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09 | 29 | 2012 VOLUME 17 | ISSUE 42

KINGS GET FIRST WIN UNDER THEIR BELTS SPORTS PAGE 11

COMMENT PAGE 8

HARD DECISIONS ABOUT CORE NEED TO BE MADE

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com

Mayor casts deciding vote in nixing Dollarama; says no conflict COLIN DEWAR

Bridge out West Montrose covered bridge officially closed to traffic The covered bridge was closed last week by the region when a floor beam that supports a portion of the bridge deck was damaged likely due to overloading by heavy vehicles.

COLIN DEWAR Ontario’s only covered bridge is closed. The Region of Waterloo made a decision to restrict all vehicle and buggy traffic on

5

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the West Montrose Bridge as a safety precaution.  A floor beam that supports a portion of the bridge deck has failed likely due to overloading by heavy vehicles, despite weight restrictive signage. 

[COLIN DEWAR/THEOBSERVER]

The damage to the bridge was reported by an observant resident who was kayaking under the bridge last week. “Upon hearing of the issue, Regional staff checked the bridge, and noted the

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BRIDGE OUT | 2

The addition of two more people at the council table reversed the decision on a dollar store in Elmira, and generated another controversy. Meeting with just three members present Sept. 18, councillors approved Sobeys Capital Inc.’s plan to put a Dollarama store in the long-vacant space adjacent to the Foodland grocery store at Arthur Street and South Field Drive. This week, with the return of councillors Mark Bauman and Allan Poffenroth, council reviewed the proposal and ultimately defeated it with a tie vote. Before voting Tuesday night, Poffenroth excused himself, citing pecuniary interest, as he owns commercial property downtown. After he left the room, Bauman asked for a recorded vote, which meant that Mayor Todd Cowan was also forced to make a decision on the matter. With Poffenroth gone, Cowan made for an even number of votes; under municipal rules, a tie vote results in a defeat. “If it wouldn’t have been a recorded vote … then the mayor would not have been asked to vote. It’s not unusual, normally in situations like that they will call for a recorded vote but you end up in a tie and what is unusual about a tie in the planning realm is that in a planning decision you’re supposed to try and make a decision to approve or reject. When you do a tie vote you DOLLARAMA | 4

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2 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

BRIDGE OUT: Repairs to floor

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Regional staff were alerted to a structural failure of a floor support under the West Montrose Covered Bridge by a kayaker passing under the bridge. No traffic allowed. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

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damage. We then confirmed through a consultant that the damage was sufficient enough to warrant limiting traffic loading on the bridge,” said Shawn Buckley Senior Transportation Infrastructure Engineer for Region of Waterloo. Last Thursday the region limited traffic to horse and buggies only but noticed that cars and trucks were still crossing the bridge and made the decision to close the bridge to all traffic, except pedestrians to ensure no further damage would be sustained to the structure until a repair can be made, which could take up to a couple of weeks.    “We are hoping to have the necessary repair made within a couple of weeks, but we will have a better indication once we hear back from the consultant, who is preparing the recommendation for repair,” said Buckley. “Due to the nature of the floor beam failure, we suspect it was caused by overloading of the bridge. “ The bridge is currently posted with a 3 tonne or 6,600 lbs limit. “Our first priority is to have the bridge fixed, and reopened to light traffic. Further discussions surrounding whether heavier

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loads will be allowed onto the bridge have started, but will take some time to come to any conclusions.” Although the region owns the bridge the West Montrose Residents’ Association, the BridgeKeepers, have been key to helping maintain and clean the bridge and organizers hope to help in any way they can with the repairs. “We are discussing amongst ourselves how we can get involved in the process. There has been nothing formally done but we have been in communication with the region. We are hoping to sit down with them and hopefully we can create a joint venture as we are the eyes on the ground in West Montrose,” said Tony Dowling member of the BridgeKeepers. “We would like to help out any way we can whether that be physically or just help make sure that this or something worse doesn’t happen again.” The iconic West Montrose “kissing bridge” was built in 1881 across the Grand River on the road between Guelph and Elmira. The bridge is one of the iconic symbols that have been used to identify the region in tourism promotion, and there are thousands of people who visit the bridge each year.

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NEWS | 3

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

Soldier back on patrol Original cenotaph soldier behind glass at entrance to the WMC ELENA MAYSTRUK The original soldier from the Elmira War Memorial has gathered dust for too long. Now the Royal Canadian Legion in Elmira has a chance to give the restored statue a new home in a glass and wood case in the front entrance of the Woolwich Memorial Centre. “It fell apart…and what happened was it was decided to restore it and where to put it,” explained the legion’s memorabilia chair Clayton Ash. “World War I vets originally built the arena,” he said of the WMC in a phone interview on Tuesday. After various instances of vandalism to its fragile marble surface –including continuous damage to the soldier’s rifle, Ash explained—the statue was in rough shape. But the damages were not always deliberately inflicted. Years of exposure also took its toll on the original detail of the statue explained Elmira Legion president Sandra

Pember. The old statue was in a severe state of disrepair, eventually taken down from its original spot in Elmira’s Memorial Park on Arthur Street. It was removed from the memorial’s original cenotaph and replaced by a new soldier of bronze created by local sculptor Timothy Schmalz in 2010. The old soldier was kept in storage at the Memorial Centre “until some enterprising individual felt it should be in the memorial complex,” Ash said. It was restored by the Nelson Stone Centre in Kitchener during a span of two weeks with most of the restoration being done by carver Carl Olsen. “It was broken into four or five pieces…the rifle was broken into about eight pieces,” said company president Garth Nelson. The statue had to be completely re-sanded after turning yellow from being washed with bleach in the SOLDIER | 7

Lakeland author visits EDSS for One Book, One Community event ELENA MAYSTRUK This year’s book selection for One Book One Community made its way to Elmira District Secondary School on Wednesday where specially selected students and the public had a chance to meet the author at the event held in the school’s cafeteria. Allan Casey’s novel, Lakeland is a take on Canada’s many lakes and their role in the country’s landscape and various communities. “It’s a non-fiction look at different lakes in Canada and what those lakes represent to the communities around them. It touches on environmental issues; it touches on the psychology of lakes…on how we interact with them and then how they shape our communities” said EDSS Department Head of English Kelly Brown who organized the event. One Book One Community is in its eleventh year of encouraging readers to take interest in Canadian literature. Casey read a passage from his book in front of Elmira’s visitors and students present on Wednesday at 1:30 p.m.

Author Allen Casey with a copy of Lakeland, this year’s book choice for the One Book One Community campaign. Casey was at EDSS Wednesday, to read an excerpt and speak to students. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER] Casey shared a passage in his book detailing his trip to La Ronge, Saskatchewan where his family use to own a hotel and from

where he would travel to an area of Lake Athabasca only assessable during winter months. The passage as many of the book’s as-

pects do, spoke of barriers between cultures in Canada, issues surrounding Canada’s water bodies and the history of aboriginal communities in the town. “I’m a journalist by trade and I built Lakeland with a journalist’s tools kit,” he said, addressing the crowd at the reading and referring to Lakeland, in some ways, as an extended work of journalism. He added that he could not have done have finished his work “without the generosity of people to share their experiences.” “The really Canadian aspect was people so automatically want to talk about the country in regional terms,” he explained, “not having the sense that just beyond the horizon the exact same things are happening,” he said before reading the short passage to students and other visitors to the school. “It‘s a wonderful opportunity for our students,” Brown said. Due to limited space, students came on an invitation basis as organizers tried to choose classes that would benefit most ONE BOOK | 7

And this year's Diamond Jubilee Medal goes too... Five local residents recognized by Queen Elizabeth for their significant contributions to the community COLIN DEWAR A commemorative medal was created this year to mark the celebrations of the 60th anniversary of Queen Elizabeth II’s accession to the Throne as Queen of Canada. Known as the Diamond Jubilee Medal it has become a way for Canada to honour the queen as well as the significant contributions and achievements by many Canadians.

HOW TO REACH US

Some 60,000 Canadians will be recognized with a medal including residents of Woolwich and Wellesley Townships. Last week Charles Foy, LuAnn Snyder, Kelly Meissner, and Chattar Ahuja of Woolwich and Brent Thomlison of Wellesley, along with nine other individuals from the region, received their medals at a ceremony held at the Waterloo Region Museum. The medal recognizes outstanding citizens who

excellence in their field and continuously contribute to their community. For more than 30 years, Charles Foy has been actively involved in Waterloo Minor Soccer serving as a coach and past president of the club. Over the years he has become the face of the sport in the community. Always one to volunteer he was inspired by the time he spent working at the Ontario Summer Games,

LuAnn Snyder was one of the recipients of the 2012 Diamond Jubilee Medal. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

JUBILEE | 4

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THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

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are kind of in planning limbo because of the nondecision,” said chief administrative officer David Brenneman. The proposal was defeated when councillors JulieAnne Herteis and Bonnie Bryant voted in favour and Bauman and Cowan against. With Cowan’s vote the issue became a stalemate. And a controversy arose. Cowan’s wife and motherin-law own and operate Gramma B’s Craft Den located on Union Street in Elmira. He did not declare a conflict even though the Dollarama usually sells similar items in its store as does the Craft Den. “I did not have a conflict, they (Craft Den) are not in the BIA, they are not in the downtown. I sit on the BIA as the council rep and I voted the way I voted because I felt we do need to protect the core in the downtown,” said Cowan during a phone interview later in the week. Sobeys has wanted to develop the Foodland site for some time but has met resistance and was forced to scale down their initial proposal that would have the grocery store expand into the vacant portion of the existing building. Woolwich planners recommended against allowing a Dollarama proposal. Before they voted, council received delegations for and against the project. Ann Tomadini, who owns and operates the Elmira dollar store, said a Dollarama would have serious ef-

fects on the downtown core, causing stores to close and leaving vacant buildings. “Please consider that as new stores open in the Sobeys location anything that duplicates stores that we already have in the downtown core, one-byone we will lose the stores in the downtown because we can’t compete with a big franchise store,” she said. “I believe this would be the beginning of the end of the downtown.” Hugh Handy of GSP Group representing Sobeys said the proposal for the site was appropriate and had been scaled back considerably. “We recognize the importance of the downtown and that is echoed through our planning report. It is also recognized that this is a service commercial designation with permissions that have looked towards accommodating large types of stores,” he said. “We feel this site will compliment those uses on the site and not harm the downtown.��� Before voting, Bauman said he was struggling with the issue but decided against Dollarama, noting council has made an effort to try and revitalize the downtown core and this could take away that option. Cowan, too, had reservations. “I look at the small town businesses and they are the heart and soul of the small town. We have had businesses come and go within the township and within Elmira but I look at the dollar store — it’s one of the places that is

always friendly and has the Elmira touch. I agree with free enterprise but I also agree in downtown cores and we need to check what we want to see in our downtown and what makes up our downtown. We have here in Elmira seen small businesses lately close up either because of recession or on their own but here we will be forcing a business not to have a chance,” said Cowan for his decision not to support the Dollarama. Herteis and Bryant both said they had not received any negative comments about the proposal from business owners. “I have talked with a couple of shop owners who have been established for 30 or 40 years and they said they have a strong clientele and they are not worried about this. We are going to end up bringing in another 1,200 homes and we are going to need more businesses here and more jobs in this area,” said Herteis. Although the application was denied with the stalemate vote in accordance to the planning act if council fails to make a decision the applicant, in this case Sobeys, has the ability to appeal the matter to the Ontario Municipal Board. “I don’t know if the applicant and our township staff can talk about things or maybe … there can be some mediation some consolation between the applicant and our staff,” said Bauman after the vote. This week’s decision is subject to appeal to the Ontario Municipal Board.

New group on the "Horizon" in Maryhill ELENA MAYSTRUK Historical Society of St. Boniface and Maryhill will be reaching out to the Woolwich community this October through a look at the history of local communities. New Horizons— a community group for seniors operated out of Maryhill— will be hosting the event on Oct. 11 with organizer Joan Haid at the helm. The group was first developed by Haid, a Maryhill resident for 35 year. After retiring from a 40-year nursing career the organizer felt compelled to start a group that caters to “zoomers, boomers and seniors." “We have a lot of new people here in the village. I’ve lived here for 35 years but I was not born and raised here. So for me and for others who don’t go back for generations to this area we still have this

desire to know about the past,” she said in a phone interview on Monday. Haid hopes this event will bring together not only Mary Hill locals but also history lovers from around the Woolwich community, connecting newcomers with life-long residents of the area including three from a local nursing home. “There’s going to be three residents from that nursing home…one woman who’s ninety five… that to me is a really special guest and she’s lived here all her life,” Haid explained. The day’s history lessons will encompass areas like Bloomingdale as well as Maryhill and will feature three speakers showcasing various artifacts collected by the historical society. “I want them to be a surprise,” Haid said of the artifacts, I don’t want to give it all away before the event.”

Together, she hopes the speakers can define the history of the area’s community and the historical society’s role in preserving it. Speakers Ron Brohman President of the Maryhill historical society, executive Marjorie Zinger will speak on various topics regarding the origins of their historical society. In addition, Kitchener-Waterloo local Germaine Bader will speak on the area’s roots in Alcase Lorraine as well as her own ancestry. “She’s going to talk about her connection. A lot of people from this area came from Alcase Lorraine,” Haid said of the speaker and Maryhill’s ancestry. The event will be held at the Maryhill Heritage Community Centre on 58 St. Charles St. E starting at 10:00 a.m. running until approximately 11:30 a.m. with an entrance fee of $2.00 per person.


NEWS | 5

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

Paving the way for road maintenance The Township of Woolwich awarded a maintenance paving program tender to Steed and Evans Limited at a total cost of $182, 088.33. The company beat four other paving businesses with the lowest bid. Work will be aimed at roads which require maintenance including Tanager Street, Maple Street adjacent to Riverside School and Hemlock Hill Drive. In order to reduce ongoing maintenance costs township

staff informed council it would be more cost effective to place a single lift of asphalt over the roadway as an interim solution until such time that the roadways can be reconstructed as opposed to placing cold patch material on an ongoing basis.

Legionnaire's disease makes appearances in Region

Reports of Legionnaire’s disease also known as Legionellosis have

been increasing throughout the summer months in Ontario. In the province there have been 58 confirmed cases of the disease from August 1 to September 7, 2012. There have been eight cases reported in the Waterloo Region this year. No deaths have been reported. The illness is an acute bacterial disease caused by the bacterium Legionella pneumophilia and can be acquired by breathing in contaminated water droplets or mist from hot tubs, air conditioners, shower heads and decorative fountains. It does not spread from person to person. Symptoms include feeling unwell,

loss of appetite, sore muscles, fever, headache, abdominal pain, diarrhea and non-productive cough. The disease can be treated with antibiotics.

WRDSB french immersion seeks more french

Waterloo Region District School Board is inviting the parents of student from kindergarten to grade 6 to participate in a survey regarding possible changes in the partial French immersion program. The board is currently exploring

the possibility of boosting the amount of French instruction time in partial French immersion for grades 1 through 3 by 40 per cent. Fifty per cent of the current program is taught in English. The change would lower English instruction to 10 per cent leaving 90 per cent to be taught in French. There is also a prospect of increasing French immersion in grades 7 and 8, 34 percent of which are currently taught in French. Eligible parents and guardians can visit the WRDSB website to complete the survey at http://www. wrdsb.ca

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untouched by the flames and no livestock were harmed. The fire was controlled and extinguished by Wellesley fire fighters and no injuries were reported. The silo was used to store gluten, police later learned. Damage to the structure is estimated at $20,000. The feed that was lost in the fire is estimated to be worth between $10,000 and $15,000. The fire is not being treated as suspicious.

SEPTEMBER 20

2:23 PM | A blue Raleigh Matterhorn bike was found beside Mac’s Milk convenience store in Elmira. The rightful owner can claim the bike at the Elmira detachment.

9:20 AM | A break-in was reported at Ingenuity Ltd. on 483 Bridge St. A window was broken and doors were left ajar. Nothing appeared to have been taken. Police are investigating. 2:23 PM | A Schwyn orange and white mountain bike was found on Sawmill Road near Conestogo. The rightful owner can claim the bike at the Elmira detachment.

Firefighters inspect an accident after a 1993 Ford hit a parked truck from behind on Oriole Pkwy. and Meadowlark Road Monday morning. [JOE MERLIHAN / THE OBSERVER]

SEPTEMBER 22

SEPTEMBER 21

2:50 PM | Thirty-one marijuana plants were found in a field near 31 Streicher Line near Manser Road. Plants were destroyed by police.

8:49 PM | A 39-year-old Elmira woman drove her silver Hyundai Elantra into a pole in the Foodland parking lot in Elmira detaching one of its wheels. No injuries were reported. The woman was looking for a pharmacy and was not paying attention when her vehicle hit the pole. No charges were laid. SEPTEMBER 23

1:20 AM | A disturbance was called in at The Central Tavern on

Church Street in Elmira. The fight between two sisters aged 23 and 25, stopped before police arrived. Ambulance was refused. 2:23 AM | A fight broke out between a 23-year-old woman, involved in an earlier altercation at The Central Tavern in Elmira, and a 23-year old man. She believed he was responsible for her removal from the bar. Both parties appeared to have been drinking and separated for the night.

Kid’s Home and Farm Safety Day being held this Saturday at Deboer Farm Equipment in Salem. “Children will go home and tell their parents what they have learned so hopefully the whole family benefits from the day” said Farm Safety board member Walter Grose in a press release. “There are far too many kids being hurt... if hosting a day such as this can prevent an accident it is time well spent.”  The workshops will be held on 0519 Wellington Rd. 7 from 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. for ages 6 to 13.

investigating.

$35K estimated lost in silo fire A fire broke out in Wellesley Township causing thousands of dollars in damage last Saturday afternoon. Wellesley fire crews and regional police were called to the scene at 12:56 p.m. after the report of a barn fire on William Hastings Line. When emergency services arrived they observed smoke coming from a silo on the property but the damage was contained to the area and the livestock barn located close by was

Farm safety day

SEPTEMBER 23

10:36 AM | A 36-year-old man fell from a truck and broke his leg at Home Hardware in St. Jacobs. The man was taken to hospital by ambulance. Nothing suspicious was reported. The Ministry of Labour is investigating the incident. 10:59 AM | A 25-year-old woman called police informing them of a missing purse. The bag had gone missing during an altercation at The Central Tavern in Elmira during the night. Police are

1:46 PM | A 16-year-old young woman was approached by a man who gave her a cheque for $250.00. He asked her to deposit the money into her bank account then return the money to him at which point she would receive $50.00. The young woman deposited the money but could only take out $100.00 and gave the cash to the man. He then gave her a cell phone with the instructions to call him when she took out the rest. Later she received a text message on the same phone telling her to keep the rest. The man went by the name Jimmy and is described as 5”5 with short hair, some facial hair, and many tattoos on his arms and neck as well as two tear drops tattooed below his left eye. He was riding a blue bicycle. Police are investigating. SEPTEMBER 24

8:40 AM | A 57-year-old woman in a 1993 Ford ran into the back of a parked pick-up truck on Meadowlark Rd. and Oriole Pkwy. Her airbag deployed and the BLOTTER | 7

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6 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

GRCA to work with local farmers to protect watershed ELENA MAYSTRUK A young agri-innovation project came to Linwood on Thursday through a workshop for local farmers. Initiated by ClimateCHECK and with support from the Grand River Conservation Authority, the project, aptly named Farming 4R Watershed incorporates 4R Nutrient Stewardship Program originally developed by the Canadian Fertilizer Institute to apply better management practices on farms in Ontario. The programs are designed to create sustainable progeress in the agri-

cultural sector. In the 39 municipalities and in the Grand River Watershed, water quality is a priority according to ClimateCHECK Project Manager Ben Lemire. “The project is a collaboration of different groups. The Canadian Fertilizer Institute is one of the funding partners, Ontario Centers of Excellence, then ourselves ClimateCHECK which is the project lead,” he explained in an interview in Tuesday adding that the project also has the support of the Ontario Farmers Association (OFA) and the GRCA as well as the Region of Waterloo.

“The main premise of the project is just to promote more environmentally friendly and sustainable use of fertilizer on farms in the Grand River watershed area but mostly in Waterloo Region,” he said. Though the project is relatively new; the project launch commenced on Aug. 23, supporters like the OFA hope that farmer education on the proper usage of fertilizer will soon spread with the incorporation of educational seminars such as the event in Linwood on Thursday, said OFA director of regulatory modernization David Armitage. “Think its basically

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teaching them the judicious use of mineral fertilizer… to ensure that it doesn’t impair water quality.” There are a number of issues associated with improper use of fertilizer. Fertilizer can seep into water sources in various ways. “It can leech downward into groundwater or there are some nutrient elements that can bind to soil particles. If you have rainfall it can wash soil into surface water and then you get surface water contaminated,” he explained. In this way the Grand River watershed’s the aquifers—an underground layer of water-permeable rock—

underlying the area can become contaminated as well as the Grand River itself. The seminars as well as online educational tools are designed to teach farmers the 4 R’s: using the right source, at the right time, in the right place and at the right time, Lemire explained. “The goal of the project is to gauge where some of the farmers are in terms of fertilizer practices in the region right now and how we can improve…to protect the watershed and the water quality in the region,” adding that part of the challenge is working with farmers to find out what

issues might be preventing some from using fertilizer in a sustainable way. “The word is spreading through the agricultural community,” said ClimateCHECK’s Communications Consultant Janice Hall who has worked on getting farmers on board with the program. “As the project moves along and starts to connect with more and more people we are hoping word will get around event more quickly.” “It’s very much a collaborative project where we are just trying to work with farmers and different groups from the region,” Lemire added.

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special needs division and started a local program to coach children with autism. He is a founding member and past president of the Waterloo Epilepsy Chapter and a key contributor for many years with the Heidelberg Park and Recreation Association. “There is an importance to volunteering in a community and I feel we should all try to do more… unfortunately I have seen a decrease in volunteers over the last few years to the point where things like the (Heidelberg Autumn Fair) have had to be cancelled,” said Foy at his home in Heidelberg after receiving the award. “I feel it is up to the younger people to step up and start volunteering within their own communities. It only takes a few hours a week and the rewards are endless.” Although honoured to be presented with the jubilee medal he initially tried to have someone else nominated in his place. “It is nice to be recognized but I work along side so many others that I feel that this medal should be theirs as well,” he humbly said. LuAnn Snyder was recognized for her work with the Dan Snyder Memorial Foundation, named in honour of her son, NHL hockey player Dan Snyder who passed away in 2003. That foundation has provides scholarships to post-secondary students in Elmira and supports local sports and camps. Five years ago the foundation raised enough money to help build the Dan Snyder Memorial Arena. She can also been seen volunteering at the Elmira fire department and assisting seniors with gardening and rides to

Charles Foy was awarded the 2012 Diamond Jubilee Medal for his volunteer work in the region. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER] medical appointments. “I was quite overwhelmed when I learned that I would be receiving the medal and I feel it is an absolute honour to be among those chosen,” said Snyder. Kelly Meissner received her medal for her successful fundraising work through Kate’s Kause for the Gibson Park playground. Meissner’s daughter Kate was diagnosed with a congenital neurological condition known as Angelman Syndrome two years ago. Meissner was determined to ensure her daughter could enjoy the same activities as other children and managed to raise more than $300,000 to put towards the project. In recognition of his volunteering, Chattar Ahuja, received a medal for his efforts to comfort and counsel patients at regional hospitals as well as to individuals at the Grand Valley Institute for Women and the Fenbrook and Beaver Creek Institutes for Men. In 2008 he was named

Volunteer of the Year by Victim Services on Waterloo Region and Community justice Initiatives. He is one of the founding members of Interfaith Grand River, an organization dedicated to promote better understanding between different religions and faiths. As the Deputy Chief of Operations for the Waterloo Regional Police Service, Brent Thomlison chairs the Ontario Association of Chiefs of Police where he serves on both the youth and training committees. With 30 years of experience on the force, he has been involved in developing a community mobilization approach to policing that he has shared with law enforcement agencies across the globe and has helped teach police officers and the public in Latin America about proven crime prevention strategies used in Canada. He was awarded the Order of Merit of the Police Forces this spring for his dedication as a police officer.


NEWS | 7

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

Heritage designation under way for Chalmers church COLIN DEWAR The Chalmers Presbyterian Church in Winterbourne took its first steps toward becoming a heritage site this week. Woolwich councillors voted in favour of providing a Notice of Intention to Designate under the Ontario Heritage Act to claim the church as a heritage building. Back in January council received a petition signed by 42 residents of Winterbourne requesting the site be designated a historical building. The request to designate has also been supported by the NorthWaterloo Region Branch of Architectural Conservancy of Ontario. In order to for a site to be designated as having heritage values it must meet one or more designation criteria such as design or physical value, historical value and contextual value. “We have proceeded with the investigation as to whether it should be designated under the Heritage Act and we have determined that of the three heritage values that have to be present in order to justify a designation the (church) actually satisfies

The Chalmers Presbyterian Church in Winterbourne is one step closer to being named a heritage site. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER] ber 2011. all three of those criteria,” The vernacular archisaid Dan Kennaley Director tecture of the simple rectof Engineering and Planangular structure reflects ning. the construction used by The church located at 4 builders in the late 19th Katherine Street was estabcentury. It was designed for lished by Scottish settlers functionality and includes in the 1830’s and the buildtall gothic windows, timbre ing was completed in 1870. framed roof, high ceiling, a It is the only church buildlarge double front door and ing in the village and a key a yellow brick common to feature in the community. the area. The church served the Council was informed the community for 131 years as building has not been siga place of worship but over nificantly altered and is an time attendance decreased ideal historic structure as and the church was forced it reflects the history of its to close it doors in Decem-

ONE BOOK: Getting a lesson in geography FROM | 3

from Casey’s presentation. “We’ve got writers crafts class which is a grade 12 class for students who are interested in the writing process and potentially even becoming writers if that’s their goal. Students are going to have the opportunity… to learn more about the writing process from a real author,” Brown explained. Because of a strong geographical aspect in

the book Brown was also inclined to invite senior geography students to participate in the event where they could discuss the book and ask questions of the author after the reading. Signed copies of the novel were also available for purchase at the event. Copies of Lakeland will be provided for teachers of the students in attendance on Wednesday. Though time constraints will likely not permit teachers to cover the entire book, ac-

cording to Brown, students will cover parts of the book in class. This wasn’t the first time Lakeland has been recognized. The author and journalist’s work won Canada’s 2010 Governor General’s Award for nonfiction and was nominated in the non-fiction category of the Saskatchewan Book Awards and for the Edna Staebler Award for Literary Non-fiction according to the author’s website.

SOLDIER: Date of move yet to be set FROM | 3

past and the rifle’s bayonet had to be re-created using a design taken by craftsmen from a historical website. The face and many of the statue’s finer details were reconstructed as well, Nelson explained. A decision on the date the statue will be moved to its new location is still pending according to WMC representatives but the most pressing concern is the transportation of the fragile piece which will require careful planning according to lead hand Brad Hergott. “It’s definitely a risk, you

don’t want to damage it, it comes with a lot of importance.” “Our president Sandra

Pember, she told me it looks quite good but it sure can’t stand any rough treatment,” Ash said, “or else it’ll collapse in a heap.”

BRIDGE LESSONS (Beginner)

Fridays 9:30-11:30a.m.

surrounding community. The building is currently up for sale and Kennaley did not know if there were any active offers on the building at this time. Addressing a question made by Mayor Todd Cowan, Kennaley said if an offer was made by someone and their intent was to demolish the building and redevelop the property they would be prevented from doing so as long as the church was designated at heritage site. Councilor Bonnie Bryant asked if the site had recently undergone any archeological digs and Kennaley said some testing had been done as to whether there might be still be some graves on the property. “We know that most of them were moved to another cemetery but there was a concern that a few of them may have been missed,” said Kennaley. “I believe there have been subsequent archeological investigations but I have not seen any reports from those investigations.” Council can designate a property without the support of the property owner. “In this case it is pretty clear cut it is worthy of designation,” said Kennaley.

HOME OF THE HANDY PEOPLE

Home Hardware employees Tricia Fawcett and Tammy Hehn pose for a photo with vendor Kristen O’Shea at the Home Hardware Fall Market on Wednesday. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

BLOTTER: Can't stomach gas FROM | 5

woman received minor injuries. Ambulance services treated her injuries and no charges were laid. 9:50 AM | A theft of gas was reported on Mill Run Lane. The incident occurred overnight and the owner awoke to find a hose attatched to the gas tank of his vehicle. Neighbours heard a car alarm go off at 4:30 a.m. and saw a brown SUV. In the morning vomit was found where the vehicle had been.

2:11 PM | Six marijuana plants were found in a field near Boomer Line. The plants have been destroyed by police. SEPTEMBER 25

12:00 PM | A 10x6 black and white Royal Cargo trailer was stolen from a property on Durst Road. The trailer was filled with tools which are also missing. The trailer’s worth is estimated at $3,500, as are the tools. 8:20 PM | A silver scooter was taken from Park Manor Public School. Police are investigating.

We’re hiring a family! Mennonite Savings and Credit Union (MSCU) is currently seeking a family who would like to walk the journey of faith and finances with us, up close and personal. By inviting us into your lives in 2013, we can share in your interactions with each other and with MSCU. It will be a learning experience that will enrich our members’ view of faith, finances, and their credit union. Conversations and interactions will be shared through a variety of media. As with everything we do, MSCU’s approach will be respectful and reflect our core values: integrity, compassion, and responsible stewardship. It’s important for the family to have: a membership at MSCU; multiple generations; a wide variety of life experiences; and a willingness to have fun and share in this journey with MSCU. We recognize this will be a significant commitment so the family will be financially compensated for their time. For more information or to discuss this opportunity, call or email me under no obligation. Frank Chisholm, Marketing Manager Phone: 519.772.5233 | Email: fchisholm@mscu.com

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8 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

JOE MERLIHAN PUBLISHER STEVE KANNON EDITOR

COMMENT

DONNA RUDY SALES MANAGER

COLIN DEWAR REPORTER

ELENA MAYSTRUK

PAT MERLIHAN PRODUCTION MANAGER

LEANNE BORON GRAPHIC DESIGN

REPORTER PUBLICATION MAIL AGREEMENT NUMBER 1004840 | ISSN 12039578

OUR VIEW / EDITORIAL

THE VIEW FROM HERE

Making the hard choices about the downtown core IT'S NO SURPRISE THAT Woolwich council this week pulled the plug on the short-lived Dollarama experiment. The original decision from the previous week, made with just three of five councillors present, went against staff's recommendation -- and that's just not the norm. Moreover, the township has a long-standing policy of protecting the core area of Elmira. Admirable, if not always rational. Almost every municipality has a plan for its downtown, some more elaborate than others. In Kitchener, for instance, they've spent millions upon millions buying up real estate and assisting with development. The payoff has been small, but has picked up some steam in recent years. Woolwich doesn't have that kind of money to waste -no community does, even if some act as though taxpayers are a bottomless well — so its efforts have centered on planning controls: dictating what can go in the core and what can't locate elsewhere in competition to the downtown. We've seen that in issues ranging from the Walmart-King/86 battle to ongoing efforts to develop the former Procast site. In the case of the Sobeys land in the south end of town, the Dollarama isn't the first hubbub. Putting a grocery store there in the first place was a controversial issue, as that's not what the township had in mind for that area. Things got more complicated when the former grocery store-turned-industrial building just up the street became a grocery store again, No Frills. Planners were unhappier still when Sobeys closed the IGA store downtown, concentrating on the current Foodland location. It's still official policy to champion a food store downtown, though efforts have been fruitless. The township is also wary of commercial ventures in the south end that it deems more suitable for the core. Here's where the reality of current shopping preferences diverge from the ideal as seen by planners. As representatives from Sobeys argued, the Dollarama formula requires far more square footage than can be typically accommodated downtown. Customers also demand the convenience of free, easy and ample parking: drive up, pop in, drive off. Again, that's just not in the cards downtown. That conundrum extends well beyond dollar stores. Sobeys' original plan for the site called for the expansion of the food store — a no-go — and new retail space to house, among other things, a restaurant and beer and wine stores. The project was scaled back dramatically following township objections. The developer now finds itself in a position similar to what's going on at the King/86 and stockyards areas near St. Jacobs: many of the would-be tenants are unable to locate there due to limitations built into the Official Plan and zoning. And few of those prospective businesses see the township's preferred locations as viable. That's what drives requests for changes and the corresponding resistance from Woolwich, as most recently demonstrated this week. The township, of course, is not alone in that situation, just as it's not the only municipality trying to protect and/or revive its downtown. Elmira is in much better shape than many cores, which gives councillors some wiggle room — there's no sense of desperation — but there are bigger issues at play than a Dollarama store.

In the course of a week, Woolwich council takes Dollarama through the full gamut ... To be continued. WORLD VIEW / GWYNNE DYER

No more coups in Turkey WORLD AFFAIRS In my trade you get used to it after a while, but the first time you wake up to find a military coup has happened overnight where you live is quite alarming. That was in Turkey back in 1971, when the army seized control of the country after months of political turmoil. It was not as bad as the 1960 coup, when the military authorities tried and hanged the prime minister, but it was bad enough. There were two more coups in Turkey: in 1980, when half a million were arrested, tens of thousands were tortured, and fifty were executed, and 1997, a post-modern coup in which the army simply ordered the prime minister to resign. But there will be no more coups in Turkey: the army has finally been forced to bow to a democratically elected government. On 21 September a Turkish court sentenced 330 people, almost all military officers, to prison for their

involvement in a coup plot in 2003. They included the former heads of the army, navy and air force, who received sentences of twenty years each, and six other generals. Thirty-four other officers were acquitted. Five years ago, nobody in Turkey could have imagined such a thing. The military were above the law, with the sacred mission (at least in their own minds) of defending the secular state from being undermined by people who mixed religion with politics. Making coups against governments that trespassed on that forbidden ground was just part of their job. This was the duty that the 330 officers thought they were performing in 2003, according to the indictments against them. The Justice and Development Party (AKP), a moderate Islamic party espousing conservative social values, had come to power after the 2002 election: the voters had got it wrong again, and their mistake had to be corrected. With public opinion abroad and at home increasingly hostile to military coups, a better pretext

was needed than in the old days. So the plot, Operation Sledgehammer, involved bomb attacks on two major mosques in Istanbul, a Turkish fighter shot down by the Greeks, and an attack on a military museum by Islamic militants.  The real attackers, in every case heavily disguised, would actually be the military themselves. The accused 330 claimed that Operation Sledgehammer was all just a scenario for a military exercise, and the documents supporting the accusations (probably leaked by junior officers opposed to a coup) have never been properly attributed. But given the army’s track record of four coups in fifty years and its deeply rooted hostility to Islamic parties, the charges were entirely plausible, and in the end the court believed them. The army has no choice but to accept the court’s judgement. The AK party has been re-elected twice with increasing majorities, the party’s pious leaders have not tried to shove their values down everybody else’s throats, and the economy has flourished.

A new constitution, ratified in a referendum in 2010, has finally made elected civilian governments superior to the army. It even removed the legal immunity that those who carried out the bloody 1980 coup wrote into the previous constitution to protect themselves. As a result, the leaders of that coup, retired generals Kenan Evren and Tahsin Sahinkaya, have also been brought to trial. And about time, too. Even now, many secularminded people in Turkey do not trust the motives of an Islamic party in government. They still think that the army is there to protect them from the dark oppression of the religious fanatics, and that any attempt to curb its power is a conspiracy against the whole principle of the secular, neutral state. But the Turkish secular state has never been neutral. From the time when Mustafa Kemal Ataturk and his companions, all military officers, rescued Turkey from the wreckage of the Ottoman empire after the First World War, DYER | 11


COMMENT | 9

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

THEIR VIEW / QUESTION OF THE WEEK

With such a young team, how do you think the Sugar Kings will do this season?

»»Ben Beacom

»»Reilly Brick

I think they will play really well this year.

They will do really well and make it quite far in I think they will be either second or third. They Top three for sure. the playoffs. will do very well.

»»Buster Ertel

»»Katherine Hoffman

»»Georgia Gagnon They will do really well as long as we (the fans) come out to support them.

"Downtown businesses will either meet the challenge or they won't, but robbing your local taxpayer of expanded choices is wrong." Rob Martin | Pg 10 HIS VIEW / STEVE KANNON

There's no denying rising sea levels and the costly consequences EDITOR'S NOTES Low countries is no exaggeration. From the air, that much is clear. Flat as far as the eye can see. On the ground, that makes life much easier while walking through the scenic areas of Belgium and the Netherlands - as you read this I’m in Amsterdam,where the biking is easy and plentiful. A quick look at the coastal areas, however, shows you the consequences of all that low-lying land: the endless battle to keep out the sea. Here the reason for climate change is less of an issue than dealing with its impacts. Manmade or natural cycle, meters of extra seawater flood just the same. Here in Holland, water makes up 7,700 square kilometres of the country’s total area of 41,500 sq. km. A quarter of the place

is below sea level. Being wealthy, the Dutch have spent more than a century devising ever-more clever ways of keeping the water at bay, reclaiming land from the sea. Other low-lying parts of the world don’t have that kind of luxury. In fact, more than 640 million people, the better part of 10 per cent of the world’s population, lives at sea level on coastlines or in areas that are only 30 feet above sea level near the coast. Any significant rise in sea levels could lead to a large loss in life or at the very least result in a massive amount of refugees. Most of the people under threat live in what’s known as the Ring of Fire -- such countries as China, India, Japan, Indonesia, Vietnam and Thailand --seismically active areas that are now facing even more damaging earthquakes and tsunamis. But the problems and potentially larger crises aren’t contained to Asia and the Third World, as can be seen in prepara-

tions along the U.S. coasts and, of course, in Europe, including the UK and here in the low countries. As sea levels continue to rise they will have devastating effects on coastal habitats of not only mankind but animals, fish and birds. They will cause erosion, flooding and contamination of aquifers (fresh water) and agricultural soil while destroying towns and homes. The influx of refugees worldwide will become common place, putting strains on already fragile economies. Safely tucked away in southwestern Ontario, we’re not going to experience the firsthand effects of rising sea levels -- the Canagagigue and even the Nith, Conestogo and Grand are not going to engulf us, unlike what’s in store for Bangladesh. Canada is not immune, however. Coastal cities such as Vancouver are in jeopardy due to rising sea levels compounded by severe

weather driven by climate change, according to Simon Fraser University’s Adaptation to Climate Change Team (ACT). If sea levels continue to rise at their current rate, the experts warn, much of Metro Vancouver as we know it today could be under the sea by 2300 – as much as 91 per cent of Richmond could be under water, followed by Delta at 76 per cent, Pitt Meadows at 76 per cent and Port Coquitlam at 51 per cent.  Vancouver’s not alone -in Canada, where the total coastline exceeds 203,000 kilometres, sea level rise is a significant issue. Government researchers have identified two major regions of high sensitivity to climate change: Atlantic Canada (much of the coasts of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and New Brunswick) and parts of the Beaufort Sea coast. Small areas of high sensitivity occur in Quebec, Newfoundland and Labrador, and British Columbia.

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tion densities and small amounts of infrastructure at risk. Awareness of the expected sea-level rise and coastal erosion, which have been occurring for many thousands of years, should ensure that future developments are set back from threatened areas. But as the current economic situation has reminded us, our economy has become so entwined with that of much of the world such that we’re going to feel the pain, not to mention the pressure from the large number of refugees expected to be displaced, which we must resist. Whether the melting ice caps and rising sea levels are manmade or not. Whether you believe mankind is responsible or not, we’re going to have to deal with the consequences. From where I’m sitting right now, that means yet more efforts to keep back the water. At home, we won’t be building dykes, but we’ll feel it just the same.

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As sea level rises, storm surges will inflict greater damage on communities located close to the level of the ocean. A reminder of this was the flooding of Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island by a storm surge in January 2000. Other communities at risk include Placentia in Newfoundland and Labrador, and even downtown Halifax. The lowlands at the head of the Bay of Fundy are also at risk from storm surges. This area was devastated in the great storm surge of 1869, the so-called ‘Saxby Tide’. With accelerated sea-level rise, the dykes will be breached by some of the high tides by the middle of the century. A rising sea level will result in more coastal erosion in this century. However, when compared with Europe and Japan, where expenditures on coastal protection are in the many billions of dollars, Canada is fortunate in having low popula-

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10 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

THE MONITOR

VERBATIM

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

A complete transcription of convicted terrorist Omar Khadr’s seven-hour interview at Guantanamo Bay has been released to the press. Forensic psychiatrist Michael Welner was hired by Pentagon prosecutors to assess him in the interview before Khadr was tried for war crimes. Welner submitted a 63-page report on the interview to prosecutors.

“I have repeatedly raised concerns about discrimination of girls by sex-selection abortion, no law needed, but we need awareness!”

In 2005 Woolwich adopted plans for a new multi-use complex in Elmira. The township initially set aside $12 million for what would become the Woolwich Memorial Centre housing the Dan Snyder Arena and the Jim McLeod Arena.

»»Maclean’s Magazine

»»Status of Women Minister Rona Ambrose tweeted after voting in favour of a

»»From the Sept 24, 2005 edition of the Observer

motion to study the legal rights of the human fetus. The motion was not passed.

DYER: Army forced to bow-

NATIONAL VIEW

down to elected government CONTINUED FROM | 10

the state was at war with religion. Ataturk began by abolishing the religious schools, the Sultanate, and the Caliphate (religious authority over all Muslims) that Ottoman sultans had traditionally claimed. He banned forms of headgear, like the fez and the turban, that had religious connotations. He replaced Islamic law with Western legal codes, and declared the equal status of women and men (including votes for women). It was understandable, because Ataturk had always argued that Turkey must Westernise its institutions and write off the nonTurkish parts of the empire if it wanted to survive in a world dominated by industrialised Western empires. But that was 75 years ago.

Today’s Turkey is modern, powerful, and prosperous, and there is no external threat. It’s high time for the Turkish army to stop waging a cold war against the part of the population who are still devoutly religious. They are entitled to the full rights of citizenship too, although they are not entitled to force their beliefs and values on everybody else. That was the significance of AK’s victories in the past three elections, and of the trials that have finally brought the army under control. The head of the Turkish armed forces and all three service chiefs resigned in July in protest against the trials of military personnel, but President Abdullah Gul promptly appointed a new head of the armed forces “who tamely accepted the post. It’s over."

YOUR VIEW / LETTERS

What exactly are township planners protecting in downtown Elmira? To the Editor, I was dismayed by the article in last weeks Observer that Sobey’s has had to scale down their expansion proposal from something positive to add yet another dollar store to this town. It is frustrating to me as a taxpayer to see new development thwarted because the planners are worried about the downtown core. I paid special attention driving through the town on the weekend to see what the planners are trying to protect and I couldn’t see why they are concerned. We have three Chartered banks, Brown’s Menswear, Hartman Jewellers, Snider Brothers Furniture, three Realtors, a Bridal shop, two restaurants etc. But what stood out for me was the new buildings that house Macs Milk and

the Mennonite savings and Credit Union. I think the town planners need to take into consideration that if they want to keep Elmira dollars in Elmira they need to give us options more then dollars stores. I think council needs to allow for new business and new business models. Downtown businesses will either meet the challenge or they won’t, but robbing your local taxpayer of expanded choices is wrong. Town Hall used to be downtown on main street but the choice was made to move into improved facilities at a new address.

ROB MARTIN, ELMIRA

Encourage respect, don't legislate it To the Editor, In the Woolwich Observer, Saturday 22, 2012 there was a brief article entitled, “Woolwich rec. adopts noise-making pol-

icy” I wondered why this was the first time I had ever heard of it – something that affects absolutely everyone in the township whether they be involved directly in Woolwich sports or indirectly as someone who comes to be supportive and cheer. My interest was piqued and so I called the township and asked what was behind the necessity of this policy. I was told it was created for the health and safety of everyone because of the potential damage to people’s hearing. Action would be taken by staff in response to a complaint where “excessive decibels of noise damaging to hearing” was reported using “common sense” in addressing the issue. The policy is there so that staff have something in place to respond and refer to. My understanding is that this will just be an extension of township enforcement they already address at the complex ie.

when someone is running on the walking track or walking around to the left on a day when they are all supposed to be walking to the right. So exactly who determines what “excessive” noise levels are that could lead to hearing damage, how hard you can clap your “clappers, thunder sticks and the like” (or perhaps they’re not even allowed in the arena anymore) and how hard you can push from your diaphragm to whistle and cheer which covers “though they also include excessive whistling and yelling”. What is offensive and hurtful to one may not be to another depending on their particular mood or sensitivities that day. Other townships have what is known as an “R Zone” policy – respect and responsibility. Respect and responsibility for others, self and your own actions. LETTER 1 | 23

Township puts the brakes on expressing pride in our teams To the Editor, Shhhhh! Calm down! I know your team just scored but keep it down please. No need to get noisy, it was only a double Lutz your child just landed, no need to cheer. This is a place of quiet contemplation not a sports complex. Does this not sound silly? Sadly, it is true that our Woolwich Recreation management has passed an excessive noise policy, which includes clappers, thunder sticks, whistling, and yelling. You can be banned from the facility if you yell to loud. I had hoped that the appointment of the new director would improve the way recreation was managed in this township. It took ten years to decide on if we needed a new facility,

then no hanging of banners (can we not have pride in our township’s teams), no time of day clocks in the arenas, (no need to track your rental usage), 2 years to decide what to do about rink board advertising, then another year to implement them. Recreation teams are leaving the township because of changes to ice fees, policies, and times. Those ice times are lost revenue as they sit empty. The only thing changed under the new leadership is allowing league and provincial banners to be hung in Snyder. I had hoped for more but I guess I expected too much. I won’t even start the discussion on the maintenance of the soccer fields and ball diamonds. These things seem like common sense to you and I, why not for the township? Then again this is the township that wanted to pay an inexperienced LETTER 2 | 23


SPORTS | 11

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

SPORTS HOCKEY / JUNIOR B

HOCKEY / OHA

Kings win back to back games

Jacks make it two wins

Elmira defeats first place Winterhawks and move into second place COLIN DEWAR The Elmira Sugar Kings were put to the test last weekend, and they passed with flying colours. The team, advanced into second place of the GOJHL Midwestern Conference after defeating both Brampton and first place Cambridge. On the road the Kings visited the Brampton Bombers and posted a 10-0 win, giving Kings netminder Hayden Neuman his second shut out of the season after defeating the Guelph Hurricanes 3-0 last weekend. Elmira got things rolling when Brodie Whitehead beat the Bombers goalie, Erik Angeli two minutes into the first frame. The rest of period would see some silly plays by the boys in green as they were forced into a defensive game as Brampton went into attack mode. Elmira managed to hang on and returned to the room up by one. “Brampton played us real tough in the first period and our guys were a little sloppy and we made a few adjustments in the second and third and our guys were rewarded for it,” said head coach Dean DeSilva. Those adjustments seemed to renew the Kings as they scored four goals in the second with Cash Seraphim, Zac Coulter,

Wellesley is undefeated on the road as they beat Delhi

Rob Kohli, and Mitch Wright all collecting points. The third period saw more of the same as Elmira scored five unanswered goals this time off the sticks of Cass Frey, Patrick McKelvie, Brady Campbell, Jake Weidner and Matt Schieck. Although the team managed a good clean win over the Bombers they would be facing the undefeated Cambridge Winter Hawks the following day and it was up to DeSilva to refocus his squad. “I told the boys we are going to enjoy this win on the bus and celebrate but the toughest thing we are going to have to do is come back down after a game like that,” said DeSilva. “We have to make sure our emotions and our focus are on the next opponent. There is a lot of familiarity between our two teams, there are a lot of guys from Cambridge on our team and there are a few players on the Cambridge team that were playing for Elmira at one point. There is always that rivalry and any time there is a team that comes in who you are chasing in the standings you have to be prepared for it.” The Kings kept their fans on the edge of their seats during the course of a nailbiter of a game on Sunday KINGS | 13

COLIN DEWAR The Wellesley Applejacks rallied from behind to claim their second win of the season thanks to Connor McLeod netting a hat trick for the squad. The Jacks were on the road visiting the Delhi Community Arena to take on the Travellers on September 21. The game got off to a good start for Wellesley when they scored in the first minute of play as McLeod beat Delhi’s netminder Alex Stephens with Devon Wagner and Rob Hinschberger collecting the assists. But half way through the period the Jacks squad fell apart taking silly penalties and allowing three unanswered goals by the Travellers. “The stats from that first period don’t really show what happened. We came out and really controlled the period and got ourselves into some penalty trouble and went down. Five-on-five we dominated the game and were unlucky not to capitalize on some wide open nets,” said head

Kings forward Patrick McKelvie celebrates his game winning goal with teammate Zac Coulter during a game against Cambridge at the Dan Snyder Arena on Sept.23. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

JACKS | 13

Tough start, not discouraging for EDSS boys volleyball ELENA MAYSTRUK Elmira District Secondary School volleyball players started the season with mixed results. Juniors beat both Waterloo Oxford Secondary School and Waterloo Collegiate Institute in last week’s games while senior boys had a tough start with a cancellation on Tuesday and a tough first game against

Waterloo Collegiate Thursday night. “It was a tough way to start but we showed them we could play with them. Hopefully it will be a year we can gather experience,” he said, adding that the team’s goal this year is to be one of the top two AAA teams and fight for a chance to go to CWOSSA . Elmira District Secondary School junior volleyball

finished off last season with a bang, snatching silver at the CWOSSA Championship games. This year, both junior and senior coaches have high expectations for new players as well as those who made it to championships last year. It was a big year for junior boys who have been steadily improving for the past two seasons working

with volleyball coach Sarah Gerth. This year, some of the younger victorious players are staying on the team, while many older students are spilling over onto the senior team. “[Winning silver] was huge! This is my third year; our goal first year was to double our record which we did. Last year we had an almost perfect record, it was awesome,” she said

in her office at EDSS on Tuesday. This season many of lastyear’s junior players have moved to the senior level, filling up much needed spots on the team that was left destitute last season, when EDSS went without a senior team due to a lack of interest from students. Senior coach Adam Hiller helped to train last season’s junior team instead. Now

presented with a roster of older players whom he has already coached, Hiller is optimistic. “We actually didn’t have a team last year; about four guys came out to try out… It’s nice to keep a team together and work different plays with them,” he said. Last Tuesday senior boys were deprived of an opener VOLLEYBALL | 12


12 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

NOT SO GREAT OUTDOORSMAN / STEVE GALEA

Tennis elbow, definitely not OPEN COUNTRY I was raised with the belief that when a man sustains an injury it ought to be outdoorsy, dramatic or, failing that, dramatically told. Regrettably, young men these days seem to have forgotten this pearl of wisdom. This occurred to me recently, when my buddy’s son sprained a middle finger after tripping over a loose Welcome mat edge – which is fine, except for the fact that he told it precisely

that way. To be fair, my pal Tom was quick to recognize his failing as a father. “I don’t know where I went wrong?” he said, after Gord left the room. “I have always tried to lead by example.” This is true: Once, after a minor knuckle scrape sustained while using a cheese grater, Tom blamed a pack of wolves. Still, there was no doubt that he had failed his son miserably. Otherwise, Gord might have quickly uttered something like, “This splint? Well, it’s a long story, but let’s just say never give a bear the finger…”

And, needless to say, we would have all been proud. Sadly, this type of behaviour has gone the way of my old Aerosmith tee shirts and much of my hair. These days, given the opportunity, more and more slightly injured young men simply tell the truth about how they sustained their wounds. Hopefully, this trend towards brutal honesty won’t spill over into other aspects of life. Otherwise, people will soon be turning in honest golf scores or the actual weight of the fish no one else witnessed. And, of course, the world will be poorer for it. Sadly, however, I am

afraid that this might be the case. The world is changing. In related news, I have acquired an elbow injury that is not – I repeat not – tennis elbow, as my partner Jenn diagnosed. In fact I’m surprised she jumped to that conclusion since that ailment is neither manly nor even vaguely outdoorsy. I believe my elbow injury happened in a far more dramatic, outdoorsy and brutal way, perhaps the recurrence of a long-forgotten alligator wrestling injury. I have also put in countless hours shooting my longbow and fly fishing – both of which, especially if done simultaneously, are quite hard on

the elbow. Yes, that’s probably it. Even better, there is no known name for this horrifically painful medical condition which I endure so stoically. That’s good, because it suggests that my injury is a rare ailment too – which is also something that young men of my day were taught to emphasize when explaining grievous wounds. All I know is that this possibly fatal injury was not sustained while playing tennis or even badminton. And no matter what my doctor tried to suggest, it is definitely not the result of a repetitive typing injury.

None of this helps my buddy Tom, however. Nor does it alleviate the worries we all now have about Gord’s future as an outdoorsman. So, as an honourary uncle, despite my debilitating injury, I took Gord aside and explained that he was turning out to be a disappointment to his father. As if to prove my point, he said he felt no need to deviate from the path of honesty. Did I make any progress at all? Well maybe. He did prove to me that, given the opportunity, he is fully capable of giving the finger to a bear.

VOLLEYBALL: Coaches have high hopes for the season FROM | 11

when the rival Waterloo Oxford DSS cancelled the game, pitting EDSS against Waterloo Collegiate Institute (WCI) on Thursday. It was a tough first game for the young team; WCI was a force to be reckoned with according to Hiller, who was nevertheless happy with the results of the play. With a CWOSSA silver in their past, the new junior team retained a few of its main returning players from last season. Setter Ben Strauss, middle blocker Eric DeVos and last

year’s libero Nick Pavanel stayed for another season with the juniors. “This year [Pavanel] has grown, and has great defensive skills from last year so now he’s a hitter,” Gerth said. For her team the start of the season launched with the annihilation of two teams last Tuesday and Thursday nights. Waterloo Oxford junior boys put EDSS second at CWOSSA last year, pushing them aside to win the gold. In last week’s opener against Oxford, EDSS

was victorious with three straight wins in the first match. EDSS held their own against WCI on Thursday, giving the juniors a perfect record in the first two games of the season. Unity is a key factor in player performance according to Gerth. “My biggest thing is team unity and working together. We do a lot of conditioning, I make them work out. I would say team cohesiveness is the biggest thing.”

EDSS junior volleyball player Owen Kidnie scores a point for EDSS against the visiting WODSS. The team won three sets, 25-22, 25-21, and 25-23. (Left) Ben Straus and Owen Kidnie try to block a spike by a Waterloo-Oxford player during a home game on Sept. 18. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

WOOLWICH MINOR MIDGET A TEAM

The Woolwich Minor Midget A team wins it’s first (AA) tournament of the season. They went undefeated against New Market, Belle River and Orangeville to gain entry into the final. They beat Orangeville in the final with a score of 3-2, claiming the title of the Orangeville Early Bird AA Tournament. Front Row (L-R) Thomas Vickers, Jayden Weber. Second Row: Cole Lenaers, Luke Brown, Alex Uttley, Bailey Nickel. Third Row: Assistant Coach Russ Jones, Assistant Coach Justin Schlupp, Jordan Shantz, Troy Nechanicky, Jason Dunbar, Matt Leger, Eddie Huber, Scott Martin, Josh Kueneman, Manager Mike Lenaers, Coach Rick Weir. Back Row: Trainer Ryan Larson, Matt Lalonde, Connor Pierson, Nic Pavanel, Cole Conlin [SUBMITTED]


SPORTS | 13

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

KINGS: Coach keeps squad focused after 10-0 win in Brampton FROM | 11

at the Dan Snyder Arena. The first period would go scoreless as both teams were eager to be the first to draw blood. That chance came in the second frame during a power play for Elmira when Seraphim passed to Weidner from the blue line and he found Campbell out in front of the net as he slipped the rubber between the legs of Cambridge’s goalie, Lucas Machalski at 3:51. The celebration did not last long as the Winter Hawks returned the favour ten seconds later when Cambridge’s defenceman Trevor Hache beat Neuman high right to even the score. With less than five minutes remaining in the sec-

ond the Kings would once again be on the power play. This time Campbell would find Weidner in front of the net as he deflected the puck past Machalski to take the lead 2-1. “(Weidner) is a solid player, when you watch him play you can’t tell if the score is tied, if we are down a goal or we are up by eight he works just as hard every single time, whether it is the last 30 seconds or the first 30 seconds,” said DeSilva. McKelvie would make it three with just two minutes remaining giving the Kings a two point lead over Cambridge heading into the third. The last period of the game was by far the most physical as both teams clocked a combined 28

minutes in the penalty box with 12 offenses in the third. Tension began to grow as Cambridge desperately tried to forge a come back and managed to score a second goal when Cameron Pentsa beat Neuman on the right side to bring the score within one, but the Kings managed to hold on handing the Winter Hawks their first loss of the season. The win moves Elmira into second place just above Stratford and one game behind Cambridge. The Winter Hawks will be looking for revenge next Saturday when the Kings visit Cambridge. The home team then hosts the visiting Brampton Bombers on Sunday at the WMC. The puck drops at 7 p.m. for both games.

Kings Cash Seraphim, Jake Weidner and Matt Pacsuzzo celebrate their teams 3-2 win over the Winter Hawks. (Right) Seraphim collides with a Cambridge player.

[COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

JACKS: Team rallies from behind FROM | 11

coach Kevin Fitzpatrick. Delhi’s first goal came during a power play off the stick of Mike DeCoene as he beat Josh Heer who was between the pipes for the Jacks at 8:01. Two minutes later on their second power play the Travellers would take the lead when Delhi’s Brad Ward deflected a shot off a Jacks defenceman

and into the net catching Heer off guard. Delhi would make it three before the end of the first frame when DeCoene potted his second of the night another deflection this time off the helmet of a Jack player sending the puck up and over Heer. The Jacks would return to the room down 3-1. “When we were down we just told the guys they need

to stay out of the penalty box and keep playing them five-on-five and we had to shut down their best player which we managed to do after the first period,” said Fitzpatrick. The second period was a rough frame as both teams racked up the penalty minutes with a combined 70 minutes in the box. The Jacks managed a short handed goal when

Reid Denstedt found Michael Pollice who brought the game within one eight minutes into the period. The goal seemed to invigorate the squad and led to the Jacks scoring the equalizer five minutes later on a power play that saw McLeod notch his second of the game making it 3-3. “They were a good team, they’re fast but when we had our full team on the ice

we controlled the play.” Returning to the ice in the third McLeod wasted no time scoring his third of the night during a break away beating Stephens with the winning goal. The remainder of the period would see more penalties for both squads with a game total of 116 minutes. “McLeod had his best game in two years and he is a very skilled player and

has taken on a larger leadership role for us this year as one of our captains.” Heer would save 34 of 37 shots on net for the win. The Jacks are on the road against the Ayr Centennials on October 4 before returning to the Wellesley Arena on October 6 for their home opener against the Travistock Braves. The puck drops at 7:30 p.m. for both games.

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14 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

VENTURE FOOD FOR THOUGHT/ OWEN ROBERTS

NEW BUSINESS / HOLISTIC MEDICINE

Connecting with society a big part of being inventive

Helping people to heal Her non-invasive procedures give clients another option ELENA MAYSTRUK Out of a concern for her children Kate Brubacher found a new passion for health. The mother of three has recently turned her fifteen year career as a registered nurse into a holistic practice of bioenergetics. “I started my business because my two youngest children were very, very sick; many trips to hospitals, diagnosed with severe asthma both of them, not getting any better, going to doctor after doctor and pediatricians. Still not getting any better, [they were] actually getting worse,” she said in an interview this week at her office on 10 Church St. W., Elmira. Though Brubacher says her switch did not mean she lost faith in western medical practices, conventional methods had not been able to help her children and finding a holistic answer to their conditions was an eye opener to the new business owner who still works as a nurse. “I knew there had to be something more that I could do so I ended up going to a bioenergetics practitioner in Kitchener where she did muscle testing and worked with foods that they were intolerant to and we saw results right away,” she explained. “At that point I said I must do this, this is what I have to do,” she said of her decision to join the holistic practice. Though her children’s conditions improved long ago, Brubacher’s business is still young. She began

HMC Renewed Wellness in May of 2011, naming the business after her three children Hunter, Mackenzie and Carter. She worked out of her home before moving to a location on Church Street six months later. Bioenergetics claims to use frequencies of the body to cure intolerances to substances and environmental conditions that can cause minor allergies, asthma, migraines, a distaste for certain foods in children and other similar conditions. “I muscle test to determine environmental intolerances,” Brubacher said, explaining that her tests during preliminary consultations with clients are non-invasive. “It’s great for children, I don’t use needles I don’t use medications, I don’t do any blood testing at all. After I’ve determined what is causing their symptoms I use a low frequency device to help reintroduce those items back into the body so the body will accept them again,” she said. “Our bodies are made of frequencies, kind of like magnets. You’re either attracted to something or you’re repelled by it. If you are intolerant to something you will be repelled by it. There are children who don’t eat anything because it makes them sick.” Testing for intolerances involves placing the suspect substance against the patient’s forearm, asking them to hold two fingers on the same hand together

FIELD NOTES

Kate Brubacher with her daughter Mackenzie, whose health, Brubacher says, improved since she has been treated using Bioenergetics. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

and as she places a substance against their skin Brubacher tries to pull the fingers apart using moderate strength. “I try to pull them apart and if I can easily pull them apart that means they are intolerant to the substance

because it weakens [the client]. Their energy will go away from the substance because it’s repelled by it.” After she determines what substance a patient is intolerant to Brubacher can start to heal her patients

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A great deal of creativity, expressed in new inventions, technology and knowledge, must come out of an institution for it to be awarded the lofty title of Canada’s most inventive university. But think it through, and you’ll arrive at the conclusion that for a lot to come out, a lot must come in, too, in the form of funding and partnerships, to fuel inventiveness. And it must keep on coming, to keep that inventiveness buoyant. Funding is an important input for inventiveness. Universities need funds to hire the people and purchase the equipment and supplies that help drive and support research activity and accomplishments. Vibrant research universities attract great faculty and top students. Both groups are drawn to the excitement new knowledge brings to a campus. New knowledge has a ripple effect when shared with society. In Ontario, pretty well everyone benefits from the knowledge created by research. For better food, health, water, communities, you name it, research touches everything. One invention can serve millions.

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VENTURE | 15

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

ROBERTS: New knowledge has a ripple effect when shared with society FROM | 14

Earlier this week, a report on university innovation surfaced from a Toronto-based science and technology-related consulting company called the Impact Group. For Guelph, the report contained groundbreaking news – the university, it said, is Canada’s most inventive university. Guelph ranked first in the number of inventions per faculty and in the number of inventions in proportion to research funding, which sits at about $150 million.

It was an eye opener, not to mention poetic justice, considering Guelph has gone noticeably uninvited to the table of a clubby group of Canadian research-intensive universities, known as the U15, bent on lobbying governments for more support. The Impact Group study shows Guelph is way out in front of the rest of the country. Queen’s and the University of Victoria were a distant second and third. Locally, Waterloo was in the middle of pack of Canadian

universities, just a little behind the national average. Efficiency was a key measurable on this study. At Guelph, it takes about $1 million to produce one disclosure. That’s lower than any other university, by far. At the University of Toronto, for example, that figures climbs to $6.5 million. Support from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs is pivotal to Guelph’s effectiveness as a research institution, and for its standing in the Impact Group study.

Farming and food processing have now become the leading sector of the Ontario economy, and the smooth transition of ministrysponsored research from lab to field to fork is a key factor in this rise. Applied research and knowledge transfer to users is what Erin Skimson, director of the university’s Catalyst Centre, calls “part of the DNA at Guelph.” Researchers connect with government and industry partners to ensure that major societal, environmental, economic and production

HOLISTIC: Another way to heal

challenges are being addressed. The Catalyst Centre’s role is to work closely with researchers and industry to help move inventions to market efficiently. That approach is working well for Guelph, and has ever since the start of last century. Today, technologies such as seed germplasm constitute a large proportion of the invention disclosures received by the Catalyst Centre. For the most part, these are readily transferred to industry for application, and the impact is massive

for the institution and – particularly -- for the agri-food sector. For example, ministry-sponsored research has returned more than $10 million in germplasm royalty revenues since the late 1970s. Transferred to industry, that germplasm spawned more than $170 million in seed sales and $2 billion-plus in crop sales. These figures show how research underpins the economy. And as the economy continues to recover, investing in research is essential.

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$ Brubacher sits at her office on 10 Church St. W in Elmira. Here she performs consultations and treatments. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER] FROM | 14

through a series of appointments. She uses a GSR-120 unit; a device that emits impulses to help heal the body helping it to tolerate the substances the patient is repelled by. “This is what I use to help reintroduce that substance back into the body and its using acupressure points. It’s like a pulse, you don’t feel anything. Again it’s great for kids because it doesn’t hurt.” When it comes to anaphylactic conditions in people, bioenergetics is beneficial, but she still works with the medical community when it comes to severe cases that might take years to treat. In addition to treating children with mild allergies and other environmental issues, Brubacher deals with patients complaining of migraines and has recently started working with animals using the same methods to cure environmental problems. “That’s been phenomenal too, so I get my steel toed boots on and I go to the barn and I work with some horses.” Brubacher has stepped in to use holistic methods of healing on horses that have not benefitted from conventional treatment. “For them its environmental intolerances; when they have to put a horse

down because it can’t breathe, I do some testing to determine what is going on with the horse. That was my first horse,” she said of her first experience with treating animals with noninvasive techniques. Brubacher’s new career choice keeps her busy. Along with working at a long term care facility as a nurse, she splits her time as a holistic healer between her offices on Church Street, Grassroots Wellness and Nutrition in Wellesley Village and St. Jacobs Naturopathic Clinic. Her services include an hour-and-a-half consultation in which she can determine the problem through a lengthy questionnaire and an evaluation of symptoms. “I have a huge variety of things, I have tons of plants and pollens, I have about 100 food items, I work with hormones as well, but I typically go by what my client is telling me to know what to test for.” After, patients can visit for follow-up appointments. “Typically four to seven times for follow-ups and I don’t often see them back cause they are healed up,” she said. For more information, schedules and prices visit http://hmcrenewedwellness.ca or call (519) 5010946.

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16 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

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FOR SALE 49 CHURCH PEWS, 15’ seat depth, 31 (9 ft) plus 18 (171/2 ft), solid oak, can be viewed at Palmerston CRC; accepting offers. Call Bill 519-343-3099 or Gerald 519-323-4554. ANNUAL FALL SALE at Martin’s Drygoods, 519-6982152. 15% off storewide. October 1 to 31. Monday to Saturday 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. CORN SILAGE FOR Sale. Cut, processed and delivered. St. Clements area. Call 519-5750143 or 519-577-2889. EXCALIBER EXOMAX CROSS Bow for sale. Fully loaded. Call 519-648-3111. SOLID OAK KITCHEN for sale with sink and countertops. Used in excellent shape. Call 519-574-4755.

SAT. SEPT 29 at 10:00 AM - Clearing auction sale of scooter; appliances; household effects; furniture; antiques; tools; and miscellaneous items to be held at 3 Erb St. (corner of Erb and Duke) in Elmira for Albert Lubberts (former Pilgrims Provident Seniors Home). Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 or www.Jantziauctions.com

ELMIRA - 1 bedroom, newly renovated building. Smaller unit but very nice. $660 + utilities. Avail. Nov. 1. 519-669-2212.

SAT. OCT 6 at 9:30 AM Clearing auction sale of property zoned commercial/ residential; antique guns; antique automotive parts; woodworking equipment; household effects; antiques; lawn and garden equipment and miscellaneous items to be held at 3233 Erb’s Rd west in Phillipsburg approx 3 kms north of New Hamburg for Fred Leu. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 or www.Jantziauctions.com

COMM/ INDUSTRIAL FOR RENT

SAT. OCT 13 at 11:00 AM - Clearing auction sale of riding lawnmower; household effects; antiques; and miscellaneous items to be held at 674 Hawkesville Rd RR 1 St. Jacob’s approx 3 km west of St. Jacob’s for Henry and Leah Martin. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 or www.Jantziauctions.com

LUNCH BOOTH

WANTED

TERMS: Cash, Interac, Visa, M.C. NOTE: Clothes will be sold in large lots, list subject to additions & deletions. Viewing from 4:00 P.M. day of sale. Owner or auctioneer not responsible for accidents day of sale.

SEEKING RIDES MONDAYFRIDAY from commuters to elmira (a.m.) returning to Drayton area (evenings), Will share costs. 519-669-1456, dvm975@gmail.com.

AUCTIONEERS:

GRAY’S AUCTION SERVICE INC., HARRISTON | (519) 338-3722 LICENSED & BONDED

FOR SALE NEW ITEMS ADDED DAILY! Visit our 2nd floor clearance centre for mega deals on hand tools, small appliances, artwork, homedecor, lighting, paint sundries, and so much more. All at least 35-50% off retail prices. Elmira Home Hardware. OPEN Mon Fri 8 a.m. - 8 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. & Sun noon - 5 p.m. WOODWORKING/FACTORY EQUIPMENT FOR sale. Homag Beam Saw, Duplicator, Box & Lid maker, Fletcher Edge Bander. Priced to sell. 519-501-5016.

AUCTIONS FRI SEPT 28 at 4:30 PM - large toy auction of approx 400 pieces of farm toys; precision; fire trucks; tractor trailers; banks; cars; and other collectables to be held at the St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s for John Buikema of Beamsville with additions. Janzti Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 or www.Jantziauctions.com WED. OCT 10 at 10:00 AM -Clearing auction sale of household effects; furniture; antiques; and collectables to be held at the St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s for a Waterloo estate with additions. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 or www.Jantziauctions.com

RENTALS

AUTOMOTIVE 2004 MAZDA 3 Sedan, blue, 263,000 km, highway driven, automatic, One owner/non smoking. Power sunroof, tinted windows, new brakes Maintenance receipts available, E tested, AM/FM radio and CD player. $3000. Pls contact Jarrett at 905-867-1222, or email agesant10@hotmail.com

RENTALS BRIGHT, SPACIOUS, 1-BEDROOM apartment on first floor in quiet building. Ideal for non-smoking mature tenant. Close to downtown. Phone 519-669-3423. BUNGALOW IN ELMIRA. 3 Bedroom with finished basement. Available Nov. 1st. $1500.00 monthly plus utilities. Call Mildred Frey 519-669-1544 or cell 519-741-6368.

GARAGE AND CAR Lot for rent. Good for other types of business too. 761 Sawmill Rd., Bloomingdale. Call Jerry 519213-1123 or cell 519-581-8859.

ELMIRA STORE 1560 sq. ft. plus unfinished basement with shelving - front & rear entrances, move in condition. $1175.00/mth plus utilities and taxes. Suitable for retail or office. Phone Allan 519-669-8074 or Paul 519-669-8582. Email allanpoffenroth@gmail.com FOR RENT - For Not For Profit Woolwich Township organization or charity. Older 3 bedroom house about 1300 sq. ft. known as Kiwanis house. Plenty of parking, has central air. Rent will include all utilities and maintenance. Monthly rent negotiable. Located near Elmira Memorial Centre (arena & pool) KIWANIS HOUSE could share with other “not for profit” group or charity. Email allanpoffenroth@gmail.com

TRADES & SERVICES CUSTOM GARDEN PLOWING. Small tractor so I can get into small gardens. Call Garald Gingrich 519-669-2043 or cell 519-503-5641.

GARAGE SALES 2 HUGE YARD SALES! Saturday Sept. 29, 34 & 47 Aspen Cr. Elmira. 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Tons of stuff for men, women, children and teens. GARAGE SALE - Fri. Sept. 28, 9:30 a.m. 6:30 p.m. & Sat. Sept. 29, 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. 26 Hampton St. Elmira. Futon, apartment size freezer, tools, small dog carrier, electronic pet gate - in box, commercial cleaning equipment, Surround Sound system - in box and more!

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CLASSIFIED | 17

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

Scott Grainger

Barrister and Solicitor Phone: 519-669-1736 Fax: 519-669-9991 scott@propertyshop.ca

Elmira Real Estate Services Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage

90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

519-669-3192

When you buy or sell your home with us, part of our commission supports women’s shelters & violence prevention programs.

CALL A PARTICIPATING LAWYER TO FIND OUT HOW PROPERTYSHOP.CA CAN WORK FOR YOU IN THE SALE OF YOUR MOST IMPORTANT ASSET.

Bonnie Brubacher Shanna Rozema Jason Shantz Broker of Record

NEW BRICK BUNAGLOW

Broker

THIS WEEK’S LISTINGS WITH PROPERTYSHOP.CA

Broker

Spacious 5 level backsplit on almost 1/2 acre. Nicely decorated home offers 3 bdrms, 2 baths, bright dinette with walkout to large deck, private yard backing onto green space, detached shop with hydro, oversized garage, extra long double driveway. MLS

Attractive cream kitchen with dark island, hardwood and ceramic, gas fireplace, open concept main floor, master bedroom ensuite, main floor laundry, walkout. MLS A MUST SEE.

ATTRACTIVE BACKSPLIT $288,000 | DRAYTON

$1457/MONTH INCLUDING CAM. Ideal location in

This 5 year old backsplit offers an open concept layout, cathedral ceilings, spacious kitchen with dinette plus separate dining area, garden door to private patio & yard, bright recreation room, 3 bdrms, 2 bathrooms. NEW MLS

Elmira’s service industrial area, 1350 sq ft main floor includes bay with 12’ x 12’ door and front office floors all tiled and infloor heating; additional 2nd floor 19.5’ x 16’ in attractive building. Excl

FROM PAPER TO PRINT THAT PHOTOGRAPH IN THE OBSERVER CAN BE YOURS. VISIT OUR WEBSITE AND ORDER ANY PHOTO IN PAPER OR ONLINE.

PREMIUM LOT, CLOSE TO EVERYTHING! You found it! The perfect family home! The “Merchantâ€?, a 7 year old Finoro Home offers 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms and many upgrades in the vibrant town of Elmira. Your premium lot includes a walk-out basement and yard backing to natural green space, overlooked by a phenomenal custom deck, providing all the outdoor entertainment space you will ever need. Inside, the homeowner has enhanced the builder’s excellent work with fine carpentry, moldings and details, OPEN HOUSE SAT. SEPT 29 & including tasteful and functional built in SUN. SEPT. 30 | 1-5 P.M. study spaces in the second and third bedrooms and the office/study on the second floor. That fine carpentry continues with custom enhancements to the living room which joins the kitchen in this open concept floor plan accommodating the flow of family life. The master bedroom includes a luxury ensuite with corner tub and shower while the main floor features a powder room. The partially finished walk-out basement also includes a rough-in for a 3 piece bath. Your location in Elmira is close to everything: downtown, the brand new community centre (pool, twin ice pads, senior centre, youth centre, and walking track), the local high school, public and separate elementary schools. It’s all here, but if you must drive to the city, Waterloo is 15 minutes away and Guelph is an easy 30 minute commute‌The vendors are friendly! Call Bonnie and Dave at 519-669-9246 to view this home.

PROPERTY ID# 2626

QUALITY COLOUR PHOTO REPRINTS

4x6 $9

(2 nd Print only $4.50)

5x7

CALL THE 24 HOUR INFO LINE FOR MORE DETAILS: 519-742-5700 | 1-866-432-6884 + Property ID# is extension

8x10

$11

or visit us online at:

for photos & full descriptions • www.propertyshop.ca

$15

(2 nd Print only $5.50)

- Property ID# 2626

PRICE: $359,900

$334,000 ST.CLEMENTS

$342,735 ELMIRA

FOR LEASE | ELMIRA - EARL MARTIN DRIVE

78 Porchlight Drive Elmira , ON

WOW! AMAZING PROPERTY

(2 nd Print only $7.50)

FIND YOUR HOME HERE!

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& 2 + ( 1


18 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

THIS WEEKS FEATURE PROPERTIES! Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

OPEN HOUSE Sun. Sept. 30 , 2-4pm

79 Margaret

OPEN HOUSE Sat. Sept. 29 , 2-4pm

21 Raising Mill

OPEN HOUSE Sun. Sept. 30 , 2-4pm

26 Memorial

Independently Owned and Operated

3 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5426

$369,000 FABULOUS BUNGALOW

$500.00 donation will be made to WCS Family Violence Prevention Program with every home bought or sold by Paul, Alli or Bill in Woolwich.

Waterloo - Surrounded by beautifully landscaped yard. Excellent opportunity for seniors or family. Lg 4 car concrete driveway leading to tandem garage. Lg island in bright kit over looking dr w/walk-out to lg deck featuring retractable awning & view of yard. Rec rm w/wood fp & walk out to patio. Close to all amenities, downtown & expressway. MLS 1234685. Call Alli or Paul direct.

NEW LISTING

$265,000 RARE FIND!!

Elmira - A perfect family home located on a mature treed lot complete with shed and detached garage. This 2 storey, 3 bedroom home features a finished rec room, separate dining room, and main floor family room with sliders to large wrap around deck. New main floor and rec room windows excluding living room. All appliances included with the exception of freezer. MLS 1237778. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$389,000

BACKING ONTO GREEN SPACE!

Elmira - Backing onto Green space! This fantastic

home was built with family in mind! Huge kitchen with breakfast bar and walk out to large deck over looking green space. Office just off kitchen with side door to deck. Finished recroom with laminate floors and ample storage space. Large master bedroom complete with 2 walk-in closets and ensuite. MLS 1234126. Call Alli or Paul direct.

D L SO

$274,000

MODERN SEMI ONLY 5 YRS OLD

Elmira - This Elegant home features Ceramic and hardwood floors thought out main floor. Double doors leading into the exceptionally large master bedroom with 3 piece ensuite and walk in closet. Walk-out from dinette to fenced yard with pergola over beautiful interlocking patio with large decorative stones. Side entrance at landing to basement. Oversized 20ft x 12ft Garage. MLS 1237386. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$575,000 OUTSTANDING BUNGALOW

Elmira - Only 2 years old! Backing onto greenbelt.

Many upgrades throughout. Open concept mf w/hardwood & ceramic throughout. Gas fireplace in great room w/cathedral ceiling. Lg master w/5pc ens incl corner whirpool bath. MF laundry/mudroom. Finished basement includes: 2 bdrms, 4pc bath & lg rec rm. Sunroom walk-out to deck & interlock patio over-loogin yard & greenspace. MLS 1237430. Call Alli or Paul direct.

Alli Bauman SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-577-6248

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

Bill Norris SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-588-1348

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

OUTSTANDING AGENTS. OUTSTANDING RESULTS.

$279,000 LARGE WORKSHOP

Heidelberg - Bungalow with lg Workshop. This

home is complete with 4 Bedrooms, plus office, living room, family room and finished basement. The bright living room is open to dinning room and kitchen. Unfinished walk up attic. Located on large lot featuring detached 17ft x 18ft, insulated, heated workshop, fantastic gazebo and 10ft x 20ft shed. MLS 1234999. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$399,900 IMPRESSIVE

ELMIRA - 3bdrm, 2baths birdland bungalow

backing onto farmland on a family oriented st. From the welcoming eat-in kit, to the oversized LR, to the gorgeous master w/walkout , this home is bright & spacious. Add in the huge unfinished basement, beautiful covered patio & well-kept yrd complete w/shed, this home is everything you are looking for! MLS 1231378. Call Alli or Paul direct!

$347,000

POTENTIAL DUPLEX

Waterloo - Close to universities and downtown, this

very well kept, cheerful century home boasts original charm with many modern twists! Original hardwood floors, bright airy kitchens and a huge finished walk up attic with closet are just a few. Walkout to fenced yard from back family room. Ample parking, lots of storage, appliances included. MLS 1234099. Call Alli or Paul direct

$359,000 5+ BEDROOM HOME

$225,000 EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY!

Elmira - This semi is only steps to downtown! Fantastic hardwood floors, high ceilings, original built in cupboards and trim provide charm and character. Bright spacious kitchen with walkout to sun porch. Featuring; large front porch, carpet free, 3 bedrooms, living room, family room and lots of parking. MLS 1237444. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$299,000 EXECUTIVE WILLOWELLS CONDO!! Waterloo - Bright 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom condo featuring large living/dining room with built-in sidebar, separate dinette, 2 fireplaces and beautiful sunroom. Large master bedroom with 3 pc ensuite and walk-in closet. Underground parking and membership to Willowells Club included. MLS 1237578. Call Alli or Paul direct.

D L SO

$269,000

LOVELY 4 BEDROOM HOME

Kitchener - 2.5 storey home close to downtown

and farmer's market. Features an enclosed front porch, separate dining room, rec room and a fully finished walk-up attic. Detached garage and large private yard with an upper and lower level. Appliances included. MLS 1234158. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$299,900

Waterloo - within walking distance to Universities,

YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS THIS!

RIM and other Tech companies. This home could be an Investment property, residence or both! Just steps away from bus stop. Multiple driveways for parking. Separate entrance. Roof 2012. MLS 1237590. Call Bill or Alli direct.

Complete with main floor laundry, 4 piece ensuite, open concept eat-in kitchen and living room with French door walk out to deck. All the conveniences on one floor. The large garage is perfect for storage and have room for a vehicle. Located close to downtown, walking distance to library, restaurants and banks. MLS 1234444. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$319,000 PERFECT FOR A YOUNG FAMILY!

Elmira - Don’t miss this modern home featuring warm, neutral décor throughout and rich ceramic tile. Bright living room, open to dinette with slider to spacious fenced yard. Finished basement could be used for rec room or very large bedroom just off the fabulous 4 piece bathroom complete with corner tub. Appliances included. MLS 1232147. Call Alli or Paul direct.

Elmira - Brand new semi detached raised bungalow.

$769,000 EQUIPPED FOR 2 FAMILIES!!

Elmira - This home is equipped for 2 families! Front and side entrances, separate garages, separate laundry rooms, separate bathrooms, living rooms and 2 huge kitchens. Fantastic opportunity for large family/families complete with 7 bedrooms. Perfect for the hobbiest 3 car garage & detached 4 car garage/workshop. Large yard 87x250ft over looking farm land just steps to golf course. MLS 1225049. Call Alli or Paul direct.

FOR RENT. WITH REAL INVESTMENT YOU WILL SEE A REAL RETURN. MAKE THIS SPACE YOUR NEW HOME. ADVERTISE WITH US TODAY.

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com


CLASSIFIED | 19

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Bert Martin

dale@kellersellsrealestate.com

® Mildred Cell: 519-741-6970 | Len Cell: 519-741-6368

www.thefreyteam.com OPEN HOUSE - Sun. Sept. 30, 2-4pm - 17 Park Avenue W., Elmira This 2-storey home includes a gourmet kitchen with custom maple cupboards and a breakfast bar with 3 stools. The huge dining room is adjacent to the kitchen and opens into a large living room with large stained glass window. This home has lots of old time charm and character. Take the time. Come to our open house. MLS 1221850 Call Mildred Frey to view.

BROKER

Remax Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

REALTY LTD., BROKERAGE

DIRECT: 519-572-2669

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

519.500.1865

(Direct)

Dale R. Keller

17 Church St. W., Elmira • 519.669.1544 (Business)

Sales Representative

www.KellerSellsRealEstate.com | dale@kellersellsrealestate.com

EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

FREE Market Evaluation NEW PRICE!

Millbank

CLASSIC CAPE COD

On 1/4 acre lot with mature perennial gardens. This home offers a "Hanover" kitchen with centre island, 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, formal dining, living room w/wood fireplace, family room w/gas fireplace, nice stone patio & deck with pergola overlooking the rear yard & pool. MLS. $374,900.

$329,000 Millbank. Stately Victorian red brick with original gingerbread trim, some stained glass, original woodwork, updated windows, wiring, plumbing, etc. Finished rec room, walk up attic for potential use as family, games, office, whatever.Large lot backing onto greenspace. Must see! MLS

NEW PRICE!

Wellesley

Price $399,900 OPEN HOUSE - Sun. Sept. 30, 2-4pm - 30 Adam Brown St., Moorefield All brick bungalow on a large lot. Perfect for the first time home buyer. Extra large lot 100 ft wide. Home has 2 bathrooms . Basement is partially finished. Ideal for someone wanting to purchase reasonable and do some work on the home. Can be made into something great. Owners are in the process of installing a new roof and will be included. MLS1221989 Call Mildred Frey for more info.

Price $214,900 Concession 12-Lot 18 10 acre country lot. Presently in 2 parcels. Build your dream home along with storage shed for the hobbyist . This lot is level and is in good production area for market gardeners. Also on a paved well traveled road. Perfect for a roadside stand to sell your own product. Has an open ditch could possibly be utilized for watering produce or create a pond if permissible. This is a rare find. Lots are not readily available in the country. Call Mildred Frey now for more information to start your building program for this fall or next spring. MLS1237449

3 Arthur St. S. Elmira

www.remaxsolidgold.biz

OFFICE: 519-669-5426

SIDE SPLIT

On a wooded lot offers a custom "Alderwood" kitchen with a walkout to the deck, living room with gas fireplace, family room with a walkout to the patio, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, finished rec room. Newly paved double drive with space for an RV. MLS. $364,900

$396,500. Stunning 3 bdrm home with numerous upgrades. Fully fenced and landscaped yard. Finished office with separate entrance on lower level. Must be seen! MLS.

NEW PRICE!

BEAUTIFULLY DESIGNED

and detailed master bedroom and ensuite is the main feature of this 4 bedroom, 4 bathroom home situated on a large mature lot backing to green space. The main floor offers large principle rooms with hardwood and crown mouldings. Walkout to large deck, patio and spacious rear yard. MLS. $474,900.

Country All Around $528,500. 7280 Wellington Rd 12. Beautifully landscaped with a nice stand of trees. All brick quality construction with a fully finished basement and loads of features. Bright and spacious would lend itself to a granny suite or a large family. Walk down from garage. Flexible closing. MLS.

COMMERCIAL LEASE SPACE

For Lease - St. Clements

Commercial space for lease in busy plaza only 15 minutes to K-W. Office space from 144 s/f to 2400 s/f. Zoning allows numerous uses. Lots of parking. MLS.

3200 sq. ft available Lots of parking. High traffic exposure and visibility. Can be divided. Great character building for retail or professional services.

Your referrals are appreciated! Dorinda Orser, Sales Representative Unit# 15C 370 Highland Road West Kitchener, Ontario Canada N2M 5J9

Office: 519-745-7000 Direct: 519-574-1559

Price $199,900 Thinking of Buying or Selling call or email today! Free, no obligation, Opinions of value

WITH A REAL INVESTMNET YOU WILL SEE A REAL RETURN

$199,900 - RETIREMENT LIVING IN A SMALL TOWN

less than 30 minutes from KW. Spacious condo with walkout to interlocking stone patio and cedar screened gazebo. Beautifully well maintained with updated flooring throughout and neutral tones. Convenient main floor laundry. Lots of storage. Detached garage. Pavillion for family use. MLS 1234274

DON’T FORGET TO TAKE US. INCLUDE US IN YOUR TRAVEL PLANS. SNAP A PIC WITH YOU, THE OBSERVER AND A LANDMARK & SEND IT IN.

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com

FIND YOUR PERFECT HOME HERE

BROKERAGE

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. 45 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

BRAD MARTIN

519-669-2772

MVA Residential

Broker of Record,

JULIE HECKENDORN

TRACEY WILLIAMS

Res: 519.669.1068

Res: 519.669.8629

Cell: 519.505.0627

Broker

Sales Rep.

WELL MAINTAINED - older home w/duplex potential. 2 driveways. 2 baths. Large oak kitchen. 3 season ‘pine’ sunroom. Main flr. laundry. Carpet free main floor. Tastefully decorated. Newer furnace and roof. Garage. Private fenced yard. Close to downtown. NEW MLS $314,000.

H U G E- park-like backyard

COUNTRY PROPERTY- 12 acres overlooking the countryside & pond! Custom Built and loaded w/extras! Gourmet kitchen. High ceilings. Hdwd. floors. Open concept - great for entertaining! Huge fin. walkout bsmt. TRIPLE garage. You won’t be dissapointed. MLS. $899,000.

AFFORDABLE- large fam. rm addition w/cathedral ceiling & lots of windows! Oversized dining area. Main flr. laundry, bathrm. and master bdrm. Huge rec.rm. w/high ceiling. Newer doors, windows, furnace & deck. MLS. $259,900.

overlooking an open field. Lg D.A. w/ walkout to oversized deck. patio area & covered porch. Oak kitchen. Gas fireplace in living rm. Hardwood in several rooms. Main flr. office. Private master ‘suite’ and lavish ensuite bath. Fin. Bsmt. MLS $474,900.

www.thurrealestate.com


20 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

Complete Collision Service

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE. 101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

519.669.8330

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial On-The-Farm Service

FAX: 519.669.3210

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

AFTER HOURS

519-669-3232

THOMPSON’S

Auto Tech Inc.

ARE A

Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

AUTO CLINIC 21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

24 Hour Accident Assistance Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400 30 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

519.669.8917

Quality Collision Service

1-800-CARSTAR 519-669-3373

519-669-7652

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

BODY MAINTENANCE AT:

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

Call Us At (519)669-3373 33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

GENERAL SERVICES

BICYCLE SALES & REPAIRS World’s Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location

NOW ACCEPTING

• Janitorial

NEW CLIENTS

• Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off / Pick up Service • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair

$139 FREE Gift Offer Learn More Online At...

budurl.com/SAVE139 Chem-Dry Acclaim® 61 Arthur St., N. Elmira

www.completecarpetcare.ca

ROB McNALL 519-669-7607 LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

PROFESSIONAL BIKE MECHANIC ON STAFF

Buy your bike from us and get a FREE annual inspection!

ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd. • 14 ton BoomTruck • 40 ton Mobile Crane

519-664-9999

20

$

ST. JACOBS

PARTS EXTRA

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel:519-669-5537

669-3332

STORE HOURS: M-F: 8-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

24 Hour Service (Emergencies only) 7 Days A Week

GENERAL SERVICES

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

MUSIC-LOVER GIFT ALERT! COUNTR Y

’s 60’s / 70

HIGH SCHOOSL BAND

GOSPEL

ROCK

MUSIC TRANSFERS FROM LPs, 45s, 78s, CASSETTES TO CD

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING

Your favourite albums get a whole new life on CD after we clean up the clicks, pops and surface noise.

QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

MORE INFO | 519.669.0541

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102

EMAIL: vinylp2cd@gmail.com

Various sizes & rates

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE Call

Boat Covers | Air Conditioner Covers | Small Tarps Storage Covers | BBQ Covers | Awnings & Canopies Replacement Gazebo Tops | Golf Cart Enclosures & Covers •Ratches, Hooks, Straps, Webbing etc. •Canvas, Vinyl, Polyester, Acrylic Fabrics

519-669-4964

General Repairs

519.595.4830 6376 Perth Rd. 121 Poole, ON

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

GENERAL SERVICES

WE’RE AT YOUR SERVICE. We specialize in getting the word out. Advertise your business services here. Get weekly exposure with fantastic results. Call us at 519.669.5790.

MAR-TARP CUSTOM TARPS, COVERS & REPAIRS

GRAIN/ FORAGE BOX • TRUCK • TRAILER • BOAT AWNINGS • STORAGE COVERS AND MORE!

ivan@aaronmartin.com

(519) 698-2754

4445 Posey Line Wallenstein ON.

BAUMAN PIANO

SERVICES TUNING & REPAIRS

Sew Special Custom Sewing for Your Home

Custom Drapery

Local & Expedited Shipping

Custom Blinds

Cube truck with 15’ box can haul up to 5500lbs

(519) 575-1811 OPEN MONDAY-SATURDAY

daver.reimer30@gmail.com www.davescourierservice.com

Free Estimates In Home Consultations

JAMES BAUMAN

Over 20 Years Experience

Craftsman Member O.G.P.T. Inc NEW PHONE NUMBER

519-880-9165

Lois Weber 519-669-3985 Elmira

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada Established 2000

F. David Reimer

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications:

The Sharp Shop | 112-D Bonnie Cres., Elmira

519.669.5313

Mon.-Tues. 3pm-6pm | Wed.-Fri. Noon-6pm Saturday 9-5 | Sunday Noon-3pm

● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

www.reimerhbot.com For more information call:

519-669-0220

56 Howard Ave. Unit 2, Elmira, ON, N3B 2E1

READ’S DECORATING

20 years experience

SINCE 1961

Specializing in Paint & Wall coverings

FOR ALL YOUR HOME DECORATING NEEDS. 27 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

519.669.3658

free estimates interior/exterior painting, wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

519-669-2251

RA HOME COMF ELMI (519) 669-4600 ORT APPLIANCES – FURNACES – FIREPLACES AIR CONDITIONERS – WATER HEATERS SPRING SPECIAL ON AIR CONDITIONING TUNE UP $99, INSTALLED FROM $1999 FURNACES INSTALLED FROM $2499 FRIDGES $499, STOVES $399, WASHERS $399, DRYERS $369, FREEZERS $199 Come visit our show room FREE QUOTES 1 Union Street, Elmira

36 Hampton St., Elmira

ehc@hotmail.ca (519)-669-4600


CLASSIFIED | 21

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

AMOS

D&H

INC

R O O F I N G

Ltd.

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

D&H CONCRETE

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Decorative/Stamped and coloured concrete

Specializing in Concrete Driveway, Walkways, Pads, Stairs & More!

www.facebook.com/marwilconcrete

519.954.8242

519-638-2699

FREE ESTIMATES

One stop shop for all your needs. PLUMBING, FURNACE REPAIRS, SERVICE & INSTALLATION, GAS FITTING

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches

66 Rankin St. Unit 4 | Waterloo

519.501.2405 | 519.698.2114

Doug | 226.748.0032 Heather | 519.277.2424

519-885-2828

A Family owned and operated business serving KW, Elmira and surrounding area for over 35 years.

WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED

CALL JAYME FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE. In Business since 1973 • Fully Insured

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

$175.00/OUT

pump

• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

(1800 Gallon Residential) Waterloo Region • Woolwich Township

519-896-7700

or

Home Improvements

FREE ESTIMATES

519-648-3004

TEL:

519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

General Construction | 12 Years Experiance Residential & Agricultural • Barns / Shops • Decks & Railings • Poured Concrete • Driveways & Sidewalks • Siding, Fascials, Soffits • Interior Renovations Call Lawrence Metzger (226) 789-7301 Wallenstein, ON

www.biobobs.com

ROOFING | SIDING | SOFFIT & FACIA DRYWALL INSTALLATION

MURRAY MARTIN | 519.638.0772

7302 Sideroad 19 RR#2., Alma, ON, N0B 1A0

FREE ESTIMATES

FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

WINDOWS & DOORS

HOME IMPROVEMENT

WEICKERT& MEIROWSKI Concrete Foundations Limited

YES... WE DO RESIDENTIAL WORK!

6982 Millbank Main St., Millbank 519-595-2053 • 519-664-2914

Steve Co.

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

 WOOD  GAS  PELLET

ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

519.669.1462 Fax: 519.669.9970 Tel:

18 Kingfisher Dr., Elmira

www.fergusfireplace.com

CONESTOGO 1871 Sawmill Road

519-664-3800 877-664-3802

troductor Offer y

• Custom Kitchens • Custom Furniture • Libraries • Exotic Woods

> Superior Salt Products > Fast, Friendly Service > Convenient Delivery Times > Discounts for Seniors

For all your Plumbing Needs.

Taking Salt to Peoples’ Basements Since 1988

24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

KENJI ORITA

FREE BAG In

519-747-2708

ELMIRA

Waterloo www.riepersalt.com

519-669-3652

TEL: +1 (519) 574-6734 oritakenji@gmail.com 20B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA

OUTDOOR SERVICES

Outdoor

Randy Weber

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

HOME IMPROVEMENT

• Residential • Commercial • Industrial

100% SUPERIOR QUALITY CUSTOM WOODWORKING

FERGUS

180 St. Andrew St. W.

519-843-4845 888-871-4592

Services

> Commercial & Residential > Fully Insured > WSIB Clearance > Senior Discount

Lawn Maintenance Programs | Spring Clean-up Flower Bed Maintenance Programs Leaf Clean-up and Removal | Soil & Mulch Delivery & Installation | Snow Clearing & Removal | Ice Control 27 Brookemead, St, Elmira

KEVIN DETWEILER

P: 519-669-1188 | F: 519-669-9369

kdetweiler@rogers.com

OWNER-OPERATOR

Since

1998 •Final grading •Lawn repair & complete seeding •Well equipped for large stoney areas •Spike Aerator/Overseeding •Site prep for Garden sheds, sidewalks etc. •Natural & Interlocking Stone •Retaining Walls, Walks & Patios •Help for Top Water & Drainage issues •Rain Water collection systems

Murray & Daniel Shantz

ALMA, ONTARIO | PHONE: 519.846.5427

OUTDOOR SERVICES

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

YOUR SOURCE FOR YEAR-ROUND PROPERTY MAINTENANCE • Lawn Mowing Packages • Lawn Maintenance & Landscaping • Top Dressing/Overseeding • Mulch Delivery & Installation • Commercial & Residential Full Flower Bed Maintenance • Snow Plowing & Ice Control • Tractor Snowblowing

Call Jeff Basler, Owner/Operator, today 519.669.9081 mobile: 519.505.0985 fax: 519.669.9819 | ever-green@sympatico.ca

OFFERING A QUICK AND EASY WAY TO RECLAIM UNUSED LAND

Got long grass? Our tracked skid steer equipped with a forestry brush mower can handle ANY long grass!

- Trail Maintenance and Development - Wooded Lot Thinning - Pasture Reclaimation All other - Orchard Maintenance tracked skid - Industrial Lots steer services are available - Real Estate Lots

No job too small.

CFB

Mini Excavator Available

BACKHOE SERVICES • Specializing in farm drainage repair/installation • Footing / cellar / eavestrough / drains • Stump removal FOR RENT

LIKE US. FACEBOOK, A GREAT PLACE TO MAKE FRIENDS. FIND US. LIKE US. FRIEND THE OBSERVER AND STAY INFORMED.

•Tamper (Jumping Jack) •Power Drain Cleaner (Electric Snake)

6656 Sideroad 19 | RR#2 Wallenstein ON N0B 2S0

Call Clare at 519-669-1752

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com


22 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

MUNICIPAL | REGIONAL PUBLIC NOTICES

Woolwich Celebrates!

JOIN US FOR FOUR EDUCATIONAL

Saturday September 29th

WOOLWICH BUSINESSES

SPORTS DAY IN CANADA A National celebration of sport taking part in thousands of communities across Canada, sponsored by True Sport, CBC and Participaction.

AND NETWORKING EVENTS FOR

WOOLWICH SPORTS INFORMATION FAIR Woolwich Memorial Centre, 10 am - 2 pm

Representatives from many local Sports Organizations & Clubs will be in attendance!

FREE DEMOS & CLASSES! 9:30 - 10:15 am 10:15 am 10:45 am 11:15 am 11:45 am 12:15 pm 12:45 pm 10 am - noon

Deepwork Cardio Class Carpet Bowling Pickleball ZUMBATOMIC Class for Families & Kids! Woolwich Gymnastics Club Elmira Karate Dojo Waterloo Regional Synchro WCS YOUTH CENTRE WILL BE OPEN … COME CHECK IT OUT!!!

Time

Sept 28

6 - 7 pm

Sept 28 Sept 29 Sept 29

6 - 9 pm 11 - 3 11 - 1:30 pm

Sept 29

1 - 2 pm

Sept 29

4:15 - 5:45 pm

Oct 4 Oct 16

6:30 pm 5:30 - 6:30 pm

INFO

Elmira Karate Dojo Ages 5 - 12 Try Karate FREE! Elmira Lawn Bowling Club Give Lawn Bowling a Try! Elmira Sugar Kings Pumpkin Shooting Contest Woolwich Gymnastics Club Come out & try out the club! NEW GOLFERS - hit range balls & use putting green for free. PGA pros on site! NEW CURLERS - Come out and try Curling! Elmira AquaDucks Open Practice!

Kate’s Place GRAND OPENING! Sept 29, 11 am - 2pm Gibson Park, Elmira

$12

WOOLWICH BUSINESS BUILDER BREAKFAST SEMINAR SERIES

PER SEMINAR

SEMINAR 1:

SEMINAR 2:

FINDING & KEEPING GOOD EMPLOYEES

HEALTH & SAFETY: DEVELOPING CHANGES TO THE EXCELLENCE OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY ACT Do you know your responsibilities? The responsibilities of business owners have changed and interpretations have been expanded.

A workshop about setting individuals and teams up for success. Learn how to set better goals & achieve better results.

22 Mockingbird Dr., Elmira

Learn about how to manage a pressing small business problem: How to find and keep solid employees who will help you build your business.

How relationships are evolving, two things you can do to guarantee you deliver value to your clients, and more.

St. Jacobs Country Gardens

LOIS RAATS Ready2grow Associates

RICK FILSINGER HRServices

GREG VINER The ELDC Group

RICK BAKER Spirited Leaders

97 Earl Martin Drive, 669-2227

WED OCT 10, 2012 7:30AM

WED DEC 5, 2012 7:30AM

WED MAR 6, 2013 7:30AM

WED MAY 8, 2013 7:30AM

Council Chambers Township Admin Building 24 Church St W, Elmira

Community Centre Room Woolwich Memorial Centre (WMC) 24 Snyder Ave S, Elmira

Council Chambers Township Admin Building 24 Church St W, Elmira

Council Chambers Township Admin Building 24 Church St W, Elmira

“TRY “TRY--IT/DEMO DAYS” Across the Township Date

introducing the

LOCATION

St. James Lutheran Church, 669-0853

Elmira Golf Club

SEMINAR 3:

SEMINAR 4:

CHANGING YOUR SALES APPROACH TO FIT CHANGING TIMES

Elmira Curling Club, 669-9208

Bob Waters Way Official Dedication

September 29, 2pm Woolwich Memorial Centre, Elmira

To register, contact: LAUREL DAVIES SNYDER

Economic Development & Tourism Officer

E: ldaviessnyder@woolwich.ca T: 519.669.6020

Advance registration required.

TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH

Make K ndness a Priority on November 9th!

TENDER 2012-14

Snow Clearing of Municipal Sidewalks in Elmira Sealed Tenders clearly marked as to contents, will be received by the undersigned until: Wednesday October 10, 2012 at 1:00 p.m. (local time) Further details and specifications with respect to specifications, Form of Tender and Information to Bidders, may be obtained as noted below: Finance Department Township of Woolwich 24 Church Street West Elmira, ON N3B 2Z6 Fax: (519) 669-9348 Email: rpetherick@woolwich.ca Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.

Please join us at the

Woolwich Kick-Off November 8th - 7pm - 8pm Woolwich Memorial Centre

Find us on Facebook: facebook.com/rakday Follow us on Twitter: @rakdaykw #rakday www.kwcf.ca Thanks to our Kick-Off Partners Township of Woolwich

How will YOU help spread the gift of Kindness on Random Act of Kindness Day®? You can… Pay your cart forward at No Frills Help rake your neighbour’s leaves Donate to the local Foodbank Volunteer at Woolwich Community Services Hold a door open for someone at Tim Horton’s Form a Kindness Krew! Teams of 2-4 volunteers will be spread around Woolwich handing out free copies of the Waterloo Region Record on November 9th! For more details, or to register, contact Rae Ann Bauman (rbauman@woolwich.ca) by November 2nd!

TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH Currently seeking resumes from qualified Part Time Instructor / Lifeguard

Daytime Hours Apply by sending resume to druetz@woolwich.ca mail to: Instructor /Lifeguard Position 24 Church Street West PO Box 158 Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6

)

www.woolwich.ca


CLASSIFIED | 23

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

FAMILY ALBUM OBITUARY BIRTHDAY

STAG & DOE

Happy 1st Birthday Abbey!

Stag -N-Doeberfest

MARRIAGE

for Catrina Gunn & Mike Clark

Greenwood, Beatrice

Love Mommy, Daddy, Dustin, Devin & Dylan

Saturday October 6th, 2012, 9:00pm to 1:00am at the Linwood Community Centre (5279 Ament Line, Linwood) DJ, PRIZES AND OKTOBERFEST FOOD $10/per ticket Bus pick up and drop off at the Central Tavern in Elmira *Remember your Oktoberfest swag*

Meghan Hunter is thrilled to announce that she has morphed into Meghan Sheepway, with her marriage to Scott on Sept 8th, at Port Stanton, Ont. Congratulatios Meghan & Scott, and all the best. From your proud families.

ANNIVERSARY

ANNIVERSARY

Happy 50th Anniversary

Happy 50th Anniversary Leighton and Florence Martin

Ralph & Eleanor Longstaff

DEATH NOTICES

October 3, 1962

Verdella | Verdella Elizabeth Harloff of Stratford passed away peacefully at the Stratford General Hospital on September 26, 2012. Beloved wife of the late Earl Harloff who predeceased her February 14, 2011. Loving mother of Dianne Kraemer, Glen and Don Harloff.

HARLOFF,

SCHLUETER, Vera Magdalene (nee Heimpel) | 1922 - 2012

Love from your family.

DEATH NOTICES BOWMAN, Paul B. | Passed away peacefully on Tuesday, September 25, 2012 at Grand River Hospital after a brief battle with cancer, at the age of 45 years. Paul Bowman, of RR 2 Wallenstein, was the beloved husband of Marilyn (Martin) Bowman. Loving father of Nicole, Darcy, Trevor, all at home. Son of Sarah Bowman and the late Ephriam Bowman of Floradale. Loving brother of Maryann and Harvey Weber of RR 2, Dobbinton, Harvey and Amy Bowman of RR 6, Mount Forest, Minerva and Lloyd Frey of RR 1, Harriston. Son-in-law of Osiah Martin of Kitchener and Elsie Martin of RR 2, Wallenstein. Brother-in-law of Kenneth and Deborah Martin of RR 2, Wallenstein. Lovingly remembered by his nieces and nephews. The family wishes to extend a special thank you to the staff at Grand River Hospital for their compassionate care. A family service will be held at the funeral home on Saturday, September 29, 2012 at 9 a.m., then to Goshen Mennonite Meeting House for further service and burial in the adjoining cemetery. PEREZ, Elaine (nee Steckley) | Of Devon, Alberta, passed

away in hospital on September 15, 2012, at the age of 63. She was formerly of Kitchener and of Wellesley VOISIN, Ronald G. | After a lengthy illness, our dear husband, dad and papa has been taken by the angels, peacefully at St. Mary’s Hospital on Wednesday, September 19, 2012. Ronald Gerard Voisin, aged 81 years. Ron had owned and operated Ron Voisin Auto Service until his retirement in 1990. WILBURN, Mary Anne | Peacefully, passed away at Chateau Gardens, Elmira, on Friday, September 14, 2012 at the age of 82 years.

Congratulations Mom and Dad! Thank you for loving and supporting each other and us. Love and best wishes from your family.

LETTER 1: Where does

legislation stop?

FROM | 10

A policy that encourages (not legislates) “common sense” and courtesy on a daily basis in how one interacts with others and encourages being thoughtful and compliant with everyone’s needs. Why has it been deemed critical that we have a list of do’s and don’ts for cheering behavior in Woolwich Township? That though they “expect it to be a non-issue” it has become an issue by the very action and essence of creating a policy. Where are the studies and lists of complaints? When was the opportunity given to our community for input? There are other common day occurrences that can lead to damage of the ear drum. On the government website Centre for disease and control and prevention, some listed are attending school dances and pep rallies, rock band concerts for more than 1.5 minutes, an ambulance siren for more than 9 seconds, band class for more than 2 hours, power tools, as well as a vacuum cleaner and lawnmower. It does not recommend telling people to stay home or live in a bubble but suggests that if you’re going to be exposed, wear protective gear. No one would suggest

Passed away peacefully at K-W Health Centre, Waterloo on Monday, September 24, 2012, age 90. Local relative is her son Wallace Schleuter of Elmira.

that these activities shouldn’t take place but like attending a rock concert, don’t stand in front of the speakers. If you go to an arena in winter, don’t wear shorts and a t-shirt, wear warm clothing because it protects you from getting cold. Common sense at work. This policy does not encourage tolerance instead it promotes an attitude of- I don’t like it so you can’t do it. What about behavior that affects emotional health and safety – why stop at hearing? What other potential issues can we brain storm to create policies for? Where does it stop? If whistling or cheering excessively loudly is sensitive to ones ears, clapping thunder sticks or clappers hurtful, there are choices. Like any unwanted behavior deemed personally unacceptable, there are options. If after explaining the discomfort of another’s actions the person does not respond in a manner that is suitable to you– there are choices. You can stay and ignore it or you can MOVE. You can choose to become frustrated or you can choose to MOVE. Why should the person complaining have to move? Simply put - the problem is theirs. Just because something bothers you, you shouldn’t expect to have control over other peoples actions. If a concern has been voiced and ignored – there are choices. It’s about compromise and get-

Passed away on Sunday, September 23, 2012 at her home in Elmira. Beatrice (Matson) Greenwood, age 82 years, was the beloved wife of the late Leonard “Len” Greenwood (October 19, 2007). Dear mother and mother-in-law of Chrys Greenwood and Diana of RR 3, Listowel, Jane Greenwood-Hesselink and Jerry Hesselink of Floradale, and Patty Peterson-Greenwood of Ajax. Lovingly remembered by her grandchildren Samantha (Carmine), Calvin, Jessyca (Kris), Alex, Ben, Jon, Tim and Maddy, step-grandchildren Jason, Sarah (Jay), Dean, Rachel and Alexander, and great-granddaughter Evelynne. Bea is fondly remembered by her niece Kim Greenwood of Brantford, and her nieces and nephews in Scotland. She will be missed by her little dog Tessa. Predeceased by her parents Robert and Agnes (Watson) Matson, sons Drew (1999) and Robert (2009), and sisters Jean and Roberta. At Bea’s request cremation has taken place. A memorial visitation to celebrate Bea’s life will be held at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira, on Saturday, September 29, 2012 from 1 p.m. until the service time in the funeral home chapel at 2 p.m. In her memory, donations to Gale Presbyterian Church - Building Fund or Elmira District Community Living Day Program would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

ting along so that ALL people can enjoy the facilities. Here is an opportunity to be the better person – take it whether you’re the noise maker or more subdued fan. Why should thoughtful and caring behavior need to be legislated? Give me a break.

SUSAN WEBER, ST. JACOBS

LETTER 2: How loud

is too loud?

FROM | 10

administrative assistant $50,000/year when the average wage for an administrative assistant is $35,000. Please everyone come out and watch a game at the WMC, but please refrain from making noise you might wake up management from their nap.

BROOKS CAMPBELL,ELMIRA

SOMETHING TO ADD TO THE DISCUSSION? WRITE A LETTER.


24 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

LIVING HERE CHEF’S TABLE/ RYAN TERRY, FLOW CATERING

COMPETITION / THE ROAD TO WINNING

Bringing home the hardware

Viva Portugal!

Three Home Hardware drivers ran over their competition at the Truck Driving Championships

RECIPE NOTES

From left: Joe Kuntz, Shawn Matheson and Wayne Burnett came home with hard-earned awards for their driving skills.

ELENA MAYSTRUK Three Home Hardware truck drivers won big in the annual National Truck Driving Championships in Moncton, New Brunswick. Though this is not the first time the threesome have thrown themselves into the annual competitions, beating stiff competition to come out on top in their classes is something to be proud of for Shawn Matheson, Joe Kuntz and Wayne Burnett who spend most of their careers staying safe on the road. “My previous employer got me into it, with safety and how good it is to promote stuff like this and I’ve been addicted ever since,”

said Shawn Matheson in a phone interview. Matheson was this year’s first place winner in the tandem class and has been employed at Home Hardware for over five years. In addition to the win Matheson also bagged the title of Grand Champion at the national level of the competition. “My score was so much bigger than the class average,” he said while explaining his additional win. “The friendships you gain from it…we’re lucky here at Home Hardware in that we’re more or less a team… the red shirts,” said Matheson of his co-workers. In the seven years the driver has been competing,

[SUBMITTED]

this was his third time winning at the national level of the competition having won second place twice before. In order to get to the Nationals the three drivers had to win regional and provincial competitions. The top three in every class continue on to the provincials where five different team members from each province compete. In the provincial Kuntz explains, only one winner from each class could go on to nationals meaning that Matheson, Kuntz and Burnett beat out all of their competitors in order to work their way to the coveted final events at nationals; no easy task. Classes refer to

the different categories of contests at the events. “The very first thing before you even apply is you have to make sure you have a clean safety record for the previous year. There are a number of criteria, 12 or 13 different criteria that you have to follow in order to even qualify for it,” he explained adding that he has been driving for 41 years. “Years and years ago I had always been interested in trucks and competitions and how skillful drivers are,” he said of how he started in the competition. A man told him once that if he was interested in trucks he shouldn’t just go to watch, but enter the competitions himself to see

what he could do. “That was just before the central Ontario truck driving championships began in 1985, the following year that this guy told me this I said you know what? I’m going to try this out and see how it works,” he added. This year Kuntz won first in the straight truck class, a personal best for the competition veteran. There is no prize money for winners even at the national level of the competition, but the drivers found other rewards during their trip. Burnett, second place winner in the singlesingle class also recalled

This past weekend we catered a traditional Portuguese inspired sixcourse menu and I am still thinking about the simple and delicious recipes from this function. We started the meal with the country’s national soup, Caldo Verde. Every Portuguese family has made it, eaten it, loved it and each family has their own special touch to make it the perfect bowl of soup. This made things a bit intimidating, but by using some simple techniques we managed to make this soup a hit amongst the guests. Here in Elmira, it may be hard to find certain ingredients for this soup, but if you are feeling adventurous and want to attempt this recipe, you must pay a visit to an authentic Portuguese store for some key ingredients like the chouriço (garlicky sausage) and collard greens. We loved visiting Torreense Store in Kitchener as they were very friendly, and helpful in giving us tips on how to make the soup and what products were the best. They also gave us helpful hints on how to wash the collards to bleed some of the bitterness out of them. As a side note, if you are a cheese lover, you will find this store has an incredible selection of authentic Portuguese

TRUCKING | 27

Auto Care Tip of the Week Good wiper blades are important for vehicle safety, but have a short life-span of approximately 6 months. As the seasons change, come see us for replacement blades and free installation! - KENDRICK FREY

20 Oriole Parkway E., Elmira, ON N3B 0A5 Tel: (519) 669-1082 Fax: (519) 669-3084 info@leroysautocare.net

www.leroysautocare.net

NEW LOCATION!

CHEF’S TABLE | 27


LIVING HERE | 25

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012 “A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

Kleensweep Carpet Care

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates West Montrose, ON

T. 519.669.2033

COLLEEN

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville 519-699-4641

Rugs and Upholstery

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS • Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

519.669.5105 P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

KIN KORNER

www.freybc.com

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

E-MAIL: ads@woolwichobserver.com

each month, except December. Free Admission.

SEPTEMBER 28 WOOLWICH SENIORS ASSOCIATION BRIDGE Lessons (Beginner) Fridays 9:30 – 11:30 a.m. for 8 weeks starting Oct. 5. Cost is $40. For age 55 and up. For more information call 519-669-5044.

FARM AND HOME SAFETY Day for children ages 6 to 13, 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. at DeBoer’s Farm Equipment Ltd., 0519 Wellington Rd. 7 Elora. Students will have an opportunity to tour various stations including fire house, bike safety, OPP, fire and ambulance, animal safety and more! Complementary lunch served. The day is hosted by Wellington Farm and Home Safety Association. For more information call 519-846-5329.

TOM HOWELL’S FISH FRY at St. Teresa of Avila Church Hall, 19 Flamingo Dr. Elmira. Two sittings 5 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Adults $15; children (ages 5-12) $7 and under 5 free. Advanced tickets only. For tickets: St. Teresa of Avila Parish Office between 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. or call 519-669-3387. Don’t miss out on this popular annual dinner. H.U.G.S. PROGRAM. MEET WITH other parents to discuss parenting and child health issues. Topic: Separation Anxiety. Dianne Sutherland from Kidslink will have suggestions for parents to calm children’s fears. Held at Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr. St. Jacobs. Call Heidi at 519-664-3794 ext. 237 for more information.

OCTOBER 1 OUR GOVERNMENT HAS DESIGNATED Oct. 1 as National Seniors Day. Chateau Gardens Elmira invites all seniors to celebrate with a free Muffin Mania Coffee Break, 9:20 – 11:30 a.m. in our Activity Room, along with a games event. Use either 8 Snyder Ave. or 11 Herbert St. Elmira entrance. For more information call Vicky Rau at 519-669-2921 ext. 300.

OCTOBER 2 COME READ WITH ME Family Storytime – an evening family storytime program recommended for parents/ caregivers and children 3-7 years old. Tuesday evenings from 6:45 – 7:30 p.m. ongoing from Oct. 2 to Nov. 20. Read, play gems, and learn about literacy in fun ways. For more information call 519-699-4341 or email stclemlib@regionofwaterloo.ca

WCS YOUTH CENTRE LOVES Fridays! Our fun and fantastic Friday activities include a game of Clue and Twister. We will also be continuing our Harry Potter movie marathon. It is also jersey day, so wear one. Hope you can come chill with us. For more information contact Catherine or Anna at (519) 669-3539.

SEPTEMBER 29

CAREGIVER COFFEE HOUR GROUP will meet at Chateau Gardens, Elmira, 10:00 – 11:30 a.m. The topic discussed will be ‘Understanding Guilt.’ This meeting is open to caregivers of those family members who have Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia. Please call Lorraine at 519-664-3794 or Cara at 742-1422 for more

DURING THE APPLE BUTTER and Cheese Festival, join us at the WTHHS Historical Room at the Old School, 1137 Henry Street, Wellesley, between 10:00 A.M. and 3:00 P.M. In 2012, we are open every last Saturday of

information.

Check Us Out Online! woolwichkin.com

OCTOBER 3 SKILL BUILDING FOR OUTREACH. The congregation of St. Paul’s invites you to hear Rev. Larry Gajdos, Mission Executive of Lutheran Church-Canada, speak on building skills for outreach. Held at St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, 27 Mill St., Elmira, open to the community. The evening begins with a meal from 6 to 7 p.m., followed by Rev. Gajdos’ presentation from 7 to 8 p.m. Time for questions will be offered afterward. A free will offering to cover meal expenses will be taken. For more information: 519-669-2593 or stpauls@golden. net STORYTIME FOR CHILDREN AGES 3-5 at the St. Clements Branch of the Region of Waterloo Library. Join us for stories and fun activities on Wednesdays, Oct. 3 – Nov. 2 from 11:45 to 2:30 p.m. OR Thursdays, Oct. 4 to Nov. 22 from 9:15 – 10 a.m. – 2:45 p.m. For more information call 519-699-4341 or email stclemlib@ regionofwaterloo.ca STORYTIME FOR CHILDREN AGES 3-5 at the St. Jacobs Branch of the Region of Waterloo Library. Join us for stories and fun activities on Wednesdays, Oct. 3 – Nov. 21 10 to 10:45 a.m. OR Thursdays, Oct. 4 to Nov.22 from 1:30 – 2:15p.m. For more information call 519-664-3443 or email stjaclib@regionofwaterloo.ca

OCTOBER 4 WEEKLY BINGO 7 P.M. at Elmira Lions Hall, 40 South St., Elmira. All proceeds go to support the many projects of the Lions Club of Elmira. For more information call 519-500-1434.

21 INDUSTRIAL DR. ELMIRA

519-669-2884

CORPORATE WEAR PROMOTIONAL APPAREL WORK & SAFETY WEAR | BAGS T-SHIRTS | JACKETS | HATS

245 Labrador Drive | Waterloo

519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT The Events Calendar is reserved for Non-profit local community events that are offered free to the

public. Placement is not guaranteed. Registrations, corporate events, open houses and the like do not qualify in this section. 24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

NANCY KOEBEL

Bus: 519.744.5433 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Suite 102, 40 Weber St. E., Kitchener

TOTAL HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby?

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

BE IN THE KNOW.

It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess.

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

Everyone wants to know what’s going on in the community, and everyone wants to be in the know.

Elmira & Surrounding Area

SANYO CANADIAN

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

Advertise here.

VERMONT Castings

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763

519.664.2008

psgingrich@hotmail.ca

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

PLACES OF FAITH | A DIRECTORY OF LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP

St. Teresa Catholic Church No God, No Hope; Know God, Know Hope! Celebrate Eucharist with us Mass times are:

Sat. 5pm & Sun. 9am & 11:15am

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

Trinity United Church, Elmira

Zion Mennonite Fellowship

Finding The Way Together 47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 www.thejunctionelmira.com

Sunday School at 9:30am

rm A Wlcaome e W all! to

21 Arthur St. N., Elmira • 519-669-5560 www.wondercafe.ca

Service at 10:30am Rev. Paul Snow REACH WITH LOVE. TEACH THE TRUTH. SEND IN POWER. 290 Arthur St. South, Elmira • 519-669-3973 www.ElmiraAssembly.com (Across from Tim Horton’s)

SUNDAY SCHOOL

HEARING ASSISTED

Sept. 30, 2012

-The JunctionSunday School 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am

“Our mission is to love, learn & live by Christ’s teachings”

Sunday am Sunday Worship: Worship: 10:30 10:30 am Sunday School during during Worship Worship Sunday School Minister: Rev.Dave DaveJagger Jagger Minister: Rev.

NURSERY PROVIDED

Acts-The Gospel In Action

“Our Source of Power” Acts 1: 1-11 Discovering God Together

11AM Ron Seabrooke

4522 Herrgott Rd., Wallenstein • 519-669-2319 www.wbconline.ca

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

9:15 Sunday School 10:30 Worship Service Pastor: Richard A. Frey

Sharing the Message of Christ and His Love 27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593 www.stpaulselmira.ca

Choose Your Own Adventure September 30th “Relationships”

Sunday, Sept. 30th, 2012 9:15 & 11:00 AM

“God Builds A Nation” SUNDAYS @ 10:30AM Services at Park Manor School 18 Mockingbird Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1459 www.elmiracommunity.org

200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 www.woodsidechurch.ca

THERE ARE SOME QUESTIONS THAT CAN’T BE ANSWERED

BY GOOGLE.

Keep faith alive, advertise here.


26 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

STRANGE BUT TRUE / BILL & RICH SONES PH.D.

Which creature hates to get caught in the rain?

Q.  A puzzle for you

from the popular British magazine â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ladies Diaryâ&#x20AC;? of 1704-1841 for promoting math among the middle class: If at h-feet tall, you somehow managed to walk all the way around the Earth on a solid circumference, would your head or your feet travel farther? By how much? A.  Your head, by 2 times pi times your height h, answers Frank J. Swetz in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mathematical Expedition:

x 6, or nearly 38 feet farther traveled by your head than by your feet!

Q.  Which creatures

probably hate getting caught in the rain more than you do? A.  Rain poses a challenge for any fliers, with water drops often hitting them hard, reducing visibility and adding water weight that makes staying aloft more energy- consuming, says the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ask Usâ&#x20AC;? page of â&#x20AC;&#x153;ScienceIllustrated.Comâ&#x20AC;? magazine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not surprisingly, most flying insects seek cover when the rain comes.â&#x20AC;? Luckily, when it rains lightly, many are able to navigate between the drops, especially certain

Q.  If you start with YOU

as a single person, or a 1, then raise this number to 5 people, 15, 50, 150, 500 and 1500, whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening here communally? A.  These are the groupings in a typical personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life, beginning with 5 intimates, 15 best friends, 50 good riends, 150 friends,

SUDOKU



    

             

     

THE CHALLENGE

SOLUTION: on page 17

tions: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Historically, it was the average size of English villages. It is also the ideal size for church parishes and is the size of the basic military unit, the company,â&#x20AC;? Dunbar explains. Contrary to the urban myth that many people have 1000 or more friends on Facebook, the typical user actually has 120-130 friends-about the same as offline. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Of course, anyone can sign up 500 or even 5000 friends online, but how many of these are real friends who would help out if the person were in a fix?â&#x20AC;?

ABOUT THE AUTHORS Bill a journalist, Rich holds a doctorate in physics. Together the brothers bring you â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strange But True.â&#x20AC;? Send your questions to strangetrue@compuserve.com

OBSERVER CROSSWORD PUZZLER

HOW TO PLAY: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. We have got you started with a few numbers already placed in the boxes.

500 acquaintances and finally 1500 people that he or she can recognize, says evolutionary anthropologist Robin Dunbar in â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Scientistâ&#x20AC;? magazine. We humans are a bonded species, living amid family and friends in social networks that have dramatic effects on our lives, influencing how we eat, what we wear, even how we laugh. Based on the group size of other social primates and on human brain size, we could expect our own group to swell to about 150, or about the limit â&#x20AC;&#x153;where we can still have a real relationship involving trust and obligation.â&#x20AC;? The 150 figure, called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dunbarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s number,â&#x20AC;? is surprisingly common in human social organiza-

quick-moving mosquito species that manage to â&#x20AC;&#x153;danceâ&#x20AC;? through the air. Small slow movers, however, are often knocked down. While bigger insects generally fare better, â&#x20AC;&#x153;in heavy rains almost all insects that have not sought shelter are knocked to the ground, where they either die or take flight again once they dry off.â&#x20AC;?





















 

 







SOLUTIONS: 1. BOYS TOOTH 2. GIRLS MOUTH 3. RAKE 4. MISSING LEAF 5. NUMBERS ON BOYS SHIRT 6. GIRLS PIG TAIL 7. LEAVES SHADOW SIZE

Three generations of the Weiss family travelled to Newfoundland recently and took along the Observer. Back row: Mike Weiss, Gord Snider, Dave Weiss, Keaton Weiss. Middle row: Lorrie Snider, Sue Weiss, Bailey Weiss, Marie Weiss. Front row: Jody Weiss. Picture was taken in Gros Morne National Park, at Norris Point.







 









 























ACROSS 1. Defeatistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s word 7. Large two-handed saw 13. Not just â&#x20AC;&#x153;aâ&#x20AC;? 16. Iroquoian language 17. Green 18. Battering device 19. Largest tuna 21. Priestly garb 22. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Kingâ&#x20AC;? 23. Adjudge 24. Used for seasoning 26. Meaning literally â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;bornâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 27. Blue 29. Elmer, to Bugs 31. Drunk, in slang 32. A family of Afroasiatic tonal languages 35. The character of loam 37. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is fun!â&#x20AC;? 39. One who has left school 44. Charged, in a way 46. Formal wear, informally 47. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nightmare on _ Streetâ&#x20AC;? 48. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aladdinâ&#x20AC;? prince 49. Kama ___ 50. Beauty



52. Heirloom location 54. â&#x20AC;&#x153;... ___ he drove out of sightâ&#x20AC;? 55. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no ___!â&#x20AC;? 58. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Absolutely!â&#x20AC;? 60. Hackneyed 61. Speech in its original form 65. Decorated, as a cake 66. Approval 67. Kind of center 69. A New Zealand parrot 72. Addis Ababaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s land: Abbr. 74. An end to sex? 75. â&#x20AC;&#x153;ERâ&#x20AC;? network 78. Boredom 79. Course 81. Harness racer 83. ___ lab 84. Disinfect with antiseptic 88. Statehouse V.I.P. 89. Just out 90. Narrow ridge found in rugged mountains 91. #13 92. Put away 93. Chief source of beryllium DOWN



 

 























 











OBSERVER SPOT THE DIFFERENCE

CAPTION





 









Norris Point, Newfoundland











LOCATION









OBSERVER TRAVELS

























1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Suzanneâ&#x20AC;? songwriter 2. Lizards, ability to change skin colour 3. Provides info. and control 4. Not yet final, at law 5. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Potemkinâ&#x20AC;? setting 6. Cap 7. Brownish purple 8. Signed 9. Vibrating effect 10. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dearâ&#x20AC;? one 11. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tarzanâ&#x20AC;? extra 12. Mat outside a door 13. Bring up the rear 14. Bisect 15. Put in 20. Hound 25. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hey!â&#x20AC;? 28. Infomercials, e.g. 30. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unforgettableâ&#x20AC;? singer 33. Prince of Wales, e.g. 34. To drink very fast 36. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is that ___?â&#x20AC;? 37. Past participle of wise. 38. Voluptuously beautiful young woman 40. Daisy variety



SOLUTION: on page 17

WEIRD NOTES

Exploring Word Problems Across the Ages.â&#x20AC;? Think of it this way: When considering distance around a circle, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dealing with a circumference whose formula is pi times the diameter (d). So your feet would travel a global circuit equalling pi times the diameter of the Earth, or pi times d. But your head is h extra feet farther from the center of the Earth, so the circle your head follows has h extra feet at each end of its diameter. This makes it 2h longer than d with a circumference of pi times d + 2h, or exactly 2 times pi times h more than the distance traveled by your feet. Therefore, assuming youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 6 feet tall, 2 times pi times 6 feet is really 2 x 3.14

41. Capital of the State of the Vatican City 42. A-list 43. Like some potatoes 45. Caucasoid race 51. Convene 53. Barberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s job 56. Chester Whiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home 57. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ quam videriâ&#x20AC;? (North Carolinaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s motto) 59. Subsist on a meagre allowance 62. Biblical birthright seller 63. Slightly intoxicated 64. Consumes 68. Strike caller 69. A small anchor 70. Bother 71. Jack 73. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Siddharthaâ&#x20AC;? author 76. Sloping edge, cutting tool 77. Salad green 80. Abbr. after generalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name 82. Maple genus 85. After expenses 86. Quip, part 3 87. Bar bill


LIVING HERE | 27

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

CHEF’S TABLE: A taste of Portugal’s classic dishes FROM | 24

cheeses for one to explore and discover. Since fish is another staple in traditional Portuguese fare, we encourage you to try this simple and tasty baked fish recipe which was served as the third course in this meal. The recipe works for any type of whitefish, but I recommend trying cod as this would be the most common amongst the Portuguese if you are aiming for authentic. We hope you try these recipes and we are sure you will enjoy them as much as we did!

Caldo Verde 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided 2 medium onion, minced 2 clove garlic, minced 6 russet potatoes, peeled and thinly sliced 2 quarts cold water 6 ounces chouriço sausage, thinly sliced Vegetable soup base, to taste Salt and ground black pepper, to taste 1 pound collard greens (can also use kale), rinsed and chiffonade

Chiffonade your collard greens or kale by rolling the leaves into ‘cigars’ and thinly slicing. If using kale, simply rinse and set aside. Collards require a special washing technique which consists of two hot water rinses and one cold. Soak the collards in hot water two times and squeeze using your hands. The final rinse should be a cold water rinse. This process will make the collards taste less bitter in addition to bleeding some of the green colour out of them. After the cold water rinse, set aside. In a large saucepan over medium heat, cook onion and garlic in three tablespoons olive oil for three minutes. Stir in potatoes and cook, stirring constantly, three minutes more. Pour in water, bring to a boil, and let boil gently for 20 minutes, until potatoes are mushy. Meanwhile, in a large skillet over medium-low heat, cook sausage until it has released most of its fat, seven minutes. Drain. Mash potatoes or puree the potato mixture with a blender or food proces-

sor. Add salt and pepper into the soup and return to medium heat. Cover and simmer 5 minutes. Just before serving, stir collards into soup and simmer, five minutes, until collards are tender. Stir in the remaining tablespoon of olive oil. Place fried sausage into your severing bowl and serve at once.

Portuguese Baked Fish 2 lbs fish fillets (cod, haddock or other white fish.) 2 tablespoons olive oil

garlic, and saute over medium heat till transparent (about 5 minutes). Add peeled tomatoes, and seasonings. Cook for about 15 minutes over medium heat. Preheat the oven to 350. In a baking pan pour

about 1/3 of the sauce. Put the fish fillets on top of the sauce. Top with the sliced peppers. Pour the wine over this and then top with lemon slices. Pour the rest of the tomato sauce over all and then top with minced

parsley. Bake this for about 25 minutes, or until the fish is done and the sauce is bubbly. Serve with rice. ABOUT THE AUTHOR Chef Ryan Terry owns FLOW Cafe & Catering in Elmira. More information can be found at his website, www. flowcatering.ca.

TRUCKING: A sense of adventure added to the

experience FROM | 24

an aspect of adventure on their trip when the teams would visit the sights in New Brunswick when they weren’t competing, adding

that the experience was a great way to bond and support their team. “They just spread all the money out and everybody has a really good time the whole weekend. When we

were in Moncton there was a really good meal,” Kuntz said. “Oh boy, it was a long time coming. We were pretty ecstatic; we were up in cloud nine for a couple of days.”

1 onion, chopped 4 garlic cloves, minced 1 1/2 cups canned plum tomatoes (about 1 medium sized can)

DON’T WORRY, BE HAPPY.

1 ¼ cup white wine

SEE AN IMAGE IN THE OBSERVER THAT YOU LIKE? DON’T WORRY, WE DO PHOTO RE-PRINTS! VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR SIZES, PRICING AND ORDER FORMS.

1/2 teaspoon oregano 1/2 teaspoon rosemary salt and pepper 1 yellow & red pepper, sliced 1 lemon, sliced 1 bunch fresh parsley, minced

In a skillet heat the olive oil. Add the onions, and

Waterloo-Wellington CHCs are celebrating Community Health Week

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com

JØTUL DAYS Ends October 6th

Community Health Centres (CHCs) are accredited, non-profit organizations that have provided primary health care in Ontario for more than 30 years. CHCs employ interdisciplinary teams of health providers such as nurse practitioners, nurses, social workers, dietitians and health promoters, and physicians on salary. CHCs provide primary health care and a range of health promotion, illness prevention and community development programs and services. For more information about CHCs, please check out our websites today!

15% OFF

All Gas & Wood www.guelphchc.ca 519– 821-6638

www.langs.org 519-653-1470

Inserts, Stoves and Fireplaces

www.kdchc.org 519-745-4404

Traditional and Contemporary Designs www.thewoodburner.com

www.wchc.on.ca 519-664-3794

396 Victoria St. N., Kitchener tel: 519.578.9663

Supported by:

See store for details

STORE HOURS: Mon.-Thurs. 9-6; Fri. 9-8; Saturday 9-5 While quanities last. May not be exactlty as shown.


28 | BACK PAGE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2012

EXTREME QUALITY | EXTREME PRICES

SAVE% UP TO

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grand opening! THIS SATURDAY

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September 29, 2012