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10 | 20 | 2016 VOLUME 21 | ISSUE 41 HE SAID/SHE SAID PLAYS FOR LAUGHS IN ETC PRODUCTION ARTS PAGE 17

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Community Care Concepts seeking financial support from Wellesley council

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Public input to be sought on expanding Elmira bus service

LIZ BEVAN WELLESLEY RESIDENTS ARE GETTING older, and as the senior citizen population grows, so does the need for support services, says the director of an agency that serves older residents. Cathy Harrington, executive director of Community Care Concepts, is looking for the township to continue to help fund its work, making her case to councillors meeting Tuesday night. The volunteer-driven organization focuses on five aspects of healthy aging, while providing rides, meals and interaction for their clients, who are mostly seniors, allowing them to live independently. The senior population is set to grow significantly in the next 25 years. Harrington pointed out that the township’s community parks and recreation strategic plan says the Wellesley population over the age of 70 will increase by 96 per cent by 2031. “You see the steady increase in terms of services that are required. If you take a look at the tail end of 20132014, that is when we launched our service support workers and exercise programs. With these two programs being offered in a variety of communities and locations, what it did was significantly drive up the demand for FUNDING | 4

Woolwich council will go to the public with plans to extend service hours of GRT route 21, where already-low ridership numbers are shrinking.

Woolwich looks at extending evening hours of operation as ridership numbers and revenue drop on GRT route 21 STEVE KANNON ALREADY USED SPARINGLY, THE bus connecting Elmira to Waterloo has seen falling ridership numbers this year. Perhaps hoping that extending the hours of operation will boost ridership – though there are no numbers

to back that up – Woolwich will turn to the community for input on the idea. Having looked at a number of options, including a bigger loop through Elmira with more stops, the township settled on going to the public with a plan to increase evening hours on Grand

E H T G E N I H V T Y A R S ON EVE STORE* E H ! T N X I TA

[LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]

River Transit route 21. Currently, there is no service after about 7:30 p.m. through the week and 4:30 p.m. on Saturdays. That plan would add another $83,000 a year to almost $500,000 a year the township is already paying for the limited number of users today. A study last year found that, on an average trip along the route, total ridership maxed out at a dozen people. Most days, buses run with passenger num-

bers in the single digits. The number of passengers is down this year, however, in keeping with a trend in the region and, indeed, across the country. With falling revenues, the region has lowered its target for revenue – i.e. fares – to 20 per cent of the cost of operation, down from 25 per cent, itself about half of the GRT average. That leaves taxpayers on the BUS | 4

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2 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

Purple Day at schools focuses on child abuse awareness WHITNEY NEILSON STUDENTS AND TEACHERS ACROSS the region donned their favourite purple hues on Wednesday for Go Purple Day, an initiative which raises awareness of child abuse in October in conjunction with child abuse prevention month. Prior to Go Purple Day, Karen Spencer, director of client services at Family and Children’s Services of the Waterloo Region, said it’s an important way to get youth involved and encourage people to speak up against child abuse and neglect. “I think spreading the word that some kids in our community are in need of protection is helpful be-

Students at St. Clement Catholic School wore purple on Wednesday in support of Go Purple Day, an initiative to raise awareness and remove the stigma around child abuse. Schools across the region and both school boards were encouraged to participate. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER] various reasons. Often it’s taken into care. Instead, cause there often is a stigma tion to wear for the day because the parents themthey remain with their which say “Speak Up For attached to families requirselves have experienced families and FACS help the Kids!” ing our help,” Spencer said. some trauma in their own parents. She notes in more than Both school boards in past. They may have addic“What their parents need 95 per cent of cases the the region participated and tion issues or mental health is some support in carfamilies they assist don’t principals were sent purple issues and so I think the ing for their children for require the children to be capes from the organiza-

really important message that we want to get across is that we are here to help families and primarily keep families together,” Spencer said. They work with more than 1,200 local families in the region who are facing challenges for a variety of reasons. Child abuse can be physical, sexual and/or emotional. It also includes neglect. And the schools play a vital role in protecting children and recognizing signs of abuse, since they see them five days a week during the school year. “The schools are a really important partner in this work because teachers

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NEWS | 3

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

A central part of the community Alumni return in droves as Linwood PS celebrates its 50th anniversary LIZ BEVAN FOR 50 YEARS, LINWOOD Public School has been a hub for the surrounding community, with students from multiple generations filling the classrooms of teachers that wouldn’t want to teach anywhere else. The school’s milestone anniversary was marked last weekend with a party for the community, including barbecue, cake and a live band, as well as displays showing the school throughout the years and all of the major changes made as the student body grew. Bruce Dammeier was a student at the school the first year it opened in 1967. He was in Grade 6 and was one of many students who were charged with picking colours, putting on a musical and more. He says a few things have changed since he was a student, but others have stayed exactly the same. “The school is a lot bigger, and obviously there are more students and staff now. I still live in Linwood and my wife is an educational assistant here, so I still have that connection to

the school,” he said. “(When I was a student) we came up with the school colours, the yearbook and the crest. All that stuff is still here.” One of the big memories for Dammeier was the school musical. The first year the doors were open, staff and students took on the daunting task of putting together H.M.S. Pinafore, a classic Gilbert and Sullivan musical with plenty of work involved. “I was coming from a one-room school where something like that just wasn’t possible,” he said. “So when I got here, we went all out with the props, the makeup and everything. It was a really big deal. That is the biggest thing that sticks out for me.” His wife, Debbie Dammeier, known by her students as Mrs. D, has been an EA at Linwood Public School for three decades, watching students and staff come and go through the years. She says the school is a great place to be and she wouldn’t want to be working in any other community. “We have had a great turnout (tonight) but that is because it is a great school. One boy that I

Pearl Frey takes a stroll through the 1980s at the Linwood PS anniversary celebrations last week. Secretary Liz Shantz, principal Shawn Thompson and EA Donna Dammeier serve cake to visitors. Betty Theissen, Cindy Matthews and Margaret Dahmer were all teachers at Linwood PS in the 1990s. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER] worked with in one of my first years here, he has Down Syndrome, came up to me yelling, ‘Mrs. D!’ That feels really good,” she said, adding that she has seen the school grow over the 30 years she has been working in Linwood. “We have had a couple of additions over the years. Staff has changed, except me and a few others. When you come to Linwood, you stay here. It is a great school. It is fun to work here.” Linwood principal

Shawn Thompson has been at the school for the past three years. As a newcomer to the staff, he says it was a bit surprising to see the community come out in droves to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Linwood Public School. “It is a community thing for us. We had a presentation earlier from three generations of families that had been through our school. For a small town, a school is a big deal. You can tell by the number of

people that came here tonight,” he said. “We never expected this many people, but it just shows the connection we have made with the community, which is what we want.” Part of the celebrations included opening a time capsule put together by students in 1982. The capsule remained sealed for 25 years waiting to be opened on the 50th anniversary. Some of the student predictions came true. Thompson was impressed with the

creativity and foreshadowing coming from the 1982 students. “We had one kid write about how he thought cars would drive themselves and cars would talk. He was right on,” he shared. “Another kid said that we wouldn’t use pennies and that we would have plastic money. We had a Mennonite boy say that in 25 years, kids will be playing video games against other kids from their homes. Again, right on.”

Wellesley councillors look at changing up township committee structure

HOW TO REACH US

one of the councillors gets to know the different portfolios the more we rotate this,” he said. Not all of his colleagues were in agreement, however. For van der Maas, a short rotation schedule might not allow councillors to be effective. “To switch every three months, particularly for new councillors, you can’t work with any kind of confidence and background knowledge. All you will be doing would be pushing paper,” he said.

As the new chair of planning, Wagner says the current transition is difficult enough, let alone every three months. “As much as I am going to embrace my new chair position, because I like planning and I am willing to learn whatever I can, for me, learning road, bridge, property and fire has been a big thing,” she said. “I kind of feel like I am abandoning ship when things are really starting to get going. It has been a process doing the

fire master plan and all that. Three months is too short.” Rather than a threemonth rotation, Neher suggested a compromise at a year between chair position changes. “Three months, there is no continuity in that. You are just getting into something and before you know it, you’re involved and then you out, and then someone new gets involved. Once a year, I could see,” he said. Mayor Nowak wondered if maybe councillors

weren’t clear on their roles as committee chairs. “It kind of begs the question about what the role is of the councillor and the relationships between the councillor and the director. I think it is not really clear. I don’t know if it has ever really been defined,” he said. He requested that CAO Rik Louwagie compile a report before the Nov. 29 deadline, outlining the expectations of municipal councillors sitting on committees.

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HALFWAY THROUGH THEIR TERM, Wellesley councillors are switching up their roles on township committees. Staff will be putting together a report for the next council meeting after Mayor Joe Nowak suggested shortening the two-year term each councillor has as a chair of a committee, whether it be road and bridge, fire, recreation or planning.

Coun. Shelley Wagner will chair the planning committee, Coun. Herb Neher will now chair the road and bridge committee, Coun. Carl Smit will chair the fire committee and Coun. Peter van der Maas will continue to chair recreation. The change goes into effect on Nov. 29. Nowak proposed giving councillors an opportunity to sit on each of the committees on a three-month rotation. “The intent is that each

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4 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

FUNDING: Changing demographics will put more pressure on agencies serving seniors, groups say FROM | COVER

our other services,” said Harrington. “As an example, this past year, we provided over 2,000 rides in the township, we delivered just shy of 2,800 meals, we have 1,900 visitors in our exercise programs and we had over 1,500 home visits. There is considerable growth there. There is no shortage of work.” In 2011, the organization provided fewer than 4,000

rides and meals. The number of township residents served by CCC has increased from around 200 in 2011 to more than 650 in 2015. In 2013, township council voted to reduce their contribution to CCC by $300, giving the organization $1,200 for the past three years. Harrington was in Wellesley requesting the same amount this year. Mayor Joe Nowak, how-

ever, said he didn’t think the amount they were asking for was enough. “We’re only looking at $1,200. In my opinion, I think we can do better with these services,” he said. Coun. Herb Neher was certain something could be done, down to asking Nowak to bring it up at the next regional council meeting, or a meeting of the rural mayors. “You get no money at

all from the region, but we are all paying taxes to the region. I am wondering if it is possible for the rural mayors to get together and take it to the region. Even if it is a pittance,” he said. “I am surprised. These are excellent services that you are providing here and with the aging population, I am wondering why, if the region kicks in on city services, why they can’t give a nominal amount to our

residents.” Other agencies originally scheduled to speak to council on Tuesday evening weren’t in attendance, and Nowak put forth a friendly amendment to defer a decision on the donation until the other organizations could ask for their funding. Both the Wilmot Family Resource Centre and the Woolwich Counselling Centre were set to ask for $5,000 each.

The organizations, along with CCC, work together in some cases to avoid overlapping services and to remove gaps in care. “We would always welcome more money, but certainly wouldn’t want to do that at the expense of the other core services that are funded,” said Harrington. Council agreed to defer a decision until all organizations could be heard from early next month.

BUS: Some councillors remain skeptical about spending, but plans don’t include cancelling service FROM | COVER

hook for 80 per cent of the cost. Councillors meeting Tuesday night approved going ahead with a public consultation process, wanting to know what residents think before digging deeper into their wallets. The expanded service would boost the tax hit from the bus by 18 per cent, to $46.56 from $39.51, using the regional average home assessed at $312,000 (a tax bill of $1,843.83). The actual hit on most Woolwich households is much higher, with the levy applied to ev-

ery home in the township. Mayor Sandy Shantz said it was most “reasonable to add evening service” when discussing expansion options. Some councillors remained skeptical, however, particularly in light of low ridership numbers and higher costs. Coun. Murray Martin noted the taxpayer subsidy continues to grow, from a 60-40 percentage split predicted before route 21 was launched on a trial basis in 2009, to 70-30 and now 80-20. “I think it’s high for that

(level of ridership). People that ride it could pay an extra couple of dollars to use it,” he said, suggesting fare hikes for the route. Coun. Patrick Merlihan argued against moving ahead with any expansion plans or consultations in light of falling ridership numbers that may be due in part to long detours and

delays caused by the reconstruction of King Street in St. Jacobs, a project that will drag through next year. “The timing for going to the public is not good,” he said, adding the ridership levels themselves are discouraging. “They’re not good numbers.” With falling numbers and no sign that’ll change,

Merlihan argued now is not a good time to spend money on expansion. “It seems like a lot of money for a very low expected increase in ridership.” “I think it’s important that we have public transit, but we have to look at those numbers,” agreed Coun. Scott Hahn. Despite their reserva-

tions, however, most councillors agreed to go ahead with consulting the public on the possible expansion. Plans for the process are expected at a later date. The township has also discussed the prospect of extending bus service into Breslau, though the financial case for that is even more precarious at this point.

FUNDRAISING EFFORTS GO FULL STEAM AHEAD Larry Zehr, Byron Kropf of the Tavistock Assistance Program, Anne Runstedler, Meagan Martin from Big Brothers Big Sisters Listowel, Lester Brubacher, Sharon Walkom from the Tavistock Assistance Program, Amsey Metzger and Eileen Metzger gathered at the Metzger farm in Wallenstein last week to distribute the proceeds from the Waterloo County Steam Threshers Reunion held in August. The two agencies each received $4,574.87 from the organization. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER

RETAIL BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY FOR AN AGENCY STORE IN ST. CLEMENTS, LCBO RFP #2016-122 ST. CLEMENTS An excellent business opportunity is now available to established retailers in St. Clements. The Liquor Control Board of Ontario (LCBO) is seeking a responsible, customer-focused retailer to operate an LCBO Agency Store in St. Clements. To qualify, the applicant must have an existing, currently operating retail business in the community and commit to operating the Agency store within established LCBO guidelines. To facilitate the sale of beverage alcohol products, the operator may be required to enter into separate commercial arrangements with the LCBO and domestic beer suppliers. The successful applicant will also be required to participate in a special LCBO servertraining program to ensure the responsible sale of beverage alcohol products. Since 1962, the LCBO has authorized more than 200 Agency stores to serve communities that have requested service but where the local population is too small to support a regular LCBO or beer store. These Agency stores are operated by local retailers within their existing retail business. Agency store contracts are normally awarded for a five-year term. In communities where there is currently an Agency store, as the contract nears expiry, the LCBO will take into consideration the fact that new businesses in the community may have been established and will allow an opportunity for all businesses in the community to compete for the next five-year term.

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Operating an LCBO Agency Store provides a retailer with an excellent opportunity to increase revenue and attract customers while providing local residents with beverage alcohol services. Agency stores also deliver economic benefits to the community in many cases through job creation and increased customer traffic for local merchants. For this competition, the LCBO must receive requests for the application package from interested businesses by mail before end of business day Friday, November 4, 2016. The application requests must quote the following information: RFP #2016-122 St. Clements Request for Application Package Procurement and Contract Management, LCBO 1 Yonge Street, Suite 1404 Toronto, ON M5E 1E5 Please note: An application fee of $100 must be included with your request in order to receive an application package. Make the cheque or money order payable to the LCBO only. In order to be considered for this business opportunity, applicants must submit to LCBO Procurement and Contract Management a completed proposal in the required format before the closing date and time, Friday, November 18, 2016, 3 p.m. local time. Late submissions will not be accepted and will be returned unopened.

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NEWS | 5

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

Changes to on-street parking rules The weather may have been warm for October, but Woolwich councillors meeting Tuesday night had snow on their minds. Specifically, the township’s wintertime ban on on-street parking to facilitate snow removal. Council approved a plan to shift the hours when on-street parking is not permitted, moving to 4 a.m. to 9 a.m. from the current 2:30-6 a.m. The ban remains in effect for the same period, Dec. 1 to Apr. 1. Dan Kennaley, the township’s director

of engineering and planning, noted road crews typically start at 5 a.m., so the new hours better reflects when snowplows are on the road. “This will give our snowplow operators more time to get the work done,” he said. Councillors suggested staff begin issuing warnings to drivers by midNovember, alerting them to changes in the prohibited hours. While some leniency will be allowed in the early part of the season, they pressed for more consistency in enforcing the ban. Currently, enforcement is weatherdependent, with milder conditions seeing less activity on the ticketing front. Having had staffing issues in the bylaw

enforcement department, the township will look at “deputizing” some of the roads crews to issue warnings and tickets. “We need to do a better job than last year,” admitted chief administrative officer David Brenneman.

Construction underway on Wellesley trail Construction on the hotly debated Greenwood Hill Road trail is underway, and the trail is almost ready to be laid. Coun. Shelley Wagner provided an update on the project as Wellesley council met Tuesday night, saying she

has heard things are going smoothly on the multi-use trail. “Construction is going very well,” she said. “(Director of Public Works) Kevin (Beggs) says…weather permitting, we should have all the piping laid in this week and started on placing the trail.” Beggs passed along the message that residents have been good and there haven’t been very many complaints. The issue was a topic of many discussions in council chambers with residents on Greenwood Hill Road, between Queen’s Bush Road and Ferris Drive in the Village of Wellesley opposed to some aspects of the plan, including proximity to the houses along the road.

The plan was approved at the Sept. 6 meeting, giving township crews the go ahead to start construction on the trail from Queen’s Bush Road, south to Gerber Meadows Drive. The project is being funded by the Healthy Kids Community Challenge to the tune of $30,000.

Ont. infrastructure fund increases Woolwich is expecting a large jump in provincial infrastructure grants over the next three years. Having received $137,000 in 2015 and 2016, the township will see $287,000 from the Ontario Community

Infrastructure Fund (OCIF) in 2017, with that number growing to $408,000 the following year and $636,000 in 2019. Meeting this week, councillors quickly endorsed entering into a new contribution agreement with the province in order to secure the funding. In 2015, the OCIF money helped with the rehabilitation of Floradale Road Bridge, while this year it was applied to the recently completed resurfacing of New Jerusalem Road. OCIF was introduced by the Ontario government to provide stable funding to help small communities address core infrastructure needs in relation to roads, bridges, water and wastewater, providing steady funding for such projects.

Majority in riding want referendum on electoral reform, according to survey by MP WHITNEY NEILSON THE VAST MAJORITY OF residents in the KitchenerConestoga riding are in support of a referendum before any changes are made to Canada’s electoral system, according to responses from a survey sent out by federal MP Harold Albrecht. Albrecht mailed information on electoral reform to all constituents in his riding last month and asked them to share their views on the topic. Of them, 1,178 constituents responded. Most of them – 1,058, or nearly 90 per cent – said they support a referendum, while 114 indicated a referendum wasn’t necessary and six were undecided. “I was hoping for a strong support for a referendum because quite frankly that’s where I lean. But I tried to give an unbiased approach to the actual paper and I was thinking if we had 80 per cent I’d be thrilled,” Al-

brecht said. The results were sent to the special committee studying electoral reform. The committee has spent months gathering opinions from across the country on electoral system options other than Canada’s current first-past-the-post system. It’s part of the federal government’s decision to put a new voting system in place before the next federal election. Albrecht said the literature he sent to his constituents explained the pros and cons of having a referendum and also asked them to give their feedback. The goal was to get as many constituents as possible providing input into the process. “It’s just a matter of letting more constituents have a voice. We could have done a roundtable, we could have done a town hall meeting, but we would never have had 1,178 people participate,” he said. He notes his main con-

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cern with doing a referendum is it has to be a clear question due to the complexity of the issue. Albrecht has been clear even in the last election of his support for the firstpast-the-post system, despite its drawbacks. He says all systems have strengths and weaknesses but he takes issue with systems of proportional representation. When he visited Moldova two years ago, who uses a proportional representation system, as an election observer he recalls there were more than 20 different party names on the ballot. “The other thing with proportional representation is that people who are vying to be members of parliament would need to be vetted by the actual party and ranked in a system so that those who were highest in their ranking for that party would be the ones who would end up being in parliament. So the party

actually has more control over their members of parliament through the proportional system than they do in the current system,” Albrecht said. He also has concerns with how proportional representation tends to increase the size of ridings and the

effects that would have on MPs trying to represent all those people. Although, supporters of proportional representation argue it creates greater representation. Once the committee decides what the options for the electoral system will be, Albrecht plans to send out

more material to keep his constituents informed. “For me the key is getting as many Canadians as possible involved in the actual decision ... I think everyone that wants to has to have a say. That’s why we’re saying a referendum is the best way to do it.”

KEEPING IT SAFE FOR YOUNG DRIVERS

Young Elmira residents were invited to the Elmira Lions Hall last week for the Sweetlife Road Show: Teens Learn to Drive to learn a bit about driving safety from Lauren Ball of the Cambridge Ontario Provincial Police. The day included lectures, testing blind spots and learning about the importance of wearing a seatbelt. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]

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6 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

JOE MERLIHAN PUBLISHER STEVE KANNON EDITOR

COMMENT

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OUR VIEW / EDITORIAL

THE VIEW FROM HERE

One group in the EU has it right on CETA trade deal JUSTIN TRUDEAU, WHO NEVER met a photo op. he didn’t like, may have to miss one. He’s scheduled to be meet with European Union officials Oct. 27 for the signing of the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), a trade deal between Canada and the EU. The EU, however, can’t get the deal approved – the Walloon region of Belgium is holding out, preventing the national government from providing the EU with the needed unanimity. Belgium and the EU will attempt to bring the region on board, or do an end-run, of course. That the Walloon legislators are absolutely right in calling CETA a bad deal makes no never mind, just as is the case with every other so-called free trade agreement. Trade deals such as CETA and the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) have little to do with trade. Certainly less so with every iteration. Tariffs are already generally low or non-existent. No, this is about corporate power, specifically the power to bypass governments and the will of the public. It’s about safeguarding profits ahead of jobs, the environment, taxes, borders and a host of other democratic controls. All of the downsides are the reason for the security surrounding such “trade” talks. Proponents don’t want you to know because they fear the public backlash would kill the deals. They simply wouldn’t hold up to public scrutiny, as they’re bound to make the economy worse for most of the people in the countries involved. CETA, for instance, is predicted to create a huge trade deficit for Canada, resulting in the loss of up to 150,000 Canadian jobs. Among the well-documented impacts are projections CETA would give big European drug companies extended patent rights, resulting in massive cost increases for Canadian drug plans, including $1.3-billion per year on taxpayer-funded public drug plans and $1.5-billion on private drug plans. While politicians routinely claim free trade deals create jobs and wealth, that’s just not the case. Well, not the jobs part. And the wealth goes to only a few. But that’s not what supporters will tell you. CETA and the TPP are rife with downsides, though the government continues to tout it as a jobcreation scheme, just as all governments do with trade agreements that typically result in job losses and the hollowing out of the manufacturing sector. Of course, calling them trade agreements is rather disingenuous. The real goal is the ability to move capital with the intent of securely off-shoring jobs, intellectual property rights (a big push in the U.S.-led talks), extending pharmaceutical patents to raise the cost of drugs and reduce access. Language in existing deals such as NAFTA becomes even more pronounced in CETA and TPP, allowing for end-runs around national governments, essentially constraining their powers. In many ways, it’s continued deregulation by stealth, as governments would be handcuffed. As parties to the negotiations, they do so willingly, attempting to hide from the public the desire to turn more power over to corporations. Once the agreements are in place, politicians can simply say their hands are tied, hoping the public doesn’t remember who tied them in the first place. It can be argued that liberalized monetary policies and trade deals that favour corporate interests over the well-being of citizens – policies that have eroded our standard of living for three decades – culminated in the recent financial meltdown. The cure, we’re told, is yet more deregulation and globalization, essentially offering a drowning man more water instead of a lifejacket. The Walloons have it right. It’s not like there’s any shortage of photo ops. for Trudeau.

Clown-ish behaviour, some of it over the top, has redefined scary this Halloween, with clowns beyond the pale for school dress-up events. WORLD VIEW / GWYNNE DYER

Banning HFCs: too late and too slow WORLD AFFAIRS THE CHIEF SOURCE OF new problems is solutions to old problems. The ammonia that we used in domestic fridges as a coolant in the early 20th century was poisonous if it leaked, so in the 1930s we replaced it with chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which you can breathe all day without harm. Problem solved. Unfortunately, it turned out that CFCs, when they leaked, eventually rose into the stratosphere where they began destroying ozone. The ozone layer is the only thing protecting us from the sun’s harmful ultraviolet radiation, so countries responded quickly in the 1980s when scientists discovered a spreading “ozone hole” over the Antarctic. In only a few years the world’s nations negotiated the Montreal Protocol of 1987, which mandated the elimination of CFCs from all industrial processes by 1996. The deadline was met, and the latest projec-

tion is that the ozone layer will recover to 1980 levels between 2050 and 2070. Problem solved. Unfortunately, the CFCs were replaced in most fridges and air-conditioning units by hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs). They don’t hurt the ozone, but they are very powerful warming agents – 10,000 times more powerful than the same volume of carbon dioxide – when they escape into the atmosphere. Global warming was not seen as an urgent threat in the 1980s, so the negotiators were not much concerned by that. If the warming turned out to be a major problem, it could be dealt with later. But it did turn out to be a major problem, and later is now. The rapid industrialization of the warmer parts of the world (India, China, Brazil, etc.) has led to an explosion of demand for air conditioning and other cooling technologies. According to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California, about 1.6 billion new air-conditioning units will be switched on worldwide by 2050. HFC leakage from air

conditioners alone will raise the global average temperature by half a degree Celsius by mid-century. When all the world’s governments are pledged to stop the warming before it reaches plus-2 degrees C, and we are already well past plus one degree C, an extra half a degree is a lot. So we needed another miracle like the Montreal Protocol – and now we have it. On Oct. 15, in Kigali in Rwanda, almost 200 countries signed an agreement to curb the use of HFCs being used. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry called it “the single most important step we could take at this moment to limit the warming of our planet.” Well, yes it is, but you are probably noticing a pattern in all this. It’s not so much that we keep getting it wrong. It’s the time it takes to put it right: a century so far, and we’ll still be at it for at least another 30 years before all the HFCs are out of the system. When you read the fine print of the Kigali Amendment, it turns out that the United States (the secondbiggest HFC polluter),

the European Union, and some other rich countries will have to achieve their first 10 per cent cut in HFC production by 2019 – but the schedule for further cuts is not clearly defined, apart from the fact that they must be down by 85 per cent by 2036. (That’s 20 years from now.) The majority of the world’s countries – including China, the biggest polluter – will only have to freeze their production level in 2024. (At the moment, their production of HFCs is going up by an average of 16 per cent a year, which means it could almost triple by 2024.) The first 10 per cent cut by these countries is only due in 2029, and it will be 10 per cent of whatever they are producing five years from now – possibly double the current amount. They will then make further cuts in 2030-2045, getting production of HFCs down by 85 per cent by the latter date (three decades from now). India, Pakistan and most of the Middle Eastern countries don’t even have DYER | 8


COMMENT | 7

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

THEIR VIEW / QUESTION OF THE WEEK

What issues would you like to see discussed more by the township?

» Ellen Siebel-Achenbach

» Sandra Bray

“I want to see a vision statement for business “I would like to see two things: fewer trucks on growth in the area. Also, Hampton Street Arthur Street and more information about traffic is too fast. We need calming measures Chemtura.” and maybe directions for pedestrians.”

» Ron Gowing

» Shannon Purves-Smith

» Sebastian Siebel-Achenbach

“I have no concerns with the township, but I don’t want to be paying a single cent towards the LRT. Whether it is development charges, taxes or whatever.”

“I have a list of six topics with 22 subtopics. I “I want to know about the transportation want to get rid of the sign that says Drive Like bottleneck. We are having trouble moving Your Children Live Here. I don’t want to drive people from Elmira to Waterloo and back.” like my children.”

“The pace of the political process does not remotely match the speed with which the threat is growing.” Gwynne Dyer | 6 HIS VIEW / STEVE KANNON

Action needed to ban the practice as payday loan industry continues to grow EDITOR'S NOTES THEY ARE WHAT PAWNSHOPS have traditionally been: a sign of bad times. Far more prevalent, cheque-cashing and payday loan outfits appear at times to be as numerous as donut shops or convenience stores. While governments have moved to regulate some of the industry’s most scammy and scummy tendencies – Ontario is currently reviewing its Payday Loans Act, introduced in 2008 – there’s been no move to do what’s right: ban the entire industry. The government tendency to protect financial gain over the public good is clear in this case. Worse still, there’s a secondary level of business looking to profit on the misfortune of those who use payday loans, as indicated this week by an Ontario company hyping its software that monitors concurrent loans at multiple payday hucksters – those locked in

the cycle of usurious fees and interest rates tend to flit from lender to lender, robbing Peter to pay Paul, as it were. With no central government oversight of the practice – the privacylessening niche this company hopes to fill – it’s easy for some people to get in way too deep. The entire business is essentially parasitic, preying on the most vulnerable. Instead, the government is proposing three options to reduce fees rather than doing what’s right: $15 per $100 borrowed, $17 or $19. All three are an improvement on the current cap of $21, a figure set the last time the Liberals amended the Payday Loans Act. The $21 figure is the second lowest cost of borrowing in Canada, but ranks among the highest when compared to other North American jurisdictions. The $15 target would be the country’s lowest rate. Still, it’s no bargain. Payday loans are an expensive form of credit. Before getting a payday loan, consider that almost any other way of borrowing

HOW TO REACH US

the unethical practices, the industry is a sign of the underlying decay of our financial health – we’re maintaining our middle-class lifestyles mostly through debt. We might appear to prosper for a while by consuming beyond our means, but we’re already fraying at the edges, and not just in the unsustainable housing market. Easy credit and low interest rates have fueled the borrowing, but it’s our spending habits that have got the better of us: bigger homes, new cars, electronic toys and so on. Our wants are limitless. Our wallets, not so much. Worse still, our real incomes and net worth are in decline, meaning we’re borrowing just to maintain the status quo. More of us are getting caught between falling incomes and growing household debt, which reaches an all-time high pretty much each month. Worse still, increasingly the borrowed money is being used to finance day-today expenses rather than consumer goodies.

This is no accident, nor is it the result of the financial crisis that began with the meltdowns of 2008, as the middle class has been under assault for more than three decades. The recession and “recovery” that followed collapse caused by the financial services industry is indicative of the trend: corporate profits and executive bonuses quickly bounced back, while unemployment remains high and those with jobs work longer and harder to tread water. The decline to virtual serfdom is intentional. Look at the history of automation and productivity gains in industry. They were supposed to bring us a higher standard of living and more leisure time. Instead we got neither. In fact, just the opposite happened. Corporations did in fact make larger profits, but the money was shuffled into the hands of a few and into dubious financial transactions. At first, workers in Canada, the U.S. and other advanced economies were displaced by the produc-

tivity gains. Real wages fell as unemployment levels rose, putting more downward pressure on incomes due to the competitive job market. Later, of course, more of the jobs were transferred offshore to low-wage countries, a trend that continues today. The result? More profits, with almost all of the gains concentrated in a few hands. Governments routinely aid and abet the shift. That’s why there is no effort to shut down the payday loan industry: someone profits – and gives money to politicians – and the lenders serve as something of a safety valve, albeit damaging and ultimately futile, as people sink into a financial morass, starting with the most vulnerable. The entire credit industry that keeps those in the middle afloat just now is set to swamp that group, too. More people are taking note of the inequities and the resultant social unrest that’s starting to bubble to the surface, but don’t expect the situation to change anytime soon.

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money (e.g., from family or friends, a bank or credit union or your credit card) would be much cheaper. At the current maximum of $21 for every $100 someone borrows, if you borrow $300 for two weeks from a payday loan outfit, the advance will cost you $63 as opposed to $2.65 in the case of a credit card with a 23 per cent interest rate. The numbers get worse when you consider that many users get caught in a cycle of repeated loans, perhaps paying the fees but rolling over the principal. One loan becomes two, then three and so on. By the sixth loan of that hypothetical $300, the repayment cost has hit $378 as opposed to the credit card’s $15.88. The Payday Loans Act was introduced to license all operators and ban some of the most controversial lending practices. Even then it was really too little, too late – the industry should have been axed right from the beginning, given its propensity for preying on those who can least afford it. Far more troubling than

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8 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

THE MONITOR

VERBATIM

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

Almost none of the $11.7 million spent on the Ontario Electricity Support Program went to provide relief, instead, 98% of the program budget was spent on consultants, publications, media and advertising. In total, the government spent $9.3 million on consultants, and $2.4 million on advertising, media and publication, mostly to promote itself. There was no indication of benefit to the public.

“The premier says she wants to improve digital health care options. But her minister didn’t write to Ed Clark asking for ways to improve our public digital health assets. Instead, Premier Wynne’s minister asked Ed Clark to figure out how much money the government could get for selling them off. Can the premier explain why she needs to know how much money she’ll get for selling eHealth in order to improve it?”

Private wells are on the endangered species list in Elmira, as council approved measures to restrict the use of groundwater. A two-part plan of attack sees a ban on drilling new wells in the town, and the requirement that some homeowners connect to municipal services rather than use existing wells. The move stems back to the 1989 discovery that NDMA (N-nitrosodimethylamine) from Uniroyal Chemical (now Chemtura), had made its way into Elmira’s drinking water.

» Ontario Public Accounts

» NDP MPP Catherine Fife demands Wynne stop her plans to sell off eHealth after

» From the Oct. 22, 2005 edition of The Observer

her government ordered privatization czar Ed Clark to look into how much the market will pay for the public digital health asset

DYER: Action today, however

NATIONAL VIEW

minor, may be helpful later

FROM | 6

to freeze production until 2028, and their target date for getting to 85 per cent cuts in production is 2047. At a rough guess, global HFC production will peak sometime in the late 2020s, and will be back down to the current level by the mid-2030s. Don’t get angry. Countries don’t know how to negotiate any other way: nobody gives anything away if they don’t absolutely have to. But if you want to despair, go right ahead. The pace of the political process does not remotely match the speed

YOUR VIEW / LETTER

Canada needs to take action on climate change

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been enough snow in Guelph all winter to build a snow tunnel for children. We need to put pressure on the government to ensure children of the future will have the same experiences as we did. We can build a clean economy that will create long-term jobs throughout the country, reduce extreme weather events, improve human health and reduce boom-and-bust cycles in the energy sector that are causing some regions of the country to suffer. With the price of oil plummeting and jobs in the oil sector being lost, there is no better time to take action to transition to a clean economy powered by renewable energy.

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with which the threat is growing. We have to do much better than this if we are to avoid crashing through the plus-two-degree limit and tumbling into runaway warming. We are not ready to make those deals yet, but when we finally are we will have one small consolation. This deal has been far easier to make because it is an amendment to the 1987 Montreal Protocol, not a whole new treaty. The more treaties we have on climate matters now, however imperfect they may be, the faster we will be able to move when we finally do take fright.

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SPORTS | 9

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

SPORTS NOT SO GREAT OUTDOORSMAN / STEVE GALEA

HOCKEY / JUNIOR B

Kings extend streak to four games with latest wins

The skunk and the savvy deer hunter

On the road in Brantford, then home to Brampton, Elmira squad is full value in pair of 6-2 victories

KINGS | 12

OPEN COUNTRY

Jonathan Reinhart now needs just one more victory to break the Elmira franchise record of 56 wins.

[LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]

Jacks chalk up another pair of wins After a back-and-forth affair in New Hamburg, Wellesley steamroll the visiting Burford Bulldogs Wellesley took back the game with a goal from Nick Mercier just under three minutes into the period, winning the game 5-4. Head coach Brad Gerber says the guys were really good about coming back from a two-goal deficit against New Hamburg, but they should have kept the

lead in the third. “I actually thought we started out a bit slow, but I give the guys lots of credit. We fought back and we tied the game up and eventually took the lead late in the game. We had the lead 4-2, and unfortunately, we lost that, they came back to score two goals and tie

it up, but I give our guys all the credit for getting in there and finishing the game off in overtime,” he said. “At the same time we have to learn to play with the lead a little bit and go with it, but New Hamburg is a good team and they JACKS | 12

GALEA | 10

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THE WELLESLEY APPLEJACKS SCORED 15 goals in a pair of games last week, earning themselves the four points they were looking for. While the team was up against it in posting a one-goal win against New Hamburg, they skated

away with things in the Burford game, a 10-3 victory. Facing New Hamburg Oct. 14, the Jacks were trailing behind after the first, and managed to pull ahead with a lead of 4-2 going into the third. The Firebirds tied it up in the final frame, pushing overtime.

r St

LIZ BEVAN

WHEN YOU HUNT WITH a bow and arrow for deer, it shouldn’t really be all that complicated. First, you find a comfortable spot downwind of a food source or along a travel corridor between a bedding and feeding area. Then, you can either sit high in a tree stand or low in a ground blind. After that, you stay very still and wait for deer to pass by. Unfortunately, skunks complicate all this. And, lately, I’ve been seeing a lot of skunks. Actually, I suspect it’s the same skunk over and over again. Of course, that doesn’t really matter because, in my books, even one skunk constitutes a lot. I’m going to be very clear on this. It is not what the skunk does that makes a hunter nervous. It is what the skunk has the potential to do – make you late for dinner. Piss off a raccoon and all you’ve got is something interesting to talk about at dinner. Piss off a skunk and you are eating dinner outside, three hours late – and, perhaps even 100 yards downwind. Worse still, there will be a whole lot of tomato juice included

Ar

IT WAS A BIG week for the Elmira Sugar Kings, adding two more ticks to the win column and running their winning streak to four games. Both victories, over Brantford and Brampton, rang in at 6-2. First to fall were the 99ers, as the Kings weren’t gracious visitors on Oct. 13. Head coach Ty Canal says the team started off fine, exiting the first period with a two-goal lead, but he would still like to see a bit more from the guys. “I think we got off to a pretty good start, scorewise. Then they brought some momentum against us, and we were able to hold them off obviously, but it was one of those games where they get a couple goals on us and you could feel that they would get a bit of extra momentum,” he said. “We didn’t play the 60

minutes like we wanted to, obviously, but we did what we needed to do to get the two points.” The six Elmira goals came from all different players, really cementing the idea that the team has plenty of scoring options. Jake Brown and Blair Butchart scored in the first, with Andrew McIntyre, Mitch Hoelscher and Ethan Skinner putting pucks past Brantford in the second. Anthony Azzano closed out the scoring for the Kings in the third. Sunday’s win, at home against Brampton, was some of the best hockey Canal says he has seen from the Kings so far this season. The final score was again 6-2. “Our first period was one of the better periods that we have had all year from a consistency standpoint

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10 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

GALEA: A good hunter uses what he knows to avoid something he doesn’t want to nose FROM | 9

in that meal. The question then is how do we avoid upsetting skunks? I think the main issue is surprises. In my experience, skunks are not all that big on surprises. That’s unfortunate because when you are sitting in a deer stand you are actually going to great effort to surprise a deer.

That’s why you hide, wear camouflage, sit silently and try to remain downwind. When a skunk gets close, however, one poorly timed sneeze or a call on your cell phone is pretty well the equivalent of jumping out from behind the couch with a party hat on your head and sparkler in hand while yelling, “Surprise!” Skunks react accordingly. Worse still, as I men-

tioned, you are downwind from the ambush site. That’s why some bow hunters will change stand location if a skunk is a resident of the area. Other hunters are optimists who ask the question: what’s the worst thing that can go wrong? The answer is that the skunk in question can spray you. On the plus side, if you

have ever spent two weeks in deer camp, you’ll realize this is not all that different. In fact it might even cause you to reminisce fondly about the last day of camp. Heck, if you are going to look on the bright side, you should also consider that some hunters pay good money to purchase skunk cover scents to fool deer. Admittedly, not everyone is a confirmed bach-

elor, but you get the point, right? Another bonus is, if a deer is unsure whether it should approach the area of your stand, all it needs to do is see a skunk nearby. Most deer take that as proof that there will be no surprises. You could, of course, theoretically arrow a deer as it stands beside a skunk. But all the commotion that follows might

ensure that you are late for dinner and that every venison recipe you use on that deer includes lots of tomato juice. It’s not something most of us prepare for, but every bowhunter is, at one time or another, faced with this situation. All you need to do is keep your cool and let the skunk and deer pass. When that happens, you can breathe easy.

THE SCORE

WOOLWICH WILDCATS

Tyke: SELECT Oct. 9 vs Centre Wellington Home: 8 Visitor: 2 Goals: Zack Forwell (6), Nolan Martin, Matthew Kochut Assists: Reese Martin, Evan Hall (2), Lucas Frey (2), Nolan Martin

Home: 17 Visitor: 1 Goals: Reese Martin, Zack Forwell (5), Colton Brito, Nolan Martin (2), Liam Straus (2), Cruz Balog, Lucas Frey (2), Matthew Kochut (2), Mason Gear Assists: Nolan Martin, Zack Forwell (2), Colton Brito, Liam Straus (2), Mason Gear, Reese Martin

Tyke: SELECT

Tyke: SELECT Oct. 11 vs Oakville Home: 11 Visitor: 0 Goals: Colton Brito (2), Zack Forwell (5), Evan Hall, Mason Gear (2), Nolan Martin Assists: Lucas Frey (3), Matthew Kochut (2), Max Krasovec (2), Colton Brito, Nolan Martin, Cruz Balog, Zach Wiseman, Evan Hall, Reese Martin Shutouts: Ben Hacock, Cohen Hamburger

Tyke: SELECT Oct. 15 vs Brampton

Oct. 16 vs Oakville Home: 5 Visitor: 1 Goals: Mason Gear, Lucas Frey, Reese Martin, Nolan Martin, Liam Straus Assists: Reese Martin (2), Lucas Frey, Mason Gear (2), Cameron Fisher, Evan Hall, Nolan Martin

Novice: MAJOR A Oct. 11 vs Oakville Home: 5 Visitor: 3 Goals: Tristan Hill, Caleb Paquet, Mitchell Krasovec, Adam Bloch, Adam Lavigne

Assists: Mac Zettel, Carter Weir, Lucas Benham, Adam Bloch (2), Spencer Hume, Mitchell Krasovec

Novice: MAJOR A Oct. 15 vs Burlington Home: 2 Visitor: 2 Goals: Wade McKenzie, Spencer Hume Adam Lavigne (2), Mitchell Krasovec

Novice: MAJOR A Oct. 16 vs Milton Home: 4 Visitor: 2 Goals: Adam Lavigne, Mitchell Krasovec (3) Assists: Mitchell Krasovec, Spencer Hume, Adam Lavigne

Atom: MINOR A Oct. 16 vs Brampton Home: 2 Visitor: 1 Goals: Danny Schaefer, Josh Carson Assists: Karsten Smith, Drew Snyder

Atom: MINOR A

Atom: MAJOR A

Oct. 17 vs Ancaster Home: 1 Visitor: 0 Goals: Josh Carson Shutouts: Ayden Schaap

Oct. 15 vs Burlington Home: 4 Visitor: 0 Goals: Michael Gear, Eric Kane (2), Liam Wood Assists: Evan Passmore, Mitchell Walker, Nathan Martin (2), Pacey Camm, Justin Strohoff Shutouts: Justin Strohoff

Atom: MINOR AE Oct. 12 vs Flamborough Home: 3 Visitor: 0 Goals: Blake Dueck, Thomas Ferguson, Tyler Gingrich Assists: Taylor Weber, Carson Staken, Wesley Aitken, Carter Snyder, Nathan Dyck Shutouts: Reid Deyell

Atom: MINOR AE Oct. 16 vs Flamborough Home: 7 Visitor: 2 Goals: Tyler Gingrinch (4), Carson Staken (2), Bryson Rozema Assists: Nathan Dyck (3), Bryson Rozema (2), Wesley Aitken

Atom: MAJOR A Oct. 16 vs Brampton Home: 9 Visitor: 0 Goals: Liam Wood (3), Nathan Martin, Eric Kane, Ian Leech, Mitchell Walker, Isaac Lopers, Pacey Camm Assists: Eric Kane, Isaac Lopers, Nathan Martin, Mitchell Walker (2), Evan Passmore, Pacey Camm (2), Elijah Weiss, Ian Leech, Andrew Chumley, Liam Wood Shutouts: Tyler Fisher

Atom: LL #1 Oct. 15 vs Hespeler Home: 2 Visitor: 6 Goals: Matthew Ramage, Adam Short Assists: Beckett Wadel

Atom: LL #2

We need your input! The Region of Waterloo is developing a plan which will help guide the future of the Region of Waterloo International Airport for the next 20 years. Come to our second Public Information Centre to learn more about the Airport and Master Plan project and provide your feedback. This is the second of two public information sessions. Event: Airport Master Plan Public Information Centre #2 Date: Thursday, November 10, 2016 Location: Waterloo Region Museum 10 Huron Road, Kitchener Times: 4:00 – 8:00 p.m. Airport Overview Presentations at: 5:00 & 7:00 p.m. Unable to attend? Join the conversation online: www.engageregionofwaterloo.ca beginning November 10 to provide your feedback.

For more information visit: www.waterlooairport.ca/masterplan If you require accessibility assistance to participate in this event please contact us in advance at: 519-648-2256 or TTY: 519-575-4608. Under the Municipal Act, personal information such as name, address, telephone number, and property location that may be included in a submission becomes part of the public record. Questions regarding the collection of this information should be referred to the Region of Waterloo International Airport at 519-648-2256.

Oct. 15 vs St. George Home: 2 Visitor: 7 Goals: Owen Tettman (2) Assists: Andrew Zettler, Sam Brown

Atom: LL #3 Oct. 15 vs Ayr #2 Home: 2 Visitor: 4 Goals: Hayden George, Lucas Hubbard Assists: Connor Haley

Atom: MAJOR AE Oct. 16 vs New Hamburg Home: 6 Visitor: 1 Goals: Preston Hackert (2), Cale Waechter, Tyson Roth (2), Hunter Brown Assists: Owen Weber, Hunter Brown, Josh Uhrig, Seth Shantz, Daniel Kochut

Atom: MINOR AE Oct. 17 vs Erin-Hillsburgh Home: 12 Visitor: 1 Goals: Owen Weber, Tyson Roth, Daniel Kochut (2), Preston Hackert, Cale Waechter, Seth Shantz, Hunter Brown, Jake Patterson, Josh Uhrig, Jamie Ferretti, Josh Gibson

Assists: Seth Shantz (2), Josh Gibson (3), Hunter Brown, Jamie Ferretti, Preston Hackert, Tyson Roth (2), Daniel Kochut, Ethan Gilbert

Roemer Assists: Owen Lee (2), Nate Snyder Shutouts: James Berti

Bantam: MINOR A

PeeWee: MINOR A Oct. 12 vs Caledon Home: 8 Visitor: 1 Goals: Sam Hacock, Joe Martin (3), Haiden Idzik, Ethan Bickerton, Drew Birmingham, Jordan Chang Assists: Jordan Chang, Ryan Brubacher, Mason Spark, Drew Birmingham (2), Eric Hutton, Haiden Idzik

Oct. 15 vs Halton Hills Home: 8 Visitor: 1 Goals: Cameron Leonard (2), Kyler Austin, Cole Slade x3, Tyler Martin, Lucas Carson Assists: Tyler Martin (3), Carter Servais, Nate Snyder (2), Lucas Carson, Cameron Leonard, Tyler Moore, Easton Gowing (2), Ethan Birmingham, Gavin Roemer

PeeWee: MINOR A

Bantam: MINOR A

Oct. 14 vs Halton Hills Home: 1 Visitor: 2 Goals: Drew Birmingham Assists: Haiden Idzik

PeeWee: MINOR A Oct. 15 vs New Hamburg Home: 4 Visitor: 3 Goals: Ethan Martin, Ryan Brubacher, Joe Martin, Ethan Bickerton Assists: Keenan Martin, Jordan Chang, Austin Schnarr (2)

PeeWee: MAJOR AE Oct. 15 vs Hespeler Home: 1 Visitor: 4 Goals: Sebastian Garrett

PeeWee: MAJOR AE Oct. 16 vs Hespeler Home: 3 Visitor: 3 Goals: Sam Siopiolosz, Sebastian Garrett, Shelby Rempel Assists: Shelby Rempel, Nolan Williamson

PeeWee: LL #1 Oct. 16 vs Ayr Home: 14 Visitor: 0 Goals: Emmet Weissenboeck (3), Will McDougall, Ryan Curtis (2), Dominic Roth (2), Logan Beard (2), Thomas Hill-Ring, Owen Battler, Calvin Oleski (2) Assists: Calvin Oleski, Owen Battler, Josh Sager (2), Zach McMurray (4), Emmett Weissenboeck (2), Nolan Balzan, Nathan Whittom, Ryan Curtis, Nicholas Ritchie, Dominic Roth (2) Shutouts: John Kilgour

Bantam: MINOR A Oct. 8 vs Burlington Home: 2 Visitor: 2 Goals: Cameron Leonard, Gavin

Home: 4 Visitor: 6 Goals: Mike Devries, Aaron Crawford (2), Max Bender Assists: Aaron Crawford, Nick Campagnolo, Kyle Gingrich, Mike Devries, Nathan Horst, Ryan Diemert

WOOLWICH WILD

Atom: B Oct. 15 vs Twin Centre Home: 2 Visitor: 0 Goals: Olivia Straus, Claire Jacklin Assists: Tiana Bender Shutouts: Makenna Kroetsch

Oct. 17 vs Hespeler Home: 4 Visitor: 0 Goals: Carter Servais, Cameron Leonard (2), Cole Slade Assists: Cameron Leonard, Owen Lee, (2), Ethan Birmingham, Kyle Mulder (2), Tyler Moore, Gavin Roemer Shutouts: James Berti

Atom: B

Bantam: LL #1

Oct. 11 vs Huron Home: 1 Visitor: 0 Goals: Haylee Clemmer Shutouts: Mackenzie Koenig

Oct. 14 vs Ayr Home: 4 Visitor: 2 Goals: Tyler Newton, Danny Soehner (2), Patrick Perry Assists: Gavin Wright, Malcolm Sager, Matt Henry

Bantam: LL #1 Oct. 16 vs Woolwich LL #2 Home: 4 Visitor: 5 Goals: Tyler Newton (3), Cole Brubacher Assists: Tyson Kraemer, Patrick Perry, Tanner Mann

Bantam: AE Oct. 16 vs Orangeville Home: 5 Visitor: 10 Goals: Ben Fretz (2), Gavin Wilson, Alex Hutton, Andrew Weber Assists: Colton Schmidt (3), Simon Shantz (2), Andrew Weber, Michael Wang, Gavin Wilson, Patrick Perry

Midget: LL #1 Oct. 13 vs Twin Centre Home: 6 Visitor: 1 Goals: Liam Catton, Ben Lenaers, Nathan Horst, Noah Bauman (2), Ryan Diemert Assists: Aaron Crawford, Nathan Horst, Ryan Diemert, Kyle Deyell, Kyle Gingrich

Midget: LL #1 Oct. 14 vs New Hamburg

Oct. 16 vs Guelph Home: 5 Visitor: 1 Goals: Sara Forwell (3), Claire Jacklin (2) Assists: Olivia Straus, Ella Hicks, Brienne Brezynskie, Kayla Sargent

PeeWee: BB 7100

PeeWee: BB 7100 Oct. 16 vs Huron Home: 4 Visitor: 2 Goals: Haylee Clemmer (3), Jane Hinsperger Assists: Makenna Mclaughlin (2), Jocelyn Pickard (2), Paige Woods, Chloe Huslop, Tanis Uhrug

PeeWee: LL #1 Oct. 15 vs Grand River Home: 1 Visitor: 0 Goals: Annie Sargent Assists: Kyla Bloch, Emme Williams Shutouts: Lauren Gerth

WATERLOO WOLVES

Atom: MAJOR AA Oct. 14 vs Cambridge Home: 1 Visitor: 4 Goals: Tim Hodson Assists: Hayden Taylor, Jackson Andrews

Atom: MAJOR AA Oct. 15 vs London Home: 1 Visitor: 5 Goals: Declan Uniac Assists: Griffin Beddis, Carter Merritt

SUBMIT HOCKEY SCORES ONLINE: www.observerxtra.com/score


SPORTS | 11

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

ELMIRA BLOOD DONOR CLINIC

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12 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

KINGS: Coach happy with what JACKS: Team takes 8-2 record up against 9-1 Ayr this weekend

he’s seeing from his netminder FROM | 9

and we played the full 20 minutes. We were skating well and we scored with the chances that we had. It was the type of hockey that people like to watch,” he said, adding that he wants to see more of that in the future. “In the second, they let their foot off the gas a little bit and started giving up some odd-man rushes and turnovers in bad spots and things like that, but we were really happy with the first. It was the kind of hockey that we need to play all the time, for sure.” Sunday afternoon’s goals were also spread out among many players on the Kings’ lineup. Hoelscher started the count in the first, followed by Skinner, Brown and Ty Biles, finishing the first period with a four-goal lead. Brampton got on the board just a few minutes into the second, but Skinner and Kyle Soper shot back, bringing the score to 6-1. The third was scoreless for the Kings, with just one goal from Brampton’s Masson Sarris. Both games saw high counts for shots on goal – 44 against Brantford and 41 against Brampton – while limiting the opposition’s chances against goalie Jonathan Reinhart. “That is something that we have been working on, stopping scoring chances,” said Canal. “Odd-man rushes are a big part of that, and the D-Zone, the teams are going to get scoring

chances, and it is just a matter of limiting what you can, and we have been trying to clear the net as much as we can so the goalie can see the first one and take care of that, and hopefully we can take care of the rest. That has been improving as we work on it, for sure.” Sunday’s win also marked a big milestone for goalie Reinhart, tying the record as the team’s winningest goalie with 56. He has been the team’s fulltime netminder while their second goalie, Tyler Mazzocato is off sick. Canal couldn’t be happier with what he has seen from Reinhart. “He puts a lot of pressure on himself and he expects big things and good things, and we do too. It is nice to see all of that fall into place for him after he puts in all the work and all that time into it. He is a great character guy, great in the room,” he said. “We don’t know how long Mazzocato is out for, so unfortunately for him we are going to be relying on him for a little bit longer. Mazzocato has played really well for us too, and it is unfortunate that he is sick now and it is going to keep him out of the lineup for now, but he will bounce back and Jon will help him out.” The Kings go up against Brampton once again this weekend, this time visiting the Bombers on Friday night before coming back home to the WMC to host Brantford on Sunday at 7 p.m.

FROM | 9

are going to hammer their goals too and I am just glad the guys stayed focused enough to get the winning goal in overtime.” The Jacks learned from Friday night’s game and put all their effort into a big win against Burford on Saturday night. The team hosted the Bulldogs at home, and it was a blowout finish. After the first, the game was tied 1-1, with Burford giving the team a run for their money, but eventually, they slowed down while Wellesley ramped it up. In the second period, the Jacks scored three more to Burford’s one, and in the third, managed to get six more past Burford’s goalie, while the Bulldogs got only one more between the posts. The final score was 10-3. Gerber was happy to see the guys gain the lead, and this time, keep it until the end. “I think we put the game away. That is what we have been talking about, in the third period just finishing teams off. Not giving up the lead and just finishing strong,” he said after the Jacks’ winning weekend. “I thought the guys did a really good job in the third period, scoring six more goals, but I also think that going with four lines that keep coming at these teams that by the third period we can wear them down a little bit. If we can stay out of the penalty box and rotate four lines through, by the third period, that is what hap-

Wellesley defenseman Nick Mercier scored the winning overtime goal for the Jacks last Friday night. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER] pened on Saturday night. cused,” he said. I think Burford were a bit The guys have also been tired in the third.” pushing themselves to get For Gerber, this weekend the puck to the net, with wasn’t just a win on the more shots on goal and scoreboard, but also with more scoring chances than the guys taking coach adthey have created in the vice onto the ice. One thing past. the team has been working “We have been workon is limiting their time in ing on a lot of transitions the penalty box. in practice - getting the “That has been a big ispuck and moving up quick sue with us. We have been before the other team gets taking way too many penready, and just shooting alties, especially penalties the puck. Good things hapafter the whistle. We are pen and it’s an old cliché, definitely trying to talk to but if you don’t shoot the the guys about it and they puck, you aren’t going to are doing a good job. They score,” said Gerber, adding are slowly becoming a lot that there was still work more disciplined, just foto be done. “I think we are cusing on the task at hand, starting to shoot more, but which is always getting at the same time, we are two points and staying fostill missing the net a lot.

It is something that we are going to keep working on and getting the puck to the net.” Next up for the Jacks, a matchup with the Ayr Centennials, the top team in the division. Gerber says as the number two team, Wellesley is looking to show that they are competitive at the top of the standings. “We played them earlier this season in Ayr and they beat us in overtime. I think the guys are excited,” he said. “Right now, we are sitting in second place behind Ayr and I think the guys are excited about getting another shot at them and proving that we can play along with them. We are looking forward to it.” As they prep to face off against Ayr on Saturday night at home, Gerber couldn’t say enough about how the Jacks gel together on the ice. “Definitely the way we came back and won that game on Friday night, that was definitely a team effort. And on Saturday night, it was a four line, six defensemen, goaltending team effort, especially with the way we finished up in the third,” he said. “That is one of the things we like about our team. We use all four lines, and all four lines can score. In the long run, that is a really good thing for our team. It is rare.” The puck drops against the Centennials at 7:30 p.m. on Oct. 22. The team will be heading to Paris for a 4:30 p.m. game on Sunday.

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SPORTS | 13

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

BOWLING FOR DOLLARS IN SUPPORT OF WCS

A big crowd gathered at Elmira Bowl last Saturday afternoon to knock down as many pins as they could in support of Woolwich Community Services and its Family Violence Prevention program. The event has been held every year since 1993.

[LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]

SENIOR BOYS DOUBLE UP ON KCI

The EDSS senior football team earned a resounding 52-26 victory over visiting Kitchener Collegiate Institute on Oct. 13 at home. Elmira points came from Adam Weber (16), Greg Huber (12), Evan Seip (12), Luke DeCorte (6) and Keyshawn Holland (6). [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]

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14 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

VENTURE FOOD FOR THOUGHT/ OWEN ROBERTS

HISTORY OF CHANGE / MAKING THEIR MARK

Celebrating the women who changed how we live and work Waterloo Region Museum receives grant to create a touring exhibit in conjunction with Canada’s sesquicentennial next year LIZ BEVAN THE FAMOUS FIVE FOUGHT for a woman’s right to vote, Jennie Trout was the first woman to earn a medical doctorate and Charlotte Whitten was the first female mayor of a major Canadian city. These are just a small sampling of the influential women over 150 years of Canadian history that have been trailblazers, changing the way women have been regarded in this country since Confederation. The Waterloo Region Museum is getting ready to celebrate what it means to be a woman in Canadian society, and highlight the issues that still affect the female population to this day. James Jensen is the supervisor of collections and exhibits and is in the process of working with women’s groups, sociology professors and curatorial staff at the museum to put on Going Public – Women Transform Canada. The exhibit is scheduled to open next summer, and museum planners have just received nearly $200,000 from the Minister of Canadian Heritage to go towards the showing in the region and a five-year tour across the country. The show is going to look at major events through a female lens, says

Jensen, noting the Canada 150 grant is a big help. He hopes the displays and artifacts, which will come from the region’s collection, will remind visitors of tougher times and inspire them through education. “We aren’t shying away from difficult topics. It isn’t going to just be a hall of fame, rah rah rah kind of thing,” he said. “We will highlight exceptional women who did great work, but particularly when looking at First Nations women’s history, it is a difficult topic in general and there are still issues with the murdered and missing indigenous women’s inquiry – that is a facet that still continues with violence against women, which will be one of the sections of the exhibit. But, there are still areas where there have been significant gains like employment, gender issues and rights within the political framework to sort of remove the barrier and difference between the genders.” The other four sections to be on display are the body, feminism, politics/ law and work. By looking to the past accomplishments of individual women and examining past movements in history, Jensen says the Waterloo

Farmers need credit to do business and feed the world FIELD NOTES

From the Waterloo Region Museum archives: top, employees at Dominion Electrohome Industries Plant No. 2 in Kitchener in 1942. Bottom right, employees on top of the Smiles n’ Chuckles building in Kitchener in the late 1940s or early 1950s. James Jensen, supervisor of collections and exhibits, is putting together the Going Public exhibit at the museum, celebrating women throughout Canadian history. [WATERLOO REGION MUSEUM] couldn’t vote. It is as much about the contemporary Region Museum will get built into your experisituations and things people thinking about ence that you can vote. It that still need to be acwhat still needs to be done is just the way things are complished as well as the when it comes to gender now. Why wouldn’t you things that have come beequality and phenomena be allowed to vote? But we fore,” he said.“Let’s not forlike the wage gap. “The intent of the exhibit get the fact that 100 years EXHIBIT | 15 ago, give or take, women is to try and talk as much

LATELY, FOOD WASTE HAS been a feed-the-world target in developed nations. It’s something we have an opportunity to change, whether we’re university students, mid-career wage and salary earners, or seniors. Typically, we waste food because we don’t know how to prepare it, or don’t have time. We buy it, take it home, then it sits. And goes bad. The food chain begins with farmers. Value Chain Management International, an Oakville-based consultancy group, says any waste in the food chain is bad for farmers, no matter where they grow crops or raise livestock. If some part of the food production line – processors, truckers, retailers and distributors, among them – is lacking, profitability suffers. And farmers have to make a profit to stay in business. Over the past few weeks, I’ve talked to experts from two underdeveloped nations, Africa and Cuba, about what farmers need to be profitable. Certainly, many of the ROBERTS | 15

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VENTURE | 15

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

ROBERTS: Farmers in the poorer parts of the world want access to credit, not grants and handouts FROM | 14

world’s hungry people live in Africa, and on a relative scale, their problems are much bigger than Cuba’s. But both nations are struggling. And their representatives – one, a farm-

ers’ union leader, and the other, a government official – told me they need the same thing: that is, access to credit. Not that it all comes down to money. And not that aid, grants and bailouts aren’t helpful – if

you’re in a jam, they can be a difference maker. But you can’t run a business on aid and grants. And farming is a business. This is an easy concept to understand in creditdependent North America. Just think about credit

EXHIBIT: Preparing to take it on the road FROM | 14

are stopping and saying that there are things that have not been completely resolved in terms of equality.” The Going Public – Women Transform Canada exhibit has been in the works for quite a long time, starting as just an idea between retired and current professors at the University of Waterloo and Wilfrid Laurier University. It has grown from there.

“They brought this to us as an idea in late 2014, early 2015. It went from, ‘this is an interesting idea’ to it being our Canada 150 project,” said Jensen. “We have the capability to design and build a show that can be rented by other museums across the country.” Creating a touring show presents a challenge outside of determining the exhibit’s content. “You have to be able to pack it up into boxes and fit it all into one 53-foot

trailer to travel in. Often with our shows, we are able to build specific items for an exhibit because we know that we are just going to be taking it apart and moving on to the next. This has to go up and come back down and go back up 10 or 12 times,” said Jensen with a laugh. The Going Public – Women Transform Canada will be opening in June 2017, and after will visit nearly a dozen Canadian cities.

could be done through the farmers’ unions. “We don’t want grants,” he said. “We want loans. We need credit so we have some purchasing power.” The situation in Cuba is a little different. Not only can farmers not get credit, neither can others in the ag sector, because of the U.S. embargo (Cubans describe it as a blockade). The embargo calls for any transactions with the US, for items such as machinery and inputs, to be paid in cash up front. But where is a Cuban farmer or machinery dealer or fertilizer supplier who’s been subject to an embargo for 60 years supposed to get cash? Bankers, financiers and economic policy makers

in consumer terms, and imagine trying to run your household purely on cash. If you need things – a new car, new appliances, home renovations, for example – most of us need credit. And so do farmers in Africa and Cuba. But they have no equity. They don’t own their land. So creditors have nothing to seize if a loan goes bad, and are reluctant to give loans without security. The African farmers’ union official I spoke with said it would help if developed countries helped facilitate loans to farmers there – not to the countries, where it could very well end up as nothing more than a ledger entry, but rather, to the farmers themselves. Perhaps this

are not typically those we look to for helping to eradicate hunger. Rather, it’s considered a job for researchers, to help create new crop varieties and keep livestock healthy. Then, it’s up to those who actually grow the food, process it and distribute it. However, in some countries, those who control credit are standing in the way of meaningful food production. Farmers can feed people if they can buy seed, fertilizer and machinery to produce food. But where they need credit the most, they can’t get it. And if the world hunger situation is going to change, this limiting approach must change too.

SOME EARLY CHRISTMAS SHOPPING IN BRESLAU

Landfill tours! Saturday, October 22, 2016, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Celebrate Waste Reduction Week with a free, one-hour guided bus tour of the Waterloo Waste Management site. Ira Needles Blvd

It isn’t even Halloween yet, but Christmas shopping started early in Breslau on Saturday. Above, Patty Rempel shows off her gift stockings for the family pet. Top right, Steph VanDorp from Hofkissed Custom Designs gets in the holiday spirit with handmade greeting cards. Above right, Phil Cole sells handmade tree ornaments through his company, PC Scrollwork. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]

SCRAP METAL RECYCLING

Walmart Waste Management Operations Centre

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Farm Equipment, Cars, Trucks, Road Trailers, Appliances, Structural Steel, Sheet Steel, Misc. Scrap Steel, Copper, Aluminum, Brass, Stainless, Lead, Lead Acid Batteries, Diecast, Carbide, Insulated Wiring, Alternators, Starters, Magnesium, Car Rims & Butyl Rubber Inner Tubes.

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If you require accessibility assistance to participate, please let us know at time of booking. Food Bank donations are welcome.

www.regionofwaterloo.ca/waste

Call 519-575-4400 or email waste@regionofwaterloo.ca TTY 519-575-4608


16 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

You’re invited! Kindred Credit Union Community Open House

Banking with Purpose?

Visit our Elmira branch on October 20 to learn more about what we have to offer. And while you’re at it you can enjoy some great local food, pick up a copy of our 2017 calendar, and enter to win a GIC or a Kindred bike!

It’s about… Making choices that reflect who you are Connecting with those you care about Being part of something bigger From socially responsible investments to global impact GICs, connecting values and faith with finances can impact the world in amazing ways! At Kindred, we call it Banking with Purpose. Ready to start banking with purpose? Call or visit our Elmira branch to join Kindred today.

info@kindredcu.com | 519.669.1529 | www.kindredcu.com

Hope to see you there!

“PROUDLY REMEMBERING OUR PAST; CONFIDENTLY EMBRACING OUR FUTURE.”

Community Information Page Notice of Study Commencement STOCKYARDS SECONDARY PLAN & ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT The Township of Woolwich has initiated the preparation of a Secondary Plan for the Stockyards Industrial / Commercial Area and King and 86 Power Centre (see study area in the map below). The Township has retained the services of The Planning Partnership and a team of consultants to prepare the Secondary Plan. The purpose of the Secondary Planning process is to develop a land use strategy that: • recognizes the area’s unique attributes; • reconsiders its planned function in light of:  recent Provincial and Regional policies promoting compact development, mixed use and higher density,  its Urban Area designation in the Regional Official Plan, and  its role as an economic driver in the Township; • provides a sustainable municipal servicing strategy and aligns with best practices related to natural heritage; and • provides an appropriate transportation strategy which considers the importance of pedestrian and cycling movement and access.

The work program for the Secondary Plan process is organized into six Tasks and is anticipated to take about 18 months to complete. Project details and information regarding planned public consultation will be posted to the Township’s website (www. woolwich.ca). It is anticipated that the public consultation process will commence in late 2016. The Secondary Plan is being undertaken in accordance with the requirements of a Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (October 2000, as amended in 2007, Section A.2.9, Integration With the Planning Act). The Class EA process includes stakeholder, public and review agency consultation, an evaluation of alternatives, an assessment of the anticipated effects on the environment, and identification of reasonable measures to mitigate any adverse effects. The Township and The Planning Partnership are very enthusiastic about the opportunity of working with the entire community on this important project and invite you to participate and provide your input to help shape the long-term vision for the Stockyards. Comments and information regarding this project are being collected to assist the Secondary Plan Team in meeting the requirements of the Environmental Assessment Act and determining the overall scope of this project. With the exception of personal information, all comments will become part of the Public Record and may be used in the Environmental Study Report.

P.O. Box 158

24 Church St. W. Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6

Phone:

519-669-1647 or 877-969-0094 Fax: 519-669-1820

519-575-4400 www.woolwich.ca

For more information, please contact: John Scarfone, OR Ron Palmer, Partner Manager of Planning Township of Woolwich Tel: 519 669-6037 1-877-969-0094 ext. 6037 Email: jscarfone@woolwich.ca

After Hours Emergency:

The Planning Partnership Tel: 416-975-1556 ext. 227 Email: rpalmer@planpart.ca


THE ARTS | 17

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

THE ARTS ON STAGE / LIVE THEATRE

ETC production pokes fun at the big divide between men and women It’s all played for laughs in the Elmira Theatre Company’s fall dinner theatre production of Buying the Moose

IT’S A TALE AS old as time – the classic he-said, shesaid story. Elmira Theatre Company’s latest production, Buying the Moose, explores the hilarious interactions between two brothers and their wives, who are best friends. Written by Canadian playwright Michael G. Wilmot, this is just the first of ETC’s completely Canadian 2016-17 season. It’s also the subject of their fall dinner theatre. Director Deb Deckert says Theatre Ontario encouraged all community theatre groups to do Canadian plays in honour of Canada’s 150th anniversary next year. “It’s a relatively new play, which we’re happy about because in this area we have such a glut of theatre, community theatre and then professional theatres as well.” Wilmot actually sent the play to Deckert for her to consider. As the chair of the script reading committee, she says this happens all the time. She read it and thought it was hilarious, as did the rest of the committee. At least three people from the committee read each play to decide if

it’s good and if it will work for Elmira audiences. “Everybody loved this one. You laugh out loud when you read it,” Deckert said, adding it will transition well on stage. The four actors are no stranger to the Elmira stage. Steve Whetstone plays Rob and was last seen in Ned Durango Comes to Big Oak. Deckert says he brings his droll sense of humour to the part. Andy Wasylycia plays Rob’s brother Greg and was in ETC’s production of Murder at the Howard Johnson’s. “He has a great laugh on stage which is very natural, so that makes it funny too. And they’re playing brothers. They’ve got a nice rapport the two of them, like brothers do, you know razzing each other and the punch in the shoulder kind of thing,” Deckert said. Their female counterparts are equal in wit. Tracy Biggar plays Betty and performed in the theatre company’s run of Menopositive! The Musical. Michelle Kreitzer, last seen directing Murder at the Howard Johnson’s, fills out the foursome as Cheryl. “[Biggar’s] character’s a little more hysterical. She gets wound up so easily

Audiences, prepare to have your funny bones tickled, with ETC’s latest production, Buying the Moose. The play is a Canadian comedy and features four local actors, Andy Wasylycia, Michelle Kreitzer, Tracy Biggar and Steve Whetstone. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER] and she does it very well too. And of course Michelle Kreitzer, she’s got impeccable timing and energy. When she hits the stage she just glows. She’s wonderful to watch on stage,” Deckert said. Paul Dietrich designed the set which is two small houses, one on either side of the stage. She says they’re so well built they could be used as backyard sheds after the show. The lighting crew will

have their hands full though. As one of the men finishes their line, it will instantly switch to the women. “There’s the overlap of lines, so the lighting has to be it’s on the guys, flip to the girls. There’ll be no sleeping in the booth,” Deckert said with a laugh. She expects audiences will identify with the characters. The men are always saying something that gets interpreted differently by

the women and vice-versa. “You see the guys talking on the back deck drinking beer and you see the girls talking on the back deck of another house, they’re drinking wine. There’s mirror images of scenes and it’s very funny. The guys will say ‘well this is what happened’ and you hear their side of the story. Then you hear the girls say ‘no, no this is what he did,’” Deckert said. As for where the moose

in the play title comes from, Deckert explains it’s part of a conversation between the women. One of the men wanted to buy a stuffed moose and his wife is telling her friend about how he wanted to put the moose head on one wall and the rest of the moose on a wall in another room. “She said ‘why do they do stupid things like that?’ And she said ‘the only reason he didn’t do it is because I was there to stop him or he would have bought the moose.’ So they laugh about that and they say ‘how many times has your husband bought the moose?’ And she says ‘I think we have a sizable herd by now,’” Deckert recalls. As it’s their dinner theatre, Stone Crock will be catering the meal. Friday, Saturday and Sunday shows will include dinner and the show, while the Thursday performances are just the show. Elmira Theatre Company’s production of Buying the Moose runs Nov. 4-19 at their 76 Howard Ave. venue. Tickets are available at the Centre in the Square box office in Kitchener by calling 519-578-1570 or 1-800-265-8977, online at www.centre-square.com or www.elmiratheatre.com.

We’ve Got Pumpkins! TRY TRY OUR OUR

VISIT US FOR:

Pumpkins, Gourds & More!

Pumpkin Pumpkin Whoopie Whoopie Pies Pies

2191 Arthur St. N., Elmira, just before Florapine Road | 519-669-3154 | M-F 9-6 • Sat 8-5

N. St., N. ur St., Ar thur Arth

WHITNEY NEILSON


18 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

CLASSIFIED

CLASSIFIED DEADLINE:

WEDNESDAYS BY 10AM HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

AUCTION

AUCTION SALE Floradale Feed Mill Limited is an independent, family owned and operated feed company serving livestock and poultry producers in Ontario.

Floradale Feed Mill Limited is an independent, family owned and operated feed company serving livestock and poultry producers in Ontario.

We currently have an opening for:

We currently have an opening for:

Health and Safety Coordinator

(Part-time position but could lead to full time) This Health and Safety Coordinator is responsible for promoting the organizational health and safety culture and ensuring compliance with the Occupational Health & Safety legislation. The Health and Safety Coordinator will be responsible for the on-going sustainability of the Health & Safety Management System. At Floradale Feed Mill Limited we take pride in providing the finest in quality feeds and service to our customers in the livestock and poultry industries. Therfore, a background in agriculture is considered an asset. To apply, forward your resume to: Brian Chamberlain, Operations Manager Floradale Feed Mill Limited 2131 Floradale Road, Floradale, ON N0B 1V0 Or e-mail: brianc@ffmltd.com

Truck Driver (DZ)

This fulltime position will involve safe operation of a bag unit or bulk hopper bottom unit week days (Monday to Friday) with an occasional Saturday shift. The successful applicant will have • A valid commercial driver’s license • Strong oral and written communication skills • Ability to develop effective work relationships with co-workers, and • Ability to represent the Company positively with customers. At Floradale Feed Mill Limited we take pride in providing the finest in quality feeds and service to our customers in the livestock and poultry industries. Therefore, a background in agriculture is considered an asset. To apply, forward your resume to:

We appreciate all who apply but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

HELP WANTED

Brian Chamberlain, Operations Manager Floradale Feed Mill Limited 2131 Floradale Road, Floradale, ON N0B 1V0 Or e-mail: brianc@ffmltd.com We appreciate all who apply but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

HELP WANTED Floradale Feed Mill Limited is an independent, family owned and operated feed company serving livestock and poultry producers in Ontario.

Truck Driver (DZ) - Part Time

The successful applicant will have • A valid commercial driver’s license • Strong oral and written communication skills • Ability to develop effective work relationships with co-workers, and • Ability to represent the Company positively with customers.

HORSES WATERLOO COUNTY HORSE Sale to be held at OLEX. Saturday October 29th. Horses sell at 10 a.m. To consign or for more info call 519-5953307.

HELP WANTED NURSERY WORKERS NEEDED starting October 6, 2016. Pay rate $11.40/hour. Working hours 7 a.m. - 5 p.m., 6 days per week. Work includes field potting, weeding in field and containers, truck loading, digging etc. Must be willing to work in all weather conditions and weekends. Own transportation required. Police clearance needed. Please send resume to: West Montrose Farms Ltd., 1614 Halm Road, West Montrose, ON. N0B 2V0.

FOR SALE HILLTOP FABRICS ANNUAL Fall Sale. Oct. 24 - 29th. 10% off storewide. Refreshments provided. 4785 Perth Line 67, Milverton. 519-595-4344.

At Floradale Feed Mill Limited we take pride in providing the finest in quality feeds and service to our customers in the livestock and poultry industries. Therefore, a background in agriculture is considered an asset. To apply, forward your resume to:

LAMINATE - LOTS of instock specials from .99 sf. Wellelsey Home Centre - Flooring Division, 2196 Gerber Rd., Box 10, Wellesley, Ont. N0G 1A0. Phone 519-656-3533.

Brian Chamberlain, Operations Manager Floradale Feed Mill Limited 2131 Floradale Road, Floradale, ON N0B 1V0 Or e-mail: brianc@ffmltd.com We appreciate all who apply but only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5TH @ 10:00 A.M.

HOUSE: Consisting of a 1 ½ storey brick

To apply for this role, please call Jim Taglietti at 519-622-6901 or toll free at 888-213-3375 or email Taglietti.jim@protrans.ca.

BOWEN THERAPY YOUR choice for effective treatment of specific health conditions or wellness maintenance. KEVIN BARTLEY, Professional Bowenwork Practitioner, Clock Tower Wellness Centre, 69 Arthur St. S., Elmira. 519-669-0112. Every Body is Better with Bowen!

This part time position will involve safe operation of a bag unit or bulk hopper bottom unit on Saturdays and holidays.

HOW TO REACH US

BRIDGELAND TERMINALS LIMITED Protrans is actively seeking a career minded professional shunt driver for Bridgeland Terminals Limited in Elmira. Local Monday to Friday 2:30 AM start time. 45 to 50 hours a week with overtime after 45. $21.00 starting wage. Great benefit package, bonuses and profit sharing programs. Applicants must have at least 2 years AZ experience, clean abstract and CVOR. Talk to us:

HEALTH CARE

We currently have an opening for:

Of 1 ½ storey brick house, tools, household effects, antiques and miscellaneous items, to be held at 11 Dunke St. South in Elmira (off Church St. West near downtown), for Roger and Almeda Gervais, on

house with attached addition, sunporch and covered deck, nicely situated on a large 81 X 97ft. corner lot. House has good roof, 3 bedrooms, second floor balcony, bathroom, washroom, main floor laundry, some hardwood flooring, natural gas furnace, gas water heater. On premises - 25 X 35ft. insulated 2 car garage/workshop and a 10 X 12ft. storage shed. Note – A well-kept home on a spacious lot. A quiet street, close to downtown. See www.auctionsfind.com/ gerber for photos. Terms – Will be sold at 12:00 noon subject to a reasonable reserve bid with 10% down sale day and the balance in 60 days or when possession is given. To View – Attend open houses Sat. Oct 22nd 1-4pm or Wed. Oct 26th 6-8pm or call 519-5809477 for appointment.

FOR SALE MANY COLLECTIBLES, ARTWORK and Old and Newer Books. Selling 850+ items and much more. Searth “Linwood” to see my kijiji ads, using “view poster’s other ads”. 5150 Ament Line, Linwood (indoors) 519-698-1018. Open most Fridays, Noon - 6pm or call for a personal viewing. MATTRESS AND BOX Spring, new, never used, still in sealed bag. Sacrifice $195. Delivery available. 519-6358737.

TOOLS & MISC. ITEMS: King 14in. band saw. Delta 12in. planer. Toolex TSC-10L – 10in. table saw c/w Excalibur fence. King floor model drill press. Concept sliding mitre saw. Ryobi 16in. scroll saw. Belt/disc sander. 6in. bench grinder. Router. Acetylene torch. Fabric cutter & stapler. Polisher. Vise. Glass grinder. Hyd. floor jack. Table top sand blaster. Upholstery tools & supplies. Fabric. Garden tools. Odd lumber. Supplies for staining glass. Stained glass. Assorted hand & power tools. Furniture clamps. Scaffolding. Shop vac. Alum. ladders. Wire. Hardware. Right hand golf clubs, etc.

SOFTNER SALT - 20kg bags, minimum 25 bags, skid lots of 56. Delivered in St. Jacobs, St. Clements, Elmira & Linwood areas. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-574-4141 or 519-6692045.

HOUSEHOLD:

Fridge. Frigidaire stove. Maytag Quiet Series 100 – Heavy duty washer & dryer. Double bed. 2 single beds. Bedroom furniture. Antique extension table. La-Z-Boy recliner. Upholstered furniture. Upholstered lift chair. Desks. Chairs. Antique fern stand. Electronics. TV. Newer Coke cooler, plus other household goods.

SOLID PINE QUEEN size bedroom suite. 7 piece & box spring & mattress $495. Lazy Boy plaid reclining couch and love seat $445. Call 519-748-7167 or 519-6693148 .

NOTE – Plan to attend! Proprietors and auctioneers not responsible for accidents day of sale. Lunch booth. Terms – Cash or cheque with I.D.

AUCTIONS FRI. OCT 21 at 9:00 PM Annual charity auction of gift certificates; new furniture; and new donated items to be held at the Victoria Park Pavilion 80 Schneider Ave Kitchener for the KW Pregnancy Centre. Jantzi Auction Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com SAT. OCT 22 at 10:00AM - Surplus auction sale of antiques; bedroom suites; glassware; crocks; jugs etc. to be held at 311 Main St. E in Listowel for Church’s Antiques. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com

AUCTIONEERS:

Gerber Auctions Ltd. 519-699-4451

2827 Hutchison Rd., RR#1 Millbank (Crosshill)

AUCTIONS WED. OCT 26 at 10:00 AMClearing auction sale of furniture; tools; antiques; collectables; household effects and miscellaneous items to be held at the St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s for an are estate with additions. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com

AUCTIONS FRI. OCT 28 at 5:00 PM - Property auction of a turnkey commercial property with variety store and 2 recently renovated apartments to be held at 347 Princess St. Shallow Lake for Patricia and Carman Salway. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com

PHONE 519.669.5790 | TOLL FREE 1.888.966.5942 | FAX 519.669.5753 | ONLINE WWW.OBSERVERXTRA.COM

ADDRESS 20-B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA, ON N3B 1Z9 PLACING A CLASSIFIED WORD AD

CLASSIFIED ADS

DISPLAY ADS

519.669.5790 EXT 0

519.669.5790 EXT 104

ads@woolwichobserver.com

sales@woolwichobserver.com

RESIDENTIAL COST $7.50 /20 WORDS EXTRA WORDS 20¢ PER WORD

COMMERCIAL COST $12.00 /20 WORDS EXTRA WORDS 30¢ PER WORD

In person, email, phone or fax submissions are accepted during regular business hours. Deadline for Thursday publication is Wednesday by 10 a.m. All Classified ads are prepaid by cash, debit, Visa or MasterCard. Ask about Observer policies in regard to Display, Service Directory and Family Album advertising.


CLASSIFIED | 19

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

CLASSIFIED ADS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18 AUCTION

AUCTION

Fabricating , Shop & Woodworking Equipment

AUCTION for

Upper Grand School Board Major Contractor & Others to be held at

Breslau Airport Road Auction Complex

5100 Fountain St., North, Breslau (Kitchener)

Sat. Oct 22 9:30 a.m. nd

Woodworking => Thickness Planer*4-HD Table Saws*Mortise Drill * Jointers*18” Wood Bandsaw *4-Radial Arm Saws*4-Drill Presses * 2-HD Shop Compressors*Stroke, Edge & Disc Sanders*Dust Collector 40+ Carbide Blades*Cordless Tools*Large Quantity of Hand Tools/etc Fab & Sheet Metal => 6’ Hand Brake*24ga Lockformer 5’ Power Shear*7-Mig Welders*10-A/C, D/C & AC/DC Welders Band Cutoff Saw*Weatherhead Hyd Hose Crimper Set* 10+ Chain Hoists/Come-A-Longs*10+I-Beam Trollies/Clamps 2-50 Ton Jacks*Tri-Stand*Safety Harness Sets*Generators Red-I-Rack* New Doors*Engine Hoists*Parts Washers

Check Website for Updates!!!

PARTIAL LIST ONLY!!! No Buyer’s Premium!!! VIEWING: Fri Oct 21 , 2016, 1pm to 5pm TERMS: $500 Deposit on Major Units, Balance in 48 Hours, or as announced. st

M.R. Jutzi & Co PROFESSIONALS IN THE ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AND APPRAISALS OF COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, CONSTRUCTION, MUNICIPAL EQUIPMENT & VEHICLES 5100 FOUNTAIN ST. NORTH, BRESLAU, ONTARIO, N0B 1M0

www.mrjutzi.ca

519-648-2111

AUCTION

AUCTION SALE Of household effects; furniture; antiques; tools; primitives; and miscellaneous items to be held at the St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s for Marie Eberlin of Linwood with additions on:

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 26 AT 10:00 AM

ANTIQUES

AND

COLLECTABLES:

fainting couch; settee; curio cabinets; maple extension table and 6 chairs; tea wagon; pine coffee table; hall table; singer treadle sewing machine; plant stand; chrome table and chairs; flour bin; wash tub; Danby ringer washer; press side extension table; 4 press back chairs; washboards; ironing board; quilts; tub stand; crocks; jugs; oil lamps; side table; cream cans; cabbage cutter; steamer trunk; fern stand; Tasco telescope, Dinkies 1940’s, telephones, corning ware, cook ware, pressure cooker, shaving mug, coffee grinder, crocks, framed stain glass, Royal Albert petit point, Banner ash sifter, Carnival amber punch bowl, horse clock, wooden wind spinner, crocks, oil lamp, tools, old heat registers, wardrobe; pine table; older glass and china including depression; crystal; cups and saucers; etc; artwork; cast iron pump; needle point pictures; 8 place and 12 place dinner sets; bed with high headboard; dresser and chest of drawers;

HOUSEHOLD EFFECTS: king size bed; queen bed; matching dresser and chest of drawers; 4 pc bedroom suite with dresser with wing mirror; sectional couch nice; glider rockers; ottomans; TV stand; 3 pc living room table and 4 chairs; Woods freezer;3 pc bedroom suite ; cooler; floor and table lamps; mirror; Rainbow vacuum with attachments; maple table and chairs with hutch; etc. MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS: lawn boy

lawnmower; rear tine tiller; wheel barrel; step ladders; router; B&D sander; hedge trimmer; axes; 100ft water hose; edger; sythe; quantity of lawn and garden tools; hand tools; wood working tools; extension cords;

AUCTIONEER:

Jantzi Auctions Ltd. Wellesley | 519-656-3555 www.JantziAuctions.com

AUCTION

AUCTION SALE Of woodwork equipment and tools; household effects; antiques; collectables; and miscellaneous items to be held at 75 Peppler St in Waterloo (near Noecker) for Arthur Rudy on:

Elmira Charity Quilt Auction & Country Market At Elmira Produce Auction Cooperation (EPAC) 7400 Reid Woods Drive, Elmira

SATURDAY OCTOBER 29 AT 11:00 AM

QUILTS • SOLID WOOD FURNITURE • FOOD • GIANT BAKE TABLE • LIVE & SILENT AUCTION

WOODWORKING & MISCELLANEOUS:

equipment: Rockwell table saw with extended table; 5ft x 10ft utility trailer; Yardmachine 28” snow blower with electric start like new; Sanborn air compressor; Makita 400 mm planer; wood lathe; bench vise; variety of Makita power tools; grinder; King dust collector; jointer; Craftsman sander; Beaver 16” band saw; Beaver 16” band saw on stand; Trademaster drill press; 10ft belt sander; workshop filtration system; mitre saw; quantity of tool boxes; small air compressor; router; chain saw; skill saw; hammer drills; car ramps; sanding belts; quantity of nut and bolt bins; handyman jack; come along; winches; grease guns; aluminum step ladder; wood stepladder; shop vac; fire extinguisher; bar clamps; c clamps; air nailer; 2 safes; work tables; work benches; large quantity of woodworking; hand and power tools; lawn and garden tools; fire place; variety of copper and scrap metal; drill bits; and many other items too numerous to list.

ANTIQUES

AND

COLLECTABLES:

6ft wagon with wooden spoke wheels; claw foot bath tub; old wooden carpenters tool boxes; variety of old primitives; yokes; buckeye incubator; anvil; old skiis; dresser; mirror; press back chairs; ammunition box; tin toys; tin crane; power shovel; flat bed truck; dump truck; Tonka toys; child’s tin stroller; sky view parking tin toy parking lot; hockey sticks; old wrenches; rotary dial phones; old wooden boxes; organ stool with ball claw feet; old saddle; bar stools; hockey game with tin players Leaves vs Canadians; marble roller; cabbage cutter; oil lamps; horse shoes; adze; apple peeler; tin soldiers; lanterns; Minolta pottery chicken waterer; old planter; brace and bits; oil cans; old chairs; settee; stool; Hardy boy books and other old books; cedar chest; organ stool; magazine rack; clocks; 4ft wood clock; tri lamps; binoculars; lamps from the 50’s; globe; double bed; vanity and stool; chest of drawers; night table; dresser; cabinet; chamber set; iron chair; oak table and chairs; matching china cabinet; pine cabinet; older glass and china including crystal; Chintz; depression etc; many items from the 50’s and 60’s and the list goes on and on.

NOTE: AN all around interesting auction

full of unique and one of a kind rare items; all wood working equipment is in working order; a sale not to miss. Terms: cash, cheque or debit.

AUCTIONEER:

Jantzi Auctions Ltd. Wellesley | 519-656-3555 www.JantziAuctions.com

AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

SAT OCT 29 at 11:00 AM Clearing auction sale of woodworking equipment, tools, household effects, antiques, tools, collectables, and miscellaneous items to be held at 75 Peppler St in Waterloo for Arthur Rudy. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com

SAT. OCT 29 at 10:00 AM Farm Property auction of approx 80 acres including a 3 bedroom recently renovated home, 70 workable acres, and a large steel sided driveshed to be held at 5389 Line 2 Granton for Alex Bucur. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com

SAT OCT 29 at 9:00AM Charity auction of approx 100 quilts, new furniture, donated items, etc, to be held at 7400 Reid Woods Dr Elmira for the Elmira and District Association for Community Living. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com

AUCTION SALE OF 1 storey brick house, tools, household effects, antiques and miscellaneous items, to be held at 11 Dunke St. South in Elmira (off Church St. West near downtown), for Roger and Almeda Gervais, on Saturday, November 5th @ 10:00 a.m. Gerber Auctions Ltd. 519-699-4451.

Family Night – Friday, October 28th 5:30-9pm Everyone Welcome! BBQ Beef Brisket Dinner served from 5:30pm-7pm or until sold out Dinner Tickets ($12 in advance / $15 at the door) are moving fast so buy your Tickets now - Call 519-669-3205 Preview the quilts and new furniture to be auctioned on Saturday Friday Night Live & Silent Auction Items: Children’s table w/ 2 – chairs, 3 Station bike rack, Toy tractors & Equipment, Etc. Many more items coming Auction Day - Saturday, October 29th Opens at: 8:00 am – with Country Market and Silent Auction 9:00 am - Live General Auction 11:00 am Auction of Handcrafted Wood Furniture 12:00 Noon – Quilt Auction

Auction Sale Listing

QUILTS: This Year’s Collection Features Beautiful Quilt Patterns including: Garden Twist, Tree of Life (appliqued), October Sky, Disappearing Nine Patch, Fond Memories, Magic Tiles, Starlight Log Cabin, Courthouse Steps, Sunburst, Heart and Soul, Plus: Many More Quilts, Wall Hangings, Afghans and Hooked Rugs not listed. NEW FARM EQUIPMENT: 10’ railing with 2’ gate for goats, 5’ Pulsar (M-K) Rotary Cutter, 4 –22.5 X 8.25 used Truck Tires on 8 bolt rims, HLA skidsteer to Alo adapter plate, HLA Alo 2 prong bale spear, 10 - 11L X 15 8 ply on 6 bolt rims, Assortment of Plywood & Lumber, Assortment of Trees & shrubs, General Auction Items: Set of tractor fenders (Ford 3000), Barn fans, Logging chains, 16” tires, Kongskilde S tines, 2 Coleman propane camp stoves, Kerosene heater (like new), Toolboxes, Incubator, 40 plus Bushel baskets (new or almost new), Truck steps (new), Rain Barrel (new), Wheel barrow tub (new), 4 – Cords Fire Wood NEW FURNITURE: 4-Folding Chairs, Coffee table, 2-End tables, and Hall table (oak unfinished), Night table (maple & finished), 2-Small coffee tables (oak-finished) Cedar Chest, 3-Folding dryer racks, Replica Peggy’s Cove Light House, 2 Adirondack Chairs. SILENT AUCTION: Extensive Selection of Gift Certificates, Corn seed, Grass seed, Feed, Sugar Kings Tickets, Mulch, Lube & service, alignments for vehicles, Gift cards & baskets, & many more: New: Work Boots, Dairy Boots, Toy Tractors & Equipment, Dog Feed, EAS Adult Jacket, Anti-Freeze, Crokinole Board, Stihl FS38 trimmer, 42 - 4’ X 5’ Round Bales fine cut wheat Straw, Touch Lamp, Woodcutter Safety kit, Dewalt Hammer, Dewalt Tool Bag.

Partial List Only - Many more items arriving at publishing time. terms: INTERAC, VISA, MASTERCARD Not responsible for accidents or loss. All Articles Donated All proceeds to Elmira District Community Living (EDCL) Ph: (519) 669-3205 Or visit our website at http://www.elmiraquiltauction.com

AUCTIONS SAT. NOV 5 at 9:00 AM Annual Charity auction of new donated items; furniture; quilts; gift certificates and more to be held at the Stratford Rotary Complex 353 McCarthy Rd for the Gospel Echoes Team. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com TOY AUCTION OF Tractor trailers, farm tractors & implements, industrial, banks, memrobilia & other interesting items, to be held at the K.W. Khaki Club, 2939 Nafziger Rd. 2 miles south of Wellesley, for Les Jacklin, Bob Foxton (both of Wingham), The Peter Bleay Estate, Tavistock and additions, on Saturday, November 12th @ 10:00 a.m. Gerber Auctions Ltd. 519-699-4451.

AUCTIONS AUCTION SALE OF Antique tractors, car, machinery, trailers, commercial lawn tractors, butcher equipment and miscellaneous items, to be held at 1209 “C” Snyder’s Rd.1 km east of Baden, for Mike Koller, on Saturday Nov. 19th @ 10:00 a.m. Gerber Auctions Ltd. 519699-4451.

HAY & STRAW SMALL SQUARE STRAW for sale. Delivered. 519-6355416.

FARM SERVICES BAGGED PINE SHAVINGS Agricultural Spray Lime, 22.5kg. bag; feed grade lime, 25kg. Delivered. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-574-4141 or 519-6692045.

FARM SERVICES KILN DRIED CORN & CORN SCREENING Delivered by Einwechter. Minimum 15 ton lots. Call George Haffner Trucking 519-574-4141 or 519-669-2045. SEED WHEAT AND FERTILIZER competitive pricing. Rye seed, winter barley. Hard red wheats, Gallus, Princeton and Sampson. Soft red wheats, Emmit, CM614, Marker, Emperor and more. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-574-4141 or 519-669-2045.

FIREWOOD GERBER’S FIREWOOD YOUR source of quality slabwood and seasoned bodywood. All prices include delivery. No Sunday calls please. 519656-2057.

WANTED CASH FOR OLD watches, jewellery, all gold and silver, coins, military, toys, records. Call Terry 519-2100551 Elmira or 519-242-6900. gallamore@golden.net 40 years experience, fair honest prices. Will travel.

RENTALS LINWOOD HOUSE - 1050 sq. ft. $695.00/mth + utilities. 2 bedrooms, 1-3 piece bathroom, large kitchen, large living room, parking for 2 cars, large deck, unfinished walk-out basement, large backyard, detached shed. Call/text Elvin 519-580-6415. UNIT AVAILABLE IN St. Jacobs Meadows Residential Community. 1059 sq. ft. on main floor, facing Water St. Attached garage. Call 519664-2646.

MORE CLASSIFIED LISTINGS PG. 20


20 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

CLASSIFIED ADS TRADES & SERVICES

FAMILY ALBUM

NEED YOUR LEAVES and Fall Clean Up done? For free quote Call: John’s Quality Home Services. Tel: 519669-4955.

CUSTOM APPLE JUICE Pressing and custom juice sales. Call for more info or to make an appointment. Cedaridge Pressing, Wesley Martin, 3175 Northfield Dr. Elmira. 519-669-3541.

GARAGE SALES

BIRTHDAY

OBITUARY

Happy 13th Birthday Megan! Where does the time go!!!!

HUGE INDOOR GARAGE Sale. Oct. 22nd, 8 a.m. noon. 27 Mill St. Elmira (St. Paul’s Lutheran Church). Furniture, fashionable ladies clothing - sizes between 14 & 20 and lots more!

MASONRY REPAIRS STONE, brick, concrete. 11th year in business. Call Jeff The Mortar Mender 226-338-6243, you may have to leave message.

SMALL ADS, BIG IMPACT.

Love Mom, Dad & Bryson

THE OBSERVER

Bauman, Simeon B. Passed away at home, RR 3, Wallenstein, on Monday, October 17, 2016, at the age of 87 years. Simeon Bauman was the husband of Lovina (Brubacher) Bauman. Father of Sarah and George Bauman of RR 3, Wallenstein, Henry and Nancy, Judith and Abraham Bauman, Daniel and Salinda, Amos and Betsy, all of RR 1, Wallenstein, Veronica and Manassa Hoover of RR 2, Proton Station, Simeon and Elizabeth, and Ezra and Salome, both of RR 1, Wallenstein. Grandfather of 53 grandchildren and numerous greatgrandchildren. Brother of Isaac and Enoch Bauman. Predeceased by his parents David and Louisa (Bearinger) Bauman, six brothers and six sisters. Interment and funeral service took place at Wellesley Mennonite Meeting House. Arrangements entrusted to the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira.

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com “PROUDLY REMEMBERING OUR PAS T; CONFIDENTLY EMBRACING OUR FUTURE.”

Community Information Page

P.O. Box 158

24 Church St. W. Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6

Township of Woolwich Annual Grants Now Accepting Applications

The Township of Woolwich Annual Grant process is now open. Non-profit organizations may apply for an annual operating grant to be used for the delivery of programs and services. Applications must be received no later than Monday, October 31, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. Additional details regarding the Township’s annual grants and special assistance programs may be found on the Township’s website: http://www.woolwich.ca/en/townshipservices/Grants.asp Phone: 519-669-1647 or 877-969-0094 519-669-1820 519-575-4400orwww.woolwich.ca Completed applications and questionsFax:may be directed to After JulieHours ForthEmergency: at jforth@woolwich.ca 519-669-6010.

TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH LEAF DISPOSAL

Please do not rake your leaves onto the road. This practice has been prohibited by bylaw in the Township of Woolwich since 1994. There is a fine of $125 for depositing any debris or refuse, which includes leaves, on Township Roads. These piles of leaves are a safety hazard as they encourage children to play on the road. They can also result in flooding issues when the leaves block storm drains.

Natural Choices

OBITUARY

OBITUARY McGinnis, Warren Warren was a gentle, kind, and hardworking man. His loving nature and warm laughter touched everyone he met. He died peacefully on October 13, and is survived by wife Mary, son Dan, siblings Jerry (Donna) and Marnie (Bruce Bailey), and his nieces and nephews; and predeceased by parents Alec and Thelma, and sister Cheryl (Don Douglas). His family welcomes donations in his name to the Canadian Cancer Society or the St. Mary’s General Hospital Foundation. (Cards are available at the funeral home.) The family will host an informal gathering at the Stone Crock Restaurant on King St. in St. Jacobs to share memories of Warren, on Sunday, October 23 from 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Martin, Susannah Susannah Martin went home to be with her Lord on Thursday, October 13, 2016, in her 102nd year, at Chartwell Elmira Long Term Care. She was the youngest of nine children born to Elias and Barbara (Brubacher) Martin in their farmhouse near Wallenstein on November 21, 1914. On August 25, 1935 she married Urias Martin and together they raised a family of six: Grace (Ewald) Frede, Murray (Shirley) Martin, Gladys (the late Dave) McClurkin, the late Marjorie (Gord) Smith, Stanley (the late Peggy) Martin, and the late Dorothy (Emmanuel) Kuepfer. She was predeceased by her husband in 1999. Susannah brought such love and happiness into the lives of her children, 16 grandchildren and 25 great-grandchildren. As a teenager she committed her life to following Jesus and remained vibrant in her faith. She loved the outdoors, life on the farm and tending her garden. Beautiful paintings and hand-stitched quilts evidenced her creativity. She has left a wonderful, positive impact for good on so many throughout her life. Visitation was held on Monday, October 17, 2016 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, 62 Arthur St. S., Elmira. A Celebration of Life service was held on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 at 2 p.m. at Woodside Bible Fellowship, 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira. A private burial took place prior to this. As expressions of sympathy, gifts may be made to Woodside Bible Fellowship or The Gideons.

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

Visit www.henrywalser.com for Warren’s memorial.

JUNIOR SQUAD ROMPS TO VICTORY OVER KCI

LEAF DISPOSAL ALTERNATIVES

Mulching and composting are the most economical and environmentally beneficial ways to deal with your leaves. • Instead of disposing of your leaves, save them, mulch them with your lawnmower and gradually add them to your home composter. They will break down into a useful organic material that can be added to flower and vegetable gardens. • Rather than raking your leaves, why not mulch them on your lawn or into your garden? When the “PROUDLY REMEMBERING PAS T; leaves CONFIDENTLY EMBRACING FUTURE.” leaves are dry, mow your lawn more frequently. TheOUR mulched will soon disappearOUR into your lawn or garden as fertilizer.

Community Information Page

Curbside Leaf Collection Program

P.O. Box 158

24 Church St. W.

Bagged Leaf Collection Elmira, Ontario • Bag leaves using only paper yard waste bags or returnable containers marked with a Region N3B 2Z6 of Waterloo Yard Waste Sticker. • Place out with yard waste materials on yard waste collection days separately from your garbage containers. • For more information call the Region of Waterloo at 519-883-5100. Tip: Mulching your leaves with a lawn mower or other mulching device prior to bagging can reduce leaf volumes. (10 bags of loose leaves = 1 bag of mulched leaves) If you have too many leaves for your composter to handle, you may bring your leaves to the Regional Landfill Site. Gate 2, 925 Erb Street West, Waterloo Monday to Saturday, 7:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. For more information follow the link below: http://www.regionofwaterloo.ca/en/aboutTheEnvironment/Landfill_Operations.asp Phone: 519-669-1647 or 877-969-0094 Fax: 519-669-1820 After Hours Emergency:

519-575-4400 www.woolwich.ca

Elmira District Secondary School’s junior football team defeated Kitchener Collegiate Institute 28-6 on Oct. 13 in Elmira. Scoring for Elmira were Colby Van Bargen (12), Bart Sherrer (6) and Jake Gingrich (10). [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]


CLASSIFIED | 21

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES

Complete Collision Service

SPACE FOR RENT

THOMPSON’S

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

GENERAL SERVICES

Auto Tech Inc.

ARE A

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.

Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

519.669.8330

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial On-The-Farm Service

FAX: 519.669.3210

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

AFTER HOURS

519-669-4400 30 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

519.669.8917

519-669-3232

Accredited Test & Repair Facility

GENERAL SERVICES

MUSIC-LOVER GIFT ALERT! COUNTR Y

’s 60’s / 70

HIGH SCHOOSL BAND

GOSPEL

Your favourite albums get a whole new life on CD after we clean up the clicks, pops and surface noise.

MORE INFO | 519.669.0541 EMAIL: vinylp2cd@gmail.com

Call

APPLIANCES – FURNACES – FIREPLACES AIR CONDITIONERS – WATER HEATERS SPRING SPECIAL ON AIR CONDITIONING TUNE UP $99, INSTALLED FROM $1999 FURNACES INSTALLED FROM $2499 FRIDGES $499, STOVES $399, WASHERS $399, DRYERS $369, FREEZERS $199 Come visit our show room FREE QUOTES

www.biobob.com or call today!

519-669-4964

519-648-3004

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

or

JAMES BAUMAN Craftsman Member O.G.P.T. Inc NEW PHONE NUMBER

519-880-9165

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

www.biobobs.com

Visit our website

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE

TUNING & REPAIRS

MUSIC TRANSFERS FROM LPs, 45s, 78s, CASSETTES TO CD

RA HOME COMF ELMI (519) 669-4600 ORT Various sizes & rates

ROCK

BAUMAN PIANO

SERVICES

1 Union Street, Elmira

800-232-6396

ehc@hotmail.ca (519)-669-4600

John Schaefer Painting FREE ESTIMATES Interior/exterior Painting, Wallpapering & Plaster | drywall Repairs

NOW ACCEPTING VISA OR MASTERCARD

519-669-2251 36 Hampton St., Elmira

Steve Co.

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs. 24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

ELMIRA

519-669-3652

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

The Right Window Treatment Can

Save you

Blinds by Elite or Mera

In home consultations Wide selection of styles & fabrics 1011 Industrial Crescent St. Clements | 519-699-5411 www.LetUsFloorYou.ca

FREE INSTALL

ATION When you buy 3 or more

Hours: M-F 8:30 - 5:30 Sat 9:00 - 3:00

Evenings By Appointment

“25 years in Business”

• Residential • Commercial • Industrial

CONSTRUCTION INC. (519) 569-0772 • Commercial & Industrial General Contracting • Specializing in Concrete Work & Excavation • Retaining Walls

info@trappconstruction.ca www.trappconstruction.ca

• • • •

Randy Weber

Stamped Coloured Concrete Demolition Bin Service Machine Bases

ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

519.669.1462 Fax: 519.669.9970 Tel:

Concrete Breaking & Removal

18 Kingfisher Dr., Elmira

HOME IMPROVEMENTS SERVICES

WINDOW FASHIONS

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS

GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1553 King St. N., St. Jacobs, ON N0B 2N0

Free in-home Consultations. Call someone you can trust.

• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

A Brand You Can Trust 22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

STORE HOURS: M-F: 8-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

TEL:

519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104 FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

AMOS INC

R O O F I N G

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches A Family owned and operated business serving KW, Elmira and surrounding area for over 35 years.

WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED

CALL JAYME FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE.

519.501.2405 | 519.698.2114 In Business since 1973 • Fully Insured

SPACE FOR RENT Your Business Here!

Advertise your business services in our service directory. Weekly exposure with fantastic results! Call Donna at 519.669.5790 Ext 104.

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL - Design and build -

AGRICULTURAL | RESIDENTIAL FRAMING • ROOFING RENOVATIONS • EAVESTROUGHS

Wayne Martin | 519-504-2016 darwayconstruction@icloud.com | Alma, ON

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Patios Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Steps Decorative/Stamped and Coloured Concrete www.marwilconcrete.ca

519-577-0370

OUTDOOR SERVICES Since 1998

CONCRETE BREAKING SKID STEER SERVICES • ALL ATTACHMENTS AVAILABLE

CALL ABOUT OUR 28FT FLAT BED SERVICE

CALL DUSTIN AT

226-750-4532

•Final grading •Lawn repair & complete seeding well equipped for large stoney areas •Spike Aerator/Overseeding •Natural & Interlocking Stone •Retaining Walls, Walks & Patios •Help for Top Water & Drainage issue

Murray & Daniel Shantz

ALMA, ONTARIO | PHONE: 519.846.5427


22 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

FRIENDLY PROFESSIONAL SERVICE BIRDLAND BUNGALOW! NEW LISTING

$349,000

Elmira - Looking for a bungalow in a quiet area of Elmira? Look no further! Situated on a quiet street, this home has much to offer, 3 bedrooms, large yard with room to run or relax, large rec room to customize as you wish, spacious garage and carpet free. Don’t wait, won’t last long! MLS 30543968.

35 ACRES!

PERFECT LOCATION

$599,000

Elmira - Beautiful location on sought after Bobolink Place is home to this 4 bedroom, 3 bathroom home with a huge park like yard. Start with a clean slate, an open mind and your creativity to make this your dream home. This home needs TLC, property being sold "as is". MLS 30538469.

PEACEFUL & LUXURIOUS Linwood - Country living awaits you in this newer custom-built bungalow located 20 minutes from KW. Situated on 4.96 acres, this 3-bedrm, open concept home offers the benefits of small-town living. Enjoy the beautiful country view year round from the hot tub in the 15ft x 32ft large screened-in lanai. Fully-finished rec room with in-floor heating. Attached 2 bay garage plus oversized 1 bay heated workshop with hoist. MLS 30527979.

Mount Forest- This 35 acre property features a mix of bush and some wet areas. Great building site for your future hobby farm, dream home, or perfect retreat /hide-a-way location. Located on highway 89 between Harriston and Mount Forest. MLS 30529342.

$198,000

VERDONE HOMES: WILL BUILD TO SUIT NEW LISTING

$412,900

Elmira Bungalow - Purchase now and choose your finishes in this 2 bedroom home with main floor laundry and open concept living areas. Would you like quartz or granite in your kitchen? Building has started, so don't delay. Unfinished basement with rough-in bathroom can also be finished to your liking for an additional cost. MLS 30543324.

$555,900

Elmira 2-Storey - This beautiful Verdone model home features hard wood floors and gas fireplace in the Family room, upgraded ceramic tile and a stunning quartz kitchen with an island and walk in pantry. Main floor laundry room with an entrance from the garage. 4 generous bedrooms including a master with a walk in closet and ensuite bathroom. MLS 30543086.

$419,900

Drayton Bungalow - This yet to be built beautiful Bungalow features open concept great room with electric fireplace and two tray ceiling, & Barzotti kitchen with granite counter tops. Master bedroom has double walkin closets, ensuite & main floor laundry. Pick your finishes & colors throughout the house. MLS 30540494.

Drayton 2-Storey – This yet to be built beautiful 2076 sq ft Foxwood-model features granite counter tops, Barzotti kitchen & gas fireplace. Second floor features media room, 3 bedrooms, main bath, laundry, master bedroom with 5-pc ensuite & walk-in closet. MLS 30540442.

$448,900

Donating back to the community we call home.

Alli Bauman Paul Martin Sue Wideman SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

allibauman@rogers.com

paul@remaxsolidgold.biz

519-577-6248 519-503-9533

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

226-750-9332

suewidemanhomes@gmail.com

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

3 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5426

$412,900

Elmira Semi-detached - Quartz or Granite? Order the finishes that you want in this 1555 sq. ft. Verdone Home. Construction is underway on this 3 bedroom open concept home, including an island in the kitchen and gas fireplace in the great room. Footings are already in place for your future deck off of the dinette. Unfinished basement with rough-in bath and walk-out to back yard can be finished to your taste for an additional cost. MLS 30543090

Call today Thinking About Selling? and book a FREE HOME EVALUATION


CLASSIFIED | 23

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

LET OUR 50+ YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WORK FOR YOU!

BROKERAGE

45 Arthur St. S., Elmira www.thurrealestate.com

BROKER

BROKER

BRAD MARTIN

JULIE

LUKE

SHANTZ Broker of Record, HECKENDORN Broker Sales Rep. MVA Residential Res: 519.669.1068 Cell: 519.588.7562 Cell: 519.584.4400

FLAX MILL DR., CONESTOGO PERFECT FOR AN EMPTY NESTER this renovated bungalow offers an open concept with panoramic views! Kitchen & D.A. open to great room w/3 glass doors & gas fireplace. 2 Open + house bdrms. main flr. laundry/mudSaturday Octfin. 22nd room. Nearly rec.1:00-3:00pm room w/ 7822 Colonial Carthage walkout to back Drive, yard. 3rd bdrm. ( new photo attached please & 3 pc. bath. Workshopuse)Â under Ranch Bungalow + Shop the garage w/separate entrance - $559000. perfect for the hobbyist. MLS.

$569,900 BRISTOW CREEK

Open House DR.,Sunday ELMIRA Oct 23rd 1:00 - 3:00pm 20 Centre Street, Elmira BACKS TO GREENSPACE! 1900 1886 Elmira "Trish Romance" Feeling sq. ft. Lovely foyer open to upper $449000.00. level with lots of windows and wood staircase. Gleaming hdwd. floor in L.R. and dining room. Large dinette seats 10 people! Open concept to L.R./D.R. w/gas fireplace. 3 spacious bdrms., 4 bathrooms (5 pc. ensuite). Upper laundry. Fin. rec. room & 2 bdrms. (w/deep windows). MLS.

D L O S $435,000

WOLLE REALTY , BROKERAGE INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

“HELPING YOU IS WHAT WE DO.�

90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 4, Elmira N3B 3L4

519-669-3192

www.YourFamilyTeam.ca

PARADIGM (ELMIRA) HOMES SOUTHWOOD ESTATES

* Front elevation may differ from rendering.

EXECUTIVE freehold town homes now under construction in Elmira.

PRICES STARTING FROM $386,900. Bungalow and bungalow loft plans. Reserve yours today. Please contact Shanna or Bonnie for details. EXCLUSIVE.

OPEN HOUSE

SATURDAY, OCT 22ND • 1-3PM

7822 COLONIAL DR., CARTHAGE

$319,900 CALL FOR YOUR FREE MARKET EVALUATION

RANCH BUNGALOW + SHOP $559,000 NEW PRICE Nearing 2800 sq ft + walk out basement, hardwood flooring, oak

trim. .75 ACRE lot overlooks private owned green space. 30 x 50 shop w/ r.i. for heat. Priced to allow your own finishing.  Hwy#86 W, to Line 131 towards Milverton, Left in Carthage, First Right.  MLS

Len Frey Sales Representative

Mildred Frey Broker

519-741-6368

519-741-6970

mildred@thefreyteam.com mildred@thefreyteam.com

www.thefreyteam.com #1-63 Arthur St. S., Elmira NEW PRICE @ 12.50 / 1025 sq. ft. of professional office or any retail. Great street exposure on Main Street. MLS 1524851 call Mildred to view. #3- 120 Oriole Parkway @ 8.50 per sq ft. Large area available, can be divided into smaller units. In the middle of high density residential. MLS30538837 Call Mildred to view. Call or email today for a FREE, NO Thinking of Buying or Selling? OBLIGATION, OPINONS of VALUE!

Bert Be Martin Re/max Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., R

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

BROKER

Brokerage

Independently Owned and Operated

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 3 Arthur St. S. Elmira DIREC OFFICE: 519-669-5426

www.remaxsolidgold.biz

ÂŽ INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

519.747.0231 (Office)

FREE Market Evaluation

D L SO $379,900 READY TO MOVE IN!

family home close to all amenities in Heritage Park. Recently updated this home offers 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, kitchen with centre island, separate dining room, rec room, family room with walkout to fenced yard with mature trees and garden shed. All new windows in 2007, some new doors. MLS. Call Bert to view.

Your referrals are appreciated!

$ 7 % $ 3 $ 5 6 3 2 , / 6 ( ( ( 2 5 6 9 3 & 3 $ 6 8 1 + ' 8 2 $ 6 $ / $ 7 ( 6 3 8 5 2 5 2 ' ' 6 3 $ < $ 2 1 ( 7 6 $ 5

        

        

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SELL YOUR HOME, YOUR CAR, ALL YOUR STUFF ...

REALTY LTD., BROKERAGE

519.500.1865 (Direct)

warmth welcomes you from the front wrap around porch to spacious foyer accented with original balustrade continues up to the upper foyer. Open concept mainfloor of 9 1/2' ceilings. Eat-in kitchen, enclosed sun porch and back covered verandah overlooks the 209' deep mature irregular yard + 78' frontage! Gleaming 2nd floor pine flooring and over 11' ceilings. Call today or visit for further details. NEW MLS.

SUDOKU CHALLENGE

Or by Fax

519-669-1544 519-669-5119

20 CENTRE ST., ELMIRA

1886 ELMIRA â&#x20AC;&#x153;TRISH ROMANCEâ&#x20AC;? FEELING $449,000 ELMIRA Full of character and

EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

REALTY LTD., BROKERAGE

SUNDAY, OCT. 23RD â&#x20AC;˘ 1-3PM

CROSSWORD PUZZLER

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IN THE OBSERVER. CALL 519-669-5790 EXT 104 OR email: drudy@woolwichobserver.com DEADLINE: Wednesday by 10am


24 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

LIVING HERE ARTIFACTS / A PIECE OF HISTORY

Commonplace item carries a stamp that’s anything but A simple burlap food bag emblazoned with the Nazi symbol makes its way to the Elmira Legion LIZ BEVAN SOMETIMES IT’S THE LITTLE things that serve as reminders of much larger issues. One such memento made its way to the Elmira Legion last week, a token of dark times that gripped the planet more than 70 years ago. With Remembrance Day on the horizon, Elmira Legion member Dale Snyder came into possession of a reminder of the largest conflict involving Canadian troops: a German army food sack with a recognizable and sometimes hated symbol stamped on it, a swastika with the Third Reich eagle. The burlap bag, complete with some tears and rips, was made in 1944 and comes with a stamp indicating its age and who used it. The bag was used to carry food supplies such as potatoes, beets and cereals. A friend of Snyder’s brought the bag back from Poland a few weeks ago, where it was about to be thrown out. He says anything with a swastika on it is a rare find, especially in North America. “It is just interesting, the simple fact that we support our veterans big time, and it is part of a history that we don’t see any more,” he said. “The part that makes it so interesting, I think, is the swastika (and the eagle). I show the letters first, then spin it around

CHEF’S TABLE/ DIERRE ACHESON

Tasty risotto makes use of bountiful harvest time RECIPE NOTES

Dale Snyder and Clayton Ash hold up a burlap food sack stamped with the Nazi symbol at the Elmira Legion branch last week. and everybody’s jaw drops. Most of the crests were just a cross on the arm, but not the whole symbol, with the eagle and the swastika – it is the whole crest.” Most Nazi memorabilia sits behind glass in a museum, or in a private collection and even then, something like this is hard to find on this side of the Atlantic Ocean. In Europe, however, Nazi artifacts are more common. “A lot of our American

and Canadian soldiers wanted to bring memorabilia back, but it got stolen. The Europeans gobbled it up like crazy and so the soldiers went to sleep and it would disappear – all the German lugers and the handguns and stuff. They all disappeared,” he shared after doing a bit of research on the bag. “Also, from what I hear, when the guys came back on the ships, and the officers on the ship asked if there was anything

[LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]

you were bringing back, and if there was, it went overboard. So, very few things actually hit North American soil. All this stuff never got here.” Legion member Clayton Ash, a history buff and local author, says items like the Nazi Germany food bag serve as a reminder of darker times, but the war years aren’t something modern day societies should forget. “It is important to share

those stories. There is no other way we could identify with that kind of thing,” he said with tears welling up in his eyes. “That is what war is about. If we don’t stop and take the time to remember and learn about these things, and know how vicious and horrid and stupid it is, then we will just continue to do it, but I am not sure that we won’t anyways. It

THE LEAVES HAVE TURNED and started their descent. Nature’s bounty provides us with so much to cook with and to be grateful for. Our harvest has been plentiful and in the store everyone is happy to see our butternut squash soup is back. This year we grew butternut squash. Our yield was not very exciting, but the taste was amazing – the texture was tender, sweet and the flavour was delicious. The effort in the garden this year was definitely worth it. Now if I could get over how beautiful everything looks and eat it – I often feel guilty enjoying the beauty that is in the garden. As we prepare for what is coming and putting our gardens to bed we can let go of that summer feeling and nestle into family, fall and comfort. This risotto will fill your kitchen with the smells of comfort and depth of flavour. Don’t be shy: risotto is not as complicated as its reputation. It’s well worth the effort and the wait.

ARTIFACT | 27

CHEF’S TABLE | 27

Did you know now is a great time to start thinking about getting your winter tires on? As temperatures slowly begin to drop, it is beneficial for you to plan early and beat the rush when the snow does come as there is no harm in getting tires on a little early! If you don’t have winter tires yet, don’t fret! We are more than happy to get you into a winter tire that suits your driving needs and budget! Call the shop at 519-669-1082 to get your winter tires on soon! – Lewis

Tel: (519) 669-1082 Fax: (519) 669-3084 info@leroysautocare.net 20 Oriole Parkway E., Elmira, ON

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LIVING HERE | 25

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016 “A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

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CHOLESTEROL SOLUTIONS. WE CAN help you discover ways easy ways to modify your diet and help you improve your cholesterol level; 5:30-7:30 p.m. at Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs. For information call 519-664-3794.

Truck & Trailer Maintenance

OCTOBER 21 FREE HEALTH EDUCATION SESSION at Woolwich Community Health Centre. Getting Enough Sleep and the Role of Medication, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Presented by Jen Bruce, pharmacist, Martin’s Pharmacy.

Cardlock Fuel Management

OCTOBER 22

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR

ELMIRA LEGION CRAFT SALE, 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Come support local crafters; 11 First St. E., Elmira.

OCTOBER 23 HOT HAM SUPPER FROM 4-7 p.m. at St. Clements Community Centre, 1 Green St., St. Clements. Tickets: adults $12; children 5-12 $6 and children 4 and under are free. For tickets please call Wayne or Marilyn Curry at 519-206-0151.

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HUNGRYMAN BREAKFAST, BENEFITTING THE Red Knights Fire Fighters Bike Club at the Elmira Legion Hall, from 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Adults $6, kids 6-10yrs $3, 5 and under free.

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S., Elmira (Community Room). Cost $6. Join us for a noonday light lunch and fellowship. Call Community Care Concepts at 519-664-1900 for more information.

OCTOBER 26 SENIORS COMMUNITY DINING AT noon (doors open at 11:30 a.m.). Linwood Community Centre, 5279 Ament Line, Linwood. Cost $11. Community Care Concepts invites you to join us for a hot noonday meal, fellowship and entertainment. Call 519-664-1900 or toll free 1-855-664-1900 for more information.

OCTOBER 27 CHATEAU GARDENS AUXILIARY ANNUAL Harvest Tea. Tearoom, craft vendors, quilt raffle; 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Entertainment by Jeff Poolton. All welcome. Use entrance at 8 Snyder Ave. or 11 Herbert St. (Chartwell Elmira).

OCTOBER 28 HUGS AT THE WOOLWICH Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs. For parents and their children (0-5 yrs) living in the catchment area of WCHC; 9:30-11 a.m. on the second and fourth Friday of every month. Topic: Hands-on baby and toddler massage. For more information call Heidi at 519-6643794, ext. 237.

OCTOBER 29 COUNTRY JAM SESSION AT the Elmira Legion, 4-10 p.m. No charge to enter. Dinner - ham and scalloped potatoes & beans, $10/person, served from 5-7 p.m. Call Donna Vervoort at 519-669-2932

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REMEMBRANCE DAY TEA & Bake Sale - Royal Canadian Legion, 11 First St. E., Elmira; 1-3 p.m. Baking, deli table, tearoom, raffle table & penny table. TWIN OAKS OF MARYHILL Tea & Bazaar from 1-4 p.m. Tearoom, quilt raffle, penny, craft and bake tables. 1360 Maryhill Rd. (entrance at rear of building). This fundraiser benefits Twin Oaks residents. For further info contact Marg at 519-648-2915.

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NOVEMBER 9 SENIORS COMMUNITY DINING AT noon (doors open at 11:30 a.m.) Calvary United Church,48 Hawkesville Rd., St. Jacobs. Cost: $11. Community Care Concepts invites you to join us for a hot noonday meal, fellowship and entertainment. Call 519-664-1900 for more info.

NOVEMBER 10

21 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.2884 | martinselmira.com

WOODSIDE EVERGREEN FELLOWSHIP FOR Seniors, 10:30 a.m. at Woodside Bible Fellowship, 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira. “Remember The Days” - a morning of humour, inspiration and encouragement. Pastor Troy Toby, Bright’s Grove Pentecostal Assembly. Suggested donation $7 includes hot lunch at noon. For more info call Reta Malloy 519-669-8752.

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NEW HORIZONS - ENJOY coffee or tea and a delicious snack. Topic: Resilience in an Uncertain World, John Milloy, professor of public ethics; $2 per person, 10-11:30 a.m. at the Maryhill Community Centre. For more information call Joan Haid at 519-648-2742 or email at jehaid@xplorenet.ca.

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PLACES OF FAITH | A DIRECTORY OF LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP

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St. James Lutheran Church

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26 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

STRANGE BUT TRUE / BILL & RICH SONES PH.D.

For scientific researchers, there are Sleeping Beauties waiting to be awakened WEIRD NOTES

Q. Is there anything offbeat about your birthday that you share with many others? No, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not the date, though that IS shared by millions of others around the world. A. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the iconic eight-note

sing-song â&#x20AC;&#x153;Happy Birthday to You,â&#x20AC;? which the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Guinness Book of World Recordsâ&#x20AC;? cites as â&#x20AC;&#x153;the most recognizable English-language song in existence,â&#x20AC;? says Dan Lewis in his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now I Know More.â&#x20AC;? The song was composed in 1893 by sisters Mildred and Patty Hill, who called it â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good Morning to Allâ&#x20AC;? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good morning to

you/ Good morning to you/ Good morning dear children/ Good morning to allâ&#x20AC;?). How the more well-known lyrics became affixed to the famous melody is unclear, but they appeared in a 1924 book as a second stanza after the original good morning song. In 1935, the publishing company of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good Morning to Allâ&#x20AC;? copyrighted â&#x20AC;&#x153;Happy Birthday.â&#x20AC;? Rights owner Warner Music Group has continued to enforce the copyright for public and/or for-profit performances, having netted itself $2 million in royalties in 2008 alone. (Singing the song at a private gathering is not an issue.) But in a stunning reversal of decades of copyright claims, a federal judge in Los Angeles recently ruled that â&#x20AC;&#x153;none of the companies that

have collected royalties on the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Happy Birthdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; song for the past 80 years held a valid copyright claimâ&#x20AC;? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Los Angeles Timesâ&#x20AC;?). Q. They were fancifully dubbed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sleeping Beautiesâ&#x20AC;? of science. What are they, and can you name a few examples?

A. Discovery lies at the core

of science but rediscovery can be just as important, says Amber Williams in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scientific Americanâ&#x20AC;? magazine. Indiana University researchers sifted through 22 million scientific papers and found dozens of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sleeping Beautiesâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; those studies that had been largely unnoticed for years until suddenly being â&#x20AC;&#x153;reawakened,â&#x20AC;? often by researchers in other fields who came looking for fresh insights.

and accessibility of scientific literature.â&#x20AC;? Q. If you were challenged to sum up your lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work in just six words, what would you say? Consider the following responses â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from ironic to inspirational â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from these 10 scientists, as reported in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scienceâ&#x20AC;? magazine, edited by Jennifer Sills.

Top ones were in the areas of chemistry, physics and statistics. For example, John Turkevich wrote a paper about suspending gold nanoparticles in liquid. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It owes its awakening to the medical field, which now employs gold nanoparticles to detect tumors and deliver drugs.â&#x20AC;? And the famous thought experiment in quantum physics by Albert Einstein and colleagues could at first be discussed only theoretically, but by the 1970s physicists were able to test quantum entanglement experimentally. As for the future of Sleeping Beauties, project team member Qing Ke says they will likely become â&#x20AC;&#x153;even more common because of the increasing availability

A. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Data overload: Juggling

balls, many fall.â&#x20AC;? (Noa S., cell therapy, Israel) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thinking over the nature of thought.â&#x20AC;? (Rohan S., neuroscience, India) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything in moderation, or maybe not?â&#x20AC;? (Ryan C., nutritional science, USA) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living beings make me like fossils.â&#x20AC;? (Shivangi T., geology, India) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s create a dancing colorful bacteria.â&#x20AC;? (Anibal A.,

synthetic biologyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;plants, Chile) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I bunsen burnt my 1118th worm.â&#x20AC;? (Eugene L., neuroscience, USA) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Living my life under extreme pressure.â&#x20AC;? (Alexandra S., mineral physics, Germany) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Planets found. Now searching for life.â&#x20AC;? (David W., astronomy, USA) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cradle to grave fight against waste.â&#x20AC;? (Jingzheng R., environmental engineering, Denmark) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scientists: Global citizens with local burdens.â&#x20AC;? (Hari Krishna B., liquid crystalline materials, USA)

ABOUT THE AUTHORS Bill is a journalist, Rich holds a doctorate in physics. Together the brothers bring you â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strange But True.â&#x20AC;? Send your questions to strangetrue@compuserve.com.

OBSERVER CROSSWORD PUZZLER

ACROSS 1. No longer dangerous 5. Combined by melting 10. Gives a real beatinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; to 15. Links numbers 16. Captainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s standby 17. Brightly colored fish 18. W.W. I soldier 20. Gumbo vegetables 21. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Uâ&#x20AC;? of UHF 22. Catches sight of 23. Reason to cram 24. Banded metamorphic rock 26. High tidal wave 28. Computer menu option 30. Big Apple attraction, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;theâ&#x20AC;? 31. Invitation abbreviation 34. Utterance after a spill 36. Cream of the crop 38. Number cruncher, for short

39. Absorb, as a cost 40. Rain-bringers of Greek myth 43. Wide-brimmed summer headgear 45. Opportunities, so to speak 46. Be against 49. Couples 50. Suggestions 51. Dickensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ___ Heep 53. Respiratory problem 54. Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bohemian _______ 55. When repeated, like some shows 57. Cowboy boot attachment 58. Otherwise 59. Anomalous 62. Fix, in a way 63. Bang-up 64. Peter the Great, e.g.

DOWN 1. Software program, briefly 2. New Mexico art community 3. Cheese on crackers 4. Not alert 5. Hoof infection 6. Maintenance 7. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dearâ&#x20AC;? ones 8. Carry away, in a way 9. John ___ Passos 11. Burrow 12. When computers work 13. Analyze, in a way 14. Cascades peak 19. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a free country 21. Loosen, as laces 24. Overlays with gold 25. Tolkien creatures 27. Attack 29. Scarcity 32. Tater

33. Vilaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nation 35. Boutique 37. Autocrats 39. Atlantic Coast states, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;theâ&#x20AC;? 41. Part of BYO 42. Campus area 44. Canadian lout 45. Kind of fingerprint 47. High school class, for short 48. Commandment pronoun 50. Messaging format 51. Out of bed 52. Not to mention 56. Opportune 60. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Two Years Before the Mastâ&#x20AC;? writer 61. Textile worker 62. Warmed the bench

















 















 



















 



















 





 



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CAPTION The Besters visited Normandy Lodge in Wawa, Ontario to enjoy a family fishing trip with their daughter, Jennifer and her fiancĂŠ Dustin and his father Kevin.



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LIVING HERE | 27

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

CHEF’S TABLE:

Risotto only seems tricky

A blood drive with a personal touch Though Ella won’t need more transfusions, Dorscht family is happy to keep giving back

FROM | 24

Butternut Squash Risotto 1/2 butternut squash, diced into 1” squares 1 carrot, diced into 1” squares 1/2 red onion, julienned 1 clove garlic, chopped 2 Tbsp. butter, melted 1 sprig rosemary, chopped 4 sprigs of thyme, chopped Snow peas

Risotto 1 Tbsp. olive oil 1/2 onion 1 clove garlic, chopped 2-1/2 cups Arborio rice 1/4 cup white wine 1 tsp. local saffron 7-9 cups of chicken stock, (hot) 4 Tbsp. butter, Parmesan to finish Chopped parsley

Combine diced butternut squash, carrot, red onion, garlic, butter, rosemary and thyme on baking sheet, lined with parchment paper and roast in a 375 F oven until tender and golden. Set aside. Have chicken stock on and hot. In another pan, sauté onion with olive oil, add garlic, Arborio rice, toss and toast the rice, then deglaze with wine, add saffron and chicken stock until rice is covered. Allow to simmer. As the chicken stock reduces, add more stock. When the rice is about halfway, add half of the roasted vegetables. Keep stirring and adding stock. Once the rice is cooked finish with butter and parmesan cheese and parsley, place in a bowl and top with the rest of the roasted vegetables. Enjoy!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Never Enough Thyme Catering Inc. was created with one thought in mind ... to create more thyme! Enjoy our food shop, specialty cakes and catering. 83A Arthur St. S., Elmira. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

WHITNEY NEILSON AN ELMIRA FAMILY IS asking the community to sit down, relax and roll up their sleeves again for two upcoming blood donor clinics. Clinics in Elmira on Oct. 27 and in Linwood on Nov. 4 are being done in Kristen and Nick Dorscht’s daughter Ella’s name. Ella was born with pulmonary hypertension, a disease which affects only 5,000 people in Canada. Ella also has a heart defect and spent the first two months of her life at Sick Kids Hospital, undergoing two open-heart surgeries. Using an artificial heart and lung machine after the surgeries resulted in her developing pulmonary hypertension. Her parents encouraged the community to donate blood in her name last year to replace the units of blood she used while in the hospital. They collected 103 units, surpassing their 100-unit goal. While they reached their

ELLA | 28

ARTIFACT: Simple item serves as a link to a horrific display of human stupidity FROM | 24

was so stupid. They were close together, shooting at each other. It didn’t make any sense. Did nobody have any sense to say, ‘this is stupid, let’s get the barbecue out and get the booze out and invite the other side.’ The German soldiers were just as badly dealt with as the Canadian, British soldiers. It was terrible.” Seeing the bag reminded Ash of his time as a child in Listowel, playing with his brother at the armory that used to be in town. “I am a 1941 model, and in Listowel, we had an armory just as you were coming into town that is now the agricultural hall. That armory was built in 1914, and in about 1949 or 1948, they had a Sherman

4th Annual

DS O O W K W HA mas

Chrisatntile Merc

The Dorscht family – Cameron, Ella, Kristen and Nick (absent) – are reaching out to the Elmira and Linwood communities with two upcoming blood donor clinics, asking people to donate in honour of Ella, who received many blood transfusions while at Sick Kids Hospital, and to support the many people who need blood every day. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER] They moved the clinics to Kristen said. goal, they recognize the a month later than last year She says it’s also a nice need is still there and albecause turnouts weren’t as way to put a face to what ways will be. high as the clinics expect“Just because we’ve given you’re doing and knowing ed. They think this is beit really does make a differback what Ella used – and cause last year the weather knock on wood we don’t an- ence. was good in September and Their goal is 100 units ticipate Ella needing blood much of the farming comthis year and so far they’re in the next little while – but munity was occupied. at 61. They’re hopeful they that doesn’t mean that lots The Dorscht family will can get the last 39 donors of other people don’t still be on hand for the clinics with the two clinics. need it every single day,”

and anyone who stops by the clinic, whether they donate or not, can enter their name in a draw for prizes like gift cards for the LCBO, Tim Hortons, Home Hardware, as well as a spa basket and Sugar Kings tickets. Kristen notes if people are looking to have their donation count towards Team Ella they need to specify that when they donate. The donations will be made in her name and going into another patient that needs it because Ella doesn’t require blood transfusions now. “If we can help do the advertising and donate some prizes and talk to the donors and help them know what they’re doing is really appreciated then I think that that does help,” Kristen said. As for Ella, she had surgery in August and the doctors said she’s the same as she was last summer, heart-wise. It’s a bit disappointing she hasn’t improved, but Kristen says

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tank, and my brother and I would go out there. They had trucks, a howitzer. We climbed all over that stuff,” said Ash. “We would go down into the tank, turn the wheel which turned the gun and the turret. It was great fun. We were play fighting. There were

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also foxholes there where they would do training exercises. There were things about that we didn’t know at the time.” Ash took the moment to reflect on the different conflicts involving Canadian military members and says for him, the World Wars

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especially were all about helping others overseas. “It all comes together and I take offense because of some of the things that are being said like, ‘we have our freedom because our soldiers fought for it.’ That is not true. Our soldiers fought on foreign

land for their freedom and Canada has a reputation for that. That is what it is. It is not about us having our freedom. It was for them. Our freedom comes from good governance. I don’t care if you vote Conservative or Liberal, it is good governance,” he said.

Pork On Your Fork Saturday, October 22 7am - 7pm Lunch Specials Pork Roast & Sauerkraut Ham Steak & Pineapple Marinated Pork Chops & Applesauce Farmers Sausage Baked in Tomato Based Sauce

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28 | BACK PAGE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2016

BLOWOUT!

ELLA: Oct. 27 in Elmira, Nov. 4 in Linwoood on the other hand it’s good she hasn’t worsened. She’ll repeat the surgery again next summer. And if it weren’t for the oxygen tank that goes with Ella everywhere, you’d never know she has a heart condition. “She’s super active, super happy. She doesn’t have any outward signs for her heart. She kind of confuses the doctors in that way, that her test results show that she should be tired and lethargic, but she’s a big ball of energy and she never slows down,” Kristen said. Ella is like any other three-year-old. She spent the summer riding her tricycle, swimming and even went down waterslides with her oxygen tank. Kristen notes the donor clinics have changed the donation steps, speeding

Ella Dorscht, 3, suffers from pulmonary hypertension, a rare affliction. up the process. “Before you had to see a nurse to do some paperwork, then you would answer a whole bunch of questions on a piece of paper by yourself, then you’d have to wait to go into a booth to see another nurse and she would ask you a whole bunch more questions and do your vitals. Now they’ve changed it so that all the questions are asked on an iPad,” Kristen said. Those uncomfortable with technology can still have all

the questions asked in person or on paper instead. The need for donors is even greater this year because some donation requirements have changed. Extra travel restrictions means people who took a trip down south have to wait one year until after they took the trip to donate blood. “It’s important for those that can donate to go out and donate because there’s so many people that need it all the time. You never anticipate that you are going to need it or anybody in your family or your friends are going to need it, but the needs come up all the time,” Kristen said. The first donor clinic is at the Elmira Lions Hall on Oct. 27 from 2-8 p.m. The second clinic is at the Linwood Community Centre on Nov. 4 from 2:30 to 8:30 p.m.

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probably next to parents spend more time with kids than anybody else. We do get a lot of calls from schools. We do work very closely with schools and teachers can be an important aspect of support in a child’s life if there are some

things going on at home,” Spencer said. They recommend discussing with kids at a young age about being able to talk to adults that they trust, whether it’s a teacher, neighbour or grandparent. FACS Waterloo is also planning their second an-

nual Child Abuse Awareness Walk in Cambridge and Kitchener where participants will walk through their communities in their purple awareness t-shirts. “If you’re worried about a child, a child’s safety, call us and don’t be afraid to call.”

You are Invited to a Public Information Session Community Improvement Plan Project Public Information Session #1 Details:

DATE: Wednesday October 26, 2016 TIME: 6:00pm to 8:00pm (Note: formal presentation will start at 6:30pm)

LOCATION: Wellesley Community Centre, 1004 Catherine Street, Wellesley The Township of Wellesley has initiated a Community Improvement Plan Project, which will focus on the downtown areas of Wellesley and St. Clements. The Township and its project consulting team (Stantec Consulting Ltd.) are pleased to invite you to a Public Information Session to learn more about this exciting project.

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FROM | 27

October 20, 2016  

The Observer

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