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09 | 19 | 2015 VOLUME 20 | ISSUE 38

TEACHERS’ PAY DOESN’T BOOST OUTCOMES VENTURE PAGE 17

COMMENT PAGE 8

REGION SHOWS NO INTEREST IN TRANSFER STATION

Woolwich eyes 2.1% tax increase as 2016 budget process gets rolling

SOMETHING FOR GRANDMA

TAXES | 2

Region ignores Woolwich, plans to close transfer station

No effort, broken pledge to cooperate show region never had any intention of doing right by the public

STEVE KANNON A 2.1 per cent tax increase is the starting point as Woolwich council prepares for its 2016 budget deliberations. The township also expects to hit up taxpayers for another 1.5 per cent to fund infrastructure projects. Together, that would add some $30 to the property tax bill of an average township home assessed at $331,500. In 2015, Woolwich reduced spending and used a windfall to hold the general tax increase to zero, with a 1.6 per cent levy for infrastructure projects. The 2.1 per cent target for next year represents the projected inflation rate. Unlike the rapid growth of the past decade, Woolwich expects assessment growth to be at its lowest level in years at 1.25 per cent, bringing in an additional $111,400 in 2016. That compares to 2.5 per cent this year, creating revenues of $214,000. In contrast to past years, however, budget talks may actually look at the township’s largest single expense: payroll costs. Meeting September 15, council-

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STEVE KANNON

Allie Brubacher gets wrapped up by “Monty” the Burmese python during a Grandparents Day celebration at Elmira’s Chartwell Retirement Residence Sept. 11. [SCOTT BARBER / THE OBSERVER]

Intent on closing the Elmira transfer station over the objections of Woolwich residents, the Region of Waterloo will do nothing to help keep the well-used facility going as a private venture. Months after promising to look at options for turning over the transfer station to a private operator, the region opted to do nothing. Regional council’s planning and works committee voted this week to mothball the waste stations in all of the rural townships by December 31. The region has no interest in keeping the transfer station going, or even in helping the township maintain a service widely used by residents, said Woolwich Coun. Patrick Merlihan, who made a presentation to the committee

Tuesday afternoon. While the decision left the door open for a pitch to privatize the service, Merlihan said the dismissive reception left no room to be hopeful. “I was really disappointed,” he said at Tuesday night’s township council meeting. Mayor Sandy Shantz, Woolwich’s representative on regional council, was equally unoptimistic, noting the region has essentially washed its hands of the issue. “They’ve sort of thrown it back to us to work with a private operator.” The township now expects nothing but roadblocks to finding a way to keep the transfer station open. Regional staff was instructed last winter to look at options to privatize TRANSFER STATION | 9


2 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

TAXES: Council may finally OM

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lors discussed a staffing level report that shows the number of full-time township of employees increased by 30 per cent over the last 10 years, to 65 from 50. The addition of five contract positions contributed to millions of dollars in new payroll costs, which eat up half of Woolwich’s operating budget of some $14 million. The direction was welcomed by Coun. Patrick Merlihan, whose push for a staffing review was rebuffed during last year’s budget deliberations “It’s half the budget and we weren’t talking about it,” he said, noting such costs are the only place to find money to fund other priorities such as the often-cited infrastructure deficit. “If we’re serious about the infrastructure deficit ... we have to look at the biggest budget item.” Director of engineering and planning Dan Kennaley noted the township will need considerably more money – the equivalent of a 4.3 per cent tax increase annually for 15 years – to catch up on infrastructure work such as road paving and bridge repairs. While that’s not feasible, he said, the township is hopeful additional funding will come from the federal and provincial governments to help tackle

the deficit. Looking down the road, Merlihan said council needs to set priorities for revenue from future assessment growth, which provides short-term cash infusions that could be set aside for the future expenses that come with each new home. Staff costs are also a place to find savings that can translate into real dollars for more pressing needs. For Coun. Larry Shantz, figures showing staffing expenses on a per capita basis are up 44 per cent over the last 10 years is something of a red flag. As a way of constraining ever-growing costs, he suggested cost of living adjustments be based on a dollar figure rather than a percentage increase. That would make a bigger difference to those at the lower end of the scale, while preventing a widening gap between the bottom and top, he said. With salaries, there’s no need for a cost of living adjustment to apply across the board, perhaps only to those on the lower end of the pay scale rather than those at the higher end, chipped in Coun. Scott Hahn. While staff are now preparing next year’s budget, the real council deliberations and public input will begin in mid-January.

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NEWS | 3

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

Special focus for pair of blood donor clinics in Elmira and Linwood WHITNEY NEILSON Ella Dorscht received 17 blood transfusions and more than 50 units of blood while on an artificial heart machine at Sick Kids Hospital. The two-year-old Elmira girl and her family are hoping to give back now with two blood donor clinics coming up in the area, to help replace the blood she used. Ella has pulmonary hy-

pertension and a severe heart defect, which require her to be on oxygen 24/7. Her mom, Kristen Dorscht, explains why these clinics are important for their family. “Right away my husband and I decided that we wanted to put at least 50 units back into the system, so that we could kind of pay back what we had used. So since she’s been out of the hospital we’ve gotten a

small group together every other month. You’re only eligible to donate every 56 days,” Kristen said. They’ve donated 18 units since last fall. They decided to do clinics in both Elmira and Linwood because while they live in Elmira, they also used to live in Linwood, and that’s where Ella’s dad grew up. Both towns have been plastered with posters, along with a big sign on Arthur Street

and another on Highway 86 in Linwood. “Before Ella was born, my husband and I always said we should donate blood and we wanted to, but we never got around to it. Life was busy and it got in the way and we wanted to. So this was our push to do it,” Kristen said. And now’s as good a time as any to get out and donate. The blood donor clinic contacted Kristen

this week to tell her they’re low on both types of O blood and A- blood. For type O blood they only have a three-day supply, and there’s been a big dip in blood donor bookings nationally. They’re hoping to attract people with the addition of a raffle at the Elmira clinic. Everyone who attends can put their name in the raffle, whether you donate or not. Prizes include a

LCBO gift card, a Foodland gift card, and Sugar Kings tickets, among others. As for Ella, Kristen says she’s doing well, but there are still medical hurdles to overcome. “From our perspective she’s doing awesome. She’s all caught up on her milestones, she’s really far ahead in her speaking. So she runs around like crazy BLOOD | 32

Sally Draper named ambassador as Wellesley fair gets underway WHITNEY NEILSON Second time’s a charm for Wellesley’s Sally Draper. As a two-time participant, she was chosen as this year’s Wellesley-North Easthope Fall Fair Ambassador. The 2014-15 ambassador, Ashley Jeffries, handed over the crown and sash on Tuesday night at the opening of the fair after judges selected Draper as the winner. Four hopefuls, adorned in long gowns of black and blue, gave speeches and answered an impromptu question. Draper spoke about what it means to her to be from Wellesley. The 18-yearold is in her first year at the University of Guelph studying international development. She often gets to explain where home is to people she meets. “I tell them to take the 86 until their cell phone runs out of service, then take a left and if they’ve hit Dorking they’ve gone too far,” Draper said. She explained how being from a small town is more than an address for her, it’s a way of life. “It’s the way we drive our tractors to school, pick out our best jeans for church, know all of our neighbours’

names, and discuss with them what height to set the lawnmower at over a drink,” Draper said. Because of where she’s grown up she said a deep passion for agriculture is ingrained in her, and with that comes the need to properly represent Canadian farming. When people find out she can tell the difference between a cow and a heifer, where her burger came from and what its name was, she gets some funny questions. “First of all, is it like Breaking Amish? Which is no. What about the GMOs Sally, what about the factory farms? I gently remind them that their truth is misinformed, and that we are the 98 per cent of families that own 98 per cent of our Canadian farms and produce the 245,000,000 meals that our Canadians eat every day,” Draper said. Now, as she sits in lecture halls at university, she may not be able to tell you all her fellow classmates’ name and fun facts about them. But she promises she’ll always try to find out. “This means the world to me,” Draper said in an interview after she was crowned. “It’s such an honour to be able to represent

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AMBASSADOR | 8

Brooke Bauer, Taylor Kelly and Paige Warner are moving on to the final round of Wellesley Idol at the Apple Butter and Cheese Festival, after wowing the judges on Tuesday night. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]

And then there were three Fall fair performances allow judges to choose finalists for the 2015 Wellesley Idol contest, with winner to be selected at upcoming ABC Festival WHITNEY NEILSON There was no shortage of talent at the Wellesley Idol semi-finals on Tuesday night. Opening the 162nd Wellesley-North Easthope Fall Fair, young singers tackled everything from One Direction to Eva Cassidy, with the hopes of making it on to the final round. Judges whittled the seven singers down to just three, who will compete for the ultimate title of 2015 Wellesley Idol at the Apple

Butter and Cheese Festival on September 26. Byron Shantz, Kalina Seifried and JP Sunga commended all the participants for their performances, and offered some general advice to the group. “Sharing your art with your voice, with your instrument, it’s daunting, it’s terrifying, and it’s magical. And it’s much like an onion, you’re peeling back layers and layers of who you are. I’ve seen several of these people come back year after year and holy cow. They’re getting bet-

ter and better and better,” Shantz said. As someone’s who’s been making music for 25 years, he said he’s encouraged by the talent in this young group. Before announcing the finalists, they advised all the participants to keep singing and enjoying what they do. Seifried offered advice for singers going to the final round and those thinking of coming back next year. “We’d like you guys to think about song choices, about your vocal range,

knowing where you are really comfortable and then pushing yourself just a little bit past that,” Seifried said. “Really understanding the maturity of the song and the meaning of the song and really grabbing on to that. We want you guys to think about audience connection, so working on your confidence, your stage presence, and your comfort level on stage.” She said confidence on stage comes from taking every opportunity to perIDOL | 8

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4 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

Woodside set to celebrate 40 years in Elmira Since first meetings in a school, Woodside Bible Fellowship has seen a steady growth in the numbers that attend WHITNEY NEILSON From its humble beginnings meeting at Riverside Public School on Oct. 5, 1975, to now a congregation of 1,000, Woodside Bible Fellowship has plenty to celebrate on its 40th anniversary this Sunday. “We’re looking back to the past with gratitude for all the people that have made sacrifices to make Woodside what it is today. It’s a day as well where we’re looking ahead to the future with expectancy and just to continue the mission of the church,” senior pastor Dan Allen said. A group from Wallenstein Bible Chapel who lived in Elmira decided to start holding church in Elmira in 1975. From there, they built

a church on the corner of Arthur and Whippoorwill. Soon, they needed more space and built the current church on Barnswallow Drive in 1989, followed by the addition in 2010. “Seeing how Elmira has grown and changed and evolved, there are a lot more people here. And when I look at Woodside, having grown up here and seen all the changes, how things have grown and how we do things differently, I just feel there’s very much a parallel,” executive director Jeremy Malloy said. Looking ahead, they see Elmira poised for another big growth spurt with the new housing developments, which may see all churches in the area experience growth. He says they’ll need

Woodside Bible Fellowship celebrates 40 years this Sunday, and Dan Allen and Jeremy Malloy are excited to continue the intergenerational unity of the Elmira church. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER] with many churches and to be prepared, which could explained. there are a number of mean expanding the buildAs can be expected, the churches in our commuing again, including more church has seen extensive nity doing so many good service times, or another changes over the past four things. So we’re just a part creative option. decades. Music during of a broader church,” Allen “This is a community church service has come a long way from the days of just a capella singing. It progressed to piano, then organ, then the addition of guitars and drums, and now it’s a full band. “One of the things we feel really blessed about is as the changes happened over 40 years, we haven’t met a lot of resistance to that. The people here have been very understanding of there are many things that are a lot more important than what your personal preference is of how you do church,” Malloy said. He notes there’s a feeling of unity within the church, from children to seniors, which can sometimes be a Most voters are already registered. But if challenge for churches. you’ve moved recently or are planning a Allen emphasizes the move before election day, you may need to church continues to be intergenerational. A lot of update your address. their ministries are built around younger families, With an up-to-date registration, you’ll get: with a children’s ministry, a youth ministry, but also a • a personalized voter information card senior’s ministry. that tells you when and where to vote “To see a 17-year-old trying to mentor and help a • faster service at the polls seven-year-old, who at the same time knows a 77-yearCheck and update your registration at old and is gleaning wisdom

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and counsel from them … just seeing so many young people is so encouraging,” Allen said. And the church’s young people are certainly putting their knowledge to good use. They’re on mission trips in Nigeria, the DRC, Colombia, and Malaysia. The church also works with a church and a camp in Ecuador, refugee housing in Austria, and ministries involving street kids. It’s equally important for them to be doing good in their own community too. “So many of our people are integrated into the community. They’re out in the community, working, playing, serving. But as well at Woodside we want to be a welcoming community where everybody’s welcome here,” Allen said. The addition of the gym has given them the ability to provide a safe place for youth to hang out and also reach out further to the community, hosting floor hockey with the Sugar Kings and people with special needs, and partnering with Elmira District Community Living for Special Olympics. It’s also exciting for the church to see increasingly more people coming to the church who aren’t sure what they believe, maybe they didn’t grow up going to church, but they’re curious about what Woodside has to offer. Allen says their mission is to share Jesus Christ’s message and to help others live out their faith. At the celebratory service on Sunday, church members will share some of the values that have remained the same over the 40 years, to remind people of its mission. They’ll also sing songs from different eras, and recognize the changes, Allen said. WOODSIDE | 25

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NEWS | 5

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

More duties for MPP Harris Add Research and Innovation critic to Michael Harris’ list of duties. The Kitchener-Conestoga MPP also retains his role as Transportation critic under new Ontario PC leader Patrick Brown’s new lineup of opposition critics. “I’m looking forward to picking up on the effective work of former Research and Innovation Critics Randy Hillier and Ted Arnott, while continuing to concentrate my efforts on improving transit and transportation across Ontario,” said Harris.

Harris was first named to the Transportation role in July 2014, and has since worked on a wide range of issues including distracted driving, GO Transit, LRTs, roundabouts, winter road maintenance, truck testing, HOV lanes and more.

Say Hi next Thursday

The ninth annual Say Hi Day returns to elementary and secondary schools across Waterloo Region Sept. 24. The lesson taught is simple: by saying hi, students get to know one another, learn to become more inclusive and promote

a greater sense of community within their schools. “Saying hi is one small step towards bullying prevention,” said Christiane Sadeler, executive director of the Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council. “It brings students together in a positive, inclusive way and promotes a sense of belonging. ” Since 2007 the Crime Prevention Council has partnered with the Waterloo Region District School Board and the Waterloo Catholic District School Board to bring the Say Hi campaign to more than 100,000 students annually at local schools. Schools celebrate Say Hi Day in many

different ways which may include teaching how to say hi in different languages, participating in group icebreaker activities, having special guests and greeters welcome students, doing community outreach or creating handprint murals. The Say Hi message translates into themes of inclusion, diversity and understanding within a school community.

More students using food banks Of the millions of students who just started school, many will be forced to use the food bank on their campus in

order to survive. Since many campus food banks are running out of food for the growing numbers using them, more and more students have recognized the need for political action. “Since I started at the food bank, 35% more students are accessing the service,” says Drew Silverthorn, a campus food bank coordinator in Toronto. “Rather than having more food drives or fundraising, we are recognizing that we’ll never meet the need until we deal with the underlying issues that are driving people into poverty.” In January, Silverthorn published Canada’s first Campus Hunger Report, which demonstrates that tuition fees

and unemployment are linked to higher food bank usage. This past summer, Silverthorn was hired at Meal Exchange, a national non-profit, to support the creation of Campus Hunger Reports on other campuses. For the federal election, Meal Exchange is working with Food Secure Canada’s Youth Caucus to support students to host Eat Think Vote events. These events invite all candidates to discuss over a meal the food issues facing students and young people. With dozens of events already registered, hundreds of candidates will be engaged and asked to show how their party will tackle food insecurity among students.

POLICE BLOTTER

Be mindful of phone/internet scammers, police warn The Ontario Provincial Police and Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre is warning residents of Ontario of an active internet scam in Ontario this month.   The scam generally involves a call to a grandparent who is advised by the scammer that one of their grandchildren is in trouble and they are asked to send money. While the “grandson” version attracts the media attention, another common trend in the emergency pitch involves emails being sent to contact lists from hacked email accounts.   The general scam usually contains a story that the victim is stranded and in need of money, e.g. travelling abroad, mugged,

lost all money and identification and needs money to travel home. The scammer asks for money to be sent by Western Union or MoneyGram to a foreign country. Police warn residents to be cautious, protecting themselves. Do your research: if this is someone you know you may be able to call them or other family members and friends to confirm their whereabouts. Never send money to a stranger, always check with someone you trust before you ever send money. If in doubt, contact your local police authority. For more information, check out www.opp.ca or www.antifraudecentrecentreantifraude.ca.

SEPTEMBER 4

10:45 PM | A 27-year-old Moorefield man will be heading to criminal court later this summer following a traffic stop after OPP received a call about a possible impaired driver. Officers began patrolling the area and within a few minutes a Perth OPP officer spotted the vehicle on Line 88 east of Road 146.  A traffic stop was initiated and upon speaking with the driver the officer noted the driver had been drinking alcohol and had an open container of alcohol inside the minivan. A roadside screening test was performed and the driver registered a fail. He was placed under arrest and subsequently charged with

3:42 PM | Members of the Wellington County OPP Street Crime Unit (SCU) and the Emergency Response Team (ERT) executed a Controlled Drugs and Substances Act (CDSA) warrant at a residence in Moorefield, Mapleton Township. Police seized marijuana plants that were growing outside the residence, along with drug paraphernalia that was located inside the home. A 33-year-old Mapleton Township man was charged with ‘produce a substance in schedule 2 – marijuana.’ He is scheduled to appear in Guelph Criminal Court on October 9 to answer to the charge.

POLICE SEEK SUSPECT AFTER ST. CLEMENTS FIRE

A fire, which is being described as an explosion, occurred at The Fitness Edge Gym in St. Clements at approximately 12:35 a.m. Thursday. The Ontario Fire Marshall was on scene investigating later in the day. There were no injuries reported and damage is described as extensive. Waterloo Regional Police are looking for a suspect described as roughly 5’4”, dressed in a black hoodie and black pants with a white diagonal stripe near the waist. Witnesses are asked to contact the Waterloo Regional Police. [JOE MERLIHAN / THE OBSERVER]

‘drive motor vehicle – over 80 milligrams of alcohol’ and ‘drive motor vehicle with open container of liquor.’ He has been released from custody with a court appearance scheduled for the Ontario Court of Justice – Listowel on September 30.  He also received an automatic 90 day driver’s licence suspension and his motor vehicle has been impounded for seven days. SEPTEMBER 13

6:30 PM | Wellington County OPP officers investigated a break-in at a business on 4th Line, Mapleton Township. It occurred between 10 a.m. on September 12, 2015 at 10

a.m. and  the time of the report.  The unknown suspect(s) gained entry and stole: 2014 Odes ATV 800 CC-dark blue, a Dewalt 18-volt cordless drill, two Dewalt batteries, a Dewalt cordless hammer drill, Powerfist heavy duty booster cables, an LED light bar, and a small amount of money. Any person with information regarding this incident should contact the Wellington County OPP at 1-888-310-1122. Should you wish to remain anonymous, you may call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or submit a tip on-line at www.csgw.tips. You may be eligible for a reward from Crime Stoppers of up to $2,000.

BIG RESPONSE FOR MILL FIRE

Fire crews from Elmira, St. Jacobs and Conestogo responded to a fire at the Jones Feed Mill near Heidelberg at 10:52 a.m. Sept. 12. Flames in a processor were quickly extinguished; the cause, and cost of the damage have not been determined, Woolwich fire officials said. [SCOTT BARBER / THE OBSERVER]

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6 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

Taking a peek as Doors Open across the region this Saturday SCOTT BARBER Interested in taking a peek behind the proverbial closed doors of Waterloo Region? Saturday (Sept. 19) Doors Open Waterloo Region returns with a new slate of historic buildings, manufacturing plants and prominent businesses that will welcome guests inside for a closer look. “Every doors open event has a lineup of interesting places,” organizer Karl Kessler explained. “Either they are architecturally interesting, or they have a heritage interest, or they are interesting for what’s going on inside and it’s not the building itself that’s unique, rather it’s about the people and what they are doing that is fascinating.” There are 40 locations taking part this year, across Kitchener, Waterloo, Cambridge, North Dumfries and Wilmot. The theme is “Play On! Sports Past, Present and Future.” “It’s tying in to Doors Open Ontario, because a lot of Doors Open Ontario affiliated events are running with the sports theme this year as sort of a link to Sport Canada’s year of sport and also the Pan and Parapan Am Games,” Kessler said. “So we have 10 different theme sites, everything from community clubs to arenas.” Highlights include the Kitchener Memorial Auditorium Complex, the home of the Kitchener Rangers, the Rockway Golf Course,

Galt Collegiate, Big Footprints Inc. and St. John the Baptist Romanian Orthodox Church are among the 40 sites welcoming visitors Sept. 26 as part of the 13th annual Doors Open Waterloo. Clearpath Robotics, the Detweiler Meetinghouse – built in 1868 – and old Hespeler Town Hall. There are 40 venues in total, with some popular spots from past years back on the docket, along with a variety of new places for visitors to check out.

them for granted, but there is good reason to be interested in them, especially when they look like they might have a story. Whether it’s a factory that’s being reused, or maybe it’s still a factory, or it’s a grand piece of civic architechture, or a one-room schoolhouse. You

“It’s a great community building event, and it also gives people a chance to see some of the places they might drive by everyday and are curious about, but wouldn’t otherwise be able to get into,” Kessler said. “We see these buildings everyday and we might take

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it really becomes a thing that’s really about the people who use these places.” The 13th annual Doors Open Waterloo Region runs 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday. For more information, visit www.doorsopenontario. on.ca/Events/WaterlooRegion.

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NEWS | 7

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

Conestogo firefighters serving up more than breakfast Sept. 26 Event at the fire hall is association’s largest fundraiser of the year SCOTT BARBER There’s nothing quite like waking up to the unmistakable sound and smell of bacon cooking in the morning. The combination of fresh eggs and fluffy pancakes with local maple syrup , is surely the foundation of the classic Canadian breakfast. On September 26, you can enjoy an all-you-can-eat buffet of your favourites for a good cause, at the Conestogo Firefighters Association’s annual fundraiser breakfast. “This is our main fundraiser for the year,” CFA social chair Terry van Lenthe said. “We haven’t tagged anything specific for the (money raised) this year, but last year we donated ($2,000) to a cause called Heroes of Human, which is an organization that supports first responders suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder, so we thought it was a fitting cause because we are all first responders and we deal with stressful situations and sometimes we do deal with death and that can be stressful. So we thought it was an appropriate charity to donate to. In previous years we have donated to Kate’s Kause in Woolwich Township, and we have also do-

nated to a fellow firefighter on the Woolwich Fire Department who died a couple years ago and we donated to his family to try and help out. So like I said, we try to keep it either related to the fire service or the Woolwich area.” Funds also go “towards regular association sponsored events to promote safety as well as to assist members of our community inordinately affected by an emergency,” CFA Treasurer Phil Bauman said. “We do other social activities for the fire department, but as far as the fundraisers that we do, this is really the big one,” van Lenthe added. “We also do some activities for schools, including at the Conestogo Public School where we set up a truck each year to give the kids a chance to check it out and see what we do. The kindergarten classes also usually have a trip to our fire hall each year so they can see what we do. We also hold safety events at the West Montrose trailer park just to show people how to use a fire extinguisher and we show how to put out a fire.” The Conestogo Firefighters Association all-you-caneat fundraiser breakfast runs 7-11 a.m. September 26 at the Conestogo fire hall, 1869 Sawmill Rd. Cost is $8.

Regional Municipality of Waterloo 2016 Citizen Appointments to Boards, Commissions, Advisory Committees & Special Purpose Bodies Each year the Regional Municipality of Waterloo advertises for applications from the public and appoints citizens to various Boards, Commissions, Advisory Committees and other Special Purpose Bodies required for a particular year(s) or Council term of office. These appointments give citizens of this Region, from a variety of backgrounds, an opportunity to volunteer and become actively engaged as a member of a Board, Commission, Advisory Committee or other Special Purpose Body. Interested citizens and incumbent members are invited to apply for appointment to any of the following: Active Transportation Advisory Committee (ATAC) Three persons required for a four-year term ending December 31, 2019 and one person required for a three-year term ending December 31, 2018; where possible, preference will be given to applicants from the four (4) rural Area Municipalities. The Active Transportation Advisory Committee will serve as a forum for the public to raise their viewpoints on particular active transportation issues and to advise Regional Council and staff on cycling and pedestrian issues. Residents with skills and demonstrated expertise in cycling and pedestrian areas of concern are encouraged to apply. Ecological and Environmental Advisory Committee (EEAC) Five persons required for a three-year term ending December 31, 2018. Persons with knowledge, interest, professional and/or technical qualifications in environmental issues related to such disciplines and policy areas as biology, ecology, hydrology, hydrogeology, forestry, agriculture, environmental law/policy, wildlife management and urban/rural planning are encouraged to apply. Heritage Planning Advisory Committee (HPAC) Three persons required for a three-year term ending December 31, 2018. The Heritage Planning Advisory Committee advises on Regional heritage issues and policies, in accordance with the Regional Official Plan. The Committee also assists the Region in promoting Regional heritage and in increasing public understanding of heritage issues. Kissing Bridge Trailway Advisory Board Two persons required for a three-year term ending December 31, 2018. Persons who are farm and non-farm landowners in proximity to the Kissing Bridge Trailway in any of the communities in which the Trailway is located are encouraged to apply. The Trailway Advisory Board advises the County of Wellington and Regional Council on the development and management of the Trailway. Laurel Creek Headwaters Environmentally Sensitive Landscape Public Liaison Committee (LCHESLPLC) Five persons required for a three-year term ending December 31, 2018. Persons residing or owning property in the Laurel Creek Headwaters Environmentally Sensitive Landscape in the Townships of Wellesley, Wilmot or Woolwich or the City of Waterloo are invited to apply. The Laurel Creek Headwaters Environmentally Sensitive Landscape Public Liaison Committee serves as a communitybased forum to monitor, discuss and provide periodic advice to the Region on how best to implement the objectives of the Regional Planning Policies for the Laurel Creek Headwaters Environmentally Sensitive Landscape. Public Art Advisory Committee (PAAC) Two persons required for a three-year term ending December 31, 2018. The Region of Waterloo Public Art Advisory Committee develops and recommends policies for the selection, acquisition, display, retention, maintenance, storage and de-accessioning of public art which is owned by or on loan to the Region. Specialized Transit Services Advisory Committee (STSAC)

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Five persons required for a two-year term ending December 31, 2017. The Specialized Transit Services Advisory Committee will advise and provide assistance relating to the development of Special Transit Services policies and service that best meet the needs of the community. The Committee requires two individuals that are members of MobilityPLUS service and one individual that is a member of the medical community (i.e. Nurse, Occupational Therapist, Physiotherapist or Physician). These individuals are strongly encouraged to apply. Water Efficiency Advisory Committee (WEAC) Two persons required for a four-year term ending December 31, 2019. The Water Efficiency Advisory Committee will give direction and make recommendations regarding water-efficiency initiatives and program development to staff and through staff to Planning and Works Committee. Persons interested in serving as a Committee member must file an application with the Regional Clerk prior to 4:30 p.m. on Friday, October 9, 2015. The application form and the Terms of Reference for the listed Committees are available on the Region’s website or by contacting the Regional Clerk’s office. To view the application and the Terms of Reference for the various committees on the Region’s website: • Go to www.regionofwaterloo.ca • Select the “Regional Government” pull-down menu • Select “Agendas/Minutes” • Select “Advisory Committees” • Scroll down page for “2016 Citizen Appointments” This information may also be obtained from the office of the Regional Clerk by contacting Tim Brubacher at 519-575-4493 or by emailing tbrubacher@regionofwaterloo.ca. Advertised vacancies on a particular Committee may be filled by incumbents whose terms have expired and, therefore, the number of actual vacancies may differ from the number of advertised vacancies. All applicants will receive written notification about the outcome of their application. It is expected that all appointments will be finalized and approved by Regional Council no later than December 16, 2015.

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Kris Fletcher Director, Council & Administrative Services / Regional Clerk 150 Frederick Street, 2nd Floor Kitchener, Ontario N2G 4J3 Personal information is collected under the authority of the Municipal Act and will be used to determine suitability for appointment. Questions regarding the collection of personal information should be referred to Tim Brubacher at 519-575-4493, Office of the Regional Clerk.


8 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

GETTING BEHIND THE WHEEL ... AND THE COMMUNITY

Woolwich Lions Club members Elaine Racey, Val King, Nancy Booth, Dorothy Campbell, Eileen Taylor, Pat McLean, Jenn De Costa, Linda Litt, Shelly Taylor and Hedy Iviney helped more than 200 people register for the “Drive 4UR Community” fundraiser at the Foodland parking lot Sept. 12. [SCOTT BARBER / THE OBSERVER]

AMBASSADOR: Ready to represent farmers FROM | 3

my community like this and to be able to represent my community to a larger audience at the CNE this year.” She said during her time as the ambassador she’s looking forward to working with the Wellesley-North Easthope Agricultural Society as a member and also helping put on the fair next year and for years to come. “All the girls were so great and so friendly. And it’s always nice to work with Joanne (Stewart) and Wendy (Richardson), and it’s so inspiring to see how much work all the volunteers put into the fair and I’m inspired myself by that,” Draper said. Before passing the torch, Jeffries told the crowd how the experience has changed her over the course of the last year. “From the moment I entered the competition I knew I had stumbled upon a group of role models that would change my life. Thank you all for encour-

aging me, supporting me, and allowing a goofball like me to represent you for the year,” Jeffries said. She encouraged all the participants, win or lose, to soak in the experience and be proud of the accomplishments they’ve made so far. She also took time to thank the people closest to her, in her own unique way. “I would like to

thank my family and friends for putting up with me and my tiara headaches, constant reciting of speeches, and annoying with sharing facts I’ve learned about proper etiquette and agriculture,” Jeffries. She had some simple advice for Draper, who will be filling her shoes representing Wellesley across the province and at the Canadian National Exhibition. “This coming year will change you forever. Take lots of photos. Share your experience with others through social media and face-to-face conversation. You’re about to embark on quite the adventure,” Jeffries said. “Bring comfortable shoes and your amazing personality. That’s all you’ll need to succeed.”

St. Clements’ Sally Draper was named the 2015-16 Wellesley-North Easthope Fall Fair Ambassador on Tuesday at the opening of the event. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]

IDOL: Young performers wow the judges FROM | 3

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form, whether it’s on stage, in a choir, or busking on a street corner. They selected Taylor Kelly, Paige Warner and Brooke Bauer to move on to the finals. Their musical styles range from rock to folk to Broadway. It’ll be a tough choice for the judges to choose a winner, as all three have some serious pipes and bring a unique sound to the stage. The audience also voted on a fan favourite, Jessie MacDonald, who will perform in the finals. Prizes for the top three are $500, $300, and $200, respectively. The fan favourite will receive $125. Bauer put on a show with Naughty from Matilda the Musical.

“We like to tag her as Broadway Brooke. She’s this tiny person, but such a powerhouse presence on the stage. That’s what she has going for her, so we’re really excited to see how she can elevate that to bring more of herself out at the ABC Festival. She’s just one small package of small entertainment,” Sunga said in an interview after the winners were announced. Warner sang Autumn Leaves by Eva Cassidy, and accompanied herself on guitar. She was selected as the fan favourite and made it to the finals in the 2013 Wellesley Idol. “She’s obviously a born entertainer. She has crazy stage presence. She held the whole room in the palm of her hand. She just

had to sing those first few notes and she captivated everyone. She’s just super talented. And I think that presence for me was the main reason she needed to go on to the next round,” Seifried said. Kelly performed Ironic by Alanis Morissette. She made it to the semi-finals last year, but wasn’t selected to move on to the finals. “Her vocal quality is awesome. She’s got great control over her voice and we want to see her break out of her shell and gain some more confidence and really entertain us. But the goods are there. We’re excited for the next round,” Seifried said. The finalists hit the stage at the ABC Festival on September 26 at 2 p.m.


NEWS | 9

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

Woolwich council uneasy with fundraising policy STEVE KANNON A blanket policy that citizens fundraising for new recreation facilities must collect an extra 15 per cent to cover operating and maintenance costs failed to catch on with Woolwich councillors this week. Championed by Coun. Mark Bauman, the policy was deemed likely to discourage community volunteers, winning just a pair of votes. Tuesday night’s discussion followed the tabling of a report by recreation director Karen Makela suggesting a “menu of options” for the township to consider when community groups come forward with project ideas such as the skate park and Kate’s Place accessible playground in Elmira. The report, the first draft of which was debated last month, stems from concerns the township takes on increasing operating and maintenance costs when it assumes ownership of community-driven projects such as playgrounds and sports pads. Both Bauman and Coun. Larry

Shantz have been adamant that the benefiting community should pay for the projects, including future costs, rather than having the burden fall on general tax coffers. “I don’t think the citizens of this community should pay for special interest groups ... through their tax levy,” said Bauman, adding it would be reasonable to expect groups to raise an additional 15 per cent to support ongoing maintenance and operation costs. Coun. Patrick Merlihan objected to Bauman’s rationale, however. “These are our citizens. I don’t consider them special interest groups,” he said of volunteers working for new projects, noting the policy could put a damper on community spirit. “By making this a legal contract, I think we kill that spirit. It kills the fun.” Fellow Ward 1 councillor Scott Hahn was also vocal in his opposition to a blanket policy. “We’re asking individuals who raised outstanding amounts of money to raise more. We’re ultimately say-

ing, ‘Thanks, but what you accomplished isn’t good enough,’” he argued, saying the policy would be poor treatment of volunteers who step up to do good things in the community. The policy under consideration would create more problems than it solves, said Hahn, noting council’s “moral compass” would not be pointing north if it approved the plan. Rather than pushing groups to collect more money, the township should only support projects it feels warrant the future costs, he suggested. “If we can’t afford to take care of these projects, then we should not be supporting them from the beginning.” A major fundraising organization, the Woolwich Recreational Facilities Foundation (WRFF), has indicated it sees the policy as an impediment. The township has been talking with the group, along with others such as Kate’s Kause, about the proposed changes. Calling the policy unprecedented, Kelly Meiss-

TRUDEAU ANNOUNCES JOB PLAN IN WATERLOO

ner of Kate’s Kause told councillors “the 15 per cent is intimidating,” making it more difficult for fundraising organizations. On the fence, Coun. Murray Martin ultimately voted against the policy as being too sweeping. “It’s way too broad –

painting everything with one brush.” Makela, however, argued the policy presents a number of options, allowing leeway to waive the fundraising requirement in cases, for instance, where the township doesn’t see any significant operating or

maintenance expenses. “It’s not meant to be the one brush for all projects,” she said. Under the policy, the township could also look at sponsorship options, or continuing to pay for costs from general township revenues.

NOTICE OF COMPLETION Class Environmental Assessment Study Conestogo Plains Water Supply System In August 2013, the Region initiated a Class Environmental Assessment (EA) study to confirm the feasibility of using the Conestogo Plains system to also supply West Montrose. As part of this study, several alternatives to ensure long term sustainable water supply to both communities were identified and evaluated. The Class EA study has been conducted in accordance with the requirements of a Schedule B project of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment document (Municipal Engineers Association, October 2000 as amended in 2007 & 2011). The Class EA has identified that the preferred water supply solution, for the West Montrose and Conestogo Plains service areas is the connection to the Region’s Integrated Urban System (IUS) at St. Jacobs. This solution offers the opportunity to also connect the Conestogo Golf Course service area to the IUS in the future. The preferred water supply solution has been selected to minimize potential impacts and maximize the opportunity to provide sustainable and reliable water servicing to the West Montrose and Conestogo communities. Your Opinion Matters A Project File Report (PFR) documenting the planning and decision making process followed during the Class EA study has been prepared. By this notice, the PFR is being placed on the public record for a 30-day review period. Subject to comments received as a result of this Notice and the receipt of all necessary approvals, the Region intends to proceed with the detailed design and construction of the Conestogo Plains Water Supply System project as documented in the PFR. The report will be available for public review starting on September 16, 2015, until October 16, 2015. The Report will be available online at www.region.waterloo.on.ca/water and at the following locations during normal business hours: Region of Waterloo Clerk’s Office 150 Frederick Street, 2nd Floor Kitchener, ON N2G 4J3 Phone: 519-575-4420

Federal liberal leader Justin Trudeau stopped at a plumbers and steamfitters union-run training facility in Waterloo on Tuesday, promising more than $750 million in federal funding for job training programs if elected in October. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]

TRANSFER STATION: Council meets Sept. 23 FROM | COVER

the service, but the report tabled this week offered no solutions, only another call to close down the transfer stations. Originally scheduled to shut down in March, the facilities were kept open in part to maintain continuity while the options were explored. Now, all the months appear to have been wasted. “It took them six months to come to us and say, ‘you guys figure it out’?” asked an incredulous Coun. Scott Hahn. The wasted time essentially scuttles any plan to find a private solution. Woolwich Township has

been especially vocal about retaining the much-used facility in Elmira, pushing for the region to keep the station open pending sale to a private operator. Timing is a key issue, as the two private companies that have expressed an interest in taking over the facility have stressed the need to keep the site in operation during the transition stage, which could take a considerable amount of time. Along with the time the region would need to clear the way for something like the sale of the land, the new operator would also face regulatory hurdles from the provincial Minis-

try of the Environment. In closing the Elmira station, the region will have to turn over the property to the township – a 1991 agreement in which the region took over the facility says the property reverts to the Woolwich should operations cease. But ownership doesn’t come with any of the licenses and clearances to run a transfer station, however. The committee’s recommendations go to regional council Wednesday evening, with the township suggesting any last-minute attempts by residents to get out in numbers will have to be arranged by then.

Township of Woolwich Clerk’s Office 24 Church Street West Elmira, ON N3B 2Z6 Phone: 519-669-1647

Materials are available in alternate formats upon request. Contact Us Interested persons should provide written comments regarding the project within the prescribed review period to either of the following individuals: Pam Law, P. Eng. Senior Project Engineer, Water Services Region of Waterloo 150 Frederick Street, 7th Floor Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4J3 Telephone: 519-575-4095 Fax: 519-575-4452 Email: PLaw@regionofwaterloo.ca

Eric Tuson, P.Eng. Project Manager CIMA 3027 Harvester Road, Suite 400 Burlington, Ontario, L7N 3G7 Telephone: 289-288-0287 Ext. 6839 Fax: 289-288-0285 Email: Eric.Tuson@cima.ca

If concerns arise during the prescribed review period that cannot be resolved through discussions with the Region, a person or party may request that the Minister of Environment and Climate Change make an order for the project to comply with Part II of the Environmental Assessment Act. This request (commonly referred to as a Part II Order) must be received within the above prescribed review period by the Minister at the address listed below and copied to Ms. Pam Law at the Region of Waterloo. If no request is received on or before October 16, 2015, the Region intends to proceed with detailed design and construction of the project. The Honourable Glen Murray Minister of the Environment and Climate Change 11th Floor, Ferguson Block 77 Wellesley Street West Toronto, ON, M7A 2T5


10 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

JOE MERLIHAN PUBLISHER STEVE KANNON EDITOR

COMMENT

DONNA RUDY SALES MANAGER

SCOTT BARBER REPORTER

WHITNEY NEILSON

PATRICK MERLIHAN PRODUCTION MANAGER

JAKE STALLARD GRAPHIC DESIGN

REPORTER PUBLICATION MAIL AGREEMENT NUMBER 1004840 | ISSN 12039578

OUR VIEW / EDITORIAL

THE VIEW FROM HERE

Region shows its contempt for township residents WOOLWICH GOT A REFRESHER this week on why a single-tier government would be detrimental for residents of the region’s rural communities. Despite pushing to save the well-used waste transfer station, the township got only derision and a slap in the face for its troubles. Even if you skip past the value-for-money proposition of having the region continue to run the facility in Elmira, there is very real interest in having the service continue in private hands. That would have required the region to make some effort to ensure continuity and to turn over the operation. Aside from a few worthless platitudes early on, the region this week told Woolwich to go pound salt. It was readily apparent staff and politicians did nothing since promising to look at the issue months ago – they were essentially running out the clock so that there was no chance the timing would allow for a hand-over. The region lied, plain and simple. Why, you might ask? The region wants to funnel more money into the enormous white elephant known as Ion. Not only do they want to waste the purported savings from cutting the transfer stations on their pet project, you can bet they will be coming up with new ways to reduce the services you use in favour of taking your money for a useless service you don’t. And there’s hypocrisy at play here: While regional officials complain incessantly about the need to keep waste out of the landfill site, their rationale for backstabbing a transfer station deal is that a private operator might choose to take the waste elsewhere – it’s all about the money, not helping to extend the life of the Erb Street dump. While it’s clear having the garbage go elsewhere would ease the burden on the landfill site – the ostensible reason for many costly diversion plans, including the mismanaged green bin program – it’s all about short-term thinking and the need to pour money into an unneeded and unwanted project that’s already bleeding red ink, with hundreds of millions of gallons to come. This week’s decision – all but assured to be rubberstamped at regional council next Wednesday – shows disregard for township residents. If they were really interested in ensuring the public was served, regional officials would have quickly turned over the facility to a private operator. But they have no interest in that. No, they want the money. Woolwich is now on its own if it wants to have a transfer station in the township. There is, however, not enough time to make a transition at the current facility – the region is set on closing it by year’s end. Woolwich could agree to finance the continued operation of the site pending a sale to a private company. That would take a considerable amount of cash – regional figures show a net cost of about $9,000 a month this year for the poor level of service now on offer – and the township might not be in a position to do that, the region having offered no refund or tax reductions despite discontinuing to provide the service. Of course, there’s an easy spot to find the money: there is some $500,000 a year being wasted on a little-used bus service the region is happy to operate at a huge loss because it feeds the wasteful transit machine. Far more people in the township use the transfer station, and it is of much greater use to businesses than GRT route 21. Axing it would free up some cash, and send a message to the region about working with duplicitous partners.

Happy to cut services and spend the money on pet projects, the region has no interest in helping Woolwich move ahead with the transfer station. WORLD VIEW / GWYNNE DYER

There are plenty of parallels between Labour’s Corbryn and Democrat’s Sanders as both focus on the people WORLD AFFAIRS Jeremy “Jez” Corbyn and Bernie Sanders are very much alike, and so are their ambitions. Corbyn wants to lead Britain’s Labour Party into the next election and become prime minister; Sanders wants to win the Democratic Party nomination and become the next president of the United States. And then each man plans to turn his country sharply to the left. To the vast surprise of practically everybody, Corbyn has just achieved the first stage of his master plan: on Saturday, he became the leader of the Labour Party. When he entered the leadership contest, the bookmakers were quoting odds of 200-to-1 against him, but he ended up winning the leadership by a landslide. Senator Sanders was also seen as a complete no-hoper when he threw his hat into the ring: 74 years old (Corbyn is 66), no money

and no well-honed political machine behind him (ditto), and far too left-wing to win the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination, let alone the presidency. But something unexpected is also happening with Sanders’s campaign. There were no other high-profile candidates for the Democratic nomination: most people assumed that it was Hillary Clinton’s for the asking. But then Sanders began to creep up on her, especially in the two states where the first primaries will be held, New Hampshire and Iowa. The last three polls have shown Sanders leading Clinton in New Hampshire by an average margin of 7.5 per cent, and he is now one per cent ahead in Iowa too. Sanders is not as far left as Corbyn, of course. No elected U.S. politician is as far left as Corbyn, who promises to nationalize the railways and energy companies, scrap university tuition fees, bring back rent controls, raise taxes and introduce a national maximum wage to cap the wages of bankers and other high

earners, impose an arms embargo on Israel, and get rid of Britain’s nuclear weapons. When asked if there were any circumstances under which he would deploy British armed forces abroad, Corbyn replied: “I’m sure there are some but I can’t think of them at the moment.” He’s a republican, although he says that ending the monarchy is “not the fight I’m interested in.” He’s a vegetarian who does not own a car, and he looks a little like Obi-Wan Kenobi. He is, in other words, the Real McCoy. Bernie Sanders, by contrast, lives in the United States, where many people regard “democratic socialism” as akin to devil worship. He favours universal healthcare funded by taxes (supported by all parties in Britain) and publicly funded elections with strict limits on corporate donations (ditto), and he too advocates free higher education and higher taxes on the rich. That’s already “socialist” in an American political context. But he’s not planning

to nationalize anything, bring in rent controls, end all American military interventions overseas, or ban arms sales to Israel. Whatever his private opinions may be, he is running for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination, and nobody in the Democratic Party has advocated anything that radical within living memory. Sanders is as far left within the American political spectrum (which doesn’t extend very far in that direction) as Corbyn is within the broader British spectrum. Could he really pull off a Corbyn-style upset and win the Democratic nomination? It depends on whether Hillary Clinton’s current stumbles end in a big fall in her support. It could happen. Last week’s opinion polls revealed that she had lost her lead over her two likeliest Republican opponents in next year’s presidential election, Jeb Bush or Ben Carson – and even Donald Trump was drawing level with her. The Democratic NaDYER | 12


COMMENT | 11

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

THEIR VIEW / QUESTION OF THE WEEK

What’s your favourite part of the Wellesley Fall Fair?

»»Sally Draper

»»Emma Seip

»»Ceilidh McBay

The tradition of everyone coming out and candy apples.

The ferris wheel.

I like the rides and how it happens every year. Seeing everyone at the same time every year. My favourite part about the fall fair is the I still see people I went to public school with. cotton candy because it’s so sweet and it feels like you’re eating a cloud.

»»Ashley Jeffries

»»Katie Kniesel

“Bernie Sanders, by contrast, lives in the United States, where many people regard ‘democratic socialism’ as akin to devil worship.” Gwynne Dyer | 10 HIS VIEW / STEVE KANNON

A real regard for what people need trumps populism every time EDITOR'S NOTES There’s much talk these days about peoplefirst leadership. Unfortunately, little of it is happening here. The goings-on in Europe, particularly Syriza in Greece and Podemos in Spain, brought the issue to the fore. This week’s election of Jeremy Cobryn as leader of the UK Labour party has socialism on the tip of every tongue, some of them in very frothing mouths. Most surprisingly, even the U.S. is seeing some real movement on that front courtesy of Bernie Sanders’ bid to be the Democrats’ presidential candidate. In looking at these campaigns, you get the sense there’s a real concern for the plight of actual people. Truths are being told instead of the useless platitudes/prevarications aimed at getting re-elected while masking policies designed to benefit very few. “This government has no strategy to move beyond

the low-pay, low-skill, lowproductivity economy. It has been content to leave people’s potential untapped, talents wasted. It is content with an economy that works for the few not the many,” is what Cobryn had to say of his country’s latest budget. Or take Sanders. “If I’m elected president, trust me, we will be directly involved and working with millions of people who will tell the billionaire class: their day is over, they are not going to get it all, they’re going to pay their fair share of taxes, we are going to create millions of jobs, we are going to raise the minimum wage, Wall Street will pay a tax on speculation whether they like it or not, because millions of people now will be involved in the political process.” Governing is more difficult than critics make it out to be, but by a much wider margin it’s nowhere near as difficult as those in power suggest. What is difficult is changing the status quo, especially with large factions intent on retaining their entitlements. That includes the self-serving managers and workers and, at the higher levels,

HOW TO REACH US

that would benefit large chunks of the population, not those financial backers and the monied classes. His is a grassroots campaign, essentially running against a Hillary Clinton bid that comes with all the money and media exposure (the media largely being the property of large corporations). On the Republican side, it’s Donald Trump’s campaign that is the populist one, though for a far different reason. Like other self-styled outsiders who promise to change the system, Trump knows which buttons to push. He’s loud, crass and politically incorrect. Having craved the limelight his whole life, taking his media personality directly to television as an entertainer, he plays that game very well. He’s unapologetic, coming out with things many Americans think but don’t say. Trump doesn’t have any policies (substance), but he’s certainly got style ... the kind that we might recognize courtesy of a former Toronto mayor. We’ve seen this kind of sizzle before, but perhaps

the likes of Sanders and Corbyn indicate a growing preference for steak. That’s why a back-to-basics approach appeals to so many of us: intrinsically, we know government is getting too controlled by corporate interests, too wasteful and too unaccountable. Leaders who actually get us back on track – as opposed to talking the talk simply to get elected – will be doing use a much larger favour than simply providing good government for the next four years. Thanks to decades of concerted effort, many people have bought into a set of diminished expectations about the role of government and, more troublingly, the possibilities of shaping a better society. We’ve had democracy reduced to the occasional trip to the polls. We’ve seen government reduced to managerial functions, where debate is constrained to a few wellworn topics. We’ve seen the economy reduced to fiscal policy – deregulation’s the order of the day as the financial services industry sets the agenda. We’ve seen citizenship dumbed down to

passive observation, at best. Fewer of us bother to vote, let alone take an interest in elections. Far fewer still look past the slogans and latest complaints. But if we’re going to have a better society we need to think about the future 10, 20, 50 and 100 years down the line. The road we’ve been on for the last three decades, driven by the neoconservative corporate agenda, has diminished our quality of life. We have to look past dubious vote-buying programs, immediate tax cuts and partisanship. Where Trump, following in a long line of would-be and purported leaders, offers the cult-of-personality, maybe we’re now ready to look for leaders to shape a shared vision that’s good for the many. In our federal election, the opposition parties have talked a good game. Certainly a change is needed to go away the corruption, illegalities and disregard for the public, but we have yet to see the substance that’s emerged elsewhere. If it does, maybe we’ll be more eager to take note of the campaign.

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those with political power – i.e. the large financial contributors and their lobbyists – whose only concerns are for what benefits them, not the public. There is a decided lack of leaders intent on serving the public good. Oh, they mouth the platitudes, but their actions clearly belie their words. This is true of Woolwich council, for instance, but the real battle plays out at the national level. In this country, the current government is running on a record it lies about – it has been one of the worst in Canada’s history, but it misrepresents everything it’s done, from its mismanagement of the economy through to stripping away of our civil rights. For a far more blatant example, see the U.S. system. Right now, presidential hopefuls are lining up for the Democratic and Republican primaries, itself an exercise in big money and even bigger lies ... erm, embellishments and evasions. That’s where Sanders comes in – he speaks far more plainly and tells the truth, presenting policies

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12 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

THE MONITOR

VERBATIM

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

In the 2011 election, Harper won his majority with just 6,201 votes out of 14.8 million cast. Those 6,201 votes were the difference between the Conservative win and the second place finisher in the 14 closest races across Canada. This time around, strategic voting could see 57% of Liberal voters vote NDP and 50% of NDP supporters vote Liberal to topple Harper.

“Stephen Harper has severely damaged our democracy. The Green Party believes that a Member of Parliament fundamentally works for their constituents, not for their political party. That is why we don’t whip votes. It is critical that we restore parliamentary democracy, reduce the power of the PMO, and work across party lines for the good of Canadian families.”

A plan to slow traffic on Conestogo’s old bridge hit a bump in the road this week, as vandals unbolted temporary speed bumps and dumped them into the river. The units were installed two weeks ago as an experiment to reduce speeding across the old structure. The rubber bumps were retrieved from the river undamaged.

»»Nanos Research

»»Green Party leader Elizabeth May comments on the state of affairs in Canada in

»»From the Sept. 17, 2005 edition of The Observer

marking the International Day of Democracy

DYER: Citizens facing hard

NATIONAL VIEW

times are now the mainstream

FROM | 10

tional Convention is still 10 months away, but it’s already late for anybody other than Vice-President Joe Biden to enter the race with a good chance of winning – and Biden is deeply conflicted about running. So if Clinton fades, Sanders would have a chance: the odds against him are already a good deal shorter than 200-to-1. Whether he could actually win the presidency is a different question. British pundits were unanimous in saying that Corbyn has no chance of winning a national election and becoming prime minister. Former Labour leader and prime minister Tony Blair went further: “If Jeremy Corbyn becomes leader it won’t be a defeat like 1983 or 2015 at the next election. It will mean rout, possibly annihilation.” But Labour just lost the

YOUR VIEW / LETTER

The state should stay out of the way of the economy

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To the Editor, The two things I got out of Steve Kannon’s Editor’s Notes is that he knows not what capitalism is, nor does he see any problem with stealing from the wealthy instead of creating more wealth for all. Capitalism is, and only is, the separation of economy and state. That means the state does not interfere with the economy in any way. When even one regulation is required by government of business we no longer have capitalism, but statism. This does not mean that under capitalism businesses can run amok and use slaves or child labour. A government’s purpose, its only true purpose I might add, is to protect the rights of

its individual citizens. Laws pertaining to protecting said rights would be enforced upon business and citizen alike, therefore slaves and child labour would be outlawed due to its violation of individual rights. It would not be a “regulation” for business to follow. Furthermore, there is no such thing as “corporate capitalism.” As stated, when even one regulation is placed upon the economy we no longer have capitalism, therefore the current system we have now, with massive regulation, corporate lobbying, financial bailouts and taxes, is not a form of capitalism but a form of statism, called corporatism. Just as other forms of statism (such as cronyism, socialism, totalitarianism, communism) violate individual rights, through the use of force, to achieve its end, so too does corporatism. Finally, and perhaps

last election, and the next one is five years away. There is still time to change horses if Corbyn isn’t working out. Whereas the U.S. election is next year. Could Sanders win it? The professional pundits and pollsters in the United States say no, because he’s too far from the mainstream. Sanders just points to the despair that grips so many middle-class Americans as the rich get ever richer and their own living standards stagnate. “Don’t let anybody tell you that we’re radical, that we’re outside the mainstream. We are the mainstream.” He could be right: it’s the same despair with business as usual that has pushed Donald Trump out in front of the Republican nomination race. And that would be something, wouldn’t it? Bernie Sanders vs. Donald Trump for the presidency. At last Americans get a real choice. most upsetting, is that Kannon’s column does not offer a single suggestion as to how to raise the 90 per cent of Canadian families that are not getting richer into more wealth. It seems he would prefer to tear down the 10 per cent of Canadian families that are getting richer instead. Personally I would rather work at deregulating our current statist system to allow my family, and many others, to freely join the ranks of Canada’s wealthy, rather than steal the wealth from those who already are.

MATTHEW GEORGE | ELMIRA

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SPORTS | 13

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

SPORTS HOCKEY /SHOOTING FOR THE PROS

Elmira contingent cheers on Habs prospect in London SCOTT BARBER Decked out in Montreal Canadiens gear, flags and foam fingers, Marie and Allen Hanley may have been the biggest Habs fans at London’s Budweiser Gardens last weekend. Proud as punch, the pair watched as grandson Joel donned the iconic bleu, blanc et rouge sweater for the first time, in rookie camp action. “I can’t even explain the feeling, I just felt so proud,” Marie said. “And when he and grandpa hugged, when he came out to see the family after the game, it was emotional; It was very special.” Allen and Marie Hanley are longtime Elmira residents, while grandson Joel grew up in the Keswick area, cutting his teeth in minor hockey with the York Simcoe Express. He made the jump up to Junior A with the Newmarket Hurricanes as a 16-year-old, eventually settling in as a regular with the squad the following season. A smooth skating, puck moving defenseman, Hanley scored 29 goals and 39 assists over parts of three seasons with the Canes, before landing a scholarship to play hockey at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. There, he notched 13 goals and 58

Making the transition is never an easy thing OPEN COUNTRY

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx Jacqueline Hanley, Allen Hanley, Marie Hanley, Fausto Vespa, Robert Hanley and Mike Cormier were part of a group of over 30 friends and family members that traveled to London’s Budweiser Gardens Sept. 11-12 to watch Montreal Canadiens prospect Joel Hanley compete in an NHL rookie showcase tournament. [SCOTT BARBER / THE OBSERVER] assists across four seasons. In 2014, Hanley made his professional debut with the Portland Pirates of the American Hockey League, where he tallied five assists in 15 games. “He’s good on the blue line. He’s a rushing defenseman, and he tried that against the Leafs’ rookies and he shot one across the front of the net and his teammates come in to back him up when he does that. It’s a lot like Bobby Orr used to do it,” Allen said with a chuckle.

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The solid collegiate career earned Hanley a tryout with the Arizona Coyotes last fall, but he ended up back with the Pirates for the 2014-15 campaign. There, he recorded a plus seven rating through played 62 games. He also added a pair of goals and 15 assists. This summer, Hanley signed a two-way entry level contract with the Canadiens, earning a spot at their rookie camp this month. The highlight of the

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against prospects for the Toronto Maple Leafs and the Ottawa Senators. The club split the two games, with Hanley picking up an assist. Now, he’ll wait to see if he’ll get a shot at training camp with the Canadiens in Montreal, later this month, or if he’ll head to the club’s AHL affiliate in St. John’s, Newfoundland. “He such a modest guy,” Allen said. “He did really well and we’re so proud of him.”

These days I hear a lot of talk about transitioning on TV entertainment shows. I don’t watch those shows because they generally contain things that are designed to rot our collective brains. Generally, it’s all fluff and no substance. But this topic is different. And, for once, I think I know exactly what they are talking about. You see, I myself am currently transitioning. And, let me tell you it is not easy. I mean how do you switch from fishing to hunting mode without having major doubts? There are still plenty of fish to catch. Plus, late summer and fall fishing opportunities are among the best of the year. Unfortunately, all that excellent fall fishing coincides with the onset of a new hunting season. The thing is transitioning from fishing to hunting is often quite painful. When you break the news to all your fishing buddies, they look at you like you are from Mars. Some of them can’t comprehend why. If you are truly committed to this, however, GALEA | 15

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14 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

Kings back in town for home-opener Sunday Coach happy with what he saw from young team as it split a pair of games to open the season in London SCOTT BARBER Having come away from a challenging opening two games of the 2015-16 season with a split at the Western Fair showcase tournament in London over the weekend, Elmira Sugar Kings head coach Jeff Flanagan says he’s proud of the resiliency his team showed. The defending Cherrey Cup champions began their title defense with a squad that includes just six returning players. With a young group and just a few weeks of practices to institute systems and schemes, Flanagan knew it would be a tough match-up

against the St. Catharines Falcons on September 12. And while the Kings fell 7-2, he was pleased with how his squad came out ready to compete against one of the top clubs in the Greater Ontario Junior Hockey League. “We thought actually that we had a pretty good weekend,” Flanagan said. “The score against St. Catharines on Saturday didn’t really reflect our total game. The first period we felt we played well, but they scored a shorthanded goal against us with a minute and a half left in the period. Though up until that point we felt we had played a very good game against

them. And then we had about a six or seven minute lapse in the second period where they scored three goals and that put us down a significant amount. Then in the third period, we felt we played really well. So it was just a matter of young guys that are learning and we made some mistakes that cost us, but at the same time, we thought we competed very well with them and they’re going to be a very good team this year. We think we’re going to be a good team too, but we’re certainly a different makeup than them and we’ve got a little bit more learning to do I think.” Ryan Walsh and Zac

Coulter scored the goals for Elmira, while Rob Kohli and Ethan Skinner (2) picked up the assists. Back on the ice at 10:30 a.m. the following day, the Kings bounced back for a 5-4 win over the Lambton Shores Predators. “On Sunday we thought we played well,” Flanagan said. “I think (Mike) Black would like a couple of those goals back, and I know we also had another shorthanded goal scored against us and the (penalty kill) guys, I know felt pretty bad about that. But all in all, we scored some nice goals and our systems were working not too bad and our guys worked hard, which is al-

ways number one for us. It was a back and forth game and we were happy with the way our guys reacted on the bench when we got scored on and we had some good momentum goals where we came back. So all in all it was a good weekend. It certainly showed us some of the things we need to work on, but it was also a good chance for our guys to bond, staying overnight in London.” Ethan Skinner was the offensive star of the game, with a hat trick and an assist. Kohli scored a goal and added an assist; Jeff Jordan scored his first goal as a King; Mitch Montgomery and Coulter both had two

helpers; while Riley Cribbin, Alex Peterson, Ryan Maksymyk and Ty Jackson all had an assist. The Sugar Kings of back in action Friday (Sept. 18) on the road against the Listowel Cyclones. They return to the Woolwich Memorial Centre Sunday to host the Guelph Hurricanes in the home opener. There will be a pre-game barbeque outside the arena beginning at 12:30 p.m. followed by the dedication of the rink’s referee room in honour of Richard Rank, a prominent figure in Elmira’s hockey community who died of a heart attack in 2014. Game time is 2 p.m.

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SPORTS | 15

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

GALEA: Making the change from angler to hunter is never easy, especially on friends and neighbours FROM | 13

you begin with the easy outward things to get you mentally prepared. I start by placing my fly fishing vest and waders away. Then, to confirm my commitment further, I retire my fishing hat for the season. This is not done without some tears. Once I’ve done that, I no longer look like an angler. This is the part that gets people talking. They say things like, “Hey,

have you noticed Steve isn’t wearing his waders and fishing vest when he collects his mail these days?” Ignore that talk. The difficult part comes next. For most anglers, putting away their fishing rods for an evening is hard enough, but imagine putting them away for what seems like forever – meaning, till spring. Again, people will talk. They’ll say, “Hey, have you noticed Steve isn’t

carrying a net and fly rod when he gets the mail these days?” After that, you are pretty well committed to making the transition. So you take your tackle or fly boxes and organize them one last time before saying goodbye ’til spring. Needless to say, this can be a very emotional thing and, as I said, you find yourself wondering if it is indeed the right decision – especially when someone

shows you a photo of a three pound brook trout in fall colours. No matter, you complete the transition by bringing out hunting boots and clothes appropriate to the season. For instance, my next trip involves driving to northern Ontario to hunt grouse for four days. That means I need my shotgun, shells, dog gear, GPS, compass and shooting vest. Again, this gets people talking.

They say, “Hey, have you noticed Steve is wearing hunter orange when he gets the mail these days?” The point I am trying to make here is that when you transition like this, people will talk. I think it is because they are unsure what to make of it. I mean they associated you with fishing and now they have to associate you with hunting. The thing is, you have to do what makes you happy –

and it doesn’t really matter what your fishing buddies think. No, at this time of year it matters more what your hunting buddies think. Plus, you have to be comfortable in your own skin. You have to live life on your own terms. If that means trading your fishing waders for duck hunting waders, so be it. Yes, transitioning is never easy – especially from hunting to ice fishing season.

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16 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

GREAT WEATHER HELPS WELLESLEY WELCOME FALL FAIR FESTIVITIES Kids enjoyed the rides and games at the Wellesley-North Easthope Fall Fair Sept. 15-16. Inset: Kylan Noom enjoys an ice cream cone under sunny skies, Wednesday afternoon at the fair. [SCOTT BARBER / THE OBSERVER]

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VENTURE | 17

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

VENTURE FOOD FOR THOUGHT/ OWEN ROBERTS

LABOUR / WHAT IT COSTS

Canada working with UAE for more refugee support

WLU economics professor David Johnson’s study compared salaries to student outcomes.

Crunching the numbers on compensation for teachers

FIELD NOTES

clearly aren’t diminished due to lower wages. “It does say that if Ontario pays in the mid-80s of their percentile and British Columbia pays somewhere in the mid-70s, British Columbia gets the same results as Ontario, it kind of suggests that British Columbia pays enough to attract very good people,” Johnson said. The student results are passed on an index of output in the program for international student assessment. Students age 15 take the test internationally. Anywhere from 30 to 50 countries participate to test their students’ reading, math, and science skills. Over time, students in all 10 provinces were incorporated into the assessment, making it possible to compare outcomes across provinces because it’s the same exam being written in different places at the same time. “We know, to put it

Even with other major stories percolating – sex education in schools and the federal election among them – the Syrian refugee crisis has thankfully not been nudged off the front pages. Noble and determined efforts are underway everywhere to help the Syrian refugees find new homes. Last week, the Ontario government pledged $10.5 million to resettle 10,000 refugees here by the end of 2016. About $2 million of that will go to immediate humanitarian help. Also in the province, an initiative called Lifeline Syria will recruit, train and assist sponsor groups to support 1,000 Syrian refugees coming to Canada as permanent immigrants to resettle in the Greater Toronto area. Back in April, the province gave the group $30,000 to get started, then came through with another $300,000 just prior to Labour Day. In Ottawa, most lately the federal government has pledged to match $100 million in humanitarian aid donations from Canadians. It’s given support to Syrian

COMPENSATION | 18

ROBERTS | 18

Study by WLU economist shows paying more doesn’t lead to better outcomes for students, so fairness is an issue WHITNEY NEILSON The notion that paying teachers more equates to better student outcomes, turns out to be less than accurate in a recent report by Wilfrid Laurier University economics professor David Johnson. Titled, Value for Money? Teacher Compensation and Student Outcomes in Canada’s Six Largest Provinces, the paper compares the pay scales of public school teachers in Canada’s six largest provinces. And the results are striking. “Across Canadian provinces, although the pay differential is fairly wide you don’t get better results in the high paying provinces. That’s the kind of research question that then people can take and make of it as they wish,” Johnson said. The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development argues outcomes for students across the world are better where

teachers are paid relatively well. Johnson was intrigued. He decided to look into if teachers are paid relatively similar salaries across provinces. He found they aren’t and that the higher the pay the better the pension – contrary to the OECD. Johnson says the question to ponder is, what’s fair to taxpayers? “I think the policy maker clearly faces a tradeoff. The more you pay presumably you attract better people, but there comes a point where additional pay no longer attracts, apparently in the data the additional relative pay in Ontario doesn’t appear to attract that much better people that you get better results,” Johnson said. He doesn’t advise stooping to the teachers’ salary levels in the United States though, or having the lowest teachers’ wages globally. The report indicates Ontario, Manitoba, and Quebec as the relatively high paying

provinces, with Alberta, Saskatchewan and BC as the relatively low paying provinces. Manitoba is the highest paying province by a wide margin. Three-quarters of Ontario teachers fit into the highest pay category, with an average salary of $91,815. The same highest pay category average salary for BC teachers is $81,534. “The main message to take away from this paper is simply that within this group of six provinces there are relative salary differences. When you look at that data there’s just no relationship between paying your teachers relatively more and getting a better result,” Johnson said. He says the data shows that teachers’ unions can no longer make a credible argument they need to pay their teachers more to attract better teachers – a welcome observation considering the seemingly never-ending teacher strikes in Ontario.

The idea is to attract good teachers, but not overpay. “That’s the way everybody thinks about purchasing something. You want to pay enough to get a good quality product, but not more than you need to. How much do you decide to pay for your car? How much do you decide to pay for your house? That’s all sort of the same question. I guess if we dropped salaries to the point where we didn’t retain people that would be a signal,” Johnson said. Manitoba has some of the highest paid teachers in the country, yet students’ scores in reading, science, and mathematics are some of the lowest. The opposite can be seen in British Columbia where teachers are paid lower than in the other five large provinces, and students score higher in standardized tests. He suggests it might be worth looking at paying teachers what they’re paid in BC, since the results

STANDARD AWD IS ALWAYS IN SEASON.

*MSRP of $19,995 on 2015 Impreza 2.0i (FF120). Lease rate of 0.9% for 48 months. Monthly payment is $198 (monthly payment includes $500 stackable cash) with $2,591 down payment. Option to purchase at end of lease is $9,737 with $3,313 due on signing. Advertised pricing consists of MSRP plus charges for Freight/PDI ($1,595 on 2015 Impreza), Air Conditioning Charge ($100), Tire Stewardship Levy ($27.15), OMVIC Fee ($5), Dealer Admin ($199). Freight/PDI charge includes a full tank of gas. Taxes, license, registration and insurance are extra. $0 security deposit. Models shown: 2015 Impreza 2.0i Limited Package with Optional Technology Package (FF2LPE) with an MSRP of $29,395. Dealers may sell or lease for less or may have to order or trade. Offers applicable on approved credit at participating dealers only. Lease based on a maximum of 20,000 km per year, with excess charged at $0.10/km. Leasing and financing programs available through Subaru Financial Services by TCCI. Other lease and finance rates and terms available; down payment or equivalent trade-in may be required. Vehicles shown solely for purposes of illustration, and may not be equipped exactly as shown. Offers available until September 30, 2015. See your local Subaru dealer for complete program details. ‡Ratings are awarded by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS). Please visit www.iihs.org for testing methods.

26 Manitou Drive, Kitchener, ON | Tel: (519) 894-2050 | www.geminimotors.com


18 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

ROBERTS: Helping to create a hub for humanitarian aid FROM | 17

refugees in other ways; since the beginning of 2014, Canada has allocated more than $21 million to respond to humanitarian needs in Iraq. Of that sum, $9.6 million has been targeted for Syrian refugees there. In total, Canada has given $800 million to the Syrian situation since 2011 The huge humanitarian task ahead underlines the ongoing need to forge global relationships and open trade channels, especially before crises arise, so responses can be better coordinated. One such relationship that bears mentioning is the one between Canada and the United Arab Emirates (UAE). The UAE is the global

leader in humanitarian aid, proportionate to its income. It has dedicated more than US $1 billion to support the Syrian people and refugees. In April, the UAE and Canada signed a memorandum of understanding for international development cooperation. It was mainly designed to help with poverty reduction in the Middle East, Asia and Africa. A month later, a state official from Dubai (one of the emirates) visited Canada to further develop relations. Such developments represent new ways for both nations to help hungry people. For Canada, it’s another step towards greater cooperation with the UAE. Agriculturally, the nation already imports about $50 million worth of Canadian

beef, mostly from Ontario. The Ontario corn fed beef producers are trying to up that amount with a new agreement they believe could put $1 million worth of their product on consumers’ plates there. Other markets exist for hay. On the humanitarian relations side, last year Canada established an emergency stockpile warehouse in Dubai (this is Canada’s second such warehouse, its first abroad). The stockpile, managed by the Canadian Red Cross, includes an array of items designed to meet the basic needs of a minimum of about 25,000 people for three months. By 2021, the UAE plans to be the first global hub for distributing humanitarian aid in response to regional

disasters and crises. It’s already recognized as a pivot in the Middle East for such aid. For years, vessels have left Dubai for Syria carrying relief items from a huge emergency aid repository there, to help meet the needs of displaced people. This repository is part of what’s called International Humanitarian City in Dubai, described as the world’s largest (and busiest) logistics hub for humanitarian aid, with nine UN agencies and nearly 50 NGOs and commercial entities as members. As Canada strengthens its relations with the UAE, a central player now in global food aid distribution, it’s reasonable to expect more and more Canadian food finding its way to refugees.

COMPENSATION: Looking

at what’s fair to taxpayers FROM | 17

bluntly, that good teaching matters but we’ve defined good teaching as good outcomes,” Johnson said. “And there are people in that world who say ‘well I think that’s too narrow an outcome, I don’t like using reading, writing, and mathematics as an outcome,’ and to those people I guess I say well what would you like to use?” He continued, “I realize it’s not the be all and end all, but if that’s not what an elementary school is doing then what are they doing?” According to Johnson, provinces now have negotiating room to restrict increases in teacher compensation. Pensions should

also be examined, as BC teachers’ pensions are substantially lower than Ontario’s, with minimal repercussions. Politicians would be wise to consider this, with education accounting for the second largest spending in their budget, behind healthcare. “The argument is made on an international level and that argument has certainly been taken up by the Canadian Teachers’ Federation saying this is a good thing that we pay teachers a lot because international data says the more you pay your teachers the better your results and that does not appear to be true within the data for these six provinces,” Johnson said.

The Westhill Retirement Residence | Thursday, September 24th at 2:30 pm Sept Join us for afternoon tea with guest speaker, James Graham from the Waterloo 24 Horticulture Society. Visit our website to register for our FREE monthly events! THE WESTHILL RETIREMENT RESIDENCE 25 WESTHILL DRIVE, WATERLOO, ON | westhill.sifton.com | 519.725.0525


THE ARTS | 19

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

THE ARTS ON STAGE / LIVE MUSIC

Melissa Etheridge brings solo show to Centre Next week’s Kitchener stop promises to be an intimate one, with just the award-winning performer and her guitars SCOTT BARBER Thirty years into a legendary career, Melissa Etheridge has done it all in rock and roll. With her unmistakable combination of powerful, passionate vocals, deep lyrics and catchy hooks, the iconic gay rights activist has amassed a pair of Grammy Awards, an Oscar, five platinum records and a star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame. Now a 54-year-old mother of four, Etheridge shows no signs of slowing down. “I love what I do,” she said, on the line from her home in southern California. “I am so lucky to be able to be a rock star; I have the best job in the world. And, I love to do it. I love, love to play my music for people, I love to create new music and I love for people to hear a new song and go, ‘wow, I love that.’ I love trying new things and I love collaborating. It brings me great joy and I see no reason to stop, whatsoever.” On the road promoting her latest album, 2014’s This is M.E., Etheridge will perform at Centre in the Square in Kitchener on September 21. A stripped down, intimate solo show, Etheridge says fans can expect to hear new songs as well as her ’90s hits. “This show is my solo show, which has really

grown over the last year that I have been doing it,” she explained. “It’s a very intimate show and it’s a way to really reach some of the places that I am not able to bring my whole band into. And it’s just a way for me to get really close to the audience and to get inside some of the songs.” She added, “I get to kind of show off, because I get to play a lot of my guitars, and the stage when you come in, you see all my guitars lined up on the stage. And I use a looper where I make some hand drums and create the songs and really just have a great time.” Etheridge has been performing since 1985, and broke out with her selftitled debut in 1988, which was critically acclaimed and garnered her first Grammy nomination for the single “Bring Me Some Water.” In 1993, she picked up her first Grammy win for “Ain’t It Heavy” off her third record, Never Enough. Later that year, she released her biggest commercial success, Yes I am, which featured the smash hits “I’m The Only One,” and “Come To My Window.” She also came out as a lesbian that year, beginning her influential run as one of America’s leading gay rights activists.

Melissa Etheridge, currently touring her solo show This is M.E., takes to the stage at the Centre In The Square Sept. 21. And there have been other causes close to her heart, including advocating for the legalization of marijuana and promoting environmentalism. For the latter, Etheridge wrote “I Need To Wake Up,” which won the Academy Award for its role in the documentary film An Inconvenient Truth. With a catalogue that includes 13 studio records,

Healing

for the Brokenhearted October 23 - 24, 2015 Maple View Mennonite Church

5074 Deborah Glaister Line, Wellesley Ontario

Special Guests: Old Order Mennonite Couple & Dale Ingraham www.generationsunleashed.com • 519-590-4907 EARLY BIRD by September 23: $45

Sexual Abuse: Reclaiming Our Identity

38 singles and 32 music videos, Ethebridge has covered a lot of ground musically. Yet, the breast cancer survivor’s passion for music continues to burn as hot as ever. “The music has evolved as I’ve evolved,” she said. “I think I’m becoming more of a confident musician. I think my guitar playing has taken more of a front and centre role. I think my

[SUBMITTED]

voice is stronger because I’m healthier.” And from sold out stadium shows to a one-on-one setting, Ethebridge still gets a rush from connecting with others through music. “I love the capacity for the audience to be able to go from complete utter silence to crazy over-thetopness,” she said. “When you have an intimate,

smaller audience, they all kind of come together, and I can talk and tell the stories and you just feel like everybody is on the same page.” Melissa Etheridge’s This is M.E. solo show hits the main stage at Kitchener’s Centre in the Square on September 21 at 8 p.m. For more information, visit www.centreinthesquare. com.


20 | APPLE BUTTER & CHEESE FESTIVAL

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

www.wellesleyabcfestival.ca

2015 Wellesley Apple Butter & Cheese Festival Saturday, September 26, 2015 | Start Your Day at 7am with a Pancake Breakfast. FARMERS MARKET | CIDER MILL TOURS | FARM TOURS | HORSESHOE TOURNAMENT QUILT AUCTION | SMORGASBORD DINNER | ANTIQUE CAR SHOW & TRACTOR DISPLAY LIVE ENTERTAINMENT | STEAM SAWMILL & WOOD CARVERS | PARADE @ NOON and much more!

F

REIS

Schmidtsville Restaurant & Gift Shop

CONSTRUCTION LTD.

Custom-Built Homes, Renovations and Additions

FRANK REIS

email: frc@bellnet.ca Phone: (519) 656-2282 Fax: (519) 656-3171 Cell: (519) 580-6898

111 Gerber Meadows Dr., Wellesley, ON N0B 2T0 www.reisconstruction.ca

2196 Gerber Rd.,Wellesley

519-656-2010

www.wellesleyhomecentre.net

BUILDING CENTRE HOURS:

Mon.-Wed. 7:00-5:30; Thurs, Fri 7:00-6:30; Saturdays 8-5

OLD FASHIONED COUNTRY COOKING SERVED DAILY

Homemade Soups & Pies | Lunch & Dinner Specials Breakfast Served All Day

3685 Nafziger Rd., Wellesley | 519-656-2430 Mon-Wed 6:30am-4:30pm • Thurs & Fri 6:30am-8pm • Sat 7am-4pm

Country Style Meats

Our Family

Helping

YOUR HOME IS IN GOOD HANDS

Wellesley, Ontario 519 - 656 - 3083 leis@bellnet.ca www.murrayleisconstuction.com

• Homemade Sausages

Your Family

• Drug Free Beef

Linda Dreveny

Michelle Dreveny

linda@soldbylinda.ca

michelle@soldbylinda.ca

Sales Representative

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

www.soldbylinda.ca Office: 519-888-7110

• Fresh & Smoked Pork Products

Sales Representative

Independently Owned and Operated 180 Weber St. S., Waterloo

Wishing everyone a happy ABC Festival!

• Custom Cutting 3700 Nafziger Rd. Wellesley, Ontario N0B 2T0

Phone 519-656-3380

24 HOUR

EMERGENCY SERVICE

from

Jantzi Plumbing Inc. Plumbing • Boilers • Radiant Floor Heating

Come check out our Plumbing Showroom

www.jantziplumbing.ca 1426 Hutchison Rd., Wellesley | 519.656.3030

1•888 •567 •7546 www.josslin.com

Enjoy your day at the Festival!

POOLE ELECTRIC LTD. Enjoy your day at the festival • RURAL • RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL

HOME • AUTO • FARM • BUSINESS Represented by:

Chris Dietz, Agent

31 David Street, Wellesley

519-656-2909

ECA License #7000298

519.656.2585 | 1082 Queen’s Bush Road, Wellesley

cdietz@traditionmutual.com | www.traditionmutual.com

Pure Apple Butter - Apple Syrup - Apple Cider Apple Sauce • Fresh Ontario Grown Apples 3800 Nafziger Road N., Wellesley 519-656-2400 Retail Shop Hours: Mon - Fri 8-5pm, Sat. 8:30-1pm


CLASSIFIED | 21

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

CLASSIFIED HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

FOR SALE

Youth Worker

EMPLOYEE NEEDED: Need a person with driving experience to drive truck, assemble furniture and deliver furniture to customers. Only valid G licence is needed. Apply with resume at Millbank Family Furniture Ltd. 4082 Waterloo St., Millbank, ON

(Permanent Part Time) Promote, design, and implement activities of the Youth Centre in Elmira. Post secondary degree (or working towards degree) with emphasis on youth and youth issues. Must be enthusiastic with the inherent ability to relate to youth. Excellent for someone seeking a career involving supporting Youth. Tues-Fri * 20 hrs per week

Phone: 519-595-7105 • 519-595-7107

www.millbankfamilyfurniture.ca

Apply to:

HELP WANTED

Fermon Construction Inc.

Construction Labourers

Fermon Construction is a General Contractor located in Hawkesville, Ont. Specializing in concrete forming. Due to continued growth we are looking to fill multiple positions, if you are a hardworking individual looking for steady employment please contact Fermon at 1-519-699-4095 fermon@fermonconstruction.com

Woolwich Community Services 5 Memorial Avenue Elmira, ON N3B 2P8 Fax: 519-669-4210 Email: don_wcs@yahoo.com Only interviewees will be contacted. HELP WANTED

VOISIN CHRYSLER LTD. Licensed Automotive Technician Voisin Chrysler is looking for a Full Time Licensed Automotive Technician.

HELP WANTED

Josslin Insurance is looking for an energetic professional to join our Elmira team as a Personal Insurance Service Broker. If you like a job with variety, have a good understanding of personal insurance and are passionate about helping clients, you’ll enjoy this role. This fast-paced position is full-time and has a competitive compensation and benefits package. Candidates should have prior experience in a personal lines environment, and a RIBO license; experience with Power Broker and Compuquote is an asset. Please email resumé to juliez@josslin.com or drop off at 48 Arthur St. South in Elmira.

Please send resume to Sherry via email sherry@voisinchrysler.com Or call 519-669-2831 WORK WANTED RETIREE WANTS PART time job. 15 - 20 hours weekly. Is flexible. 519-664-2161.

TRAINING & LESSONS WHO’S THE BEST Guitar Teacher in town? Ask around or try Bob Wilhelm’s Guitar Studio. Call 519-669-5371. Classical, acoustic, electric, bass.

FIND IT IN THE OBSERVER

HOW TO REACH US

TRAINING & LESSONS PRE-SCHOOL CLASSES TUES. Wed. or Thurs. mornings 9-11:30 a.m. FUN WITH MUSIC, $19 per class. Stories, crafts and songs. 519-669-5046.

FOR SALE FREE MOTION QUILTING machine. Artistic Quilter SD - 18” arm space, excellent condition. Asking $4,500. Please call 519-669-2672.

LAWN FERTILIZER AND LAWN SEED - Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-574-4141 or 519-669-2045. PRESSURE TREATED WOOD decking 14’ x 23’ deck. You remove. Best offer. Call 519664-3463. ROYAL ALBERT TRILLIUM dinner set. Trimmed in gold. 33 pieces. Entire set for $450 OBO. Call 519-886-5459 after 5pm, pat.hayne@sympatico.ca SOFTNER SALT - 20kg bags, minimum 25 bags, skid lots of 56. Delivered in St. Jacobs, St. Clements, Elmira & Linwood areas. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-5744141 or 519-669-2045. STAINLESS STEEL TANKS - 2200 litre round tank and two 3’x4’x5’ open top tanks. Also, stainless steel pipes and fittings. Call 519-662-3724. TURKEYS FOR SALE. Ready September 15th or December 1st. Also roaster chickens, ready October 13th. Please call 519-638-5037.

AUCTIONS FRIDAY SEPT 18 at 5:00 PM - Auction sale of property; household effects; furniture; woodworking equipment to be held at 109 White Oak Place in Waterloo for Peter Sommerfield. Jantzi Auctions, 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com SAT. SEPT 19 at 10:00 AM - clearing auction sale of tools; household effects; antiques; and miscellaneous items to be held at 3339 Huron Rd Haysville (approx 3 kms south of New Hamburg) for Bernd Wascke. Janzti Auctions, 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com WED. SEPT 23 at 10:00 AM - Clearing auction sale of furniture; household effects; antiques; tools; and miscellaneous items to be held at the St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s for an area estate with additions. Jantzi Auctions, 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com

CLASSIFIED DEADLINE:

THURSDAYS BY 10AM AUCTIONS WED. SEPT 23 at 6:00 PM - property auction of a 14 acre hobby farm with 6 bedroom house; new heated shop; barn; and other buildings to be held at 4435 Line 67 Newton. Jantzi Auctions, 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com AUCTION SALE OF tools, lawn & garden equipment, household effects, antiques and miscellaneous items, to be held at the K.W. Khaki Club, 2939 Nafziger Rd. 2 miles south of Wellesley, for Gerald & Margaret Martin, Waterloo, The Les & Ruth Darrington Estate, Elora & additions on Thursday, Sept. 24th at 10 a.m. Gerber Auctions, 519-699-4451. SAT. SEPT 26 at 10:00 AM Auction sale of a 3 bedroom brick bungalow; household effects; furniture; tools and miscellaneous items to be held at 28 Harlew Cres New Hamburg for Paul and Nancy Gingrich. Jantzi Auctions, 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com SAT. OCT 3 at 10:00 AM Clearing auction sale of 60 acre farm; machinery; tractors; and miscellaneous items to be held at 617 Brock Road, Flamborough for the estate of Arthur Bonas and Kristian Steinbergs. Jantzi Auctions 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com WED. OCT 7 at 10:00 AMClearing auction sale of furniture; antiques; collectables; household effects; tools; and miscellaneous items to be held at the St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s for an area estate with additions. Jantzi Auctions 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com

FARM EQUIPMENT FOR SALE - New Holland 782 Harvester with two heads. New Holland 28 Forage blower, two right hand delivery Dion forage wagons. Call 519-496-2725.

NEW CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE WEDNESDAYS BY 10AM

FARM SERVICES BAGGED PINE SHAVINGS Agricultural Spray Lime, 22.5kg. bag; feed grade lime, 25kg. Delivered. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-5744141 or 519-669-2045. KILN DRIED CORN & CORN SCREENING Delivered by Einwechter. Minimum 15 ton lots. Call George Haffner Trucking 519-574-4141 or 519-669-2045. SEED WHEAT AND FERTILIZER competitive pricing. Rye seed, winter barley. Hard red wheats, Callus, Princeton and Sampson. Soft red wheats, Emmit, CM614, Wave, Emperor and more. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519574-4141 or 519-669-2045.

FIREWOOD FIREWOOD - HARD cherry, dry and split, $75/face cord. 2 kms west of Guelph. 519-824-0608.

WANTED TEAMS WANTED: WOOLWICH Area Mens’ 30 Plus Slow Pitch League is inviting teams for 2016. For more info call 519-669-2115.

RENTALS 3 BEDROOM HOUSE, edge of Elmira. $1500/mth + utilities. Available Oct. 1. Call 226-748-4818. APT. FOR RENT, Nov. Moorefield - Large one bedroom apartment, with deck, furnished or unfurnished, laundry facilities, parking, electric heat, cable tv. No pets, adult building. Reference, $855.00 inclusive. First and last. 519-638-3013. DUKE OF ERB Suites has a 1st floor 925 square foot two bedroom suite available for November 1, 2015. It features four stainless steel appliances - stove, fridge, OTR microwave and dishwasher plus in suite laundry, granite counters in kitchen and four piece bathroom, bamboo and ceramic tile floors, private balcony, privately controlled air conditioning and heating, security entrance, parking, large basement storage locker and more. Call 289242-1736, visit our web site at www.dukeoferb.ca or email duke3erb@gmail.ca.

RENTALS 2 BEDROOM APARTMENT in Elmira. Quiet building, newly renovated, close to downtown. Call 519-669-5798.

CONTINUED ON PG. 22

AUCTIONS

AUCTION SALE OF CONSUMER GOODS,

AT GRAY’S AUCTION & LIQUIDATION CENTRE, 5737 HWY 23, 1 MI. W. OF HARRISTON MONDAY SEPT 21, 2015, AT 5:30 P.M. SALE CONSISTS OF: Furniture Pcs; T. V. Stands; Fridge; Dishwasher; Keyboards, Skid Lots of Misc, Household Items; Bikes; T.V.’s & Ass’t. Electronics; Vaccumes; Watches; Pcs of Swar; Kid’s & Adult Clothing; Bedding; Books; Consumer Goods; Plus a Very Large Selection of Other Misc. Items. NOTE: This is a very large offering. LUNCH BOOTH TERMS: Cash, Interac, Visa, M.C. NOTE: Clothes will be sold in large lots, list subject to additions & deletions. Viewing from 4:00 P.M. day of sale. Owner or auctioneer not responsible for accidents day of sale. AUCTIONEERS:

GRAY’S AUCTION SERVICE INC., HARRISTON BARRY | (519) 338-3722 | LICENSED & BONDED

PHONE 519.669.5790 | TOLL FREE 1.888.966.5942 | FAX 519.669.5753 | ONLINE WWW.OBSERVERXTRA.COM

ADDRESS 20-B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA, ON N3B 1Z9

CLASSIFIED ADS

DISPLAY ADS

519.669.5790 EXT 0

519.669.5790 EXT 104

ads@woolwichobserver.com

sales@woolwichobserver.com

RESIDENTIAL COST $7.50 /20 WORDS EXTRA WORDS 20¢ PER WORD

COMMERCIAL COST $12.00 /20 WORDS EXTRA WORDS 30¢ PER WORD

PLACING A CLASSIFIED WORD AD In person, email, phone or fax submissions are accepted during regular business hours. Deadline for Saturday publication is Wednesday by 5 p.m. All Classified ads are prepaid by cash, debit, Visa or MasterCard. Ask about Observer policies in regard to Display, Service Directory and Family Album advertising.


22 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

CLASSIFIED ADS CONTINUED | AUCTIONS | PUBLIC NOTICES AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

AUCTION SALE

AUCTION SALE Of Tools, lawn & garden equipment, household effects, antiques and miscellaneous items, to be held at the K.W. Khaki Club, 2939 Nafziger Rd. 2 miles south of Wellesley, for Gerald & Margaret Martin, Waterloo, The Les & Ruth Darrington Estate, Elora & additions, on

THURS SEPT 24TH @ 10:00 A.M.

LAWN, GARDEN, MISC. ITEMS: ECLO

Cycle – 3 wheel scooter c/w battery & charger, 3 yr. old – good. Cub Cadet 1330 hydrostatic riding lawn mower with 12.5 Kohler engine & bagger. MTD 13hp 38in. riding lawn mower. Honda 6.5hp mower “EZ Walk”. Ariens Rocket VII rear tine tiller. 5hp garden tiller. Yard-Man 10.5hp 29in. snow blower with heat houser. Craftsman 8hp 27in. snow blower. Dynamark 5hp 23in. snow blower. Little Wonder 5hp blower. JD “10” garden dump trailer. Homemade lawn sprayer on trailer. Wheel barrows. Large quantity of hand, power & garden tools. Lincoln 225ac welder. Shop vac. Workmates. Alum. step ladders. Chop saw. Air compressor. 10 X 10ft. gazebo frame. Concrete water fountain. Bicycles, etc.

HOUSEHOLD: CHEST freezers. Knechtel

4pc. solid wood bookcase bedroom suite, double, good. 4pc. double bedroom suite. Bedroom furniture. Oak curio cabinet – nice. Pine corner cabinet. Computer work station. Glider rocker. Rocking chair. Patio furniture. Samsung 42in. LCD TV. Power tread mill. Hobart electric slicer – good. White electric sewing machine. Office chair. Wall art. Bedding & linen. Small appliances. Correlle dish set. Kitchen goods, etc.

ANTIQUES/COLLECTIBLES: BLANKET

box (old paint). Round top trunk. Parlour & other fancy tables. Captains chair. Oil lamps. Wash board. Kitchen collectibles. Crocks (some large). Hand water pump. Counter top scale. Grain cradle. Int. electric clock. Costume jewelry. 12pl. setting china. China & glass (coloured glass, depression, tea sets, Royal Albert, cornflower, fancy cups & saucers, etc.), plus items still to be unpacked!

To be held at 28 Harlew Cres in New Hamburg for Paul and Nancy Gingrich

SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 26 AT 10:00 AM PROPERTY: NICE brick bungalow with charming covered porch located on a quiet court, in a private residential area; 3 bedrooms; 2 bathrooms; spacious living room with original hardwood floors; eat in kitchen. Renovated basement with large family room; games room; laundry room. Beautifully landscaped backyard oasis with mature trees; gardens; pond; walkways and large deck. Attached garage

Thursday SEPT. 24th 2015 6pm

Auction for: Bella Roma Foods At 570 Kortright Rd W Guelph. Just off Hanlon ExPwy #6 N

Location: On Site 570 KORTRIGHT RD WEST GUELPH EQUIPMENT & COOLERS Antique Gurney Stove Gas or Wood dated late 1920’s Isaus punch clock 3yrs old- Hollymatic 200burger maker makes 4in patties – Stainless steel table 4’7” x 6’ open underneath for storage- cold meat display 20ft total or 2 10’ units total 8 door - Roof top compressor NOT included – Hot box 1’10”w x 35” h 110v Cressor – 2x uniwell cash registers 1+ 1yr old other 2yrs old includes 2 sets of dra programmable – 3 door freezer 4 shelf display 7’ 3” long x 2’ 10” w x 6’11” h compressor contained gold – 3 door freezer display NEEDS COMPRESSOR contained Hussman 6”L x 2’9” W x 8’ H – 9 foot exhaust fan hood ONLY – Rapid reach in frig 115V contained compressor 10’ x3 ½”w x 6’ 11” h – Roof top unit included – Hot table round up 4 2 shelf – sneeze guard 5” closed on 3 sides. Fits 2 large hot servers - bone saw table top Bird 110v – Hand sausage stuffer 15 lbs capacity 1 yr old , made in Italy – Classic 2 soup Terrene includes 2 inserts with lids 2yrs old – 6’ bbq with propane tank , folds down for easy storage – 6’ display refrigerated 3 shelf 2 door round glass - large meat scale Mettler Toledo flat top 200lbs capacity – Scale Kilo Tech programmable with book LP – 15 15kg capacity label producing kg lbs needs sensor unit – Toledo scale kg only 15kg capacity printer cable not attached – Hobart commercial Stainless steel dishwasher

HOUSEHOLD EFFECTS AND antiques:

fridge; stove; microwave; washer; dryer; table and chairs; hall table; 5 pc bedroom suite with dresser with bookshelf mirror; chest of drawers; 2 night tables; wing back chairs; glass top table; modern lamp; end tables; maple corner cupboard; dry sink; press back rocker; ½ moon table; 4 pressed back chairs; maple china cabinet; couch and loveseat; leather footstool; bookshelves; what not shelf; 8 dining room chairs; linens; 2 stools; magazine rack; microwave stand; side table; armoire and matching night table; lazy boy recliner; child’s kitchen cabinet; 2 lamp tables; wrought iron chairs; single beds; couch; bunk beds; cups and saucers; silverware chest; linens; crocks; etc.

RESTURANT SUPPLIES & MISC. Meat display trays 11 large( 27” W x 3’) 11 Medium(22”W x 3”) 5 Small ( 6W x 30”W x 2” deep)Numerous stock, roundo, sauce pans & pots aluminum some with lids – 2 coffee carafes insulated – 2 insulated cream carafes – black display bowls – baking sheets – display baskets – paper shredder - Can goods ie canned tomatoes, vinegars, etc mustard, lemon juice , etc. – chaffing dish with candle, includes lids and inserts. Turkey gadgets for retail individually packaged ie. Turkey pop up timers, basters , lifters, thermometers –cs of papers for pattie machine – table top safe ( no key) – photo copiers – file cabinets – packaging 1e. Styrofoam meat trays sm, med, lg. poly bags various sizes – meat soaker pads – scale paper – waxed butcher paper roll – deli containers sm, med , lg - sm & lg pie tins – cooling rack .With lots not mentioned

MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS: Yardman 6.5 hp lawnmower; tool chest; garden ornaments; double s.s. sink; step stool; Workmate bench; computer monitor; hammock; garden tools; patio table; 3 pc lawn furniture; bird bath; step ladder; garden bench; and much more.

AUCTIONEER:

AUCTION NOTE: Bella Roma is moving to Empire St. therefore no longer need this surplus Equipment. All in great condition. Being used up to date of sale.

Jantzi Auctions Ltd. Wellesley | 519-656-3555

VIEWING: - 5pm- 6pm day of sale. Any Announcements day of sale take precedence over ads. Proprietors & Auctioneer not responsible for accidents day of sale. Proprietors & Auctioneer not responsible for accidents day of sale.

www.JantziAuctions.com

TERMS: CASH or CHEQUE with proper ID, DEBIT 10% Buyers Premium

AUCTIONS

WELCOME TO THE NEW HOME FOR AREA-WIDE AUCTIONS.

NOTE – See www.auctionsfind.com/gerber

for photos. Terms – Cash, debit or cheque with I.D. 10% buyer’s premium.

AUCTIONEERS:

Gerber Auctions Ltd.

519-699-4451 or 698-0138 2827 Hutchison Rd., RR#1 Millbank (Crosshill)

FIND OUT ALL ABOUT THE LATEST SALE DATES EVERY WEEK.

LOOKING FOR A CHANGE OF PACE? YOUR NEW JOB IS IN THE OBSERVER

PUBLIC NOTICE

RENTALS ELMIRA - 2 Bedroom apartment. $900/mth, utilities included. Available Oct. 1. Call 226-748-4818. ONE BEDROOM QUALITY apartment, Linwood. Spacious, newly renovated. Garage, private entrance, semi private laundry, yard, deck. Privately controlled high efficiency furnace and A/C. No pets. $885/ mth plus gas and hydro. References. 2 units available. Call Don 519-897-2600.

COMM/ INDUSTRIAL FOR RENT INDUSTRIAL UNIT - For lease or rent. M-2 zoning, 2640 ft2, 16’x16’ electric OH door. 600V, 600 Amp service, gas radiant heat, natural and energy efficient lighting. Please call 519-669-8776 for details.

TRADES & SERVICES CUSTOM APPLE JUICE pressing. Also, juice sales. Place order early for best availability. Cedar Ridge Pressing, Wesley Martin, 3175 Northfield Dr., Elmira. 519-669-3541. GARDEN SERVICES TILLING and plowing available for residential gardens. Call (cell) 519-503-5641 or 519669-2043 for details. NEED YOUR LEAVES and Fall Clean Up Done? For a free quote call John’s Quality Home Services 519-669-4955. TRAVELLING SOUTH THIS \ cs0 Winter? Do you need someone reliable, insured and bondable to watch over your home for insurance purposes? Call John’s Quality Home Services 519-669-4955.

GARAGE SALES PORCH/GARAGE SALE - Sat. Sept. 19th, 8 a.m., 871 Northfield Dr. E. Cleaning out the corners including furniture and more!

PUBLIC NOTICE “PROUDLY REMEMBERING OUR PAS T; CONFIDENTLY EMBRACING OUR FUTURE.”

Community Community Information Page Information Page

“PROUDLY REMEMBERING OUR PAS T; CONFIDENTLY EMBRACING OUR FUTURE.” P.O. Box 158

24 Church St. W. Elmira, Ontario P.O. 158 N3BBox2Z6 24 Church St. W. Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

Township of Woolwich Technical Advisory Group (TAG) Thursday, September 24, 2015 | Council Chambers, 2nd Floor Administration Building, 24 Church Street West, Elmira 7:00 p.m. Closed Session Resolution | 8:00 p.m. Public Meeting 519-575-4504 www.woolwich.ca

Phone: 519-669-1647 or 519-664-2613 Fax: 519-669-1820 After Hours Emergency: Phone: 519-669-1647 or 519-664-2613 Fax: 519-669-1820 After Hours Emergency:

Public Consultations Township of Wellesley

FIRE MASTER PLAN For Your Community Fire Service The Township of Wellesley is in the process of preparing a Fire Master Plan. We are seeking public input. An open house will be held at the

COUNCIL CHAMBERS,

4805 William Hastings Line Crosshill on Thursday September 24, 2015 from 6:00pm to 7:30pm

519-575-4504 www.woolwich.ca

CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE WEDNESDAY BY 10AM


CLASSIFIED | 23

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

THOMPSON’S

Complete Collision Service

Auto Tech Inc.

ARE A

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.

Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

519.669.8330

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial On-The-Farm Service

FAX: 519.669.3210

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

AFTER HOURS

519-669-3232

GENERAL SERVICES

www.biobobs.com

AUTO CLINIC 21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400

519-669-7652

30 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

519.669.8917

Visit our website

www.biobob.com or call today! 519-648-3004

or

800-232-6396

GENERAL SERVICES

BIKE SALES & REPAIRS

PROFESSIONAL BIKE MECHANIC ON STAFF

Buy your bike from us and get a FREE annual inspection!

1551 FLORADALE ROAD ELMIRA, ON. N3B 2Z1

CLIMATE

20

$

CONTROLLED

PARTS EXTRA

The Sharp Shop | 112-D Bonnie Cres., Elmira

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel:519-669-5537

519.669.5313

FLORADALE SELF STORAGE

STORE HOURS: M-W: 8-6, TH-F 8-8, SAT, 8-6, SUN 12-5

226-266-5525 www.floradaleselfstorage.com

E-Mail: floradaleselfstorage@gmail.com

 WOOD  GAS  PELLET

CONESTOGO

FERGUS

1871 Sawmill Road

519-664-3800 877-664-3802

180 St. Andrew St. W.

519-843-4845 888-871-4592

www.fergusfireplace.com

GENERAL SERVICES

SPACE FOR RENT

Various sizes & rates

Your Business Here!

Advertise your business services in our service directory. Weekly exposure with fantastic results! Call Donna at 519.669.5790 Ext 104.

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE Call

519-669-4964

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

MUSIC-LOVER GIFT ALERT! Boat Covers | Air Conditioner Covers | Small Tarps Storage Covers | BBQ Covers | Awnings & Canopies Replacement Gazebo Tops | Golf Cart Enclosures & Covers •Ratches, Hooks, Straps, Webbing etc. •Canvas, Vinyl, Polyester, Acrylic Fabrics

519.595.4830 6376 Perth Rd. 121 Poole, ON

GENERAL SERVICES

SPACE FOR RENT

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING

QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102

General Repairs

COUNTR Y

’s 60’s / 70

HIGH SCHOOSL BAND

GOSPEL

ROCK

MUSIC TRANSFERS FROM LPs, 45s, 78s, CASSETTES TO CD Your favourite albums get a whole new life on CD after we clean up the clicks, pops and surface noise.

MORE INFO | 519.669.0541 EMAIL: vinylp2cd@gmail.com

HOME IMPROVEMENTS SERVICES BAUMAN PIANO

SERVICES TUNING & REPAIRS

“25 years in Business”

CONSTRUCTION INC. (519) 569-0772

JAMES BAUMAN Craftsman Member O.G.P.T. Inc NEW PHONE NUMBER

519-880-9165

• Commercial & Industrial General Contracting • Specializing in Concrete Work & Excavation • Retaining Walls

info@trappconstruction.ca www.trappconstruction.ca

• • • •

Stamped Coloured Concrete Demolition Bin Service Machine Bases

Concrete Breaking & Removal

HOME IMPROVEMENTS SERVICES

The Right Window Treatment Can

Save you

Blinds by Elite or Mera

In home consultations Wide selection of styles & fabrics 1011 Industrial Crescent St. Clements | 519-699-5411 www.LetUsFloorYou.ca

FREE

INSTALLATION When you buy 3 or more

Hours: M-F 8:30 - 5:30 Sat 9:00 - 3:00

WINDOW FASHIONS • Residential • Commercial • Industrial

Randy Weber ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

519.669.1462 Fax: 519.669.9970 Tel:

Evenings By Appointment

18 Kingfisher Dr., Elmira

Free in-home Consultations. Call someone you can trust. Call Cindy. A Brand You Can Trust 22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

STORE HOURS: M-F: 8-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

WEICKERT& MEIROWSKI Concrete Foundations Limited

YES... WE DO RESIDENTIAL WORK!

6982 Millbank Main St., Millbank 519-595-2053 • 519-664-2914


24 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY HOME IMPROVEMENTS SERVICES

IRA HOME COMFORT M L E (519) 669-4600

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS

GLASS SYSTEMS INC.

APPLIANCES – FURNACES – FIREPLACES AIR CONDITIONERS – WATER HEATERS SPRING SPECIAL ON AIR CONDITIONING TUNE UP $99, INSTALLED FROM $1999 FURNACES INSTALLED FROM $2499 FRIDGES $499, STOVES $399, WASHERS $399, DRYERS $369, FREEZERS $199 Come visit our show room FREE QUOTES 1 Union Street, Elmira

1553 King St. N., St. Jacobs, ON N0B 2N0

• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair TEL:

ehc@hotmail.ca (519)-669-4600

Ltd.

- Design and build -

AGRICULTURAL | RESIDENTIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs. 24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

ELMIRA

519-669-3652

OUTDOOR SERVICES

AMOS R O O F I N G

Interior/exterior Painting, Wallpapering & Plaster | drywall Repairs

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches

NOW ACCEPTING VISA OR MASTERCARD

CALL JAYME FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE.

519-669-2251 36 Hampton St., Elmira

A Family owned and operated business serving KW, Elmira and surrounding area for over 35 years.

WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED

519.501.2405 | 519.698.2114 In Business since 1973 • Fully Insured

SPACE FOR RENT

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

FREE ESTIMATES

OUTDOOR SERVICES

Advertise your business services in our service directory. Weekly exposure with fantastic results! Call Donna at 519.669.5790 Ext 104.

Services

> Commercial & Residential > Fully Insured > WSIB Clearance > Senior Discount

Lawn Maintenance Programs | Spring Clean-up Flower Bed Maintenance Programs Leaf Clean-up and Removal | Soil & Mulch Delivery & Installation | Snow Clearing & Removal | Ice Control 27 Brookemead, St, Elmira

KEVIN DETWEILER

P: 519-669-1188 | F: 519-669-9369

kdetweiler@rogers.com

OWNER-OPERATOR

OBSERVER PUZZLE SOLUTIONS Since 1998

•Final grading •Lawn repair & complete seeding well equipped for large stoney areas •Spike Aerator/Overseeding •Natural & Interlocking Stone •Retaining Walls, Walks & Patios •Help for Top Water & Drainage issue

Murray & Daniel Shantz

ALMA, ONTARIO | PHONE: 519.846.5427

+ 2 2 6 * 2 :

( ; 7 ( 5 1

' ) , / ( 8 + / , 8 7 + ( $ 6 7

0 $ 0 7 ( $ ' ( / 8 , & ) ( ( + ( , 6 6 3 7 2 2 8 5 6 < (

1 6 $ $ 3 ' 0 $ < ( 5 2 6 2 1 7 ( / 2 5 ( 0 ( 8 3 , 6 $ 1 ( 0

/ 9 2 ( $ ) , 0 $ 3 ( 3 2 7 5 5 $ , ( * 2 ) ( 5 6 $ 5 , 2 1 (

PRINTING | MAILING | SIGNAGE SERVICES

& $ 6 7 2 1 $ , 6 . ( 3 , , 2 $ 7 & + . $ < 1 5 8 % ( $ + < 0 1

( 5 * 2 7 2 1 8 6

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

SUDOKU CHALLENGE

Your Business Here!

Outdoor

CROSSWORD PUZZLER

SPACE FOR RENT

519-577-0370

darwayconstruction@icloud.com | Alma, ON

FAX: 519 664-2759 â&#x20AC;¢ 24 Hour Emergency Service

John Schaefer Painting

www.marwilconcrete.ca

Wayne Martin | 519-504-2016

519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

INC

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

Driveways â&#x20AC;¢ Sidewalks â&#x20AC;¢ Curbs â&#x20AC;¢ Patios Finished Floors â&#x20AC;¢ Retaining Walls â&#x20AC;¢ Steps Decorative/Stamped and Coloured Concrete

FRAMING â&#x20AC;¢ ROOFING RENOVATIONS â&#x20AC;¢ EAVESTROUGHS

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

Steve Co.

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL


CLASSIFIED | 25

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

BUY WITH CONFIDENCE. SELL WITH SUCCESS. GREAT RENTAL PROPERTY

$249,000

Elmira - Affordable town house with large master bedroom featuring a walk in closet. Main floor is finished with ceramic and hardwood, deck area off of the kitchen. Enjoy entertaining in your basement complete with a finished rec room and bathroom. Located 2 blocks from the public school and within walking distance of the rec center, pool and downtown area. MLS 1535058.

A DONATION will be made with every home bought or sold by Alli, Paul or Sue.

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

SPACIOUS CONDO WITH WALKOUT

Conestogo Lake - Enjoy the beautiful views overlooking the lake right from the back deck. Tastefully updated, this open concept cottage provides sleeping for up to 10. Concrete boat launch with electric winch, dock, tiered deck and garage. Located only 40 minutes from KW, or Guelph, this makes the perfect weekend getaway. MLS 1534798.

NEW PRICE

Bonnie

Brubacher

BROKER OF RECORD

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

allibauman@rogers.com

paul@remaxsolidgold.biz

suewidemanhomes@gmail.com

519-577-6248 519-503-9533 226-750-9332

Call today and book a

$334,900

FREE HOME EVALUATION Shanna Rozema

BROKER

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED & OPERATED, BROKERAGE

“HELPING YOU IS WHAT WE DO.”

NEW PRICE

90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 4, Elmira N3B 3L4

519-669-3192 | www.YourFamilyTeam.ca

SPECIAL OPEN HOUSE | SATURDAY SEPT 19TH & SUNDAY SEPT 20TH • 1-4PM MODEL HOME 162 Ridgeview Dr., Drayton STANDARD FEATURES

INTRODUCING THE LAST PHASE $316,900

• Starting from 1424 sq.ft • All brick & stucco exterior • Double car garage & driveway • Main floor master with an ensuite • Gourmet kitchen with island • Hardwood & ceramic floors • Gas fireplace & more • 2-3 month closings

ADDRESS: 3 Arthur

St. S., ELMIRA

SOLD OUT

DIRECT: 519-503-2753

WOODSIDE: Sunday celebration

40%

3 Bungalow units left with $12,000 Builder Bonus*

5 minutes to Conestoga Lake, Country living in Dorking! 1½ story 3 bedroom 3 bathroom home beautifully redecorated and updated w/central air, central vac, main floor laundry, large newer country kitchen – too many upgrades to mention. Covered front porch, back yard patio, 2 garden sheds, timber frame. Black chain link fence completely enclosing the large back yard! Next door to home baking and grocery store. MLS

EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net

FROM | 4

2nd Phase

Waterloo - Immaculate end unit bungalow condo has everything you need on one level. Two bedrooms with a private ensuite plus a spacious open concept kitchen, dining room living room combo that backs onto a nice deck and green space as well as a double car garage.  MLS 1531346.

Alli Bauman Paul Martin Sue Wideman

3 Arthur St. S., Elmira 519-669-5426

Independently Owned and Operated

Elmira Real Estate Services

Elmira - Located just outside of town, this bungalow has been redone inside and out! Enjoy the convenience of the back entrance into the mud room and main floor laundry.  This home also boasts a separate garage on the 200 ft deep lot, with decking straight through from the side to the back yard.  MLS 1532036.

$325,000

BREATHTAKING SUNSETS

$324,900

COUNTRY LIVING WITH LARGE LOT

Bungalow lofts with $8000 Builder Bonus* PRICED FROM $354,900

WOW! IMMACULATELY MAINTAINED $489,000 ST. JACOBS Lovely curb appeal with 100’ frontage, oversized double car

garage & driveway, colonial style two storey, inviting foyer, open hardwood staircase w/iron spindles to upper level, spacious main floor principle rooms, walkout to backyard, 3 bdrms, 4 baths incl ensuite, finished basement. MLS.

GORGEOUS RAISED BUNGALOW $449,900 ELMIRA Great location, 61’ frontage, double car garage & driveway, 2000 sq.ft of superb living space, fresh decor throughout, many extras & updates, walkout to deck & landscaped fenced yard, bright finished basement, appliances included, c/air, c/vacuum. A MUST SEE MODEL LIKE HOME. MLS.

CALL TODAY FOR YOUR FREE FALL MARKET ANALYSIS!

The people who were at that inaugural service some 40 years ago, never imagined it would have grown to this size, he adds. “Forty years ago when we first met, we didn’t ask them to turn on their electronic device to look at today’s scripture, but yet that mission has been the same and just trying to make a difference in the community and in the world,” Allen said. The church’s message is an everyday part of their lives, and not just something they practice on Sundays, Malloy says. With numerous parenting, marriage, family, and children’s activities, they’re

looking forward to watching the next generation of the church grow and continue their missions. “When we think of how many people call this church their home and the positive effect we have on them, that extends out in the community, whether that’s in their workplaces, whether they’re coaching a hockey team or just cheering on as a fan or whether they’re interacting at the park. We see that positive influence flowing out of the people and it’s people living their faith in everyday life,” Malloy said. The 40th anniversary services will be September 20 at 9:15 a.m. and 11 a.m.


26 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Bert Martin Re/max Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd.,

LET OUR 50+ YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WORK FOR YOU!

BROKER

Brokerage

Independently Owned and Operated

BROKERAGE

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 3 Arthur St. S. Elmira OFFICE: 519-669-5426

www.remaxsolidgold.biz

EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

FREE Market Evaluation

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. | 519-669-2772 45 Arthur St. S., Elmira | www.thurrealestate.com

$209,900 DRAYTON STARTER HOME offers large country kitchen with lots of oak cabinets, main floor laundry, great family room with gas heat stove, newly renovated main floor bathroom, three bedrooms, mature trees on fenced lot 66’ x 165, newer detached garage 12’ x 24’, concrete driveway. MLS. Call Bert to view.

ANN ST.

TWIN CITY REALTY INC.

CORAL GABLES CRT.

LUKE

WEST MONTROSE

$725,000

$532,999 AFFORDABLE SINGLE FAMILY HOME in a quiet neighbourhood. Oversized garage. Long driveway. Updated kitchen & bath. Lovely pine sunroom. Fin. rec. rm. Large L-shaped deck. Fenced yard. New shed. Gas furnace (2014) MLS.

COUNTRY LIVING – 1.89 acres,close to Elmira, K-W & Guelph. Scenic back yard with a trout stream & concr bridge. Lovely ‘Chervin’ kitchen w/built-ins, quartz and fireplace. Newer windows. Hdwd. in LR/DR. Huge deck w/hot tub. Fin. bsmt. w/2 bdrms. rec. rm. games rm. kitchenette & 2 walkouts (Great income potential!). 27’x16’ shed. A MUST SEE! MLS.

PINTAIL DR.

VOISIN CR.

HIGH ST., DRAYTON

$619,900

IMPRESSIVE STONE BUNGALOW NESTLED IN TREES. Backs to parkland. Open concept from oversized great room w/ fireplace. Spacious kit/dining area w/walkin pantry. You’ll enjoy entertaining in the fin. bsmt. – rec. room, games rm, office, den, bathroom & exercise room. Both levels are carpet free. A must see! MLS Reduced.

TEAM

TRACEY

STUNNING BUNGALOW W/UNIQUE STUCCO EXTERIOR. Aggregate concrete driveway. 2 bdrms./2 baths (ensuite) on the main level. Open concept from great rm/kit/din. area (great for entertaining). Spacious rec. rm., games rm, bdrm, exercise rm & bathrm. In lower level. Hot tub, fenced yard. Flagstone patio. You won’t be disappointed! MLS.

SO LD

Your referrals are appreciated!

JULIE

WILLIAMS Broker of Record, HECKENDORN SHANTZ Broker Sales Rep. MVA Residential Sales Rep. Res: 519.669.1068 Res: 519.669.8629 Cell: 519.505.0627 Cell: 519.584.4400

NEW LISTING

$270,000

$534,900 NEW LISTING! Enjoy the 3,400 s/f of finished living space in this 1,900 s/f beautifully detailed bungalow offering dream kitchen w/granite, cherry cabinets and quality appliances, main floor great room w/fireplace, superb master w/ensuite plus 4 spacious bedrooms and 3 bathrooms, large rec/games room, walkup to large double garage. Mature trees in fenced yard surrounding salt water pool and large deck. Great in-law suite in basement. MLS. Call Bert to view.

BRAD MARTIN

$799,999 ST CLEMENTS – Outstanding 3+ bdrm. bungalow, only 3 yrs. old. Open concept from lovely kit. to great room, dinette & dining rm. Vaulted ceilings, lots of windows. Huge rec. rm. & 3pc. in bsmt. PLUS 1 bdrm. in-law suite w/separate entrance. Detached Shed 20’x20’ w/bsmt, gas, hydro & water. Iron fence. MLS.

$454,900 DRAYTON – Custom built one owner bungalow w/walkout bsmt. 98’wide lot. 3 bdrms. Main flr. laundry & family roo. Fin. bsmt w/games room, rec. rm, exercise rm & storage rms. INGROUND pool & hot tub – great place to entertain! MLS.

CALL FOR YOUR FREE MARKET EVALUATION

BROKERAGE

519-579-4110 OFFICE

FAMILY ALBUM

sold@clickthathouse.com

Warren McNeil - Sales Rep. | Melanie McNeil - Sales Rep.

$

Move in ready! Too many features to mention! 3 beds, 4 baths, kitchen w/backsplash & breakfast bar, master ensuite, upper floor laundry, 2 gas fireplaces, finished basement, new garage door, updated roof, deck, shed, appliances included. A must see!

00 9 9, 34

SOLD

ANNIVERSARY

OBITUARY

DEATH NOTICES

Happy 60th Anniversary

Martin, Sarah (Mrs. Urias W.)

FUTHER, CAROL ANN R.N. | With great sadness, the Futher family announces the sudden passing of Carol Ann on Thursday, September 10, 2015 at Heritage House in St. Jacobs. Carol (nee Kloepfer) of Wellesley, in her 80th year. 

Doris & Albert Sheppard

NEW LISTING

,9 69 3 $

00

OPEN HOUSE | Sunday 2-4pm | 57 Falcon Drive, Elmira

Love, Your Family

Great value! 3+2 beds, 2 baths, attached 1.75 garage, updated flooring on main level and new countertop, open concept floorplan, good sized bedrooms, walkout to deck, patio, fenced yard and shed. A great home for the growing family!

THANK YOU

#1

With Thanks

NEWS

SOURCE

IN THE REGION

WE COVER THE COUNTRY!

I wish to thank everyone for all the best wishes & cards on the occasion of my 90th Birthday. You made it a memorable occasion for me. Sincerely, Marg Hillis

Peacefully passed into the presence of her Lord on Friday, September 11, 2015 at Chartwell LTC Residence, Elmira at the age of 93 years and 3 months. Beloved wife of Urias Martin for 65 years. Sister and sister-in-law of Lydia Martin of RR 4, Listowel, Elam M. J. Martin of RR 3, Harriston, Esther Martin of RR1, Waterloo, Elam Martin of RR 1, St. Clements, Daniel and Ada Martin of RR 1, Wallenstein and Lauretta Martin of RR4, Elmira. Also lovingly remembered by her many nieces, nephews and their families, Wayne and Doreen Martin and Glen and Eileen Weber. Predeceased by her parents Christian and Lydia Ann (Horst) Martin, stepmother Catherine Martin, brothers Clayton, Reuben, Henry and Noah Martin, sisters Saloma Brubacher, Emma Weber and Lydia Martin, brothers-in-law Amos Brubacher and Abram Weber, and sister-in-law Saloma Martin. The family received their friends and relatives at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira on Sunday, September 13, 2015 from 1-4 and 7-8:30 p.m. Funeral Service was held at Countryside Mennonite Fellowship, Hawkesville on Monday, September 14, 2015 at 2:30 p.m. The casket remained open at the church from 1:30 p.m. until time of service. Interment in Hillside Cemetery. In Sarah’s memory, donations to Christian Aid Ministries would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

MARTIN, SARAH (MRS. URIAS W.)

| Peacefully passed into the presence of her Lord on Friday, September 11, 2015 at Chartwell LTC Residence, Elmira, at the age of 93 years and 3 months. MORAN, GEORGE ROYDEN (ROD)  |

It is with great sadness that we announce the death of Rod Moran at his home in Chilliwack, B.C., on Tuesday, September 8, 2015, after a long battle with cancer. Local relatives are his son Rod (Jenn) of Maryhill.

NEW DEADLINE FOR FAMILY ALBUM IS TUESDAYS BY NOON


LIVING HERE | 27

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

LIVING HERE CHEF’S TABLE/ DONNA GINGRICH

ADVENTURES / TRYING SOMETHING NEW

Seeing the world by WWOOF-ing it up Elmira woman gains some novel experiences in Germany by providing farm work in exchange for room and board courtesy of an organization called World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms WHITNEY NEILSON Forget Cabo, Bora Bora, or wherever your go-to summer destination is. For Elmira’s Ally Melitzer, Germany was the place to be. The EDSS grad and current University of Waterloo master’s student spent two months travelling and working her way through Germany, meeting new people, and testing her German language skills. “I did my undergraduate degree in linguistics and languages, and my housemate had done WWOOFers – the World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms – and it was in Germany and Switzerland that he had done it. So I talked to him a lot about it and decided before I graduated that it was something I really wanted to do,” Melitzer said. After she graduated from McMaster University with a degree in linguistics she worked for eight months to save money for the trip. She thought it would be a good immersive opportunity to better learn the language before embarking on her master’s in German this fall. She stayed at two different farms, and also spent two weeks in Berlin seeing the sights. “I booked the hostels months in advance, so I knew what I was going to do there,” Melitzer said. “And then I thought I’ll figure out the trains when I get there, it can’t be that difficult – and for me it was pretty difficult, actually.

Ally Melitzer spent three weeks on a sheep farm in Germany helping out with farm chores and practicing her German language skills. [SUBMITTED]

Speaking some German helped a lot definitely … I think I underestimated how far I would actually be travelling. German trains are actually really amazing. You can get everywhere, so it did work out.” She travelled from Berlin to the middle of Germany, which was a five-hour train ride, and then down to the southwest, near the Swiss border.

The first farm she stayed at was an animal rescue farm. There were three other WWOOFers there, which meant there wasn’t enough work to go around, and more free time than she hoped for. But she enjoyed seeing the different animals on a farm setting, like pigs and sheep, where they weren’t being raised for slaughter. “They had foxes actu-

ally, and they had baby raccoons and raccoons aren’t native to Germany,” Melitzer explained. “I thought it was kind of cool how they had a wide assortment of different animals and that the whole focus was just basically caring for them. I wasn’t vegan, they were all vegans, but they were okay with the fact that I wasn’t.” Then she stayed on a

sheep farm with a family near Switzerland. This time she got more of the experience she was looking for, working long days on the farm, having dinner with the family, and learning about their lifestyle. “I got there and I was thrown into this whole sheep farming experience where he gave me a shepherd’s crook and was like, ‘okay we’re going to herd all the sheep today from the low pasture up to the mountain.’ I’m just in the back with this shepherd’s crook having no idea what I’m doing,” Melitzer laughs. “We sheared two sheep by hand and that took two hours for each sheep. So that was definitely interesting.” WWOOF-ing isn’t operated by one worldwide organization. Rather, each country runs it in their jurisdiction. Interested travellers pay a small membership fee to access profiles on the website of people who are willing to provide room and board in exchange for help on their farm. Melitzer emailed back and forth with a few people before selecting the two farms, based on her interest in what kind of work she’d be doing and how friendly they seemed. She previously did an exchange trip to Italy in high school, so her parents were supportive of her decision to WWOOF it in Germany. “I brought it up to my mom first and she was like ‘great, that’s wonderful. ABROAD | 30

There’s more to potatoes than just boiling them RECIPE NOTES For generations, potatoes have been a staple in this community. We bake, boil, mash, fry, grill or deep fry them. There is a phenomenal amount of recipes available; we have come a long way from our ancestors who boiled them to death. The red potatoes from my garden are a good size this year but there are not many on one plant. I am grateful for what there is – using potatoes from your own garden is much more satisfying than buying them at the store. The cooking onion crop is very good this year; they are huge! So with the produce coming in from the garden and another family reunion potluck to attend, the recipe below is the result. I put some type of onions into almost every savoury dish I make because I love them. Those folks who think they don’t like onions don’t notice them when they are chopped small but the flavour is still there. One of my favourite ways to cook onions is to caramelize them, taking the time to brown them slowly. CHEF’S TABLE | 30

Get Ready for Winter! Now is a great time to begin planning ahead for winter and starting to think about booking your vehicle in to get the tires changed over. Appointments fill up fast once the snow falls, so be prepared early this year to beat the rush and aim to schedule your vehicle in for the middle to end of October. – Ken Neary

Tel: (519) 669-1082 Fax: (519) 669-3084

20 Oriole Parkway E., Elmira, ON

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28 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

“A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

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SEPTEMBER 19 ANNUAL CHICKEN AND SAUSAGE BBQ at St. Jacobs Mennonite Church (1310 King St. N., St. Jacobs). dinner includes: chicken leg, sausage, baked potato, coleslaw, corn, roll, dessert and a beverage. Tickets available at the church off ice by calling 519-664-2268 or at the door. Visit www.sjmc.on.ca for more info. COMMUNITY CARE CONCEPTS 30TH Anniversary celebration 2-9 p.m., Lions Hall in Elmira. Free family/ community event featuring Erick Traplin, bouncy castle, face painting, children, youth and adult activities, music and more. Free barbeque at 5 p.m. Call 519-664-1900 for details.

SEPTEMBER 22 WEEKLY BINGO UPSTAIRS AT the St. Clements Community Centre, 7 p.m. Sponsored by the Paradise & District Lions Club. Wheelchair accessible. For more information contact Joe Brick at 519-699-4022.

SEPTEMBER 23 SENIORS COMMUNITY DINING AT noon (doors open at 11:30 a.m.). Linwood Community Centre, 5279 Ament Line, Linwood. Cost: $11. Community Care Concepts invites you to join us for a hot noonday meal, fellowship and entertainment. Call 519-664-1900 or toll free: 1-855-664-1900 for more information.

SEPTEMBER 24 ELMIRA LIONS BINGO - Doors open at 6 p.m., starts 7 p.m. sharp. Lions Hall Elmira. For more info call 519-500-1434.

1540 FLORDALE ROAD

ALZHEIMER’S AND DEMENTIA - Speakers from the Alzheimer’s Society will lead this important program addressing latest research information, community resources available and questions; 6 p.m., Woolwich Seniors Association room. All welcome. For information call 519-669-5044. THERE’S AN APP FOR that! Join Telemedicine Nurse, Jenn DeCosta, and learn how to use your tablet or smart phone to enhance your health. Jenn will help you download some apps and show you how apps can help you achieve your health goals; 6-7:30 p.m. at Woolwich Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs. For more information call 519-664-3794, ext. 0. HUGS AT BRESLAU COMMUNITY Centre, 100 Andover Dr. from 9:30-11 a.m. Topic: Letters and Numbers all around us, Ontario Early Years presentation. Parents and children age 0-5 welcome to attend. Call Heidi 519-664-3794, ext. 237 for more information.

SEPTEMBER 25 HUGS AT WOOLWICH COMMUNITY Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr. St. Jacobs from 9:30 - 11 a.m. Topic: Meal planning for busy families and cooking demonstration. Parents and children age 0 - 5 welcome to attend. Call Heidi 519-664-3794 ext. 237 for more info. THE KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS Council 8192 are sponsoring a Fish Fry at St. Teresa of Avila Church, 19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira. Two sittings - 5 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Adults and Take out $15; children (12 & under) $8. Advance tickets available until Sept. 23. Purchase tickets from the church office between 9 a.m. & 1 p.m. or call 519-669-3387.

BOARD GAMES DAY IN Breslau, 1-11 p.m. Join us for our next board games day at the Breslau Community Centre (100 Andover Dr.). New people always welcome. For more information email boardgamers@rogers.com Admission $2. Children under 16 welcome to participate if accompanied by an adult who is also participating. FISH FRY - MARYHILL Heritage Community Centre, 58 St. Charles St. E., Maryhill; 11 a.m - 7 p.m. Eat in or take-out, no reservations - service in order of arrival. Fresh cut fries with haddock fish, served with coleslaw, tartar sauce and lemon. 1 piece dinner $13 or 2 piece dinner $15. Dessert and refreshments available. Cash only. Take out order of FOUR or more call or email by Sept. 24, 519-648-2939 or email maryhillfishfry@outlook.com.

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SEPTEMER 28 SENIORS LUNCH CLUB AT noon (doors open at 11:30 a.m.). Woolwich Memorial Centre, 24 Snyder Ave. S., Elmira (community room). Cost $6. Join us for a noonday light lunch and fellowship. Call Community Care Concepts at 519-664-1900 for more information. BABY FOOD BASICS: 6 months to 1 year. Join Registered Dietician and Lactation Consultant Robin Hicken and learn about the foods that are good for your baby’s age and stage, how to choose, make and store baby food as well as learn about ways to nurture a “good eater;” 2-3:30 p.m. at the Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs. For more information call 519-664-3794, ext. 0.

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PLACES OF FAITH | A DIRECTORY OF LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP

building relationships with God, one another and the world

SUNDAYS - 9:00 & 11:00AM WEDNESDAYS - 7:00PM

St. James Lutheran Church

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10:45am Worship Service Finding The Way Together 47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 www.thejunctionelmira.com

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Elmira Mennonite Church

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Emmanuel

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58 Church St. W., Elmira • 519-669-5123

Sunday, September 20th Relationships

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200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 www.woodsidechurch.ca

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Sunday School 9:45am Worship Service 11:00am Hopping Thursdays 7-8:30pm 22 Florapine Rd., Floradale • 519-669-2861 www.floramc.org


LIVING HERE | 29

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

STRANGE BUT TRUE / BILL & RICH SONES PH.D.

Unless itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s an unwanted guest, best to wait a while before serving dropped beer WEIRD NOTES

Q. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We do not ride on the railroad; it rides upon us,â&#x20AC;? cautioned 19th-century naturalist Henry David Thoreau in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walden.â&#x20AC;? How much more ubiquitous are the effects of technology today and the language they generate? A. Start with the â&#x20AC;&#x153;wearable,â&#x20AC;? a computer worn either as an piece of clothing or as an accessory,â&#x20AC;? says Paul McFedries in â&#x20AC;&#x153;IEEE Spectrumâ&#x20AC;? magazine. Now add â&#x20AC;&#x153;smart glasses,â&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;memory glassesâ&#x20AC;?; â&#x20AC;&#x153;smart watchesâ&#x20AC;?; â&#x20AC;&#x153;smart braceletsâ&#x20AC;?; and â&#x20AC;&#x153;smart trackersâ&#x20AC;? for fitness, activity and GPS.

Attach these to bicycles for â&#x20AC;&#x153;rideables.â&#x20AC;? Next bring on the â&#x20AC;&#x153;hearable,â&#x20AC;? an in-ear computer also known as an â&#x20AC;&#x153;earable,â&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;smart ear device.â&#x20AC;? Not intimate enough? Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always the â&#x20AC;&#x153;embeddable,â&#x20AC;? a device inserted under the skin; or the â&#x20AC;&#x153;ingestible,â&#x20AC;? such as a â&#x20AC;&#x153;smart pillâ&#x20AC;? that reports on how the body is reacting to its medication. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t confuse these with â&#x20AC;&#x153;nearables,â&#x20AC;? which get â&#x20AC;&#x153;smartâ&#x20AC;? only when a mobile computer gets into range. When McFedries asked a wearables researcher to predict some future applications, she mentioned â&#x20AC;&#x153;jackets that tell what the temperature, barometric pressure, or smog level is and a baseball hat that gives the score of the game.â&#x20AC;?

Concludes McFedries: â&#x20AC;&#x153;If we are on our way to becoming â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;citizen terminals,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; bristling with bodymounted gadgetry, if we are becoming THAT close to the machine, then letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hope itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for better reasons than these.â&#x20AC;? Q. How early do we humans begin forming our â&#x20AC;&#x153;first impressionsâ&#x20AC;?? What are they likely to be?

A. Going by recent research, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the fetus uses its budding brain and senses to learn about itself and the outside world well before birth,â&#x20AC;? says Ferris Jabr in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scientific Americanâ&#x20AC;? magazine. In one classic drawing, a fetus at 27 weeks is shown sucking one thumb and using its other hand to grasp onto the umbilical cord. In fact, as early as

seven weeks after fertilization, fetuses start to move, swinging their umbilical cords, climbing the walls of the amniotic sac and sticking their limbs in their mouth. Their coordination improves as they grow. By the 15th week, a fetusâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; taste buds have formed, by the 24th week olfactory cells are working. Newborns show a preference for flavors and odors such as garlic, anise and carrot that they grew accustomed to in the womb. Fetal hearing comes on between weeks 24-27. Not only do fetuses learn the rhythm and intonation of their native language but they also pick up distinct words and syllables. Brain activity of newborns showed they â&#x20AC;&#x153;recognized

three-syllable nonsense words that had been repeatedly played in their environment prior to birth, whereas newborns never exposed to the words were indifferent.â&#x20AC;? Of all the senses, vision takes the longest to mature: Not until its 28th week does a fetus open its eyes, though itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s debatable what, if anything, it can see. Q. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How long do you have to wait after dropping a bottled beer before you can safely present it to a guest, and how did its internal pressure build up if the system is in equilibrium?,â&#x20AC;? asked â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Scientistâ&#x20AC;? magazine of its readers.

A. The pressure inside is

unchanged after a dropping or shaking, though tiny beer bubbles are now distributed

throughout, answers Andrew Carruthers of Quebec, Canada. When the bottle is opened, these bubbles serve as nucleation points for the dissolved carbon dioxide, which takes a lot of beer with it as it rushes out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a terrible waste: not only is good beer lost, but what remains is flat.â&#x20AC;? Better to wait a bit before openingâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;long enough to allow the last, smallest bubbles to rise to the surface and burst harmlessly. The time required depends on how large and deep the bubbles are and how viscous the beer is.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS Bill is a journalist, Rich holds a doctorate in physics. Together the brothers bring you â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strange But True.â&#x20AC;? Send your questions to strangetrue@compuserve.com.

OBSERVER CROSSWORD PUZZLER ACROSS 1. Defender of Castle Grayskull 5. Artillery burst 10. Brahman, e.g. 15. Plow puller 16. Blueprint 18. Like Beethoven 19. Broadcasting 20. Slugger Mel 22. ___ Day 24. ICQ 25. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life ___ We Know Itâ&#x20AC;? 26. Fraternity party staple 27. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Comprende?â&#x20AC;? 28. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aeneidâ&#x20AC;? figure 30. Dash 32. Private eye, for short 33. Alum 35. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m ___ you!â&#x20AC;? 37. Chamber group, maybe 39. Word before large 40. ___ or about 41. Moray, e.g. 43. Beaver State 44. Common aspiration

46. Artificial bait 47. Yours truly 48. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Monopolyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; square 49. Send to the canvas 52. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No ___!â&#x20AC;? 53. Astir 54. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Charlotteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Webâ&#x20AC;? girl 55. Bleed 56. Transverse flute 57. Part of the verb â&#x20AC;&#x153;to beâ&#x20AC;? 58. Raniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wear 59. Bridges of Los Angeles County 60. Author Harper 61. Buttercup family member 62. Sacred songs 63. That man 65. ___ Masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Voice 66. Speech problem 67. Gift-tag word 68. 10 C-notes 70. All ___ 71. Eye affliction

DOWN 1. Slang for a jail 2. Nonresident doctor 3. PM preceder 4. Finger, in a way 6. Flyer 7. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fantasy Islandâ&#x20AC;? prop 8. Theda Bara, e.g. 9. Word before course, sometimes 10. Comedian Bill, informally 11. Indefinite article 12. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Open Windowâ&#x20AC;? writer 13. 20-20, e.g. 14. Cereal killer 17. Conditional release 21. Oolong, for one 23. Hitherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s partner 25. Deductive 29. Defeat decisively 31. Display unit 32. Kind of mark 34. Devil 36. Bauxite, e.g. 38. Tagged player

42. â&#x20AC;&#x153;... ___ he drove out of sightâ&#x20AC;? 45. Group of whales 46. Biography 50. 10 jiao 51. ___ probandi 52. Conk out 53. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the ___?â&#x20AC;? 54. Buff 56. Bird ___ 57. Stylish 58. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who cares?â&#x20AC;? 59. The x in â&#x20AC;&#x153;2x4â&#x20AC;? 64. Champion 65. Conversation starter 66. Renaissance instruments 69. Pillbox, e.g.

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SUDOKU CHALLENGE LOCATION

Versailles, France

CAPTION George Connell & Debra Cowal of Elmira recently travelled to Chateau of Versailles, Versailles France.



HOW TO PLAY: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. We have got you started with a few numbers already placed in the boxes.

             

         


30 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

ABROAD: Learning more than the language while

taking part in a new adventure

FROM | 27

You should definitely do that.’ I think they’re kind of used to me just being like I want to go live in another country for a few months. They were really supportive, my dad was too,” Melitzer said. Initially, she didn’t plan to study German during her undergrad. She was studying French and Italian, but when the Italian program was cut at McMaster she had to pick a nonromance language to study. She landed on German because it didn’t seem too far off from English. “I started taking it and I just fell in love with it and started trying to do everything by myself, like read books and watch movies,” Melitzer said. “I was in fourth year so it was already pretty late and I didn’t know if I could learn enough to get into the grad program and then I applied and it was really cool because a lot of that was just me taking my own initiative and trying to learn as much as I could.” She says it’s exciting because at UW the master’s in German is combined with linguistics, so she’ll get to put both of her in-

say that but I don’t really want to,’ to just feeling really comfortable expressing myself and not having to think about grammar and everything as much, which was really, really cool,” Melitzer said.

sively in German. “When I was on the sheep farm that was three weeks of just German. I didn’t speak any English. And even just from those three weeks my German level went from ‘oh I could

CHEF’S TABLE: Plenty of

tasty options for your spuds

FROM | 27

Now pursuing a master’s in German, the EDSS grad says her summer spent WWOOF-ing in Germany helped her better appreciate the work that goes into farming. [SUBMITTED] terests to good use. And it won’t be long before she’s back in Germany as she’ll be spending a year studying at the University of Mannheim come January. “Initially, and still to some extent, I’m really interested in doing translation, even if I could just do it not as a full-time thing, just as a side. I’d love to live and work in Germany. So that’s something I’m interested in, maybe a GermanCanadian company that have affiliations in both countries,” Melitzer said. Aside from some initial language difficulties, she says the most challeng-

ing part of her trip was the physical component of working on a farm. Despite being surrounded by farms in Elmira her whole life, she never expected to carry a giant battery for an electric fence up the side of a mountain or lift up a sheep by its forelegs to shear it – both examples of the hard work she put in on the sheep farm. She says she took away an appreciation for the farming lifestyle. “The fact that I expected it to have normal hours, most of the time we were working from 8:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., just nonstop because it just had to get done. And

then we did everything without modern technology. We actually had scythes and everything,” Melitzer said. You can travel as a WWOOFer practically anywhere in the world, from Tanzania to Australia, to back home in Canada. “It’s such a great way to travel, to experience the actual culture and not just the touristy stuff. And it’s cheap,” Melitzer said. And while she visited the East Side Gallery, historical war monuments, and the Berlin Wall, for Melitzer the highlight of her trip was being able to speak exclu-

Caramelized Onion and Potato Bake 2 large cooking onions 3 Tbsp. butter (first amount) 1/2 tsp. white sugar Sprinkle salt 6-8 potatoes 1/4 cup melted butter (second amount) 3/4 tsp. salt 3 Tbsp. fresh herbs of your choice or 3 tsp. dried herbs Freshly grated black pepper 1/4 cup water 2 Tbsp. chopped fresh parsley

For the caramelized onions, peel and slice onions. Melt 3 Tbsp. butter in frying pan. Add onion slices, sprin-

kle with sugar and salt. Over medium heat, cook slowly and stir frequently until evenly browned. Depending on your stove or your frying pan, you may have to turn up the heat but don’t burn them. Set aside to cool slightly. Cut potatoes into 1” chunks, put them into a greased casserole dish. Add melted butter, salt, herbs, black pepper and water. Stir. Cover tightly and bake at 350º F for 1 hour or more until potatoes are cooked. To serve, sprinkle with chopped parsley. Serves 6-8 people.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Donna is the author of A Taste of Nostalgia Cookbook, which is available by calling 519-638-5791 or email donna.atasteofnostalgia@gmail.com.

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Economical 4 cylinder engine with 6-speed automatic transmission, air conditioning, power windows/locks/mirrors, Uconnect voice command with Bluetooth, fog lights and more. Only 20,750 kilometers, previous daily rental, finished in deep cherry red. $20,995.

2011 DODGE JOURNEY CREW

3.6 litre V6 with 6-speed automatic, dual zone climate control, power driver's seat, heated front seats,8.4 inch media center with U-connect voice command and Bluetooth, remote start and more. Finished in silver, only 55,350 km.$16,995.

84 mths @ 5.99%

2014 DODGE DART GT

2.4 litre Multi-air 4 cylinder engine, 6 speed automatic transmission, leather interior with heated seats, heated steering wheel, remote start, Uconnect 8.4 media with Bluetooth and Navigation, back-up camera and much more. Finished in Granite, only 5,800 kilometers$22,995.

2011 DODGE JOURNEY SXT

2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN CREW

3.6 litre V6, 6 speed automatic transmission, full Stow-n-Go, front and rear climate control, power driver seat, power windows front and rear, fog lights, alloy wheels and more. Finished in dark grey, only 39,500 kilometers. $21,995.

2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT STOW-N-GO

3.6 litre V6 with 6 speed auto transmission, 2nd row bucket seats with Stow-n-go, rear air, Navigation, rear back-up camera, Bluetooth with hands-free, overhead DVD video unit and much more. Finished in dark blue, only 33,900 kilometers. $23,995.

CALL ONE OF OUR PROFESSIONAL SALES REPS TODAY: RAY FREDERICK, COLIN KROPF, JEFF JOHNSON. All sale prices exclude H.S.T, and License Fee. Fixed rates, based on bi-weekly payments O.A.C. Finance rates are only good for date of publication.

361 ARTHUR STREET SOUTH, ELMIRA • www.voisinchrysler.com

519-669-2831


LIVING HERE | 31

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

NOTICE TO OUR READERS AND ADVERTISERS

YOUR OBSERVER IS MOVING TO THURSDAY OCTOBER

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32 | BACK PAGE

THE OBSERVER | SEPTEMBER 19, 2015

BLOOD: Family is looking to give back FROM | 3

with the other kids and has lots of fun and talks and plays and jumps,” Kristen said. Aside from the oxygen tubes in her nose, you’d never know she’s sick from looking at her. But she underwent her seventh heart catheter operation this summer, and the results were worse than last time. Doctors put her on a new medication and told her parents to keep her on the oxygen because it’s helping. “The hospital said she’s kind of puzzling to them because her tests show that her heart is pretty sick, but she sure doesn’t act like she’s sick,” Kristen said. She’ll undergo another heart catheter surgery early next year to see how the medication has worked. If it hasn’t helped then they’ll look at other medications, hopefully still oral and not an IV pump. Despite the challenges, Kristen says it doesn’t slow Ella down. “No one ever expects to need blood. You don’t expect to be driving home from work today and get in a car accident and need blood. Or if you’re expecting a baby you never ex-

3

Summer

CLEARANCE EVENT!

CLICK

S AT U R D AY S E P T E M B E R 1 9 • 9 - 6 S U N D AY S E P T E M B E R 2 0 • 1 1 - 5 M O N D AY S E P T E M B E R 2 1 • 9 - 9

LAMINATE CLICK LAMINATE

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LAMINATE 25 YEAR WARRANTY!

Ella Dorscht’s family organized two upcoming blood donor clinics to help replace the units of blood she’s used through her time at Sick Kids Hospital. [SUBMITTED] pect the baby you’re going to have is going to need all these units of blood. For those that are eligible to donate I think it’s important to do it because you never know when someone you care about is going to need it,” Kristen said. At Woolwich council on Tuesday night, councillor Scott Hahn challenged fellow councillors and township staff to get out and donate.

The Elmira clinic will be at the Elmira Lion’s Hall (40 South Street West) on September 25 from 2-8 p.m. The Linwood clinic is the following week on October 2 at the Linwood Community Centre (5279 Ament Line) from 2:308:30 p.m. You can register with Donate For Ella #TEAM368169. Appointment bookings can be made at www.blood.ca and 1-888-2-DONATE.

IN STOCK

1

$ 37

$

WAX SEALED!

VINYL LUXURY VINYL PLANKS

OFF

www.elmiragiftoutlet.com

TILE PORCELAIN TILE

REG 2.99

AREA RUGS PLUS

NO TAX! 5x8

4x6

37 $ 97 $

7x10

NEXT SENIOR’S DAY: THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24th! 519.669.3072

REG 2.99

PER SQ FT

SALE PRICE

1 Union St., Elmira

PER SQ FT

67¢

HOURS: Mon.-Wed. 9:30-5:30 Thur.-Fri. 9:30-7:00 Saturday 9:30-5:30

May not be exactly as shown. While quantities last.

20%

1

$ 37

57 $ 127 $

8x11

NEW PRODUCT!

STAIR TREADS SOLID RED OAK 36” WIDE

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OPENS LEFT OR RIGHT 42” OR 49”

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PER LIN FT

REG 9.99

HARDWOOD

OAK OR MAPLE

IN STOCK

7 MODERN STAINS

$

canadian made

2 97

PER SQ FT

REG 4.99

VINYL CLICK VINYL LUXURY PLANKS

IN STOCK

1

$ 97

5MM THICK!

WOW!

PER SQ FT

REG 3.99

TILE PORCELAIN TILE

IN STOCK

16” X 16”

SELECT SUMMER ITEMS ADDITIONAL

PER SQ FT

REG 4.99

IN STOCK

FIND THE PERFECT GIFT FOR EVERY OCCASION

10

2 97

26” WIDE!

FROM

25YR WARRANTY

2 NEW COLOURS!

ITEMS ARE HERE!

SUMMER NOW CLOTHING $

$

PER SQ FT

REG 2.99

HARDWOOD ENGINEERED CLICK MAPLE

PER SQ FT

REG 2.99

CARPET CARPET RUNNERS

IN STOCK

97¢

IN STOCK

FALL

swiss made

FREE UNDERPAD!

IN STOCK

swiss made

AC4 COMMERCIAL GRADE!

PER SQ FT

CARPET BERBER OR FRIEZE

/SF

LAMINATE

¢

REG 2.99

77

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IN STOCK

12.3MM THICK!

97

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12” X 24”

97¢

FIRST COME

PER SQ FT

REG 3.99

FIRST SERVED!

CARPET REMNANTS

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NO TAX! 12x12

12x9

$

12x15

67 $ 77 $ 97 HOT DEAL!

BASEBOARDS 3-7/8” X 12’ BASEBOARDS

59

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PER LIN FT

5-1/4” X 12’ BASEBOARDS

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$ 19

PER LIN FT

.COM

1 3 6 2 V I C TO R I A S T N . K I TC H E N E R 5 1 9 . 7 4 2 . 9 1 8 8

M - F 9 A M - 9 P M S AT 9 A M - 6 P M S U N 1 1 A M - 5 P M

September 19, 2015  

The Observer

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