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IT’S COMING... ARE YOU READY?

21 Industrial Dr., Elmira | 519.669.2884 | martinssmallengines.ca

10 | 20 | 2012 VOLUME 17 | ISSUE 45

JACKS GO DOWN AS OPPONENTS PILE ON TOP SPORTS PAGE 13

COMMENT PAGE 10

MCGUINTY'S RESIGNATION PROTECTS HIS LEGACY

Floradale firefighters extinguish a tractor fire on a farm located near Yatton Road and Third Line on Tuesday afternoon. The tractor was destroyed in the fire. The cause is still under investigation.

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com

[COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

Elmira BIA faces prospect of suspending activities Organization having a hard time recruiting new board members, but mayor offers to serve as interim chair STEVE KANNON Facing the prospect of suspending the activities of the Elmira BIA, Mayor Todd Cowan says he’s willing to step in as interim chairman. The organization representing downtown businesses is without a chair, and faces more vacancies on its board of directors following

its annual general meeting next month. Current board members are calling on fellow businesspeople to help revitalize the group. BIA treasurer Keith Schelter, who’s stepping down at the end of the year, said this week he’d like to see a full complement of new board members elected at the Nov. 14 AGM. While waiting for new people to step up, the

BIA is in something of a holding pattern. Four of the eight board positions, including the chair, will be available at the meeting. Cowan currently makes a ninth member as the representative of Woolwich council, but is open to the idea of serving temporarily as chair “if nobody wants to do it,” he said this week.

“We need some fresh blood. “I’d like to get more people involved.” The alternative would be to suspend or even disband the organization. The Elmira Business Improvement Area was formed in 1980, ostensibly to help deal with major downtown renovations that began in that era – long-term debt associated with those im-

provements was retired in 2002. The organization is a committee of council, appointed by and answerable to the municipality, which sets the group’s budget, currently $40,000 a year. Most of the funding comes from a special levy on businesses in the downtown core, while $10,000 comes BIA | 4


2 | NEWS

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THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012


NEWS | 3

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

Kiwanis Transit to reduce fees for most trips Provincial rules mean fares have to follow structure set for conventional public transit COLIN DEWAR Riders of Kiwanis Transit may be paying less starting next year. The organization provides public transit services in the municipalities of Woolwich, Wellesley and Wilmot to KitchenerWaterloo through a contract with the Region of Waterloo that pays it a fee for service. The accessible transportation service is available to residents who are 65 years or older and those with a physical disability. There are currently 1,333 residents using the service in the three townships, including 689 in Woolwich, 244 in Wellesley and 400 in Wilmot. The organization expects to provide some 39,000 rides this year, the majority of those are to health centres and hospitals in the region. When a customer travels between municipalities the practice of Kiwanis Transit has been to charge an additional fare for each municipal boundary crossed. Addressing Wellesley council Tuesday night, Cheryl Fisher, manager KiTRANSIT | 4

Bieber, or a facsimile thereof, up for bids Raffle at Shoppers Drug Mart will benefit the Woolwich Youth Centre

STEVE KANNON

COLIN DEWAR Feeling a little Bieber fever coming on? There might be a treatment at hand. Head over to the Elmira Shoppers Drug Mart where they’re selling raffle tickets for a chance to win a lifesize Justin Bieber cutout. Each ticket is $10 and the raffle will be drawn on Nov. 2 to raise funds for the Woolwich Youth Centre. Currently, the cutout is on display in the cos-

metics department and many fans have stopped by to have their photograph taken with the cardboard Bieber. It’s been more than a year

since the cutout was sent to the store to promote the pop superstar’s signature fragrance, Someday. Denise Moser, manager at the cosmetic counter at the downtown store, and her colleagues have had to be watchful to prevent Bieber from suffering at the hands of the public. “There have been people who have tried to get him,” says Moser. “We had two girls pick him up and nonchalantly just started to walk out the store with him. We just told them to

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Region seeks input on King Street construction project

Madison Berg, 12, a self-confessed Justin Bieber fan, holds a cutout of the young pop star that Shoppers Drug Mart is raffling off this month, with proceeds going to the Woolwich Youth Centre. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER] many people want him. turn around and put him Shoppers Drug Mart is Everyday we have people back.” hosting the draw for the coming up to the counter Bieber cutouts at other cutout as part of a Purple asking if we they can buy Shoppers Drug Marts and Black Justin Bieber him. But we have very across the country have Day Gala. Five dollars from strict rules as to what we met a variety of fates, ineach raffle ticket sold will can and can not do with cluding kidnapping, vango directly to the youth the cutouts.” dalism with makeup, and centre and the remaining Moser has been offered decapitation. $5 can be used towards the $150 for the newest Bieber Currently there are two purchase of any cosmetic cutout, promoting the Bieber cutouts in the store product at the gala. fragrance Girlfriend, but it but only the ‘Someday’ “We wanted to keep the will be at least a year before money raised within the Bieber is available to be she can do anything with raffled off. community and it’s all gothat one. “It’s unbelievable – so ing for a good cause.”

St. Jacobs residents worried about the impact of the planned reconstruction of King Street should come out to a public consultation meeting next week to have their say, suggests their ward councillor. Mark Bauman is serving as Woolwich’s representative on a Waterloo Region committee providing input on the project, slated for 2016. He encourages those with concerns to check out the proposal and say their piece. The work, which encompasses portions of King Street between Printery Road and Hachborn Street as well as Eby Street-Northside Drive to Sawmill Road, brings some positives, he said, including improved street lighting, sidewalks on both sides of the road, and a pedestrian-activated crosswalk signal downtown. “There are some small things I disagree with ... but I’ll let people make up their own minds.” Business owners are likely to have the most concerns, but given that it’s not a full reconstruction of underground services, the work shouldn’t drag on, he suggested. His main concern is to have an early spring or fall start, avoiding an disruption during the prime tourist months of July and August. The public consultation centre is set for Oct. 24, 5-8 p.m., in the gym at St. Jacobs Public School, 72 Queensway Dr. Along with illustrations of the proposed work, regional representatives will be there answer questions through one-on-one discussions.

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4 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

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A number of Woolwich firefighters received exemplary service medals, recognizing their years of service, at a ceremony Tuesday night in council chambers. Back row: Arnie Gingrich (20 years), John Scheeringa (20 years), Mark Weber (30 years), Bruce Good (30 years), township chief Rick Pedersen. Front row: Tom Snyder (25 years), Mayor Todd Cowan, Mark Bauman (35 years), township deputy chief Dale Martin. [STEVE KANNON / THE OBSERVER]

Chemtura-bound train derails in Waterloo ELENA MAYSTRUK A train heading to Elmira’s Chemtura plant derailed near Uptown Waterloo on Oct. 11 at around 8:30 p.m. The train was pulling five empty cars and two engines, travelling at 10 miles per hour when four cars left the tracks between Allen and William streets. According to CN Rail rep-

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wanis Transit, and Eric Gillespie, the region’s director of transit services, spoke about how the program has plans to change the zone user fees. “Zone fares are fares that are charged to people travelling from one municipality to another. If someone was traveling from Wellesley to Woolwich they would pay two fares and if they travelled into an urban area they would pay a third fare,” said Gillespie. In accordance to the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act by Jan. 1, 2013 there needs to be fare parity between specialized services, such as those offered by Kiwanis Transit, to fares charged to customers of the region’s conventional transit service, said Gillespie. “The zone fares do not offer fare parity. The regional Grand River Transit allows riders to travel from

Cambridge through Kitchener-Waterloo to Elmira on route 21 for one fare – there is no consideration given to geographical or municipal boundaries,” he explained. The plans are to scrap the zone fares and charge one flat rate for travel within the region. The current fares are $2.50 to travel within a township, a $5 fare to travel between two townships and a $7 fare to travel between three zones. The plan is to remove both the $5 and $7 fares and have a single fare of $3 to travel between the townships and urban areas of the region. “The Kiwanis Transit board has approved the zone fares being removed,” said Fisher. The estimated annual cost impact of eliminating the revenue generated by the zone fares is approximately $64,000. That amount will be offset by the region. In 1992 Woolwich Township approved funding for

a specialized transit in the township along with a financial commitment from the Kiwanis Club of Elmira and formed Kiwanis Transit. Wellesley Township requested service in 1993 and Wilmot Township had service start in 2001. For 20 years the organization has operated in the three townships Monday to Friday 6 a.m. to 6 p.m. and starting in 2013 Saturday service will be offered. “I have seen accessibility in our community make tremendous progress since this program began,” said Fisher. “It allows our riders independence in their homes and in the community and it provides a quality of life that we are all entitled to. Our goal is a full accessible community for all.” This Saturday (today) the organization is celebrating its anniversary with an open house from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at its office located at 13 Industrial Dr. in Elmira.

BIA: Time to refocus group's visions, says mayor

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view on Wednesday. Crews arrived early morning last Friday. The scene was cleaned up and the train was back in service the next afternoon. The reason for the derailment is under investigation, a process that will take approximately two weeks. No injuries occurred during the accident and damage was reported to be minor.

TRANSIT: Region to offset $64,000 cost FROM | 3

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resentative Lindsay Fedchyshyn, engineers were involved in the cleanup before the case was handed over to Goderich Exeter Railway Ltd. for further investigation. It took two days to clear the scene. GEXR train master Wesley Logan called it a minor derailment. “It was one of our more minor ones, that’s for sure,” he said in a phone inter-

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from a settlement with King/86 Developments over the Walmart-anchored power centre south of St. Jacobs. This is not the first time the organization has been on the verge of suspension. A lack of new members

for the board led to a similar discussion in the fall of 2004. The prospect of losing the BIA seemed to galvanize members into action, bringing new recruits to the board. Addressing the current need, Cowan said business owners would regret the loss of the BIA if it came to

that, arguing that in a few years someone downtown would be calling for an organization to boost the core. Today’s situation is a good opportunity to “Stop and refocus” the vision and goals of the BIA, he added. “We need to give people a reason to be involved.”


NEWS | 5

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

WNEA Fall fair fundraiser set for November 3 The annual fundraising banquet for the Wellesley North Easthope Agriculture Society is set for November 3 at the Wellesley Community Centre. Tickets to the banquet are $30, with proceeds supporting for the townships 160th fall fair in 2013. Humourist Eleanor Wood is the keynote speaker at this year’s event. There will be a silent auction held with prizes ranging from sporting paraphernalia to restaurant

certificates, gift baskets to art work. For tickets contact Beth Schlueter at (519) 656-2731.

CarShare goes electric Grand River CarShare, Waterloo Region’s non-profit carsharing cooperative, has launched its first electric vehicle, a Mitsubishi i-MiEV. The vehicle was purchased in part with a $15,000 grant from the Region of Waterloo’s Community Environmental Fund. The Mitsubishi i-MiEV is charged

with a level-two charging station (full charge in seven hours), installed at the Region of Waterloo administration building. The vehicle has a range of up to 155 kilometres on a single charge. For CarShare members, this is more than enough to meet most of their needs, as 80 per cent of trips made on the CarShare vehicle previously stationed at the Region of Waterloo were 50kms or less. The i-MiEV has a fuel mileage equivalency of 1.9L/100kms in the city. Grand River CarShare provides access to 23 vehicles on a self-serve, pay-per-use basis to its 700 members in Waterloo Region and Hamilton.

MP Albrecht to receive hospice award Hospice of Waterloo Region announced this week it will be presenting the 2012 Hospice Community Award to two local Members of Parliament on October 26. Harold Albrecht, MP for KitchenerConestoga, and Frank Valeriote, MP for Guelph, have been chosen to receive this award for their outstanding work as co-chairs for the Parliamentary Committee on Palliative and Compas-

sionate Care. The presentation will be made at a reception at 6 p.m. the Hospice of Waterloo Region Family Centre in Kitchener.

Rural property workshops

Rural landowners in Waterloo Region who want to learn how to better manage the natural features on their property can get some advice at a series of workshops organized by the Grand River Conservation Authority in partnership with the Region of

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POLICE BLOTTER

a field when the incident occurred. The investigation continues.

Sharp-eyed parent calls police, Elmira man nabbed for indecent act A parent who was dropping off his child at John Mahood Public School in Elmira about 8:30 a.m. Monday observed a young man in a van who appeared to be masturbating while driving by the school.

OCTOBER 12

7:30 AM | A 65-year-old Waterloo man was charged with failing to yield to a pedestrian when he struck a 48-year-old Breslau man while operating a 1992 Oldsmobile on Dolman Street near Woolwich Street in Breslau. Minor injuries were sustained by the Breslau man. 11:45 PM | A taxi picked up passengers in Waterloo and drove to an address on Sawmill Road near Golf Course Road in Conestogo, where the two men fled without paying. The men were intoxicated at the time, ditching a fare of $34.50. When police responded they were told by the taxi dispatch that the fare had been paid at the taxi company's

3:30 PM | A 27-year-old Listowel woman was charged with turn not in safety when she drove her Ford Windstar across the median at Arthur Street South and Listowel Road and hit the barriers of the propane dispenser at the ESSO gas station. Damage to the vehicle was reported as moderate.

Police were contacted and the vehicle and driver were located in a nearby parking lot. A 19-year-old Elmira man was charged with an indecent act in a public place and released on an appearance notice.

OCTOBER 17

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2:10 PM | A 23-year-old Holyrood, Ontario man was driving a 2004 black Chevy along Benjamin Road in Woolwich when he swerved to miss a deer and lost control of the vehicle. He drove through a ditch and fence, hitting 10 Christmas trees at the Benjamin Tree Farm before stopping. The vehicle sustained severe damage. The man suffered minor injuries and was taken to Grand River Hospital. OCTOBER 15

8:00 AM | Police responded to a break-and-enter at the Lockhart scale house on Middlebrook

Waterloo ’s Community Environmental Fund. At the evening sessions, landowners will go through a workbook that will provide them with information that will help them manage and enhance their property. It will include information on the grants and other support available for tree planting through the Trees for the Grand Program. Workshops, which begin at 7 p.m., are set for Nov. 6 at the Linwood Community centre and Nov. 13 at Farmers Plus in Elmira. The workshops are free but space is limited; to register in advance, call 519-621-2763, ext. 2277.

A tow truck prepares to leave the scene of a collision between a Honda and Buick at the intersection of Kossuth Road and Shantz Station Road on Oct. 17. Both vehicles had to be towed. No injuries were reported at the scene. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

Road in Woolwich. When they arrived they discovered a screen had been removed and a Powermate red and black Sport 1850 generator valued at $200 was missing. The investigation continues. 3:20 PM | An Elmira man whose bike was stolen last week saw a 17-year-old Elmira girl riding the bike. He contacted police who spoke to the girl who said she had got the bike from a schoolmate.

The investigation continues. 4:20 PM | A 28-year-old Fergus man was charged with careless driving after he hit a 59-year-old man in a grey Toyota from behind at the intersection of Sawmill Road and Katherine Street near Conestogo. Both vehicles sustained minor damage. 8:20 PM | Police responded to an alarm at Stoltz Farm Equip-

ment on Line 86 near Floradale Road west of Elmira. When police arrived they discovered a window had been tampered with but no suspects could be found and nothing was stolen from the business. The investigation is ongoing. OCTOBER 16

2PM | Floradale firefighters were called to a farm on Yatton Road near Third Line to put out a tractor fire. The tractor was out in

9:15 AM | A Breslau woman driving a silver Honda was charged with fail to yield when she tried to make a left turn and struck an oncoming 2003 grey Buick operated by a Cambridge woman on Kossuth Road at Shantz Station Road outside of Breslau. No injuries were reported, but both vehicles sustained severe damage and had to be towed from the scene. 9:54 PM | A 29-year-old Drayton man riding a Kawasaki motorcycle hit a dog that ran out in front of his bike on Hessen Strasse near Willow Way Road and MoserYoung in Wellesley Township. The dog was killed in the collision and the bike sustained significant damage. The rider was uninjured.

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6 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

Wellesley seeking grant to help with repairs to council building COLIN DEWAR The Wellesley Township council chambers are undergoing a facelift. The building located at 4805 Hastings Line in Crosshill is currently under renovation. The existing cedar roof requires replacement and the stone exterior requires re-pointing to maintain its structural integrity and weather-resistant qualities as well as keeping with the original appearance of the building. The repairs

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were needed as the structure would have deteriorated quickly over the next few years. The structure was built in 1855, making it 157 year old. In 1987 the council chambers were designated a heritage building and was the first project to be considered for a grant by the heritage foundation. At a council meeting Tuesday night, councillors decided the township should apply for a Waterloo Regional Heritage Founda-

tion property grant, requesting funding to complete the required repairs to the building. “This grant will apply to the work that is being done currently,” Rik Louwagie, chief building officer of Wellesley Township, told council. “We are asking for the full cost of the repairs that are being done right now. The council chamber is the oldest functioning municipal building in the Region of Waterloo.” The Waterloo Regional

Heritage Foundation is a non-profit organization funded through an annual grant from the Region of Waterloo. Its mandate is to promote and encourage interest in the heritage and culture of the region. Since forming the foundation has distributed more than a $1 million to a variety of projects throughout the region. The township is estimating that the renovations will cost approximately $37,235 and the project is expected to be completed by December.

The Wellesley Township council chambers are undergoing renovations to replace the roof and mortar of the building. The township has applied for a grant by the Waterloo Regional Heritage Foundation to help pay for the repairs. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

Are you interested in starting or expanding your business in Clifford, Harriston or Palmerston?

Downtown Clifford, Harriston & Palmerston Saturday October 27, 2012 10:00a.m. - 3:oo p.m. Various properties and businesses in Clifford, Harriston and Palmerston that are for sale or lease will be open for viewing during this time. Business Resource Personnel will also be on hand to answer questions related to starting or expanding your business, they will be available from 10:00 a.m.— 3:00 p.m. in the basement of the Harriston Library. Be sure to pick up your Property Open House package at the Library or download from our website to help guide you on your tour.

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NEWS | 7

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

Repairs underway, region ponders reopening West Montrose bridge

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COLIN DEWAR It has been one month since the iconic covered bridge in West Montrose was closed when a floor beam that supports a portion of the structure failed likely due to overloading by heavy vehicles. Waterloo Region officials are hoping to have the repairs done this week but are not sure when it will reopen to vehicle traffic. “Workers have put some temporary bracing in and around the area of the damaged beam and right now we are leaning towards not opening the bridge until we can assess what needs to be done,” said Shawn Buckley, senior transportation infrastructure engineer for Region of Waterloo. Repairs to the 131-yearold bridge are estimated to cost $35,000. A 4.3-metre Douglas Fir square beam arrived in Toronto on Monday. It came from British Columbia and was sent to Toronto to be pressure treated before continuing the journey to West Montrose to be put in place, said Buckley. “We are optimistic that the bridge will be repaired by this week, it all depends on the new beam and when it arrives,” he said Tuesday. Opening the bridge to

Seven-year-old Emily clutches some handmade hair clips she purchased at the annual craft show in Breslau last Saturday. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

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Registered Massage Therapy The West Montrose covered bridge is under repair after a support beam crack. The region has yet to decide when it will re-open the bridge to motor vehicles. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER] viding information when to help with the decision traffic is a different story, they can to concerned as to when it should be rehe added, as officials have residents and will be holdopened. only just begun to discuss ing a private meeting with “We have to reanalyze when they plan deem it the residence association that three-tonne limit sare. of West Montrose to disand some of the informa“We are having internal cuss what has happened so tion we need to do that discussion about opening far with the repairs to the analysis needs to be the bridge first and then bridge. gathered while the bridge they will fan out into the A public meeting will is (under repairs), as all community to get their also be held, but not until the paneling along the take. We have to figure out after the repair work is how we are going to control sides are open and we completed. That meeting can take a look at how the the traffic loading on the will discuss what to do bailey truss is performbridge,” he said. with the provincially proing underneath,” Buckley While the bridge is tected historic bridge and said of the steel under the closed, a consultant is how to keep heavy vehicles wooden bridge. gathering additional inoff it. The region has been proformation on the structure

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PUBLIC NOTICE NoticeACTIVITIES of Public Information Centre MAINTENANCE AFFECTING ELMIRA AND ST. JACOBS PROPOSED REGION OF WATERLOO DRINKING WATER SYSTEM SIGN BY-LAW

Due to planned maintenance activities in Elmira and St. Jacobs you may notice some changes to your Drinking Water from The Region will beThese holding a public information centre water to introduce a draft October 15, 2012oftoWaterloo December 31, 2012. activities may impact your water pressure, taste and odour in these Regional By-law respecting signs on Regional roads. The proposed Sign By-law addresses communities due to operation changes during this period.

all types of unofficial signs on Regional roads including election signs, business accessory

You may farm also notice an increase of activity in youraccessory area, as theresigns, will beopen watermain flushing to support the above maintesigns, accessory signs, mailbox house signs and poster signs. nance work. Changes are expected to re-direct the flow of the water in some watermains, which may cause some discolThe proposed Sign By-law establishes requirements for unofficial signs including: ouration of the water. If you notice your water is starting to discolour, you should discontinue use, wait approximately one hour,•and then allow aand cold hard water tap to run for approximately 5 minutes until the water clears. Once water is clear, it Location placement; is safe consumption. we recommend you do not drink discoloured water. • for Size, shape,However, construction and content; We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause. • Impacts to the function of the road;

• Number of signs and timing of placement; and • Sign removal.

If you have any questions or concerns contact

Kathy Waterloo 519-575-4757x3162 StaffTaylor, are Region also of proposing an amendment to the Region’s Tourism and Essential Services Email: Kataylor@RegionofWaterloo.ca

Signing Policy to allow tourism signage on Regional roads for agri-toursim activities.

After hours, Region of Waterloo SCADA Room 519-571-6208 When: Tuesday, June 17,Control 2008, drop in 4:00or;- 8:00 p.m.

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Regional Administration Headquarters (lobby) 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener

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8 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

Region launches happy cycling campaign to boost on-road safety ELENA MAYSTRUK With an increasing number of cyclists on the roads, Waterloo Region is launching a “happy cycling” campaign to remind all who share the road about the importance of safety while driving and cycling. The region is partnering with Cambridge, Kitchener and Waterloo and the Working Centre to hire bike ambassadors; experienced cyclists trained in urban cycling. “This is kind of the coolest part, we think. We have these really outgoing and friendly individuals that will be placed at areas where there are a lot of cyclists. They are there to thank folks for cycling and give an opportunity to read our Happy Streets Movement booklet,” said James LaPointe, principal planner at Waterloo Region. The campaign is a reflection of how important cycling and safety issues are to the public and local cyclists are not unaware of the dangers. Last May, one week after a Waterloo cyclist was fatally hit

from behind by an SUV in Wellesley Township, 500 cyclists joined in support of Barrie Conrod’s family for a memorial ride on the spot where he was killed along Herrgott Road. Project managers are starting the campaign off in urbanized areas where traffic is heavy but hope to expand efforts into northern areas of the region such as Woolwich and Wellesley townships in the spring, according to LaPointe. Efforts were triggered after a 2010 study by the University of Waterloo conducted in partnership with the region of Waterloo. It showed that many of the region’s residents choose to ride their bikes all year around. After completing the studies planners pitched the project last year. It will now run for the rest of the fall and into the spring of next year. “Certainly a lot more people that are cycling and we are recognizing that ... as cycling becomes a more attractive mode of transportation for folks we want to make sure that individuals who are choosing to

A FIRSTHAND LOOK AT LOCAL GOVERNANCE

cycle are not only encouraged to but rewarded for it. We wanted to make sure people know how to properly ride their bicycles,” he said. Though reasons for cycling range from living a healthier lifestyle to saving on gas, the stats show most often people cycle as a way to save on buying a second vehicle. Studies also show that riding on sidewalks and through crosswalks is a factor in 86 per cent of collisions involving bikes in the region, a statistic has been reflective of accidents in Woolwich and Wellesley townships as well. The campaign is being conducted in hopes of eliminating accidents involving cyclists at intersections and on the roads. Cyclists will also encouraged to go to www.travelwisecyclingquiz.com to complete the campaign quiz for a chance to win a $500 gift card for a bike store of their choice in Waterloo Region. For more information about the campaign check out www.travelwisecyclingquiz.com or http://happystreets.wordpress.com.

Following a tour of the Woolwich Township administration building Tuesday evening, members of the Elmira Cubs sat in on a council meeting led by Mayor Todd Cowan. The visit came in conjunction with local government week. [STEVE KANNON / THE OBSERVER]

MINOR DAMAGE, MAJOR EFFORT

A Waterloo Regional Police officer directs traffic at the intersection of Sawmill Road and Katherine Street on Oct. 15 after a collision between a Ford pickup and a Toyota. Damage to both vehicles was minimal. No injuries were reported. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

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NEWS | 9

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

WHERE THE ACTION IS

Conestogo family part of foster care network in Waterloo Region Family & Children’s Services to hold appreciation night for those who make the program work; "it's good for the kids that need a place to stay" ELENA MAYSTRUK

It was football Friday at EDSS Oct. 12, but the junior boys fell 47-14 to Jacob Hespeler Secondary School, while the senior boys lots 32-0. Top, a crowd gathers around the Elmira ball carrier. Above, Lancer Nathan Schlupp tries to block an opponent. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

Six years ago Martia and Chris Ferguson of Conestogo became foster parents and their home became one of dozens around Woolwich and Wellesley townships to take in foster children through Family & Children’s Services of the Waterloo Region. The Fergusons will be among those individuals honoured during National Foster Family Appreciation Week, which runs Oct. 2127 this year. Martia Ferguson explains that she and her husband became foster parents because they wanted to help. “To give back to the community, to help others that need help, that’s just what we do. We try to encourage our kids to be kind to others and help when you can,” she explained at her home in Conestogo on Tuesday. Along with raising with their own three children the couple has taken up to four foster kids at once, looking after both infants and older children. “We would love to see people come out and foster children. The more foster parents we have the more support services we can provide children” said Teresa Trofymowych, foster/adoption recruitment worker at FCS.

Martia and Chris Ferguson at home in Conestogo with their three children James (left), Thomas, and Emily. The couple is being recognized for their efforts as foster parents. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

The foster care organization supports children from the ages of infancy to 16. Though being a foster parent requires commitment, education and time, Ferguson finds the experience not only rewarding

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but necessary. “Life gets a little bit busier any time you add another child into the mix you’re going to have more stuff, whether it’s school or taking them to appointments or extracurricular

activities,” she said of her commitments, adding she hopes her own children will benefit from the experience of helping others. “Why would you want to deal with that or how can you let them go? Those are the two big questions I find people ask. If feeling sad when they leave is the reason not to foster, I don’t agree with that.” She explained that the challenge of having children with different histories come into her home is something that she her husband, kids and foster kids work on as a family, trying to reinforce rules and provide a healthy environment for everyone. “I just think that people if they thought about fostering, its fun, you can make a difference and it’s not necessarily the bad thing people think it is. It is busier, but I think that it’s good for your family and it’s good for the kids that need a place to stay – it’s very worthwhile. Foster Care Waterloo Region will hold an appreciation dinner for current foster parents on Oct. 24. A public information night for prospective parents on the same night at the family centre a 65 Hansen Ave. in Kitchener. Visitors are asked to register in advance by calling 519576-0540.

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10 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

JOE MERLIHAN PUBLISHER STEVE KANNON EDITOR

COMMENT

DONNA RUDY SALES MANAGER

COLIN DEWAR REPORTER

ELENA MAYSTRUK

PAT MERLIHAN PRODUCTION MANAGER

LEANNE BORON GRAPHIC DESIGN

REPORTER PUBLICATION MAIL AGREEMENT NUMBER 1004840 | ISSN 12039578

OUR VIEW / EDITORIAL

THE VIEW FROM HERE

McGuinty's legacy at root of this week's resignation DALTON MCGUINTY’S ANNOUNCEMENT THAT he plans to step down as Ontario’s premier caught most of us by surprise. With some reflection, perhaps we could see it coming, however. Premier for nine years, McGuinty has had his ups and downs, but nothing like the relentless negatives of his third term, and first in a minority government. For much of his tenure, the public’s reaction was positive, though there are plenty of people who strongly opposed Premier Dad and his penchant for appeasement and taxation by stealth. His reputation has taken a beating since last fall’s election as he attempted to rein in Ontario’s massive deficit and deal with scandals such as the politically-motivated cancellation of two gas-fired power plants. Perhaps it was time to step down, removing himself from the fray in order to preserve his legacy in the long term. Surely he looked at other politicians, most recently Jean Charest in neighbouring Quebec, who stuck around too long, allowing voters to exact their revenge and leaving the public with a lasting impression of the downside of their careers. Politicians have egos, and it’s unlikely McGuinty wants to be remembered for what’s gone on in the last year, his government largely adrift. Rather, he would prefer we concentrate on the early days, when he arrived as the antithesis of the muchreviled Mike Harris. He set about bringing some stability to such files as health and education. It didn’t hurt that times were good, as it never does for any government so favoured. But, like many boom-time politicians before him, McGuinty spent and spent, winning friends (at least temporarily) and votes. It left the province in a more precarious state, however, in the downturn that followed the financial crisis of 2008. Already hammered by globalization that was killing the manufacturing sector, Ontario had a rough ride. McGuinty seemed to have difficulty moving away from his conciliatory, nice-guy image in order to deal with needed austerity measures, including rolling back runaway public sector wages and benefits that blossomed on his watch. It will be up to his successor to do the hard work necessary to get the budget under control. That will fall to his replacement as leader of the Liberal party or, given the minority status, one of the opposition parties. Whoever takes the helm is best advised to keep things simple, which is a fairly good bet given the province’s mounting debt load – Ontarians have no stomach for deficits and increased taxes. With that in mind, the next leader will have to focus on job creation and growth in the real economy, while curbing government spending, shrinking the civil service and rolling back public sector wages. Clearly, the economy is the top priority, intertwined with our education and health care systems. The latter are important to us, but both will require a deft hand to get runaway expenses under control. You can bet the next premier will be looking for more money from Ottawa, but, again, wages will be a big part of the equation while trying to reel in costs that have far outstripped inflation and economic growth. As the two biggest draws on the public purse, those sectors will need the most attention: we can no longer throw money away as we have in the past. Most of the economic levers lie with the federal government, where the government is not friendly to average Canadians, but McGuinty’s successor can set the tone in the most populous province by focusing on what matters most.

As hockey fans look elsewhere while the NHL lockout continues, some teams may not fare very well against the competition. WORLD VIEW / GWYNNE DYER

Concern about currency, but no real panic in Iran WORLD AFFAIRS Iran’s currency virtually collapsed last week, and the public protests that followed in Tehran stirred memories of the massive anti-regime protests of 2009. This has caused excited speculation in the United States and its allies about the imminent fall of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the abandonment of Iran’s uranium enrichment program, or even the end of the whole Islamic regime. Don’t hold your breath. Ahmadinejad blamed the currency crisis on the foreign sanctions that are crippling Iran’s trade, of course. His critics at home just blamed him: “The smaller part of the problem relates to sanctions while 80 per cent of the problem is rooted in the government’s mistaken policies,” said Ali Larijani, the speaker of the Iranian parliament. But he would say that, wouldn’t he? It’s true that Ahmadinejad has used the country’s

large oil revenues to paper over some serious mistakes in running Iran’s economy, but the current crisis was caused by a steep fall in those revenues – which is directly due to the sanctions. Four rounds of United Nations-backed trade sanctions, ostensibly meant to stop Iran from developing nuclear weapons, had already cut the country’s oil exports from 2.5 million barrels a day to 1.5 million b/d by early this year. Then came new American sanctions that blocked any international bank doing business in Iran from access to the immense U.S. market – so most of them ended their dealings with Iran. In July came new European Union sanctions banning oil imports from Iran entirely. Since Europe was taking one-fifth of Iran’s remaining oil exports, that blow was enough to send the Iranian rial into freefall. Until 2009, the rate of exchange was fairly stable at about 10,000 rials to the dollar. Then it started to fall slowly, and then faster – and in a hectic few earlier

this month, it tumbled a further 40 per cent to a low of 35,000 rials to the dollar. That was when the protests began in Tehran’s Grand Bazaar, whose merchants were amongst the strongest supporters of the revolution in 1979. The protests were contained without any deaths, and the shops in the bazaar are now open again. The rial has recovered slightly, stabilizing at around 28,000 to the dollar. But that is one-third of what it was worth three years ago, and the effects are being felt in almost every household in the country. Formerly comfortable middle-class families are scrambling to put food on the table, and the poor are really suffering. So the sanctions are working, in the sense that they are hurting people. But what are they accomplishing in terms of their stated purpose of forcing Iran to abandon its nuclear weapons program? More importantly, perhaps, what are they achieving in terms of their unstated purpose: triggering an uprising that overthrows the whole Islamic regime?

First of all, Iran doesn’t have a nuclear weapons program. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the U.S. and Israeli intelligence service are all agreed on that, although the public debate on the issue generally assumes the contrary. Iran says it is developing its ability to enrich uranium fuel for use in reactors, which is perfectly legal under the Nuclear NonProliferation Treaty. It’s true that the same technologies give the owner the ability to enrich uranium further, to weapons grade, and there is good reason to think that Iran wants that capability. It’s probably not planning to make nuclear weapons now, but it does want that “threshold capability” in case things get really bad in the region and it needs a nuclear deterrent in a hurry. A “threshold nuclear weapons capability” (but no nuclear weapons) is still not illegal. Other countries with enrichment facilities include Argentina, Brazil, Germany, Japan, and the DYER | 12


COMMENT | 11

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

THEIR VIEW / QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Do you think Dalton McGuinty was right to resign as premier?

»»S’danne Stortzthuroo

»»Jacob Enns

Interesting question, I don’t know. I’m very I don’t really know why he resigned; I have shocked he resigned. I don’t think the reasons problems with other things right now. he gave are the real reasons.

»»Rachel Vandenberg

»»Walter Kusy

»»Paul Henderson

Yes.

I don’t really know I don’t pay much attention Undecided, I really don’t have a lot of the to that. information.

"So what are these sanctions really about? Overthrowing the Iranian regime, of course." Gwynne Dyer | page 10 HIS VIEW / STEVE KANNON

Real waste reduction may require a few changes to our comfortable lifestyle EDITOR'S NOTES Caught up in the post-Thanksgiving, preHalloween season – not to mention local government week – you may have missed the fact this is also Waste Reduction Week in Canada. Yes, such a thing exists. The goal is to make us mindful about just how much stuff we accumulate and throw away. And we dispose of a considerable amount of waste: 1,670 lbs (760 kg) each every year, the equivalent of eight adult men. Enter Waste Reduction Week, which came to Canada in 2001 courtesy of a coalition of 13 recycling councils and sister organizations from across the country. It’s rolled out each October by the same group. The program’s goal is to inform Canadians about the environmental and social ramifications of wasteful practices. The message is sinking in – many of us are mindful

of over-packaged goods, for instance – but it’s a slow process, says Jo-Anne St. Godard, executive director of the Recycling Council of Ontario. As individuals we’re starting to make some changes, smarter choices. On the whole, however, Ontarians are generating more waste than ever. That has much to do with industry rather than individual actions, but the two are connected, she notes. In the case of excess packaging and products such as single-serving food items, business takes its cue from consumers: if we stop buying such goods, or shift our dollars to lesswasteful choices, they’ll take note. In the meantime, industry is also encouraged to reduce how much waste they generate behind the scenes as part of the manufacturing process. That’s not just good for the environment, but also for the bottom line, cutting material costs and, at the end of the process, disposal fees, she stresses. Much of the impetus will be on us as consumers, however. Change will come

HOW TO REACH US

remanufacturing and less materials in the landfill. We’re starting to think in those terms, but haven’t fully embraced the concept. We are rather wedded to our North American consumption patterns. “I think consumers are becoming more savvy, more conscious of their choices,” says St. Godard of our tendency to differentiate between products on the shelves. But we’re not ready to really shine a light on how we live, she adds. “I don’t think that we’re really examining our consumption habits.” Take the issue of singleserving packaging. Convenience often trumps environmental considerations, especially in such common tasks as packing a lunch for your kids. “We aren’t at the point of saying ‘do I really need this? Should we consume this?’” If things are going to change, we’ll have to change our mindset to reflect those thoughts. We have to take responsibility for what we choose from the store shelves – industry will respond accordingly.

Our buying power will influence how business is done. In the meantime, however, there are some small steps that can make a difference. From that reusable coffee cup for the drivethru (though putting it in park and walking inside is better still) to actually remembering to bring those reusable shopping bags with you when you get groceries, it all adds up. “It’s the low-lying fruit. Easy changes that you could consider doing today,” says St. Godard, noting making such things a habit, part of your routine, is key to sticking with them. Collectively, that’s taking more responsibility for the piles of waste we send off to the landfill, where it’s out of sight and out of mind ... well, at least until

@

it starts getting full and we need to find another hole in the ground to “deal with” our crap. Here in Waterloo Region, we’re going through just such an exercise, attempting to extend the life of the existing landfill site and pondering about what to do next. It’s with that bigger picture in mind that we can start making small changes – we wouldn’t want to sacrifice too much of our lifestyles – that lead us down the road to better things. “We’re blessed where we have many choices, many freedoms. We can’t ignore the responsibilities,” she says. As Waste Reduction Week winds down, she urges us all to look for the one small thing we can do. “Small changes add up. You can make your own difference.”

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because we demand it. Otherwise, well, don’t hold your breath. It’s a matter of choices. Moving away from our penchant for disposable items, for instance. Using quality, long-lasting equipment that can be serviced and reused rather than discarded minimizes waste. This practice supports quality manufacturers. Higher initial costs are often justified by lower replacement and disposal costs as equipment is in use for a longer period. Choose reusable products rather than single-use items. Simple measures such as reusing ceramic mugs instead of using disposable cups, using cloth shopping bags rather than disposable plastic ones, using rechargeable batteries or reusing items such as file folders and interoffice envelopes mean less waste and lower costs. When you purchase products keep in mind what will become of them at their end-of-life. Materials that can be fully recycled, or that are made of recycled materials mean less energy consumption in

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12 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

THE MONITOR

VERBATIM

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

In 1986, 120,074 temporary foreign workers were in the country. By the year 2000 this increased to 177,781 and by 2010 the number increased to 432,682, an increase of 140% during the 2000s alone. It continues to grow under federal government policies relaxing the rules.

“It is critical that people understand that completion of the southern leg of Keystone XL—which President Obama and Gov. Romney both fully support—would give TransCanada a direct line from Alberta’s landlocked tar sands minefields to refineries in Texas for export overseas. It is unconscionable to put the interests of a transnational corporation before the health, safety and economic well-being of the American people.”

What was expected to be a close race was anything but as Conservative Harold Albrecht cruised back into his seat as MP for Kitchener-Conestoga on election night, Oct. 14, 2008. Albrecht took almost half of the votes in the riding, returning to Ottawa as part of Stephen Harper's second minority government.

»»Citizenship and Immigration Canada

»»U.S. climate activist Tom Weis, a former congressional staffer, sees both Barack

»»From the Oct. 18, 2008 edition of the Observer.

Obama and Mitt Romney as likely to give in to corporate interests over the Keystone XL pipeline to ship bitumen south from Alberta.

DYER: Iran unlikely to yield

NATIONAL VIEW

to foreign pressure for change CONTINUED FROM | 10

Netherlands. Moreover, Iran’s stock of reactorgrade enriched uranium is under permanent IAEA supervision, and alarms would go off instantly if it started to upgrade that stock to weapons grade. Israel’s current government has talked itself into a state of existential panic over Iran’s uranium enrichment program, but the U.S. government certainly doesn’t believe that Iran has any immediate plans to build nuclear weapons. So what are these sanctions really about? Overthrowing the Iranian regime, of course. American sanctions against Iran long predate any concerns about Iranian nuclear weapons, and would not be ended even if Iran stopped all work on uranium enrichment tomorrow. The U.S. legislation that imposes the sanctions makes that very clear.

Before sanctions are lifted, the president must certify to Congress that Iran has “released all political prisoners and detainees; ceased its ... violence and abuse of Iranian citizens engaging in peaceful political activity; investigated the killings and abuse of peaceful political activists...and prosecuted those responsible; and made progress toward establishing an independent judiciary.” In other words, it must dismantle the regime. Since stopping the enrichment program would not end the sanctions, why would the Iranian government even consider doing so? And will the Iranian people rise up and overthrow the regime because sanctions are making their daily lives very difficult? Even anti-regime Iranians are proud and patriotic people, and the likelihood that they will yield to foreign pressures in that way is approximately zero.

RETIREMENT PARTY OPEN HOUSE FOR LORNE BOWMAN

Thursday, Oct. 25th, 2012

You’re invited

come and go between 2-4pm

RBC® and Premier Equipment are inviting you to a fun and fact-filled barbeque event in honour of small business month. See the latest John Deere farming equipment, enjoy some great food and company, and get financial advice from your local RBC agricultural account managers.

Date: October 31, 2012 Time: 11:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Place: Premier Equipment Elmira Location

The Staff at Stoltz Sales and Service wish to express our thanks and invite you to join us here in Elmira to show your appreciation for Lorne Bowman who after 41 years of service will be retiring on October 31st 2012. Lorne started with B&M in April 1971 and has been part of our parts team ever since!! His experience and knowledge gained over the years will be missed but he is always welcome here. Please join us as we wish him all the best in his post career adventures and pass along your thoughts and memories of the agricultural industry in person from 2-4pm on Thursday October 25th. For more information or questions please call us at 1-800-665-1561.

122 Church Street West, Elmira

RSVP by October 24 to darcy.krahn@rbc.com or by phone at 519-669-1550. We look forward to seeing you there! YOUR PRESENCE IS OUR GIFT

® / ™ Trademark(s) of Royal Bank of Canada. RBC and Royal Bank are registered trademarks of Royal Bank of Canada.

THANK YOU. STOLTZ SALES & SERVICE , 6805 Line 86 W, Elmira


SPORTS | 13

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

SPORTS HOCKEY / JUNIOR B

HOCKEY / JUNIOR D

Jacks discover that losing feeling

Kings fail to execute in 6-4 loss to Waterloo

Wellesley drops three in a row in a weekend they’d rather forget; on the road looking for redemption

Players need to play as a team, focus on the unglamorrous jobs if they want to be successful, says coach ELENA MAYSTRUK

Rob Hinschberger (left) and Bobby Gray (right) team up to protect the net and battle Ayr’s Brady Wheelans for the puck during last Saturday’s home game. The Jacks lost 5-4. ELENA MAYSTRUK A strong start to the OHA hockey season turned sour for the Wellesley Applejacks, who lost three consecutive games last weekend to New Hamburg and Ayr. The game on Oct. 12 against the New Hamburg looked promising in the first minutes of play when Connor McLeod shot one past Firebirds goalie Graeme Lauersen at 8:08 to open the scoring. But even Jacks coach Kevin Fitzpatrick was not prepared for the level of play his team would face: “We missed some real opportunities in the second period and they capitalized on them. They just wore

us down. We hadn’t played a team of that intensity level,” he said looking back at the weekend. The next six minutes would yield results for the Firebirds, who got three in a row behind netminder Josh Heer. Wellesley pushed back with the final goal of the period, making the score 3-2. When the Jacks scored their third goal it was 1:23 into the second and the Firebirds came back with a goal of their own before Wellesley’s Reid Denstedt scored his team’s final goal, assisted by Luke Rose. The 4-4 tie was shortlived. New Hamburg broke the impasse at 11:53 when an attack by three Firebirds on the Wellesley net result-

WOOLWICH

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ed in a goal by Sean Kienapple. That shot opened the floodgates in the third, which saw New Hamburg finish the game 7-4. The Jacks faced Ayr the next night and fared no better. Wellesley was at a fever pitch in the opening frame when Devon Wagner and Mark Detzler drew first blood with two goals in the first eight minutes of the game, but lost the momentum by racking up the penalties. “We self-destructed,” Fitzpatrick said. “This team up to that point was the least penalized team in the league; it was really out of character.” Still, Wellesley had no intention of backing down in the second frame when

The Elmira Sugar Kings continued an uneven season with 6-4 loss at home against Waterloo on Sunday. The Kings and Siskins faced off for the first time this season to the noise of a full house. Fans of the home side were subdued at 13:46 when the visitors drew first blood, as Jimmy Sopher put one past netminder Hayden Neuman with the Siskins on a power play. It was a rough night for Neuman, who would stop just 24 of the 30 shots he faced. “We weren’t really out of it, but we weren’t really into it either. It’s tough playing catch-up all game but our guys battled and kept coming,” said Elmira coach Dean DeSilva after the game. This season’s team is young, he explained, and a lot of work needs to be done, both with offensive tactics and forming a more aggressive defence. “Unless you are going to play consistently it makes

[ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

they got two more past Centennials’ Bobby Brown, only to see Ayr fight back with two goals of their own. Though it looked like a promising game for the Jacks, with a 4-2 score by the end of second, Ayr would soon flip the odds and dominate in third with 17 shots on net to Wellesley’s three, skating away with a 5-4 victory over the home team. The Jacks would continue the lost weekend in a home game rematch against New Hamburg that saw the visitors steamroll Wellesley once more in Sunday’s 6-2 game. The Jacks were the only team to score in the first period, going up 1-0 after 20 minutes.

New Hamburg got on the board in the second, potting a shorthanded goal when the puck flew past two Wellesley defencemen and onto the stick of Matt Yantzi. Wellesley went up 2-1 less than two minutes later, but it was all Firebirds after that. The home team seemed to lose its fighting spirit, leaving New Hamburg to score three more before the intermission. After the break, the visitors added two more, leaving the defeated Jacks in the dust. Wellesley players will have a chance to redeem themselves this weekend when they travel to Travistock, Hagersville and Burford.

KINGS | 17

ELMIRA SUGAR KINGS

Since 1929

PRESENT TRIBUTE TO THE

EAGLES

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Dinner & Show $45 | Show Only $20 Catered by Kennedy’s

Doors open @ 6pm | Dinner 7pm | Show 8:30pm Tickets available at all home games or call (519) 669-2828 or (519) 669-9224

Billiards Tables

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519.745.4053 FREE PARKING


14 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

ELMIRA BLOOD DONOR CLINIC Sophia: Blood Transfusion Sunday 6:30am

Give Blood ... to save lives. The Next Elmira Clinic: Friday, October 26, 2012

from 2:30pm - 8:30pm at Lion's Hall, Elmira THE ELMIRA BLOOD DONOR CLINIC ANNOUNCEMENTS ARE BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITY-MINDED BUSINESSES:

Various sizes & rates Serving you for over 100 Years

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE 100 South Field Dr. • 519-669-4964

1145 Printery Rd., St. Jacobs | TEL: 519.664.2263

Bus: 519-698-9930 Res: 519-698-2213

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Mon. to Sat. 6 am - 5:30 pm • Closed Sunday

22 Church St. W • 519-669-5353

FLORADALE FEED MILL LIMITED FLORADALE FEED MILL LIMITED Finest in feeds and service for over 50 years!

STORE HOURS: OPEN 24 HOURS, 7 DAYS A WEEK 315 Arthur St. S., Elmira • 519-669-5403

• Fabrics • Men's Wear • Ladies Coats • China • Glass Ware The Quality You Demand, the Service You Deserve.

Mon. Closed · Tues.-Fri. 8-6 · Sat. 8-5

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JOHN KENDALL Barrister & Solicitor

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Blood and blood products are a critical part of everyday medical care, such as major surgeries and other medical procedures.

CALL 1 888 2 DONATE for more information or to book an appointment. Visit bloodservices.ca


SPORTS | 15

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

NOT SO GREAT OUTDOORSMAN / STEVE GALEA

It’s only out in the wilderness where you’ll score points for a nice rack OPEN COUNTRY Just the other day, my hunting buddy and I looked at a few photos that one of our trail cameras had captured. For those, who don’t know, a trail camera is a programmable camera that you strap to a tree. It takes photos or video of anything that passes by, so we hunters use them a lot to get a good idea of the incredible number of raccoons that roam our woods. Sometimes, however, you’ll get a good photo of a deer, bear or moose too – or, more likely, a hapless hunter looking desperately for a trail camera. On that occasion, however, we had a nice photo of a 10-point buck with a wide rack – the kind of head that, in a perfect world, any spouse would be proud to hang over the dining room table or any other prominent place. Accompanying that deer was a very respectable sixpointer too. More a family room type of buck, I’d say.

My buddy immediately said, “That 10-pointer is mine. You can take the sixpointer.” He said it with a smile, but he said it nevertheless. And, since we are hunting his property, in a perfect world, this would be the case. The problem here is that this statement assumes I have far more willpower than any mortal man should be given credit for. That is especially unfair, since he knows that a lemon meringue pie or a bag of red licorice wouldn’t survive 10 minutes in my presence. Ask me to resist the charms of Sofia Vergara in a skimpy bikini and you stand a very good chance. Ask me to resist an easy shot at a 10-point buck and you are dreaming. Having said that, here are two possible scenarios he is anticipating. One, the 10-pointer steps into my shooting lane and I salute, smile at its magnificence and let it pass. Two, the 10-pointer and the six-pointer pass and I, being the considerate guy I am, take the smaller buck. As you can see, each scenario is totally implausible.

A more realistic scenario would have included me lining up that 10-pointer, only to have my arrow centre-punch an arrow-wide branch protecting its vitals. Then, the deer would trot away and stop broadside in front of his ground blind to catch its wind. There he would shoot it dead and I would tell my buddy I let it pass. Later, as he came whistling down the trail to get me to help drag it out, he would notice the tracks leading from my stand to his and thank me for passing up on the animal. Then, he would ask why my bow was wrapped around a tree. In response, I’d grumbled something unintelligible. I’m not really sure why antler points matter at all since you can’t eat them and – due to the advent of equal rights between the sexes – few of us actually use them for home decorating or homemade jewelry anymore. Still, there’s nothing like an impressive set of antlers to stir up a hunter’s blood and bring out a bit of the competitive spirit. My buddy and I are both

actually meat hunters and a nice, plump doe would normally suit either of us just fine. And, the odds are

good that this is exactly what we’ll tag, since we see far more does than bucks. Still, I’d rather shoot

that big buck – or even the smaller one. Not that either would score me any points at home.

LADY LANCERS BEST HURON HEIGHTS

EDSS player Kelsie Freeman (15) rises above a pack of Huron Heights players to take a shot during junior girls’ high school basketball action at the EDSS gymnasium on Oct. 16. The Lancers would defeat HHSS 49-31. [COLIN DEWAR /THE OBSERVER]

CELEBRATES DRS. LE AND VO'S

FIRST-YEAR ANNIVERSARY IN ELMIRA

The tradition of excellent dental service and patient care that was established by Dr. Gregory Mason is continued as the practice moves forward. Drs. Le and Vo and the staff at Arthur Street Dental Office would like to express gratitude to the residents of Elmira and surrounding areas for their continued support and patronage.

We are honoured to be your healthcare providers.

77 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA | PH. 519-669-1577

DR. ANH LE | DR. LINDA VO | DR. GREGORY MASON www.arthurstreetdental.ca


16 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

Oct 14 vs. Brampton Woolwich: 7 Brampton: 2 Goals: Cameron Leonard x3, Owen Lee x2, Tyler Martin, Colton Schmitt Assists: Alex Hutton, Colton Schmitt x2, Gavin Roemer

THE SCORE WOOLWICH WILDCATS

Tyke: SELECT Oct. 13 vs. Brampton Woolwich: 5 Brampton: 1 Goals: Dustin Good x 2 Jordan Chang x 2 Joey Martin x 1 Assists: Drew Birmingham x 2 Joey Martin x 1 Eric Hutton x 1 Denver Martin x 1 Parker Collingwood x 1 Oct. 14 vs. Oakville Woolwich: 9 Oakville: 4 Goals: Dustin Good x 6 Denver Martin x 2 Cade Beacom x 1 Assists: Ethan Bickerton x 2 Will Lavigne x 2 Drew Birmingham x 1 Sam Hacock x 1 Jordan Chang x 1 Oct. 16 vs. Milton Woolwich: 2 Milton: 5 Goals: Jordan Chang, Dustin Good

Assists: Austin Schnarr

Novice: LL#2

Oct. 13 vs. Embro Woolwich: 3 Embro: 3 Goals: Parker Alles, Ryan Brubacher, Tanis Uhrig Assists: Johnathan Staken, Tristan Kraemer

Novice: LL#3 Oct. 13 vs. St. George Woolwich: 3 St. George: 8 Goals: Coleton Benham x3 Assists: Ryan Ament X 2, Dalton Taylor X 2, RJ Good, Alex Albrecht, Tommy Bearinger

Atom: MINOR AA Sept. 23 vs. Milton Woolwich: 1 Milton: 0 Goals: Kolin Weigel

Assists: Evan Roth Shutout: Quinn Brown Sept 25 vs. Stoney Creek Woolwich: 4 Stoney Creek: 2 Goals: Tyler Martin, Cole Slade, Kyler Austin x2 Assists: Colton Schmitt, Ethan Birmingham x2, Kyler Austin, Evan Roth, Cole Slade Sept. 29 vs. Oakville Woolwich: 1 Oakville: 5 Goals: Colton Schmitt Sept. 30 vs. Centre Wellington Woolwich: 0 Centre Wellington: 2 Oct. 10 vs. Orangeville Woolwich: 3 Orangeville: 7 Goals: Kyler Austin, Alex Hutton, Cole Slade Assists: Cole Slade, Gavin Roemer, Cameron Leonard, Owen Lee, Kyler Austin, Kolin Weigel

Atom: AE Oct. 12 vs. Acton Woolwich: 5 Acton: 3 Goals: Tyler Newton X2, Conner Waters, Eric Martin, Andrew Weber (Tanner Mann, Eric Martin, Gavin Wilson, Tyler BrubacherX2, Nathan Snyder)

Atom: LL Oct. 13 vs. Grand River Woolwich: 0 Grand River: 2 Goals: N/A

Atom: LL#1 Oct. 13 vs. New Hamburg Woolwich: 6 New Hamburg: 0 Goals: Matthew Brubacher x2, Ian McGregor x2, Kieren Oberholzer, Mac Benham

Assists: Kieren Oberholzer x3, Mac Benham x2, James Reichard, Cody Kroetsch, Caden Sellars, Matthew Brubacher Shutout: Kody Lewis Atom: LL#3

Oct. 13 vs. Paris Woolwich: 7 Paris: 2 Goals: Cameron Martin x 3 Nate Curtis x 2 Cole Seabrook Diego Flores-Dyck Assists: Ryan Martin Gavin Wright Zach Downs Jordan Dickieson Cameron Martin

Atom: MAJOR AA Oct 12 vs. Stoney Creek Woolwich: 3 Stoney Creek: 1 Goals: Jesse Martin, Isiah Katsube, Blake Roemer Assists: Trevor Ferretti, Brett Allen, Ben Witmer, Matt Fleischmann Oct. 16 vs. Centre Wellington Woolwich: 2 Centre Wellington: 2 Goals: Keaton McLaughlin, Conner Bradley Assists: Ben Witmer, Nathan Taylor, Matt Fleischmann, Isiah Katsube

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Oct. 10 vs. Centre Wellington Woolwich: 1 Centre Wellington: 1 Goals: Griffen Rollins Assists: Brody Waters, Lukas Shantz Oct. 13 vs. Oakville Woolwich: 5 Oakville: 1 Goals: Sam Davidson, Nolan Hislop, Bart Sherrer, Brody Waters, Justin Taylor Assists: Lukas Shantz (3), Jake Code, Justin Taylor, Austin Cousineau, Griffen Rollins (2), Nolan Hislop Oct. 13 vs. Oakville Woolwich: 5 Oakville: 1 Goals: Sam Davidson, Nolan Hislop, Bart Sherrer, Brody Waters, Justin Taylor Assists: Lukas Shantz x3, Jake Code, Justin Taylor, Austin Cousineau, Griffen Rollins x2, Nolan Hislop Oct. 16 vs. Flamborough Woolwich: 4 Flamborough: 4 Goals: Brody Waters x2, Jake Code, Josh Martin Assists: Justin Taylor, Griffen Rollins, Jake Code, Lukas Shantz

Peewee: LL #1 Oct. 6 vs. LL#2 LL1: 2 LL2: 0 Goals: Simon Zenker, Chad Hoffer) Shut Out: Liam O’Brien

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Minor Bantam: A Sept. 29 vs. Dundas Woolwich: 5 Dundas: 3 Goals: Cameron Brown, Mitch Waters, Jacob Uridil x2, Owen Read Assists: Isaac Frey, Aaron Logan, Connor Martin x2, Owen Read, Jacob Uridil Oct. 7 vs. Owen Sound Woolwich: 1 Owen Sound: 2 Goals: Owen Read Assists: Jacob Uridil Oct. 10 vs. Hespeler Woolwich: 1 Hespeler: 3 Goals: Connor Martin Assists: Jacob Uridil, Mitch Waters Oct. 13 vs. Guelph Woolwich: 2 Guelph: 1 Goals: Johan Boehm, Owen Read Assists: Isaac Frey, Mitchell Newson, Sheldon Metzger, Jacob Uridil Oct. 14 vs. Caledon Woolwich: 3 Caledon: 0 Goals: Owen Read, Sheldon Metzger, Mitchell Newson Assists: Alex Turchan, Isaac Frey, Jonah Boehm, Aaron Logan Shutout: Ryan Conrad

Bantam: MAJOR A Sept. 30 vs. Owen Sound Woolwich: 2 Owen Sound: 5 Goals: Ryley Cribbin, Daneial Kauth Assists: Tyler Martin, Aaron Weigel, Brant McLaughlin Oct. 2 vs. Georgetown Woolwich: 5 Georgetown: 2 Goals: Mathieu Fife, Tyler Moser x2, Aaron Weigel, Jayden Hipel Assists: Kelby Martin x2, Connor Bauman, Chase McCallum, Danial Kauth x2,Aaron Weigel Oct. 10 vs. Brampton Woolwich: 1 Brampton: 5 Goals: Kelby Martin Assists: Lke Merritt,Tyler Martin

Bantam: LL#1 Oct. 14 vs. LL2 LL1: 6 LL2: 1 Goals: Mason Buehler,Luke DeCorte (3), Joe Hanley, Nathan Horst, Luke DeCorte, Jeff Talbot, Joe Hanley, Ryan Diemert x2, Alex Berry, Max Bender x2, Jordan Luis

Woolwich: 9 Dundas: 0 Goals: Nathan Schwarz x3, Danyal Rennie x2, Daniel Gallant, Blake Doerbecker, Luke Charter, Connor Goss Assists: Benton Weber x2, Mitchell Rempel x2, Brett Henry, Danyal Rennie x2, Connor Runstedler x2, Nathan Schwarz, Daniel Gallant Shoutout: Dylan Creelman Oct. 14 vs. Centre Wellington Woolwich: 2 Center Wellington: 3 Goals: Daniel Gallant, Benton Weber Assists: Danyal Rennie, Mathew Uhrig

Juvenile Oct. 14 vs. Burford Woolwich: 8 Burford: 2 Goals: Clinton Dechert, Alex Albrecht, Ryan Ament x3, RJ Good, Logan White, Tommy Bearinger

Midget: MINOR A Oct. 3 vs. Caledon Woolwich: 9 Caledon: 4 Goals: Matthew Leger x4, Josh Kueneman x2, Alex Uttley, Nicholas Pavanel and Troy Nechanicky Assists: Josh Kueneman x2, Alex Uttley x2, Nicholas Pavanel, Jason Dunbar, Connor Peirson, Jordan Shantz and Matthew Lalonde Oct. 10 vs. Ancaster Woolwich: 2 Ancaster: 2 Goals: Josh Kueneman and Cole Conlin Assists: Nicholas Pavanel and Matthew Leger Oct. 12 vs. Owen Sound Woolwich: 4 Owen Sound: 1 Goals: Alex Uttley x2, Cole Conlin and Nicholas Pavanel Assists: Cole Lenaers x2, Alex Uttley, Cole Conlin, Scott Martin

Juvenile: U10 Oct. 13 vs. Tavistock Woolwich: 3 Tavistock: 1 Goals: Logan White, Dalton Taylor, Alex Albrecht Assists: Ryan Ament, Jordan Moore, Clinton Dechert

WOOLWICH WILD

Novice: LL#1 Oct. 6 vs. Waterloo Woolwich: 1 Waterloo: 1 Goals: Annie Sargent Assists: Taya Diefenbacher

Bantam: LL#1

Bantam: AE

Novice Novice: C REP

Oct. 13 vs. Ayr Woolwich: 1 Ayr: 2 Goals: Luke DeCorte

Sept. 29 vs. Acton Woolwich: 3 Acton: 5 Goals: Connor Runstedler, Nathan Schwarz, Danyal Rennie Assists: Benton Weber x2, Danyal Rennie Oct. 2 vs. Centre Wellington Woolwich: 2 Center Wellington: 1 Goals: Brett Henry, Benton Weber Assists: Mitchell Rempel Oct. 6 vs. Erin Woolwich: 6 Erin: 3 Goals: Connor Runstedler x3, Blake Doerbecker, Connor Goss, Nathan Schwarz Assists: Luke Charter, Gareth Rowland, Brett Henry x2, Connor Goss, Danyal Rennie Oct. 9 vs. Dundas

Oct. 14 vs. Lucan Woolwich: 3 Lucan: 6 Goals: Halyee Clemmer x2 Taylor Schmitt Assists: Haylee Clemmer Talyor Schmitt Maggie Sabean Carly Bauman Oct. 14 vs. Waterloo Woolwich: 0 Waterloo: 4 Goals: N/A

Bantam: LL#2 Oct. 13 vs. New Hamburg Woolwich: 1 New Hamburg: 3 Goals: Connor Graham Assists: Vincent Dally

Peewee: MAJOR A Program Partners

Woolwich: 4 Hespeler: 2 Goals: Riley Runstedler x 2, Garrett Teitzel, Brady MacDonald Assists: Brad Hale, Daniel Carr, Cole Altman, Sammy Huber

Oct. 13 vs. Dundas Woolwich: 5 Dundas: 3 Goals: Riley Runstedler, Jordan Lee, Chase Mooder, Nolan McLaughlin, Garrett Reitzel Assists: Austin Flaherty, Evan Gowing, Nolan McLaughlin, Daniel Carr Oct. 15 vs. Hespeler

Atom Atom: B 7116 Oct 13 vs. North Halton Woolwich: 6 North Halton: 0 Goals: Mya Brubacher (2), Ella Campbell (2), Delaney Douglas, Cassidy Moser Assists: Mya Brubacher (2), Julia Doerbecker, Cassidy Moser, Sydney Dettweiler (2), Abby

Burkholder

Bantam: LL Oct. 13 vs. Fergus Woolwich: 2 Fergus: 1 Goals: Karli Keen x1, Amanda Fleischmann x1 Assists:Rosemarie Hartman x1

Bantam: B Oct 10 vs. Grand River Woolwich: 3 Grand River: 2 Goals: Taylor Duench, Caitlin Pickard, Abi Martin Assists: Caitlin Pickard, Abi Martin (x2), Nicole Merlihan, Victoria Weber, Ciara Hea Oct. 13 vs. Mount Forrest Woolwich Wild: 0 Mount Forest: 3 Goals: N/A

Bantam: BB Oct. 13 vs. St. Thomas Woolwich Wild: 0 St. Thomas: 0 Goals: N/A

Midget: B Oct. 9 vs. Milverton Woolwich: 1 Milverton: 0 Goals: Claire Hanley Assists: Michelle Bauman, Rebecca Luis Oct. 14 vs. Brantford Woolwich: 2 Brantford: 0 Goals: Gillian Olsthoorn, Lea Olsthoorn Assists: Sara Church x 2, Tori Martin, Gillian Olsthoorn,) Shutout: Lauren Lesage

TWIN CENTRE STARS

PeeWee: REP Oct. 10 vs. Langton Twin Centre: 6 Langton: 0 Goals: Mitch Esbaugh (x3), Tyson Bolender, Brett Hartin, Tyler Munro Assists: Aiden Krueger (x2), Josh Monk, Jacob Voisin (x2), Tyson Bolender

TWIN CENTRE HERICANES

Atom: REP Oct. 10 vs. Woolwich Twin Centre: 1 Woolwich: 0 Goals: Emily Krueger Shoutout: Kylee Zacharczuk Oct. 13 vs. Brantford Twin Centre: 3 Brantford: 0 Goals: Blythe Bender x2, Jordyn Torti Assists: Megan Jantzi x2, Kara Dietrich, Blythe Bender, Kendra Pauser Shoutout: Kara Mark Oct. 14 vs. Oakville Twin Centre: 2 Oakville: 7 Goals: Blythe Bender x2 Assists: Lauren Skanes

Intermediate: LL Oct 12 vs. Cambridge Twin Centre: 5 Cambridge: 0 Goals: Stephanie Lorentz, Sarah Miltenburg, Janessa Heywood x2, Lisa Guenther Assists: Becky Cornwall, Janessa Heywood, Holly Lorentz x2, Brittany Wagner, Shannon Lorentz, Lisa Guenther Shutout: Lindsay Dietrich


SPORTS | 17

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

KINGS: Keeping it simple is the key for young team struggling with some of the basics FROM | 13

it tough. Were getting shots on net but we still have to be willing to go to those dirty parts of the ice and go to the front of the net and put pucks in through battles,” he said. With this loss Sugar Kings remain fifth in the Midwestern Conference, one point below Listowel and Caledonia. Players were getting “too fancy’ with their plays, DeSilva explained, and missed key opportunities to defend their territory. The coach singled out Waterloo goalie P.J. Bridges as a difference-maker, stopping 40 of the 44 shots directed his way. Bridges came across the net on a shot in the first period that

would have brought Elmira to within one. “They [Siskins] came down and scored shorthanded on a bad bounce with our defenceman breaking a stick. That happens and we’ll have to learn from it,” DiSilva said. Elmira did manage to find a chink in the netminder’s armour when Brandon Stewart scored one off the stick of Matt Harding at 18:22, sending the Kings back to the room down 2-1. The second frame saw players from both teams well matched. Waterloo scored early, but Elmira replied quickly with goals from Jake Weidner and Matt Harding to tie it up at 3-3. Parity wouldn’t last

long, as Waterloo scored again at 15:08 to go up 4-3. DeSilva pushed his squad for the equalizer before the second intermission, but to no avail. “We just couldn’t seem to get that tying goal. Had we gotten that tying goal it might have been a little different.” All hopes of tying things up after 40 minutes were shattered when the Siskins shot another past Neumann one second before the buzzer. The Kings managed to score one more time in

third before being finished off by Waterloo at 19:24 with the last goal of the night. Though some players managed to shine on Sunday, DeSilva attributed the poor outcome to the team’s lack of focus and a need to work harder. “A lot of work to do; [the season is] still young but two or three guys a lot of our guys didn’t show up consistently tonight. I thought Brady Campbell and Jake Weidner had good games and they bring it every night. Clay Greer

played his heart out tonight from there it dropped off pretty quick,” he explained. DeSilva said the young Kings are slowly improving in some areas of the game while still missing key components of play that would otherwise result in more goals for the team. “Our forecheck is getting better; positionally we are getting better in some parts of the game, but we are not improving in our battles,” he said, adding that the team needs to work on defence as well as on basic tactics.

“We are not getting pucks out of our zone when we have an opportunity to, and that’s what makes it tough. To play hockey in your own zone, it’s all about hard work and pride, and right now guys are thinking breakaways instead of preventing goals. It’s not glamorous but they are going to have to do it to have success.” The Kings face off against Guelph in a home game tomorrow (Sunday). The puck drops at 7 p.m. at the Woolwich Memorial Centre.

UNTIL OCTOBER 31ST

PUMPKIN BARN

BUY ONE PUMPKIN GET ONE FREE*

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in Ba

mpk ur Pu

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*Of Equal or Lesser Value The Sugar Kings fell 6-4 to the Waterloo Siskins Oct. 14 at the WMC. Top, defenceman Justin Cooke smashes a Siskin to the boards. Above, Adam Brubacher tries to get past Waterloo’s Jimmy Soper. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

2191 Arthur St. N., Elmira, just before Florapine Road

519-669-3154

OPEN Monday to Friday - 8:30 am to 7 pm Saturday - 8 am to 5 pm | SUNDAY - CLOSED

Owned & Operated By The Stuart & Esther Horst Family


18 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

VENTURE FOOD FOR THOUGHT/ OWEN ROBERTS

NEW BUSINESS / IN THE DENTIST’S CHAIR

Sinking her teeth into something new Branching out into her own practice, dentist Erin Walker sets up shop in St. Clements ELENA MAYSTRUK Looking for a place to launch her own practice, dentist Erin Walker set her sights on St. Clements. In the village’s Foodland plaza on Lobsinger Line, a jade-green sign for Dr. Walker’s dental practice now welcomes. The Waterloo-born, first-time business owner is optimistic about the future, hoping to become a fixture in the community. “It’s not difficult if you have a vision for what you want. I was a little bit nervous at first because everything is so new and I don’t have any dentists in the family but if you take it one step at a time everything falls into place,” she said of her initial plans to start the practice. “I decided I was ready to take that next step I had a good vision for my own office and here I am.” A graduate of the University of Western Ontario, Walker began her dentistry career working at other practices, learning how an office is run. This proved beneficial to the new entrepreneur when she decided to branch out on her own. Where in the past Walker’s work primarily included treating patients under someone else’s roof, now she’s running things herself as part of a twowoman team with receptionist Cheryl Veevers, who also acts as a temporary chair-side assistant: an

extra pair of hands helping Walker with procedures like fillings, root canals and extractions. In the past Walker worked alongside dental hygienists and assistants. Now she prefers to do cleanings and checkups herself, using that time to get to know her patients. She said part of the reason for her decision to open a practice was a wish to focus on overall healthcare in her patients and having the opportunity to make lasting relationships with them. “Dentistry is a branch of healthcare where ultimately you are dealing with dental health and overall health as well and dealing with patient relationships. Having someone come into your office who is, say, four years old and taking care of them from their very first experience up until they are an adult is really what it is about.” Many people who are afraid of dental procedures have had bad experiences in the past or are not sure what to expect, she suggested. It’s important to make people feel comfortable from the start when they call in for an appointment and to take an interest in them as a person, “not just as a set of teeth.” The same goes for children who slip into Walker’s chair. Kids should come in at very early ages – as early as six months according to Walker – in order to get

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FIELD NOTES

Dr. Erin Walker sits in her dentist chair at her office on Lobsinger Line in St. Clements. used to a dental office environment. Dentists often give kids chair rides and count their teeth during first appointments in order put them at ease. “The key with kids is just making them feel very comfortable. Talking to them and making them

involved in what is going on,” she explained. With construction on the property taking place from March to September when the office received its permit, many locals have had a chance to drop in on the

(519) 504-7909 | www.smartinksigns.com

[ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

VENTURE PROFILE BUSINESS: Family Dentist LOCATION: 3650 Lobsinger Line, St. Clements PHONE: (519) 218-7777 OWNER: Dr. Erin Walker

The debate over using grain for food, fuel or other industrial products hit another crescendo this week when the United Nations warned of more pending problems on the food frontier. It said there’s little buffer left in world grain reserves anymore, which have further dwindled this year owing to poor production in grain-producing countries, mainly the U.S., which was rocked with drought. Basically, we’re consuming more than we’re producing. And once again, food prices are inching up. That’s prompted doomsday predictions, including one from long-time global agriculture watcher Lester Brown who warns of more civil unrest if food production can’t keep up with demand. It’s important to acknowledge such warnings. Privileged countries such as Canada need to help those less fortunate grow food for themselves, through a combination of education for better management and more crop and livestock options suited for specific regions.

DENTIST | 19

ROBERTS | 19

WCS

THE HIDDEN MESSAGE IS ABOUT TO BE REVEALED!

Woolwich Community Services

PLEASE PASS THE WORD...

to former work-mates at Elmira Donuts & Deli or Swiss Pantry Donuts who worked for Dianne or Jean, THE FOLLOWING MESSAGE: “Meet at 2 First St. W., Elmira (Emmanuel EM Church) on Sunday, October 21, 2012 from 3:00 - 7:00pm for a time down memory lane! Bring your immediate family and some food to share.

Elmira, Ontario

How extending road life helps feed the world

3 or fewer = hot dish, salad or dessert | 4 or more = 2 dishes

RSVP by Oct 20 to Jean at jemorby@hotmail.com | 519-669-8242

Thrift Sho Stuff a Bagp For

5

$

Includes all items in store (Bag will be provided by store)

Thurs. Oct. 25, 2012 9am-6pm “Together We Make A Difference” 48 Arthur St South Elmira/ 519-669-1129 Mon-Fri 9am-6pm & Sat 9am-4pm www.woolwichcommunityservices.com


VENTURE | 19

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

ROBERTS: Diversifying markets is still key even as food prices rise around the globe counter to the need to have farmers feed the world. But soybeans are already a globally exchanged commodity, and the system there is working. Owing to their versatility, it’s the industrial sector that holds as much promise for them domestically as does the food sector. The drive to expand the

soybean market started years ago when farmers were getting peanuts for their harvests. Governments were pouring millions and sometimes billions of dollars every year into financial aid programs to keep them going, because people weren’t paying enough for food. Now, the price of food is more in

line with what it costs farmers to grow it, and at the same time new opportunities are emerging for their harvests. This is already a challenging balance. It’s one that the agri-food community will need to address publicly with increasing clarity, as pressure to feed the world grows.

Notice InformationCENTRE Centre NOTICEof OFPublic PUBLIC CONSULTATION

PROPOSED REGION OF WATERLOO King Street Reconstruction, St. Jacobs Settlement Area, Township of Woolwich SIGN BY-LAW

The Regional Municipality of Waterloo invites you to attend a Public Consultation Centre for the proposed King Street reThe Region of Waterloo be holding a public information centre to introduce a draft construction project in St. Jacobs,will Township of Woolwich. The project location is King Street (Regional Road #8), from south ofRegional Printery Road to Sawmill Road (RR #17). Theon project includes:roads. The proposed Sign By-law addresses By-law respecting signs Regional • Full reconstruction Kingsigns Street (a) south of Printery (railwayelection all types of unoffiofcial onfrom Regional roads Road including signs, business accessory HAWK ESVIL LE R track) to Hachborn Street and (b) Eby Street-Northside Drive to Sawmill OAD signs, farm accessory signs, mailbox accessory signs, open house signs and posterSAWMILL signs. ROAD Road, including storm sewer replacement, curb and gutter, sidewalks, onThe proposed Sign By-law establishes requirements for unoffi cial signs including: road cycling lanes, reconstruction of the channelized right turn lane, illumination and drainageand improvements at Sawmill Road, and other locations • Location placement; as required and water and sanitary sewer system improvements where • Size, shape, construction and content; deemed necessary; • Impacts to the function of the road; • Partial reconstruction of King Street between Hachborn Street and the • Number of signs and placement; Conestogo River bridge including curbtiming and gutterof and sidewalk repairsand • Sign removal. (where required), consideration of decorative lighting, repair/rehabilitation of underground services (sanitary and water) if required by Township of Staff are also proposing an amendment to the Region’s Tourism and Essential Services Woolwich, removal of existing asphalt and asphalt surfacing; Signing Policyoftopedestrian allow tourism signage onat Regional roads for agri-toursim activities. • Consideration crossing improvements various locations and improvements to GRTJune bus stop17, locations; When: Tuesday, 2008, drop in 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. • Conestogo River bridge deck repairs, waterproofing, asphalt resurfacing, Place: Regional Administration Headquarters (lobby) and miscellaneous off-road erosion repairs; 150 ofFrederick Street, Kitchener • Consideration the realignment of Municipal Drain #10 (Hachborn/ King) This public information centre is being held for the purpose of providing information and • Consideration of extending the existing sanitary sewer and water system receiving public. A copy of Township the draft By-law and is available southerly tocomments Printery Road from pendingthe further discussion with the of Woolwich stakeholders;for andreview in the Clerk’s Offi ce, Region of Waterloo, 2nd fl oor, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener or on the • Utility relocation where necessary, to accommodate these improvements. EB

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PUBLIC INFORMATION CENTRE LOCATION ST. JACOBS PUBLIC SCHOOL 72 QUEENSWAY DRIVE

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DENTIST: A reason to smile

processing has now been established as the leading economic driver in Ontario. So maybe that irony no longer exists. In any event, the grain farmers’ group also says products such as RePLAY have the potential to open a new market opportunity for Ontario soybean farmers. This may seem to run

D

Earlier this week the Grain Farmers of Ontario demonstrated that versatility when the organization hosted a demonstration of an asphalt sealant called RePLAY. On a rare sunny autumn day, in the increasingly busy parking lot of the Ontario AgriCentre in Guelph, officials showed how the product is applied and explained how it can extend the life of asphalt by at least five years. This is significant when you consider how many thousands of miles of asphalt cover Ontario. Maintaining roads is a huge tax commitment by the province. It’s also essential if Ontario farmers are to transport their harvests abroad, while simultaneously attracting and servicing the business and industry it so desperately wants and needs to help its bottom line stay in the black. It’s kind of ironic that it would turn to agriculture to help promote manufacturing sector infrastructure, I suppose. But then again, agriculture and food

NORTH SIDE

Back home, part of the research required to keep Ontario farmers’ production humming along concerns the environment. The domestic population won’t tolerate feed-the-world practices that put too much pressure on their own surroundings. That’s one reason Ontario farmers have individual environmental farm plans that guide them through increasingly tough regulations designed to look after the population’s best interests. And it drives agri-food research activity at the University of Guelph, sponsored by the sector’s chief research funder, the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs. It’s a twist on a theme when farmers’ harvests go towards making products specifically dedicated to helping the environment. Actually, it happens a lot, but like most of agriculture, the incredible versatility of basic commodities such as soybeans and corn is not well understood.

QUEENSWAY

FROM | 18

PRINTERY

ROAD

Region’s website at:

Construction on this project is planned for the spring to fall period of 2016.

www.region.waterloo.on.ca - tab Newsroom, tab Public Notices

After months of planning and renovations, Walker finally opened her first dental practice in early September. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER] FROM | 18

owner and ask questions. When Walker purchased the building on 3650 Lobsinger Line, her practice had to be built from the ground up, with new plumbing and electrical work as well as floor plans fit for a multi-room dental office. That was one of the steps after she created her business plan and successfully approached the bank. Adding Veevers to the business was an important step, as the two women are so far are running the practice on their own, hoping to hire an assistant and a hygienist as soon as business picks up. Last weekend Walker held a grand opening bar-

becue in town to celebrate her new business and clientele. Prior to the event, getting to know the community took a team effort. Word of Walker’s presence in the area was also spread by the people she worked with on the construction of the office as well as surrounding businesses. “My first step was deciding what I wanted. I looked around at some different locations and fell in love with St. Clements,” Walker said of her decision to relocate her work. Walker hopes the addition of her office to St. Clements will help deepen her roots in a community she has long felt a part of.

This Project is being conducted in accordance with the Environmental Assessment Act through the approved environIf you have questions concerning the By-law, please contact Nancy Button, mental planning process for Schedule “A+” projects under the “Municipal Class Environmental Assessment” (June 2000, Manager, Transportation Engineering at 519-575-4520 or by email at as amended in 2007).

bnancy@region.waterloo.on.ca

All partiesaccessible are invited toservices attend an informal, “drop-in” Public Consultation Centre for this project as follows: If interested you require to participate in this meeting, please contact the above

Wednesday, noted person by Tuesday, June 10, 2008. October 24, 2012 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.

All comments and information received from individuals, stakeholder groups and agencies regarding this St. Jacobs Public Gymnasium project are being collected to assist the Region of School, Waterloo in making a decision. Under the Municipal 72 Queensway Drive, St. Jacobs and property location that may be Act, personal information such as name, address, telephone number, included in a submission becomes part Township of the public record. Questions regarding the collection of this of Woolwich information shouldtobe referred the person indicated above. Staff will be present answer your to questions and your comments will assist the Project Team in finalizing the Recommended Design alternative for this project. The plans will also be available for viewing after October 24, 2012 at the Region Nancy Button Administration Building, Design and Construction 6th Floor, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener. If you are unable to attend the Manager, Transportation Information Centre and would like to makeEngineering your views known, please address your comments by November 14, 2012 to Mr. Region of Waterloo Bob Wheildon, P.Eng., Region of Waterloo Tel: 519-575-4757 x 3103, Fax: 519-575-4430, email: 150 Frederick Street, 7th Floor RWheildon@regionofwaterloo.ca.

Kitchener, ON N2G 4J3

Accessibility: This event is accessible for people with disabilities. Accessible Parking is available. If you require assistance to attend or participate in this meeting, or to access information in alternative formats, please contact Mr. Bob Wheildon (as above) at least five days prior to the meeting. All comments and information received from individuals, stakeholder groups and agencies regarding this project are being collected to assist the Region of Waterloo in making a decision. Under the Municipal Act, personal information such as name, address, telephone number, and property location that may be included in a submission becomes part of the public record. Questions regarding the collection of this information should be referred to Mr. Bob Wheildon (as above).


20 | THE ARTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

THE ARTS ON THE STAGE / LOCAL THEATRE

Flashback to 1961

SOUND STAGE / INTRODUCTIONS

Concert offers up a crash course on Baroque

K-W Silver Stars harken back to the music, dances and characters of five decades ago STEVE KANNON

STEVE KANNON

Playwright and director Peter Mansell (above left) takes notes during a rehearsal of Waiting for Father Anthony, the latest production from the K-W Silver Stars.

-TRADE ORG AIR A F F

Silver Stars group. K-W Silver Stars is a non-profit organization, founded in 1994, drawing participants from Waterloo Region and Wellington County. For 18 seasons, the group has been staging two annual productions by seniors for the general public. The K-W Silver Stars production of Waiting for

OFFEE CC NI

Coffeehouse & Espresso Bar

plenty of energy from the older cast. “We dance all the dances of the ’60s.” More than 50 people taking part in putting on the show, including about a dozen and a half on stage. Everyone is energetic about it, she said. “There are jobs for everybody in a production like this,” Hill added of the

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of Brad Pitt and Elvis. – “the ladies all go gaga,” she laughed. They also quickly revert back to their dancing ways from five decades earlier. For the cast members, it’s a chance to relive some of those moments for real. “You still feel the same when you hear the music,” said Hill, noting there’s

10 TYPE SO

Nostalgia has a powerful draw on us. For seniors, that’s especially true. For the members of the K-W Silver Stars, it’s also great fodder for musical comedy, as can be seen with the theatre group’s upcoming production of Waiting for Father Anthony. Set to open Oct. 25 at the St. Jacobs Community Centre, the play is an original comedy with music from the 60’s by local playwright and theatre educator Peter Mansell. Waiting for Father Anthony touches on the ups and downs of teens of the past and the reminiscences of the adults they are today, told with the music that turned them on. In the here-and-now, a group of church ladies who gather regularly are waiting for the priest coming to replace Father Patrick, who’s leaving the parish. Their reminiscences take them – and the audience – back to 1961, where a much younger Patrick was part of the group as teens. “We try to encapsulate a little moment in time,” explained producer LeslieGail Hill. “We want to capture the music and the social mores of the time that are so different from today’s world.” It’s a trip down memory lane for the seniors involved in the production, and they want to take everyone along for the ride. Things take a twist when Father Anthony finally shows up, revealed to be some kind of combination

OO B SE LEAF TEAS IN

[SUBMITTED]

Father Anthony runs Oct. 25 (7:30 p.m.), Oct. 26 (7:30 p.m.), Oct. 27 (2:30 p.m.) and Oct. 28 (2:30 p.m.) at the St. Jacobs Community Centre, 31 Parkside Dr. Tickets are $18, available at the Centre in the Square box office by calling 5781570 or toll free 1-800-2658977 or online at www. centre-square.com.

Familiar enough with Baroque music that you might try your hand at distinguishing between classic and newly-composed pieces? Curious about the classical style? Either way, the Nota Bene Baroque’s got Something Old, Something New lined up for Oct. 21 at the Registry Theatre in Kitchener. It’s a concert in which half of the music is from the Baroque era and the other half is newly composed. Try to guess whether what you’re hearing is by Telemann, Vivaldi, Reincken, Purcell or a living composer, because the program won’t list the music in order, and there will be a quiz afterwards to see if you guessed right. Nota Bene was founded in 2001 by Daniel Zondervan, Michael Purves-Smith and Richard Cunningham to treat Waterloo Region music lovers to 17th and 18th century music as audiences experienced it at the time. Part of the Classics at the Registry series, the show is scheduled for Oct. 21, 3-4:30 p.m. at the Registry Theatre, 122 Frederick St., Kitchener. Tickets are $28 for adults, $25 for seniors and $5 for kids under 18, available at the Centre in the Square box office by calling 578-1570 or toll free 1-800-265-8977 or online at www.centre-square.com.

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CLASSIFIED | 21

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

CLASSIFIED LEGAL NOTICE

HELP WANTED

INDIAN RIVER DIRECT LOCAL SALES PERSON / DRIVER NEEDED For Orange and grapefruit sales route. Need a DZ with air brake endorsement. $1000 a week salary, Mon – Sat. November through April. Call: Dan in Florida 772-519-3307.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND OTHERS All claims against the estate of Vera B. Frey, late of the Township of Woolwich in the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, who died on or about the 10th day of May, 2012, must be filed with the undersigned Estate Trustees on or before the 3rd day of November, 2012; thereafter, the undersigned will distribute the assets of the said estate having regard only to the claims then filed. DATED at Woolwich this 4th day of October, 2012.

Box 216, 9 Memorial Avenue, Elmira, Ontario. N3B 2Z6. Solicitors for the Estate Trustee

WOOLWICH TOTAL HEALTH PHARMACY

Are you looking for a new and exciting career in Agriculture? Stoltz Sales & Service is looking for an individual that is ready to lead our busy and progressive service department as our Service Manager. We need a person that has excellent communication, organizational, multi tasking and technical skills. Agricultural experience is an asset. Please apply to cbrown@stoltzsales.com or keith@stoltzsales.com or in person to Carson at Stoltz Sales and Service, 6805 Line 86 west, Elmira.

Jones Feed Mills Ltd. Full time position: is available immediately to support a swine genetic loop in the Dundalk area. Must have extensive hands on swine production knowledge and a DZ / AZ license. We offer competitive wages and benefits. Responsibilities include managing production in contract barns, selection of gilts, sorting and transporting early wean pigs to nursery barns. Send resume to Paul Pletsch, email: paul@jfm.on.ca or fax #519-698-2719.

HELP WANTED DIETARY AIDE/COOK FOR long term care. Reply to Derbecker’s Heritage House, 54 Eby St., St. Jacobs N0B 2N0 519-664-2921. Email pamderbeckerheritagehouse @sympatico.ca

HELP WANTED PERMANENT PART TIME position on Poultry farm. Flexible hours Mon. - Sat, no Sunday work. Great job for semi retired person, near Elmira. Reply to: Box 300, c/o Woolwich Observer, 20B Arthur St. N., Elmira. On. N3B 1Z9.

HOW TO REACH US

Part-time Pharmacy Assistant required. Must have flexible availability including some evenings and Saturdays.

Drop resume at 10 Church St. W. Elmira Attention: Samer Mikhail

CHILD CARE DAYCARE IN BIRDLAND. Full-time position available, 1.5 years old and up, starting end of October. Healthy meals and snacks provided. Police check and current CPR. Smoke free, pet free. Please call Jennifer, 519-807-1099.

FOR SALE

SWINE PRODUCTION BARN MANAGER

39th Annual Charity Quilt Auction Sale

Riverdale Poultry Express, Church Street - 2km west of Elmira

Saturday October 27, 2012

Sale Times:

Gloria Weber, Dennis Frey, Durrell Frey and Merlin Frey, Estate Trustees, by their Solicitors WOODS, CLEMENS & FLETCHER

HELP WANTED

Exciting New Career Opportunity

AUCTION

ALUM FUEL TANK, new 540L/180gal - $175. 9” new disc grinder $90, 16 only 4’x8’ foam freezer panels 3 1/2” thick, b/o. 2 100amp-24cir electrical breaker panels $30 each. 10 4500W, Flange waterheater elements. 1 workshop dust collector, portable, $160. 1 - 40 gal propane direct vent water heater, new, $275. Call John at Fergus 6-7pm, 519-843-3560. BED SET, TWIN, complete w/ frame, blue headboard, mattress, box spring and bedding. Excellent condition. $100 obo. Please call 519-362-2950. HILLCREST HOME BAKING ANNUAL FALL SALE - October 16 - 31, 2012. 519-669-1381.

FOR SALE FALL CLEARANCE AT Cozy Quilts. All fabrics 20% off marked price. October 15 31. Closed Saturday October 20. $7762 Wellington County Rd. 8. Drayton. HEATER, DIRECT VENT, Natural Gas, 17,500 BTUH w/ fan & vent kit. Size 26”h x 24” w x 12” d. Excellent condition $450. 519-669-2362 Clayton Metzger.

• 8:00 am - Country Market and Silent Auction • 9:00 General Auction • 12:00 Noon sharp - Quilt Auction

AUCTION SALE LISTINGS QUILTS: This year’s collection features beautiful quilt patterns such as Boston Commons, Fantasy Heart, Connecting Blocks, Snake River Log Cabin, Lone Star, Frosty Sunrise, Irish Chain, Log Cabin, Hallow Cube and Log Jam Sampler NEW AND USED FARM EQUIPMENT: New 11 L Tires on 6 bolt rims, Water pump, 60” Rotary cutter, Steel gate, Snow Blower 28” walk behind, Stihl Grass trimmer, used Yard Man self-propelled push mower with bagger and more. NEW FURNITURE: Oak Extension Table (seats 22), Folding clothes dryer, Children’s table & chairs, Plant stand, wall mirror, Hat rack, Hall trees, Cedar Chest, Curio Cabinets, Console table, bookcase, Hutch & Buffet, Kitchen Chairs, Magazine rack, Folding chairs, Wood fram mirrors, Arm Chairs, Rustic Hall Tree and more. SILENT AUCTION: Good selection of gift certificates. Stainless steel mailbox, Soybean Oil, Stainless steel cooker & canner, Grass & Corn Seed.

HILLTOP FABRICS ANNUAL Fall Sale. Oct. 22 - 27. 10% off storewide. Refreshments provided. 4785 Perth Line 67, Milverton. 519-595-4344.

MISC.: Assortment of Lumber, pine siding, Ornamental windmill, 2 cords split firewood, Windows, Muck Boots, Trees, Work boots, 40 big square straw bales.

HOOSIER KITCHEN CUPBOARDS, pine flat-to-wall cupboard, small 1870’s safe, goalie pads. 519-669-7673 after 6pm.

NOTE: Plan to attend for a great country day with 7 Auctioneers. Two sale rings selling at the same time. Quality merchandise, great food, hundreds of pies, rosettes, bread and tasty baked goods.

MATTRESS AND BOX Spring, new, never used, still in sealed bag. Sacrifice $195. Delivery available. Temperpedic Memory Foam Mattress, new, never used, in sealed bag. Like sleeping on a cloud. No pressure points. Bankruptcy sale $595, box spring $200 extra. Delivery available. 519-635-8737. NEW ITEMS ADDED DAILY! Visit our 2nd floor clearance centre for mega deals on hand tools, small appliances, artwork, home-decor, lighting, paint sundries, and so much more. All at least 35-50% off retail prices. Elmira Home Hardware. OPEN Mon Fri 8 a.m. - 8 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. & Sun noon - 5 p.m.

Partial List Only. Many more items arriving at publishing time.

COMMUNITY NIGHT: Preview the auction Friday October 26th – 6:00 to 8:30. Food, entertainment, a children’s auction and silent auction. Fun for the whole family! TERMS: Visa, Mastercard, Cash or cheque with proper ID. Not responsible for accidents or loss.

ALL ARTICLES DONATED • Lunch provided on premises. All proceeds to Elmira District Community Living

Ph: 519-669-3205 Fax: 519-669-3444 or visit our website at www.elmiraacl.com to register

AUCTIONS 1020 SAT. OCT 20 at 3:00 PM - 2 town house property auctions of residential 4 level side split homes located in a sought after area of Kitchener to be held at 35 Breckenridge Drive Units 1 and 8 in Kitchener near River Rd for Doug Woodhall. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 or www.Jantziauctions.com

AUCTIONS 1027 SAT. OCT 27 at 8:30 AM Annual Charity auction sale of quilts; new and used furniture; farm miscellaneous; and miscellaneous items to be held at Riverdale Poultry Express 1 km west of Elmira for the Elmira and District Association for Community Living. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 or www.Jantziauctions.com

AUCTIONS 1031 WED. OCT 31 at 10:00 AM - Clearing auction sale of household effects; furniture; tools; antiques; and collectables to be held at the St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s for a Kitchener estate with additions. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 or www.Jantziauctions.com

PETS SAVE $5-$10 OFF our 1st bag of Dog or Cat food! PLUS free bag credits transferrable from other stores. Creature Comfort Pet Emporium, 1553 King St. N. St Jacobs. Open 7 days/week. 519-664-3366. www.creaturecomfort.ca CONTINUED ON PG 26

PHONE 519.669.5790 | TOLL FREE 1.888.966.5942 | FAX 519.669.5753 | ONLINE WWW.OBSERVERXTRA.COM

ADDRESS 20-B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA, ON N3B 1Z9

CLASSIFIED ADS

DISPLAY ADS

519.669.5790 EXT 0

519.669.5790 EXT 104

ads@woolwichobserver.com

sales@woolwichobserver.com

RESIDENTIAL COST $7.50 /20 WORDS EXTRA WORDS 20¢ PER WORD

COMMERCIAL COST $12.00 /20 WORDS EXTRA WORDS 30¢ PER WORD

PLACING A CLASSIFIED WORD AD In person, email, phone or fax submissions are accepted during regular business hours. Deadline for Saturday publication is Wednesday by 5 p.m. All Classified ads are prepaid by cash, debit, Visa or MasterCard. Ask about Observer policies in regard to Display, Service Directory and Family Album advertising.


22 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

Complete Collision Service

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE. 101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

519.669.8330

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial On-The-Farm Service

FAX: 519.669.3210

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

AFTER HOURS

519-669-3232

THOMPSON’S

Auto Tech Inc.

ARE A

Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

AUTO CLINIC 21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

24 Hour Accident Assistance Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400 30 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

519.669.8917

Quality Collision Service

1-800-CARSTAR 519-669-3373

519-669-7652

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

BODY MAINTENANCE AT:

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

Call Us At (519)669-3373 33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

GENERAL SERVICES

BICYCLE SALES & REPAIRS World’s Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

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$139 FREE Gift Offer Learn More Online At...

budurl.com/SAVE139 Chem-Dry Acclaim® 61 Arthur St., N. Elmira

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ROB McNALL 519-669-7607 LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

PROFESSIONAL BIKE MECHANIC ON STAFF

Buy your bike from us and get a FREE annual inspection!

ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd. • 14 ton BoomTruck • 40 ton Mobile Crane

20

519-664-9999

$

ST. JACOBS

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22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel:519-669-5537

669-3332

STORE HOURS: M-F: 8-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

24 Hour Service (Emergencies only) 7 Days A Week

GENERAL SERVICES

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

MUSIC-LOVER GIFT ALERT! COUNTR Y

’s 60’s / 70

HIGH SCHOOSL BAND

GOSPEL

ROCK

MUSIC TRANSFERS FROM LPs, 45s, 78s, CASSETTES TO CD

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING

Your favourite albums get a whole new life on CD after we clean up the clicks, pops and surface noise.

QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

MORE INFO | 519.669.0541

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102

EMAIL: vinylp2cd@gmail.com

Various sizes & rates

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE Call

CUSTOM TARPS, COVERS & REPAIRS (519) 698-2754

4445 Posey Line Wallenstein ON.

General Repairs

519.595.4830 6376 Perth Rd. 121 Poole, ON

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

HOME IMPROVEMENTS SERVICES

BAUMAN PIANO

SERVICES TUNING & REPAIRS

Sew Special Custom Sewing for Your Home

Custom Drapery Custom Blinds Free Estimates

GRAIN/ FORAGE BOX • TRUCK • TRAILER • BOAT AWNINGS • STORAGE COVERS AND MORE!

ivan@aaronmartin.com

•Ratches, Hooks, Straps, Webbing etc. •Canvas, Vinyl, Polyester, Acrylic Fabrics

519-669-4964

GENERAL SERVICES

MAR-TARP

Boat Covers | Air Conditioner Covers | Small Tarps Storage Covers | BBQ Covers | Awnings & Canopies Replacement Gazebo Tops | Golf Cart Enclosures & Covers

In Home Consultations

JAMES BAUMAN Craftsman Member O.G.P.T. Inc NEW PHONE NUMBER

519-880-9165

Over 20 Years Experience

Lois Weber 519-669-3985 Elmira

Steve Co.

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs. 24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

ELMIRA

519-669-3652

100% SUPERIOR QUALITY CUSTOM WOODWORKING Softener Salt & Pool Salt

KENJI ORITA

FREE BAG In troductor Offer y

• Custom Kitchens • Custom Furniture • Libraries • Exotic Woods

> Superior Salt Products > Fast, Friendly Service > Convenient Delivery Times > Discounts for Seniors

Taking Salt to Peoples’ Basements Since 1988

519-747-2708

Waterloo www.riepersalt.com

TEL: +1 (519) 574-6734 oritakenji@gmail.com 20B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada Established 2000

F. David Reimer

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications:

The Sharp Shop | 112-D Bonnie Cres., Elmira

519.669.5313

Mon.-Tues. 3pm-6pm | Wed.-Fri. Noon-6pm Saturday 9-5 | Sunday Noon-3pm

● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

www.reimerhbot.com For more information call:

519-669-0220

56 Howard Ave. Unit 2, Elmira, ON, N3B 2E1

READ’S DECORATING

20 years experience

SINCE 1961

Specializing in Paint & Wall coverings

FOR ALL YOUR HOME DECORATING NEEDS. 27 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

519.669.3658

free estimates interior/exterior painting, wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

519-669-2251

RA HOME COMF ELMI (519) 669-4600 ORT APPLIANCES – FURNACES – FIREPLACES AIR CONDITIONERS – WATER HEATERS SPRING SPECIAL ON AIR CONDITIONING TUNE UP $99, INSTALLED FROM $1999 FURNACES INSTALLED FROM $2499 FRIDGES $499, STOVES $399, WASHERS $399, DRYERS $369, FREEZERS $199 Come visit our show room FREE QUOTES 1 Union Street, Elmira

36 Hampton St., Elmira

ehc@hotmail.ca (519)-669-4600


CLASSIFIED | 23

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

AMOS

D&H

INC

R O O F I N G

Ltd.

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Decorative/Stamped and coloured concrete www.facebook.com/marwilconcrete

519-638-2699

D&H CONCRETE

Specializing in Concrete Driveway, Walkways, Pads, Stairs & More!

519.954.8242 FREE ESTIMATES

One stop shop for all your needs. PLUMBING, FURNACE REPAIRS, SERVICE & INSTALLATION, GAS FITTING

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches

66 Rankin St. Unit 4 | Waterloo

519.501.2405 | 519.698.2114

Doug | 226.748.0032 Heather | 519.277.2424

A Family owned and operated business serving KW, Elmira and surrounding area for over 35 years.

WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED

CALL JAYME FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE.

519-885-2828

In Business since 1973 • Fully Insured

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

$175.00/OUT

pump

• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

(1800 Gallon Residential) Waterloo Region • Woolwich Township

519-896-7700

or

519-648-3004

Home Improvements

FREE ESTIMATES

TEL:

519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

General Construction | 12 Years Experience Residential & Agricultural • Barns / Shops • Decks & Railings • Poured Concrete • Driveways & Sidewalks • Siding, Fascials, Soffits • Interior Renovations Call Lawrence Metzger (226) 789-7301 Wallenstein, ON

www.biobobs.com

ROOFING | SIDING | SOFFIT & FACIA DRYWALL INSTALLATION

MURRAY MARTIN | 519.638.0772

7302 Sideroad 19 RR#2., Alma, ON, N0B 1A0

FREE ESTIMATES

FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

WINDOWS & DOORS

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

WEICKERT& MEIROWSKI Concrete Foundations Limited

Complete Home Renovations

ď Ż WOOD ď Ż GAS ď Ż PELLET

Kitchen ¡ Bathroom ¡ Basements Welcome Carpenter Mike Webers

Call for a FREE Quote

www.fergusfireplace.com

YES... WE DO RESIDENTIAL WORK!

FERGUS

CONESTOGO

6982 Millbank Main St., Millbank 519-595-2053 • 519-664-2914

1871 Sawmill Road

180 St. Andrew St. W.

Tony Webers

888-871-4592

cell 519.820.3967 home 519.846.5261

519-843-4845

519-664-3800 877-664-3802

|

OUTDOOR SERVICES

IMPROVEMENT

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

• Residential • Commercial • Industrial

YOUR SOURCE FOR YEAR-ROUND PROPERTY MAINTENANCE • Lawn Mowing Packages • Lawn Maintenance & Landscaping • Top Dressing/Overseeding • Mulch Delivery & Installation • Commercial & Residential Full Flower Bed Maintenance • Snow Plowing & Ice Control • Tractor Snowblowing

Randy Weber ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

Tel: Fax:

519.669.1462 519.669.9970

18 KingďŹ sher Dr., Elmira

Call Jeff Basler, Owner/Operator, today 519.669.9081 mobile: 519.505.0985 fax: 519.669.9819 | ever-green@sympatico.ca

OFFERING A QUICK AND EASY WAY TO RECLAIM UNUSED LAND

FOR RENT

•Tamper (Jumping Jack) •Power Drain Cleaner (Electric Snake)

6656 Sideroad 19 | RR#2 Wallenstein ON N0B 2S0

Call Clare at 519-669-1752

Since 1998

•Final grading •Lawn repair & complete seeding •Well equipped for large stoney areas •Spike Aerator/Overseeding •Site prep for Garden sheds, sidewalks etc. •Natural & Interlocking Stone •Retaining Walls, Walks & Patios •Help for Top Water & Drainage issues •Rain Water collection systems

Murray & Daniel Shantz

kdetweiler@rogers.com

OWNER-OPERATOR

ALMA, ONTARIO | PHONE: 519.846.5427

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THE CHALLENGE

â&#x20AC;˘ Specializing in farm drainage repair/installation â&#x20AC;˘ Footing / cellar / eavestrough / drains â&#x20AC;˘ Stump removal

KEVIN DETWEILER

P: 519-669-1188 | F: 519-669-9369

CROSSWORD PUZZLER

CFB

27 Brookemead, St, Elmira

OBSERVER PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

Mini Excavator Available

BACKHOE SERVICES

Services

Lawn Maintenance Programs | Spring Clean-up Flower Bed Maintenance Programs Leaf Clean-up and Removal | Soil & Mulch Delivery & Installation | Snow Clearing & Removal | Ice Control

- Trail Maintenance and Development - Wooded Lot Thinning - Pasture Reclaimation All other - Orchard Maintenance tracked skid - Industrial Lots steer services are available - Real Estate Lots

OUTDOOR SERVICES No job too small.

Outdoor

Got long grass? Our tracked skid steer equipped with a forestry brush mower can handle ANY long grass!

> Commercial & Residential > Fully Insured > WSIB Clearance > Senior Discount


24 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Our Team will meet your Needs and fulfill your Dreams NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

OPEN HOUSE Sat. Oct 20, 2-4pm

220 Bruce St. Kitchener

NEW LISTING

Independently Owned and Operated

3 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5426

$345,000 FANTASTIC LAYOUT

Elmira - Fantastic Layout in this bright home!

$500.00 DONATION will be made to WCS Family Violence Prevention Program with every home bought or sold by Paul, Alli or Bill in Woolwich.

Modern colours & décor throughout. Hardwood floors in the lg open living room & master bedrm. Eat-in kitchen w/slider to deck overlooking green space. Convenient upper floor laundry w/lg window. Finished basement w/slider walkout to back yard. Large 1.75 garage (18x20ft). MLS 1241698. Call Alli or Paul direct.

OPEN HOUSE Sat. Oct 20, 2-4pm

164 Erb St. Waterloo

$347,000

POTENTIAL DUPLEX

Waterloo - Close to universities and downtown, this very well kept, cheerful century home boasts original charm with many modern twists! Original hardwood floors, brigh airy kitchens and a huge finished walk up attic with closet are just a few. Walkout to fenced yard from back family room. Ample parking, lots of storage, appliances included. MLS 1234099 Call Alli or Paul direct.

$314,000

GREAT OPPORTUNITY St. Clements - Own a duplex in small town St.

Clements. Great mortgage helper, excellent tenants, ample parking, fantastic location. Live in one and rent the other or rent them both or convert back to a large family home. very large country lot with mature trees. Backs onto greenbelt. Just minutes from the city and steps from all amenities, everything you want can be found in St. Clements. MLS 1241584. Call Alli or Bill direct.

$269,900

LOCATION, LOCATION!

Kitchener - - Fantastic bungalow close to expressway, amenities, bus routes and in quiet neighbourhood. The carpet free main floor is complete with 3 bedrooms, living room and eat-in kitchen. Large finished rec room with gas fireplace. Both bathrooms recently renovated. Convenient second garage door to fenced backyard featuring patio and large 10x16ft cedar shed. MLS 1241620. Call Alli or Bill direct.

NEW LISTING

$239,900

SPACIOUS TWO STOREY

Floradale - 1866 sq.ft. home in Floradale with

a large lot backing onto green belt. This century home is one of Floradale's originals. This home is priced right for a young family and has great potential . Close to Floradale School and the park. 20 min to K-W. MLS. Call Alli or Bill direct.

$218,500 EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY!

Elmira - This semi is only steps to downtown! Fantastic hardwood floors, high ceilings, original built in cupboards and trim provide charm and character. Bright spacious kitchen with walkout to sun porch. Featuring; large front porch, carpet free, 3 bedrooms, living room, family room and lots of parking. MLS 1237444. Call Alli or Paul direct.

NEW PRICE

$379,000

Paul Martin

BACKING ONTO GREEN SPACE!

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Elmira - Backing onto Green space! This fantastic home was built with family in mind! Huge kitchen with breakfast bar and walk out to large deck over looking green space. Office just off kitchen with side door to deck. Finished recroom with laminate floors and ample storage space. Large master bedroom complete with 2 walk-in closets and ensuite. MLS 1234126. Call Alli or Paul direct.

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-503-9533 www.homeswithpaul.ca

Alli Bauman SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-577-6248

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

Bill Norris SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-588-1348

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

OUTSTANDING AGENTS. OUTSTANDING RESULTS.

$369,900

PRIME LOCATION!

Elmira - Backing onto farmland! Open welcoming front entrance to this, like new, open concept home. The main floor is bright and airy featuring: large breakfast bar, powder room, main floor laundry and is carpet free. The second floor is carpet free, master bedroom complete with walk in closet and spa like ensuite. Appliances are included. MLS 1241487. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$269,000 $279,000

$259,900

RARE FIND!!

Elmira - A perfect family home located on a mature

treed lot complete with shed and detached garage. This 2 storey, 3 bedroom home features a finished rec room, separate dining room, and main floor family room with sliders to large wrap around deck. New main floor and rec room windows excluding living room. All appliances included with the exception of freezer. MLS 1237778. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$359,000

LARGE WORKSHOP

5+ BEDROOM HOME

home is complete with 4 Bedrooms, plus office, living room, family room and finished basement. The bright living room is open to dinning room and kitchen. Unfinished walk up attic. Located on large lot featuring detached 17ft x 18ft, insulated, heated workshop, fantastic gazebo and 10ft x 20ft shed. MLS 1234999. Call Alli or Paul direct.

Waterloo - within walking distance to Universities, RIM and other Tech companies. This home could be an Investment property, residence or both! Just steps away from bus stop. Multiple driveways for parking. Separate entrance. Roof 2012. MLS 1237590. Call Bill or Alli direct.

Heidelberg - Bungalow with lg Workshop. This

$399,900 $399,900 IMPRESSIVE

ELMIRA - 3 bdrm, 2baths birdland bungalow backing onto farmland on a family oriented st. From the welcoming eat-in kit, to the oversized LR, to the gorgeous master w/walkout , this home is bright & spacious. Add in the huge unfinished basement, beautiful covered patio & well-kept yrd complete w/shed, this home is everything you are looking for! MLS 1231378. Call Alli or Paul direct!

$549,900

OUTSTANDING BUNGALOW

Elmira - Only 2 years old! Backing onto greenbelt.

Many upgrades throughout. Open concept mf w/hardwood & ceramic throughout. Gas fireplace in great room w/cathedral ceiling. Lg master w/5pc ens incl corner whirpool bath. MF laundry/mudroom. Finished basement includes: 2 bdrms, 4pc bath & lg rec rm. Sunroom walk-out to deck & interlock patio over-loogin yard & greenspace. MLS 1237430. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$319,000 PERFECT FOR A YOUNG FAMILY!

Elmira - Don’t miss this modern home featuring warm, neutral décor throughout and rich ceramic tile. Bright living room, open to dinette with slider to spacious fenced yard. Finished basement could be used for rec room or very large bedroom just off the fabulous 4 piece bathroom complete with corner tub. Appliances included. MLS 1232147. Call Alli or Paul direct.

D L O S

$369,000

FABULOUS BUNGALOW

Waterloo - Surrounded by beautifully landscaped yard. Excellent opportunity for seniors or family. Lg 4 car concrete driveway leading to tandem garage. Lg island in bright kit overlooking dr w/walkout to lg deck featuring retractable awning & view of yard. Rec rm w/wood fp & walkout to patio. Close to all amenities, downtown & expressway. MLS 1234685 Call Alli or Paul direct.

D L O S

$299,000

EXECUTIVE WILLOWELLS CONDO!!

Waterloo - Bright 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom condo featuring large living/dining room with built-in sidebar, separate dinette, 2 fireplaces and beautiful sunroom. Large master bedroom with 3 pc ensuite and walk-in closet. Underground parking and membership to Willowells Club included. MLS 1237578. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$299,900 YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS THIS! Elmira - Brand new semi detached raised bungalow.

Complete with main floor laundry, 4 piece ensuite, open concept eat-in kitchen and living room with French door walk out to deck. All the conveniences on one floor. The large garage is perfect for storage and have room for a vehicle. Located close to downtown, walking distance to library, restaurants and banks. MLS 1234444. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$769,000 EQUIPPED FOR 2 FAMILIES!!

Elmira - This home is equipped for 2 families! Front and side entrances, separate garages, separate laundry rooms, separate bathrooms, living rooms and 2 huge kitchens. Fantastic opportunity for large family/families complete with 7 bedrooms. Perfect for the hobbiest 3 car garage & detached 4 car garage/workshop. Large yard 87x250ft over looking farm land just steps to golf course. MLS 1225049. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$379,900 PERFECTION! CHARISMATIC! RARE!

Elmira - Century home boasting original woodwork and hardwood throughout, 9ft ceilings, and pocket doors. spacious main bath and bedrooms with bonus room off master. Fully finished attic with skylights and gas fireplace. Within walking distance to all amenities. Detached workshop. MLS 1241191 Call Alli or Paul direct.


CLASSIFIED | 25

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Bert Martin BROKER

Remax Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 OFFICE: 519-669-5426

3 Arthur St. S. Elmira

www.remaxsolidgold.biz

REALTY LTD., BROKERAGE

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED

17 Church St. W., Elmira

Len Frey

Phone: 519-669-1544

Sales Representative mildred@thefreyteam.com

Fax: 519-669-5119

Mildred Frey

Wendy Taylor

Mary Lou Murray

Dale Keller

Bill Cassel

519-741-6970

519-669-1544

519-669-1544

Cell: 519-500-1865

Cell: 519-505-3111

Broker Broker/Manager Sales Representative Sales Representative Sales Representative mildred@thefreyteam.com wendy.taylor1@rogers.blackberry.net marylou@mmrealestate.ca dale@kellersellsrealestate.com sandcasselkids3@gmail.com

519-741-6369

EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

FREE Market Evaluation NEW LISTING!

Millbank $329,000 Millbank. Stately Victorian red brick with original gingerbread trim, some stained glass, original woodwork, updated windows, wiring, plumbing, etc. Finished rec room, walk up attic for potential use as family, games, office, whatever.Large lot backing onto greenspace. Must see! MLS Call Dale to view.

ELMIRA! GREAT STARTER semi offering new kitchen, two bathrooms, three bedrooms, patio and deck, fenced yard backing to green space. New roof September 2012. MLS $229,900.

NEW LISTING!

$379,900 This 2-storey home includes a gourmet kitchen with custom maple cupboards and a breakfast bar with 3 stools. The huge dining room is adjacent to the kitchen and opens into a large living room with large stained glass window. This home has lots of old time charm and character. Take the time. Come to our open house. MLS 1221850 Call Mildred Frey to view.

Wellesley

Elmira | 10 Martin’s Lane | New Listing $354,900 Huge older home with in-law

$389,500. Stunning 3 bdrm home with numerous upgrades. Fully fenced and landscaped yard. Finished office with separate entrance on lower level. Must be seen! MLS. Call Dale to view.

ELMIRA! GREAT INVESTMENT PROPERTY Duplex with two 2 bedroom units. Separate laundry, hydro, gas and water meters. Lots of parking. MLS $279,900.

set up M 1 zoning (light industrial) Inlaw allows as a mortgage helper. Some updates are New wiring, 200 amp, new plumbing, New on demand water heater, new kitchen in the main unit, 3 bathrooms, Some new windows & floors. More work in progress to be finished by the buyer. To view call Mildred or Len Frey.

Country All Around

For Lease - St. Clements

$528,500. 7280 Wellington Rd 12. Beautifully landscaped with a nice stand of trees. All brick quality construction with a fully finished basement and loads of features. Bright and spacious would lend itself to a granny suite or a large family. Walk down from garage. Flexible closing. MLS. Call Dale to view.

COMMERCIAL LEASE SPACE

Commercial space for lease in busy plaza only 15 minutes to K-W. Office space from 144 s/f to 2400 s/f. Zoning allows numerous uses. Lots of parking. MLS.

Your referrals are appreciated!

BROKERAGE

OPEN HOUSE Sunday 2-4pm - 17 Park Ave. Elmira

3200 sq. ft available Lots of parking. High traffic exposure and visibility. Can be divided. Great character building for retail or professional services. Call Dale to view.

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD.

Elmira Real Estate Services Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage

90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

519-669-3192

When you buy or sell your home with us, part of our commission supports women’s shelters & violence prevention programs.

Bonnie Brubacher Shanna Rozema Jason Shantz 45 Arthur St. S., Elmira Office:

519-669-2772 $409,900

Broker of Record

NEW BUNAGLOW Broker of Record,

JULIE HECKENDORN

TRACEY WILLIAMS

Res: 519.669.1068

Res: 519.669.8629

Cell: 519.505.0627

BRAD MARTIN MVA Residential

Broker

FEATURED PROPETRY - Extensively renovated bungalow 85‘x170’) in ST. JACOBS. Hardwood & ceramic flrs. Oak kitchen w/island. Fin. rec. rm. & 4th bdrm in lower level. Main flr. laundry 2 baths. Main flr. family rm. (could be a master w/ensuite). Updated bathrms, windows, and furnace. NEW MLS EXPECT TO BE IMPRESSED! 12 acres overlooking the countryside & pond. Custom built and loaded w/extras. Gourmet kitchen. Open concept makes it great for entertaining. Private master suite. Huge fin walkout bsmt. TRIPLE garage. Prof. landscaped. MLS

$474,900

HUGE Park like back yard overlooking an open field. Large D.A w/walkout to oversized deck, patio & covered porch. Oak kitchen. Gas f.p. in L.R. Hardwood in several rooms. Main flr. office. Private master ‘suite’ & lavish ensuite bath. Fin. bsmt . MLS

$259,900

AFFORDABLE Large fam. rm addition w/cathedral ceiling and lots of windows! Oversized dining area. Main flr. laundry, bathroom and master bdrm. Huge Rec. rm. w/high ceiling. Newer doors, windows, furnace & deck. MLS

MOVE-IN CONDITION! enjoy the dble. garage w/stairs to basement. Updated kitchen, 2 bathrooms, windows, doors, furnace & central air. Private dec area. Fin. rec. rm. w/fireplace 2pc washroom and games room. MLS

LET OUR 50+ YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WORK FOR YOU!

www.ThurRealEstate.com

Broker

LOVELY BACKSPLIT

MARYHILL 25 ACRES

$288,000 DRAYTON. Inviting open concept layout with main floor cathedral ceiling, spacious living and dining room, large eat-in kitchen offers a garden door to the rear patio, 3 bdrms, 2 bathrooms, cozy rec. room, unfinished 4th level with many possibilities. MLS

$839,000. Picturesque property of rolling land, mature trees for privacy. 3 Bedroom bungalow with walkout basement, an ideal in-law if needed. Inground pool, shop/barn future pond sight. Centrally located to the tri-cities. MLS

Sales Rep.

$899,000

$289,000

BACKSPLIT ON 100’x190’ LOT!

Broker

$342,735 ELMIRA. Well designed home with all main floor amenities, gorgeous kitchen with island & pantry, ceramic & hardwood floors, living rm with gas fireplace and walkout, 2 bdrms, 2 baths, full basement for future development. NEW MLS

$319,900 ST. CLEMENTS. Sought after property minutes from KW. Features 3 bdrms, 2 bathrooms, unique layout with 2 walkouts, gas heat, oversized garage, detached 16’x24’ shop, extra long double driveway. MLS

COUNTRY LOT .5 ACRE | $73,500 Don’t miss this chance to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. Within 40 minutes of KW or Guelph. High speed internet is available with fibre optic. MLS

FOR RENT. BUILD TO SUIT

FREE HOME

WITH REAL INVESTMENT YOU WILL SEE A REAL RETURN. MAKE THIS SPACE YOUR NEW HOME. ADVERTISE WITH US TODAY.

EVALUATION www.OBSERVERXTRA.com


26 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

FAMILY ALBUM

Sunlight Homes Drayton Heights

IN MEMORIAM

In memory of

Darryl Bowman Who passed away on October 24, 2002. Life goes on and the years go by but treasured memories never die. No longer in our life to share, but in our heart your’re always there.

DEATH NOTICES ARISS, JEAN “JEANNIE” (NEE ZINGER) | July 10, 1928 - October

14, 2012 Jean was born and raised in Elmira, Ontario and spent her adult life in K-W. MARTIN, EDNA M. | Passed away peacefully, at her residence in Hawkesville, on Monday, October 15, 2012, at the age of 81 years. MARTIN, CLINTON TROY | Passed away at McMaster Medical

Centre, Hamilton on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 at the age of 51 days. Clinton was the beloved son of Stuart and Amy Beth Martin.

MUSSELMAN, MARSHALL | Peacefully passed away on

Monday, October 15, 2012 at Caressant Care in Fergus, at the age of 86 years. Marshall was the beloved husband for 57 years of Mary (Cressman) Musselman of St. Jacobs.

WEBER, URIAS W. | Passed away on Monday, October 15,

2012, at his home, in his 85th year.

Lovely remembered by Merle, Elsie & Family.

WILLIAMS, FRANCIS OWEN (FRANK) | Passed on at KW Health

Centre of Grand River Hospital on Friday, October 12, 2012, at the age of 80 years. Frank Williams, of Elmira. SERVICE DIRECTORY

BIRTHDAYS, MARRIAGE & BIRTH NOTICES, STAG & DOE. SHARE IT ALL!

Stolen, Recovered, Lost & Found

Annual Fall Police

AUCTION For

WATERLOO REGIONAL POLICE to be held at

Breslau Airport Road Auction Complex

5100 Fountain St., North, Breslau (Kitchener)

Sat Oct 27th 9:00am Ring #1- 350+ Mountain, Racing, Hybrid Bikes @ 9am Ring #2- Wood Working Tool & Electronics @ 9:30am Estate=> 2006 piaggio LS Gas Scooter Craftex=> Thickness Planer & Sander, Jointer, Shaper, Dust Collector DeWalt * Carbide Blades, Router Bits & Cutters * Routers * Clamps 16”Bandsaw * Skids of Lumber * Mitre Saw * Power Saws/Sanders PLUS=> Jewelry * Electronics * Chainsaws * Power Tools * Drill Press 2-Champion 9000W Generators * Alum Ext/Step Ladders * Core Drill 10 Skids of NEW Nuts/Bolts/Screws * 25 New Gear Boxes * etc

INSIDE - RAIN OR SHINE!

www.mrjutzi.ca - Website is updated daily as vehicles arrive!

PARTIAL LIST ONLY!!! No Buyer’s Premium! | 2 AUCTION RINGS!

VIEWING: Friday Oct 26th, 2012, 1:00 pm to 4:00 pm Sat 8am to sale. TERMS: CASH & CARRY=> Cash, Interact, Master Card & Visa

M.R. Jutzi & Co

PROFESSIONALS IN THE ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AND APPRAISALS OF COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, CONSTRUCTION, MUNICIPAL EQUIPMENT & VEHICLES 5100 FOUNTAIN ST. NORTH, BRESLAU, ONTARIO, N0B 1M0

www.mrjutzi.ca

519-648-2111

OPEN HOUSE EVERY SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 1-5PM Come take a look you won't be disappointed!

WE’RE AT YOUR SERVICE.

We specialize in getting the word out. Advertise your business services here. Get weekly exposure with fantastic results. Call us at 519.669.5790.

The last home in the Sunlight Heritage Homes Phase 1!! Beautiful 1400 sq ft home, features 3 beds, 3 baths, master with ensuite and walk in closet. Open concept main floor, with custom kitchen and island. Buy today and celebrate the holidays in your brand new home! Quick Possession available!

15 Green St., Drayton only

$259,990

Don't forget to check us out in 2014 when Sunlight Heritage Homes begins its second Phase!! Learn More About Sunlight Heritage Homes and Our fine communities by Visiting us Today!

Alyssa Henry Broker Re/Max Real Estate Centre Inc.

www.sunlighthomes.ca

519.787.0203

Have a question? Email us at: info@sunlighthomes.ca

SERVICE DIRECTORY CONTINUED WANTED WANTED. CLEAN, NONSMOKING, two bedroom, apartment. Spacious and very bright, first floor or a house. Please call 519-669-2981.

RENTALS ELMIRA 2 BEDROOM basement apartment in quiet duplex. In suite laundry, newly renovated, no smoking/pets. $825.00 inclusive. Call 519-574-6105. ROOM AND BOARD in a family home. Shared kitchen, livingroom, family room, fireplace, laundry. $500/mth inclusive. Parking. Avail. Nov. 1. 519-884-3713.

COMM/ INDUSTRIAL FOR RENT ELMIRA STORE 1560 sq. ft. plus unfinished basement with shelving - front & rear entrances, move in condition. $1175.00/mth plus utilities and taxes. Suitable for retail or office. Phone Allan 519-669-8074 or Paul 519-669-8582. Email allanpoffenroth@gmail.com

COMM/ INDUSTRIAL FOR RENT FOR RENT - For Not For Profit Woolwich Township organization or charity. Older 3 bedroom house about 1300 sq. ft. known as Kiwanis house. Plenty of parking, has central air. Rent will include all utilities and maintenance. Monthly rent negotiable. Located near Elmira Memorial Centre (arena & pool) KIWANIS HOUSE could share with other “not for profit” group or charity. Email allanpoffenroth@gmail.com

GARAGE SALES SATURDAY OCT 20, 8am-3pm. 47 Poffenroth path, Elmira. Furniture, table and chairs, lawn mower, tools, brand new power mitre saw, Lego, shelving units, and much much more! SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27. 9am to 2pm, 1 mile East of Northfield Drive on Line 86. Household items, store fixtures, bikes, toys, furniture including 7 piece sectional.

SELL YOUR STUFF HERE


CLASSIFIED | 27

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

MUNICIPAL | REGIONAL PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE OF INTENTION TO DESIGNATE 4 Katherine Street North, Winterbourne Chalmers Presbyterian Church TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the Corporation of the Township of Woolwich intends to designate the Chalmers Presbyterian Church and associated property at 4 Katherine Street North, Winterbourne, Township of Woolwich, Region of Waterloo, as a property of heritage value or interest under Part IV of the Ontario Heritage Act (R.S.O 1990, Ch. O. 18). A By-law to designate the property will be presented to Woolwich Township Council, for formal approval, at its regular Council meeting to be held on Tuesday, November 27, 2012. Description of Property The Chalmers Presbyterian Church is located at 4 Katherine Street North in Winterbourne. As the only church building in Winterbourne and at a prominent downtown corner of Katherine and Peel Streets, it is a key feature in the community. Statement of Heritage Value or Interest

This will be an excellent opportunity for the public to directly participate in discussions that will shape the future direction of Woolwich’s recreation facility usage and revitalization.

CONESTOGO

The church building was completed in 1870 under the guidance of Reverend Hugh Thompson and has served the local community for over 100 years as a place to worship with baptisms, funerals and marriages. The vernacular architecture of this simple rectangular structure reflects the construction used by builders at the time. It was designed for functionality and includes very tall gothic windows, high ceiling, a large double front door, and the yellow brick common to the area with a simple detail. For the most part the building has not been significantly altered externally, therefore the building is an ideal historic structure. The structure represents a high degree of craftsmanship as it is still a structurally viable building. The attributes of the building that need to be protected are: • Entire exterior of the building, including all facades. • Individual, symmetrically placed windows. • Double front door. • Timber frame roof. • Gothic windows.

PUBLIC CONSULTATION MEETING for Community Input In Conestogo

• Stone foundation. • Yellow brick. • Church Steeple. • Contextual landscape, including trees.

The church building and its contextual landscape relates to being situated at the core and crossroads of the Winterbourne community. The property meets all three criteria for designation since it has design and physical value, historical/associative value and contextual value. Further information respecting the proposed designation is available from the Engineering and Planning Services Department of the Township of Woolwich. Any person may send by registered mail or deliver to the Clerk of the Township of Woolwich notice of their objection to the proposed designation together with a statement of the reasons for the objection and all relevant facts. If such a Notice of Objection is received, the Council of the Township of Woolwich will refer the matter to the Conservation Review Board for a hearing. THE LAST DAY FOR FILING OBJECTIONS IS Tuesday, November 20, 2012.

Conestogo Park – Community Consultation for Facility Renewal and Upgrade WHEN: Wednesday October 24th, 2012 7:00 PM-8:30 PM WHERE: Conestogo Public School Gym 1948 Sawmill Rd, Conestogo, ON To fill out a survey on plans for recreation in Conestogo, please visit our website at www.woolwich.ca. For more information, please contact The Township of Woolwich Recreation and Facilities Services at 519-669-6026 or email kmakela@woolwich.ca

Dated at the Township of Woolwich this 20th day of October, 2012. Christine Broughton, Clerk, Township of Woolwich

CELEBRATE GOOD TIMES. COME ON! WE KNOW YOU HAVE GREAT FAMILY PHOTOS, WHY NOT SHOW THEM OFF IN THE OBSERVER.

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com


28 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

LIVING HERE CHEF’S TABLE/ DIERRE AND JACQUELINE

COMMUNITY / SOCIAL STIGMAS

Tackling social problems through artistic expression

Pressed for time? Soup’s on

Originally a poem, The Shunning uses dance to raise the issue of communal relationships ELENA MAYSTRUK When the MOTUS O Dance Theatre first brought their play to Waterloo Region more than 14 years ago, they struck a chord in the community. Now artistic directors James and Cynthia Croker and Jack Langenhuizen are bringing The Shunning back to kick off a new season at the Registry Theatre in Kitchener. The play is a reconstruction of a book of poetry, later a theatre production, by playwright and author Patrick Friesen. “About 18 years ago we actually read the book of poetry. We approached him and we said we really love the language and that we can see it being preformed as a dance piece,” said James Croker. The Shunning is a story of a Mennonite farmer who is shunned by his community for questioning its doctrines. In order for him to be brought back into the fold of his family he must ask forgiveness of the authorities or remain alone. As his relationships disintegrate he wants to express his personal views while struggling with life outside of the order and everything he knows. First produced for the Tarragon Theatre in Toronto, 16 years ago, the Motus O adaptation is all about representing the story through interpretive dance, video and sparse words, Croker said.

RECIPE NOTES

A poster for the play depicting Jack Langenhuizen as Peter being shunned by his community. When the play came to Kitchener a couple of years after the big city debut, it was presented with a strong response from a community that lives side by side with Mennonite culture. “Because of the close relationship people have to the Mennonite community, we had at least half a dozen people after the performance come up to us and say ‘my uncle was shunned’ or ‘my great grandfather was shunned’ and some of them had really quite terrible stories and some had great stories,” he explained. The play is made up of six performers and explores the intricacies of community

life and individualism. “It’s certainly not just religious. It’s human dynamics at work, it’s Lord of the Flies all over again; groups suddenly congregate around an idea and then pick on an individual. It can be business, it can be school, it can be bullying. It’s when a group decides a person isn’t acceptable and rather than releasing them from the group they crush them,” he added. In this case the group chose to show the complexities of the subjects at hand through dance. In one scene, Croker notes, the shunned farmer Peter and his wife are at

[SUBMITTED]

odds with each other, neither one knowing why. Rather than having the characters act out the scene through speech, the couple dances while never really connecting. “Because we are dealing with subtleties within a religious community, I don’t think we’ll get any Old Order Mennonites coming out to the show. And we’re asking people to totally suspend their disbelief because we’re Mennonites dancing,” he said of the performance. “But what we’re hoping to do is sort of take it so far out there that people begin to look at the issues of humanity and how we treat

people.” Part of the message is that many people who are shunned do not have the means to live outside of their communities and though the play fictional, part of Friesen’s intent was to bring many issues to the forefront with the tragic story of this Mennonite farmer. “As one critic said to us, they felt empathy for everybody. It’s a wonderful poetic piece, in the sense of unraveling the layers of community and individuality,” said Croker. The Shunning runs Friday and Saturday (7:30 p.m.).

Our business, Never Enough Thyme, has moved! It’s been a very busy time for our team and we are very happy to be settled in our new space. A busy business, two young children and a move makes for two time starved parents. It seems we were feeling the crunch at dinner time more than we would like to. You would think that as a chef it wouldn’t take much to put together a dinner. I turned to Never Enough Thyme many nights for our family meals. The comfort of our pot pies or mac and cheese is truly satisfying. I would have to say our kids’ favourites are always the soups. These soup recipes are easy to make and require very little time on the stove. The fragrance of the Thai chicken soup is wonderful, with a familiar comfort. The possibilities with soup are endless. Cream, broth, international, local ... you are only limited to your imagination. These recipes are from our Italian and Thai cooking classes. Shopping local and cooking global on a time crunch has never been easier.

Auto Care Tip of the Week Do you drive on diesel? Today’s diesel engines are very prone to problems due to buildup of carbon in the engine’s intake system. Come see us for options on getting your induction system cleaned to keep you running efficiently. - KEN NEARY

20 Oriole Parkway E., Elmira, ON N3B 0A5 Tel: (519) 669-1082 Fax: (519) 669-3084 info@leroysautocare.net

www.leroysautocare.net

NEW LOCATION!

CHEF’S TABLE| 31


LIVING HERE | 29

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012 “A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

Kleensweep Carpet Care

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates West Montrose, ON

T. 519.669.2033

COLLEEN

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville 519-699-4641

Rugs and Upholstery

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS • Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

519.669.5105 P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

KIN KORNER

www.freybc.com

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

E-MAIL: ads@woolwichobserver.com

Concepts invites you to join us for a hot non day meal, fellowship and entertainment. Call 519-664-1900 for more information.

OCTOBER 19 PROGRESSIVE EUCHRE CARD PARTY – 7:30 p.m. at St. Teresa of Avila Church Hall, Elmira. Doors open at 7 p.m. Admission $6. Tables will be set aside for the guests who wish to bring their own games to play. Dorr prizes and light lunch served. Everyone welcome! Sponsored by St. Teresa of Avila Catholic Women’s League.

FAMILY AND CHILDRENS’ SERVICES of the Waterloo Region is hosting a Foster Parent Information night. Open to anyone interested in learning more about becoming a foster parent to help children. 7 – 8:30 p.m. at The Family Centre. For more information call 519-576-0540.

WCS YOUTH CENTRE IS going swimming. Join us as we go swimming at Waterloo Swimplex, just bring your permission form and $5. We are leaving the YC at 7:30 p.m. For more information contact Catherine or Anna at (519) 669-3539.

OCTOBER 25 CHATEAU GARDENS ELMIRA AUXILIARY Annual Harvest Tea. 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Tea room, craft vendors, draw tables, quilt raffle. All welcome. Use either 8 Snyder Ave. or 11 Herbert St. entrance. For more information call 519-669-2921.

OCTOBER 20 THE LADIES AUXILIARY OF Twin Oaks, 1360 Maryhill Rd., Maryhill invite you to their annual Autumn Tea and Bazaar 1-4 p.m. Main Draw: Queen size quilt, painting, shopping cart, answering set, dinner set and surprises. Draw held 3:30 p.m. Gift table draw, tea room, bake table, crafts, white elephant table. All proceeds will benefit the residents of Twin Oaks.

K-W SILVER STARS PRESENT an original 60’s Musical Comedy – ‘ Waiting for Father Anthony’ at the St. Jacobs Community Centre – Lions Hall, 29 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs. Evening performances Oct 5 & 26 7:30 p.m., matinee performances Oct. 27 & 28, 2:30 p.m. For All ages. Tickets - $18 at Centre in the Square Kitchener 519-578-1570 or 1-800-265-8977. For Groups or Special Requests – phone Sandy 519-888-7497.

FIRST ANNUAL HALLOWEEN HAUNT, 12-3pm at EDSS. Meet us at the University ave entrance for scary good times with the EDSS Haunted Gym, glow in the dark games and BBQ lunch (12-2). Brought to you by the Kin Club of Woolwich and the EDSS drama department. Donations appreciated.

EATING DISORDERS: UNDERSTANDING THE signs and the system – Trellis Mental Health and Development Services Eating Disorders Clinic staff will present this one session workshop. Topics covered will include: healthy eating, body image, red flags and how to access a referral for help. This free seminar will be held at Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs, 7-8:30 pm. For more information for

OCTOBER 24 SENIORS COMMUNITY DINING, LINWOOD Community Centre, Ament Line, Linwood. Community Care

this seminar call 519-664-3794.

Check Us Out Online! woolwichkin.com

OCTOBER 26 HOT ROAST BEEF SANDWICHES $7. Royal Canadian Legion, 11 First St., Elmira.;6 p.m. Take outs available call 519-669-2932 to place your order for pick up Friday. LIFTED VOICES IS CELEBRATING over 20 years of friendship and music-making with the release of our new CD “Sing for Joy.” Please join us for a free concert at 7 p.m. at First Mennonite Church, 800 King St. E., Kitchener. We will sing in memory of our dear friend, Joy Dorsch, who passed away in 2006. CDs will be available to purchase. H.U.G.S. PROGRAM – 9:15-11:15 a.m. Meet with other parents to discuss parenting and child health issues. Topic: Best and Worst Toys to buy for Christmas. No registration required. Held at Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Drive, St. Jacobs 9:1511:15. Call Heidi at 519-664-3794, ext. 237 for more information.

21 INDUSTRIAL DR. ELMIRA

519-669-2884

OCTOBER 27 39TH ANNUAL ELMIRA CHARITY Quilt Auction and Country Market to be held at Riverdale Poultry Express, 6811 Church St. W (Line 86) Elmira, On. www. elmiraquiltauction.com. VISIT THE WTHHS HISTORICAL Room at the Old School, 1137 Henry Street, Wellesley, on Saturday, between 10:00am and 3:00pm and enjoy displays and interesting historical facts about Wellesley Township. In 2012, we will be open every last Saturday of each month, except December. Free Admission.

CORPORATE WEAR PROMOTIONAL APPAREL WORK & SAFETY WEAR | BAGS T-SHIRTS | JACKETS | HATS

245 Labrador Drive | Waterloo

519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT The Events Calendar is reserved for Non-profit local community events that are offered free to the

public. Placement is not guaranteed. Registrations, corporate events, open houses and the like do not qualify in this section. 24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

NANCY KOEBEL

Bus: 519.744.5433 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Suite 102, 40 Weber St. E., Kitchener

TOTAL HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby?

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess.

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

BE IN THE KNOW. Everyone wants to know what’s going on in the community, and everyone wants to be in the know.

Elmira & Surrounding Area

SANYO CANADIAN

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

Advertise here.

VERMONT Castings

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763

519.664.2008

psgingrich@hotmail.ca

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

PLACES OF FAITH | A DIRECTORY OF LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP

St. Teresa Catholic Church No God, No Hope; Know God, Know Hope! Celebrate Eucharist with us Mass times are:

Sat. 5pm & Sun. 9am & 11:15am

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

Trinity United Church, Elmira “Our mission is to love, learn & live by Christ’s teachings”

Sunday am Sunday Worship: Worship: 10:30 10:30 am Sunday School during during Worship Worship Sunday School Minister: Rev.Dave DaveJagger Jagger Minister: Rev.

rm A Wlcaome We all! to

21 Arthur St. N., Elmira • 519-669-5560 www.wondercafe.ca

SERIES: BUILDING A GREAT LIFE

HEARING ASSISTED

Sun Oct 21, 2012

Finding The Way Together

Acts 2:1-12 The Great Harvest Ron Seabrooke

-The JunctionSunday School 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am

47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 www.thejunctionelmira.com

Sunday School at 9:30am

Service at 10:30am Rev. Paul Snow REACH WITH LOVE. TEACH THE TRUTH. SEND IN POWER. 290 Arthur St. South, Elmira • 519-669-3973 www.ElmiraAssembly.com (Across from Tim Horton’s)

11:00am Discovering God Together

4522 Herrgott Rd., Wallenstein • 519-669-2319 www.wbconline.ca

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

9:15 Sunday School 10:30 Worship Service Pastor: Richard A. Frey

Sharing the Message of Christ and His Love 27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593 www.stpaulselmira.ca

THERE ARE SOME QUESTIONS THAT

Sunday, Oct. 21st, 2012 9:15 & 11:00 AM

“New Commands and a New Covenant”

SUNDAYS @ 10:30AM Services at Park Manor School 18 Mockingbird Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1459 www.elmiracommunity.org

SUNDAY SCHOOL

Zion Mennonite Fellowship

October 21st Building a life of Service

NURSERY PROVIDED

200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 www.woodsidechurch.ca

CAN’T BE ANSWERED

BY GOOGLE.

Keep faith alive, advertise here.


30 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

STRANGE BUT TRUE / BILL & RICH SONES PH.D.

Why do so many people believe in improbable things like ghosts & astrology? WEIRD NOTES

Q. OK, Sherlock, so the crime sceneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a bloody mess. Where do you go from there?

A. When a drop of blood

falls or is thrown from a victim, you need to determine both its speed and size based on the stain it leaves on a surface, says Jearl Walker in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Flying Circus of Physics.â&#x20AC;? The problem is that a larger stain could be due to a small drop with a higher speed or a large

drop with a lower speed. So another factor to be considered is the number of â&#x20AC;&#x153;fingersâ&#x20AC;? present, that is, the splash points or ridges that form around the perimeter of the stain. A higher speed, for example, produces a greater number of fingers. Then thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the nature of the surface involved: the rougher it is, the smaller the blood stain and the more overlapping fingers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Extensive experimental work is needed to catalog the bloodstain properties on common types of surfaces, from concrete to paper to glass.â&#x20AC;?

The upshot: When bloodstains are found at a crime scene, you need to take a sampling of the solid stained surface to a laboratory, â&#x20AC;&#x153;where experiments using blood drops of known size and fall height can be investigated with that surface,â&#x20AC;? Walker concludes.

Q. Why do so many

people believe in improbable things like ghosts, astrology, psychic phenomena, UFOs?

A. We humans are â&#x20AC;&#x153;cognitive misers,â&#x20AC;? capable of careful, logical problem solving but much of the time using automatic decision processes and

SUDOKU

to look at evidence in a slanted way. If someone is comforted by the belief that there are ghosts or alien beings on Earth, most people wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see a problem, unless of course he or she is investing money or emotional energy in adhering to these â&#x20AC;&#x153;weird beliefs.â&#x20AC;? Concludes Butler, â&#x20AC;&#x153;a little bit of unreality isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t too harmful for people and may be more comforting than believing only in what can be observed.â&#x20AC;? ABOUT THE AUTHORS Bill a journalist, Rich holds a doctorate in physics. Together the brothers bring you â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strange But True.â&#x20AC;? Send your questions to strangetrue@compuserve.com

OBSERVER CROSSWORD PUZZLER

    

    



 



SOLUTION: on page 23





  

THE CHALLENGE

HOW TO PLAY: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. We have got you started with a few numbers already placed in the boxes.

or when we didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think of the person and he or she did call -- a classic example of â&#x20AC;&#x153;confirmation bias.â&#x20AC;? Also, we are powerfully swayed by anecdotal evidence, even if the event happened to someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cousinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brother-in-law. Our distance from the event doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seem to matter as much as the apparent match between the anecdote and our observations. Then, too, some people have a strong desire to believe thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more out there than they can easily observe. Psychic power, if true, would be pretty neat so that bias leads them

shortcuts to get a â&#x20AC;&#x153;closeenoughâ&#x20AC;? answer, says Case Western Reserve University social psychologist Jennifer Butler. Within this framework, we seek plausible explanations for the events that we seem to experience. For example, we might notice that we think of a person right before he or she calls us and conclude that we have psychic powers. But the less exciting answer is we probably think of that person often, yet our attention is drawn to the times when we think of the person right before receiving a call, ignoring the other times when there was no call,













SOLUTIONS: 1. MISSING PUMPKIN 2. BOYS MISSING SHOE 3. GIRLS HAIR 4. PUMPKIN FACE 5. MISSING SHADOWS 6. THE BUSHES 7. WITCH HAT

Queenstown, New Zealand

CAPTION Sandra Taves, Alanna Martin and Tracy Weber stop to take a photo with the Observer just outside of Queenstown, New Zealand. Looking over Lake Wakatipu and the surrounding mountains. The picture was taken at the end of a three week trip to Sydney and New Zealand

















 



 

 































OPEN 24 HOURS | 7 DAYS A WEEK



LOCATION







OBSERVER TRAVELS







OBSERVER SPOT THE DIFFERENCE



 



















  













 

DELIV SER ERY AVAILVICE Call fo ABLE rD

  

ACROSS 1. Anita Brooknerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hotel du ___â&#x20AC;? 4. between the shaft and the abacus of a Doric column 11. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Twelfth Nightâ&#x20AC;? character 16. Victorian, for one 17. To fall; to tumble 18. Any detergent plant 19. Tableware that is plated 21. Bank 22. Checker, perhaps 23. Trick taker, often 24. Dumps 25. A propeller with several angled blades 31. Decorative object without practical utility 34. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Town Tooâ&#x20AC;? (1981 hit) 35. In-flight info, for short 36. Altar avowal 37. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Baby Babyâ&#x20AC;? (Linda

etails

315 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5403 Ronstadt hit) 38. The act of abolishing a system 41. Someone who gives blood 44. ___-tzu 45. Harmony 46. Strength 48. Russian assembly 52. Barley bristle 53. Leather shorts often worn with suspenders 54. A little night music 57. Decide to leave, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;outâ&#x20AC;? 58. Hardly haute cuisine 60. A pint, maybe 61. Brought into play 62. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The ___ of the Ancient Marinerâ&#x20AC;? 63. House votes DOWN 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ we forgetâ&#x20AC;? 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mi chiamano Mimi,â&#x20AC;? e.g.

3. Mineral residue 4. â&#x20AC;&#x153;... ___ he drove out of sightâ&#x20AC;? 5. Blackguard 6. Cool 7. A relative by marriage 8. Civil rights org. 9. Absolute 10. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Comprende?â&#x20AC;? 11. Member of a large group of unicellular microorganisms 12. In-box contents 13. Danger for sailors 14. Near 15. Alter, in a way 20. Workbench attachment 24. Hex 26. Blockhead 27. Cross 28. Character 29. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Look here!â&#x20AC;? 30. Amscrayed 31. A napkin tied under

the chin 32. One way to stand by 33. Benefit 38. Bang-up 39. Bornâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s partner 40. ___ list 42. Wood sorrels 43. Bubkes 47. Plural of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;? 49. The objective case of we 50. A state in New England 51. An associate degree in nursing 54. Deck (out) 55. Failure of some tissue to develop 56. An ancient dynasty of Macedonian kings 59. Part of the leg below the ankle joint 61. Ashes holder

SOLUTION: on page 23


LIVING HERE | 31

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

CHEF’S TABLE: Soup is a perennial favourite,

and it can be made quickly and easily, too

Tom Kha Kai Roasted Red Coconut Pepper Soup Chicken 2 tbsp olive oil Soup

lemon grass, lime leaves, galangal, chilies, poach in the coconut milk, with saucepan covered. Allow to steep for 5 minutes off the heat; Strain the coconut milk to remove the lemon grass mix. Place the coconut milk in the pot and add the chicken strips, and poach until the chicken is cooked. Do not boil; Add julienne of vegetables, lemon juice, fish sauce and sugar. Simmer for 2 minutes. Garnish with fresh cilantro leaves and enjoy.

FROM | 28

2 roasted red peppers

4 oz chicken breast

1 onion, julienned

1 stick lemon grass

3 cloves of garlic

1 inch galangal root

2 tbsp Italian seasoning

4 lime leaves or 1 tbsp lime juice

2 bay leaves 1/2 can of tomato paste

1 fresh hot chili

2 cans of plum tomato

2 cups coconut milk

1 can of tomato juice

1 cup water

2 tsp balsamic vinaigrette

2 tbsp lemon juice

1/4 tomato juice can of water

1 tbsp fish sauce

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

1/4 cup of julienned carrot

Salt and pepper

Never Enough Thyme Catering Inc. was created with one thought in mind: to create more thyme! Chefs Dierre and Jacqueline offer corporate and celebratory catering, specialty food shoppe including cakes and cooking classes. Www.Neverenoughthyme.ca; like us on facebook and follow on twitter: nethymekitchen.

10 snow peas, julienned

2 tbsp pesto

1/4 red pepper, julienned

Boconcini

1 baby bok choy, sliced 1/4 tsp sugar

In a hot pot put in olive oil, onion garlic, spices and bay leaves. Saute until onions are translucent; Add tomato paste, stir to combine. Add tomatoes, tomato juice and roasted red pepper. Simmer for approximately 25 minutes, remove bay leaves, puree and add pesto, balsamic and stir in; When soup is in the serving bowl, add sliced boconcini.

Slice chicken into 1/4” strips; Smash lemon grass with flat of a chef’s knife, cut into 1” strips, slice galangal into thin medallions, slice chilies and lime leaves into thirds. Reserve in a bowl; Heat coconut milk and water in sauce pan for 2-3 minutes. Do not let it boil. Reduce the heat to medium and add the

FIND MORE RECIPES ONLINE

FALL CLEAN-OUT SALE! October 22nd-27th

75% OFF Items

50% OFF Items

• 1250 & 1700 Pond Master Filter System • Pond Master Pumps • Aquariums | Stands | Lids • Fish Tank Accessories • Premium Underground Filters • Biological Filtration Systems

• Select Dog Shampoo • Various Dog Treats • Bird Houses & Feeders • Select Dog & Cat Beds - All Sizes

Selling At Cost • Pulsar Dog Food - Grain Free - 2 diets • Harvest Blend Dog Food - 3 diets

10 Church St. W., Elmira | 519-669-4374 Hours: M-W 9-6 | Th-F 9-7 | Sat. 9-5

OBSERVERXTRA. COM

www.villagepetfoodshoppe.com MCC Thrift Shops of Ontario present

THE NEW 2013 MODELS

HAVE ARRIVED of

Fashion

supporting Mennonite Central Committee water projects with guest host, CHYM FM's George and featuring local celebrity models!

2.5X Limited Package shown

Tues. Nov. 13

2.5X

2013 LEASE PAYMENT

288

$

starting from $27,923 *

2,611

$

DOWN*

Michaels

Fashion Show starts at 7pm – Bingemans Marshall Hall

0.9 % LEASE RATE

FOR 24 MONTHS*

425 Bingemans Centre Drive, Kitchener • Doors open at 6:30pm

$20 tickets available (in advance only) at: 3.6R Limited Package shown

2013

2.5i

starting from $25,423 *

3,497

$

DOWN*

0.9 %

LEASE RATE

2013

$228

FOR 24 MONTHS*

3,831

$

DOWN*

0.9 %

LEASE RATE

JAPANESE ENGINEERED VEHICLES STANDARD WITH

All prices include freight and fees. Excludes HST and licensing.

2.0i

starting from $21,923 *

LEASE PAYMENT

$318

Best Mainstream Brand

|

2013

2.5i

convenience package

starting from $30,423 *

LEASE PAYMENT

2,390

$

DOWN*

FOR 24 MONTHS*

1.9 %

LEASE RATE

LEASE PAYMENT

$228

FOR 24 MONTHS*

Top Safety Pick: 2012 Subaru Lineup. Subaru is the only manufacturer with IIHS Top Safety Picks for all models, for the third year in a row.

www.ontario.subarudealer.ca

*Ratings of “Good” are the highest rating awarded for 40-mph frontal offset, 31-mph side-impact and 20-mph rear-impact crash tests conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) (www.iihs.org). A “Good” rating obtained in all three crash tests plus a “Good” rating in new roof strength testing and the availability of Electronic Stability Control (ESC) (Vehicle Dynamics Control) achieves a 2012 Top Safety Pick. Based on ALG’s 2012 Residual Value Award for Best Mainstream Brand. *MSRP of $25,995/$23,495/$28,495/$19,995 on 2013 Forester 2.5X (DJ1 X0)/Legacy 2.5i (DA1 BP)/Outback 2.5i Convenience Package (DD1 CP)/Impreza 2.0i (DF1 BP). Lease rate of 0.9%/0.9%/0.9%/1.9% for 24/24/24/24 months. Monthly payment is $288/$228/$318/$228 with $2,611/$3,497/$3,831/$2,390 down payment. Option to purchase at end of lease is $18,795/$16,802/$19,371/$14,708. Advertised pricing consists of MSRP plus charges for Freight/PDI ($1,595), Air Tax ($100), Tire Stewardship Levy ($29.20), OMVIC Fee ($5), Dealer Admin ($199). Freight/PDI charge includes a full tank of gas. Taxes, licence, registration and insurance are extra. $0 security deposit. Models shown: 2013 Forester 2.5X Limited Package (DJ2 LPN) with an MSRP of $33,395. 2013 Outback 3.6R Limited Package (DD2 LN6) with an MSRP of $38,495. Dealers may sell or lease for less or may have to order or trade. Offers applicable on approved credit at participating dealers only. Lease based on a maximum of 20,000 km per year, with exess charged at $0.10/km. Leasing and financing programs available through Subaru Financial Services by TCCL other lease and finance rates and terms available; down payment or equivalent trade-in may be required. Vehicles shown solely for purposes of illustration, and may not be equipped exactly as shown. Offers available until October 31, 2012. See your local Subaru dealer for complete program details.

MCC Thrift & Gift (59 Church St. W., Elmira) Generations (50 Bridgeport Rd. E., Waterloo) Kitchener MCC Thrift Shop (385 Lancaster St., Kitchener) MCC Head Office (60 Ottawa St., Kitchener) New Hamburg Thrift Centre (41 Heritage Dr., New Hamburg) or online at

mcco.ca/splash

Don't m iss this amazin g oppo rtu to purc hase clo nity thing, shoes, purses , jewelry , and Christm as giftw are! Cash • Credit • Cheq

ue

www.geminimotors.com


Less Fuel. More Power. Great Value is a comparison between the 2012 and the 2011 Chrysler Canada product lineups. 40 MPG or greater claim (7.0 L/100 km) based on 2012 EnerGuide highway fuel consumption estimates. Government of Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on powertrain, driving habits and other factors. See retailer for additional EnerGuide details. Wise customers read the fine print: •, *, ▲, †, § The All Out Clearout Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating retailers on or after September 1, 2012. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. See participating retailers for complete details and conditions. •$19,995 Purchase Price applies to 2012 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package (22F) only and includes $2,000 Consumer Cash Discount. See participating retailers for complete details. Pricing includes freight ($1,400–$1,595), air tax (if applicable), tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailer may sell for less. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on select 2012 vehicles and are manufacturer-to-retailer incentives, which are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. Amounts vary by vehicle. See your retailer for complete details. ▲$1,500 Bonus Cash is available on all new 2012 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT and $1,000 Bonus Cash is available on all new 2012 Dodge Journey SXT models except remaining Save the Freight models. Bonus Cash will be deducted from the negotiated price after taxes. See your retailer for complete details. †4.49% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on the new 2012 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package (22F) model to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank, TD Auto Finance and Ally Credit Canada. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailer may sell for less. See your retailer for complete details. Example: 2012 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package (22F) with a Purchase Price of $19,995 (including Consumer Cash Discount) financed at 4.49% over 96 months with $0 down payment, equals 208 bi-weekly payments of $115 with a cost of borrowing of $3,843 and a total obligation of $23,837.61. Pricing includes freight ($1,400–$1,595), air tax (if applicable), tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailer may sell for less. §2012 Dodge Journey R/T shown. Price including applicable Consumer Cash Discount: $25,530. Pricing includes freight ($1,400–$1,595), air tax (if applicable), tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. See bottom of the ad for range of potential retailer fees. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailer may sell for less. ^Based on R. L. Polk Canada, Inc. January to October 2011 Canadian Total New Vehicle Registration data for Chrysler Crossover Segments. ¤Based on 2012 EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide ratings published by Natural Resources Canada. Transport Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on powertrain, driving habits and other factors. 2012 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package & SE Plus 2.4 L 4-speed automatic – Hwy: 7.5 L/100 km and City: 10.8 L/100 km. 2012 Dodge Journey SXT 3.6 L 6-speed automatic – Hwy: 7.8 L/100 km and City: 12.6 L/100 km. TMThe SiriusXM logo is a registered trademark of SiriusXM Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC.

T:10.25”

32 | BACK PAGE

GREAT OFFERS

DON_121162_KB_JOU.indd 1

WE’RE GOING ALL OUT TO CLEAROUT CANADA’S #1 SELLING CROSSOVER. ^

38

$

7.5 L/100 KM HWY ¤ MPG HWY

2012 DODGE JOURNEY CANADA VALUE PACKAGE

PURCHASE PRICE INCLUDES $2,000 CONSUMER CASH,* FREIGHT, AIR TAX, TIRE LEVY AND OMVIC FEE. TAXES EXCLUDED. OTHER RETAILER CHARGES MAY APPLY.+

$

19,995

115 OR CHOOSE

BI-WEEKLY FINANCING†

• 3.6 L PentastarTM VVT V6 with 283 HP • One-touch up/down front windows

@

4.49 %

STEP UP TO THE 2012 DODGE JOURNEY SXT

• Dual bright exhaust tips • Highway: 7.8 L/100 KM (36 MPG)¤ T:14”

SCAN HERE FOR MORE THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2012

BEST NEW SUV/CUV UNDER $35,000 IN 2012 ACCORDING TO AJAC.

2012 Dodge Journey R/T shown.§

FOR 96 MONTHS WITH $0 DOWN

$

MORE BI-WEEKLY

25

(INCLUDES $3,000 TOTAL DISCOUNTS *▲ )

+Your local retailer may charge additional fees for administration/pre-delivery that can range from $0 to $1,098 and anti-theft/safety products that can range from $0 to $1,298. Charges may vary by retailer.

Dodge.ca/Offers

10 VEHICLES WITH 40 MPG HWY OR BETTER.

LESS FUEL. MORE POWER. GREAT VALUE.

10/10/12 7:00 PM

October 20, 2012  

Local Elmira Ontario Newspaper