position of second vicepresident in 2000-2001, first vice-president in 2001-2003, and two separate terms as president. That’s certainly seen her take on a range of responsibilities. “Well, to see that everything is running smoothly, and that your meeting is OK and everybody’s fine, and make sure everybody’s doing what they should be doing…” Mackintosh laughed. “And, if not, help them.” Of course, two separate terms as president means a lot of time to deal with these tasks. “I liked it so much I went the next time, and nobody seemed to be wanting to go up, so I said…” – she shrugs – “I’ll do it.” Other auxiliary members are quick to talk about Mackintosh’s zeal – a restless spirit and positive energy that continues unabated well into her ninth decade. Does she see herself the same way? “I’ve just always been active.

We have to work a little harder to bring colour into winter diet RECIPE NOTES

2003), honours and awards (2008-2011), and as a member of the nominating committee (2006-2009). Until very recently, she even taught line dancing – “I still line dance,” she

Eating all the colours of the rainbow can be seen as difficult during the winter season. Truthfully, you just need to look beyond the usual suspects. Eating and drinking many colours is so easy compared to following a menu plan or diet. Most colours are in the fruit and vegetable family, but whole grains and legumes are a great starting point that will help the healing begin. Eating from the rainbow fills your body with rich antioxidants, healthy fibre and much needed vitamins in gloomy January. Spicing your meals up with a trip to the local Asian grocery may be in order. This week we had to restock many of our ingredients from a very busy season. Vegetables like nappa cabbage, snake beans, baby Shanghai bok choy, yams, Chinese eggplant and carrots are all friends in a hot wok kissed with sesame oil. The perfume of Thai cooking in the kitchen evokes excitement for the meal ahead. This Thai chicken recipe brings forward flavour and textures

LEGION | 27

CHEF’S TABLE | 27

In her 41 years with the Elmira Legion’s Ladies Auxiliary, Isabel Mackintosh has served a variety of posts, including president, vice-president, sergeant-at-arms … and even line-dancing instructor. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER] Busy. Doing things,” she replied. Fortunately, other members are eager to compensate for her modesty. Asked for a few words about Mackintosh, Linda Rowe sighed, “Where do I even start?”

“She doesn’t stop,” Rowe continued. “She’s in her 80s and does not stop. She’s always contributing and always willing to lend a hand. She helps out with the seniors games that are held every year. She just is always willing with a

smile, always has a smile. I adore her, because I think she’s absolutely a wonderful lady – I aspire to be like her, she is just that incredible.” Mackintosh has served in other auxiliary offices as well – sorts officer (2000-

Have you registered to attend our FREE Women’s Car Care Clinic? On January 26, 2013 Kelly of Kelly’s Garage will be at Leroy’s from 10am-12:30pm. Seating is limited so be sure to register today! - LEROY MARTIN

20 Oriole Parkway E., Elmira, ON N3B 0A5 Tel: (519) 669-1082 Fax: (519) 669-3084 info@leroysautocare.net

www.leroysautocare.net

NEW LOCATION!


LIVING HERE | 25

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013 “A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

Kleensweep Carpet Care

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates West Montrose, ON

T. 519.669.2033

COLLEEN

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS • Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

519.669.5105 P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

KIN KORNER

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville 519-699-4641

Rugs and Upholstery

Pamper Yourself For A Year Raffle

www.freybc.com

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

E-MAIL: ads@woolwichobserver.com

of games including “euro” games, war games, strategy games etc. Breslau Community Centre, 100 Andover Dr. Breslau. $2.

JANUARY 18 ROBBIE BURNS DINNER. ROYAL Canadian Legion, 11 First St. E., Elmira – downstairs. 6 p.m., first come first served. Steak pie, mashed potatoe, turnip and mushy peas; $7/ person.

JANUARY 20 HUNGRYMAN’S BREAKFAST WITH THE Sugar Kings at the Elmira Legion, 11 First St., Elmira. Serving 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. All you can eat. Adults $6; children 6-10 $3; children 5 and under free. Come out for a great breakfast and meet the players.

COFFEE TIME AND MORE! 9:30-11:00 a.m. – Come for a coffee and join in discussing topics that we all face. Share stories and experiences, learn new coping skills. Childcare is provided by trained volunteers. Topic: Understanding Emotions. Held at Gale Presbyterian Church, 10 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira. For more information, call Marinela at 519-664-3794, ext. 235 (Woolwich Community Health Centre) or Anna at 519-496-9757.

ZUMBA GOLD – 4:15-5 p.m. at Woolwich Seniors Centre, beginning Feb. 7. Cost $2.50 for members, $5 for non-members per class. For more information please call 519-669-5044.

PD MOVIE DAY – 2 p.m. at Elmira Branch Library. Movie shown will be Brave (G). Tickets are $1 each and every person attending must have a ticket. Admission includes light refreshments, please no outside snacks. Children 5 and under must be accompanied by an adult. 65 Arthur St. S. Elmira, 519-669-5477 or elmlib@regionofwaterloo.ca.

JANUARY 21 SENIORS LUNCH CLUB AT noon (doors open at 11:30 a.m.) at Woolwich Memorial Centre 24 Snyder Ave. S., Elmira (community room). Cost $6 Join us for a noon day light lunch and fellowship. Call Community Care Concepts at 519-664-1900 for more information.

WCS YOUTH CENTRE HAS got some crazy fun planned today. It all kicks off with a game of Monopoly, followed by Guitar Hero. At 6:45 we are getting active outside with snow pant races, so bring your snow gear and get ready to race. For more information, contact Catherine or Anna at (519) 669-3539.

JANUARY 22 PARADISE LIONS CLUB BINGO, 7 p.m. Upstairs at the St. Clements Community Centre. SMALL BUSINESS WORKSHOP 7-9 p.m. at Elmira Branch Library, 65 Arthur St. S. This popular workshop is run by Roy Weber of the Small Business Centre, a great event to attend if you are thinking of starting your own business. For admission details and more information call the Elmira Branch Library 519-669-5477 or elmilib@regionofwaterloo.ca.

JANAURY 19 BOARD GAMES IN BRESLAU! 1-9 p.m. Stay the whole day or drop in for a game or two! Enjoy or interested in board games? Come out and meet others in your community who share a similar interest. Wide variety

Draw Date March 10th, 2012.

Get your tickets soon!

JANUARY 23

woolwichkin.com

SENIORS COMMUNITY DINING AT noon (doors open at 11:30) at Linwood Community Centre 5279 Ament Line, Linwood. Cost: $11.00. Community Care concepts invites you to join us for a hot noon day meal, fellowship and entertainment. Call 519-664-1900 or Toll Free: 1-855-6641900 for more information.

JANUARY 25 H.U.G.S. PROGRAM – 9:15-11:15 a.m. Meet with other parents to discuss parenting and child health issues. Topic: Introducing Baby to Solid Foods: Strategies to avoid a picky eater. Karen Reitzel, Registered Dietitian, will present. No registration required. Childcare provided. Held at Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs. Call Heidi at 519-664-3794, ext. 237 for information.

21 INDUSTRIAL DR. ELMIRA

519-669-2884

JANUARY 26 SPAGHETTI DINNER & SALAD Bar. Royal Canadian Legion, 11 First St. E., Elmira. Two sittings – 5 and 7 p.m. Tickets purchased by calling 519-669-2932. Adults $10; children 5-10 yrs. $4; Under 5 yrs $2. VISIT THE WTHHS HISTORICAL Room at the Old School, 1137 Henry St., Wellesley between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. and enjoy displays and interesting historical facts about Wellesley Township. Free admission.

JANUARY 28 NEEDLE SISTERS QUILTERS GUILD meets at 7 p.m. on the 4th Monday of the month at Elmira Mennonite Church, 58 Church St. W., Elmira. Guests welcome $5. For more information call 519-669-3244.

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519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT The Events Calendar is reserved for Non-profit local community events that are offered free to the

public. Placement is not guaranteed. Registrations, corporate events, open houses and the like do not qualify in this section.

“Serving the Community”

24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

NANCY KOEBEL

Bus: 519.744.5433 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Suite 102, 40 Weber St. E., Kitchener

TOTAL HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby?

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Grant’s Hands on therapy

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It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess.

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

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VERMONT Castings

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SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763

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cell: 519-577-3251 WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

PLACES OF FAITH | A DIRECTORY OF LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP

St. Teresa Catholic Church No God, No Hope; Know God, Know Hope! Celebrate Eucharist with us Mass times are:

Sat. 5pm & Sun. 9am & 11:15am

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

Trinity United Church, Elmira “Our mission is to love, learn & live by Christ’s teachings”

Sunday am Sunday Worship: Worship: 10:30 10:30 am Sunday School during during Worship Worship Sunday School Minister: Rev.Dave DaveJagger Jagger Minister: Rev.

rm A Wlcaome We all! to

21 Arthur St. N., Elmira • 519-669-5560 www.wondercafe.ca

Zion Mennonite Fellowship -The JunctionSunday School 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

NURSERY PROVIDED

SUNDAY SCHOOL

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Finding The Way Together 47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 www.thejunctionelmira.com

Sunday School at 9:30am

Service at 10:30am Rev. Paul Snow REACH WITH LOVE. TEACH THE TRUTH. SEND IN POWER. 290 Arthur St. South, Elmira • 519-669-3973 www.ElmiraAssembly.com (Across from Tim Horton’s)

Sunday, January 20th

Building My Life On The Bible

Sun. Jan. 20, 2013 11:00am Who’s The Boss? Jeff Martin

Discovering God Together

4522 Herrgott Rd., Wallenstein • 519-669-2319 www.wbconline.ca

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

Sunday, Jan. 20th, 2013 9:15 & 11:00 AM

9:15 Sunday School 10:30 Worship Service

“The Kingdoms’ Fall”

Pastor: Richard A. Frey

Speaker: Gord Ahier

Sharing the Message of Christ and His Love 27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593 www.stpaulselmira.ca

200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 www.woodsidechurch.ca

SUNDAYS @ 10:30AM Services at Park Manor School 18 Mockingbird Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1459 www.elmiracommunity.org


26 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

STRANGE BUT TRUE / BILL & RICH SONES PH.D.

Hollywoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s version of exploding cars is nothing like reality, but we enjoy it

Q. When does one lowly urine sample make the news? A. When it comes from a

31-year-old bonobo named Kanzi at the Bonobo Hope Great Ape Trust Sanctuary in Des Moines, Iowa, and the veterinarian requesting the sample doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite know how to go about getting it, reports â&#x20AC;&#x153;IEEE Spectrumâ&#x20AC;? magazine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well,â&#x20AC;? a researcher told the vet, â&#x20AC;&#x153;you could just ask him.â&#x20AC;? Then she pointed to the appropriate lexigrams

Q. How many colours

can the average person see?

A. Most of us are â&#x20AC;&#x153;trichro-

matsâ&#x20AC;? with three different types of cones, each able to distinguish roughly 100 shades of colour, for a total response of 100 x 100 x 100 = roughly 1 million different colours, says Veronique Greenwood in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Discoverâ&#x20AC;? magazine. Taking one cone away results in a â&#x20AC;&#x153;dichromat,â&#x20AC;? with the number of possible colour combinations dropping by a factor of 100, down to 10,000. Yet living among us are believed to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;tetrachromatsâ&#x20AC;? with a fourth cone, letting them see 100 times more colours, or 100 million -- some shades so subtle they have no names. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And because perceiving colours is a personal experience,

they would have no way of knowing they see far beyond what we consider the limits of human vision.â&#x20AC;? In fact, some observers believe that the natural world may lack sufficient colour varieties for the brain to learn to use a fourth cone.

Q. Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s it take to create a 40-foot-high flaming â&#x20AC;&#x153;kaboomâ&#x20AC;? that used to be a car -- a la Hollywood? A. Plenty of art and science

as well as mortars, says Shane Snow in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wiredâ&#x20AC;? magazine. Cinematically, even a small fender-bender can trigger an inferno, whereas in reality cars donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t usually explode, even if driven off a cliff or the gas tank gets hit by a volley of bullets.

SUDOKU - THE CHALLENGE

so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. We have got you started with a few numbers already placed in the boxes.

 



 



   









ABOUT THE AUTHORS Bill is a journalist, Rich holds a doctorate in physics. Together the brothers bring you â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strange But True.â&#x20AC;? Send your questions to strangetrue@compuserve.com.



















SOLUTIONS: 1. MISSING TREE 2. MISSING SNOW 3. GOGGLES 4. SCARF 5. STRIPE ON PANTS 6. HEAD BAND 7. SNOWBOARD

OBSERVER TRAVELS

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T FORGET TO TAKE US. INCLUDE US IN YOUR TRAVEL PLANS. SNAP A PIC WITH YOU, THE OBSERVER AND A LANDMARK & SEND IT IN.









 



 













 



 













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SOLUTION: on page 22

become potentially deadly shrapnel. The trunk is packed with mortars and explosive powders, the seats covered with flammable liquid, and the whole thing is detonated via a long electric cable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sure, you could do the entire explosion digitally, but the audience would know,â&#x20AC;? Jiritano says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything about a fireball is sexy and beautiful.â&#x20AC;? To prove this, he blew up a Jaguar SJ6 for Snow and â&#x20AC;&#x153;even provided a Sandra Bullock look-alike to push the button.â&#x20AC;?

OBSERVER CROSSWORD PUZZLER

        

HOW TO PLAY: Fill in the grid

â&#x20AC;&#x153;It takes at least 200 manhours to prep for something that lasts four seconds onscreen,â&#x20AC;? special effects expert Drew Jiritano told the magazine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Need to blow the doors off a car?â&#x20AC;? poses Snow. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then remove the hinges and mount mortar launchers inside. Flip a flaming car? Cut out the floor and weld in a hydraulic lifting system, then park over a steel plate to avoid just punching a hole in the ground.â&#x20AC;? Creating a two-storey fireball requires adding a mix whose ingredients are still a trade secret. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of science involved in all of this, especially when people need to be close to the action and all sorts of scraps

 

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ACROSS 1. ___-Atlantic 4. Bucks 8. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come to think of it ...â&#x20AC;? 11. Dust remover 14. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Mariaâ&#x20AC;? 15. Affirm 16. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no ___!â&#x20AC;? 17. A body of poetry 19. Sent on a mission 22. Cracker spread 23. Understatement for rhetorical effect 24. Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;___ del Cairoâ&#x20AC;? 25. Marina sight 26. Confused 27. Tropical forest 29. Corkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s country 30. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go on ...â&#x20AC;? 31. Same old, same old 32. Reddish-brown gem 34. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dear oldâ&#x20AC;? guy

315 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5403 36. In-flight info, for short 38. New newts 42. Everyday 44. Babyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first word, maybe 46. Loose 48. Appropriate 49. More than adequate 52. Chinese â&#x20AC;&#x153;wayâ&#x20AC;? 53. Term for sleep 55. ___ lab 56. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So ___!â&#x20AC;? 57. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, ___!â&#x20AC;? 58. Beach item 61. Kind of dealer 62. Ballet move 63. O. Henryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Gift of the ___â&#x20AC;? 64. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My boyâ&#x20AC;?

DOWN 1. Bambino watcher 2. Like some walls 3. Desired as a necessity 4. ___ roll 5. Stay clear from 6. Contact, e.g. 7. Victorian, for one 8. â&#x20AC;&#x153;it is a crime to commit ___â&#x20AC;? 9. An association of nations 10. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Absolutely!â&#x20AC;? 11. Adroitness and cleverness in reply 12. Abreast (of) 13. Barbarians 18. A badgerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s burrow 20. Punctuation mark (/) 21. Bookbinding leather 25. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ rang?â&#x20AC;? 27. Adioactive gaseous element 28. Swiss capital

32. Burst 33. Beginning 35. Chill 37. Charlie, for one 39. Destiny 40. Boris Godunov, for one 41. Loafer, e.g. 43. Dumfries denial 45. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ___ ...â&#x20AC;? 47. Affranchise 50. Close to 51. Associate degree in nursing 54. Loss of emotional control 58. Oil source 59. Bailiwicks 60. Adult insect

SOLUTION: on page 22

WEIRD NOTES

-- abstract symbols that the bonobo uses to communicate -- for the words â&#x20AC;&#x153;pleaseâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;pee.â&#x20AC;? Next thing, Kanzi went to the corner of his enclosure, took a plastic cup and peed into it, then handed it to the amazed vet. Equally impressed was psychologist and computer scientist Ken Schweller, the sanctuaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s head programmer, who designs computer software to help the more adept bonobos communicate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned never to underestimate these bonobos, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m sure the vet would agree.â&#x20AC;?


LIVING HERE | 27

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

LEGION: Though she downplays her contributions, others see the honour as well deserved FROM | 24

Isabel Mackintosh received her Royal Canadian Legion lifetime membership in a surprise ceremony on Wednesday. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

added with a smile. For years, Mackintosh balanced her Legion duties with her work in Kitchener, and raising four children with her Second World War veteran husband (she now has five great-grandchildren). Did she find it difficult to manage the time? “When you’re doing all those things, you’re here a lot of the time,” she admitted. “But you’re home a lot of the time, too.” In 2012, Mackintosh stepped down from executive office for the first time in many years. “There’s a

CHEF’S TABLE: Farther afield to find colours FROM | 24

not found on a meat-andpotato plate. The sauce itself can also be used for seafood, or fish with rice. Kaffir may be an ingredient you may not be familiar with but you will enjoy its lemon-lime scent and flavour. If you can’t find it, lime zest will be fine. Black mushrooms are available at the Asian grocer; thread-like black mushrooms are best. You can pre-soak in warm water and drain the water before you add to the sauce.

Thai Curried Chicken Breast Sauce 1 tbsp olive oil 2 tsp red curry paste 1 tbsp tomato paste 1 cup unsweetened coconut milk 1 cup chicken broth 1/4 cup black mushrooms soaked 3 kafir lime leaves 2 tbsp fish sauce

1 tbsp brown sugar 6 cherry tomatoes 1/2’d 9 chicken breasts, bone in 1 tbsp olive oil Salt and pepper to season

Jump Fried Asian Vegetables

Brown in skillet, both sides, and place in casserole pan for baking; Heat oil in pot, add curry paste, tomato paste, and stir until fragrant, about 3 minutes; Add coconut milk, broth, mushrooms, lime leaves, fish sauce and brown sugar; Simmer for 10 minutes and remove from heat; Once chicken breasts are seared, place in baking pan and pour half the sauce over the chicken. Bake in oven for around 35 minutes on 350 F; Once chicken is cooked through, remove chicken and skim fat off the sauce and place in pot to reduce sauce on medium-high heat to attain sauce consistency, which would coat the back of a spoon; Place cherry tomato in just before serving.

3 tbsp sesame oil 1/4 red onion 10 Shanghai baby bok choy, cut in half lengthwise 12 snake beans, blanched 1/2 julienne of red pepper 1 med. carrot cut into sticks 1/4 cup of cashews Pinch of chili flakes 1 thumb of ginger

auxiliary’s membership and passed by Provincial Command. It was presented to her in a surprise ceremony on Wednesday night’s meeting. Over the years, Mackintosh has nominated several of her fellow auxiliary members to be awarded with lifetime memberships. On Wednesday night, as her list of achievements was being enumer-

lot of new people in here, and they should be getting involved in this sort of thing,” she said. “I’m 85 – I think it’s time to coast!” Life memberships are awarded to women who have been auxiliary members for a long period of time, and have served in many official posts over the years. Mackintosh’s candidacy was unanimously approved by the

ated, was there ever a moment when she thought to herself, ‘Yes, I deserve this.’ “Yeah!” she said, laughing. “Y’know, when other people get it, and you’re saying… ‘Yep, I think it’s about time’…” It may have taken a little coaxing, but Isabel Mackintosh finally showed the attitude befitting a newlyawarded life member of the Royal Canadian Legion.

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Challenger Woolich Observer 5.0375x6.8:Challenger Woolich Observer 5.0375x6.8

28 | BACK PAGE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 19, 2013

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