Page 1

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

1 NEWS

Keeping an eye on your health > STORY ON PG. 13

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 16, 2010

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DRIVEN TO HELP- Mike Mcrae (left), Jeff Adams, Vanessa Scott, Trish Botter, Natasha Abbott and Tina Bryson from Farm Credit Canada were at Riverside PS in Elmira Wednesday collecting food for the annual FCC Drive Away Hunger program. The school donated 695 pounds of food. The FCC reps also visited Mennonite Savings and Credit Union and Elmira Farm Service Ltd.

PHOTO

» JAMES JACKSON

VOLUME.....15 ISSUE..........41

Cause of chemical release still unknown

Chemtura investigation putting the pieces together, looking to avoid repeat

'Tis the season for food drives T Thanksgiving sees increased demand at area food banks James Jackson

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anadians across the country may still be recovering from their turkey hangovers from the Thanksgiving feast last weekend, but local food banks hope that this time of year also reminds them of those who are less fortunate in the community.

For the Food Bank of Waterloo Region, this time of year marks their annual Thanksgiving food drive, and this year the food bank has set a goal of 375,000 pounds of food. Executive director Wendi Campbell says the need is such that there is no deadline for the drive either –

WEEKEND WEATHER

it will run until they reach their goal, which was mid-November last year. “There’s not too many people you talk to that don’t know somebody that has lost a job or is struggling to find new types of work,” she said, “and it’s touching all of our neighbourhoods in

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both the urban and the rural parts of our community.” About three million pounds of food is needed to meet demand in the Waterloo Region every year, according to the food bank, the distributing agency which provides food

> SEE FOOD BANK ON PG. 07 SUNDAY

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Steve Kannon

he cleanup crews scattered around Elmira are the most visible reminder of last month’s chemical release. But at Chemtura Canada, there’s plenty of work going on behind the scenes as engineers try to piece together just what happened on Sept. 27. Staff at the plant continue to investigate, with regular meetings being held to deal

Opinion...............10 Business.............13

with the incident, said Stacey Ferris, who is handling communications for the company. Dwight Este, the plant’s environment, health safety and security manager, said the company is still not sure of the sequence of events that led to the venting into the air of the chemical BLE 25. The compound, a mixture of diphenylamine and acetone used as

> SEE CHEMTURA ON PG. 09

Living Here..........15 Sports.................18

Entertainment....22 Classifieds.........23

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NEWS 2

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

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» Saturday, October 16, 2010

3 NEWS

Check it out

THE OBSERVER

> Elmira's where it all got rolling

Women encouraged to join Ontario Breast Screening Program Katie Edmonds

EE RY FR IVE L DE

TALKING POINT The Thingamaboob hanging from Elmira’s Sarah Bradshaw’s

PHOTO

efore she joined the Ontario Breast Screening Program (OBSP), Cambridge native Margot McAuliffe couldn’t remember the last time she’d thought about having a mammogram. “I think I was in denial,” she explained. “I didn’t have a family history of breast cancer, and I didn’t feel a lump in my breast, so I didn’t think I had anything to worry about.” In 2005, McAuliffe learned about the OBSP through an awareness campaign at Grand River Hospital where she works. With a group of colleagues, she made an appointment for a mammogram through the program. Just a few weeks later, she got a call from her doctor’s office. “I knew something was up,” she said. At the age of 52, McAuliffe was diagnosed with an aggressive form of breast cancer. Nearly five years later — after surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy — she’s cancer-free. “The OBSP saved my life. They really did. If I hadn’t gone for a mammogram then, I don’t know when I would have bothered going or what stage the cancer would have been at when it was finally found.” October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and the OBSP is offering high-quality mammography which meets Canadian standards for the early detection of small invasive cancers. In Ontario in 2010, an estimated 8,900 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer and 2,100 women will die from the disease, according to the Canadian Cancer Society (CCS). The good news is that thanks in part to the early detection of

» KATIE EDMONDS

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keychain is a visual reminder of the lump she found in her own breast; the Canadian Cancer Society is promoting the item in support of Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

breast cancer, more women are surviving than ever before. Since 1986, the breast cancer death rate has fallen by more than 30 per cent. “Screening really does save lives,” said Region of Waterloo Public Health nurse Donna Nicholson. “Self exams are extremely important, but a mammogram can help to find the problem sooner.” Mammograms are the gold standard for breast screening. They are a low dose X-ray that can detect changes in the breast, even when the changes are too small for you or your doctor to feel or see. According to the CCS, women aged 50 and older should have a screening mammogram, generally every two years. And just by taking a quick look at the numbers we can see that it works. Since 1995, more than 139,000 mammograms have been

performed on 51,111 women and 642 cancers have been detected. With eight OBSP sites located in the Waterloo Wellington region and a Breast Assessment Program at the Waterloo Wellington Breast Centre, accessibility has increased substantially in our region. More than 23,500 women were screened at OBSP in 2009 in WaterlooWellington alone and data shows that breast cancer death rates in Ontario women age 50-69 decreased by 35 per cent between 1990 and 2007. Ontario women who are 50 years of age and older, with no acute breast symptoms, no personal history of breast cancer, no breast implants and have not had a mammogram in the past 12 months are eligible to participate in the OBSP. “It’s extremely easy to get a screening done,” said Nicholson. “You don’t need

W • O • O • L • W • I • C • H

a referral from a doctor; you can just call up and make an appointment. Getting the word out about the screening is the first step towards early detection.” The Canadian Cancer Society’s ‘Thingamaboob’ is a great way to get the conversation started about the importance of regular mammograms, notes Elmira resident Sarah Bradshaw, a breast cancer survivor. The pink tool which can be carried as a keychain shows women hands-on the various sized lumps that can be detected through regular mammograms, a first mammogram, a physical exam by a healthcare professional and checking your breasts. Regular mammography finds the smallest lump — about the size of an apple seed — while the average size lump found by women checking their breasts is the approximate size of a cherry tomato. “Talking about breast cancer may not be a topic that everyone feels comfortable discussing,” said Bradshaw. “The Thingamaboob is a great tool because it can help you ‘break the ice’ and get the conversation started with the special women in your life by visually showing them that regular mammograms can find the smallest lump and detect cancer the earliest, which means there is a better chance of treating the cancer successfully.” To make an appointment for a screening, call the OBSP screening location that is closest to you to make an appointment (a referral is not needed). OBSP sites in the Waterloo-Wellington region are located in Cambridge, Fergus, Guelph and Kitchener. To find an OBSP, call 1-800-668-9304 or visit www.cancercare.on.ca/ obsplocations.

Along with many communities globally, Woolwich will mark Restorative Justice Week Nov. 14-21. Meeting last week, Woolwich councillors made the official proclamation following a visit by Mark Yantzi, the retired executive director of Community Justice Initiatives who’s now a Restorative Opportunities mediator. The township has a close relationship with the restorative justice movement. It was in Elmira in 1974 that the concept really began. Following an alcohol-fuelled spree of slashing car tires, smashing windows and other acts of vandalism, two teens were arrested. In an experimental move, Yantzi, then a young probation officer, suggested the two make amends by knocking on the doors of their victims, apologizing for their actions and making restitution. What would become known as the “Elmira case” turned out to be the foundation of the movement, the world’s first restorative justice project.

> Sign is no big deal, council says Perhaps too busy with election signs, Woolwich is giving a pass to the flashing one at the K-W Croatian Club in Shantz Station. Although the sign does not comply with the township’s current sign bylaw, upcoming amendments are likely to allow them, clerk Christine Broughton told councillors meeting Oct. 5. Given that the sign isn’t visible to the neighbours and the building is fairly isolated, councillors let common sense prevail in granting an exemption until the new bylaw comes into effect, citing other examples of such signs in use elsewhere in the township. “Stop worrying about things that don’t matter very much,” suggested Coun. Ruby Weber.

> Kudos for mall Conestoga Mall was the recipient this week of two Canadian Maple Leaf Awards from the International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC). The mall won a gold award for Renovation or Expansion of an Existing Project and a silver award for excellence in marketing for a Grand Opening, Expansion & Renovation. The mall’s $75-million expansion was four years in the making. More than 130,000 sq. ft. of space was added, including 30 new retailers, two new restaurants, a food court and Canada’s very first in-mall heritage museum.

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NEWS 4

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

LAW & ORDER

Thieves strike twice at Floradale Public School OCTOBER 7

>>6:50 AM | A deer was struck

and killed by an oncoming motorist on Herrgott Road near Line 86 by the Conestogo River bridge. The driver, a 61-year-old Listowel man, was on his way to work in his green Lincoln Town Car when the accident happened. No charges were laid.

>>12:11 PM | A vehicle was broken into while parked in a garage on Floradale Road near Ruggles Road in Floradale. Stolen from the car were three gold rings and a bracelet.

OCTOBER 8 >>6:15 AM | A 70-year-old

Gorrie man died following a fall at the L & M Foodland on Wellington Street in Drayton. Earl Mino, the store’s meat manager, had fallen from a ladder while at the store, striking his head. He was transported to the Palmerston District Hospital and subsequently transferred to Hamilton General Hospital, where he later succumbed to his injuries. The Ministry of

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olice responded to an alarm ringing at Floradale Public School at around 1:30 a.m. on Oct. 8. Someone had forced the rear sliding door open and stolen a number of iMac computers. The school was broken into

a second time, around 1 a.m. on Oct.12. The thieves gained entry the same way as before. This time, a snowblower was stolen. The police have some forensic leads on the case and their investigation is ongoing.

Labour has been notified of incident and will conduct a follow-up investigation.

streets in Elmira. The man was turning right onto Arthur Stret. when he took the corner too close, went up over the curb and clipped the light post, causing the light to fall from the top. There was moderate damage to the passenger side of his black, 2006 Dodge Magnum but he was not injured.

OCTOBER 10 >>12:16 PM | A woman called

police to report that the driver of a silver Grand Prix nearly hit a group of pedestrians who were exiting a church on Arthur Street at William Street in Elmira. The woman said she called out to the pedestrians to get out of the way of the vehicle and the driver made a rude gesture in her direction. Police later located the driver of the vehicle but no charges were laid.

>>2:40 PM | A 63-year-old

Elmira man was charged with ‘failing to report an accident’ after he struck a lamp post on the corner of Wyatt and Arthur

>>6:00 PM | A 19-year-old

Guelph woman lost control of her vehicle and collided with a concrete post on Arthur Street in Elmira. There was severe damage to her 2009 Pontiac, but the woman was not injured. No charges were laid.

OCTOBER 11 >>12:40 PM | Police are still

trying to contact the owner of

a fence on Apple Grove Road off Lobsinger Line in Woolwich Township after it was damaged in a collision. A 33-year-old Scarborough man was making a southbound turn onto Lobsinger Line when his 2010 Mazda slid on the gravel and hit the fence. There was moderate damage to the man’s vehicle and moderate damage to the fence. No charges were laid.

>>1:18 PM | A man called

police to report his wedding ring missing after losing it in Bolender Park. The ring is gold with a trillium design. If found, please contact the Elmira detachment at 519-570-3000, ext. 3320.

and New Jerusalem Road, and then attempted a left turn. She lost control of her 1995 Jeep Cherokee, the wheels caught the shoulder and rolled. There was only minor damage to the vehicle and it was able to be driven out of the ditch. The driver was charged with ‘careless driving.’

>>8:15 PM | A 25-year-old

Guelph woman was stopped at the corner of Sawmill Road

and Crowsfoot Road and was attempting to make a left hand turn onto Crowsfoot Road. The driver behind her, a 69-year-old Breslau man, was unable to stop in time and collided with her vehicle. The man suffered minimal damage to his vehicle and there was moderate damage to the Guelph woman’s vehicle. Neither driver was injured, but the man was charged with ‘careless driving.’

Linwood station open house

>>1:50 PM | A child’s red and

black Supercycle mountain bike was found after being left in Lions Park in Elmira. It is being held at Division 3A on Industrial Drive until it is claimed by its owner.

>>4:16 PM | An 18-year-old

Waterloo woman was unharmed when her vehicle rolled into the ditch at the side of Sawmill Road. The driver says she stopped at the stop sign at the intersection of Sawmill Road

A WARM WELCOME Local teens Josh Schneider , Connor Morgan, Chad Beacom, Andrew Moser and Ben Beacom visited the Linwood Fire Hall on the evening of Oct. 8 for the open house and demonstration, part of Fire Prevention Week activities in Wellesley and Woolwich townships.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

5 NEWS

Two Elmira schools among Parents Reaching Out grant recipients James Jackson

S

chools in the Waterloo region are set to benefit from the McGuinty government’s effort to increase parental involvement within their children’s schools, also known as Parents Reaching Out (PRO) grants. In the Waterloo Region alone, 57 PRO grants worth $43,664 will be distributed, including two local schools: St. Teresa of Avila Catholic elementary school, which will receive a $600 grant, and John Mahood Public School, which will receive $1,000. St. Teresa has already earmarked the funds to pay for Errol Lee, a motivational speaker and musician who appeared at the school back on Sept. 21. “He had an assembly for the entire student body,” explained Shelley Deyell, the head of the parent council at St. Teresa. “Then in the afternoon he broke off and did workshops with the older students, and then in the evening we invited the parents to come and he did a concert for us based on

the same information.” The talk and the concert that Lee gave at the school was the kick-off to a program called “Celebrating Differences.” The events will carry on throughout the year, said Deyell, and each week one of the school's students will be recognized for doing something that stands out in the teachers' eyes. That student gets a “Be the Change” pin, and a note is sent home to their parents to explain what their deed was. “What the school wants to do is it wants to make sure that we celebrate everybody’s differences, whether it’s race, religion, different coloured hair, different abilities, and that kind of thing.” At John Mahood, they intend to use their grant to help fund a number of initiatives, including math and science nights for kids, and a lending-library for parents, but a lot of the emphasis will be on producing an information handbook for parents that are new to the area. “Last year when we did the parent informa-

is very grateful for the grant, and that most of the projects they have planned would not have been possible without it due to the costs of new playground equipment, and the decline in fundraising over the past few years.

tion night we just had a few little pamphlets for parents,” said Jasmine Roth, the head of the school’s parent council. “But this time we will be able to put all the information down, where to meet people, who to contact and stuff like that.” The goal is to distribute the booklets to new parents in the school, and throughout the entire community. They aim to help new parents become integrated into the community and to provide helpful information such as important contacts, athletics in the area, and other useful information to someone who might be new to the area. “We just found a lot of times when you come into a community such as ours where everybody knows everybody, it’s hard to meet new people and especially if you’re not involved in anything big like hockey or nursery school,” explained Roth. Work on the booklets will begin in November and December, and the new parent information night is slated for May 2011. Roth said the school

“We probably would not have been able to implement the lendinglibrary or the science and math night. We’re really excited to have the opportunity, and hopefully it encourages more people to get involved in the school

community. That’s our main goal.” Since 2006, the government has handed out more than 7,000 grants to school councils across the province, and made a total investment of over $12 million.

Pat McLean

As your Mayor I will... • provide active leadership on all environmental issues - bio-gas and gravel pits • support a permanent bus service to Elmira and St. Jacobs. • advocate for economic development in all of Woolwich Township • commit to keeping property tax increases to a minimum. • implement the addition of a council representative for the Breslau area • support the diversity of community programs and housing needed for seniors in Elmira. • involve the community in the review of the operating costs of the WMC.

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» KATIE EDMONDS

Service to the Community

TURKEY UP FOR GRABS Students at St. Clement School geared up for Thanksgiving weekend

with their annual Turkey Shoot basketball free-throw competition and a school-wide chicken dance. Inset: student council members Sydney Nosal, Greg Haber and Josh Kelba.

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NEWS 6

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

It’s business as usual for Wellesley councillors With all five members returning by acclamation, there are no election surprises “If that percentage is met, then you cannot make decisions that bind future council until the time the (incoming) council is inaugurated. But that’s clearly not our case, since 100 per cent are returning. So it’s business as usual.” Wellesley residents might remember this occurring in the last municipal election, when all four councillors were replaced. Duke said that the council had to disband until the new group could be inaugurated. “We are fortunate we will not find ourselves in that position (this year),” she noted. Kelterborn said he is

James Jackson

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sion to pay for projects for which Wellesley received provincial and federal stimulus grants from the government. “We were lucky with regards to the stimulus money. It was a chance for us to access that kind of funding, and we were lucky enough to have a fair bit of reserve set aside,” he explained, but added that “we will have to possibly restrain ourselves,” once the stimulus money dries up. Very little money, however, has been saved by having all five members of council return for another four years instead of holding a full election. Duke said that the idea there

is no election in Wellesley this year is a misnomer, because there is still a race for Waterloo Region Chair, as well as school board trustees. Over the past four years, the township has set aside funds for use during the election, and this year it was about $30,000. The township is saving some money by opening fewer polls and having fewer staff working on the election, but that’s it. “All the training had to be done up front, all of the preparations until the nomination date had to be done, everything had to be worked out as if we were holding an election. It

» PAT MERLIHAN

Elmira cubs flock to Martha's Mixes for birding know-how

PHOTO

hile Woolwich council is on hiatus during the run-up to the election Oct. 25, it’s business as usual for councillors in Wellesley Township. All five members were acclaimed to office, and will keep going right through the Dec. 6 inauguration of a “new” council session. There was some confusion at the last council meeting as to whether or not council would have to disband, despite the fact that all four councillors – Shelley Wagner in Ward 1, Herb Neher in Ward 2, Jim Olender in Ward 3, and Paul Herrgott in Ward 4 –along with Mayor Ross Kelterborn will be returning for another term in office. “There’s no lameduck [council],” confirmed Susan Duke, the CAO and Clerk for Wellesley Township. A lame-duck council refers to when 75 per cent of a sitting council does not return to office after an election. During that time, no new laws or decision can be passed to prevent the current council from pre-determining the course of the new council.

pleased the same council will be reconvening when the new term begins in December. “I feel it’s quite a privilege to be acclaimed,” said Kelterborn. “This particular council works together so well as a group. I have been promoting a team approach, not only with council but with staff also, and I feel that that is working very well.” This council, he said, has spent the past four years trying to spend within their means, but his first order of business in the new term will be to rebuild the township’s financial reserves, which were spent during the reces-

BIRDS OF A FEATHER The Elmira Cub pack took a tour of Martha's Mixes Wild Bird Centre Oct. 12, learning from general manager Todd Cowan (right) about the different types of feed and feeders that suit the local wildlife. At left, Max Campbell and Connor Maxwell assemble bird feeders for use at home.

wasn’t until the close of nominations that we actually found out we would not be holding an election.” There will be a central polling station at the Wellesley Community Centre, along with another poll at the Pond View Retirement Village so that voting is more available to senior residents in the area. In the end, having an acclaimed council may be in the best interest of the township, said Duke. From a consistency standpoint, by not having to put the current council on hold until after the election will help them get more accomplished and to carry on with business as usual. Kelterborn agrees, noting he hopes that because all five members of council were acclaimed that means the residents of Wellesley are happy with the job they have done, and the progress that has occurred since the last election. “I’ve enjoyed the last four years, working with the people I deal with at the council level, the staff level, and the constituents who I feel are very understandable. It’s been a very enjoyable time for me.”

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Voter Notice

Township of Wellesley The Elections will be held in Wellesley Township on October 25, 2010 for the French Speaking Public School Board and Regional Chairman. All local council positions have been acclaimed. If you wish to vote please carry appropriate identification. For more information see the Township website or call 519.699.4611 www.township.wellesley.on.ca


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

7 NEWS

Food bank: Recession still taking its toll, demand for food remains high time of the year. Last weeks Oktoberfest celebrations in Kitchener-Waterloo helped the cause as well; nearly 8,000 kilograms of food and $13,000 in donations were collected at the 42nd annual Oktoberfest Thanksgiving parade on Monday. And for those interested in donating to the food drive, there are several local initiatives as well. From Oct. 13 to 16, Farm Credit Canada’s

> CONTINUED FROM COVER to a number of local organizations throughout the region. Across Canada, 800,000 Canadians make use of a food bank each month, 37 per cent of which are children, according to Food Banks Canada. Essential items such as rice, stews, chili, canned fruit, beans in sauce and peanut butter are those that typically get depleted most quickly and are in the highest demand at this

annual Drive Away Hunger Tour rolled through southwest Ontario. The food drive, which began back in 2004, involves tractors travelling through communities to collect food and cash donations for local food banks. The tour has collected more than 3.5 million pounds of food since its inception. The Region of Waterloo Public Library is also preparing for its 10th annual Food for Fines food drive at local

branches of the library, which runs from Oct. 19 to the 23. “It’s an excellent way for us to contribute back to the community, which is really the goal of the public library,” said Rebecca Knapp, coordinator of communications at the library. Donating one non-perishable food item will erase up to $2 in overdue book fines at the library, and there is no restriction on the size of fine you can pay off through your donation.

“A lot of times people will run up fines, and then be afraid to come back to the library, so this is a great way for people to give back to the community while wiping out their fines.” In 2009 the library collected 2,857 pounds of food and waived $3,782.20 in fines, up from 2,842 pounds and $3,343.30 in 2008. Campbell said it is these sorts of community initiatives which promote interest in donating to the food bank,

as well as increase awareness of just how many people rely on its services. “Although it’s dropping slightly, it still hasn’t dropped back down to what it was to prior to the recession two years ago,” she noted. “I think we’re all very busy, there’s a lot going on in our community and in people’s lives, and we do need those reminders that it takes all of us to pitch in as much as we can to help.”

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NEWS 8

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

Cleanup can be a thankless task Crews still going door-to-door in Elmira checking on extent of Chemtura spill Katie Edmonds

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eeling a little overwhelmed about cleaning up around the yard before fall gets too far along? Try trading places with workers from Winmar, busily tackling perhaps hundreds of Elmira homes affected by the Sept. 27 chemical release at Chemtura Canada. Crews were given the task of cleaning off the thousands of brown specks that landed on rooftops, eaves troughs, patio decks and lawn chairs after 4,200 kilograms of the chemical BLE 25 vented into the atmosphere to rain down on parts of the town. The extensive cleanup process was left in the hands of environmental engineering firm Conestoga-Rovers & Associates and Winmar Property Restoration Specialists, called in to Elmira to visit homes and schools on Chemtura’s behalf. Crews are now conducting door-to-door assessments in the neighbourhood to determine which properties will need to be cleaned. If the substance is found, the company starts a cleanup consisting of wiping down exterior surfaces such as windowsills, door knobs

and handles. “It looks like someone took a paintbrush with dark brown paint and just flicked it,” said Darrin Drake, a customer care representative from Guelph-based Winmar of the BLE 25 splatter. “Some properties have a lot of the speckles, and for others it’s just a few spots here and there.” The treatment being used on all the outdoor surfaces is Citrusolv, an orange-smelling product that's a superconcentrated, biodegradable, non-toxic, all-purpose degreaser designed to remove soils such as oil, tar, grease, crayon, lipstick and rubber tire marks, which are normally removed by high pH cleaners or dangerous solvents. “It seems to be working well so far,” said Drake about the many litres of Citrusolv already dispensed. “But I probably won’t be eating any oranges for the next few months.” Drake has found that although the product is doing a fairly good job of cleaning most surfaces, there are some materials which have remained stained, even after the scrubbing. “It [BLE 25] seems to stick to some surfaces more than others,”

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he said. “Some of the older plastics are still showing some signs of staining. It’s sort of a trial-and-error basis to see what works and what doesn’t.” When residents with affected properties are approached by Winmar they are given three options: the homeowner can have the cleaning crew come by their home and perform the wipe-down at an unknown time; have the cleanup done at a time designated by the homeowner; or not participate in the cleanup at all. Winmar staff has been met with a wide variety of reactions to their arrival at the doorsteps of Elmira residents, some of whom are happy to comply with the process, while others have taken out their frustrations with the situation on the cleaners there to help. “Most people are pretty receptive. They appreciate that we are out there doing what we are doing, but none of our clients are ever happy when we arrive,” Drake admitted. “We are there because their basement has three feet of water in it or their house has just burnt down, or their kids are sick from mold. It takes a certain type of person to do this job.” Drake anticipated that the job would be finished sometime next week, and encouraged residents to call their 24-hour emergency line at 519-826-0000 if there were any immediate concerns. Chemtura also has a cleanup hotline set up at 519-6691671, ext. 313. “We understand that people are frustrated with what has happened,” concluded Drake. “And we are here to find a solution. We want to focus on how to solve this and make it better.”


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

9 NEWS

Chemtura: Health fair to provide info Processes about local resources James Jackson under E review

»KATIE EDMONDS PHOTO

Eric Grinwis What do you like most about being a pipe layer? How long have you been doing it? I love everything about it. I love the job, I love the people, I love the work. I’ve been doing it for about two years now. What is your favourite part of the job? There are a lot of favourites.

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Hersgott Rd.

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Hawkesville, 3555 Broadway St. Mon. - Sat. 10 -5 Closed Evenings & Sundays 519-699-6140 Elizabeth

Victoria Rd

an antioxidant in the making of some rubber products, ended up showering down on a large swath of the town, covering homes, cars and lawns with brown, tar-like specks. The cleanup remains a top priority, with restoration teams, engineers and insurance adjusters out meeting with affected residents. The zone follows a 1.5-kilometre swath southwest of the Erb Street facility. The company has pledged to cover the cost of all damage. With the ongoing investigation, Chemtura is looking to prevent a similar occurrence. “We haven’t finalized all the corrective actions,” said Este, adding the company “will determine what is the best way to prevent this kind of event in the future.” Some 4,200 kilograms of BLE 25 were sent into the environment when the heating of a storage container created too much pressure within the vessel. When pressure increased, a builtin relief valve released the material. Some of the material escaped through a vent and out into the open air. While the system performed as designed – releasing the chemical rather than allowing the vessel to rupture – Chemtura is now looking at whether improvements can be made to the procedure. If changes are deemed necessary, they may also be looked at for the manufacturing process of other chemicals at the plant if applicable, said Este. The information will also be shared with other Chemtura plants elsewhere, he added. While the investigation is well along, the company has no timeline for a report. “We have no specifics at this time. We want to do a thorough job.”

ven longtime township residents may not be fully versed in the health services available to them. Bringing the information under one roof is the goal of this year’s Woolwich and Wellesley Adult Health Fair, the 21st annual iteration of which goes next Thursday, Oct. 21. This year’s them is “Knowing Your Resources,” which focuses on improving the wellbeing of senior citizens in the region by boosting their knowledge of a wide range of resources that are available in the area. “There’s a lot of health challenges we face as we age,” notes Marilyn Voisin, a member of the health fair planning committee. “There are a lot of agencies out there that provide a great deal of help and we have to know who those agencies are and how to approach them.” The fair, which runs from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., features talks from a wide range of professionals, including Deb Schlichter, director of housing for Waterloo Region; Peter Scheuring from St. Jacobs Chiropractic Clinic; Raza Shah from St. Jacobs Na-

(St. Jacobs)

> CONTINUED FROM COVER

turopathic Clinic; and osteopath Paul Psutka. There are other workshops throughout the day, including ones to help recognize the signs of depression, as well as exercises for seniors to not only keep their body healthy, but their minds alert too. Voisin said that seniors can sometimes have difficulty finding out about the different agencies in the region and the services they provide, which is why the fair started more than 20 years ago. Over two decades, attendance has been quite good for the event, Voisin noted. The numbers reached a peak of about 600 a few years ago, but for the past couple of years attendance has been steady at about 300. This year’s fair will be at Calvary United Church, 48 Hawkesville Rd. in St. Jacobs. In addition to the talks and the displays, the fair also offers free massages and reflexology treatments, as well as bloodpressure readings. “The nurses spend a little time with each person to discuss where they’re at with their blood pressure.” Admission to the fair is free, and donations are accepted.

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Probably breaking cement and bricks to lock the pipe in place by wedging them around the pipe. Do you think the people of Elmira will appreciate the work you’ve done here on Snyder Avenue? I think they will. We’ve had a couple complaints about the dust and for it taking so long. We’ve only been here since

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OPINION 10

THE OBSERVER

OPINION

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

I’ve lived in Elmira for seven years and am somewhat disturbed by what has happened there in my short time here. Bryce Tettman letter on pg. 12

VERBATIM

T

he Harper government has been the only government in the world to be consistently against these major UN initiatives and worse, has been actively working to undermine these treaties and efforts.

> Council of Canadians chairperson Maude Barlow on why Canada lost its bid to win a temporary seat on the UN Security Council

THE MONITOR

T

he impact of compulsory voting is significant. Countries where it is practised have an average turnout rate that is 15 percentage points higher at the federal/national level; the turnout rate at the provincial/regional or local level is even higher.

> IRPP Policy Matters

EDITORIAL

Compulsory voting might be the cure for apathy

A

s with citizens in municipalities across the province, Woolwich residents will go to the polls in just over a week. Yes, there’s an election going on. Few of us seem to have noticed. If voter turnout is any indication, still fewer of us even care. Despite the fact local governments have the most direct impact on our day-to-day lives, only about a quarter of eligible voters will bother to cast a ballot. Such apathy is not aided, of course, by the lack of issues to grab the public’s attention. On the plus side, every seat at the council table is being contested. (It’s a different story in Wellesley, where all the councillors have been acclaimed, and voter turnout is likely to be miniscule for the regional chair and school board trustee positions.) The full slate in Woolwich is likely to encourage more of us to get out

to a polling station. As with the 2006 election and the 2003 vote before that, with no controversy brewing, nobody appears to be talking about the vote. You have to go back to 2000, with the raceway/slots debate and the WalMart project, to find anything resembling public interest. Still, we’ll be doing reasonably well if a third of eligible voters bother to show up. If turnout numbers that dropped to twice that number at the federal level prompted talks of mandatory voting in the past decade, municipal elections could really use the help. The merits of compulsory voting are clear: more people show up. The practice is in place in more than 20 countries, including Australia, Belgium and Greece. On a worldwide average, there is 82 per cent participation at the polls in countries that enforce mandatory voting. Even

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WOOLWICH OBSERVER 20-B Arthur Street North, Elmira, Ontario, Canada N3B 1Z9

> COPYRIGHT

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Joe Merlihan, Publisher | EXT 107 jmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Steve Kannon, Editor | EXT 103 skannon@woolwichobserver.com James Jackson, Reporter | EXT 101 jjackson@woolwichobserver.com Katie Edmonds, Reporter | EXT 102 kedmonds@woolwichobserver.com

> LETTER POLICY

countries which have compulsory voting laws but do not enforce penalties have voter turnout in the 60 to 70 per cent range, which is higher than in Canada. The main argument against such legislation is that it seems out of place with the freedoms typically associated with a democratic system. The wider debate involves the tradeoff between our right to vote and the responsibility that comes with that. Of course, compelling people to vote – say, by issuing a fine if they don’t show up – doesn’t mean they’ll take the time to study the issues and get to know the candidates. And to work fairly, the system would have to account for more declined and spoiled ballots. A none-of-the-above option would also be helpful, even if that “candidate” ended up with a majority. In fact, that would be helpful,

Donna Rudy, Sales Manager | EXT 104 drudy@woolwichobserver.com Pat Merlihan, Production Mgr | EXT 105 pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Jon Sarachman, Production | EXT 108 jsarachman@woolwichobserver.com Lindsay Lehman, Production | EXT 109 llehman@woolwichobserver.com

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making for a better class of politicians next time around. Moreover, mandatory voting would make the results more democratic: the results would indicate the preferences of a real majority of voters. And the results would be fairer, as those most marginalized by elections today – the young and the poor – would be better represented. For today, however, most of us could set a better example by committing to show up at the polls Oct. 25. Municipal politicians have a significant impact on your lives – they look after the roads you drive on, the parks you use, services such as water and sewage and they set your property tax rates. Their decisions affect the very community where you live – certainly that merits taking a bit of time to make an informed choice and allocating a few minutes to marking an “X.”

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

11 OPINION

Israel moves to undermine the peace process W

ith this law Israel buys an exit ticket from the family of nations, wrote Israeli journalist Nahum Barnea last week in the newspaper Yedioth Ahronoth. “The proposed loyalty law ... is really racist. It obliges non-Jews to declare that they would be loyal to the Jewish state but exempts Jews from this obligation.” But Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s proposed new law is not racist, just short-sighted and nasty. It is really about foreign policy: Netanyahu has also just demanded that the Palestinian Authority recognize Israel as a “Jewish and democratic state.” Back in 1977, prime minister Menachem Begin said exactly the opposite: “We do not (demand that) our right to exist in the land of our fathers be recognized.” “It is a different recognition which is required between us and our neighbours,” Begin continued: “Recognition of sovereignty and of the mutual need for a life of peace and understanding.” In other words, take the concrete steps that Israel needs for a peaceful and secure future, and don’t demand that everybody else subscribes to your own philosophical self-description. Begin observed that principle in the peace treaty he signed with Egypt in 1979. And Yitzhak Rabin used the same language in the 1994 peace treaty with Jordan. In both treaties the parties recognize each other’s sovereignty, integrity, and political independence, but there is not a word about Israel’s Jewishness. That’s an internal issue for Israelis (who are, in any case, divided about the definition of who is really a Jew). Defining a country in ethnic and/ or religious terms sounds racist to

THE VIEW FROM HERE

International Affairs GWYNNE DYER people who live in multicultural societies like Canada, the United States, India or South Africa, but it is actually quite common. Few people object to the “blood and soil” definitions of nationality that prevail in Germany and Japan, or to states that proclaim themselves to be Islamic republics. On one condition: that they do not treat their ethnic or religious minorities as second-class citizens. Israel’s constitution declared it to be a “Jewish state” way back in 1948, but in theory its laws apply equally to all its citizens including the 20 per cent Arab minority. (In practice, Israeli citizens of Arab descent have a hard time, but Israeli governments use the shield of sovereignty and say that that is a purely domestic issue.) Netanyahu’s predecessors avoided any mention of Israel’s “right to exist” or its Jewish character when they made peace treaties with Egypt and Jordan because real sovereign states do not negotiate these matters with other governments. A different approach was needed for the Palestinians in the occupied territories, because they didn’t have a state yet. When Israel finally began talking to the Palestine Liberation Organization in the early 90s, Yitzhak Rabin demanded that the PLO publicly recognize Israel’s right to exist. (It complied in 1993.) However, Rabin never asked the Palestinians to acknowledge the

“Jewishness” of the Israeli state, because that would be a deal-breaker. You can’t ask Palestinians whose parents or grandparents were driven from their homes during the 1948 war, and were not allowed to go home again after the fighting ended because that would undermine the “Jewishness” of the new state, to accept that definition as legitimate. All you can ask, if you really want peace with them, is that they accept the reality of the Israeli state and recognize its borders. So when Binyamin Netanyahu raised the ante last week by demanding that the Palestinians recognize Israel specifically as a Jewish state (and not just a sovereign state), Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas replied: “Name yourself the Hebrew Socialist Republic – it is none of my business.” Israel can call itself whatever it wants and define itself however it likes, but it cannot demand that other states accept those definitions. So why would Netanyahu make such a demand if he wants the peace talks to succeed? He doesn’t. He is unwilling to face the huge political crisis that would erupt if he agreed to withdraw all or even many of the half-million Jewish settlers who have colonized large parts of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip (the land that the Palestinians still controlled after 1948). Since that would necessarily be part of any peace deal, he doesn’t actually want one. But he can’t say that, because it would infuriate Washington. The United States is Israel’s vital ally, and President Barack Obama really does want a peace deal, so Netanyahu must wreck it without making

THE VOICE

What have you done to celebrate Oktoberfest?

“I went to the parade with my seven-year-old daughter and we had a blast.” > Melissa Fockler

“I was working the whole time, so I don’t get to go to any of it.” > Calvin Shantz

> SEE DYER ON PG. 14 BY SCOTT ARNOLD

“We took in the parade. We don’t go to the festhalls really but we like to check out the other events.” > Ron Beaupre

The candidates may come and go, but there's always one constant in municipal elections: voter apathy, signed, sealed and delivered.

“We probably shouldn’t publish that information. Ziggy zaggy, ziggy zaggy, Oi! Oi! Oi!” > Allie Vignault


OPINION 12

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

Electricity price hikes come at a political cost U

tilities are something we take for granted: nothing we really want as consumers, just something we need. The cheaper the better. Which is why we have a strong reaction to price increases, especially the large ones we’ve seen on our electricity bills. It tends to rankle because we’re getting nothing more for all that extra money. The recent rate increases announced by Waterloo North Hydro – its portion is up 18.5 per cent – is part of the trend going back more than a decade when the province started tinkering with what was then Ontario Hydro. The organization that once served Ontarians was split into two – Ontario Power Generation and Hydro One – by the Harris government, which planned to privatize the industry. All-out privatization was scrapped, however, when rates rose alarmingly, striking fear into politicians not eager to face an angry electorate. But the damage was done. As electrical power industry consultant Andy Frame, formerly a senior adviser to the Ministry of Energy, has noted, the changes shifted the public-good focus of the electrical utility envisioned by Adam Beck back in 1906. “In 1998, Jim Wilson, minister of energy in the Mike Harris government, declared that the Adam Beck vision was over, and a new vision for Hydro has arrived. The electric power system in Ontario would be operated

From the Editor Steve Kannon like a private business, and it would have lower cost and lower rates,” he writes in a recent opinion piece. “Twelve years later, we now know that the cost of electricity in Ontario for residential, commercial and industrial customers is more than twice the 1998 rate, and that jobs have been lost because of high electricity rates.” Profits and dividends. Increased taxes on operations. Special levies for green energy. Debt-retirement charges. Conservation fees. These and other changes have contributed to increased costs passed on to consumers. Add in the HST and the impact has been dramatic. And we’re nowhere near out of the woods yet. The province is paying high rates to green producers – multiples of what it sells the electricity for – to encourage alternatives. The shortfall is costing Ontario millions of dollars today, when very few of the projects are online. Unless the pricing structure changes, our bills will be larger still if alternatives reach the 25-per-cent level targeted by the McGuinty government. Understandably, McGuinty has

been taking heavy fire for the rate increases. His defence makes perfect sense, but it’s not what we want to hear. As with water rates locally, the plan is to have consumer pay the real cost of providing the services. Theoretically, that means no more subsidies from general coffers. It means covering the cost of replacing aging infrastructure. It means paying more to replace cheap, but dirty coal-fired plants with something cleaner. In short, past mistakes and poor policies have returned to haunt us. Add in the HST and other taxes – the ones we naturally fixate on – and the package gets scarier still. The McGuinty government has not been effective to date in addressing consumer concerns, namely soaring rates and security of supply. Substantial efforts are needed on the conservation and alternativesupply fronts to tackle the long-term issues we face in maintaining a safe, abundant and – equally important – affordable electrical system in place for Ontarians. The Ontario Energy Board (OEB) says rate increases would promote conservation, giving consumers an incentive to use power outside of peak demand periods – typically between 4 and 9 p.m., especially during the winter and summer months. This is giving rise to smart meters, with an eye toward charging us more for electricity based on the

time of day. Doing your laundry and cooking at, say, 2 a.m. would prevent you from paying more, as would avoiding electric heat in the dead of winter and air conditioning on the most stifling of summer days. Unfortunately, peak time is identified as that time when most of us need electricity: if the house is empty all day because we’re at work and school, there’s no usage going on. Ditto for the wee hours when most of us are asleep. Critics have called the smart meter program a failure, and with good reason. Costs have been higher for many of those using the meters – to add insult to injury, they’re paying for the meters too – though the government has said it will look at lowering off-peak rates to make participation more rewarding. The NDP argues customers are paying an average of seven per cent more after having smart meters installed, a program that has cost the province $1.5 billion. About 80 per cent of Toronto Hydro customers, for instance, are paying more under the program. Still, changes are necessary. And that means increases, though not necessarily at the rate we’re experiencing today. Either way, the McGuinty government is going to take flak for making us think about our utility bills, and for spending money on something that isn’t a shiny new consumer product.

I were riding our horses and bicycles over the lands she wants to claim for the exclusive use of her own family. Get out. Move into a gated community surrounded by razor wire, and teach your children to huddle inside, counting every stranger as a rapist and murderer. Leave Wellesley for people who understand that real community is built by neighbours who gather in parks, jog on trails and have kids who bicycle along those trails. Getting people outside, walking throughout their neighbourhoods increases safety and connections for all who live there. I’ve seen this safety and community during long evening strolls through the streets of Paris and other European cities. Just don’t move near my home in Waterloo. We only want people who smile at each other on Walter Bean Trail, chat in RIM Park, push strollers along Ironhorse Trail and gather in a happy crowd in Waterloo Town Square. By the way, my house backs onto one of the busiest sections of University Avenue, and I managed to raise three kids without any abductions or rapes. Just a vibrant neighbourhood filled with playing kids, families who shared street parties, greeted each other while taking evening strolls and made sure we watched over everybody’s children. > Linda Stortz, Waterloo

Don't tar all priests

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

No excuse for lack of failsafes at Chemtura To the Editor, I’m writing in response to the recent chemical release that took place at Chemtura. I have 14 years experience programming industrial control (automation) equipment for places that influence the environment, such as pulp and paper mills, water/wastewater treatment plants, steel mills, rubber manufacturers, mining sites and automotive plants. With the availability of automation equipment and technology nowadays, excuses for occurrences like this have all but run out. Safety and process control systems can be designed with sufficient interlocks and measures put into place to prevent accidents from happening (the correct term is making the system “failsafe”). That being said, one would think that if you’re operating so closely to a community that you would have these in place. Apparently not. Or at least not enough. I’ve lived in Elmira for seven years and am somewhat disturbed by what has happened there in my short time here. Although I haven’t looked, I would be willing to bet that many other places that have a much greater environmental impact (e.g. nuclear)

have a better track record than a facility such as Chemtura (Elmira). I am a supporter of industries and communities being next door to each other if it is in a positive, responsible manner. Off topic, the biogas plant that is proposed should be fine as long as it is properly implemented. What will truly dictate this is how well the facility is designed and operated. We as a community cannot be the “not in my backyard” type. If all communities were to be like this, then some excellent opportunities at communitiy development and growth would be lost. But we as a community should also pass this message along to facilities that repeatedly cause problems like this: shape up or shut down. > Bryce Tettman, Elmira

Opponents to Bast Trail should move to gated community To the Editor, Regarding the Bast Trail issue in Wellesley, what fortified castle did Jillian Koehle grow up in that she parachutes into my old home town and tries to rebuild it into a monstrous, gated ghetto? Forty years ago my friends and

To the Editor, Mr. Nullmeyer’s rebuttal to my critique of Gwynne Dyer’s column (Letters, Observer, Oct. 9/10) contains errors that I need to address. First, it is claimed that I attacked Dyer’s opinions about “hundreds of thousands of [abusing] priests.” Dyer did not make that exaggerated claim and neither did I. Second, it is implied that I am not sufficiently disgusted by the abusive behaviour of the guilty priests. I presume Mr. Nullmeyer missed my statement that the “fact that sexual abuse of children should happen at all is a horrific fact.” In his letter, he also states that I am comparing these abusive priests to the “7% of the general population who were raped as boys.” This erroneous statistic was not stated in my article and I made no comparison of any kind between these two groups in my letter. In fact, I am in agreement with Mr. Nullmeyer that these abusing priests are evil hypocrites. I have witnessed the devastating impact of these horrific acts on the relationships of a close friend. However, even that does not change the fact that 99 per cent of our priests are wonderful men of God that do not deserve to be stained by faulty arguments and exaggerated numbers. > David Wang, Elmira


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

13 BUSINESS

BUSINESS Your eyes do all the talking T

hey say that the eyes are the window into a person’s soul. For Susan Young, a certified iridologist, the eyes are also a window into your health and well-being. Young has been trained to look into your eyes, and based on the markings and colour of that eye, she can understand the imbalances of your body and make suggestions on how to improve your health. “I’m looking at the iris, which is the coloured part of the eye,” she explained, sitting in her office which she shares with St. Jacobs Naturopathic Clinic. “From that, you have thousands of nerve endings that go from the back of the eye up to our brain and nervous system, down your spine, and into all the organs of your body.” When a part of the body is unbalanced, or not operating the way it should, the nerve endings attached to the eye pull back and leave a unique marking on your eye, she said. And it is from those markings that she can uncover areas of concern within the body and how to sort the problem out. Young has two locations for her company Eye Talk, in Stratford and Listowel. She is at her Stratford office one day per month, and works out of her Lis-

towel home on Monday to Thursday evenings. As of this week, she also shares Dr. Raza Shah’s office in St. Jacobs on the second Tuesday of every month. “I do have a lot of clients that travel from Elmira, Guelph, and Cambridge up to Listowel, so it just made more sense for me to be here once a month and it’s just easier for people to see me while they’re working.” Young points to a diagram of the human eye, which is subdivided into dozens of different sections with each division representing a different part of the body, from the colon to the brain. She also picks up several photographs of her customers eyes, and begins pointing to the various lines, squiggles, and hazy patches. “You see these rings that are going through the eye there,” she said, pointing to a series of dark rings surrounding the pupil, “those are what you call nerve rings, and that tells me this person worries a lot, the body feels like it’s under stress, and they’re a really uptight person.” She points to another photo of an eye, and points to a hazy blue ring around the outside of the pupil. “When you get a blue haze around the eye, it’s an indicator of iron being really low.” Iridology may seem unorthodox, and many people in Canada have

PHOTO

James Jackson

» JAMES JACKSON

Iridologist sets up shop part-time at St. Jacobs Naturopathic Clinic

THE EYES HAVE IT Susan Young, a certified iridologist, uses a number of tools including an eye scope and a digital camera to look into her patients eyes and help uncover some of the hidden causes of illness. probably never even heard of it. That’s because the government of Canada and many health care professionals such as doctors and optometrists do not recognize iridology the way they do more traditional forms of medicine, and so Young is very limited on the services she can provide her clients. She can suggest changes in their diet, suggest they take certain vitamin or mineral supplements, or refer them to another doctor, but that is about it. “Basically, I’m not allowed to diagnose. I

can’t say ‘you have a heart problem,’ but I can tell them that with their symptoms and the concern within the eye, they should go get it checked out, but through my practice I’m not allowed to say ‘this is what you have’ because we’re not acknowledged.” And that is frustrating for Young, who spent years studying human anatomy and the practice of iridology to get where she is today. She has been a certified iridologist for about two years now, and has attended night

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> SEE EYES ON PG. 14

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classes, written exams and spent time working with other certified iridologists in order to get her accreditation. “When someone is trained to be a doctor, they’re trained a particular way. For example if I come to them and say my head hurts, they’re going to give me something so my head doesn’t hurt. That’s how they were trained, to fix that pain and discomfort that you have.” Yet the emphasis for iridology is on preventative care, and finding the root cause of pain or discomfort, not simply

masking it with pills. “For me, it’s more like ‘OK, you’re getting headaches? What are you eating? What’s going on? Are you grinding your teeth at night?’ I just like to check a little bit closer to figure that out, to me that just makes sense. But that’s how I was taught.” Young’s experience with iridology came, ironically enough, when traditional medicine failed her. After years of suffering terrible headaches, and when traditional doctors couldn’t pinpoint the cause, about 10 years ago a friend told her to visit an iridologist in Kitchener. After her visit, she finally had her answer. Not everyone is as open-minded about the health benefits of alternative medicine. She has had some cases where clients come in and ask for something to make them feel better, but don’t want to correct the root cause of their illness such as their diet. “Sometimes you never hear from them again, and other times it’s so rewarding because you get the call back, ‘I feel so much better,’” she said with a laugh. The iridology appointments can take anywhere from an hour to an hour-and-a-half, and the price can vary as well. She sits down with clients and has

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BUSINESS 14

THE OBSERVER

Get ready for mass produced local food

F

armers’ and food processors’ responsibility for producing safe food is enormous, and the logistics are growing as the local food movement picks up speed. It looks to me like we’re entering a new era – that is, mass produced local food. Here’s why. People are convinced buying local is a priority. According to the province, a recent Environics study shows 80 per cent of Ontarians say ensuring a local food source is very important to them. If you trust polls, that means about 10 million or so Ontarians are on the prowl for local food. And in her Agriculture Week address last week, Carol Mitchell, Ontario’s Minister of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, said more than half of all grocery shoppers in the province are buying more

Food For Thought Owen Roberts Ontario food than ever. That equates to nearly seven million people. Then, just when you think this race car has reached full throttle, the province announces a program to make local food available to people who eat in the cafeterias of hospitals, schools and other public institutions. It’s called the Broader Public Sector Investment Fund, and it’s designed to help connect farmers, food processors, and distributors with schools, hospitals and municipalities. The idea is to

Eyes: An alternative view on health > CONTINUED FROM PG. 13 a one-on-one consultation with a printed photo of their eye, pointing out the various trouble spots and ways to help fix those problems, be it with herbal supplements, dietary changes, or referral to a doctor. She said most of her clients visit two or three times a year, depending on the plan that she has laid out to improve their health.

CLOSE-UP Young prints out a photo of each client’s eyes during the consultation.

Dyer: Moves undermine peace talks > CONTINUED FROM PG. 12 it look like Israel’s fault. Step one, late last month, was to refuse to extend the partial moratorium on new construction in the Jewish settlements that he agreed to late last year. The Palestinians had already said publicly that they would end the talks if he did that, and most people abroad don’t blame them for that. How can they be expected to negotiate while the Israelis were still expanding the Jewish settlements on their territory? But something else was needed to shift the blame for the collapse of the talks decisively

onto the shoulders of the Palestinians. That something was Netanyahu’s declaration that he will renew the settlement freeze only if the Palestinians acknowledge Israel as a Jewish democratic state. He knew they couldn’t accept that offer, which is why he made it. The proposed law requiring new citizens to swear allegiance to Israel as a “Jewish and democratic state” is just window-dressing to divert the attention of foreigners, especially Americans, from his real strategy. It will badly hurt Israel’s image overseas, but it is not racist. It is just ugly and self-serving.

increase the amount of Ontario food purchased by the broader public sector. This is huge. I suspect the movement is catching fire faster and wider than any local food proponent ever dreamed of. Farmers recognize the opportunity. Some even see the magnitude. Bette Jean Crews, president of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture, which represents most of the farmers in the province, has been pushing for a national food strategy to make sure the pieces are in place for farmers to not only stake their claim, but also to meet demand. She says it will require a united effort involving all participants in the food chain, from farmers to retailers to consumers. There’ll be no place for any party to take advantage of the other. “Cheap food is on the farmers’ back,” she says. “This can’t go on.” Crews, who earlier this week announced she’ll seek another term as president when the federation holds its annual meeting next month, says local food represents an unprecedented chance for Ontario farmers to educate consumers about the food system. She’s right – farmers are needed to put some meat on the bones of the local food movement. It’s not only permeated our culture, it’s even becoming a part of municipal political agendas. At a food forum in Guelph Tuesday, Mayor

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

Karen Farbridge said municipalities and the community “certainly” have a role to play in local food production. One of those roles will be food safety. Creative, entrepreneurial efforts will be made to mass produce local food, far beyond the relatively safe confines of the farmers’ market and unlike anything municipalities have encountered in the modern era. Part of the appeal of local food is that it harkens back to simpler times that are romanticized by some consumers, but viewed with caution by those who understand food production is a business as well as a passion. Victoria Sandilands, an avian scientist from the Scottish Agricultural College, delivered this year’s Presant memorial lecture at the University of Guelph Wednesday night. Briefly addressing the local food issue, she said interest in backyard chicken coops in the UK fell off when avian flu arrived. Consumers realized some aspects of food production are better left to professionals. Indeed, it’s one thing to grow vegetables and sell them at your roadside stand or market; animal agriculture is another thing altogether. But it will be an increasingly pertinent matter as we grow towards the inevitable mass production of local food.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

15 LIVING HERE

LIVING HERE

A diagnosis rarer than the affliction? Trying to Elmira woman suffered with lyme disease long before she knew it

PHOTO

Jackie Murdock woke up one morning last December feeling terrible. She had all the symptoms of a bad case of the flu, so she called in to her workplace and asked for the day off. Then, on New Year’s Eve, the feeling had only gotten worse so she checked herself into hospital and told the doctors about her persistent nausea, debilitating fatigue, muscle pains and twitches and heart palpitations. She was sent home and told that she likely had a sinus infection. But the symptoms didn’t stop there. Over the following few months she began to experience blurred vision, dizziness and finally tingling and numbness in various parts of her body. “I knew I didn’t just have the flu,” she said from her Elmira home. “It just didn’t add up.” Then, after a series of tests including three MRIs, two CT scans, a lumbar puncture and extensive balance testing, Murdock asked her doctor if she could be tested for Lyme disease which she had read about on the Internet. Her test came back positive in July, nearly eight months after she began feeling the effects. “I have been off work ever since,” she said of her past employment at Leisureworld Caregiving Centre. “I had just come off of maternity leave and couldn’t take any more sick days so I had to leave.” Lyme disease is caused by a bite from an infected tick. It is a bacterial infection that without antibiotics can cause serious, chronic

» KATIE EDMONDS

KATIE EDMoNDs

A LEArNING EXPErIENcE Jackie Murdock’s case of Lyme disease went undetected for eight months, not an uncommon occurrence, she says. illness often mistaken for arthritis, lupus, chronic fatigue syndrome or multiple sclerosis. “A tick can be as small as a poppy seed,” explained Murdock. “A common belief is that when you get a tick bite you will see a bull’s-eye shaped rash, but I didn’t see that. I don’t have any memory of being bitten by a tick.” The hesitancy from medical professionals to diagnose Lyme disease comes from the reliance on outdated information from health authorities that suggests the ticks that carry the disease generally don’t migrate this far north, said Murdock. “They say that you can’t get the disease in this re-

gion, but I haven’t travelled more than an hour and a half from here. The disease is something that doctors in Canada don’t seem to know much about,” she said of her drawn-out diagnosis. “Patients get tested for all kinds of things and when the tests come back negative, they are sometimes treated like they are crazy or like it’s all in their head.” There were, however, 79 reported cases in Ontario last year, though patient advocates, including Murdock, believe the rates of infection are far greater than that. Though there is a standard test for Lyme disease in Canada (ELISA, or enzymelinked immunosorbent serum assay), Murdock and

other patient advocates believe it’s not rigorous enough and often inaccurate. “I am sure that there are more people out there who are suffering with symptoms and they aren’t getting the answers from their doctors. It’s important to get the word out to people that it is here, and to be aware of the signs and symptoms before they get worse.” Since being diagnosed, Murdock has been put on antibiotics which she has been told will take between six months and a year to take effect, if not longer. Still unable to work, Murdock experiences blurred vision, a ringing in her ears, insomnia, joint pain, muscle weakness, dizziness and fatigue. When she wakes up in the morning, she takes her prescribed antibiotics, takes a shower and gets dressed. Those activities alone are enough to tire her out and she needs to sit down or even have a nap. “My son has to go to a babysitter every day because I don’t know if I will be alert enough to take care of him,” she said. “It’s sad and very frustrating.” Murdock hopes that she can come together with other Lyme disease sufferers to talk about their experiences and work towards getting more accurate information out to the public about the disease. She and other patients in the Waterloo Region plan

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> SEE LYME ON PG.16

lose weight? Keep eating!

Get healthy Stay healthy samuel & stacy Lancaster After reviewing food journals from many of my clients I’m astounded at how many of you out there under-eat. If you are someone trying to lose weight is that such a bad thing? You may reason that you are trying to lose weight, so isn’t that the idea – eat less, exercise more? It is a very common misconception that the way to lose weight is to restrict your caloric intake and increase your level of exercise. When you restrict your food intake your body goes into “starvation mode.” Your body will slow down your metabolism to conserve energy because it thinks it’s in a famine. It’s wonderful that our bodies are designed to protect us this way if in fact that was the case. However, we all know we are not in a famine. When you continually diet, restrict your food intake, don’t eat when you are hungry, and increase your physical activity, your metabolism slows down and makes it difficult for you to lose weight. In fact, just because a person is obese, doesn’t even mean that they are eating that much; it’s usually the opposite: they don’t eat enough. > SEE FITNESS ON PG.17

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LIVING HERE 16

THE OBSERVER

MY sPAcE

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

> WANT TO HAVE YOUR HOME OR WORKSPACE FEATURED? pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com

WHo? Jerry Dietrich

2

Beehaven Apiary owner

WHErE?

6

5

9

Honey Production Graham St., Alma

8

1) HoNEY

> This is Jerry’s creamed and

churned honey stash he keeps to sell to his local customers. Jerry prefers the churned: it’s easier to spread than the creamed.

7

4

10

1

2) cALENDAr

> The ‘Bee Girls’ calendar is an

annual fundraiser for the Ontario Beekeeper’s Association, with funds going to bee research. Within the year the Tech Transfer Team that conducts the research will be focused on the small hive beetle that is expected to invade from the U.S.

3

11 11

3) DIsPLAY UNIT

> An observation hive is a great

prop for school and church groups that get a tour of his facility. The photographs of a bee colony at work were taken by Paul Kelly, the official University of Guelph beekeeper.

4) HoNEY sUPErs

> These stacked boxes are called

honey supers. There are two sizes: deep ones which will produce 45-50lbs of honey, and shallow ones that garner around 35lbs. Jerry has about 350 supers, and about 100 different hives on farms

surrounding Alma.

5) scALE

> An industrial-sized scale at least

50 years old sits in the storage bay of Beehaven. Jerry uses it to weigh the barrels of honey that he wholesales. Each barrel will hold 600lbs of honey. He bought this scale from the Guelph Soap Factory in Elora when they switched to a digital version.

6) sMoKEr

main container is filled with wood shavings that are lit and the bellows create a nice cool smoke. Jerry says the bees sense a threat to the hive and start to ingest their honey, which calms them down. Jerry is able to swap out the supers without harming the bees or getting stung in the process.

7) cHUrN

> Jerry’s brother-in-law custom-

made this honey churn for him. A beater inside the tube spins at 100 rpm aerating the honey. Crystals

> Jerry’s smoker makes easy

work of handling his bees. The

in the honey attach themselves to the bubbles, which makes churned honey creamier as it hardens.

8) BoTTLING TANK

> 300lbs of honey can be stored in

this tank and kept at a temperature of 85°F, the same as a typical hive. Beehaven produces about five tons of honey per year. Jerry has a variety of honey products that he sells at a stand in downtown Alma and smaller retail stores. He has a steady supply of customers that like to buy directly from him.

9) EXTrAcTor

> The stainless steel vessel in the

corner uses centrifugal force to extract all remaining honey from the comb sheaths. Four sheaths spin inside, shooting honey to the walls that are drained and put in a holding tank..

10) UNcAPPING TANK

> Underneath the lid is a large

basin for comb sheaths to hang while they drip. The walls of the tank are filled with water which can be heated to make the honey more malleable. On top is a

standard issue bee veil. Bees like to travel upwards, so the veil is tied tightly across the chest. It’s a more of a nuisance when bees get under the veil. Jerry buys his supplies in Cambridge.

11) BEEs WAX

> When bees store their honey in

combs, they cap it with wax. Jerry scrapes the caps using a pronged scraper as well as applying heat. Jerry’s wife Jane makes beeswax candles, but most of the wax is melted down and sold for research.

Now’s the time for a cake that can’t be beet “A Cake In the House” – this is how Mennonite country’s favourite foodie and author, Edna Staebler, spoke of some of her amazing cake recipes. She talked about cake like it is something you should have in the house every day. For instance, if a friend calls to come over for a coffee, the obvious thing to do is to quickly get a cake in the oven to enjoy. Well this was sort of an inspiration for our ‘Cake in the House.’ A cake that uses some unusual ingredients that are season right now, a cake that can be served with coffee or as a decadent dessert, and a cake that keeps moist and fresh for days ‘in the house.’ Edna would say, however, that the cake is so good that it could never last for more than a day. What we wanted to do was to integrate some of the seasonal vegetables from the market and from gardens. Sometimes you just have so much of one thing that you don’t know what to do with it, and one of those things is beets. We’ve used the glorious beet before in such things as traditional borscht soup. Now it was time to be untraditional and get the dark, earthy beet in a cake. Beets, along with sweet carrots in this cake are the secret to its decadent moisture. Carrots right now are at their peak – much sweeter after the first frost. Now according to some (or most!)

From The Chef's Table Kirstie Herbstreit & Jody o'Malley

Beet, Carrot and Chocolate Cake > 1 cup sugar > 1/2 cup oil > 3/4 cup grated carrot > 1/2 cup grated beet > 2 eggs > 1 tsp baking soda > 1/4 tsp cinnamon > 1/4 tsp salt > 2-1/2 tbsp cocoa powder > 1 cup flour a cake isn’t a cake unless it is chocolate. The chocolate in this cake enriches it even more, and really compliments the flavour of the beets. We’ve topped it with a chocolate ganache icing, which is equal parts of 35% cream and chocolate.

Here, it is important to use really good quality chocolate. Lindt is great, and available at Vincenzo’s in Waterloo, and at other specialty bakeshops or bulk stores. You can also double this entire recipe and bake it in a 9x13 pan, if you have a lot of friends coming over! Grease an eight-inch springform cake pan (butter bottoms and sides, place a circle of parchment paper on the bottom and butter again); In a large bowl, cream together sugar and oil; Add carrot and beet and eggs; mix well; Sift dry ingredients into wet; mix well; Scrape into springform pan and bake at 350°F for 40-45 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean; cool completely; remove from pan; Serve drizzled with chocolate ganache.

Chocolate Ganache > 1 cup 35% cream > 1 cup 70% dark Lindt chocolate Heat cream just to boiling; Pour over chocolate and stir until all melted; Drizzle over cake slices, or cool ganache slightly and ice the entire cake.

> Chefs Kirstie Herbstreit and Jody O’Malley

are both Red Seal certified chefs. Together they run the company YouCanCook2, specializing in interactive dinner parties. You can also find them cooking at Entertaining Elements in St. Jacobs,where they hold private dinners for eight people. To contact the chefs, visit their website www.youcancook2.com.

Lyme: Support group gets underway > CONTINUED FROM PG.15 to meet every second Tuesday of the month at the Church of Holy Saviour in Waterloo and form a support group. The next meeting is planned for Nov. 9 at 7:30 p.m. “I am so looking forward to the day when this is in the past,” she said. “I can’t wait to get back to

work, to be able to do things with my son and to just live a normal life again.” To contact Murdock about her experience or where she sought treatment, email fightlymedisease@ hotmail.com. For more information about Lyme disease in Canada, visit www.canlyme.com.


THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, October 16, 2010

17 LIVING HERE

sUDoKU

THE crossWorD

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> soLUTIoNs: Find the answers to all of the puzzles on pg. 29

Across



1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Silent Springâ&#x20AC;? subject 4. Beg 9. ___ lily 13. Have a complexion with a strong bright colour 17. Victorian, for one 18. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because ___ Youngâ&#x20AC;? (1960 Dick Clark movie) 19. Plants with slender grasslike leaves and white or yellow or purple flowers 21. Ancient alphabetic character 22. A marriage for expediency rather than love 26. A measuring instrument for angles to a celestial body 27. Keisters 28. Maintained 29. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Garden of Earthly Delightsâ&#x20AC;? artist 30. Balkan native 31. Part of â&#x20AC;&#x153;the worksâ&#x20AC;? 32. A plant fibre used for stuffing and insulation 35. Acquire 38. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Star ___â&#x20AC;? 42. A debt instrument issued by a bank; usually pays interest 44. Anniversary, e.g. 45. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beetle Baileyâ&#x20AC;? dog 46. Clickable image 47. Attracted 48. Breathe hard 49. word to indicate a great extent or degree 50. Assn. 51. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Uh-uhâ&#x20AC;? 54. Introduces an alternative 56. Cram, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;upâ&#x20AC;? 57. ___-bodied 59. Expression used in prayer 60. Gauchoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weapon 61. LagerlĂśfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Wonderful Adventures of ___â&#x20AC;? 62. Evidence that cannot be used to prove belief or disbelief 73. Apprentice 74. Dye after knotting the fabric to produce an irregular pattern 75. ___ dark space (region in a vacuum tube) 76. Ziti, e.g. 78. Alternative to a fence 81. Blow 85. Cover by strewing 88. The posterior part of the mandible that is more or less vertical



















 





















































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90. Neighbor of Georgia 92. Articles capitalized as an abbreviation for the official company name 95. An imaginary place considered to be perfect or ideal 96. A soft mineral that is fluorescent in ultraviolet light 97. The earth 98. Big jerk 99. Catch 100. Airport pickup 101. Brace 102. Cousin of -trix Down 1. Retire from military service 2. Harsh Athenian lawgiver 3. A small open pie with a fruit filling 4. Excellent, in modern slang 5. One of the supports for a piece of furniture 6. #13



























7. Rise to oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s feet 8. Hold off 9. Sean Connery, for one 10. Coastal raptors 11. Statehouse V.I.P. 12. Daughter of Oceanus and Tethys (Greek mythology) 13. Woodlands in full leaf 14. Air bag? 15. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ bitten, twice shyâ&#x20AC;? 16. Garden intruder 18. Soldierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s helmet, slangily 20. Awaiting something 23. An extortionate rent 24. Italian explorer who discovered the mainland of N. America 25. 1969 Peace Prize grp. 30. Schuss, e.g. 31. Big galoot 33. The ratio of the circumference to the diameter of a circle 34. Connects a noun with the preceding word



 







36. Have an existence 37. In the direction of 39. Relating or belonging to the science of astronomy 40. Baptism, for one 41. House 42. Chocolate source 43. Broad white collar worn over the lapels of a jacket 44. Business slumps 52. Oil often used in a religious ceremony of blessing 53. Cravings 55. To adopt again 56. A knight honoured for valour higher command 57. Not much 58. Scrawny 63. in or of _____ 64. English poet (1887-1964) 65. Caribbean, e.g. 66. A public promotion of some product or service 67. The x in dimensions

68. A proven statement used to argue another statement 69. Big wine holder 70. To or toward the inside of 71. Carry out or perform an action 72. Swelling from excessive accumulation of watery fluid 77. Parenthesis, essentially 79. Boots 80. Money in the bank, say 82. Bind 83. Devout 84. Flavors 85. Low in pitch 86. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Brockovichâ&#x20AC;? 87. Ancient colonnade 88. Study, say 89. ___-American 90. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Little ___â&#x20AC;? 91. 100 dinars 93. ___ generis 94. Bauxite, e.g.

Fitness: Your choice of food is the real enemy > CONTINUED FROM PG.15

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very easy to diet your way up to an obese range because when you suppress your metabolism so low by continually dieting, when you do end up eating that food just gets stored as fat. When you under-eat it causes stress in the body. Stress hormones such as cortisol are released into your system to help cope with the stress. Cortisol is a fat-burning inhibitor. In other words, if there are high levels of cortisol in your system your metabolism will not burn fat, it will store it. After many years of continual cortisol release, fat stores will settle in the abdominal region, known as visceral fat or belly fat.

This can be very frustrating if you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand what is happening: you think you are doing all the right things by eating whole grains and low-fat dairy products, and cutting back the sugar. You even increase your exercise. But that darn scale wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t budge. So how do you break the cycle and rev up your metabolism to lose weight? Eat! Get over your fear of food. Food is not the enemy. Your choices are the enemy. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s critical to educate yourself, take responsibility and make good choices. Change your lifestyle and choose whole foods, eating every three or four hours and your body will get the message that it is not starving and

will begin to release the weight. It is also important to get active. Exercise is an essential component to weight-loss, overall health and well-being. In summary, as long as you keep eating (and eat the correct, healthy foods â&#x20AC;&#x201C; lean proteins, veggies, whole carbs, fruits low in natural sugar) and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go beyond three or four hours between your meals or your snacks, your metabolism will fire up and allow the weight to drop off of you. Your body will move out of starvation mode because you are eating often and wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be hanging onto fat reserves in fear of another famine (restrictive diet) right around the corner.


SPORTS 18

THE OBSERVER

SPORTS

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

Rebuilding year for junior, senior boys volleyball at EDSS all three games of the match,” the coach noted. “They know they’re playing teams that are a little bit better, but the guys are having fun and that’s the key.”

James Jackson

t

GAME OFF Despite the game being cancelled, the Wellesley Apple Jacks and Burford Bulldogs dressed and hit the ice for a memorial ceremony Oct. 9. The home opener was rescheduled due to a problem with the ice.

Bad ice scraps Jacks’ home opener

Pre-game ceremonies go ahead, but game postponed for safety reasons Katie Edmonds

t

he apple cider was hot, the popcorn was served, and more than 100 fans, family and friends of the Wellesley Apple Jacks and the Burford Bulldogs were waiting eagerly for Saturday night’s home opener to start at the Wellesley Arena. And waiting. And waiting. And waiting. Forty minutes after the intended start time, a voice came over the loudspeaker and announced that to the team’s dismay, the evening’s game was cancelled due to problems with the ice.

After a malfunction with the temperature controller, the arena’s ice thermometer read a balmy 28 degrees Fahrenheit; the temperature needed to skate safely is around 21. Just a few degrees warmer and it may have looked more like a swimming pool than a hockey rink. “The teams played their pre-game warmup and both the players and the referees picked up on it,” said Wellesley’s director of recreation Brad Voisin. “Eventually we made the decision that it just wasn’t safe to play on.” Despite the cancella-

tion, all of the members of the Jacks and the Burford Bulldogs were in their full hockey gear for the singing of the national anthem and for a tribute in memoriam to three members of the hockey community who passed away since the end of last season. First, there was a moment of silence for Mary Lowe, a proud supporter of the Burford Bulldogs for many years. Lowe was a close friend to many in the league and was honoured with a moment of si-

> SEE JaCKS ON pg. 19

> SEE VollEYBall ON pg. 20

MAKING CONTACT » JAMES JACKSON

» KATIE EDMONDS

pHOTO

pHOTO

he boy’s volleyball season is under way at EDSS, and the results have been mixed. The senior boys are off to a 0-5 start, while the junior boys sit at 3-2. Both coaches, however, are optimistic about the direction the teams are headed. The junior team is full of rookies, while the senior team lost all of its starting five players from last year’s squad after graduating last June. “We’re a young team, and a lot of guys haven’t played organized volleyball before,” said senior coach Adam Hiller. “Four or five of our starters have not played before, but our goal is to just get better each game.” And that steady improvement is important for the team as it makes its way through the regular season. Every team makes the playoffs under the current format, but the weaker teams are always matched up against the stronger clubs. “We win some games, we just can’t put it all together for

The junior squad is undergoing similar growing pains, but with slightly better results. As of Wednesday, the team had gone

Senior squad member John Milanovic prepares to spike the ball during practice on Wednesday afternoon in the EDSS gym.

Win streak ends as Kings drop a pair in extra time Team looks to bounce back from hard-fought losses, facing a busy schedule this weekend James Jackson

a

fter a couple of weeks of come-from-behind victories, this past week the Kings were the ones giving up the lead in a

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pair of losses. The Kings had their four-game winning streak snapped Oct. 9 in a 5-4 overtime loss to the Niagara Falls Canucks, and followed it up with a

3-2 shootout loss to the Kitchener Dutchmen on Tuesday night. In the Saturday afternoon tilt against the Canucks, Elmira opened the scoring 6:06 into the first

period with a powerplay goal from Zach Salomon, assisted by Jarred Parent and Colton Wolfe-Sabo, but gave up three straight goals to Niagara Falls. “That was probably

our weakest game of the season – we struggled,” said head coach Geoff Haddaway. “There are times where we struggle for shifts, or a period, but for the most part that

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was 60 minutes where we really struggled.” After the offensive outburst from the Canucks, the Kings responded with three goals of their

> SEE KinGS ON pg. 21


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

19 SPORTS

A proper hunt shouldn’t be this easy i

f you hunt upland birds early in the season, as I do, you are used to quick shooting in tight cover – most times at the fleeting shadow of a grouse or woodcock that your dog has pointed or flushed. Following that, you are used to a look of incredulous disappointment, first from your dog, and then from anyone else who witnessed it. Even so, man and dog will grudgingly admit that these sort of early-season shots at birds in thick cover are not always easy. So, in a sense, a miss at that time of year is, at least, forgivable. The same cannot be said for the shot I muffed today. If God judged man solely on the ability of his wingshooting, today’s performance would have damned me to an eternity in hell. Imagine my springer spaniel Callie’s look of disgust after she ran a perfect pattern through the popples, caught a whiff of woodcock and then buttonhooked back and flushed it hard, straight to me. The woodcock – a trusting individual – actually flew at eye level to me, and I believe, for a moment, considered landing on my hat. Perhaps it was the lack of a single twig or leaf between it and me, but I have never actually seen a woodcock this clearly. It didn’t hurt that the bird was in no great hurry either. “Huh,” I thought, as it closed the gap from twenty yards to I’m guessing two. And, as it veered off and landed five yards to the right of me in the goldenrods, it occurred to me that I forgot something. But

Not-So-Great Outdoorsman Steve Galea what? Oh yeah, I forgot to shoot. For those who aren’t familiar with bird hunting, let me just say that this simple oversight makes the whole proposition much more difficult. Though I’m loath to admit it, this seems to be my typical reaction to a preposterously easy upland shooting situation. I’m not sure why either. I’ll guarantee you that it isn’t out of a sense of fair play. No,

grouse and woodcock have humiliated me enough over the years that fairness isn’t even a consideration. Nor is it because I’m waiting for a better shot, because, short of blindfolding the bird, giving it a cigarette and tying it to a post, there isn’t one. Frankly, my theory is that my brain didn’t actually recognize it as a woodcock since it was not almost completely obstructed by a screen of foliage. Oh sure, I’ve seen them illustrated in bird identification books without branches and trees in the way, but I always just thought that this was some sort of artistic interpretation rather than what they actually look like. I know now that this is not true. In any case, not shooting at the

woodcock was enough to cause my dog to give me a look that said, “Ever consider taking up golf ?” Which, if the truth were to be told, was exactly what I was thinking at the time. Luckily, I saw the bird land and marked its exact location, so I walked in on one side while Callie quartered in from the other. Caught in a pinch, the bird flushed straight up behind the only tree that interfered with my line of sight. This time I put the gun up and couldn’t shoot because of the tree. The woodcock got away. It was a textbook example of how a woodcock hunt should go. Which made me happy. I can’t stand golf.

Jacks: Home-opener postponed until Friday night > CONTINUED FROM pg. 18 lence. Next, the Jacks honoured 20-year-old Norwich Merchants player Ben Pearson who died in the early morning hours of Oct. 2 of liver complications. Pearson was a close friend of Wellesley player Josh Herd. And finally, the crowd continued to stand in silence in memory of Shawn Gerber, the Jacks’ assistant coach who died suddenly in July. The teams both got a round of applause

Proceeds to Mennonite Central Committee

from the waiting crowd before promptly turning around and skating back into their respective dressing rooms. Voisin checked the ice temperature on Sunday morning and the failed mechanism seemed to be working fine again, the ice temperature back down to normal. “We are going to keep a very close eye on the piece of machinery,” he said. “It seems to be working fine now but if it continues to go out of calibration, we will have to replace it.” Because of the delay,

the Apple Jacks won’t have played a game for more than two weeks when they hit the ice this weekend. Whereas some teams in the league are going on to play their fifth or sixth game, Friday night’s match was only the third for the Wellesley team. “It’s a huge setback for what we’re trying to do,” said coach Kevin Fitzpatrick. “As a team we need to get some momentum going and it’s tough to do that when you don’t play.” When the cancellation was announced, fans that

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had already purchased tickets for the evening’s game were given the option to exchange them for a ticket to an upcoming game or to get their money back. More than 90 per cent of people asked for a ticket for another game. “We know how disappointed everyone was,” said Fitzpatrick. “It was a tough situation but we had to make the best of what we had and we really appreciate all the fan support.” The new official home opener becomes Friday at 8:30 versus Hagersville.

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SPORTS 20

THE OBSERVER

Volleyball: A mixed bag so far this season > CONTINUED FROM pg. 18 3-2, and coach Sarah Gerth has already seen enormous growth in their performance. “They didn’t win a game last year, so we’re pretty proud that we’ve already doubled our record,” she said with a laugh. “For me they’re just a really cohesive group of kids. With these guys they spend time together as a group which really impressed me, and it shows on the court. They help each other, correct each other and they take constructive criticism from each other, which is a really good sign.” The junior team is

very inexperienced; there are only two grade tens on the 14man roster, which Gerth takes away as a positive both for this season, and for next. “I think next year it’s going to be a different ball game,” she says, referring to the level of experience the team will have following this season. “They’re hustlers. And every team we have played against, the coach has come up and said ‘Wow, your boys move.’ Whether that’s because they fear me, I’m not sure, but they definitely work hard and as far as I’m concerned that’s the name of the game.”

SCORECARd WOOLWICH PEEWEE C - GIRLS

OCT. 9

WOOLWICH BANTAM MAJOR A - BOYS

Woolwich 2, Milverton 2 goals: Taylor Duench x2 (Nicole Merlihan x2, Meghan Mathieson)

SEpT. 24 Woolwich 2, Caledon 2 goals: Alex MacLean, Timmy Shuh (Timmy Shuh, Adrian gilles, Brady Erb, Mike Martin)

WOOLWICH ATOM LL - GIRLS

OCT. 9 Woolwich 5, Kitchener 0 goals: gracie Durrer x3, Olivia Martin, Claire Robertson (Claire Robertson x3, Sydney Dettweiler, gracie Durrer, Olivia Martin)

SEpT. 30

WOOLWICH BANTAM LL - GIRLS

OCT. 9 Woolwich 4, grand River 1 goals: Megan Thoman, Emily Schuurmans, Leslie Quinn, Alise Fife (Schuurmans 3, Jessica Townsend, Cassidy Bauman, Breanna Campbell, Jenessa Babcock, Erin graham) WOOLWICH PEEWEE BB - GIRLS

OCT. 9 Woolwich 5, Hamilton 0 goals: Rachel Weber x3, Emily Willms, Cassandra Tuffnail, (Sydney Meunier x2, Leah Bauman) Shutout: Alyssa McMurray & Rhiana Byrd (shared)

Burlington 2, Woolwich 1 goals: Sheldon Metzger OCT. 9

» JAMES JACKSON

OCT. 1 Woolwich 6, Burlington 3 goals: Adrian gilles x2, Alex MacLean x2, Alex White, Ryan Schinker (Alex MacLean x2, Johnny Clifford x2, Ryan Schinker, Timmy Shuh, Adam Cook, Sebastian Lane) OCT. 7 Burlington 4, Woolwich 2 goals: Sebastian Lane x2 (Timmy Shuh, Mike Martin, Johnny Clifford, Matthew Lair) OCT. 8 Flamborough 3, Woolwich 2 goals: Alex MacLean, Timmy Shuh (Adrian gilles x2, Ryan Schinker, Alex MacLean) Hespeler 4, Woolwich 2 goals: Sebastian Lane, Johnny Clifford (Ryan Schinker x2, Bo Uridil, Adrian gilles)

OCT. 6

pHOTO

Woolwich 3, Flamborough 1 goals: Sebastian Lane, Timmy Shuh, Matthew Lair (Ryan Schinker, Brady Erb)

OCT. 10

WOOLWICH MINOR PEEWEE A - BOYS

GETTING SET FOR THE MATCH Junior team member Keaton Weiss (left) practices a spike while teammate Callum Johnson attempts to block it.

Benton Weber x2, Cameron Brown, Nathan Schwarz, Alex Taylor, gareth Rowland, Brett Henry, Nick Kieswetter, Jake Lewis)

Woolwich 4, Dundas 2 goals: Alex Taylor, Aaron Weigel, Tyler Martin, Nathan Schwarz (James Cooper, Mitchell Rempel x2) OCT. 10 Woolwich 8, Arthur 6 goals: Nick Kieswetter x2, Jake Lewis x2, Benton Weber, Nathan Schwarz, James Cooper, gareth Rowland (Mitchell Rempel x3,

WOOLWICH NOVICE TYKE SELECT - BOYS

OCT. 9 Woolwich Wild Cats 15, Centre Wellington Fusion 0 goals: Colton Schmitt x4, Jake McDonald x4, Tyler Martin x2, gavin Roemer x2, Tyler Brezynskie, AJ Mitchell, Cole Slade (Tyler Martin x5, Cole Slade x3, Tyler Brezynskie x3, Weston Bradley x2, Brett Moser x2, AJ Mitchell, Jake McDonald)

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Shutout: Quinn Brown & Brett Strohoff (shared) WOOLWICH MINOR ATOM A BOYS

SEpT. 29 Woolwich 18, guelph 0 goals: Josh Martin x5, Brody Waters x5, Ethan Young x2, griffen Rollins x2, Eli Baldin, Austin Cousineau, Sam Davidson, Kurtis Hoover (Austin Cousineau x4, Eli Baldin x2, Sam Davidson, Brody Waters, Mackenzie Willms, Jake Code) Shutout: Riley Demers SEpT. 30 Woolwich 4, Burlington 2 goals: Sam Davidson, griffen Rollins, Eli Baldin, Austin Cousineau (Austin Cousineau x2, Ethan Young x2, Jake Code, Lukas Shantz) OCT. 3 Woolwich 11, guelph 2 goals: Eli Baldin x3, Jake Code x2, Brody Waters x2, Josh Martin, Mackenzie Willms, Austin Cousineau, Sam Davidson (Jake Code x4, Josh Martin x2, Eli Baldin x2, Seth Morrison, Brody Waters, Austin Cousineau, Kurtis Hoover, Lukas Shantz, Ethan Young) OCT. 7 Woolwich 6, Centre Wellington 2 goals: Josh Martin x2, Eli Baldin x2, Brody Waters, Jake Code (Brody Waters x2, Austin Cousineau x2, Lukas Shantz, Seth Morrison) OCT. 9 Centre Wellington 2, Woolwich 0 OCT. 10 Woolwich 6, Orangeville 0 goals: Jake Code x2, Brody Waters, Mackenzie Willms, Eli Baldin, griffen Rollins (Mackenzie Willms x2, Brody Waters x2, griffen Rollins, Austin Cousineau, Eli Baldin) Shutout: Cyrus Martin WOOLWICH BANTAM AE - BOYS

OCT. 9 Dundas 2, Woolwich 1 goals: Owen griffiths (Eddie Huber)

» Saturday, October 16, 2010 OCT. 10

Arthur 4, Woolwich 3 goals: Tristen White x2, Owen griffiths (Connor peirson, Nigel Baldin) WOOLWICH NOVICE MAJOR A BOYS

OCT. 9 Woolwich 7, guelph 0 goals: Isiah Katsube x2, Connor Bradley, Brett Allen, Brady Brezynskie, Spencer Young, Blake Roemer (Trevor Ferretti x2, Spencer Young x2, Keaton McLaughlin x2, Blake Roemer, Kyler Austin) Shutout: Simon Huber OCT. 10 Woolwich 13, Caledon 1 goals: Isiah Katsube x3, Blake Roemer x2, Kyler Austin x2, Lucas Huber, Ryan Elliot, Brady Brezynskie, Spencer Young, Keaton McLaughlin, Dawson good (Trevor Ferretti x3, Lucas Huber x2, Connor Bradley, Brett Allen, Spencer Young, Keaton McLaughlin, Isiah Katsube, Dawson good) WOOLWICH ATOM AE - BOYS

OCT 1 Acton 4, Woolwich 2 goals: Jackson Hale, Kyle Bruder (Riley Shantz, Noah Scurry) OCT 2 Woolwich 4, Wellington 2 goals: Zac pickard x2, Ryan Belanger, Riley Shantz (Kyle Bruder x2, Zac pickard, Jackson Hale, Cameron Maillette) OCT 8 Ancaster 3, Woolwich 2 goals: Riley Shantz, Cam Maillette (Cam Maillette, Ben Lenaers, Kieffer Beard, Zac pickard) OCT 9 Woolwich 6 Erin Hills 1 goals: Zac pickard x2, Riley Shantz, Luke Haugerud, Kieffer Beard, Nick Ravelle (Cam Maillette x2, Justin Uhrig Kyle Bruder, Riley Shantz, Owen Harnock)

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

21 SPORTS

Kings: Team has to play to its strengths, not run-and-gun, says coach overtime, which meant the Kings would be playing in their first shootout of the year. All three Kings shooters – Brad Kraus, Brady Campbell and Josh MacDonald – were stopped in their shootout attempt, and Ryan Clarkson scored the lone goal for Niagara Falls to take the victory. Haddaway said he hasn’t put much emphasis on the shootout early on this year. “We’ve had a couple practices where we’ve done a shootout to have a little fun, but we probably should spend more time practicing it.” The coach, however, isn’t too concerned with the outcome. “Yes it’s a point we’d rather have than give up, but there are no shootouts in the playoffs. This is a team that while I’ve been here hasn’t done real well in shootouts, and has always done well in overtime in the playoffs.” He also says that the game probably should have never gone to overtime. If a couple of bad bounces for the Kings

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– such as when Kraus hit a crossbar, and when an easy tap-in goal slid right through the Kitchener crease – had gone the other way, the game would have had a very different outcome. He is also pleased with how his team managed to adjust following the loss to Niagara. “Kitchener is a really good team. Going into that

game we tried to tighten things up defensively after what happened in Niagara Falls, and I thought we did a really good job.” The loss pushed Kitchener into a tie with Elmira for second in the Midwestern Conference with 14 points, with the Kings having played two fewer games. Matthew Smith finished with 26 saves in the loss.

The Kings have a tough schedule ahead with three straight games this weekend. The team travelled to Listowel Friday night before returning home Saturday to face the Waterloo Siskins. They wrap up the weekend Sunday against the Brantford Golden Eagles. The puck drops at 7 p.m. for both games at the Dan Snyder Memorial Arena.

IN ACTION What are you up to on this stationary bike? What we do is run a tin-man triathlon every May here at school (EDSS) and I did pretty well last year. So I thought if I started training now, I might do a bit better. Do you exercise alone? There are three of us here, we call it “Fat Guys Fitness”. It’s easier to work out if you have a bunch of people harassing you. I guess you might call me the leader of this motley bunch. Which triathlon sport is your favourite? I like to swim, I hate to run. I’m more Shamu than a runner. I’m new to this running thing, I’m not sure if my body likes it, but I swim three times a week at the Guelph West End rec centre. Were you in any sports when you were younger? I did a lot of swimming in high school, and I’ve been able to maintain that until now. It’s easy, I don’t need a team. I made a promise to myself to be fit at fifty, and now that I’ve done that, I’m just trying to stay there.

» JAMES JACKSON

own. The first from Lukas Baleshta at 16:30 of the second period with the man advantage, assisted by Devon Wagner, then another powerplay goal from Josh MacDonald at 6:11 of the third, assisted by Brennon Pearce and Jonathan Rizzo, and finally Wade Pfeffer gave the Kings their second lead of the night at 9:42 of the third, assisted by Baleshta. Niagara Falls tied it up at 13:17 with a shorthanded goal by Eric Diodati to force overtime, and George Dunn capped the comeback for the Canucks with an unassisted goal at 4:53 of OT. Haddaway thinks that the Kings got away from their forechecking and tight defensive game to play the run-and-gun style of hockey that Niagara Falls enjoys. The Canucks are fourth in the league in scoring with 62 goals, compared to 34 goals for the Kings. “That’s not the type of game we want to play. They’re a very offensiveminded team, but that’s

not what we are. Maybe we tried to get caught up in their game and maybe we just got away from our game plan a little bit.” Nick Horrigan was in net for the loss, stopping 33 of the 38 shots he faced. A couple of nights later, the Kings were in a tough game against the Kitchener Dutchmen. Elmira got off to another good start when Baleshta scored his fourth goal of the year and his second in as many games for the Kings on the powerplay at 8:25 of the first, assisted by Wolfe-Sabo and Josh Woolley. Elmira took a two-goal lead just over a minute into the second when Brady Campbell scored his fifth of the year at 1:16, assisted by Pfeffer and Spencer MacCormack. Kitchener responded quickly, though. Gian Paul Delle Donne scored on the powerplay at 5:39, and Connor Voigt tied it up for the Dutchmen less than a minute later at 6:13. Neither team could score in the third or in

pHOTO

> CONTINUED FROM pg. 18

Dave Conlon

triathlon


ENTERTAINMENT 22

ENTERTAINMENT

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

Spooky tale just the thing at Halloween Theatre Three-Eleven is now staging a homegrown thriller, My Soul To Take

WHEN NIGHTMARES REIGN Steve Kannon

J

ustin Webster loves a good horror story. He and his wife Stefanie like to stage something in keeping with the season at their Theatre Three-Eleven in Listowel. Having presented a few plays in the spirit of Halloween, the couple found the selection of new pieces to be quite slim, taking into account the intimate confines of the venue. The solution? Justin penned a tale of his own, which is now being performed following Thursday's opening. “We like to put on thrillers – we try to find one every fall – but the choices

Bedtime is something for Melissa Dunphy to be afraid of in the Theatre Three-Eleven production of My Soul To Take, now playing in Listowel. were pretty limited,” said Stefanie. “Justin had this story in the back of his mind for a while. … He’s always been a fan of spooky stories.” The story turned out to be My Soul To Take, which introduces us to a 13-yearold girl, her father and stepmother. After the family moves into an older home, the girl (Melissa Dunphy) begins to have nightmares. Nothing her parents do seems to help. Clearly, this is something more than a girl coping with the fact her mother has died and she’s not terribly keen about the new woman in her dad’s life. It’s beyond the typical

3

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D R A W

TES A D I D N A C L L A IL CANDIDATES RD 3 COUNC MAYOR AND WA

adolescent attitudes on display. As the lines between sleep and wakefulness begin to blur, some potential reasons for the nightmares begin to emerge. Eventually, attention turns to the house itself. Is it haunted? Possessed? Suspicions turn to the stepmother, as you might expect. Is the young girl herself being forthright? So many questions. And that’s just the point, as the audience is meant to guess what comes next, and how it will all end, said Webster, who’s directing the play. “There’s an element of

interaction. They’re in the dream. The audience gets scared along with her,” she explained. In order to create that experience, they’ve had to get creative on the technical side. The goal is to take the audience along for the ride as the nightmares play out. “It’s been a lot of work, but we’re having fun doing it,” said Webster, noting there’s a little extra stress in staging a homegrown project. “We feel very sensitive about it because it’s our own work.” Given that even those who’ve been working on the play for some time still find the scary parts scary,

the effort has been paying off, she added. “It’s spooky – a good preHalloween production.” One caveat, however. While it’s being staged on the run-up to Halloween, My Soul To Take isn’t for young children, say under the age of eight, because of some frightening imagery. “It’s not a young child’s Halloween play.” My Soul To Take runs Oct. 14-30, Thursday through Saturday evenings at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15, available by phoning 519-291-2033 or 1-877-455-0552 or by emailing info@theatre311.com. The theatre is located at 311 Main St. E., Listowel.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19TH 8PM | at FOUNDATION CHRISTIAN SCHOOL 28 Katherine Street, Winterbourne

Find out where the candidates stand on the issues that matter to you! • Campaign platforms • Vision for the future • Farmland & food production • Protection of water • Township finances & taxes • Gravel pits


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

23 CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Licensed sheet metal mechanic required. Must have new construction experience. Gas license an asset. Reply in confidence by fax (519)664-3881 or email; info@totalhomeenergy.ca HELP WANTED

PUMP ASSEMBLER

Assemble, test, paint and package large cast iron vacuum pumps in machine shop environment. Ideal candidate has a mechanical aptitude, enjoys working and learning, is quick with hands and works well with others. $15-$17/HR start, depending on experience. Career position, full benefit package, factory job. Apply in person 7 AM - 4:30 PM Elmira Machine Industries Inc. 20 Martin LN, Elmira - fax 519-669-8331

info@elmiramachine.com

HELP WANTED

Journeyman Electrician Commercial, industrial and residential experience required. Valid driver’s licence required. Competitive wage and benefit package provided. Send cover letter and resume by

FAX to 519-698-9920 ESA Licence # 7000438

> Part-Time Driver, must be available evenings and weekends. Apply in person or fax resume to Shoppers Drug Mart, Elmira. fx 519669-4943. FOR SALE

> Hillcrest Home Baking Fall Sale Oct. 19-30. Closed Sun. & Mon. 519-669-1381, Floradale. 10% off all fabrics, hosiery, tablecloths, jumbo tea towels, books, quilt batts, all underwear. Grocery Specials: Green Gain Peas, 2.39 pkg $36.75 case, Robin Hood flour, 2.5kg, all purpose, cake & pastry, whole wheat $4.19; Hershey Chipits - all kinds, 225g - 350g $2.77; Hershey Semi Sweet Chipits 1kg $7.49; Crisco Shortening 454 g $2.29; Becel Margarine 454g, reg. & light $2.99; Mazola Corn & Canola oil 2.84L $7.79; Dole Pineapple, sliced, crushed & tidbits .98; Nescafe Rich Coffee 200g $6.99; Frosted Flakes 300g $2.89; Froot Loops 275g $2.89; Miracle Whip 890ml, reg., fat free, calorie wise $4.99; Campbells Cream of Mushroom soup .99; Barbecue Sauce, reg. sweet n sour, chicken n rib 455ml, $1.29; Sunlight dish detergent 950ml $2.35; Gain Liquid laundry detergent 32 use $7.89; Fleecy 1.6L $5.99; Scotties Kleenex 144’s 150’s .99; Compliments toilet tissue - 12 double roll - $7.99; Ice Cream Syrup, 428ml - choc. strawberry, caramel $3.29; Ice cream - CHAPMANS original $2.49, Premium $3.59.

> Heavy Duty Vehicle trailer, 6’6” x 12’0”, dual axle, ramps, $900. Tractor style forklift, 13’ lift, good running condition, $1900. 519-502-7733. > HOCKEY

PLAYERS! Practice shooting, skating and stick handling on synthetic ice. On sale now. No HST with this ad. Call 1-87-SKATE-365

> Honda

Pressure Washer, gas, 11hp, 3500 psi, $500. Honda pump, 5.5hp w/gear reduction, $300. 519-886-7538.

> Lesage Piano With Bench. Call 519-884-8862, Ask For John. > Mattress/Boxspring, new, never used, still in sealed bag. Sacrifice $195. Delivery available. 519-6358737 > Passport

Photos, Gun licenses etc. $10. Brian’s Photo, 57 Arthur St. S., Elmira. 519-210-0608.

> Snowmobile Trailer, enclosed clamshell. Triton Elite 101, double wide, 10ft long, 100% aluminum, $1,950. Call 705-773-2165 or 519-669-0220. > Twin Beds! 39”w x 75” long. Mattresses from $89, boxsprings from $65. Plus, headboards, footboards, steel roller frames. Matching Deluxe sets by Serta, Permafoam, Simmons too! 226-749-3584, St. Jacobs. FIREWOOD

> Seasoned

Firewood. Call 519-669-4108.

TRADES & SERVICES

COMPUTERS - LAPTOPS

Sales and Service

• Manufacturing of Landscape & Snow Removal Equipment • Custom Manufacturing and Machining • Agricultural, Industrial, Transportation & Construction Equipment Repairs

CALL FOR DETAILS

Come see our showroom at:

> Cute,

Cuddly Farm Pups, Collie / Black Lab cross. Ready to go. Call 519638-2642.

519.669.1501

100 Union St., Elmira, ON Toll Free 1.877.467.3478

112 Bonnie onnie Crescent, Elmira r ra

519-669-5551

www.reistindustries.com

COMMERCIAL

PETS

> MEGAMUTTS

dog training, Fall Classes group session or private, starting October 26, 6 weeks - $140.00. www.megamutts. com. or 519-669-8167.

WANTED

> Buying 100 - Year old - yellow brick farmhouses, schools, churches, etc. for wrecking and brick salvage. Ross Lumley 519-383-2024. Wrecking people’s homes (360 so far this century) all over Central Ontario Since 1969. > Hockey

Players wanted for Saturday night pick up game. 7-9 pm, ages 16 and up. Call Pete 519698-0097 .

> WANTED: Old freight carts, old cast iron gates, pots, fencing etc., cupboards, small tables & desks, paintings, metal toys, basement & driveshed treasures, games etc. Restoration available. Call 519-787-8287 (machine.) RENTALS - 3 rooms available from $450 per month depending on size. Includes heat & hydro. Main floor in an active real estate office. Call Mildred Frey, 519-669-1544.

AUCTIONS

REAL ESTATE

> For

Lease: 1350 sq ft Industrial ELMIRA. Front office, Bay 22’ ceiling, 2nd floor mezzanine. 12 x 12 overhead door, in floor heating, a/c . South end of town in newer building. Call Clare Brubacher 519-748-7399.

TRADES & SERVICES

> Cleaning

Lady. Thorough and responsible. Call Elaine at 519-669-9506.

> CRD Accounting Services - Income Tax (E-File) Services. Small business accounting, payroll & govt/ filings. Chuck Downs, 95 Aspen Cr., Elmira. 519-6691498, cell 519-569-1744. > Welcome To Grant’s Hands On Therapy. Gentle touch or deep muscle treatments, excellent for recent injuries or long term ailments. Call 519-5773251. Grant Brubacher, Certified Deep Muscle Therapist.

> Upstairs Office Space

PETS

GARAGE SALES

> Garage Sale - Saturday,

Oct. 16, 7 a.m. 1122 Geddes St. Hawkesville. Silver, furniture, glassware, baby items and much, much more!

PLACES OF FAITH

HEARING ASSISTED

St. Teresa Catholic Church

No God, No Hope; Know God, Know Hope! Celebrate Eucharist with us Mass times are:

Sat. 5pm, Sun. 9am and 11:15am

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

ELMIRA

Sunday School During Worship

Welcome to

Calvary United St. Jacobs

Minister: Rev. Dave Jagger Sunday Worship: 10:55am

Wheelchair accessible • Nursery Care provided • Hearing Assisted

48 Hawkesville Rd. • 519-664-2311

Sundays - 9:45 am Family Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday School for all ages

Visit our website at: www.wondercafe.ca 21 Arthur St., North • Church Office 519-669-5560 “Our mission is to love, learn and live by Christ’s teachings”

Elec Chain & Cable Hoists * Cranes/Bridges * Equipment Liquidation

AUCTION

Surplus equipment to the ongoing operations of

ROGERS MATERIAL HANDLING to be held ON SITE at

1809 DUMFRIES RD, CAMBRIDGE (NORTH DUMFRIES)

Fountain St S off #401, Right on Dickie Settlement Rd. Right on Roseville Road, left on Dumfries Rd.

Sat

Oct 23rd 10am

6+ 5ton/10ton Cranes & 11 - 3ton/10ton Hoists 29+ Elec Chain Hoists & 10+ Air Hoists

Misc Equipment => Monorail System * Manual Chain hoists I-Beams & Steel * Red-I-Rack * Electrical Panels * Misc Rigging hardware * Steel Plate lifters * Crates Older hoists-Gear Boxes Motors & Electrics Many Unlisted Items - Partial List Only!! Partial List ONLY!!!!! Check Website for Photos of Major Equipment!!!

No Buyer’s Premium!! VIEWING: Friday, Oct 22th, 2010 - 2pm to 4pm TERMS: $500 Cash Deposit on Major Units, Balace in 48 hours by Cash, Debit or Bank Draft; or as announced

M.R. Jutzi & Co

PROFESSIONal IN ThE ORDERly lIqUIDaTION aND aPPRaISalS OF COMMERCIal, INDUSTRIal, CONSTRUCTION, MUNICIPal EqUIPMENT & VEhIClES

www.mrjutzi.ca GARAGE SALES

> 7273

Fourth line, RR2, Wallenstein Saturday, October 30 at 8am, rain or shine. Infant & children clothing and accessories, cradle, rocking chair, high chair, stroller, toys, work bench and more. Items in good condition.

1151 Snyder’s Flat Rd., Bloomingdale • 519-745-2411 www.bloomingdalemennonite.com

- Oct 17 - What Will You Do With The Rest Of Your Life? Church

SUNDAYS @ 10:30AM 5 First St., Elmira • 519-669-1459 Services at John Mahood www.elmiracommunity.org Public School

9:15 and 11:00 AM

“I Am My Brother’s Keeper” Guest Speaker: Gord Ahier 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 Check out our website www.woodsidechurch.ca

100% Local. STORAGE

> Farm Machinery Shed near Elmira w/ heated workshop for rent. Agricultural purposes only. 519-590-1297. SUNDAY SCHOOL

Sun Oct 17th @ 11:00 am Daniel 2:1-30 Doug Barnes

Discovering God Together

519-669-2319 | www.wbconline.ca 4522 Herrgott Road, Wallenstein

“Making Faith Live” Sunday Worship 9:30 am - 10:30am

2 First St., Elmira • 519-669-5030

Gale

Sunday, October 17, 2010

519-648-2111

NURSERY PROVIDED

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

Upbeat Family Worship & Sunday School 10:00 am

Bloomingdale Mennonite Church

Trinity United Church

PLACING A CLASSIFIED AD | Classified ads can be obtained in person, by phone, fax or email from Monday to Thursday 8:30am-5pm or Friday 8:30am-4pm. All classified ads are prepaid. Deadline is WEDNESDAYS by 4pm.

Commercial 20-Word Ad $12.00 (Extra Words 30¢/word)

COMPUTERS

FOR SALE

> D r i v e r / Wa r e h o u s e Driver will load and unload materials in both our warehouse and at job sites. Heavy lifting required. Excellent driving record. Ability to operate a tow motor a plus. Fax resume to 519664-3439 or e-mail info@ decortile.com.

Residential 20-Word Ad $7.50 (Extra Words 20¢/word)

Summer Worship 10:30am Sunday School during service

Minister: Rev. Dr. Linda Bell

Presbyterian www.galepresbyterian.com Church 2 Cross St., Elmira • 519-669-2852

Office Hours: M-TH 9-Noon & 1-3 • E galepresbychurch@golden.net

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

10:30am Worship Service 9:15am Sunday School Pastor: Richard A. Frey www.stpaulselmira.com

27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593


CLASSIFIEDS 24

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

2010 MUNICIPAL ELECTION

Election Day is October 25, 2010 between 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. You are entitled to vote for Mayor, Regional Chair, Municipal Councillors and French Public School Board Trustee. Some residents are also eligible to vote for the Fluoridation Question.

Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Breslau Community Centre - Fire Place Room 200 Woolwich Street, Breslau - ASL Service 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

BRING YOUR VOTER NOTIFICATION CARD TO THE POLL.

Find out if you are on the Voter’s List

Voter Identifi cation Requirements Voters voting at a voting place must show ID prior to obtaining a ballot.

The Preliminary List of Electors for the Township of Woolwich, indicating the names of those persons entitled to vote at the Municipal Elections, is currently available for review upon request at the following locations:

Each of the following options is prescribed as the proof of identity and residence that a person may present for the purposes of subparagraph 52 (1) 1 ii of the Municipal Elections Act: Option 1: An original copy of a document, if the document shows the person’s name, qualifying address and signature. (example: Ontario Driver’s license or Ontario Health Card (photo card) Option 2: An original copy of a document, if the document shows the person’s name and signature, presented together with an original copy of another document, if the document shows the person’s name and qualifying address. (example: Canadian Passport and Property Tax Assessment Notice or Certifi cate of Canadian Citizenship and a utility bill for hydro, water, gas, telephone or cable TV) Family Friendly Voting Locations Please note that children are welcome to accompany you at the Township’s poll locations. Proxy Voting If you are unable to attend either the advance polls or Election Day, applications for proxy voting can be made to the Clerk's Department during regular business hours 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (Monday to Friday with the exception of Thanksgiving Day, Monday, October 11, 2010) at 24 Church Street West, Elmira. If you are not available to vote on Election Day you can vote at one of the Advance Voting Days, which are: Friday, October 15, 2010 - 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Township of Woolwich Administration Building - 1st Floor 24 Church Street West, Elmira - ASL Service 2:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

FINE OF $300 FOR PARKING IN A DESIGNATED ACCESSIBLE PARKING SPACE WITHOUT MTO PERMIT TAKE NOTICE that the Township of Woolwich monitors designated accessible parking spaces to ensure that they are used by vehicles displaying an Accessible Parking Permit (APP) issued by the Ministry of Transportation (MTO). The individual to whom the permit is issued must be using the vehicle and the permit must be visibly displayed on the dashboard or sun visor when the vehicle is parked in the designated accessible parking space. The permit holder may use the permit in any vehicle in which they are travelling. There is no fee for an APP. The fine for parking a vehicle in an accessible parking space without an MTO permit is $300. Information about Accessible Parking Permits can be found on-line at http:// www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/dandv/vehicle/app.shtml.

• Township of Woolwich Municipal Office, 24 Church Street West, Elmira • Woolwich Memorial Centre, 24 Snyder Ave S., Elmira • Elmira Library, 65 Arthur Street South, Elmira • St. Jacobs Library, 29 Queenway Drive, St. Jacobs • Bloomingdale Library, 680 Sawmill Road, Bloomingdale (rear of Bloomingdale United Church) You may also contact the Municipal office by phone at (519) 669-6009 to find out if you are on the Voters’ list. Applications for inclusions, additions, corrections to, or deletions from the list may be made by an elector by completing and filing a form available at the Office of the Clerk, 24 Church Street West, Elmira during regular office hours, Monday to Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Poll Locations Monday, October 25, 2010, 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. (polls open to the public) Ward 1, Poll 1: Ward 1, Poll 2: Ward 1, Poll 3: Ward 2, Poll 1: Ward 2, Poll 2: Ward 3, Poll 1: Ward 3, Poll 2: Ward 3, Poll 3:

Township of Woolwich - Lobby - 24 Church Street West, Elmira Woolwich Memorial Centre - Community Room - 24 Snyder Avenue South, Elmira Woolwich Memorial Centre - Community Room - 24 Snyder Avenue South, Elmira Floradale Fire Hall - Training Room - 50 Florapine Road, Floradale Woolwich Township Community Centre - 31 Parkside Drive, St. Jacobs Conestogo Public School, Gymnasium - 1948 Conestogo Road, Conestogo Maryhill Community Centre - 58 Charles Street East, Maryhill Breslau Community Centre - 200 Woolwich Street S., Breslau

NOTICE OF WATERMAIN SWABBING OPERATION – ELMIRA The Township of Woolwich will be engaging in a watermain swabbing program on Monday, October 18th, 2010 until Wednesday, October 20th, 2010 Between the hours of 8:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. The following streets in Breslau and Maryhill will be swabbed on Monday October 18th, 2010: • Kennedy Road • Cooper Crescent • St. Charles Street The following streets in Elmira will be swabbed on Tuesday, October 19th, 2010 and Wednesday October 20th, 2010 : • Barnswallow Drive (between Whippoorwill Drive & Pheasant Drive) • Bobolink Place • Canary Court • Cedar Waxwing Drive • Chickadee Court • Flamingo Drive • Goldfinch Street (between Bobolink Place & Oriole Parkway) • Grosbeak Road • Oriole Parkway (between Mockingbird Drive & Goldfinch Street) • Pheasant Drive • Tanager Street There will be water pressure on the lines most of the time; however, it is imperative that the following procedures be implemented by each resident to prevent the passage of dirty water from the cleaning operation into your home, which could lead to the plugging of your plumbing system. During the time period within which your watermains are being swabbed, it is extremely important that you adhere to the following: 1. DO NOT USE ANY WATER, open any taps or flush toilets during the above noted hours 2. As soon as the watermain is back in service, open a cold, hard water tap in the basement until the water runs clear, before resuming regular consumption. 3. Keep a sufficient supply of water on hand for personal use during the time that the watermain is out of service.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

4. The toilet may be used, provided the water valve at the toilet is shut off and water from the supply referred to in (2) above is used.

The Chemtura Public Advisory Committee (CPAC)

5. If there is a main supply valve in your basement (usually located at the point where the water service enters your basement), it should be shut off. Hot water tanks and water softener units should be shut off or water softeners put on by-pass.

Meeting will be held Monday, October 18, 2010 at 9:00 a.m. in the Council Chambers 24 Church Street West, Elmira

NOTE: Should no one be at home during the cleaning operations, only procedures (2) & (5) are relevant. We thank you for your co-operation during this inconvenience. If you require additional information please contact Roy Garbotz, Water and Wastewater Supervisor at 519-669-6045 or Cynthia Lean-Martin, Engineering & Planning Services 519-669-6041


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

25 CLASSIFIEDS

FAMILY ALBUM STAG & DOE

ANNIVERSARY

Happy Anniversary Mom & Dad

Gerald & Verna Martin

STAG & DOE for

STAG N’ DOE

Friday, October 22nd, 2010

8:00p.m. - 1:00a.m.

8pm - 1am

St. Jacobs Community Centre

Mom & Dad, Your love has made all the difference in our lives

Look Mom, Grandma’s Turning “50”

Sarah Connor & Kendall Woeschka

Saturday, October 30th, 2010

Oct.18.2010

BIRTHDAY

STAG & DOE

Elmira Lions Hall, 40 South St. W. Elmira $10 tickets / $12 at door

31 Parkside Dr. St. Jacobs

Tickets $10/person - Available at the door Prize for best Costume M&T October 1 07/10/10 10:31 AM Page 1 Music - Food - Door prizes - Games - 50/50 With loveAd:Layout from all your children

Food • Games • Prizes

Happy Birthday

John, Erika, Chris, Tammy, Dakota, MaKenna, Kiera, Delaney & Mom

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CLASSIFIEDS 26

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

REAL ESTATE

For all the property details visit

www.homeswithpaul.ca

OPEN HOUSE Sun. 2-4

OPEN HOUSE Sat. 2-4

192 Porchlight Dr., Elmira

194 Brookmead St., Elmira

Paul Martin SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL DIRECT

519-503-9533

$431,900 AWESOME 2075 SQ. FT. HOME!

$369,000

FABULOUS FAMILY HOME!

NEW LISTING

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated 180 Weber St. S., Waterloo

HOME HOME 519-669-3074

EMAIL paul@remaxsolidgold.biz ONLINE www.homeswithpaul.ca

$234,500 ATTENTION FIRST TIME BUYERS!

$799,000 PERFECT FOR LARGE FAMILY! 25 84 0F FT TL X OT

OFFICE OFFICE 519-888-7110

SPACIOUS FAMILY HOME WAITING FOR YOU!

$189,000 ARE YOU KIDDING! GREAT BUY!

BUYING OR SELLING? BROKERAGE

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. 45 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

519-669-2772

BRAD MARTIN Broker of Record MVA Residential

Res: 519-669-1068

JULIE HECKENDORN Broker Res: 519-669-8629

TRACEY WILLIAMS Sales Rep. Cell: 519-505-0627

You’ve come to the right place to find a home.

oPen HouSe -Sun., oCt.17- 2-4pm Snow Goose Crescent, Elmira

$229,000

INCREDIBLE LOCATION!

ELMIRA REAL ESTATE Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage SERVICES

519-669-3192 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

BONNIE BRUBACHER Broker of Record

SHANNA ROZEMA Broker.

DARREN ROMKEY Sales Rep.

LAURIE LANGDON Sales Rep.

DALE KELLER Sales Rep.

MONIQUE BRUBACHER Sales Rep.

THIS WEEK'S FEATURE PROPERTIES VISIT MODEL HOME

OPEN HOUSE - SUNDAY 2-4PM eXCePtional. 1900 sq. ft. condo. backs to greenspace. Quality construction. Fin. rec. room. Elevator. Lge. garage. Retire in style! MlS $413,500

good value-updated windows, furnace, cac, & shingles. Refaced cabinetry. Rec. rm, 4th bdrm. office & 3 pc. in lower level. MlS $264,900.

22 ROBERTA STREET

LEON MARTIN

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage | Independently Owned and Operated

COUNTRY LOTS .5 acre don’t miss this chance to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. Within 40 minutes KW, or Guelph. High speed internet is available with fibre optic. Starting at $66,000 MLS loCation! 72’x165’ private lot. Furnace & CAC (2004). Extra-deep garage. Walkout to patio. Fin. rec. rm., games rm. & 2 pc. Long driveway. MlS ReduCed to $299,000

WeSt MontRoSe – sought after lot w/ walkout bsmt. backing to greenspace. Open concept from cherry kit. to great room with cathedral ceiling. Main flr. master bdrm. Fin. lower level. All the extras you’d expect. neW MlS $629,900.

MatuRe lot. Laminate & ceramic on main flr. Gas fireplace. Some replacement windows. Main flr. laundry & 3 pc. Garage. MlS $264,900

gReat RetuRn (approx. 8%) on this investment property! Always rented. 3bdrm. unit – great for owner occupied. Lots of character – wood trim & doors. Good condition. 132’ lot. Large porch. Lots of parking. neW MlS $449,900.

3 bedroom country bungalow with high speed internet available open concept. Master ensuite, main floor laundry, large 2 car garage, new ready to move in. Hobby shop allowed. $319,900 MLS Great property on the edge of town, approx. 21 acres workable, the rest is wooded with a large portion of maple trees, 1.9 acres is inside an industrial designated area. 50 acres total. $524,900 MLS Two storey 3 bed and 3 bath room home on a half acre lot, open concept, high speed fibre optic internet available. $317, 900 MLS

PRICES STARTING AT $299,900 - $400,000+

Paradigm Elmira Homes Offers Bungalows and 2 Storey Plans in Elmira Raceway Estates. Gas fireplace, HRV, ceramics, ensuite baths are standard features. EXCL

PARADIGM ELMIRA HOMES

$312,900.

New 1580 sq ft 4 Bedrooms, ensuite, fireplace in mainfloor great room. Extra deep garage. 30 day possession now available. EXCL

BARN AND/OR SHOP

$275,000 GLEN ALLAN | This great family

home has had many updates including the kitchen, windows and wiring. Patio off family room. Insulated shed 20 x 30. MLS

WELLESLEY BUNGALOW

$282,000 | 3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, finished rec room

with more room to spare. Fenced yard on 99’ frontage lot. MLS

UNIQUE MULTI LEVEL BUNGALOW

$369,900 DRAYTON | Custom built; quality

CountRY living - outside Alma. .72 of an acre. Immaculate 3 bdrm. Huge kitchen w/walkout. Walkup from garage. Detached insulated workshop. MlS $439,900.

Yatton - country property w/ updated kitchen w/island, windows, doors and shingles. Upper level family room. 4+ bdrms. Main flr. laundry. MlS $419,900.

www.thurrealestate.com

3 Bedroom back split. 1 1/2 bath, open concept with eat in kitchen & dining room with fireplace, semi finished basement, private lot, scenic view of Conestoga River Valley, in the friendly village of Glen Allan. $289,000 MLS ADDRESS: 4-B Arthur St. S., ELMIRA • EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net DIRECT: 519-503-2753 • OFFICE: 519-669-5426

features of hardwood and ceramic floors, fenced yard; great kitchen; built in lighted china cabinet in dining area. MLS

ATTENTION: HOBBISTS

$395,000 ELMIRA | .44 acre lot on edge of

Elmira, featuring a large country kitchen, gas fireplace in bright rec room. Note extra shop/ garage for your hobbies! Quick possession available. MLS

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

27 CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE

OPEN HOUSE

Sunday,October 17th 2-4pm 14 Berlin Street, Breslau

TWIN CITY REALTY INC. BROKER AGE Independently Owned & Operated

519.885.0200

Sandy Somerville Sales Representative p

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, OCT. 17, 2-4 P.M. 102 FIRST ST. W., ELMIRA Just Listed!

Wonderful bungalow with 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, hardwood, huge finished rec room, A/C, beautiful big lot with fruit trees. Move-in condition and priced to sell - won’t last long.

$284,500

Brokerage Each office independently owned and operated

Updated home that is larger than it looks! Nearly ½ acre lot that is fenced and landscaped. Oversized double garage with a WORKSHOP-great for the hobbyist in the family! Lots of parking. Family room addition. Large kitchen with newer oak cabinets. 3 bedrooms. 2 fireplaces. 3 covered porches and a large screened, covered deck overlooking the large yard. Charming home in a small village. MLS. $389,900.

720 Westmount Road, E., Kitchener, ON N2E 2M6

denisebraun@rogers.com ~ www.denisebraun.com

Denise Braun Sales Representative

direct: 519-574-7862 office: 519-741-0950 fax: 519-741-0957

Real Estate Centre Inc.,

Coach House Realty Inc. Brokerage

OFFICE PHONE: 519.343.2124

159 William St., Palmerston (Across from Home Hardware)

The Fall Market is ready to Harvest!

KATHY ROBINSON **Broker

519.292.0362

EDITH MCARTHUR DEBBIE ROY *Sales Representative *Sales Representative 519.638.2509 519.343.4817

OPEN HOUSE Sun., Oct. 17 | 1-3pm 17 Maudsley St., MOOREFIELD

Renovated family home with garage, 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths. Edith MLS 1037476. $229,000.

NEW LISTING PALMERSTON

Lots of room in this recently updated 3 bedroom, 2 bath backsplit, great location. Kathy MLS 1041120. $234,900.

Let Team McNeil Help you ‘pick’ your perfect home!

NEW LISTING PALMERSTON

Good 3 bedroom, 2 bath, family home w/eat in kit, main flr laundry, exp front sunporch. Debbie MLS 1037864. $164,900.

$4

17

,9

00

STUNNING BETTER THAN NEW

Hawthorne Model, 3 bdrm, 4 bath. Spacious kitchen w/breakfast bar open to great room w/tray ceilings, plus upper level den. Partly finished bsmt w/full bath. Party deck w/ hot tub! Plus so much more! Come check it out! MLS

OPEN HOUSE EVERY SAT & SUN 1-4pm $294,900. Nova Model Ready for quick possession. With $55,000.00 of upgrades! What a deal!! Large bungalow features 9ft ceilings, ceramics, hdwd, upgraded cabinets and windows, master bedroom has his and hers closets and a large ensuite with corner tub. Many other models available build.

$4 48 ,

90

0

A DREAM COME TRUE!

0

Huge Lot! 3 bdrm, 3 bath custom bungalow. Large Chef’s Kitchen w/granite and oversize island. Finished basement w large rec room. Central Air, Vac, Natural Gas & Fenced yard! Call today to view! MLS

Lot 29 Green St., Drayton

OPEN HOUSE EVERY SAT & SUN 1-4pm $208,970. Move in now! Fabulous 1500 sq ft Semi features beautiful stone fireplace, open concept, 3 bdrms, huge master walk in closet and unspoiled an basement awaiting your creativity. Many other models available to build.

$2 2

4,

90

THIS COULD BE YOURS!

Downtown Condo includes 1 bdrm + den, hrdwd floors, upgraded kitchen, in-suite laundry, appliances included, w/out to your private patio! A Must See! MLS

15B Green St., Drayton

LD SO $3 F 04RO ,9 M 00

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME!

REAL ESTATE CENTRE INC

Alyssa Henry and Lisa Hansen Tribble Sales Representatives

519.787.0203

$3 F 04RO ,9 M 00

519-579-4110

Melanie McNeil*

Colleen Mader*

www.clickthathouse.com www.elmirarealestate.ca

Team

McNEIL

www.facebook.com/TeamMcNeilRemax *Sales Representatives

TWIN CITY REALTY INC., BROKERAGE

How has the “pop culture” of yesterday become the “peep culture” of today?

A.

More and more of our entertainment is derived from watching ourselves and others go about our lives, says Paul McFedries of IEEE Spectrum magazine. Picture, for example, those thousands of “camgirls” and “camboys” who broadcast themselves over the Web (digital peep shows). For some kids, elaborates writer Susan Hopkins, webcams offer them identities because “they’re like, you know, sorta kinda on TV, and only important people appear on TV.” It’s that omnipresent eye of the webcam validating their existence: “I cam, therefore I am.” Huge numbers of us are now blogging, Twittering, Facebooking, Flickring, and You-

Tubing at least some details of our lives, joining writer-thinker Hal Niedzviecki’s “peep culture,” a term that plays on the “pop culture” of 1959 (which actually goes back to 1854, according to the “Oxford English Dictionary”). Also consider “lifestreaming” (an online record of everything you video or blog, etc.), “mindcasting” (all your current thoughts, ideas, passions), “Godcasting” (audio feeds of religious messages), “egocasting” (following media reflecting only your own opinions). “Peep culture may be the new pop culture,” concedes McFedries, “but is it really a twoway mass phenomenon? Maybe most of us have an audience of one: ourselves.”

>

Send STRANGE questions to brothers Bill and Rich at strangetrue@cs.com

519-669-1544 24hrs

17 Church St. W., Elmira REALTY LTD., BROKERAGE

www.peakrealestate.com

Independently Owned and Operated

BROKER MANAGER wendy.taylor1@rogers.blackberry.net

Mary Lou Murray SALES REPRESENTATIVE marylou@mmrealestate.ca

$499,900. Enjoy the spectacular view overlooking town along Nith River. Well built 3 bedrm/4 bath brick bungalow features a steel roof (08), finished walkout basement, 2 decks, professionally landscaped and more! Too many updates to mention. Shows AAA! MLS Call Mary Lou

Independently Owned and Operated

4B Arthur St. S. Elmira • www.remaxsolidgold.biz OFFICE: 519-669-5426

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

BERT MARTIN, BROKER

GREAT STARTER

Warren McNeil*

Q.

OPEN HOUSE - Sunday Oct. 17th | 2-4PM 37 Merner, New Hamburg Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

Mapleton Model to be built or choose from 10 other plans! Impressive standard features! Quality Builder! Call Team McNeil Today! MLS

Bill & Rich Sones

Now supporting Habitat For Humanity.

Conestoga Model to be built by quality builder. 10 Plans to choose from! Limited lots left! Start building today! MLS

ONLY 30 MIN. TO WATERLOO

Strange But True

Wendy Taylor

WELCOME HOME

Bungalow on large lot! 3+ bdrms, eat-in kitchen open to FR w/fireplace. Deck, workshop & shed! Loads of space! Dbl Garage & new driveway! Come take a look! MLS $326,500.

Technology makes us ‘stars’

Property offers three bedrooms, eat-in kitchen with sliders to large deck, french doors separating dining & living rooms, sun room, main floor laundry. MLS $144,900.

OFFICE SPACE for lease in busy plaza only 10 minutes from Waterloo. 3 to 4 offices,

$564,900 - New Hamburg In exclusive Whispering Woods backing onto Nith River just under 1/2 acre wooded lot. Hardwood, ceramics, private park-like backyard with extensive gardens. A must see! MLS Call Mary Lou,

reception area, conference room, waiting room and bathroom. Lots of parking space.

Your referrals are appreciated!

Thinking of Buying or Selling call or email today! “You dream...We’ll work.” Free, no obligation, Opinions of value


CLASSIFIEDS 28

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

SERVICE PROS AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

Body Maintenance

at

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

ARE A

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.

AUTOMOTIVE

THOMPSON’S

AUTOMOTIVE

21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial • On-The-Farm Service

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519-669-3232

CRANE

ONLY FROM CHEM-DRY

Worlds Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

Renovating? Let us do the clean up

RENOVATION CLEAN UPS! Call for Details • Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location • Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off and Pick up Service • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair • Janitorial • Grout Cleaning • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping www.completecarpetcare.ca

ROB McNALL

519-669-7607

LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

519-669-7652

30 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA

CARPET CARE

CARPET CARE

Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400 CONCRETE

• 14 ton BoomTruck • 35 ton Mobile Crane

Learn More Online at...

519-664-9999

OFFER

ST. JACOBS

519.669.8330

1-800-CARSTAR

AFTER HOURS

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519-669-3373

FAX: 519.669.3210

519.669.8917

CONCRETE FOUNDATIONS

WEICKERT& MEIROWSKI Concrete Foundations Limited

Ltd.

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Call for estimate

Chem-Dry Acclaim ® 61 Arthur St., N Elmira

519-669-3332

24 Hour Service 7 Days A Week

CONSTRUCTION

Willis Martin

DRAYTON, ON

DECORATING

Read’s Decorating

SINCE 1961

CONSTRUCTION

Design/ Build Agricultural/ Residential

-Framing -Roofing -Renovations -Repairs

519-669-3082

Specializing in Paint & Wallcoverings For all your home decorating needs

519-669-3658 27 Arthur St. S., Elmira

LAWN MAINTENANCE

HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING

24 Hour Accident Assistance

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

budurl.com/SAVE139

6672 Ruggles Rd. Floradale RR#2 Wallenstain, N0B 2S0

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd.

Back 2 School FREE ROOM

AUTOMOTIVE

Complete Collision Service

AUTO CLINIC

Auto Tech Inc.

Call Us At

519-669-3373

AUTOMOTIVE

519-638-2699

YES... WE DO RESIDENTIAL WORK!

6982 Millbank Main St., Millbank 519-595-2053 • 519-664-2914

SERVICE PROS

GLASS SERVICES

THIS SPACE

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS

GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

IS FOR RENT

FREE ESTIMATES • Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

Call today to get your business listed!

519.669.5790

TEL: 519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

www.ObserverXtra.com

FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

PAINTING

MEDICAL TREATMENT ER RS OVYEA 10

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada Established 2000

20 years experience

F. David Reimer

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

> Excavating > Trenching > Backfilling > Fine Grading > Overseeding & Top Dressing > Lawn Seeding

Murray & Daniel Shantz

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications: ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

www.reimerhbot.com

ALMA, ONTARIO

PHONE:

GLEN

BIRMINGHAM PAINTING & DECORATING

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING • WALLPAPERING OVER 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE!

PLUMBING

519.846.5427 FAX: 519.846.5134

19 First St. E., Elmira

519-669-1131 519-669-3362

519-669-2251 36 Hampton St., Elmira

OUTDOOR SERVICES

AMOS

PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIALISTS! BRUBACHER LTD.

519-669-0220

63 Arthur Street S., Unit 3, Elmira, ON, N3B 2M6

ROOFING

SELF STORAGE

YOUR C.J.

For more information call:

free estimates interior/exterior painting wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

Various sizes & rates

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE

Call

519-669-4964

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

R O O F I N G

INC

PAINTING

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches Serving Elmira and Surrounding Area for over 30 years!

CALL SCOTT SEILING FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE. CALL NOW AND BOOK FOR SUMMER!

519.698.2114 In Business since 1971 • Fully Insured

>Booking for Snow Removal >Complete Lawn Maintenance >Flower bed maintenance

>Commercial & Residential >Booking for Fall Cleanup

Phone: 519-669-1188 Fax: 519-669-9369 27 Brookemead, St, Elmira kdetweiler@rogers.com


Âť Saturday, October 16, 2010

THE OBSERVER

29 CLASSIFIEDS

SERVICE PROFESSIONALS ROOFING

PLUMBING

SALT

Now Booking For:

Locally Owned & Operated

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

Since 19 96

ď&#x192;žSteel ď&#x192;žCedar ď&#x192;žShingles ď&#x192;žFully Insured Thousands of satisfied customers!

24 HOUR SERVICE

519-669-3652

519-747-2708 Waterloo www.riepersalt.com

519.669.4484 benderroofing@gmail.com

SIGNAGE | VINYL & DIGITAL

troductor y Offer

Taking Salt to Peoplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Basements Since 1988

Call or email Mike for your FREE estimate.

ELMIRA

20

BILL SCHENKEL

$

ST.JACOBS

519-896-7700

ever-green@sympatico.ca

TREE SERVICE

www.biobobs.com

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

THIS SPACE IS FOR RENT

QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102

TREE SERVICE â&#x20AC;˘Tree Trimming & Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Aerial Bucket Trucks â&#x20AC;˘ Stump Grinding â&#x20AC;˘ Arborist Evaluations â&#x20AC;˘ Fully Insured & Certified â&#x20AC;˘ Certified to Work Near Power Lines

Call today to get your business listed!

519.669.5790 | www.ObserverXtra.com ELECTRICAL

WASTE MANAGEMENT

Golden Disposal

â&#x20AC;˘Removal of Trees or Branches of Any Shapes or Sizes in Almost Any location

T R

FREE ESTIMATES

519-648-3004

or

SERVICE DIRECTORY

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

FAST, FRIENDLY SERVICE AT COMPETITIVE PRICES!

Waste & Recycling Services a division of 1678834 Ontario Inc.

â&#x20AC;˘ Roll Off Containers â&#x20AC;˘ Curbside Garbage Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Registered Hauler for OTS Tire Program â&#x20AC;˘ Total Trash Removal of â&#x20AC;˘ Apartments, Estates, Insurance, Residential sites â&#x20AC;˘ Locally owned and operated since 2001

â&#x20AC;˘Hedge trimming

E

â&#x20AC;˘Branch Chipping

E

P.O. BOX 111 Breslau, On. N0B 1M0 goldendisposal@bellnet.ca

â&#x20AC;˘Stump Grinding

BUILDING DESIGN

â&#x20AC;˘ Residential â&#x20AC;˘ Commercial â&#x20AC;˘ Industrial

Randy Weber

Ken Kolpean Julie Lavigne-Kolpean Tel: 519-744-5246 Fax: 519-744-5295

ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

519.669.1462 Fax: 519.669.9970 Tel:

519-744-5246 www.goldendisposal.com

519-669-1836 Thomas Martin ELECTRICAL

519-505-0985

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING

parts extra

1600 King St. N., Unit #18

Decals & Safety Stickers

Waterloo Region â&#x20AC;˘ Woolwich Township

Mobile

With an expert spring tune up

519-664-1809

Large format printing

519-669-9081

GET YOUR BICYCLES READY

www.remingtongraphfix.com

Logos & Graphics

Owner|Operator

Inspections for Real Estate Septic System Repairs & Restoration Catch Basin Cleaning

TROPHY

BIKE REPAIR

graphfix ltd.

Vehicle Lettering

Jeff Basler

Septic Tank Cleaning

We call Elmira home but we service the surrounding area.

BICYCLE SALES & REPAIRS Signs & Banners

â&#x20AC;˘ Fall Clean-up (Leaf Removal) â&#x20AC;˘ Commercial & Residential Snow Plowing â&#x20AC;˘ Top Dressing/Overseeding â&#x20AC;˘ Lawn Maintenance/ Landscaping â&#x20AC;˘ Mowing Packages Available â&#x20AC;˘ Mulch Delivery & Installation Telephone

FREE BAG In

> Superior Salt Products > Fast, Friendly Service > Convenient Delivery Times > Discounts for Seniors

RESIDENTIAL â&#x20AC;˘ COMMERCIAL â&#x20AC;˘ INDUSTRIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs.

SEPTIC

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES Your Source for year round property maintenance

TOP QUALITY RESIDENTIAL ROOFING SYSTEMS

Steve Co. Steve Jacobi

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

18 KingďŹ sher Dr., Elmira

Serving Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge/Elmira/Guelph areas

FENCES

SNOW REMOVAL

FARM GATES FOR SALE 24 Hour Emergency Service

Call 519-505-4706 Derek Martin

1X1X100 WALL

SQ. TUBE

John M. Martin 7224 Blind Line RR4 Elmira, Ont. N3B 2Z3

ECRA/ESA: 7006936

2204 Floradale Road, Floradale

16â&#x20AC;&#x2122;....................$154 14â&#x20AC;&#x2122;....................$140 12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;....................$122 10â&#x20AC;&#x2122;....................$107 8â&#x20AC;&#x2122;......................$85

EST. 2007

We Take The Work Out Of Winter Residential/ Commercial Snow Removal 24/7

Book Now C

519-568-140a3ll

email: conestogacontractingservices@live.com

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS WORDSEARCH

CROSSWORD ' ( 0 2 %

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CLASSIFIEDS 30

THE OBSERVER

FAMILY ALBUM BIRTH NOTICE

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR “A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

Kleensweep Carpet Care

25 Industrial Dr., Elmira, On.

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS

Wilson, Linda On Friday, October 8, 2010 at the Freeport Health Centre of Grand River Hospital. Linda (Underwood) Wilson age 56 years of Elmira was the devoted wife of Don. Beloved daughter of Beverley (Phillips) Underwood of Whitby and the late William (Bill) Underwood (2004); loving sister of Patricia Underwood and Valerie Underwood both of Whitby and Geoff Underwood of Oshawa; adored aunt of Mathew Underwood and Emily Underwood. Linda was a long-time employee at Elmira Stove Works and was a volunteer for the Kiwanis Club of Elmira. The family received their friends and relatives at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira on Tuesday, October 12, 2010 from noon until the time of the funeral service in the funeral home chapel at 2 p.m. Cremation has taken place. A reception followed the service at the Royal Canadian Legion Elmira Branch 469. Flowers gratefully declined. In Linda’s memory donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family as expressions of sympathy.

• Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

519.669.5105

P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

TOTAL HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

519.664.2008

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

Louise – Suddenly, as a result of a farm accident at the family residence at RR1, Elmira, on October 6, 2010, age 2 ½ years.

OCTOBER 15

> Canadian Bible Society Gospel Sing – with “Rescue Junction” & “Schwartz Family Ministries.” Sat. Oct. 16 with “Schwartz Family Ministries” & “Watchman Quartet.” Woodside Bible Chapel, 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira. No tickets required. Free-will offering. For more information: Gladys at 519-6691292. > Liver & Onion Dinner or Chicken Casserole, Royal Canadian Legion, 11 First St. E., Elmira. 6 p.m.; $7. >

Elmira Kiwanis Haus Oktoberfest at Lions’ Hall. 40 South St. W.; 5:30pm to 1am. $10 advanced seating (admission and entertainment only.) Disc jockey, German food and refreshments available. Tickets and info at www.oktoberfest.ca or call 519-6691281.

OCTOBER 17

>

Breslau Community Breakfast 8:30 am – 12:30 at the Breslau Community Centre, 200 Woolwich Street. $6 per person, children 4 and under free. Come out and enjoy a home cooked breakfast and support your community.

> Two-hour hike at Schneider’s Woods. Enjoy the fall colours at Schneider’s Woods, 2 p.m. Meet Joy at the trail access point a the corner of Wideman Rd and the Wilmot Line, ie. Wilmot/Waterloo boundary one concession south-west of Erbsville. Trail rating: challenging due to steep hills. No baby buggies or dogs please. > The

Schneider Male Chorus, 7 p.m. at Waterloo North Presbyterian Church. 400 Northfield Dr., W. Free-will offering, wheelchair accessible. 519-888-7870.

>

Riverside Public School is doing a hungryman’s breakfast at the Royal Canadian Legion. 8:30 am – 2 pm. Funds raised will be used to upgrade technology.

OCTOBER 18

DEATH NOTICES

> GINGRICH,

www.freybc.com

OCTOBER 16

OBITUARY

> Elmira

> MARTIN,

Darryl – Darryl Grant Martin of Listowel passed away suddenly on Friday, October 8, 2010, in his 34th year. Local relative is his sister Cheryl Martin of RR1, Wallenstein.

SANYO CANADIAN

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

Free plays, tickets to hockey games, prizes, contests & more!

NANCY KOEBEL

Bus: 519.895.2044 ext. 217 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

IN PRINT. ONLINE. IN PICTURES. IN DEPTH.

www.cooperators.ca

519-699-4641

Cell: 519.581.7868

Cardlock Fuel Management

FREE CONSULTATION Bus.:519.669.2632

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville

T. 519.669.2033

Truck & Trailer Maintenance

DENTURE Allen Morrison Insurance Inc.

West Montrose, ON COLLEEN

Since 1987 - DentureTech Since 1995 - Denturist

Home Auto Business Farm Investments Life

Rugs and Upholstery

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates

DIXON -- Shane and Maggie (Mason) welcome with love, their daughter, Amelia Catherine, born August 26, 2010, weighing 7 lbs. 0.5 oz. in Overland Park, Kan. Grandparents Greg and Leslie Mason of Elmira, uncles and aunts Mike and Libby Matthews and Pete and Kate Olijnyk and cousins Finn, Bree, Ruby and Izzy are elated to have Amelia join the family.

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

& District Horticultural Society presents Alternatives to Lawns, with Dr. Helen Gordon of Kitchener Master Gardeners; 7:30 p.m., Trinity United Church Hall. Members no charge, visitors $2. Information call 519-6692458.

OCTOBER 19

> Food For Fines at the Region of Waterloo Library. Use food to erase overdue fines during Ontario Public Library Week – Oct. 19-23. One non-perishable food item is worth up to $2 in overdue fines. Food will be donated to local food banks. Call your local library brand or Library Headquarters at 519-575-4590 for more details. > An ‘Olde Fashioned Supper’ 5-7 p.m. at Bridgeport United Church, corner of Bridge and Woolwich Streets, Bridgeport, Kitchener. Treat yourself to a hearty country meal, quilt display, craft & bake table. Tickets available at the door. Adults $14; children under 10 $6.50.

> FIDA’s Annual Fall Fundraising Dinner. RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Floradale Mennonite Church, 6:30 p.m. Special presentation: “Agriculture in post-Earthquake Suite 800, 101 Frederick St., Kitchener Haiti: Healing and Restoring. Pierre Richard Pierre, Country Coordinator, productive

cooperatives Haiti (pcH). All contributions are income tax deductible. Tickets $20. For more information call FIDA 519-886-9520.

> Lunch

at Gale Presbyterian Church, 2 Cross St., Elmira. Harvest luncheon of roast pork, potatoes, hot vegetable medley, homemade bread and pumpkin cake with cream cheese frosting, beverage included all for only $9. Lunch served 11:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

• Total Denture Care “The RightDay Coverage • Same Service For You” on Repairs and Relines • Metal Partial - Soft Relines •Since Implants 1987 - DentureTech •Since DENTURE SPECIALIST 1995 - Denturist

Denture

DENTURE Vinolea Jahandari DD

• ELMIRA Total Denture Care • Same day service on and relines 15repairs Memorial Ave., Since 1987 - DentureTech • Elmira Metal Partial - Soft Relines 1995 - Denturist (Behind Bank of Montreal) • DENTURE SPECIALIST

519.669.1535 KITCHENER

OCTOBER 20

> Wellesley

Caregiver Education and Support Group meets the third Wednesday of the month from 10-11 a.m. at the Wellesley Township Community Centre. Are you caring for a frail or elderly family member? Are you looking for information and resources that are available to you in your care giving? For more information, call Lorraine at 519-664-3794, ext. 229.

OCTOBER 21

> Woolwich/Wellesley Adult Health Fair “Boost Your Wellbeing: Know Your Resources.” 8:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Dynamic speakers, entertainment & displays focusing on maximizing your wellbeing and learning what resources are available. Everyone welcome, no admission fee. Lunch (pay at the door $10). Calvary United Church, 48 Hawkesville Rd. St. Jacobs. For more information call Joy at 519-664-3534 ext. 230.

FREE CONSULTATION 519.744.9770 ELMIRA • Total Denture Care KITCHENER 519-669-1535 • Same Day Service519-744-9770 15 Memorial Ave., Elmira (behind Bank of Montreal) on Repairs and Relines • Metal Partial - Soft Relines • Implants • DENTURE SPECIALIST

Elze’s Vinolea Jahandari DD

Win Wi Wines ine nes es

FIRST $25OFF BATCH

ELMIRA

519.669.1535 15 Memorial Ave., Elmira

(Behind Bank of Montreal)

NEW CLIENTS ONLY KITCHENER

519.744.9770

29 Church St. W., Elmira

519.669.0799

OCTOBER 22

> Euchre Card Party to be held at 7:30

p.m. at St. Teresa of Avila Church Hall, 19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira. Admission $6. There will be cash prizes, door prizes and lunch served. Everyone welcome! Sponsored by the Catholic Women’s League.

> H.U.G.S. Program 9:15-11:15 a.m. Topic: House Full of Treasures. Mary Trottier form the Early Years Centre will have ideas on creating toys. Woolwich Community Health Centre, 519-664-3794.

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess. Elmira & Surrounding Area

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763

elmirawelcomewagon@sympatico.ca

OCTOBER 23

> Who’s up for a little Texas Hold’em? BridgeKeepers (the West Montrose Residents’ Association, Inc.) is holding a poker tournament in Elmira at the Woolwich Memorial Centre. $40 buys you 2,000 chips and a late night lunch. 50/50 draws, pizza and refreshments are available throughout the afternoon and evening. Door open at 3pm, play starts at 4 p.m. sharp. For more info e-mail poker@ bridgekeepers.ca. > Knights

of Columbus Dinner and Comedy Show hosted by Maryhill and Preston K of C at the Preston K of C Hall. Starts at 6:30. Tickets are $30. Includes chicken breast and ham dinner, followed by stand-up comedy. Call Mike Runstedler at 519-648-3394.

> The Ladies Auxiliary of Twin Oaks of Maryhill, 1360 Maryhill Rd. invite you to their Autumn Leaves Tea and Bazaar. 1-4 p.m. Main Draw: Queen size quilt, money tree, tool kit, breakfast at the Maryhill inn, wall hanging, surprises! Tea room, gift draws, bake table, white elephant table and more! Come one, come all and enjoy a pleasant fall afternoon in Maryhill. All proceeds benefit the residents of Twin Oaks.

519.669.2884 Summer is Here! 21 Industrial Dr., Elmira

CORPORATE WEAR PROMOTIONAL APPAREL WORK & SAFETY WEAR | BAGS T-SHIRTS | JACKETS | HATS

245 Labrador Drive | Waterloo

519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

31 CLASSIFIEDS

the observer invites you & your little ones to

FREE

Freewill offering for edss drama

saturday october 23

rd

at edss | starts at 2 O’clock sharp. ends at 4pm free pumpkins | haunted house | Elvis show {fEATURING hERB nEHER} GLOW-IN-THE-DARK FUN | treat bags | glow necklaces | crafts | refreshments

come dressed to party! TOOTHBRUSH SPONSOR:

Dr. Lawrence Mohan FAMILY

DENTIST

FREE-WILL OFFERING FOR EDSS DRAMA DEPARTMENT | PARENT SUPERVISION IS REQUIRED | ALL WHILE SUPPLIES LAST!


Wise customers read the fine print: •, *, †, ±, ††, § The New Fall Colours offers apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased between October 1, 2010 and November 1, 2010 from participating retailers. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. See participating retailer for complete details and conditions. •$19,999 Purchase Price applies to 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package (24F) only and includes $8,000 Consumer Cash Discount. $19,999 Purchase Price applies to 2010 Dodge Journey SE Canada Value Package (22F) only and includes $1,250 Consumer Cash Discount. See participating retailer for complete details. Pricing includes freight ($1,400), air tax, tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailers may sell for less. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on most new 2010 and select 2011 vehicles and are manufacturer-to-retailer incentives, which are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. Amounts vary by vehicle. See your retailer for complete details. †0% purchase financing for 36 months available to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank, TD Financing Services and Ally Credit Canada on most 2010 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge and Ram models, except Challenger, Caliber Canada Value Package and SE Plus, Grand Caravan Canada Value Package and Cargo Van, Sprinter and Ram Chassis Cab. Example: 2010 Dodge Journey SE Canada Value Package (22F) with a Purchase Price of $19,999 financed at 0% for 36 months equals monthly payments of $555.52; cost of borrowing of $0 and a total obligation of $19,999. Pricing includes freight ($1,400), air tax, tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailers may sell for less. ±Variable Prime Rate financing up to 84 months is offered on approved credit on most new 2010 and 2011 vehicles to qualified retail customers through TD Financing Services and Royal Bank of Canada. Bi-weekly payments shown are based on 84 month terms. Variable rate shown is based on TD and RBC Prime Rate and fluctuates accordingly. Payments and financing term may increase or decrease with rate fluctuations. RBC offer not open to Quebec dealers. TD offer is not open to residents of Newfoundland and Labrador, Yukon, Nunavut and Northwest Territories. Some conditions apply. See participating retailer for complete details. ††Customer Choice Financing for 36-, 48- and 60-month terms on approved credit through TD Financing Services is available at participating dealerships to qualified retail customers on most new 2010 and 2011 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge and Ram models except Grand Caravan Cargo Van and Ram Chassis Cab. Vehicles are financed over a 36-, 48- or 60-month term with payments amortized over a term of up to 96 months and the pre-determined residual balance payable at the end of the contract. At contract’s end, customers have the choice of returning their vehicle through a Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram dealership with no further obligations (except payment of a $199 return fee and excess wear and tear, mileage and similar charges), financing the remaining balance for the rest of the amortization period at then-current standard rates or paying the residual balance in full. Some conditions apply. Customer Choice Financing in Quebec is subject to different terms and conditions. Examples: 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package (24F)/2010 Dodge Journey SE (22F) with a Purchase Price of $19,999/$19,999 financed at 5.99%/4.99% APR over 60/60 months with payments amortized over 76/78 months equals 130 bi-weekly payments of $146/$138 and one final payment of $4,845/$5,273 for a cost of borrowing of $3,871/$3,259 and a total obligation of $23,870.01/$23,258.37. Taxes, licence, insurance, registration, excess mileage and wear and tear charges, any dealer administration fees and other applicable fees and charges not included. Retailers may sell for less. See participating retailers for complete details. §2010 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT/2010 Dodge Journey R/T AWD shown have a higher price than the 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package/2010 Dodge Journey SE Canada Value Package advertised. See your retailer or go to www.dodge.ca for complete details. ∞Loyalty Bonus Cash is offered on most 2010 and 2011 models (with the exception of 2010 Dodge Caliber SE, 2010 Jeep Compass and Patriot 4x2, 2010 Jeep Wrangler Sport, 2010 Dodge Journey SE, 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan CVP and Cargo Van (C/V)) and is deducted from the negotiated price after taxes. Eligible customers include those with Gold Key Lease maturity dates between November 1, 2010 and January 3, 2011. Some conditions apply. See your retailer for complete details. ^Based on January through June 2010 R.L. Polk sales total registrations. ®SIRIUS and the dog logo are registered trademarks of SIRIUS Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC. Customer Choice Financing is a trademarkk of Chrysler Group LLC.

BACK PAGE 32 THE OBSERVER

$

19,999

$

$

$ PURCHASE FOR

19

2010 Dodge Journey R/T AWD shown.§

4

STEP UP FOR ONLY

2010 DODGE JOURNEY SXT

MORE BI-WEEKLY

• Trip computer with temperature and compass • Leather-wrapped steering wheel with audio controls • 17" Aluminum wheels

WITH CUSTOMER CHOICE FINANCING

INCLUDES $8,000 CONSUMER CASH,* FREIGHT, AIR TAX, TIRE LEVY AND OMVIC FEE. TAXES EXCLUDED. OTHER RETAILER CHARGES MAY APPLY.+

STEP UP FOR ONLY

MORE BI-WEEKLY

WITH CUSTOMER CHOICE FINANCING

19,999 PURCHASE FOR

INCLUDES $1,250 CONSUMER CASH,* FREIGHT, AIR TAX, TIRE LEVY AND OMVIC FEE. TAXES EXCLUDED. OTHER RETAILER CHARGES MAY APPLY.+

PLUS GET

%

PURCHASE FINANCING

0

for 36 months †

$

OR CHOOSE OR CHOOSE

BI-WEEKLY

2010 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT shown.§

122 BI-WEEKLY

@

A VARIABLE PRIME PR RATE OF

VISIT YOUR NEIGHBOURHOOD CHRYSLER, JEEP®, DODGE, RAM RETAILER. OR CHOOSE

3.00 %±

FOR 84 MONTHS

BI-WEEKLY

» Saturday, October 16, 2010

T INTRODUCING CUSTOMER CHOICE FINANCING. THE NEW WAY TO OWN A VEHICLE. ††

LOW MONTHLY PAYMENTS, AND THE OPTION TO RETURN AFTER 36 MONTHS..

2010 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN CANADA VALUE PACKAGE

CANADA’S BEST SELLING MINIVAN FOR MORE THAN 25 YEARS

CUSTOMER CHOICE FINANCING % $ @

146 5.99

††

FOR 60 MONTHS AND $ 0 DOWN

WITH THE OPTION TO RETURN AFTER 60 MONTHS

2010 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE STOW ’N GO®

• Second Row fold-in-floor captain’s seats • Third Row Stow ’n Go with tailgate seats

2010 DODGE JOURNEY SE CANADA VALUE PACKAGE

CANADA’S #1 SELLING CROSSOVER^

CUSTOMER

CHOICE FINANCING % $ @

138 4.99 ††

FOR 60 MONTHS AND $ 0 DOWN

WITH THE OPTION TO RETURN AFTER 60 MONTHS

3.5L HIGH OUTPUT V6 24V MPI ENGINE

+Your local retailer may charge additional fees for administration/pre-delivery that can range from $0 to $1,098 and anti-theft/safety products that can range from $0 to $1,298. Charges may vary by retailer.

RETURNING LEASE CUSTOMERS, GET UP TO $750 LOYALTY CASH∞

Dodge.ca/Offers

October 16, 2010  

Woolwich Observer

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