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» Saturday, September 10, 2011

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THE OBSERVER

Sunday to Thursday 7am - 9pm, Friday and Saturday 7am - 10pm

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SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011

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> STORY ON PG. 20

Gettin’ on the soap box

PHOTO

» COLIN DEWAR

SPEED DEMONS The seventh annual Wellesley Soap Box Derby Classic was held on Labour Day, with more than a hundred drivers competing in the event as well as hundreds of supporters cheering them on. See more photos on pg. 08.

And the race is on in Kitchener-Conestoga Candidates kick into high gear as writ drops for Oct. 6 provincial election

O

ntario voters are poised to return to the polling booths for the third time in 12 months as the provincial election officially got under way on Wednesday morning. Premier Dalton McGuinty

started the campaign for the Oct. 6 election with a visit to Lt.-Gov. David Onley to formally dissolve the legislature. It stands to be one of the more interesting provincial elections in recent memory as the Tim Hudak-led Con-

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servatives look to match the success of their federal counterparts and end McGuinty’s eight years of Liberal leadership. Meanwhile, both the NDP and the Green Party look to ride on the wave of optimism and success that their

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parties enjoyed back in May when the NDP were named the official opposition and the Green Party under Elizabeth May secured their firstever seat in Parliament. Locally, Kitchener-Conestoga candidates have been knocking on doors for weeks

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– and in some cases, months – trying to get a jump on the election. Voters should be prepared to see some familiar faces, as Liberal MPP Leeanna Pendergast, PC candidate Michael Harris, and

> SEE ELECTION ON PG. 06

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NEWS 2

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

September brings back-to-school time

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

3 NEWS

> Woolwich backs permanent bus route It came down to another split vote, but Woolwich council has officially endorsed plans for a permanent bus service in the township. In a 3-2 tally, councillors meeting Tuesday night backed Grand River Transit route 21, which connects Elmira and St. Jacobs to Conestoga Mall in Waterloo. As was the case as last week’s committee-of-the-whole meeting, councillors Bonnie Bryant and Allan Poffenroth opposed the plan, citing low ridership and high costs. With councillors Mark Bauman and Julie-Anne Herteis in favour, it fell to Mayor Todd Cowan to break the tie. The fate of the route now lies with Waterloo Region, where councillors are expected to decide this fall whether or not to make the pilot project in place since April 2009 a permanent part of the system. If the bus route is approved, Woolwich will be on the hook for $450,000 a year. The expense would require a 2.6-per-cent increase on the regional portion of property tax bills, adding $38.15 a year to the average residential property valued at $254,000. Currently, fares from riders cover about 25 per cent of the cost, the rest is subsidized through taxes.

When a haircut makes a difference I am very pleased she did cut her hair to help someone else.” As for Abby, who will be attending St. Clement Catholic School this fall, she enjoys her new look and has had many compliments from friends. “They were all pretty shocked when they saw me, I had a lot of hair cut off and they were use

A CUT ABOVE

Abby Stemmler, 11, cut off eight inches of her hair to donate to Pantene Beautiful Lengths to make a wig for someone who lost their hair due to cancer treatments.

to me with my long hair,” she said. “They kept telling me it was so short but they liked it and so do I.”

» COLIN DEWAR

G

rade 7 student Abby Stemmler cut her hair just before school started. Now, getting a haircut is a pretty standard part of back-to-school preparations. In Abby’s case, however, this was more than a trim: she cut off eight inches of her hair. She plans to donate her locks to Pantene Beautiful Lengths, a program that encourages women and men to grow, cut and donate their healthy hair to make wigs for women who have lost their hair due to cancer treatments. “Her hair was pretty long and we spoke to her about possibly donating it to a cancer organization that makes wigs and she said she would love to do it,” said Lisa Stemmler, Abby’s mother. Researching for weeks, the Stemmlers came across the Pantene Beautiful Lengths program and liked the fact that is was an Ontario-based organization.

“So many other organizations wanted a minimum of 12 inches and we knew Abby was eager to have her hair cut and we couldn’t wait for her to grow another four inches as that would have taken months,” said Lisa. “There is quite an extensive list of rules we had to follow to make sure the hair would be properly used by the organization.” To donate hair to Pantene Beautiful Lengths, it has to be a minimum of eight inches long and must be freshly washed and completely dry. It cannot be bleached, permanently coloured or chemically treated. Abby had her neighbour Lori Beam of Styles by Lori cut off her ponytail and prepare it for mailing. It takes at least six ponytails to make a wig for someone with cancer. “I am very proud of her for doing this,” said Lisa. “She is at the age where sometimes looks and fashion can seem more important than helping others, so

PHOTOS

Colin Dewar

> Event a go; review of noise exemption A daytime event shouldn’t require an exemption from Woolwich’s noise bylaw, says Coun. Mark Bauman. Councillors meeting this week quickly approved just such an exemption for the Taste Local! Taste Fresh! event to be held Sept. 18 in St. Jacobs – amplifiers are to be used in Riverside Meadows Park, necessitating the exemption under the township’s current bylaw – but Bauman, backed by Coun. Allan Poffenroth, suggested the township review the regulations at a future date to eliminate staff and council time spent dealing with events that aren’t an issue.

> Volunteer fair next weekend Looking for a way to contribute to the community? Or perhaps you’re a student looking to build your skills and work experience, while completing your 40-hour community service requirement? The Volunteer Action Centre of Kitchener-Waterloo and Area (VAC) is holding a volunteer fair next Saturday (Sept. 17) for those interested in volunteering in Kitchener, Waterloo, Wellesley, Wilmot, and Woolwich. The fair runs from 9:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. at Conestoga Mall.

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October 7 - 15, 2011


NEWS 4

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

LAW & ORDER

Police warn public to be wary of fake political canvasers man operating a piece of farm equipment at a farm on King Street North in Woolwich Township got his right arm trapped in the machine while trying to remove some debris from a roller. The man was freed by the fire department and taken to hospital with non-life-threatening injuries

September 1 >>8:10 PM | An Elmira woman

was driving home when she noticed she was being followed by a grey Nissan cube van. The driver of the van, a white male with dark hair and a beard wearing a ball cap, tried to cut her off and began tailgating her vehicle. When she pulled into her driveway the van pulled up behind her. She called the police but the van left before the police arrived. The woman did not get the license of the van.

September 2 >>12:00 AM | A silver Cadillac

was stolen from a Leighland

he Waterloo Regional Police are reminding residents of the risks associated with distributing their personal information over the telephone or through email. Political parties are currently campaigning in the Region of Waterloo and police have received reports of an individual or group who is falsely identifying themselves as a political party repre-

Drive, Waterloo residence. Police were called and reported the incident to OnStar who located the car on the 300 block of Wyecroft Boulevard. When police arrived they found the car abandoned at the side of the road.

>>8:50 AM | Police responded to a collision on Barnswallow Drive in Elmira. A 36-yearold woman driving a gold Dodge van crossed over the median and collided with a

Woolwich prepares for an emergency

sentative or volunteer, and is fraudulently asking for donations from citizens. When contacted by a political campaign representative, citizens should confirm the affiliation before offering any personal or financial information. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Fraud Branch at 519-6508500, ext. 8380 or Crime Stoppers 1-800222-TIPS (8477). silver Dodge SUV driven by a 47-year-old Elmira woman. The driver of the van was charged with ‘drive left of center.’ No injuries were reported and moderate damage occurred to both vehicles.

>>12:45 PM | A 59-year-old

woman from Guelph driving in a private parking lot struck a 73-year-old Breslau man while he was parking. Minor damages occurred to both vehicles and no injuries were reported.

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PHOTOS

August 31

THIS IS ONLY A TEST On Thursday morning, the Township of Woolwich in partnership with the Region of Waterloo tested its emergency preparedness plan. Some 50 volunteers took part in the exercise, which simulated a train derailment and spill of sulfuric acid in St. Jacobs. They arrived by bus at the front entrance of the WMC where police, emergency crews, and volunteers from the Red Cross registered them. >>3:00 PM | Majestic Machine, a company from Florida, sent a cheque to the Royal Bank for $71,500 in the name of a local company from Elmira. When the clerk at the bank became suspicious they contacted the police who are continuing to investigate.

September 3 >>3:00 PM | Police responded

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to a report of a number of fallen trees and downed power lines on Kressler Road near Lobsinger Line in Heidelberg. The damage was caused by high winds and rain that passed through the area. Kressler Road was closed north and south of Lobsinger for approximately two hours while fire, township and hydro crews cleaned up the area.

>>3:00 PM | Police responded

to a residence on Kressler Road in Heidelberg after a tree fell on the house and pulled down some power lines. The tree caused $2,000 in damages to the house.

>>3:00 PM | Police were called

to the market in St. Jacobs were

a tree branch fell on a car in the market. Inside the car were three dogs that were trapped. Police freed the dogs and the car was towed to Toronto.

>>3:00 PM | Police responded to numerous calls after a storm passed through St. Jacobs causing damages to the outdoor market and incidents of people stealing from vendors after the storm had passed. A shed containing antiques was damaged in the storm.

September 4 >>1:00 PM | Two mountain

bikes were turned in to the Elmira police station, a black and silver SuperCycle and a yellow Menace mountain bike was found in St. Jacobs.

September 5 >>3:00 PM | A collision

occurred on Northfield Drive in Woolwich Township. A woman driving a red Hyundai Sonata swerved into oncoming traffic, causing a beige Toyota Camry driven by a Kitchener man onto the shoulder of the road.

He lost control of the car and spun across the road hitting a white pickup truck driven by a 30-year-old Waterloo man. Police are looking for the driver of the red Sonata.

>>9:00 PM | Police pulled over

a car driving along Delion Place and found narcotics on the three passengers. The three local men, all 21 years old, were charged with possession of narcotics.

September 6 >>6:20 PM | Police were

called to an Earl Martin Drive address for a report of a rabid skunk wandering around the premises. The skunk sprayed the owner’s dogs and headed off into a field. Police were forced to destroy the skunk.

>>6:25 PM | Police received a

call from a resident on Sylvia Street after a white male in this 30s with blonde hair and glasses driving a red Dodge Magnum was seen taking photos of a young boy with his camera phone. The young boy ran home and the man left the area.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

5 NEWS

Not happy with the change in weather? Just wait September got off to a cool and stormy start, but should get warmer than average Colin Dewar

T

here is no doubt about it – summer is over. Although not officially fall until Sept. 23, the dramatic weather change that occurred last weekend have many in Woolwich and Wellesley townships ditching their tank tops and shorts for sweaters and pants. The weather changed fast over the Labour Day weekend from a high of 32 degrees on Saturday to a high of 15 degrees on Monday. “It was a brutal change, but that is not surprising for the month of September,” said Environment Canada senior climatologist David Phillips. The last time we saw

temperatures like Labour Day Monday was almost two and half months ago and it can be quite the shock to the system. “We should be use to it as Canadians but we are not, we never are. Part of it is psychological and part physiological,” said Phillips. “We all want to be able to ease into these things but this was just a reminder, it’s nature’s way of telling us that summer is not going to go on forever.” Phillips said the quick change in weather came from some very strong winds from the north that saw many dealing with humidex one day and a wind chill the next. “It’s not as if we rush

from summer to winter: there is a legitimate season called fall. People should be thinking about the fall and not worrying about the winter.” Typically we have a month and a half before we will see frost and at least two months to go before we even get a dusting of snow, and significant snowfall is not expected to come until after Remembrance Day, he explained. Economically it is a good time of year as we generally don’t spend money on air conditioning or heating – “it’s a free energy time.” Phillips said Environment Canada is expecting September to be warmer and drier than normal.

“Not every day is going to be warm, it never is. This is a forecast for the entire month and statistically when we come to the end of September if it has been warm and dry we have won one.” Typically highs in Woolwich and Wellesley townships during September should be 21 degrees with a low of 10 degrees. “(Labour Day) gave us a shock but we are easing back into something more typical and should see the temperatures rise slightly above normal. We are not rushing towards winter but we will not be returning to the temperatures of July either; we may see the odd day here and there

where we will see temperatures in the 30s.” Warmer temperatures may even reach into October much like last year that saw a Thanksgiving where it was so hot people were barbecuing their turkeys. “Our models are showing that overall the fall should be slightly above normal temperatures and it will be warm and comfortable,” said Phillips. From a precipitation point of view we should see normal conditions this fall. “We had a good summer it was warmer than normal and quite dry, July this year was record dry but the rains came back in August, which will help the

harvest this fall. This is good weather for growers, they are a little bit behind but they should see a good quality in there crop. We will be seeing a good back end of the growing season with positive results.” The weather is always unpredictable and can change at any moment, as seen last weekend when a flash thunderstorm ripped through St. Jacobs, causing vendors’ stands to be upended and damaging parts of building at the farmers’ market. Environment Canada confirmed that damage caused by the storm came from wind gusts as high as 100 kilometres an hour, but it was not a tornado.

No compensation for construction’s impact, says Woolwich Steve Kannon

T

here’ll be no compensation from the township for any construction-related loss of revenues at a Breslau retail plaza, councillors have decided. The new owners of the Dolman Street strip mall had been seeking financial assistance, perhaps in the way of reduced property taxes, arguing the closure of

a portion of Woolwich Street caused a hardship for the business owners. “The property currently has three tenants, a memorial stone company, a casino coach tour company, and a convenience store,” wrote Colin Carslake of Carslake and Sons Ltd. in an email sent to the township. “Clearly all of our tenants have suffered

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some loss of business, but with the convenience store the drop in customers has been very significant, probably about 80 per cent, and this is obviously causing serious issues for the owner.” But the township didn’t buy into that argument for a minute, with director of engineering and planning Dan Kennaley noting compensation is not a

standard practice in Woolwich or elsewhere. “It’s unfortunate, but we certainly do what we can to be sensitive to business owners and other property owners,” he said, adding the road was reopened Sept. 6, even as councillors met. The township put up signs notifying people businesses were still open and accessible, and pushed contractors

to move as quickly as possible, he explained. For Coun. Bonnie Bryant, the fact that Woolwich Street was closed further south than the portion near the plaza, meaning it was still accessible, further weakened the company’s claim. “I don’t see problems with that at all,” she said in dismissing the request for compensation.

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The issue could resurface next year, however, as Dolman Street itself is slated for major reconstruction work. That will likely be much more disruptive to the plaza, Kennaley said, adding there’s an upside as the building could have access to municipal water and sewer services. “That’s a tremendous benefit to this property owner.”

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NEWS 6

THE OBSERVER

Election: Jockeying for position now that the race is official > CONTINUED FROM COVER the NDP’s Mark Cairn all ran four years ago. “I’ve been doing a lot of hard work for the past four years,” laughed Pendergast when asked how she was preparing for the upcoming election. The Liberals are basing much of their platform on their track record of job creation, education reform and healthcare improvements. According to the official party website, 81 per cent of students now complete high school, up from 68 per cent in 2003, the province has created more full-time jobs this year than the rest of Canada combined, and made universal health care law in the province and banned two-tier health care. The party also announced this week a new tuition grant program that would help save $1,600 per student

in university and $730 per student in college annually. For Pendergast, though, this election is more than just towing the party lines. “For me this is about real life,” said Pendergast, adding that a vote for Hudak would be a return to the slash and cut days of Mike Harris, whose cuts she picketed during her days as a school teacher. Her most notable opponent is Conservative candidate Michael Harris, who lost to Pendergast in the last election by fewer than 2,000 votes. Harris said that constituents are tired of being stretched thin by McGuinty’s tax-andspend policies. “The last eight years Ontario families have seen their budgets get a bite taken out of them and I think they need and deserve some relief,” said Harris. “Under our leader Tim Hudak, we have every

KITCHENER-CONESTOGA ONTARIO PROVINCIAL ELECTION CANDIDATES

LIBERAL

CONSERVATIVE

intention of providing that relief that they need.” Among their platform policies, the Conservatives say they will remove the provincial portion of the HST off of home heating and hydro bills, cancel the McGuinty eco-tax, and lower income taxes by five per cent on the first $75,000 of taxable income. “People don’t mind paying taxes but they’re tired of the waste,” said Harris. The NDP candidate

for the riding, Mark Cairns, has high hopes for his party following their federal success in May. “Of the 1,000 houses I’ve been to so far I can remember one person slamming the door in my face, and that was a much higher number four years ago,” said Cairns of his reception by the public thus far. “Around here it’s always been Liberal or Conservative, but I think in this particular riding people are more accepting of the NDP and see us as the better alternative.” The NDP, under the guidance of Andrea Horwath, are campaigning on making life more affordable for Ontarians by removing the HST from daily essentials, freezing transit fares and putting an end to gas-price gouging. The party also wants to reward companies for job creation rather than across-the-board tax cuts in the hopes of creating jobs, and cutting hospital emergency room waiting times in half. “We have a very large area here and it’s growing rapidly, specifically

Leeanna Pendergast

ABOUT FACE

LEAH MCEACHERN What do you like about working in the area? It’s great, especially in St. Jacobs because I meet a lot of different people and the small town has a different feel than the big city. How long have you been working at the store? I have worked here since I

Manager, Chocolates and More

was 14 years old. What are your plans for the future? My dad owns this business and I know I am being groomed to take it over when he decides to retire. How was your summer? It was really good we were

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

quite busy this summer but I am looking forward to the fall when I am going on vacation to Cuba. What is something people don’t know about you? I have been to chocolate academy.

Michael Harris

NDP

Mark Cairns in the south end of Kitchener, so freezing transit fares and expanding the reach of transit is very important,” said Cairns. Cairns said he learned many lessons after the last election when he came a distant third behind Pendergast and Harris with about 4,500 vote, and that him and his team were better prepared this time around. He also sees the NDP emerging thanks to the leadership of the late Jack Layton. “Jack’s perseverance definitely brought us out of the political wilderness so to speak and made us realize that we’re not the write-off third party. The NDP is becoming a more tangible option with the passing of each day.” The Green Party candidate, Robert Rose, is running for the first time in politics and felt that now was the time to capitalize on the renewed interest in the Green Party and their message. The party is campaigning on a message of lowering income taxes, balancing the budget by 2015, freezing tuition rates and increasing in-

GREEN PARTY Rob Rose

vestment in co-op and mentorship programs. On the more local level, Rose is concerned with the disappearance of farmland and the fact that small communities have reduced access to medical facilities due to their distance from major urban centres. Rose said that the current parties are stuck looking at the past, rather than what the future will bring. “That’s what the Green Party is about, we think about today but we have a strong focus as well on tomorrow and trying to ensure that everything turns in the right direction,” he said. Despite the optimism growing around the Green Party – which only captured 2,783 votes four years ago under candidate Colin Jones – Rose is realistic about the party’s chances. “I realize that it’s not like the Green Party is going to come out with a majority government, but the ideas and the fundamentals are in place now. “Whether it happens this election or next, Green MPPs are going to go to parliament.”

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

Well owners encouraged to be, well, aware ut of sight, out of mind. Unfortunately, when it comes to groundwater, that saying can have dangerous consequences. Up to 75 per cent of drinking water in Waterloo Region comes from the ground, and only about one-quarter of all well owners remember to test their well water at least three times per year as recommended by the province. Groundwater contamination is also something that residents of Elmira and St. Jacobs are familiar with after area aquifers became contaminated with chemicals from the Uniroyal (now Chemtura) plant, requiring water to be pumped in from Waterloo since 1992.

WELL-NESS PROGRAM

Susan Bryant will be leading a pair of Well Aware programs later this month in Elmira and Ayr with the aim of increasing well, septic and groundwater awareness, such as the effectiveness of new well plugs like the one she is holding.

» JAMES JACKSON

O

It is with that in mind that the Waterloo-based Residential Energy Efficiency Project is holding a pair of information workshops on its Well Aware program for rural, non-agricultural well owners. The program is aimed at increasing homeowner education surrounding wells and well maintenance, and it includes an introduction to the Well Aware program, practical tips for water protection and well and septic maintenance, a free Well Aware kit with information about licensed well contractors and the importance of having your well tested, water sample bottles and the opportunity to register REEP’s free well check-up. “This program really just continues REEP’s ongoing dedication

PHOTO

James Jackson

to helping protect the environment through education,” said Susan Bryant, a certified water guide who will be leading the two workshops later this month. “I’ve been doing this for about three years and I am just passion-

ate about protecting our groundwater.” She said that many homeowners just aren’t aware of the dangers and issues that can be associated with having a well improperly maintained. Over the course of one of her free visits,

Bryant spends about 90 minutes inspecting the well and the cap and informing home owners about the importance of minimizing the sources of contamination within 50 and 100 feet of the well. The visits are also

7 NEWS

voluntary, non-regulatory and confidential – which is a big selling point to well owners, she said. “I think that is why the program is so popular, because we don’t report anything, we just make recommendations to the owner,” Bryant explained. There are two scheduled Well Aware information workshops scheduled, the first is Sept. 20 at the Elmira Public Library from 7-8:30 p.m. and the second is on Sept. 28 at the Ayr Public Library, also from 7-8:30 p.m. The sessions are free, though donations to REEP are welcome, and Bryant said there are also about 30 spots left for free well checkups this fall. For more information call REEP at (519) 744-9799 or visit www.reepgreen.ca.

Wellesley nearer to a decision on Sunday hunting James Jackson

T

he Township of Wellesley will finally see a resolution to a request for Sunday gun hunting that was tabled earlier this summer. Meeting Tuesday night, councillors agreed to vote on the subject at their next scheduled meeting set

for Sept. 20 in Crosshill. “I think there’s enough information. I’m satisfied with the information I have and I’ve canvassed people around the area and I’m very confident in the decision that I will be making at the time, so I would like to see this get resolved,” said Coun. Herb Neher.

The issue was raised after a petition was submitted to council by Dusan A. Cizman that included some 51 signatures of township residents in opposition to the Sunday gun hunting proposal. No delegates for or against the bylaw change were present at Tuesday’s meeting, and

Mayor Ross Kelterborn read the petition aloud. “We have problems now six days a week [...]. We all need a day of rest and worship, and do not need strangers trespassing on our rural lands,” he read. “Approximately 12.5 per cent of Wellesley is wooded to some extent, not enough to kill and

find wildlife.” The change to the bylaw was proposed back on July 4 when delegates from the Nith River Wild Turkey Conservation Association (NRWTCA) and the Ontario Federation of Anglers and Hunters made an appeal to councillors to permit Sunday gun hunting.

They argued it would decrease predation on crops and livestock, would help increase public safety and potentially provide increased economic activity in the area. NRWTCA president Derek Snyder called the law “outdated” and

> SEE PETITION ON PG. 09

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NEWS 8

Race Day

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

PHOTOS

» COLIN DEWAR

Wellesley continues the tradition

STAYING FOCUSED Jordan Torai keeps her eye on the finish line as she competes in the 8-10 year old class at the soap box derby held Monday in Wellesley.

ON YOUR MARKS ... Geoff Flander (left) races against Brian Mainland during

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

9 NEWS

Latest run in Terry Fox’s memory set for Sept. 18 Colin Dewar

F

or 31 years Terry Fox Runs have been held all over the world to commemorate Terry Fox’s Marathon of Hope, a cross-Canada run to raise money for cancer research. The tradition carries on in Elmira with its annual Terry Fox Run to be held on Sept. 18. Last year, the event saw 47 participants and volunteers and raised $12,522 for cancer research through pledges. This year, registration begins at noon next Sunday on the front lawns of Program Insurance Brokers,

where participants will find raffle tables and a barbecue set up. The run begins at 1 p.m. and is a 10-kilometre walk, run or ride along South Field Drive and New Jerusalem Road. The run is volunteerdriven, and has no entry fee and no minimum pledge. For event organizer Kathy Bowman, the run is quite personal as her family has been affected by cancer in many different ways. “Personally, my family has lost too many aunts and uncles, and we have cousins that are fighting cancer,” she said. “The disease

Petition: Residents voice objections to Sunday shooting > CONTINUED FROM PG. 07 suggested that Wellesley should follow the lead of other townships that have made the change to permit Sunday gun hunting, including neighbouring Wilmot Township. At the time, councillors were concerned that Sunday gun hunting would disrupt the religious members of the township, but agreed to take the in-

formation provided to them to their constituents over the summer. The municipality on at least two occasions within the last several years passed a resolution not to support Sunday hunting, most recently in 2006. In the Region of Waterloo, only North Dumfries and Wilmot allow Sunday hunting, while 172 municipalities across the province also permit it.

DID YOU KNOW?

has touched our lives in so many ways it just not funny. We have lost relatives and we have had relatives and friends that are battling and winning their battles.” Bowman took over this year from longtime organizer Judy Bieman and has spent months preparing for the event, making sure everything runs smoothly behind the scenes. “I have known (Beimen) for a very long time and it has been

a privilege to have worked along side her for the last few years,” she said. “I am running solo this year but I know everything will work out as it always has.” The first Terry Fox Run was held on Sept. 13 1981, and now sees more than three million people in some 60 countries taking part. It’s the world’s largest one-day fundraiser for cancer research, and has raised more than $500 million in

Fox’s name. Having his right leg amputated at the age of 18 due to bone cancer, Fox started his crosscountry Marathon of Hope in St. John’s on Apr. 12, 1980 to raise money for cancer patients and research. His run lasted 143 days and 5,373 kilometres before the return of cancer, this time to his lungs, forced him to stop outside of Thunder Bay on Sept. 1, 1980. Fox died on June 28, 1981 at the age of 22. The first Ter-

ry Fox Run was held later that year. Bowman said anyone can do the run, all it takes is a little commitment. “We are not all millionaires and we can’t donate all our money but we do have time and we can donate our time to something we believe in,” said Bowman. “I truly do believe in the research that the Terry Fox Foundation does and I know so many others out there do to.”

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OPINION 10

THE OBSERVER

OPINION

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

Enough is enough, live within your means, Woolwich, and respect the ability of residents to pay. Tom Loft letter on page 12

VERBATIM

T

here is a severe shortage of access to acutecare services and longer-term care services that Ontarians and, in particular, seniors need.

> Natalie Mehra, director of the Ontario Health Coalition, noting cuts have reduced the number of hospital beds by 40% since 1990, sees this as an election issue

THE MONITOR

T

he majority of Canadian workers continue to live paycheque to paycheque, with 57% saying they would be in financial difficulty if their pay was delayed by even a week. The numbers were even higher for younger Canadians aged 18 to 34 (63%) and single parents (74%).

> Canadian Payroll Association

EDITORIAL

Provincial race much tighter than expected

D

alton McGuinty isn’t the most popular man in the province. He admits as much in his election ads. Part of that is his own doing: tax hikes, particularly the HST, a failure to curb public sector wages and boondoggles such as eHealth. Part of it has to do with being Premier for eight years already. And part of it has to do with taking the heat for the economy, though the manmade crisis is global. Normally, he’d be fighting a much steeper uphill battle to win a third term, but given the quality of his biggest challenger, the front-running Conservatives led by Tim Hudak, the race was much tighter than expected as the writ was dropped this week. Hudak remains largely unknown to Ontarians, who see him as Mike Harris-lite – Hudak having served in cabinet the last time the PCs were

in power. He’s largely failed to make an impression, except for negative ones. Pundits, even those traditionally supportive of the Conservatives, had assailed his economic plans, questioning his numbers. While offering some minor tweaks, it will be business as usual for the HST under a Hudak government. And then there are the promises for such oddities as chain gangs on the province’s roads. Things got worse for Hudak last week when former PC premier Ernie Eves said Hudak was leading “the Tea Party version of Ontario politics.” The biggest thing Hudak has going for him is that he’s not Dalton McGuinty. The same is true, of course, of NDP leader Andrea Horwath. Her party’s been trailing the Liberals and Conservatives, but has seen

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Joe Merlihan, Publisher | EXT 107 jmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Steve Kannon, Editor | EXT 103 skannon@woolwichobserver.com James Jackson, Reporter | EXT 101 jjackson@woolwichobserver.com Colin Dewar, Reporter | EXT 102 cdewar@woolwichobserver.com

> LETTER POLICY

a surge in the wake of the public sentiment accompanying the death of Jack Layton. She, too, is an unknown factor. But both the other main parties have taken note, having learned something from last spring’s orange wave that made Layton Leader of the Official Opposition. We can expect to see more shots directed her way as the campaign rolls along. Both Hudak and Horwath will be fighting for the public’s attention. Hudak’s team is minimizing his exposure, sticking to sound bites and attempting to stay on message. Horwath, with much more range, is trying to broaden the scope of discussion, going against the grain of increasingly simplistic electioneering we’ve seen at all levels. McGuinty, on the other hand, is working to downplay the negative aspects of all the exposure he’s re-

Donna Rudy, Sales Manager | EXT 104 drudy@woolwichobserver.com Pat Merlihan, Production Mgr | EXT 105 pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Jon Sarachman, Production | EXT 108 jsarachman@woolwichobserver.com Lindsay Lehman, Production | EXT 109 llehman@woolwichobserver.com

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ceived as Premier for the last eight years. The campaign is accentuating the positive, of which there are many. Opponents, in and out of the legislature, had much to criticize McGuinty for in both terms of office. Not much of the name-calling stuck enough to be a factor in his first reelection bid. How about this time? Well, that remains to be seen. McGuinty would be well advised to stick to the basics – it’s the economy – and focus on the lives of middle-class Ontarians, many of whom are leery about Hudak despite being more than a little ticked off with the current government. Public uncertainty about Conservative handling of the economy – typically poor – and an even greater shift of the burden away from corporations on to the middle class provides the Liberals with an opportunity.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

11 OPINION

Ten years later: analyzing bin Laden’s strategy W

riting recently in the Washington Post, Brian Michael Jenkins, a senior adviser at the Rand Corporation think tank, claimed that the 9/11 attacks 10 years ago were not a strategic success for al-Qaeda. He’s right. Osama bin Laden’s strategy did fail, in the end – but not for the reason that Jenkins thinks. Jenkins argues that Osama bin Laden believed the U.S. was a paper tiger because it had no stomach for casualties. Kill enough Americans, and the United States would pull out of the Middle East, leaving the field free for al-Qaeda’s project of overthrowing all the secular Arab regimes and imposing Islamist rule on everybody. In bin Laden’s 1996 fatwa declaring war on America, Jenkins pointed out, he claimed that the U.S. would flee the region if attacked seriously. Indeed, bin Laden gave the rapid U.S. military withdrawal from Lebanon after the bombing of the Marine barracks in Beirut in 1983, and the equally rapid retreat of American forces from Somalia in 1993 after 18 U.S. soldiers were killed in Mogadishu, as examples of American cowardice. Other al-Qaeda commanders disagreed, Jenkins says, warning that the 9/11 attacks would enrage the United States and “focus its fury on the terrorist group and its allies, but bin Laden pushed ahead. When the United States did (invade Afghanistan), bin Laden switched gears, claiming that he had intended all along to provoke the United States into waging a war that would galvanize all of Islam against it.” Jenkins is quite explicitly saying that bin Laden never realized that the United States would respond violently when his organization murdered thousands of Americans. He would have been dismayed when the U.S. invaded Afghanistan and destroyed his training

THE VIEW FROM HERE

International Affairs GWYNNE DYER camps. And therefore, the think-tank expert concludes, the United States did not fall into a trap that bin Laden had deliberately laid for it when it invaded Afghanistan. Well, that’s one point of view. Here’s another. Bin Laden was fully aware that the United States would invade Afghanistan in response to the 9/11 attacks, and he wanted it to do so. He believed that the U.S. would then get mired in a long and bloody guerrilla war in Afghanistan, a replay of the war against the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in the 1980s in which bin Laden himself had first risen to prominence. Military commanders are always planning to re-fight the last war; terrorist commanders are no different. Bin Laden hoped that a protracted guerrilla war in Afghanistan, with American troops killing lots of Muslims, would indeed “galvanize all of Islam” against the United States. So why didn’t he say that beforehand? Why did he claim that the United States would flee screaming at the first atrocity, if he really expected it to invade Afghanistan? Because revolutionaries who resort to terrorism always talk freely about their goals, but they never publicly discuss their strategy for achieving them. They can’t, because the strategy is so profoundly callous and cynical. Terrorists generally have rational political goals – usually a revolution of some kind. In bin Laden’s case, he wanted Islamist revolutions across the

Muslim world, but he had been notably unsuccessful in whipping up popular support for such revolutions. So how could he build that support? Well, how about luring the United States into invading a Muslim country? Revolutionary groups often resort to terrorism if they think they lack popular support. Their aim is to trick their much more powerful opponent (usually a government) into doing terrible things that will alienate the population and drive it into their arms: it’s the political equivalent of jiu-jitsu. They are trying to bring horror and death down on the population by triggering a government crackdown or a foreign occupation, in the hope that it will radicalize people and turn them into supporters of the terrorists’ political project. But the people they seek to manipulate must believe that it was the oppressors or the foreign occupiers, not the terrorists, who pulled the trigger. That’s why bin Laden lied about his strategy. He probably didn’t even warn his Taliban hosts in Afghanistan that he was planning 9/11, because they would not have welcomed the prospect of being driven from power and having to fight another 10-year guerrilla war against another invading superpower. Bin Laden’s strategy was not original with him: he had been fighting as a guerrilla and a terrorist leader for 15 years by the time of 9/11, and people of this sort have always read all the standard texts on their chosen trade. The notion of using the opponent’s strength against him absolutely permeates the “how to” books on guerrilla war and terrorism, from Mao to Marighella. So bin Laden dug a trap, and the United States fell into it. In that sense his

THE VOICE

Are you doing anything to commemorate the 10th anniversary of 9/11?

Well that’s my birthday so I will mostly be doing birthday stuff, but we might watch a little bit of it. > Jeff Jankowski

I’ll probably watch it on CNN. I remember it very vividly. > Lydia Ribble

> SEE DYER ON PG. 12 BY SCOTT ARNOLD

I have been watching it on TV and getting the opinions of what went wrong. Human nature has not changed much. > Doug McKessock

In an attempt to boost ridership numbers to a useful level and expand the revenue base, GRT makes a few adjustments to route 21.

I’ll be watching it on TV. I know a few people who worked in the twin towers but they managed to get out safely. > Kathy Cavlovic


OPINION 12

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

Paper or plastic... or reusable? Debating the merits I

t happens almost every time: I park my car, get out and start walking toward the entrance to the grocery store. A few steps later – sometimes less, sometimes more – a turn on my heel, pop open the trunk and grab a couple of reusable bags. Call it the transition phase: I don’t always immediately remember to bring my own bags, but they’re usually close to hand. In that regard, I’m like many people who are getting into the habit of bringing their own bags instead of relying on the plastic ones provided by the merchants. It’s one of the few instances where we’re going back to what our grandmothers did. Watching people lug their own bags and baskets into supermarkets, I’m reminded how women like my grandmother used to sport their own shopping bags, and could be seen lugging items home in a pull-cart. That certainly was far more environmentally friendly than exchanging plastic for cotton then dumping the groceries into the back of an eight-cylinder SUV. As we debate the future of the plastic bag, it’s easy to forget they’re a relatively recent issue in the numbers seen today. When I was growing up, groceries were packed in paper bags. Later, “paper or plastic” entered the equation, giving way to plastic by default – first introduced in the 1970s, the bags became ubiquitous, accounting for four out of every five used at the supermarket. So successful has been the transi-

From the Editor Steve Kannon tion, that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates upwards of one trillion plastic bags are manufactured worldwide each year. In the last few years, however, the bag has become a symbol of our disregard for the environment. The resultant backlash led to bans in some jurisdictions, while others have imposed a per-bag cost on convenience. The latter can be seen in grocery stores around here. There are plenty of good reasons for cutting back on our use of plastic bags. While recycling programs do exist, participation rates are typically low. The bags are made from petroleum, with each placing a demand on dwindling supplies. Many simply end up in landfills where they can take decades to decompose. Worse still, many of the bags simply scatter, their shape and light weight allowing the wind to move them with ease. The result can be unsightly trash gathering in ditches and hedgerows. But more seriously they end up in waterways, where marine mammals try to eat them or choking birds and other wildlife. Plastic bags and other trash wash up on far distant shores, even in some of the most pristine locales.

Images of the Great Pacific Garbage Patch – a collection of our junk, much of it plastic in various stages of disintegration, estimated at twice the size of the state of Texas – are a revealing indication of just what we’re capable of doing to the planet. With all that downside, however, there is still an argument to be made in support of the lowly plastic bag. Perhaps like me you use bags to line your trashcan. Others use them for scooping up Rover’s offerings. Or perhaps as lunch bags or general totes (though hopefully not the same ones used for the first two examples). That would adhere to the second of the three Rs (reuse), though perhaps the first (reduce) is more applicable here. The plastics and packaging industries have naturally attempted to counter the anti-bag movement, in much the same way they’ve joined in on the backlash against bottled water. Self-serving, obviously, but there are some points to ponder. Plastic bags are in some ways more environmentally friendly than the former mainstay of grocery shopping, paper. According to the Film and Bag Federation – yes, there is such a group, part of the plastics industry – plastic bags require 40 per cent less energy to produce than paper, generate 80 per cent less solid waste and produce 70 per cent fewer atmospheric emissions. Their lighter weight makes them easier to transport, saving fuel on both the distribution and recycling sides.

Transportation costs – in dollars and energy – also come into play with the argument against reusable plastic bags, which are about 15 times heavier and often made overseas versus the domestically made plastic bags. Even reusable cotton bags have their problems given that cotton is both fossil fuel intensive and reliant on pesticides. According to the Pesticide Action Network of North America, conventionally grown cotton uses more insecticides than any other single crop – more than 10 per cent of the world’s pesticides and nearly 25 per cent of the world’s insecticides. The choice, then, may not be as easy as it seems at first blush. Still, coming first on the list of three Rs, reduce should be the first priority. Ireland provides a great example of the benefits. Green and verdant, with plenty of waterways and surrounded by water, the country found itself blighted by plastic bags. An early proponent of levying fees on the bags, it placed a tax of 15 cents (more than 20 cents Canadian) on each bag. From an estimated 1.2 billion plastic bags given out annually in Ireland – roughly 328 bags per capita per year – that number fell to 21 bags per capita. The country’s National Litter Pollution Monitoring System showed that before the levy, five per cent of all litter was plastic bags. By 2006, that figure was 0.5 per cent. There’s the rationale for the switch, and why my grandmother had it right in the first place.

spending my 10-day vacation in the Elmira area. I strolled through the village and investigated local stores. I was also privileged to see Camelot at Stratford. I had a marvellous time, but one thing, however, did trouble me and continues to disturb me very much. I was impressed with the incredibly well kept farms – the buildings and fields – of the Mennonite community. I saw many working at backbreaking tasks in the fields, and enjoyed the result of some of that labour at mealtimes. Forgive me, please, if I offend, for I do not wish to do so. I am appalled, however, at the condition of so many of the horses I saw pulling the buggies of the Mennonites. None of the horses appeared to have ever been groomed and many were close to heat exhaustion. Many of the horses must have pulled those buggies more than five kilometres, and some of them were even forced to pace when in pain from varying degrees of lameness. Is it the law that these sweaty, foam-flecked and overheated animals are not to be cooled down or watered? And is it mandatory that they must be left in the sun without any shade in the heat of the day for however long it takes for the “shopping” to be done? Perhaps if there were a standard

provincial identifier on each buggy then at least when cruelty was witnesses it could be accurately reported to the authorities. Is the Mennonite community above the law and, therefore, lawenforcement and the SPCA do not act on behalf of those horses that are being treated so cruelly?

LETTERS

Taxpayers should not subsidize bus To the Editor, „ I am totally opposed to subsidizing the bus that, according to your Sept. 3 article, will be to the tune of $38.15 per taxpayer. Why should we taxpayers pay so that a few can ride at a ridiculously low fare to and from Waterloo? No one subsidizes my car expenses. Charge a fare that will cover the cost, or drop the service. Again, according to your article, the cost is $10 yet only $2.50 is charged. Also, I find it mindboggling that one bus can cost so much to operate.

> Robert Rongits, Elmira

Another government that doesn’t get it To the Editor, „ Well here we go again, another government, albeit a local one, that just doesn’t get it. The townships dodged a major bullet when regional government decided that we were not responsible for the LRT system, saving us hundreds of dollars in extra taxes. Now Woolwich council has voted to continue

with the Grand River Transit system to Elmira and St. Jacobs, but Conestogo, Maryhill and Breslau, who will have no access to the buses, will help to pay for it. It would be interesting to see if Elmira and St. Jacobs would endorse this new service if they had to pay the full cost. According to council, it will cost Woolwich residents only an extra $38.15 per year on an average $254,000 house. I would love to know where I can find a home for $254,000 in Woolwich Township, meaning that the amount of $38.15 is going to certainly double or triple on many people’s tax bills. Now we will have a new tax base on which the regional council can add to every year in addition to the 2.5 per cent tax hike next year, a new levy for infrastructure (which we won’t mind paying as long as the other tax increases are low enough!), HST, etc. etc. Enough is enough, live within your means, Woolwich, and respect the ability of residents to pay. If you want to ride the Grand River Transit System, move to the K-W area.

> Tom Loft, Conestogo

Protect your horses To the Editor, „ I am a Canadian living in the U.S. who had the joyful experience of

> Catherine Perkins, Freeport, Illinois

Dyer: Arabs opt for democracy > CONTINUED FROM PG. 11 strategy succeeded, and the guerrilla war that ensued in Afghanistan did much to turn Arab and Muslim popular opinion against America. (The invasion of Iraq did even more damage to America’s reputation, but that really wasn’t about terrorism at all.) In the long run, however, bin Laden’s strategy failed, simply because his project was unacceptable and implausible to most Muslims. And the most decisive rejection of his strategy is the fact that the oppressive old Arab regimes are now being overthrown, for the most part non-violently, by revolutionaries who want democracy and freedom, not Islamist rule.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

13 BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Retirement plans prompt changes at Elmira service station E

lmira residents may have noticed the UPI gas station on Church Street has been under construction for the last few weeks. The gas bar of the Elmira Service Centre is undergoing a renovation to keep up with Technical Standards and Safety Authority (TSSA) regulations. A new requirement demands the station replace the old galvanized pipes with triplewall plastic piping. “When you drive anywhere in Ontario right now you will notice gas stations closing down for a few weeks to have the upgrades put in,” said Norm Stanaitis, owner of the service centre. The station will be adding a new automatic monitoring system to identify any leaks that may occur and shut down the whole pumping system until the leak is fixed. “It’ all a part of the upgrade,” said Stanaitis, which includes new lighting, a new pump island and pumps. The service centre will also be offering diesel when it re-opens. Scheduling conflicts have seen two of the three gas stations in Elmira closed at the same time, which has

provided the remaining station, Esso, on Arthur Street with more customers but has also put a strain on that station being the only provider in town. “It’s very unfortunate that it happened that way,” said Stanaitis. “Originally we planned to be up and running before the Petro Canada closed down but plans changed and we are both closed at the same time.” Stanaitis said it will be another week before the gas bar is open. All the upgrades to the station will be benefitting new owner Daljeet Singh, who bought the service centre and will be taking over on on Sept. 27. Selling the business was the first step in Stanaitis and his wife Marlene’s retirement plans. He’ll be leasing the back from Singh to continue to service vehicles for Elmira residents. “We will be leasing that portion of the centre for a few months until the new owner finds someone else to take over that side of the business,” he said. “We will still be giving the same service we have for the last 31 years.” Stanaitis began working as a mechanic in Kitchener when he leased a Texaco gas station in the 1970s. After

working for 10 years at the station he and his family decided to move back to the Elmira area, purchasing in 1980 the house he grew up in West Montrose. Originally an AMC dealership, the service centre opened under Stanaitis as a full-service garage. He would eventually see more than 15 apprentices working in his garage over the years. The service centre currently employs two full-time mechanics. “Anything that goes wrong with your car we can repair, from air conditioning to diagnostics, brakes and front ends and suspensions,” said Stanaitis. “My crew is well prepared and can handle anything.” The service centre currently has 12 employees, including part-time students that work the pumps. “I can’t even count how many students we have given jobs to over the 31 years. We have always had four or five part-timers and we have needed them for after-hours work,” he said. “We would have a full-time shift during the day until three o’clock

> SEE RETIREMENT ON PG. 14

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» COLIN DEWAR

Longtime owner Norm Stanaitis clears way for transition with upgrades currently underway; more renovations coming

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BUSINESS 14

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

Immigrant farmers helped build our thriving agri-food sector

N

ext week we’re welcoming more than 250 of the world’s top agricultural journalists to our area, when three years of determined, hard work culminates with a celebration of Canadian agriculture – and a nod to those who put it on the map. The participants belong to the International Federation of Agricultural Journalists, comprising about 5,000 members from 30 countries. As part of their annual congress, they’re visiting farms in southern, central and eastern Ontario, after ceremoniously being welcomed at Guelph Wednesday night. The congress moves from country to country each year. It hasn’t been in Canada since 1967, because the organizational infrastructure wasn’t in place to support it. Over the past decade or so, though, the network of agricultural journalists and communications professionals throughout Canada has strengthened. New communications jobs have cropped up in business, industry and grower organizations, as farmers increasingly embrace the need to communicate with

Food For Thought Owen Roberts stakeholders and decision makers – politicians, the media and consumers, among them. So with that long hiatus between visits, there’s a lot of catching up to do. That’s where the likes of Canada’s Outdoor Farm Show comes in. The congress was timed to coincide with the show’s opening, because there’s no better place in Canada for a farm crowd to learn what’s new. Given the visitors are all looking for stories, the show, whose administrative home is in Guelph’s research park, is a natural stop, as are the numerous farms, farm businesses and agricultural research station the visitors will frequent during their five-day stay. The congress’s theme, Experience New World Agriculture, was chosen mainly with visitors from the old world in mind. Canadian agriculture owes so much to im-

migrants, going back to the 1600s. Pardon me if I exclude anyone, but consider the Metis descendents of French fur traders who married aboriginal women and became farmers, mainly on the prairies and in Ontario. Later, Ukrainians, Scandinavians, Belgians, Dutch, Swiss, Germans, Russians, Irish, Scottish, Welsh, French and others (United Empire Loyalists, among them) from the old world would find regions here that suited them or were available, and further open the land. Chinese workers toiled to create rail lines that would move new farmers from coast to coast. Even now, Canadian agriculture would struggle mightily without migrant workers. This diversity has contributed to a dynamic agriculture and agrifood sector, one that’s eager to tell its many stories to visiting journalists. During the development of this congress, the organizing committee found doors opened when potential sponsors (many of whom are exporters) came to realize the uniqueness of having 250 eager journalists on their doorsteps – eager to learn about New World agriculture, and eager

to share stories with hundreds of thousands of readers, listeners and viewers around the world. Journalism places great importance on mentoring, and in that spirit, the 2011 congress has for the first time an applied program – dubbed a boot camp – for young journalists. It also features a newly minted professional development initiative for journalists from underdeveloped countries, to help them connect with their colleagues, who are among the best anywhere. Appropriately, it’s called a master class. But learning is a two-way street. When Guelph Mayor Karen Farbridge and University of Guelph president Alastair Summerlee join together to welcome delegates to the city Wednesday, it will indeed mark the first experience many visitors will have with new world agriculture. They’re not the only ones who’ll have their eyes opened, however. How about Canadian journalists, who get to rub elbows with colleagues from 29 other countries, and learn from them? It’s a very exciting time to be a Canadian agricultural journalist.

Retirement: Looking forward to downtime, but he'll miss the people MIXED FEELINGS Stanaitis, who has worked for more than 40 years as a mechanic, says he’ll miss all his loyal customers when he retires later this year.

» COLIN DEWAR

and then the students would come in and pump the gas until we closed plus weekends. The only day we were ever closed was on Christmas Day.” The operation will be staying a full-serve gas station under the new owner, who plans to keep using students at the gas bar. Singh also has plans to turn the front of the service centre into a convenience store, as the current store will be undergoing renovations over the next few weeks once the pumps reopen. Stanaitis has found that the full-serve station has allowed him to stay in contact with many of his customers. “Business-wise and commonsense would tell you to go to self-serve because there is not enough money to pay your staff in fullserve, but the thing is it keeps you in touch with

your customers having that personal contact. We have found that it has helped the whole centre. The front or gas station helps the back garage and vice versa.” Stanaitis admits he has had a few customers request he holds off on his retirement plans. “We have some customers that are not happy to see us go but they understand – this is all I have done for the last 40 years. They tell me they are going to miss us, and I am going to miss them. But I am also looking forward to retirement.” Having seen a lot of changes over the last 40 years in business especially in the price of gas, Stanaitis is glad he is no longer the one customers will be complaining to about the price of gas increasing. “The station has been a great experience and has been good to our family, myself, Marlene and my son

PHOTO

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 13

Joe are very grateful for all the service we could provide Elmira. I would not have been a part of it for over 40 years if I did not enjoy it.”

Stanaitis plans to spend much of his newfound free time on his seven-acre hobby farm and up at his cottage. “We have a lot of stuff to

do. We are just looking forward to retiring and spending time together away from the centre, but we will miss our loyal customers.”

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

15 LIVING HERE

PHOTO

» JAMES JACKSON

LIVING HERE

Among the first group of girls to join in, Brenda Poole has made the sport an integral part of her life COMING FULL CIRCLE Brenda Poole has made ringette an important part of her life for nearly four decades and the game has become a three-generation sport for her family, with her mother and three daughters joining her on the ice. Poole has stepped down as president of the Woolwich Minor Ringette Association after eight years at the helm.

James Jackson

U

ntwist the brush from your mothers broom, file off the picks of your figure skates, put some sort of a helmet on and meet me at the arena. With those words from a woman named Carol Fisher back in 1972, ringette was born in Woolwich Township. One of the girls to heed that call was Brenda Poole, and she has made the sport a passionate component of her life ever since. Earlier this year Poole announced she would be leaving her post as the president of the Woolwich Minor Ringette Association, a position

she has held for the past eight seasons during one of the darkest times in their club’s history. That decision has given her a chance to reflect on the nearly four decades of involvement in the sport, where it has been and where it is heading. “I was the first to jump in, I thought it was right up my alley,” said Poole, who was 13 when she first signed up. “I don’t remember much about that first year other than learning to skate and having fun.” The sport enjoyed a boom in the early going. That first team formed the same year

the St. Jacobs arena opened, and they had only 10 players. By 1975, however, the association boasted 100. Even the players’ mothers, led by Carol Fisher, Karen Schwartz and Brenda’s mother Mary Metzger, organized their own Thursday morning league in 1973/74 so that they too could enjoy the sport. “The ladies said ‘we’ll send our girls off to school and go play ringette.’ It was just way too much fun and they were going to learn it too,” Poole laughed. The number of players in the association would more than double throughout the

1980s, but began to wane in the late 1990s and into the 2000s once Woolwich got its own girls’ hockey association. Having served on the executive for a number of years already, Poole became the president in 2003 and set out to try to save her beloved sport. “I can’t take any credit for building the association and making all these wonderful things happen,” Poole said. “The key was survival and keeping active.” Through her efforts, such as reviving the annual Sugar Ring tournament

and renewing the recruitment, training and coaching efforts of younger players, the league managed to survive and is once again starting to grow. She said that the developmental teams with girls aged four and five years old right through to 10 years old is beginning to grow, and now has six different teams. “We had to rebuild the association and we started working from the ground roots up developing the younger players and filling the association from the bottom up.” She has decided to step down from her position as president

> SEE RINGETTE ON PG. 16

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LIVING HERE 16

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

Cool weather brings a hankering for hearty soups

W

asn’t Labour Day just a wee bit chilly? With grocery stores closed and a real craving for some warm, satisfying soup, this was the (mighty delicious) result. I was inspired, a little, by actually watching the Food Network (which, believe it or not, I think chefs rarely watch). I tuned into chef Michael Smith, as I do enjoy the ‘teaching’ aspect of his show, how he talks about technique

From The Chef's Table Kirstie Herbstreit & Jody O'Malley and flavours. He’s always got some great ‘tricks’ that he doesn’t mind sharing. One of those I caught the

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other day: he was making a seafood chowder and used a grated potato to thicken the whole soup, as well as make it quick cooking. I had never actually tried this, so, on this past chilly Labour Day Monday I rifled through my fridge to see if I had enough stuff to rummage up a chowder. I almost always keep a stock of onions, celery and carrots, other-

wise known as ‘mirepoix’ on hand. This classic French combination is the start to just about any good soup or stew. I had a couple leftover ears of corn, and a few potatoes on hand. Voila, soup is starting. Any herbs here would do: dried or fresh rosemary, parsley or even summer savoury. Dill would be great too. And if I had some frozen shrimp or fish on hand, I would have added that in the soup for about the last five minutes of cooking. I was able to put this soup together in about 10 minutes, and it was ready about 20 minutes later. Melt butter in a pot and add onion, celery and carrot; sweat (soften but do not brown); Add flour and cook and stir for 1 minute; Add milk gradually, stirring until it is all added; soup should be simmering; Grate one potato in the soup (this will help to thicken), and dice the other potato and add it into the soup; Add water, herbs, bay leaf, corn and salt and pepper; Simmer until potatoes are cooked through; taste for seasoning.

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Kirstie Herbstreit and Jody O’Malley are both Red Seal certified chefs. Together they run The Culinary Studio, which offers classes, demonstrations and private dinners. To contact the chefs, visit their website www.theculinarystudio.ca.

Ringette: A family passion > CONTINUED FROM PG. 15 after the politics and procedure involved in running the association became too much, passing the torch on to new president Carole Schwartz – who was once coached by Poole back in 1977 while making her way through the system. “She always has a great sense of enthusiasm and an enormous smile on her face,” said Schwartz, who joined the executive three years ago as a volunteer. “She wanted everyone to just enjoy the sport and learn to trust each other. “Her commitment is just incredible.” Poole is certain that the association remains in good hands. She will remain on in a minimized capacity as past-president just to help with the transition. “There are lots of good local people with lots of energy and ideas and the focus on the kids, definitely if it doesn’t increase, it will hold its own.” Ringette will always have a special place in her heart for the way it has brought her family together. Not only does Poole continue to play, her mother – who will be 74 this year – also still plays in the Thursday morning recreational league, the only remaining player from that original league in the early ’70s. Poole’s three daughters, Jennifer, 29, Amanda, 20, and Michelle, 18,

have also played the sport since they were old enough to skate. In a neat twist, Poole has played on the recreational team with her mother for many years now, and 10 years ago they were joined by her eldest daughter, Jennifer. Last season, Amanda also joined the team and Poole is hoping to have Michelle in the ranks this coming season as well, her first year of eligibility. “It’s really unique to play with your kids. We’ve got a really good relationship and don’t have to speak on the ice, we know where each other will be,” said Poole. “I was involved in coaching all three of them so with them knowing how I think and coach we just know where to be.” To say the sport has changed since she first signed up as a precocious 13-year-old would be an understatement. From broom handles to basketball knee pads, the equipment was a little less refined than it is today. There were no facemasks or teeth protection in those days, either, and often players had to wear a pair of ski gloves to protect their hands. Eventually they started ditching the broom handles and began using old hockey sticks with the blades sawed off, still a far cry from the composite and aluminum ringette sticks available today. “I still like wooden sticks, though,” smiled Poole. “Good, old-fashioned wood.”


THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, September 10, 2011

17 LIVING HERE

SUDOKU

THE CROSSWORD

HOW TO PLAY: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. You already have a few numbers to get you started.

  





 

  



 

   

    

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WORD SEARCH + % 6 . , 3 7 2 1 % 0 $ 8 ' 3

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> SOLUTIONS: Find the answers to all of the puzzles on pg. 31

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ACROSS 1. Trick taker, often 4. Absorbed 8. Artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stand 13. Periwinkles 18. Concrete section 20. Way, way off 21. Chip away at 22. As a whole 23. British unit of nonprofessional soldiers organized for the defence of Great Britain 26. A sloping mass of loose rocks at the base of a cliff 27. Desert sight 28. Abbr. after many a generalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name 29. Touch lightly and briefly 31. Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;___ del Cairoâ&#x20AC;? 32. Free 34. Charged item 35. A position in management of administrative business operations 37. Advertising sign 38. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Back in the ___â&#x20AC;? 39. Madam 40. Ran out 42. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Silent Springâ&#x20AC;? subject 43. Victorian, for one 44. Bang-up 45. Bas-relief medium 46. European evergreen plant with white or purplish blooming flowers 52. Pesky insects 53. Mount Vernon, for one 56. Clobber 57. Legions 59. Many of the Marshall Islands 61. Accustom 64. A governor of a province in ancient Persia 67. A liquid that is agitated vigorously 69. Heretofore 71. literary study 73. Cook beforehand 75. Graceful bird 77. A folded part (ie)skin or muscle) 78. Smokejumperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s need 79. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had no ___!â&#x20AC;? 81. Singer Lenya 82. Adjoin 85. An iodine containing protein obtained from the thyroid gland. 90. The male organ of copulation 92. Catch a glimpse of 93. Alliance that includes Ukr. 94. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arabian Nightsâ&#x20AC;? menace 97. Something of small importance 99. Audition tape 100. Cracker spread 102. Unfair? 103. Any of various perennials having usually pinnate basal leaves and variously coloured flowers 104. Tokyo, formerly 105. Extract information from a modulated carrier wave 107. Big ___ Conference 108. Equipment for the reproduction of sound with high fidelity

















































 

















 

15. Bulbous plant having linear leaves and yellow or white flowers solitary or in clusters 16. Free from dirt 17. A pint, maybe 19. An English music entrepreneur best known for being the manager of the Beatles. 24. School of thought 25. Make sense, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;upâ&#x20AC;? 30. â&#x20AC;&#x153;2001â&#x20AC;? computer 33. Engine sound 36. Nobelist Hammarskjold 39. ___ constrictor 41. Affairs 43. German bacteriologist who found a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;magic bulletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to cure syphilis (1854-1915) 44. Waylay 46. A noun that is singular in form but refers to a group of people or things 47. Mr., abroad 48. Charlie, for one 49. Circus cries 50. â&#x20AC;&#x153;General Hospital,â&#x20AC;? e.g. 51. Bar, at the bar 53. Fold, spindle or mutilate 54. Above 55. Black, as la nuit 58. Latticework used to support climbing plants 60. Muzzle 62. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Catcher in the ___â&#x20AC;? 63. In an unnatural eery manner 65. Ancient Briton 66. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beat it!â&#x20AC;?

68. Style of rock music with gloomy lyrics 70. ___ list 72. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Comprende?â&#x20AC;? 74. E or G, e.g. 76. Colo. neighbor 80. Of or by or typical of an author 82. Appropriate 83. A severe rebuke 84. All there is 86. Second round of corrections 87. Undergo or cause osmotic diffusion 88. Mail place: Abbr. 89. Emulated Pinocchio 91. Anger, e.g. 94. Move about aimlessly 95. Make unfashionable, or obsolete 96. Clean oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body or parts thereof 98. ___ Wednesday 99. Knock down 100. A Jewish festival celebrating the exodus of the Israelites from Egypt 101. ___ Island, Fla. 102. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peter and the Wolfâ&#x20AC;? bird 105. Gloomy 106. ___ Today 109. Burns up 112. Mauna ___ 113. Check for accuracy 115. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ to Billie Joeâ&#x20AC;? 116. Animal house

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DOWN







110. ___-friendly 111. Diploma word 112. Bolshoi rival 114. A defence mechanism by explaining your actions and feelings in a way that is not threatening 117. Arise 118. Correct, as text 119. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bye nowâ&#x20AC;? 120. Aims 121. Bond, for one 122. Bulrush, e.g. 123. Angelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headwear 124. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fancy that!â&#x20AC;?





























 









 











 





 

























 

























































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SPECIAL FEATURE 18

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

19 SPECIAL FEATURE

FARM SAFETY

Farm Safety Tip – Winterizing Your Farm W

inter creates special hazards on the farm. Liquids inside machinery or containers can freeze, causing ruptured pipes and containers. Ice can cause slips and falls. Fumes from heaters and pressure washers can produce deadly carbon monoxide gas. Late summer is good time to do a farm safety inspection, fix items in disrepair, clean and service farm equipment, and make sure your pesticides are stored properly. Here are some tips on preparing your farm for

winter: #1 Conduct an all-farm inspection in the late summer which includes machinery and equipment, buildings, walkways, gates, wiring, and pesticides (see links below). Clean, service, and repair items where needed. #2 Inform workers they must never use pressure washers indoors. #3 Install carbon monoxide alarms in shops and other buildings where nonelectric heaters are used. #4 Analyze hydraulic fluid and antifreeze and re-

place as recommended. #5 Clean and drain pesticide application equipment. Use lightweight oil to prepare for storage (see link below). #6 Take an inventory of your pesticides. Read the label. Note any expiration dates and storage temperatures. Make sure dry pesticides are stored above liquid pesticides. #8 Determine if unused pesticides can be stored or need to be disposed of (contact the State Dept of Environmental Quality for info on disposal options).

Things can be replaced — Lives cannot

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LINWOOD VETERINARY SERVICES 3860 Manser Rd., Linwood | 519-698-2610


SPORTS 20

THE OBSERVER

SPORTS

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

Hockey’s back and it’s game on for the Kings Opening on the road Friday, Junior B squad plans special ceremony at Sunday’s home-opener James Jackson

PHOTO

t’ll be uncharted territory for members of the Elmira Sugar Kings this year when they start the regular season as the defending Ontario Junior B champions for the first time in a decade. The Kings opened their season last night (Friday) in Owen Sound to take on the Greys and take to the ice tomorrow (Sunday) in their home-opener, an afternoon tilt against the Listowel Cyclones at 2 p.m. at the Dan Snyder arena. After a grueling preseason schedule that saw the team play five games in nine nights, head coach Dean DeSilva is ready to get the season underway, his first behind the Elmira bench. “I can’t wait to get the season started. Training camp is always tough but I’m really pleased. I’m looking forward to getting started,” he said. “We do have some work to do still, but overall I’m really happy with where we’re starting the season.” The team features a good mixture of first-year and returning players. In goal, fans will recognize Nick Horrigan who is entering his third season with the team. He will be joined by newcomer Nick Coone from Cambridge. Hopefully that tandem can provide some stability in goal

» COLIN DEWAR

I

FIGHTING FOR POSITION Andrew Brubacher (right) of the Sugar Kings battles Ryan Watson of the Stratford Cullitons as Elmira forward, Brett Priestap, charges in during GOJHL action at the Dan Snyder Arena Sept. 4. The Kings would go on to defeat the Cullitons by a score of 2-1. because the defence has witnessed a lot of turnover. Gone are Shane Smith and Jordan Benton, along

with Cory Genovese and allstar Wade Pfeffer. Only two defenders from last year’s squad – new captain Colton

Wolfe-Sabo and second-year player Clayton Greer – are back, and they will be called on to be a steadying presence

for the young core of blueliners, DeSilva said. “We’re still pretty young at the back end and we haven’t even started working on any systems or anything,” said DeSilva, stressing the importance of maintaining good defensive presence in the zone and making a good first pass to start the offence. Getting the puck to the forwards will be critical, because that is where the Kings should really shine. With the return of six Kings from last season, including leading scorer Lukas Baleshta and rookie of the year Brady Campbell, as well as former King Riley Sonnenberg who suited up for the Guelph Storm of the OHL last year, putting the puck in the net shouldn’t be Elmira’s primary concern this season after finishing fourth in the conference last year with 219 goals. “We have a lot of offensive players and I’m going to give them full room for creativity,” said DeSilva. Sunday’s home opener will have some extra flair as the Kings will raise their Sutherland Cup champion banner and present last year’s team with their championship rings, something the head coach knows will likely distract many of his players

> SEE KINGS ON PG. 22

Synchro club opens doors of new Elmira home Public invited to check out the sport and the refurbished former municipal pool James Jackson

N

early three months after closing the deal, the Waterloo Regional Synchronized Swimming Club is opening the doors to the new and improved Elmira pool, and welcomes the public to come and see the changes and experience synchronized swimming for themselves. “We’re pretty excited,” said club president Erika Lindner. “They’ve been working really hard since we purchased it in June.” Work on the building, which has been idle since 2009 when the Woolwich Me-

morial Centre was built, was done by Kitchener’s Gateman Milloy and includes a completely refurbished pool and new ventilation and electrical systems. The contractor also knocked down several walls to make the entrance more open and to create two dry-land training rooms, along with new office space. Lindner said that it will be the only space in Canada dedicated solely to synchronized swimming. “The building just flows a lot better and it will work really great for us.” The club closed the deal on the purchase from the

township back on June 6 for $450,000 and has been hard at working preparing it for the beginning of their new season, which also starts on Saturday. The new facility is more than twice the size of the group’s current location in Waterloo, its home for the past 18 years. The Elmira pool is 200,000 gallons compared to 100,000 in Waterloo, and the building itself is 13,000 square feet compared to just 5,000 at the former location. The move was necessary given the clubs continued growth and its reputation as one of the best in the prov-

ince. The club boasts some 60 to 70 competitive swimmers and another 80 to 100 recreational swimmers who come from as close as Kitchener, Waterloo and the townships and as far away as the GTA, Hamilton and Georgetown to compete for the club, said Lindner, and swimmers compete at the local, provincial and national level. In 2010 the club earned the title of top Ontario club for the fourth time in five years, and at the Western Ontario regional meet this past summer in Waterloo, they captured 38 podium finishes, 10 of them gold. Aside from their wide-

spread success, Lindner said that the clubs popularity lies in their continuity. This is the 20th year for the club, founded by Leanne McDonnell who is still involved as the WRSSC’s program coordinator. “We haven’t had a lot of turnover. Our coaches and the leadership is long term,” said Lindner. The open house runs from 10 a.m. to noon today (Saturday) at the Elmira pool. It will include a free synchronized swimming demonstration and sessions for kids to try the sport for free, as well as a barbecue and ribbon cutting ceremony.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

21 SPORTS

Where the rubber meets the road Steve Galea because it makes me feel far less strange about those inexplicable stirrings I feel whenever I watch a really nice cedar strip canoe go by. Perhaps, but somehow I doubt it – my intentions are honourable. At most, we’d hug. But I digress. I suppose a story like this is fascinating because it has all the classic elements of good drama: passionate, forbidden love, a police chase, seedy back alleys and, I’m guessing, the judicious use of paddles. And let’s not forget that the raft in question could have fallen for a pool noodle but didn’t. In any case, the police and public outrage put an end to it. Even so, the damage has been done, the relationship is over and, even though she’s rubber, it will be awfully hard to patch things up. Even if it were allowed, they’d have some rough waters to navigate. What happens now is anyone’s guess. The only thing that we know for sure is that he’s probably on the rebound. Oh, and that raft is for sale for a very reasonable price. And somehow, this contributes to

that human sexuality can often take some truly bizarre and inexplicable turns. Sometimes, for whatever reason, wires get crossed and a person steps far outside of what mainstream society considers normal and wholesome– like a deep and abiding love for cedar strip canoes, for instance. With the occasional hug. Look, I’m all for whatever floats your boat – but this is taking it a little too far.

Bantam girls win Eastern Canada title

» SUBMITTED

Not-So-Great Outdoorsman

the general loss of innocence that is so pervasive these days. This one incident has added a whole new meaning to the terms ‘love boat’ or ‘cruising.’ Is it wrong or just really, really strange? Should we be entertained by this or appalled? That’s something we’ll only find out after the Jerry Springer special. But, in the meantime, I suppose what we have here is another one of those situations that reminds us

PHOTO

L

ong ago, Pierre Elliot Trudeau said that the government has no place in the bedrooms of the nation. I happen to agree with that sentiment, but only because I couldn’t handle all the accompanying speeches, endless debate, broken promises, voting and parliamentary procedure. Not twice. I do believe, however, that government has a place in the back alleys of suburban neighbourhoods, especially when a 30-something-yearold man chooses to consummate his relationship with a neighbour’s inflatable raft in broad daylight. Call me old fashioned, if you like, but that’s honestly how I feel. I’m not just saying this as a person with deep moral concerns about this sort of thing. No, this is far more personal for me. You see, like many outdoorsmen, I own a rubber raft or two as well as several other very attractive and vulnerable boats. And, quite frankly, I just don’t want to have this talk with them. Not yet. Still, it looks like I might have to. The event that I’ve described actually happened in Ohio and, quite surprisingly, no drugs or alcohol was involved. Worse still, when the cops showed, the man pulled up his pants and tried to run off with the raft. Which is OK, because if it was my raft, I wouldn’t want it back anyhow. A raft? I’m not sure why a story like this is so intriguing to me. It could be

ET LES GAGNANTS SONTS …

The Milverton Bantam girls’ soccer team competed in the Eastern Canadian championship in St. Basile-le-Grand, Quebec last weekend, taking first place. Back row: Amanda Rose, Taylor Wagler, Nicole Pfaff, Abbey Hertel, Maggie Martin, Courtney Higinell, Becca Dietrich. Front row: Brooklynn Leis, Sarah Biesenthal, Ashley Beacom, Lindsay Dales.

Jacks drop one to Ayr in preseason play

LEARN TO SKATE Saturdays at 3:30 pm in St. Jacobs • Full session begins October 15th and ends March 3rd ($160) • Half sessions run from either Oct 15 to Dec 10 OR Jan 7 to Feb 25 ($100 Per Half Session)

LEARN TO PLAY RINGETTE This program is based on Ringette Canada's Long Term Athlete Development program (LTAD), and their "I am skating-FUNdamentals" program • Community-based programming • No competitive programs • Combined practice and modified games • Emphasis on social interaction • Active ‘’play’’ in a structured environment

PHOTO

» COLIN DEWAR

• Instruction and technical feedback is simple

IN TIGHT ALREADY Sean McEwan of the Wellesley Applejacks battles Cal Jefferies of the Ayr Centennials during OHA action at the St. Clements arena on Sept. 5. The Applejacks had a strong first period would eventually lose to the Centennials by a score of 6-4.

In-person registration will take place Sunday, September 11th from 1:00pm until 3:00pm at the Woolwich Memorial Center, Jim McLeod rink.

DETAILS FOR LEARN TO PLAY: • Boys and girls born 2005 and later • Saturday's at 4:30 in St. Jacobs • Begins September 17th and ends March 10th • $275 FOR THE SEASON

For more information on either program, or other age divisions, please contact WMR Registrar Joanne Brown, 519-669-8880 or email woolwichringette@rogers.com

WOOLWICH RINGETTE


SPORTS 22

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

Scholarships awarded to three Kings, past and present GOJHL event also confirms Elmira will host all-star game next January Colin Dewar

PHOTO

SCHOLARLY ENDEAVOURS Former Sugar Kings Jarred Parent and current team captain Colton Wolfe-Sabo accepted

their Frank Santarossa Memorial Scholarships at the GOJHL press conference held Wednesday in Kitchener. he plans to study dentistry at to be mentioned here at this with hope of attending police college after graduation. the University of Western On- event,” said Wolfe-Sabo. Nagy , a former Waterloo Sis“This has been (Scott’s) tario. kin who recently signed with best year and he tried really “This means a lot to me as it the Sugar Kings, was unable to hard in school and in hockey takes away some of the finanattend the event due to a prior to obtain his goals which lets cial burden of school and it engagement. Nagy maintains him know he is on his right is really great that Mr. Santa- a 75 per cent average while track to his future,” said Gilrossa offers this award and it attending Conestoga College lian Nagy, Scott’s mother who is an honour to receive it and studying police foundations accepted the award on his be-

Kings: So begins the journey to defending Sutherland Cup > CONTINUED FROM PG. 20 leading up to their Cherrey Cup finals rematch with the Cyclones. “It’s going to be tough for our guys to focus, there is going to be a lot going on and it could provide some mo-

WHERE THE FISH ARE Rachel Green, 6, left, fishes off a canoe with her dad Mark and brother Nathan, 12, during

PHOTOS

CASTING THEIR LINES Hundreds came out to the fishing derby despite the cooler weather on Labour Day including (inset) Jaden Pretorius, 12, (left) and Josh Green, 10, who managed to catch a fish.

» COLIN DEWAR

the Wellesley Lions fishing derby held Sept. 5 at the Wellesley pond.

tivation for Listowel, so we have to be ready for that and I think if we can get through the first period of the game relatively unscathed we should be alright.” The puck drops at 2 p.m. but fans should get there early for the pre-game festivities.

ON THE PUCK Sugar King Cassidy Frey handles the puck as he skates down the ice against the Stratford Cullitons Sept. 4.

» COLIN DEWAR

Hundreds at Wellesley pond for fishing derby

PHOTO

hree Elmira Sugar Kings were awarded with the Frank Santarossa Memorial Scholarships at this year’s Greater Ontario Junior Hockey League (GOJHL) press conference held this week in Kitchener. Current team captain Colton Wolfe-Sabo and new Sugar King Scott Nagy were awarded the scholarships, as was former Kings forward Jarred Parent. To be eligible for the scholarship players must be registered full- or part-time at a Canadian college or university, have played in the GOJHL for at least two complete seasons and played in 60 per cent of their team’s games while keeping an average of 70 per cent or greater. Wolfe-Sabo has maintained an 80.75 per cent average while attending the University of Guelph where he is working on his major in toxicology and minoring in economics. After graduating from Guelph

» COLIN DEWAR

T

half. For Parent, who won the scholarship last year, this is a bittersweet award as he was required to leave the Sugar Kings after last season. “This is a tremendous honour as this makes two years in a row that I have been able to receive $1,000 from this scholarship program and it is an amazing feeling to know that I have accomplished that task,” said Parent, adding he misses his fellow teammates. He expects the Sugar Kings will have a great team again this year and looks forward to watching them compete for the Sutherland Cup again. Parent was able to maintain a 74 per cent average while attending the University of Waterloo, majoring in art and business. The conference also confirmed that the Sugar Kings would be hosting the Midwestern All Stars as they face off against the stars of the Golden Horseshoe league on Jan. 9, 2012 at the Woolwich Memorial Centre.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

23 ENTERTAINMENT

ENTERTAINMENT

The nuptials may not be perfect, but the farce is F

or some, a wedding is a romantic and formal event, full of the pomp and circumstance befitting a couple’s lifelong pledge to each other. And then there’s The Perfect Wedding, which is anything but … unless you’re looking for plenty of laughs. In the Elmira Theatre Company production of Robin Hawdon’s play, the pending nuptials of Bill and Rachel are fodder for a fast-paced stream of banter and slapstick. The story opens with the much-put-upon Bill waking from the previous night’s stag party to find himself in the honeymoon suite with an aching head, a naked woman in his bed and no recollection of how she got there. One thing he is certain of, however, is that it’s definitely not his bride-to-be, who’s due to arrive at the hotel momentarily. Hearing a knock on the door, Bill shuffles the girl (Judy) into the bathroom to get dressed, telling her to say she’s the chambermaid if anybody asks. The new arrival is Tom,

the best man, who’s quickly brought in to the cover-up, instructed to claim the nowout-of-sight Judy as his girlfriend. There’s a problem, however, in that the real girlfriend is due at any time. In keeping with the farce, which spirals out of control with each new cover-up, Tom ends up mistaking the real hotel maid (Julie) as the girl in question, presenting her as his girlfriend. “A perfect wedding? It’s kind of imperfect – that’s the gag,” laughs director John Snowdon, who’s putting the final touches on the play, which opens Sept. 15. “You start with one thing and it snowballs from there. Every step they take, they have to cover up something else –the whole thing is a schmozzle.” That’s truly the case when the bride arrives to get changed for the wedding, now just two hours away. Rachel (played by Shannon McCannal) is accompanied by her wedding-crazed mother, Daphne (Liz Poulton), and both women must be kept in the dark about the comedy of errors that’s unfolding

PHOTO

Steve Kannon

» STEVE KANNON

Things get out of control early and often in Elmira Theatre Company production of The Perfect Wedding

NOBODY'S PERFECT It’s not exactly wedding-day bliss as the best man Tom (Ken Noaks) takes issue with the groom Bill (Mike Rotchford) as girlfriend Judy (Jill Peterson) and bride Rachel (Shannon McCannal) try to intervene in the ETC production of The Perfect Wedding, which opens Sept. 15. around them. knowing looks and controlled in the couple themselves. In a serial case of mis- chaos. It’s a situation that de“When they discover that taken identity that has even mands much of his actors, Bill, the groom, is falling Bill (Mike Rotchford) and said Snowdon, noting the fun apart, the mother says to the Tom (Ken Noaks) confused, is mindless, but the audience bride, ‘is there anybody else both Judy (Jill Peterson) does have to pay some atten- you could marry, dear?’” and Julie (Cathy Fahey) are tion to keep up with the pace. As for the ultimate fate variously chambermaids or For anyone who’s ever been of Bill, Rachel and the rest, girlfriends, depending on the involved in a wedding party, well, suffice it to say there’s situation. there’s plenty to recognize in love in the air – it is a wed“Everything must be hid- this farcical look at the whole ding, after all. den and kept from the oth- ordeal. Some more than othThe Elmira Theatre Comers,” Snowdon explained. ers may sympathize with pany production of The Per“It’s a case of one mistaken the groom-to-be, recognizing fect Wedding runs Sept. 15-18 identity after another – that’s that the kindly and frazzled and Sept. 23-24 at 76 Howard how farces progress.” Bill is being railroaded into Ave. Show times are 8 p.m., And farce The Perfect Wed- the wedding in the first place. except Sunday (2:30 p.m.). ding is, in all the manic glory That’s exemplified in one of Tickets are $18, available at of its British roots: think Snowdon’s favourite scenes the Centre in the Square box Fawlty Towers, given the from the play, wherein the office in Kitchener by calling hotel setting. In that vein, mother-in-law appears far 578-1570 or 1-800-265-8977, onthe show is all about timing: more concerned about the line at www.centre-square. fast dialogue, quick switches, showcase wedding plans than com.

Sunday September 11

Ephriam Frey & Old Tyme Country (Rescheduled from Aug. 14 rained out)

SUNDAY NIGHTS | 7-9PM | BRING A LAWNCHAIR | FREE (From Niagara Falls)


CLASSIFIEDS 24

THE OBSERVER

CLASSIFIEDS

HELP WANTED

TRAINING & LESSONS

HELP WANTED

BRIDGELAND TERMINALS LIMITED

Locally owned & operated long haul tank truck carrier is seeking part time office help. Preference given to individuals with good computer skills, A/P background, and payroll experience. For more information visit www.bridgelandterminals.com Resumes by mail: PO Box 272, Elmira, ON N3B 2Z7 Fax (519) 669-1928 email: nicoleb@bridgelandterminals.com

HELP WANTED

>>Learn Guitar Professional one-on-one instruction with experienced teacher. All styles and methods, electric, acoustic and bass. Group rates available. Mike’s Music. 519-669-5885.

>>Elmira Based Furniture Company is accepting applications for a part time truck driver. Must have a valid G license and must supply clean drivers abstract. Some heavy lifting is involved. Please fax resume to 519-669-8820 or call 519-669-3143 for more information.

>>Summer’s Over Don’t Fret! Learn to play guitar by Christmas. Fall lessons now starting. Bob Wilhelms Guitar Instruction Studio. 519-669-5371.

>>Full time Sales clerk required. Must be able to work Saturdays and one evening a week. Apply in person with resume to: Stemmler Meats & Cheese, 3031 Lobsinger Line, Heidelberg.

HEALTH CARE

>>Try

Bowen Therapy for treatment of pain and numerous health conditions. Daytime hours now available! Contact Kevin Bartley, Certified Bowenwork Practitioner. 519669-0112, Elmira.

>>Looking for someone to demolish and reclaim residential building material in Waterloo. Call 226-979-1389.

FOR SALE

>>Craftmatic

Bed Queen size. Asking $300 or best offer. 519-669-8736.

The #1 weekly in

the region.

AZ DRIVER

Tired of sleeping in the bunk? Wintermar Farms (aka Cribit Seeds or Wintermar Grains) is seeking to add a qualified full time AZ driver to operate both DZ and AZ class vehicles to haul grains and finished goods to and from our facility. Local day runs with flexible hours but may need to work some evenings and Saturdays. Type of work includes; bulk trailer and dry van. Ag related experience an asset but not a necessity. A clean abstract is necessary. For a more detailed description contact Craig Martin @ 519-664-3701 ext#25 or craig@cribit.com.

HELP WANTED

Residential 20-Word Ad $7.50 (Extra Words 20¢/word)

>>1997 Ford 150 4X4. 182,226 mileage with 7ft 6 western plow. $6900 o.b.o. Will certify. 519-699-5983. >>2000 Neon 4 door, 4 cyl., auto, 170km. Black, matching interior, runs excellent. Asking $1200.00 as is. 519-276-2423. >>Door Cut Out Panels.

22”x36” insulation panels R13.5. 35 cents per sq ft. Volume discounts available. 519-699-6087.

>>Firewood hardwood all body wood, dry. $70.00 face cord. Linwood 519698-2033. FARM EQUIPMENT

>>3000 Gal. Husky liquid manure spreader. Top spread. Field ready. $2900. Call 519843-7590 or 519-820-5188. WANTED

>>Wanted - Broom and Indian corn. Can cut, one or two truckloads. Also wanted cooking and spanish onions. 519-699-5867.

PETS

INSTALLATION TECHNICIAN Tri-Mech Inc. is a mechanical company specializing in Gas Fitting, Hydronic Heathing, Heat pumps and Boiler system installation and service, and High Pressure Cleaning Systems. We service Agricultural, light commercial and residential systems. We are currently seeking a qualified tech, or an apprentice. Qualification in Gas fitting, Refrigeration, Air-conditioning, sheet-metal, or plumbing would also be an asset. Applicants should be able to work with minimal supervision, have good customer relation skills, and be willing to be on-call for emergency service on a rotating schedule with other team members.

Gale

Dog Training, Fall Classes - group session or private, starting September 13, 4 weeks $100.00. www.megamutts. com. or 519-669-8167.

COMM/INDUSTRIAL FOR RENT

>>Industrial Bay for rent. 64 Howard Ave., Elmira. 2000 sq ft., open space. 14’ high bay door. 16’ ceiling height, good for mezzanine. Separate hydro, gas and water meters. Inquiries please call 519-465-8421 or 519-669-1461 ext. 22. RENTALS

>>Elmira - Living Accommodation for mature single Christian girl. No smoker, no pets. Shared kitchen, private bath & rec room. Available Oct. 1. 519669-3996 , after 5 p.m. >>Room For Rent Female

Preferred. Non smoker, $125/week. Shared kitchen, own sitting room. Phone 519-669-5279 leave a message.

Worship 10:30a.m. Minister: Rev. Dr. Linda Bell

Presbyterian www.galepresbyterian.com Church 2 Cross St., Elmira • 519-669-2852

Office Hours: M-TH 9-Noon & 1-3 • E galepresbychurch@golden.net

Paid per mile, paid picks and drops, Benefits.

Please contact: Gary@thurtransport.com or Call 519-577-2072 (cell) 519-669-3991 (office) PETS

Trained by Brad Pattison

Intro class Sept. 14

FREE 16 classes

Must have a Martingale collar and a 6 foot leash!

Group class

$500

Starting Sept. 18 Wednesday and Sunday

contact Shanna at shanna@pawsitivecanineconnection.com or www.pawsitivecanineconnection.com 519.500.3594

>>Garage Sale - Sat. Sept. 10, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. 26 Zinkann Crs., Wellesley. Baby gear, baby girl’s clothes size 3m - 2t, home decor, furniture, kitchen ware, yard items, electronics, and much more! HEARING ASSISTED

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

NURSERY PROVIDED

SUNDAY SCHOOL

St. Teresa Catholic Church

No God, No Hope; Know God, Know Hope! Celebrate Eucharist with us Mass times are:

Sat. 5pm, Sun. 9am and 11:15am

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

rm A Wlcaome e W all! to

Zion Mennonite Fellowship Worship Service - 10:00am

Finding The Way Together 47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 www.thejunctionelmira.com

For

Regenerate 2011

to be held at

“What is your Prime Directive”

Region of Waterloo, Counties of Wellington & Perth Cities of Cambridge, Kitchener, Various Townships

Guest - Phil Barnes

Breslau Airport Road Auction Complex

Discovering God Together

5100 Fountain St., North, Breslau (Kitchener)

Sat

100% Local.

- The Junction -

2004 ihC 7600 Ta Dump, Sander, Plow & Wing 2 - 2004 VolVo VDC Ta Dumps, Sander, Plow & Wing’s 2001 Sterling Sa Dump, Sander 2-way Plow & Wing 2000 Sterling Ta Dump & 2-Way Plow 2000 VolVo WG64 Ta Dump, Sander, Plow & Wing 95 ihC S4900 Sa Dump. 2-Way Plow & Wing 94 Ford lTS9000 Ta Dump Sander, Plow & Wing 95 ihC 4700 Sa Tilt-n-load Tow Truck c/w hiab Crane 2001 Ford F450Xl Diesel Crew utility c/w Crane 2003 Ford F250Xl 4x4 Pickup c/w Dump & Plow

2-S/S Slide-in Sanders* 2-Western Plows* loader/backhoe* Diesel Tractor 2- 11' Poly 2-Way Plows* 6+ Poly Snow Plows* office 12x50 Trailer Concrete & Chainsaws* Trimmers* Tire Changer* Generator* Mowers Pressure Washer* Shop Tools* 9-Toro Snowblowers* 10hp Snowblower JDJ Ta Dump & Equipment Trailers* Skids of Truck Parts* JD 60” Snowblower 3pth Equip => Snowblower, Sweepers, harrow, Mower, Disc

No Buyer’s Premium or Penalty!!!

4522 Herrgott Road, Wallenstein

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

M.R. Jutzi & Co

www.mrjutzi.ca

519-648-2111

9:15am Sunday School 10:30am Worship Service Corn Roast & BBQ Pastor: Richard A. Frey www.stpaulselmira.ca

27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593

September 11 What Does God Want For Me?

Sunday, September 11, 2011 casual dress | contemporary music | christian church

VIEWING: Friday Sept 16th, 2011, 1pm to 5pm TERMS: $500.00 Cash Deposit on Each Vehicle, or as announced.

PRoFESSionalS in ThE oRDERly liquiDaTion anD aPPRaiSalS oF CoMMERCial, inDuSTRial, ConSTRuCTion, MuniCiPal EquiPMEnT & VEhiClES 5100 FounTain ST. noRTh, bRESlau, onTaRio, n0b 1M0

See website for details

519-669-2319 | www.wbconline.ca

Sept 17th 9:00am

Check Website for Daily Updates

You don’t walk your dog indoors so why train there?

GARAGE SALES

>>St. Clements Community Wide Garage Sale & BBQ Saturday September 10, 2011 8:00am-1:00pm For information contact Jen Connolly 519-699-9277 or Melanie Martin 519-6995116 Find us on Facebook! Search St. Clements Recreation Service Board

www.execulink.com/~unitedchurch/index.html Visit us at: www.wondercafe.ca 21 Arthur St. N., Church office 519-669-5560

Applicants are invited to submit a letter of application or resume by fax to 519-638-3342, or by email to sales@trimech.ca

PARTIAL LIST ONLY!!!

Outdoor Dog Training

>>St. Jacobs - Large 1 Bedroom apartment for rent. Available Dec. 1. Non smoking, no pets. $1000/mth plus utilities. Call 519-664-1358.

Sunday 10:30am am Sunday Worship: Worship: 10:00 Sunday School during during Worship Worship Minister: Rev. Rev.Dave DaveJagger Jagger

Auction

FOR LONG HAUL FREIGHT & LIVESTOCK

GARAGE SALES

“Our mission is to love, learn & live by Christ’s teachings”

* Snow Plows/Dumps * Const & Turf * Tractors 40th Annual Fall Public Municipal

AZ DRIVERS & BROKERS NEEDED

RENTALS

Trinity United Church, Elmira

AUCTION HELP WANTED

COMPUTERS

>>MEGAMUTTS

PLACES OF FAITH P.O.Box 120 Alma ON N0B 1A0

PLACING A CLASSIFIED AD | Classified ads can be obtained in person, by phone (519-669-5790), fax or email from Monday to Thursday 8:30am-5pm or Friday 8:30am-4pm. All classified ads are prepaid. Deadline is WEDNESDAYS by 4pm.

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FOR SALE

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

SUNDAYS AYS @ 10:30AM Services at John Mahood Public School A

5 First St., Elmira • 519-669-1459 www.elmiracommunity.org

9:15 & 11:00 AM

Series: Directions for Life “#1 - Forward” 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 Check out our website www.woodsidechurch.ca


THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, September 10, 2011

25 CLASSIFIEDS

FAMILY ALBUM BIRTHDAY

GRADUATION

ANNIVERSARY

ANNIVERSARY

Congratulations

Happy 1st Anniversary

Steven William Kleinknecht

Laura & Wes Errey

FAMILY ALBUM

Happy

Share The Good News!

Anniversary

With a Family Album Ad in the Observer

50th

Mom & Dad

Âť Anniversary Âť Birthday Âť Engagement Âť Stag & Doe Âť Thank you Âť Birth Notice Âť and a lot more.... For as little as...

Lincoln, Lauren and their mother Amanda are proud to announce that Steven William Kleinknecht was awarded his PhD. in Sociology at the fall convocation of McMaster University. Steven graduated from Linwood Public School and Elmira District Secondary School. He then went on to receive: â&#x20AC;˘ B.A. (Hons.) Sociology and Applied Studies University of Waterloo â&#x20AC;˘ M.A. Sociology McMaster University

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Take your Observer on all your travels, take a picture with it and then send it in to us.

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IN PRINT | ONLINE IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH

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Steven is the son of Robert and Laurie Kleinknecht of Linwood and brother of Ryan and the son in-law of Wayne and Lynne MacGillivary of Kitchener.

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The family of Dolores Reibling wish to extend their loving wishes and congratulations on the celebration of her 80th Birthday. We love you and pray for God's continued blessings on your life! Love your children Brenda & David, Janice & Ken, Kathy & Craig, & Steven & Paula, and all of your grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

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CLASSIFIEDS 26

RECREATION GUIDE FALL & WINTER 2011 LARGE PRINT EDITION NOW AVAILABLE! To request a large-print edition of the Recreation Guide that was recently delivered to all residences in the Township:

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

NOTICE TO DOG OWNERS

Please obey leash laws when walking your dog on Township Trails in accordance with By-law 75-2006 Section D1 which states that no owner of a dog shall allow or permit such dog to run at large. Those found not adhering to the By-law will be fined $195. The Township of Woolwich has been receiving an increasing number of complaints regarding dog owners not cleaning up after their dogs. Please be advised that under Animal Control By-law #75-2006, dog waste must be cleaned up. There is a fine of $345 for those found not complying to the By-law.

• Call (519) 669-6005 and leave a message with WOOLWICH MEMORIAL CENTRE your name and full mailing address. A copy will be mailed to you. CLOSURES • Send a request by e-mail to vhummel@ The WMC Pool will be CLOSED September 3 – 25, 2011 for annual maintenance. woolwich.ca to have a copy mailed to you. Memorial Centre will be CLOSED to the public on Thursday Sep• View a full-sized colour copy on the Township’s The Woolwich tember 8, 2011 from 6:30 am – 4 pm for Facility Maintenance. website at http://www.woolwich.ca/en/town For more information please contact Customer Service at: 519.669.1647 ext. 7001 shipservices/accessibility.asp • Visit the Elmira, Bloomingdale or St. Jacobs JOHN MAHOOD PUBLIC SCHOOL, Libraries.

ELMIRA

Student Drop-Off Information Parents may park or stop in the following locations: • Parking is available in the Gibson Park parking lot, if spaces are available. This lot is 183 metres (600 feet) west of the school. • The Gibson Park lot is also intended to be used as a “quick drop” area. Parents can drive in and drop their students off at the north-east corner closest to the school which has been painted with stripes and is a desig nated no-parking corner intended to create a safe access to the sidewalk. • Parking or stopping is allowed on the west side of Snyder Avenue, north of Second Street. Students can then walk to the Crossing Guard for help crossing over First Street. • Parking or stopping is allowed on First Street, west of Meadowlark. Parking closer to the school is prohibited in order to ensure motorists and the Crossing Guard have good visibility. • First Street East, east of Arthur Street. Students can be dropped off here and can cross at the intersection of First and Arthur Streets with the School Crossing Guard. • On Second Street, west of Snyder Avenue. However, do not park on Second Street east of Snyder Avenue, beside the High School. This area needs to be kept clear for bus traffic. • Local church parking lots, as available. The Township does not control or have influence over the use of local church parking lots. Check with the school to see if arrangements have been made. Closure of the Tennis Court Parking Lot (nearest the school): This lot is permanently closed to routine school traffic. It will eventually be re-opened with limited parking for motorists displaying a proper Ministry of Transportation permit or for users of the tennis courts. Parents can call the Township at (519) 669-6005 or (519) 669-6004 if they wish to discuss the changes or offer suggestions that emphasize student safety over convenience of parking.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

27 CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE FEATURE PROPERTY

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated | 180 Weber St. S., Waterloo

OFFICE 519-888-7110

Paul Martin

$284,000 NEW LISTING

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-503-9533 www.homeswithpaul.ca

$500.00 donation will be made with every home bought or sold by Paul in Woolwich.

$249,900 NEW PRICE

CHARM & CHARACTER

Open concept renovated home impressive w/ hrdwd flrs. beautiful wdwrk, newer kitchen, 2nd flr. offers 4 bdrms for plenty of sleeping space. Partially fin recrm. in bsmnt. step outside onto the spacious deck and admire your backyard oasis complete with pond and waterfall. apple tree, barberry, mulberry & gooseberry bushes for the fruit of your choice. MLS Call Paul direct.

LOOK NO FURTHER! This is a perfect house for any first time buyer or just downsizing. Completely finished, very well kept 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom home. Just move in & enjoy! Relax on those cool nights enjoying your stunning fireplace & custom mantel. Entertain friends & family in the beautifully landscaped yard. MLS Call Paul direct.

OPEN HOUSE - 20 Grosbeak Rd, Elmira | Sunday, Sept 11th, 2-4pm

NEW PRICE

$279,900 NEW LISTING

$219,000

ELMIRA OASIS

$539,900

Come and see this attractive 1810 sq ft raised 3+1 bdrm. with inlaw setup. bungalow on approx 1 acre w/ beautifully manicured gardens. Newer roof and mostly newer flooring. Oriented to seniors with main floor bedroom and laundry. Wood Fireplace. w/o Basement. Backs on Greenbelt, Separate Dining Rm. Rec Room. Family Room. Detached Workshop. MLS Call Paul direct.

$269,000

Located on quiet street, only a 2 min walk to park. This extremely well kept home features 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large finished basement and big laundry room. Newer carpet in living room dinette and hall. Handsome newer oak kitchen cupboards. Nice, private 71ft x 122ft yard with wonderful perennial gardens, large vegetable garden and deck. MLS Call Paul Direct

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-577-6248

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

$849,000

$453,900

Meet “Olivia”, another fabulous home by Verdone. 2216sqft plus fin'd bsmnt. Many quality finishes some incl: Ceramic, Hrdwd, oversized trim & mf crown moulding. MF lndy, spacious LR, Dinette walk out to covered 16.4 x 9.4ft deck. Fabulous must see kit built for convienience, French drs to mf den. Lg master w/crown moulding, 2 walk ins, lg beautiful ens w/free standing tub & oversized glass shower. MLS Call Paul Direct

$393,500

1853sqft luxurious Verdone home. Carpet free MF, Hrdwd & ceramic, mudrm, MF lndy. Bright LR equip’d w/gas fp. Lg kit abundant w/cupboards, under cabinet lights, breakfast bar. Lg master your own private oasis, spacious walk in closet, 2nd closet, fabulous ensuite: lg vanity, 2 sinks, stunning glass dr shower, soaker tubs in both baths. French door walk-out to covered 16x15ft patio. MLS Call Paul direct.

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-588-1348

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

$273,000

Unbelievable value to own your own piece of countryside in a small peaceful village with a beautiful panoramic view of the Conestoga River Valley, right from your front porch. Large 24ft X 40ft detached insulated and heated workshop (220amp service) situated on a .74 acre lot. 3 Bedroom and 2 Bathroom. Enjoy the cottage feel right at home! MLS Call Alli or Bill direct.

COUNTRY SETTING

MOVE IN AND ENJOY!

$187,900

Exceptional corner lot. Great exposure. Industrial 0.95 acre lot on the corner of Union and Donway. MLS Call Paul direct.

$199,500

DOWNTOWN GLEN ALLAN $59,000

Build your dream home on this 0.48 acre lot. MLS Call Paul direct.

$154,900

$79,000

First time home buyers, this is a great starter home with a huge lot backing onto park. The large living room with patio door opens to a spacious deck & very private yard. Features a large country eat in kitchen. Some updates include furnace (2008), laminate flooring, deck, and some newer windows. Lots of potential and very affordable. MLS Please call Bill or Alli direct.

UNIQUE SIDESPLIT!

$284,900

3bdrm, 2bath home features MF Cathedral ceilings. Loc’d on lg beautiful treed corner lot full of perennials. Potential for pool or double garage. Bright, open kit w/breakfast bar. X-lg slider in DR to 17ftx19ft deck. Airy LR w/hrdwd flrs. Whirlpool bath, RR gas FP, lndy rm walk out, Lg 19x24ft storage rm. MLS Call Paul direct.

COUNTRY PROPERTY

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME ON THIS 0.78 acre lot in the quaint little village of Glen Allan. MLS Call Paul direct.

Welcome to small town Drayton. A perfect home for that young family. Spacious, neat and tidy semi-detached located close to schools, park, and shopping. Walk-out from dinette to two tiered deck with gazebo and enjoy the privacy of your fenced yard backing onto greenbelt. Lots of updates. MLS Call Alli or Bill direct.

MOVE TO THE SMALL TOWN OF DRAYTON!

NEW VERDONE HOME

INDUSTRIAL LOT

Perfect for first time home buyers. Lots of original trim and hardwood floors through-out. Private and spacious back yard and quiet neighbourhood. 4 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, detached single garage and shed. MLS Please call Bill or Alli direct.

$369,900

NEW VERDONE HOME

Bill Norris

GREAT OPPORTUNITY!

3 plus bedrooms. Large sunken family room addition features gas fireplace, skylight and walk-out to a huge deck with hot tub and gazebo. Lots of updates through-out including furnace, a/c, windows, flooring and much more. Finished basement with workshop. MLS Call Alli or Bill direct.

THIS HOME HAS IT ALL!

Fantastic opportunity for car buff or hobbyist, 3 car garage & detached 4 car garage/workshop. Inlaw suite w/2 bdrms, full kit, bath, & lndry. lg 87x250ft lot steps to golf course. 5200 sq. ft. of fin’d living space. Grand yrd over looking farm land. MLS Call Paul direct.

Raised bungalow in immaculate condition and extremely well maintained. This is a solid brick home with three plus bedrooms located in desirable “Birdland” and is perfect for all ages and ready for immediate occupancy. MLS Call Alli or Bill direct.

SPACIOUS RAISED BUNGALOW

SENIORS BUNGALOW

Alli Bauman

BRIGHT AND SPACIOUS

$375,000

Spectacular home larger than it looks. 4bdrms, 2 full baths, updated eat-in kit w/cupboards to spare, den, lg cold room. Hrdwd flr in LR & DR, gas heating stove in FR. Fantastic home for any hobbyist w/craft rm & workshops. Balcony overlooking stunning perennial gardens, vegetable gardens & fruit trees surrounding this tranquil home loc’d on lg .69 acre lot. MLS Call Paul direct.

No matter what your style...we’ve got what you’re looking for every week in the Real Estate section of the Observer.

IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH


CLASSIFIEDS 28

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

REAL ESTATE

Scott Grainger

Barrister and Solicitor Phone: 519-669-1736 Fax: 519-210-1736 scott@propertyshop.ca

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

CALL A PARTICIPATING LAWYER TO FIND OUT HOW PROPERTYSHOP.CA CAN WORK FOR YOU IN THE SALE OF YOUR MOST IMPORTANT ASSET.

Independently Owned and Operated

4B Arthur St. S. Elmira • www.remaxsolidgold.biz

LEON MARTIN

OFFICE: 519-669-5426

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage | Independently Owned and Operated

BERT MARTIN, BROKER

Call Bert For Your FREE Market Evaluation

Y ONL

FT! 2 LE

.5 acre don’t miss this chance to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. Within 40 minutes KW, or Guelph. High speed internet is available with fibre optic. Starting at $68,000 MLS COUNTRY LOTS

Charming older home with lots of character located on a quiet tree lined street offers 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, many recent renovations including kitchen, bathrooms, windows, doors, trim, flooring, lighting, drywall, paint, soffits & eaves. MLS. Call Bert to view.

Two storey 3 bed and 3 bath room home on a half acre lot, open concept, high speed fibre optic internet available. $319,900 MLS. Financing available O.A.C.

$319,900

COUNTRY ACREAGE!

Great property on the edge of town backing to river offers century home with 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, large family room addition, attached single garage, 5 acres of manicured orchard with a mix of fruit trees, 12 acres workable. Three one storey out buildings totaling 10,000 s/f. MLS. Call Bert to View.

$375,000

BUNGALOW!

Mature trees surround this home featuring 3+1 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, finished basement with fireplace & walk-up, large attached 2 car garage, great deck & patio, backs to green space. Only 10 minutes to Guelph and K-W. MLS. Call Bert to View.

$399,900

COMMERCIAL OFFICE SPACE for lease in busy plaza in Elmira. Your referrals are appreciated!

BUYING OR SELLING?

You’ve come to the right place to find a home.

Sunlight Homes Drayton Heights

Space for lease. 4000 square feet. Available immediately. Industrial in Waterloo. $2700 per month. MLS ADDRESS: 4-B Arthur St. S., ELMIRA • EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net DIRECT: 519-503-2753 • OFFICE: 519-669-5426

THIS WEEK’S LISTINGS WITH PROPERTYSHOP.CA

75 Edward Street, Drayton - Property ID# 2531

PRICE: $210,000

A GREAT PLACE TO START! A great place to settle for empty nesters! This 3 bedroom semi presents amazing value to the sharp buyer. You won’t find a private, shaded yard like this in other semis at this price point, this close to home. The backyard is green, quiet fully fenced, ready for your active children, pets and barbecues. Entering the home you will note a spacious, separate dining room, adjacent to a tidy kitchen and dinette...everything NEW LISTING you need to entertain friends and family. A main floor addition adds excellent living room space, including a beautiful gas fireplace and patio sliders to the deck. Completing the picture downstairs, you will find a 2 piece bath, conveniently located to the front door, kitchen and dining area. Upstairs, you will discover three bedrooms, all spacious with ample closets. Your basement is partially finished and could be easily dressed up as a recreation room or play space...Lots of room for your home theatre or kids playroom. Drayton isn’t far away, just half an hour to Kitchener-Waterloo or Guelph. Discover the value and live better for less! Call Carlos to arrange a viewing today!

63 Sugar King Drive, Elmira - Property ID# 2525

PRICE: $328,800

BROKERAGE

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. 45 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

BRAD MARTIN

519-669-2772

MVA Residential

Broker of Record,

JULIE HECKENDORN

TRACEY WILLIAMS

Res: 519.669.1068

Res: 519.669.8629

Cell: 519.505.0627

Broker

Sales Rep.

OPEN CONCEPT bungalow, backs to greenspace. Fireplace in L.R./ D.R. w/hardwood. floor. W/O to deck. Ensuite priv. Fin. bsmt. w/ lge. windows - huge rec. rm. games area, 4th bdrm. 3pc. bath. Single+ garage, dble. drive. Close to downtown. MLS $309,900.

GREAT FOR ENTERTAINING! Open concept kitchen/LR/DA. Lots of cupboards. W/O to large deck and gazebo. Spacious master bdrm w/3pc. ensuite bath. Guest bdrm. or office on mn flr. Fin. bsmt. - huge rec. rm./games area, 2 bdrms., 4pc. bath and lots of storage. Private back yard. MLS $499,900.

HEIDELBERG - Quiet crescent location. Hardwood flooring in D.R. & all bedrooms. Main flr. fam rm addition w/walkout to deck & patio. Fin. rec. rm. Updated windows, shingles and furnace. CAC. Extra storage rm. Long concrete driveway. Immediate possession possible. MLS REDUCED to $309,900.

LOCATION EQUALS CONVENIENCE! This 3 Bedroom Ivystone Home is only 5 years old and could not be more conveniently located to recreational H and school amenities in the desirable IT W town of Elmira. 63 Sugar King Drive, originally intended as a builder���s model, features premium finishes, “character” maple hardwood in the livingroom and solid maple cabinetry in the well appointed kitchen. The “Lilac”, includes a master with walk-in closet and ensuite bath, in addition to the main bath on the second floor and a powder room on the main level. Approaching the home you will note a full two car garage and lovely landscaping as you ascend the porch to the front entry. Entering the foyer, your eyes lead you into the kitchen where you will discover beautiful maple cabinetry, flowing towards a spacious dinette. The adjacent livingroom room is blessed with maple hardwood and provides enough room for separate dining space! Upstairs, this home includes a generous master bedroom with a vaulted ceiling, palladium window and a 3 piece ensuite. The second and third bedrooms are also located on this level and are large enough in size for your children to share. Closet space is excellent in all three bedrooms. This home has been professionally painted and is well decorated throughout. You will find that the yard is fully enclosed and ready for the kids with a substantial deck and an impressive play house. The basement is unfinished but insulated and ready for drywall, including rough-ins for a downstairs bath. When you do bring the drywall in, you’ll be pleased to discover that the basement windows are oversized and will accommodate a full 4x8 sheet! Central air, a high efficiency furnace and rough-in for central vac complete the technical picture. Call Carson or Joanne at (519) 503-1355 to arrange a viewing or watch for open house announcements on this site!

OP H D YS L T SOPER O PR

PROPERTY ID#’s 2525 & 2531

CALL THE 24 HOUR INFO LINE FOR MORE DETAILS: 519-742-5700 | 1-866-432-6884 + Property ID# is extension or visit us online at:

for photos & full descriptions • www.propertyshop.ca

www.thurrealestate.com

VISIT US SATURDAY AND SUNDAY!

ELMIRA REAL ESTATE SERVICES

Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage 519-669-3192 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

BONNIE BRUBACHER Broker of Record

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

The Edge Semi-detached homes from

$189,990

Choose from one of our plans or let us custom build your home fully detached. Homes starting from

$239,990 Learn More About Sunlight Heritage Homes and Our fine communities by Visiting us Today! Alyssa Henry Lisa Hansen Tribble

www.sunlighthomes.ca

$259,900, MODERN DETACHED.

home with many updates completed! Open concept main floor, laminate flooring in living room / kitchen, stylish white eat in kitchen with organizers and backsplash, 4 piece bathroom completely renovated with ceramics and new vanity, 3 bedrooms, finished basement with wood fireplace, potlights, new carpet, 2 piece bath/laundry room with loads of storage! Walkup to backyard, patio and shed. 90% fenced! Roof/2006, furnace/AC/2008, Please call for a viewing. MLS

BACKS ONTO GREENSPACE!

Many models to choose from

Sales Representative

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY SEPT. 11TH 2pm-4pm 18 OAK DRIVE, ELMIRA

Sales Representative

519.787.0203

Have a question? Email us at: info@sunlighthomes.ca

$309,900

ELMIRA.

Well maintained two storey with 1.5 car garage, double driveway, open kitchen / dining area to sunken living room w/gas fireplace & walkout to deck & fenced yard, master ensuite, finished basement w/4th bathroom. MLS

SHANNA ROZEMA Broker.

LAURIE LANGDON Sales Representative

MONIQUE ROES Sales Representative

END UNIT LINK HOME! $242,900,

ELMIRA.

Spacious 2 storey, double driveway, neutral décor, walkout from dinette to fenced yd & shed, master ensuite, finished basement, central air, fridge, stove, dishwasher included, great front porch. NEW MLS

CLEAN SEMI!

$219,900,

ELMIRA.

Great opportunity to own in mature area, 150’ deep fenced yard, large main floor living rm., kitchen w/appliances and breakfast bar, washer & dryer incl., finished rec room, 3 bdrms, 2 bathrooms. MLS


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

29 CLASSIFIEDS

You smartphone is smarter than a fifth grader Q.

When I lift my wife for a good hug, her weight seems vastly different depending on whether she’s limp or rigid,” wrote a “New Scientist” magazine reader. “Is there anything real here or is it my imagination? I noticed the same thing a few years back when I’d carry our kids to bed.”

A.

When you lift something (or someone), much of the work is done by a few major muscles such as the biceps, answered New York physicist Spencer Weart, PhD. But dozens of smaller muscles that help in adjusting how you balance the load are often less well developed and so tire quickly. “A rigid load is easier to balance but something limp will shift around, putting more strain on the smaller muscles as you readjust. This is why weightlifters pick up dumbbells, not sacks of ball bearings.”

Q.

What’s it take to “defy gravity” on an amusement park roller coaster?

A.

Designing a good roller-coaster loop is a balancing act, with the

Strange But True Bill & Rich Sones

coaster naturally slowing as it rises against gravity but still needing to move fast enough to clear the crest, says Julie Rehmeyer of Wired magazine. The curving track creates a “centripetal force,” causing the cars to accelerate toward the center of the loop, while momentum sweeps them forward. This acceleration gives the ride its visceral thrill but puts stress on the fragile human body. For instance, Coney Island’s FlipFlap Railway, built in 1895, reached a neck-snapping 12 times the force of gravity at the bottom of its loop, more than enough to induce what pilots call G-LOC, or gravityinduced loss of consciousness. In other words, riders often passed out. So modern designers adapted an upside-down teardrop shape called a clothoid, where the track curves more sharply up top than at the bot-

tom. Now most of the turn happens at the peak, where speed and acceleration are diminished. “Result: no G-LOC, just screams!

Q. A.

Is your smartphone smarter than a fifth grader?

It took half a century to shrink the mainframe from the size of a living room to that of a suitcase, then another decade to make it smaller than a wallet, says Joshua Romero in IEEE Spectrum magazine. “Today’s smartphones are a marvel of engineering,” assimilating functionality from music players, remote controls, gaming consoles, even printed maps and news publications. So those fifth graders have met their match, right along with the rest of us. Smartphones are becoming as essential as keys or a wallet, and they’ll soon replace those as well. Not only are these highly personal devices always on, they’re always somewhere on us. Users now stay connected to information at any given time or location, so it’s there when you need it, said Qualcomm engineer and editor Dilip Krishnas-

wamy. But the downside here is the addictive effect of always-on connectivity, adds Romero. Blackberries are rightly nicknamed “Crackberries” for the way they feed the workaholic’s addiction. And not everyone likes it when others interrupt dinner to fact-check the conversation. Some experts even worry about a new digital divide between those who can afford smartphones and those who can’t, since many smartphones cost more than lowend computers.

Q.

What special property do the capital letters H I Z X O N share, and what other capital would also fit here?

A.

To answer, rotate the page 180 degrees in the plane, says “ScienceIllustrated.Com” magazine. In other words, turn the page upside down and you’ll see that all letters still look like themselves. So the missing letter in the look-like-themselves-upside-down set is S.

>> Send STRANGE questions to brothers Bill and Rich at strangetrue@cs.com

SERVICE PROS AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

TIRE Body Maintenance

at

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

WHERE TIRES

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE. Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial • On-The-Farm Service

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

519-669-3232

BIKE REPAIRS

BICYCLE SALES & REPAIRS

Buy your bike from us and get a FREE annual inspection!

519.669.8330

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519.669.8917

CARPET CARE

ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd. • 14 ton BoomTruck

20

ST. JACOBS

PARTS EXTRA

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

STORE HOURS: M-F: 8-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

ELECTRICAL

READ’S • Residential • Commercial • Industrial ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

519.669.3658

(Emergencies only)

7 Days A Week

NOW ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS

$139 FREE Gift Offer Learn More Online At...

budurl.com/SAVE139 Chem-Dry Acclaim® 61 Arthur St., N. Elmira

669-3332

THOMPSON’S

Auto Tech Inc. Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

21 Industrial Dr. Elmira Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400

519-669-7652

31 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

CONCRETE

CONSTRUCTION

CONSTRUCTION

Design/ Build Agricultural/ Residential 6672 Ruggles Rd. Floradale RR#2 Wallenstain, N0B 2S0

-Framing -Roofing -Renovations -Repairs

519-669-3082

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

GLASS SERVICES

AUTO CLINIC

Ltd.

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Decorative/Stamped and coloured concrete CALL NOW TO BOOK YOUR FALL PROJECTS

519-638-2699

EAVESTROUGH

ST. JACOBS

Randy Weber

27 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

24 Hour Service

World’s Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

AUTOMOTIVE

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

DECORATING

FOR ALL YOUR HOME DECORATING NEEDS.

519-669-3373

AFTER HOURS

519-664-9999

Specializing in Paint & Wall coverings

1-800-CARSTAR

FAX: 519.669.3210

• 40 ton Mobile Crane

$

SINCE 1961

24 Hour Accident Assistance

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

CRANE

PROFESSIONAL BIKE MECHANIC ON STAFF

DECORATING

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

ARE A

Call Us At

519-669-3373

Complete Collision Service

AUTOMOTIVE

519.669.1462 Fax: 519.669.9970 Tel:

18 Kingfisher Dr., Elmira

GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

FREE ESTIMATES • Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

TEL: 519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104 FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

Home Improvements

WINDOWS & DOORS

ROOFING | SIDING | SOFFIT & FACIA DRYWALL INSTALLATION

MURRAY MARTIN | 519.669.9308 1722 Floradale Rd., Elmira, ON, N3B 2Z1

AGRICULTURAL • COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL • High Quality Installation of Steel & Aluminum Eavestrough • Rugged Steel Eavestrough for Today’s Metal Roofing Systems

JEREMY MARTIN

PH 519-502-4679 | Fax 519-291-6624

xcountryeaves@live.ca

8632 Concession 3, RR#3 Listowel, ON, N4W 3G8


CLASSIFIEDS 30

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

SERVICE PROS PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

PAINTING

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

Renovating? Let us do the clean up

RENOVATION CLEAN UPS! Call for Details

www.completecarpetcare.ca

ROB McNALL

519-669-7607

LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

MEDICAL TREATMENT

Established 2000

F. David Reimer

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications: ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102 PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

Murray & Daniel Shantz ALMA, ONTARIO

PHONE:

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

www.reimerhbot.com

519.846.5427 FAX: 519.846.5134 PLUMBING

519-669-0220

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

ROOFING

519-669-2251

27 Brookemead, St, Elmira

36 Hampton St., Elmira

kdetweiler@rogers.com

C.J.

For all your Plumbing Needs.

BRUBACHER LTD.

24 HOUR SERVICE

19 First St. E., Elmira

ELMIRA

KEVIN DETWEILER

P: 519-669-1188 | F: 519-669-9369

OWNER-OPERATOR

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

YOUR SOURCE FOR YEAR-ROUND PROPERTY MAINTENANCE • Lawn Mowing Packages • Lawn Maintenance & Landscaping • Top Dressing/Overseeding • Mulch Delivery & Installation • Commercial & Residential Snow Plowing & Ice Control

519-669-3362

SEPTIC SERVICES

NOW BOOKING OFFERING A QUICK AND EASY WAY TO RECLAIM UNUSED LAND

Brush Mowing/Long Grass | Capable of mowing up to 6 inch diameter brush Tracked Skid Steer equipped with Brush Mower

Call Jeff Basler, Owner/Operator, today 519.669.9081 mobile: 519.505.0985 fax: 519.669.9819 | ever-green@sympatico.ca

SELF STORAGE

- Trail Maintenance and Development - Wooded Lot Thinning - Pasture Reclaimation All other - Orchard Maintenance tracked skid steer services - Industrial Lots are available - Real Estate Lots

ROOFING

AMOS

SPECIALISTS!

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

519-669-3652

56 Howard Ave. Unit 2, Elmira, ON, N3B 2E1

Lawn Maint Maintenance Main tenance Programs | Spring Clean-up Flower Bed Maintenance Programs Leaf Clean-up and Removal | Soil & Mulch Delivery & Installation | Snow Clearing & Removal | Ice Control

YOUR Steve PLUMBING Co. & HEATING Steve Jacobi

For more information call:

free estimates interior/exterior painting wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

Services

> Commercial & Residential > Fully Insured > WSIB Clearance > Senior Discount

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

> Excavating > Trenching > Backfilling > Fine Grading > Overseeding & Top Dressing > Lawn Seeding

PLUMBING

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada

20 years experience

Outdoor

ER RS OVYEA 10

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location • Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off and Pick up Service • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair • Janitorial • Grout Cleaning • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping

LAWN MAINTENANCE

Various sizes & rates

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE

Call

519-669-4964

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

SALT

R O O F I N G

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches Serving Elmira and Surrounding Area for over 30 years!

BOOK NOW FOR FALL INSTALLATION. CALL SCOTT SEILING FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE.

519.698.2114 In Business since 1971 • Fully Insured

TREE SERVICE

TOP QUALITY ROOFING SYSTEMS Locally Owned & Operated

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

Since 19 96

Septic Tank Cleaning Roof Replacement Specialists Cedar Shakes Composite Tiles All Flat Roofing Systems

Inspections for Real Estate Septic System Repairs & Restoration Catch Basin Cleaning

Call or email Mike for your FREE estimate.

Waterloo Region • Woolwich Township

Office: 519.206.4484 | Cell: 519.575.0311

or

mbender@rogers.blackberry.net

TREE SERVICE

T R

E

E

519-896-7700

519-648-3004

www.biobobs.com

•Removal of Trees or Branches of Any Shapes or Sizes in Almost Any location

FREE BAG In troductor y Offer

> Superior Salt Products > Fast, Friendly Service > Convenient Delivery Times > Discounts for Seniors

FREE ESTIMATES

Taking Salt to Peoples’ Basements Since 1988

519-747-2708 Waterloo www.riepersalt.com

UPHOLSTERY

now available

•Hedge trimming

GROGAN U P H O L ST E RY • Welding • Fabricating • Painting • Assembly

•Branch Chipping •Stump Grinding

519-669-1836 Thomas Martin

•Tree Trimming & Removal • Aerial Bucket Trucks • Stump Grinding • Arborist Evaluations • Fully Insured & Certified • Certified to Work Near Power Lines

METALWORK

WINDOW COVERINGS

• Industrial • Commercial • Agricultural • Residential

• Custom Upholstery • Re-upholstery • Refinishing

25% DISCOUNT

ON ALL FABRIC

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

INC

CARPET CARE

381 Hill Street West Montrose

519-742-1942

599 Lancaster St. W., Kitchener


THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, September 10, 2011

SERVICE PROS

31 CLASSIFIEDS

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

SKATE SHARPENING

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIMEâ&#x20AC;?

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

Kleensweep Carpet Care

Rugs and Upholstery

â&#x20AC;˘Mattress Cleaning â&#x20AC;˘Residential â&#x20AC;˘Commercial â&#x20AC;˘Personalized Service â&#x20AC;˘Free Estimates West Montrose, ON

The Sharp Shop

COLLEEN

Truck & Trailer Maintenance

DEATH NOTICES

>>CAYER, Carl Richard â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Carl Cayer passed away on Saturday, September 3, 2011 at the age of 68. Prior to retirement, Carl was a teacher at Elmira District Secondary School.

Cardlock Fuel Management

>>MARTIN, Beverly Dawn (1979-2011) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bev completed

her journey here with her husband Ron at her side, after a generous and fulfilling life on Tuesday, September 6, 2011 at University Hosptial, London. Bev (Roth) Martin of RR2 Drayton.

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR

CROSSWORD & / ( $ 1 ( '

( $ 5 6 + 2 7

% 5 , $ 1

& 0 $ 1 2 $ 7 2 / 5 2 , / 3 5 ( & $ % 8 7 3 ( 1 , 7 5 , 9 $ 9 ( 7 ( 1 . , 5 2 ( 1 6 8 $ * ( 1

5 $ 3 7 $ ) $ 5 , 7 2 5 , 5 ( 7 6 0 3 ( 5 ( 8 6 6 5 ( 5 $ + 5 , 6 7 ' 5 8 5 / 6 , 1 , 1 * $ & 2 2 . + 8 7 ( 7 + < 5 6 ( ' ( , $ 1 6 ( ' + , ) , 5 $ 7 9 ( 0 ( ( 6 ( ' 7

( $ 6 ( ( 5 2 ' $ / $ 5 0 ' % 5 8 ' , 2 1 % $ : ' $ 2 1 ( 0 $ 6 5 2 % + 8 5 ( 6 6 < ( 7 + ( 5 2 1 , ' ( 2 * / 2 % 6 3 < 0 2 3 $ 2 ' ( 0 6 8 6 ( , 2 1 $ / 1 ' & , * ( + $

/ ( < 6 + $ / 6 2 $ 3

( 6 7 2 3

9 , 1 & , 1 $ / 6 & 5 ( 2 & $ ' 0 , 1 $ 3 6 ( * ( 6 6 1 , 7 7 6 5 $ 3 6 ( 7 , & / , & $ / 2 7 7 , 1 6 5 2 ) 2 8 8 / $ 7 6 8 0 0 $ 7 , 2 ( 1 ' * (

$ 8 & 7 2 5 , $ /

= 2 2

< 9 2 / 7 ; ) = ' 5 8 0 & 8 5

/ / 2 ) % ( 2 % + 2 : $ 5 ' 2

2 ( ( ( 7 ) 5 $ 6 ( 5 < ( 1 '

        

        

        

        

        

        

/ , ( '

' 2 6

6 ( ( & / ( $ 1 6 (

WORDSEARCH + % 6 . , 3 7 2 1 % 0 $ 8 ' 3

$ $ 3 & * 2 ' 5 2 * 2 = ( , 3

5 8 < / < 2 % / + ' < $ ( % 9

/ & 1 $ / / 7 0 $ 2 / / ) 7 5

( + , < ( 2 ) ' % ' / . $ 2 $

& ( ( 3 1 2 / 8 2 * ( 7 6 : +

+ 1 < 2 5 . 5 1 < 7 : : 7 ( (

. < 0 7 2 * 1 8 1 1 ( < 9 5 (

& 1 ( 7 + ( 2 5 ( ( 6 ( ' ( 1

0 5 < 6 : * ; ( 1 8 5 5 $ , 7

SUDUKO - EASY         

        

        

        

        

        

SUDUKO - HARD         

        

        

        

        

        

5 . 5 2 & + ' 6 8 ' ( / ( < 2

MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS

$ / (

& ( % ; ' 8 5 + $ 0 ' ' 8 1 6

â&#x20AC;˘ Design â&#x20AC;˘ Installation â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

519.669.5105

P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

TOTAL HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

519.664.2008

SANYO CANADIAN

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

Bus: 519.895.2044 ext. 217 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Suite 800, 101 Frederick St., Kitchener

Get your tickets soon!

519-699-4641 www.freybc.com

SEPTEMBER 9

>>H.U.G.S. Program â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:15-11:15 a.m. Come meet with other parents to discuss parenting and child health issues. Topic: developmental and behavioural milestones birth to 5 years. Christine Tofflemire N.P. and Karen Reitzel R.D. will present. No registration required. Held at Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Drive, St. Jacobs. Call Heidi at 519-6643794, ext. 237 for more information. >>Chateau Gardens will hold their annual Food Drive for one month beginning Sept. 7 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Oct. 7 with the theme being â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one should go to bed hungry.â&#x20AC;? The goal at Chateau Gardens is to collect at least 2,000 pounds of food. For more information please contact Joan Norris, administrator ALC at 519-669-4111 or Helene Richard, Administrator LTC at 519-669-2921. Anyone wishing to assist can drop off their donation at 8 Snyder Ave. N. or 11 Herbert St., Elmira. SEPTEMBER 10

>>Heidelberg Fun Day 4-10 p.m.; 2915 Lobsinger Line. Games, food, raffle, music. Contact Angela 519-699-5417 for more information or to donate a raffle prize. >>A Life To Live â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Help support and bring hope to those currently struggling with suicide. Presented by Waterloo Region Suicide Prevention Council in conjunction with World Suicide Prevention Day; 7-9 p.m. at Trinity United Church, 21 Arthur St. N., Elmira. Sheila M. Stevenson, life health coach, speaks of promoting hope, preventing suicide. Musical entertainment presented by local musician Nichelle Bauman. Refreshments to follow, free will offering. All proceeds from this event will be donated to the Waterloo Regional Suicide Prevention Council. Everyone welcome. For more information, please contact Cathy Read-Wilson 519-573-4358. SEPTEMBER 11

>>Calling all former students of S.S. #28 Victoria School for their second reunion to be held at 1 p.m. Please bring any school pictures, memorabilia, stories, favourite potluck dish, refreshments and lawn chairs. This will be held at the home of Danny and Diane Strickler, 467 St. Charles St. E., Maryhill. Let other family and friends know. RSVP to dstrickler@continuum.org or 519648-2432. >>Elvis

Gospel Tribute 7 p.m. Everyone welcome, no tickets required. Doug McKenzie in tribute to Elvis. Waterloo North Presbyterian Church, 400 Northfield Dr. West. Free-will offering, wheelchair accessible. For more information call 519888-7870.

>>Hungrymanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

NANCY KOEBEL

Draw Date Feb, 13th, 2012.

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville

Cell: 519.581.7868

519.669.5313

$ 6 7 2 8 1 '

Pamper Yourself For A Year Raffle

T. 519.669.2033

112-D Bonnie Cres., Elmira

KIN KORNER

Breakfast with the 1st Elmira Venturers. Serving 8:30 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1 p.m. Elmira Legion, 11 First St. E.

>>Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Invited to a Community Corn Roast, 12 p.m. at the Bloomingdale Recreational Centre. Lots of corn, hot dogs, cookies and ice cream. Bring your appetite and a lawn chair. Games for Children. Sponsored by Bloomingdale Mennonite and United Churches.

woolwichkin.com SEPTEMBER 12

>>Making Baby Food â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1-3 p.m. Join a registered dietitian at Woolwich Community Health Centre and learn about the foods that are good for your babyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s age and stage, how to choose, make and store baby food and ways to avoid â&#x20AC;&#x153;picky eatingâ&#x20AC;?. Session will be held at WCHC, 10 Parkside Drive, St. Jacobs. Call 519-664-3794 for more information. SEPTEMBER 19

>>Elmira

& District Horticultural Society presents Andria Braun & Barry Vanderveer of Little Tree Garden Market: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Late Season Perennials;â&#x20AC;? 7:30 p.m., Trinity United Church.

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess. Elmira & Surrounding Area

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763 psgingrich@hotmail.ca

SEPTEMBER 16

>>Games night 5:30-8:30 p.m. at Elmira Branch Library. Join us for a fun evening of board games. Play or watch Mystery Games such as Clue, MindTrap, CSI: the board game and more! Free event. Chess, checkers and Scrabble will also be available at the desk. For more information call the Region of Waterloo Library, Elmira Branch 519-669-5477.

21 INDUSTRIAL DR. ELMIRA

519-669-2884

SEPTEMBER 17

>>St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Linwood and St. Josephâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Macton Beef and Pork Dinner. Linwood Rec. Complex. Doors open at 5 p.m., dinner at 6. Door prizes and draws. Adults $12 in advance, $14 at the door. Kids 5-12 $6.00 Under 5 are free. Contact Gloria Kittle at 519-698-2577. >>GALE Presbyterian Church is hosting their third annual gala. This exciting fundraising event takes place in the wonderful atmosphere of The Gardens. Enjoy live music and great food. Limited space available. Call 519-669-2852 for more information. SEPTEMBER 18

>>Two-hour hike and geocaching on the

Lions Lake Trail near Floradale, 2 p.m. Discover geocaching: the adventure that uses GPS to locate hidden â&#x20AC;&#x153;cachesâ&#x20AC;? around the world. Join hike leader and geocacher John Robinson for an introduction to this exciting trend. Meet at the main entrance to the conservation area. From Elmira, travel north on Arthur St. to Reid Woods Drive. Turn left or west on Reid Woods Drive. Travel approx. 1 km to municipal address #7224 and enter the conservation area on the north side of the road. Meet in the parking lot near the dam. Trail rating: easy, well maintained trail; includes gravel, earthen and grassed sections. Washroom available. Please contact Paul Miller at 519 664-3643 to confirm meeting times and locations. Maps with meeting locations are posted at www.healthywoolwich.org.

SEPTEMBER 19

>>Boomer Creek Pony Club Showcase; 6:30 p.m., 5325 Ament Line, Linwood. Free. Horse or pony ownership not required to join our Pony Club. Come see what we do, to have fun with horses & join our club. For more information call 519-698-9859 or visit www.canadianponyclub.org.

CORPORATE WEAR PROMOTIONAL APPAREL WORK & SAFETY WEAR | BAGS T-SHIRTS | JACKETS | HATS

245 Labrador Drive | Waterloo

519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com

PRINTING & COPYING SERVICES Black and white, 8 1/2 X 11 flyers designed and printed for as low as 6¢. Professionally designed, quick turnaround, local service. Delivery, folding and colour work also available. Call 519.669.5790 ext 107 for details.


More Power. Less Fuel. Great Value is a comparison between the entire current Chrysler Canada lineup and the entire 2010 Chrysler Canada lineup. Wise customers read the fine print: ❖, •, *, ††, § The Drive More Clearance Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating retailers on or after September 1, 2011. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. See participating retailers for complete details and conditions. ❖Save the Freight discount offer applies to eligible 2011 Grand Caravan SXT, Crew and all Town & Country models offered through Ontario retailers. Chrysler Canada will waive the $1,400 freight charge. While supplies last. See retailers for details. •$19,995 Purchase Price applies to 2011 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package (29E) only and includes $8,000 Consumer Cash Discount. The Save the Freight offer does not apply to the 2011 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package (29E). $19,995 Purchase Price applies to 2011 Dodge Journey SE Canada Value Package (22F) only and includes $2,000 Consumer Cash Discount. See participating retailers for complete details. Pricing includes freight ($1,400), air tax (if applicable), tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailers may sell for less. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on select 2011 vehicles and are manufacturer-to-retailer incentives, which are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. Amounts vary by vehicle. See your retailer for complete details. ††Customer Choice Financing for 36-, 48- and 60-month terms on approved credit through TD Financing Services and Ally Credit Canada is available at participating dealerships to qualified retail customers on select new 2011 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge and Ram models. Taxes on the full negotiated purchase price are payable at the beginning of the contract term resulting in higher payments than payments taxed on a periodic basis and are not reflected in advertised payments. The following terms apply to TD Financing Services contracts. (Different contract terms apply to Ally Credit Canada offers. See your retailer for complete details.) Vehicles are financed over a 36-, 48- or 60-month term with payments amortized over a term of up to 96 months and the pre-determined residual balance payable at the end of the contract. At contract’s end, customers have the choice of returning their vehicle through a Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram dealership with no further obligations (except payment of a $199 return fee and excess wear and tear, mileage and similar charges), financing the remaining balance for the rest of the amortization period at then-current standard rates or paying the residual balance in full. Some conditions apply. Customer Choice Financing offered by TD in Quebec is subject to different terms and conditions. All advertised Customer Choice Financing offers are TD offers. Examples: 2011 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT (29G)/2011 Dodge Journey SE Canada Value Package (22F) with a Purchase Price of $22,995/$19,995 financed at 3.99%/6.49% APR over 36/36 months with $4,899/$4,849 down and payment amortized over 112/89 months equals 78 bi-weekly payments of $89/$99 and one final payment of $13,015/$9,880 for a cost of borrowing of $1,876/$2,467 and a total obligation of $24,871.49/$22,462.09. Taxes, licence, insurance, registration, excess mileage and wear and tear charges, any retailer administration fees and other applicable fees and charges not included. Retailers may sell for less. See participating retailers for complete details. §2011 Dodge Grand Caravan Crew shown. Price including applicable Consumer Cash Discount: $29,530. 2011 Dodge Journey SXT shown. Price including applicable Consumer Cash Discount: $24,995. Pricing includes freight ($1,400), air tax (if applicable), tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. See bottom of the ad for range of potential retailer fees. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailers may sell for less. ∞Loyalty Bonus Cash is offered on most new 2011 and 2012 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge and Ram models (with the exception of 2011/2012 Dodge Caliber Canada Value Package and SE Plus, Grand Caravan Canada Value Package, Grand Caravan Cargo Van, Journey Canada Value Package, Ram 1500 Reg Cab [4x2 & 4x4], Ram Chassis Cab, Jeep Wrangler 2-door Sport, Patriot Sport [4x2 & 4x4] and Compass Sport [4x2 & 4x4]) and is deducted from the negotiated price after taxes. Eligible customers include those that had entered into a new Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge or Ram vehicle FinanciaLinx Lease or Gold Key Lease with a maturity date from September 1st, 2011 and forward. Some conditions apply. See your retailer for complete details. ¤Based on 2011 EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide ratings published by Natural Resources Canada. Transport Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. 2011 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package – Hwy: 7.9L/100 km and City: 12.2L/100 km. 2011 Dodge Journey SE Canada Value Package & SE Plus – Hwy: 7.5L/100 km and City: 10.8L/100 km. 2011 Dodge Journey SXT– Hwy: 7.8L/100 km and City: 12.6L/100 km. ■Based on Ward’s 2011 Small Van Segmentation. Excludes other Chrysler Group LLC designed and/or manufactured vehicles. ^Based on January 2010 through June 2011 R. L. Polk sales total registrations. ®SIRIUS and the dog logo are registered trademarks of SIRIUS Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC. Customer Choice Financing is a trademark of Chrysler Group LLC.

BACK PAGE 32

SCAN HERE FOR MORE

DON_11_1156_KB_CARA_JOU.indd 1

THE OBSERVER

36

$

19,995

$

2011 Dodge Grand Caravan Crew shown.§

PURCHASE FOR

$

23 THE

YOU PICK UP YOUR NEW ELIGIBLE 2011 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN, SAVE WHEN YOU PICK UP AN EXTRA $1,400

2011 DODGE JOURNEY SE CANADA VALUE PACKAGE

CANADA’S #1 SELLING CROSSOVER^

19,995 •

2011 Dodge Journey SXT shown.§

STEP UP FOR ONLY

MORE BI-WEEKLY

with Customer Choice Financing

FREIGHT

MPG

7.9L/100 KM HWY¤

HWY

THE 2011 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT

CANADA’S BEST SELLING MINIVAN FOR MORE THAN 27 YEARS

• Industry-Exclusive 2nd row Super Stow ’n Go® with one-hand operation • Segment-Exclusive Stow ’n PlaceTM roof rack • 3rd row Stow ’n Go® with Segment-Exclusive tailgate seating • Centre front floor console with cupholders • Deep-tint sunscreen glass • Body-coloured door handles and bodyside moulding ■

38

INCLUDES $2,000 CONSUMER CASH,* FREIGHT, AIR TAX, TIRE LEVY AND OMVIC FEE. TAXES EXCLUDED. OTHER RETAILER CHARGES MAY APPLY.+

$

89 3.99

OR CHOOSE

@

BI-WEEKLY

CUSTOMER CHOICE FINANCING $ 99 6.49 @

BI-WEEKLY

» Saturday, September 10, 2011

DR I VE MORE CLE AR ANCE E VENT

GET MORE FOR YOUR MONEY. GET MORE FOR YOUR FAMILY. BEST-IN-CLASS CLASS

283 3HP ■

PURCHASE THE 2011 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN CANADA VALUE PACKAGE FOR INCLUDES $8,000 CONSUMER R CASH,* FREIGHT, AIR TAX, TIRE LEVY AND OMVIC FEE. TAXES EXCLUDED.. OTHER RETAILER CHARGES MAY APPLY.+

OR CHOOSE

CUSTOMER CHOICE FINANCING %††

FOR 36 MONTHS AND $4,899 DOWN

WITH THE OPTION TO RETURN AFTER 36 MONTHS

7.5L/100 KM HWY WY¤ MPG HWY WY

%††

WITH THE OPTION TO RETURN AFTER 36 MONTHS FOR 36 MONTHS AND $4,849 DOWN

2011 DODGE JOURNEY SXT • New 3.6L PentastarTM VVT V6 with 283 HP • One-touch up/down front windows (driver & passenger) • Overhead console • Dual bright exhaust tips • Highway: 7.8L/100 KM (36 MPG)¤

RETURNING LEASE CUSTOMERS, GET $1,500 LOYALTY CASH.∞

+Your local retailer may charge additional fees for administration/pre-delivery that can range from $0 to $1,098 and anti-theft/safety products that can range from $0 to $1,298. Charges may vary by retailer.

Dodge.ca/Offers

GREAT OFFERS

9/2/11 4:36 PM


September 10, 2011