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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

1 NEWS

Sap's cultural impact > STORY ON PG. 17

VOLUME.....15 ISSUE..........39

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 02, 2010

.com

www.

Foggy conditions lead to collision ellesley and St. Clements firefighters, Waterloo Regional Police and other emergency services were on the scene of a serious multi-

Hutchison Road and collided with a burgundy minivan. The female passenger in the minivan was taken to hospital by ambulance with serious injuries after being extricated from the vehicle.

» KATIE EDMONDS

W

vehicle collision at the intersection of Weimar Line and Hutchison Road early Thursday morning. The accident occurred in thick fog just before 9 a.m., when the driver of a GMC Yukon turned onto

PHOTO

Katie Edmonds

Chemtura pledges cleanup after chemical release Steve Kannon

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hemtura Canada Co. will foot the bill for any cleanup costs associated with a chemical release over parts of

Elmira Monday afternoon, the company said this week. Residents around the plant reported a tar-like substance speckled over their cars and homes

WEEKEND WEATHER

following the incident shortly after 3 p.m. Sept. 27. The cause of the release is still under investigation, but Chemtura has identified the compound as BLE 25,

SATURDAY

Cloudy with Showers

11°

a mixture of diphenylamine and acetone used as an antioxidant in the making of some rubber products. Given the small quantity that fell, the chemi-

SUNDAY

Isolated Showers

11°

cal is unlikely to have any health impacts, the company said in a statement Wednesday night. Chemtura has set up a telephone hotline for anyone concerned about Opinion...............14 Business.............17

the incident: 519-6691671, ext. 313. While residents assess the damage, Woolwich Township officials are

> SEE CHEMTURA ON PG. 06

Living Here..........19 Sports.................24

Entertainment....30 Classifieds.........31


NEWS 2

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

Farmer seeks zone change to expand fertilizer operation

Election moves into higher gear

Steve Kannon

PHOTO

» JAMES JACKSON

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WHAT'S AT ISSUE Charles Dawson (centre) and Mike Neudoerffer (right) of the Conestoga

Winterbourne Residents Association have endorsed Woolwich mayoral candidate Todd Cowan (left) and Ward 3 councillor hopeful Bonnie Bryant in the upcoming election. They chose Cowan and Bryant for their vocal opposition to the proposed Hunsberger gravel pit. The CWRA was specifically formed to fight the gravel pit applications in the area.

he neighbours are leery, but the owner of an on-farm business in the north end of Woolwich Township argues a proposed expansion would address some of the current concerns. Robert Brubacher, who operates Wellington Fertilizer from his farm at 7021 Sideroad 5 W., is seeking a zone change to permit the construction of a new warehouse on the 56acre farm property. His application was heard at a public meeting in council chambers Tuesday night. Currently designated an on-farm business, the operation would have to be reclassified as “farm related use” due to the change in scale. Brubacher wants to add a 1,367-squaremetre warehouse to a site that’s now home to a 330-sq.-m. building

and a 71-sq.-m. office. That sizable increase requires a zone change, director of engineering and planning Dan Kennaley explained to councillors. Two letters objecting to the change were received by the township. One of the neighbours, Darren MacMillan, attended the meeting to speak out against the application. “When I bought, I bought next to a dairy operation. Now it’s a fertilizer company,” he said, noting there are already ongoing issues with odours, dust and garbage blowing on to his property. As well, he said he’s worried about the potential long-term impact on his family’s health due to all the chemicals present. The company brings in raw ingredients such as potassium sulphate, potash, copper sulphate and gypsum, mixing

them to create various fertilizers that are then sold to farm customers. With an expansion, there would be even more of the existing problems and increased potential for causing an impact on the watershed and his well. Furthermore, there’s been no effort at creating a buffer – trees or berms, for instance – between the operation and neighbouring homes. A planner acting for the applicant, however, argued the larger building would permit more of the activities to be carried out inside, reducing the potential for problems. Bob Black of RBA Planning Consultants said the owner is aware of the neighbours’ concerns, and is willing to do what he can to

> SEE FERTILIZER ON PG. 08

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

3 NEWS

BRIEFS The agency that oversees access to health care in the region has ousted its CEO. Sandra Hanmer left the Waterloo Wellington Local Health Integration Network (WWLHIN) Monday following a board decision. No additional information about the split was released by the organization. Chair Kathy Durst said the change is a personnel matter, saying she was unable to provide more details. Hamner, who was paid $280,000 last year, was under contract until 2013. She had been with the WWLHIN since its inception in 2005. Durst said the organization has launched an immediate search for a new leader, hoping to have someone in place within four months. Senior director Bruce Lauckner will act as interim CEO. “This does not affect our focus on patient care,” Durst said of the decision, which comes at a time when the province’s controversial LHIN system is taking heavy political fire.

PHOTO

» KATIE EDMONDS

> Health agency forces out CEO

THINKING IN SHADES OF GREEN Riverside Public School in Elmira is one of the participants in Capital Paving’s Green School Contest. Students Joey Metz, Sara Ratcliffe and Kyle Rintoul get a jump start on being green by helping out with the school’s recycling .

Contest asks students to come up with ideal green school Katie Edmonds

I

n a study released last week by LifeWay Research, nearly nine in 10 young U.S. adults say it’s up to their generation to clean up the environment, a mess left behind by past generations. In Woolwich, Grade 5 and 6 students across the school boards are getting a start on doing just that as they compete for the title of Capital Paving’s ‘Greenest School.’ A number of schools in the township kicked off the competition with assemblies and interactive environmental trivia for the students, all part of the launch of the competition. During the three-month contest period, middle school

EE RY FR IVE L DE

students are being asked to design the ideal green school. To win the competition, their design should be energy efficient, environmentally friendly, and sustainable for years to come. The winning school will receive at minimum a $6,000 grant that will be used towards improvements to their school. “At our company we try our best to be environmentally responsible,” explained Capital Paving’s George Lourenco. “So this year we wanted to organize something that is fun for kids, but also a learning experience. It’s important to teach people at a young age about environmental protection and we hope this is a fun way to do that.”

Both the Waterloo Region District School Board and the Waterloo Catholic District School Board are participating in this event, as the contest concept fits nicely with their current science curriculum. The students involved will see real world application of their science education in their design concepts. “That’s the amazing thing about the project; it is going to tap into all areas of the curriculum,” explained Leslie McNabb, principal of Floradale Public School. “It’s going to tap into design technology, and it’s going to tap into science and language and math. It will teach them about a lot of different things.” Other participating schools

in the area include Conestogo, John Mahood, Park Manor, Riverside, St. Teresa and Breslau PS, where the final round of judging will be held in early December. During the finals, schools will present their projects in three formats. Each group will present a written description of all the ‘green’ characteristics their school design has to offer, and how each of those items positively impacts the environment. Then, they will display their constructed model illustrating the green design. Finally, the students will have the opportunity to show other schools a short video clip about the process

> SEE GREEN ON PG. 07

W • O • O • L • W • I • C • H

> Elmira singer is Wellesley Idol Elmira’s Maggie Wang took home the title of Wellesley Idol and the top prize of $350 at the Wellesley Apple Butter and Cheese Festival held in the village Sept. 25. Wang began the process June 27th at the open audition at the Wellesley Community Centre, with 14 contestants singing for a spot in the semifinals. From there, the group was narrowed down to six competitors, then to only three. Wang, Jessi Elgood, and Emma Bender each sang two songs for a final round of judging before Wang was announced as the winner. Wang, an EDSS student, was also a contestant in this years’ Shinin’ Star competition on the Faith FM radio station.

> Algae clears Warning signs advising people to be cautious around the water are being removed from Conestogo Lake Conservation Area. Test results showed extremely low levels of the toxin microcystin in the reservoir water. That means there is little risk to swimmers, boaters and anglers from microcystin, which is produced by blue-green algae.

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NEWS 4

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

LAW & ORDER

Police seeking man after suspicious approach in New Hamburg Elmira District Secondary School called police to report that a group of students had left the school in order to have a fight in Gibson Park. Police arrived at the park before the fight began and it was broken up without incident.

>>5:30 PM Two pickup trucks

collided as one began backing up in a parking lot at a business in Elmira and struck the other vehicle. There were minor damages to both vehicles but nobody was injured. No charges were laid.

>>8:12 PM Police approached a 23-year-old Wallenstein man who looked suspicious in a St. Jacobs parking lot. Upon further investigation, police found a small amount of drugs on the man and confiscated it. The drugs were sent for destruction but the man was not charged. >>10:25 PM A vehicle driven

by a 29-year-old Elmira man was pulled over by police for erratic driving on Arthur Street in downtown Elmira. The man was accused of impaired driving, but by the time he arrived at the

aterloo Regional Police are investigating a report of suspicious activity at a New Hamburg park. On Sept. 26 at around 4:30 p.m., an unknown male in a van was observed speaking with a nine-year-old boy playing in the park near Hincks Street. During a brief conversation the boy was asked if he would like to get into the vehicle. The boy declined and the male left the area. The male is described

station for blood-alcohol testing, his blood alcohol level was below the legal limit. Provincial charges for Highway Traffic Act offenses were laid, but no criminal charges.

SEPTEMBER 24 >>7:05 AM A man was taken to

hospital in Kitchener with head injuries after falling from a garbage truck driving on the expressway, south of the Arthur Street and Sawmill Road roundabout, while crossing the Conestogo River on the way into Elmira. The man was

as white, 40s, short brown hair, very large build, sporting eyeglasses and wearing a green or gray shirt. The vehicle is described as a newer model Kia van, silver in colour. Anyone with information is asked to contact the major case unit at 519-650-8500, ext. 8674 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS. Parents are reminded to review street proofing strategies with their children. For safety tips, visit www.wrps.on.ca.

smoking a cigarette while riding as the passenger in the truck when he accidentally knocked the door handle, opened the door and fell out of the moving vehicle. He was later transported to Hamilton General Hospital.

>>7:45 AM A 21-year-old Palmerston woman lost control of her red Pontiac on Yatton Sideroad. Her car caught the gravel at the side of the road, spun, then went into the ditch and hit a hydro pole. The woman was not injured but was charged with ‘careless driving.’

Firefighters tackle pickup blaze

SPARKED UP

Firefighters were called to a truck fire at the corner of Benjamin Road and Farmers Market Road in St. Jacobs around 8:30 a.m. Thursday. The fire is believed to have started when a tire running flat caused friction. The truck was towing a lifestock trailer, which received minimal damage.

>>2:10 PM A bus designed just outside Elmira. The 24-year-

to transport people who are physically disabled was driving in the roundabout in St. Jacobs when another vehicle entered the roundabout without yielding appropriately. The driver of the bus was forced to slam on their brakes, causing the vehicle to be rear-ended by a pickup truck that was following behind. There were no injuries, as the driver was the only one on the bus at the time. There was minor damage to both vehicles.

>>3:00 PM A blue SUV and

a grey Nissan collided in the roundabout. One driver, a 46-yearold woman, suffered minor injuries but refused to be taken to hospital by ambulance. One of the drivers was charged with ‘careless driving.’

SEPTEMBER 25 >>2:12 PM Police arrested a young offender who they believe might be involved in a string of vehicle break-ins. Police are still investigating as they do not believe he is the only party involved.

SEPTEMBER 26 Smile Cookies are are gone, they’ve leftleft in our Smile Cookies gone, but butthe thesmiles smiles they’ve in our communitywill willlast last forever. forever. Thanks your support, Tim Tim community Thankstoto your support, Hortons will be donating the entire proceeds to Nutrition for

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>>2:52 AM Small change and vehicle ownership documents were stolen from an unlocked vehicle on Flamingo Drive in Elmira. The owner of the vehicle believes the thefts happened sometime early that evening. >>3:11 PM The driver of a white minivan put her seven passengers in danger when she quickly changed her mind as to the direction she was turning at Middlebrook Road and Line 86

old driver was carrying seven passengers, four of whom were children with special needs, when she began to turn left from Line 86 onto Middlebrook. She then changed her mind and turned the car right, colliding with a car that was driving behind her. The second vehicle was a Ford Taurus, driven by a 19-year-old man. No one was injured in the collision.

>>6:15 PM An employee at

Lazer Video in Elmira called police after witnessing a young male burning a hole in the chair outside the Arthur Street store. The youth was dealt with under the Youth Criminal Justice Act.

>>7:30 PM A burgundy Sportek mountain bike with a 26-inch frame was stolen from a residence on Herbert Street in Elmira. If found, please call WRPS or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.

SEPTEMBER 27 >>8:00 AM An unlocked vehicle

was entered on Pintail Drive in Elmira sometime between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. the previous day. A wallet with identification was stolen from inside. Police have identified a suspect whom they believe is tied to a string of vehicle break-ins in the area.

>>9:30 AM An employee at a

business in St. Jacobs called police to report a sweater stolen from the store. The sweater was valued at $90. Police have not yet identified any suspects.

>>11:00 AM A red mountain

bike was found on Meadowlark Road and was brought to Division

» JAMES JACKSON

>>11:00 AM A teacher at

W

PHOTO

SEPTEMBER 23

3A. Police are holding the bicycle until its owner comes to claim it.

>>12:30 PM An elderly Elmira woman was walking on Wyatt Street in Elmira when she came across bullet shells on the ground and called police. There is no indication that the bullets were used, they seem to have been dropped by accident. They were taken by police and sent for destruction.

SEPTEMBER 28 >>8:20 AM Police were called to a residence in St. Jacobs where the homeowner had found marijuana. The previous evening and into the early morning hours, a bush party had happened at the back of a Mennonite residence. When the homeowner went to the location in the morning, he located 13 grams of the drug, which police confiscated and sent for destruction. >>11:30 AM A police officer

went out to the parking lot at Division 3A and found his cruiser had a flat tire. Upon further investigation, he found that a knife blade had broken off in the tire and was causing a slow leak. The investigation is ongoing.

>>9:00 PM An Elmira woman

called police after her car was egged near Gibson Park. She was driving from Snyder Street onto First Street when she heard a smashing sound and she thought her window had been broken. Police say there were several reported incidents of egging in the area that evening. If anyone has information, please call or visit Division 3A.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

5 NEWS

S

urrounded by a group of local seniors Tuesday morning, KitchenerConestoga MPP Leeanna Pendergast unveiled a new provincial tax credit aimed at offsetting rising electricity prices. Seniors stand to gain the most under the proposed new Ontario Energy and Property Tax Credit, though the measures will apply to some 2.8 million low- and middle-come residents. Ontarians who own or rent a home could receive up to $900 in tax relief, with seniors able to claim up to $1,025. The program is an enhancement on tax credits introduced last year, increasing the number of eligible recipients and boosting the total amount mailed back to citizens, Pendergast explained. “This is a welcome program for seniors. It’s to help them run their households and stay in their homes.” Both property taxes and utility bills in most municipalities have been increasing at rates far above inflation. For those with lower earnings, particularly seniors on fixed incomes, the

credits help with higher bills. The new measure in part addresses higher electricity bills now subject to the HST. “Helping seniors is a key priority for the Ontario government,” she said. “We value the great contributions seniors have made in making Ontario a great place to live for all, and today’s announcement will help seniors on fixed incomes live a little easier in their own homes.” In announcing legislation to enable the credits, Finance Minister Dwight Duncan noted the new measures are part of an overall taxrelief plan. Income tax cuts that came into effect last January have lowered income taxes for 93 per cent of residents, representing an average tax savings of $200 per year. If the credit goes ahead, it would be paid as a lump sum starting with the 2010 tax returns. In subsequent years, it would be paid quarterly. In combination with other quarterly tax credits, including the HST program, some residents could receive a cheque in their mailboxes pretty much every month, Pendergast suggested.

Rebecca Cannon

PHOTO

Steve Kannon

» KATIE EDMONDS

New tax credits are aimed at household costs

THE DRIVE IS ON Grade 7 students at Park Manor Public School get set to sell, sell, sell at the assembly that kicked off their annual magazine drive Sept. 28. This year's target is $45,000.

Magazine drive powers Park Manor programs Katie Edmonds

I

nstead of reading the classic ‘Death of a Salesman,’ students at Elmira’s Park Manor Public School are getting a lesson on how to be a salesman as they launch their annual magazine fundraiser this week. Students are encouraged to fundraise by selling magazine subscriptions through the Canadian Community Reading Plan, in which the company donates 37 per cent of every subscription back to the school. If the funds raised aren’t enough of an incentive, the CCRP also provides prizes that go to students who raise the most money.

Typically, the two-week fundraising blitz raises about $35,000 for the school, which staff hope means that it won't be necessary to fundraise at other times throughout the year. This year, Val Soehner, leader of the 18-person magazine drive volunteer committee, has set a goal of $45,000 – money to be used on projects such as a meet the teacher night, the Grade 8 graduation trip, year-end field trips, library programs and the subsidization of school planners and yearbooks. “It’s a great fundraiser for the school,” she explained. “The money goes back to the students through activities and supplies. A lot of the kids

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wouldn’t be able to afford some things without the fundraising.” Park Manor has been running this event for 10 years and the dedication of staff, students and volunteers has made the school one of the top three schools in the country in terms of fundraising in this fashion. “This is the big event at our school that really gets the kids motivated,” said Soehner. “They work hard to earn those sales so they deserve the prizes for their efforts.” Volunteers, including Soehner, who at times throughout her association with the pro-

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NEWS 6

THE OBSERVER

Chemtura: Concerns linger over delay in notifying municipality > CONTINUED FROM COVER fuming over the fact it took Chemtura more than four hours to notify the township of the release. The company did, however, inform the Ministry of the Environment and Waterloo Region’s spill centre immediately after the incident. With the township out of the loop for so long, it was almost 10 p.m. before the Community Alert Network system was activated, with automated phone calls going out to some 850 households in the area nearest the plant. As a precaution, notification also went out to locations deemed more vulnerable, such as schools

and nursing homes, explained township chief administrative officer David Brenneman. The day after the incident, he was already hearing complaints about the delay in notifying the public. He laid the blame on the company, noting the municipality acted in a timely fashion once they knew about the spill. “There’s a need for timely communication. It was unacceptable that the township first learned about the chemical release four-plus hours after the fact,” he said Tuesday. “We’ve discussed our concerns with the company, and addressed that it was unacceptable. We wouldn’t expect this to

happen in the future.” The bigger concern right now is dealing with the chemical release and making sure residents know the extent of the problem and what should be done, he said. That sentiment was echoed by Pat McLean, chair of the Chemtura Public Advisory Committee (CPAC), who said the health and property concerns have to be the first priority. “The good news is that it’s been some number of years since we’ve had a fire, spill or anything from Chemtura that’s affected the community. The bad news is there’s been this release – the company needs to get more information

out to the community, needs to take responsibility.” Residents are advised to avoid contact with the material and to take precautions such as discarding any vegetables in gardens exposed to the chemical fallout. Chemtura needs to tell people what they’ll be doing for them in terms of cleanup, Brenneman stressed. “A person should be able to get answers to their questions. What if my child’s toys need cleaning? What if my car needs cleaning.” Following a meeting with township officials Wednesday, Chemtura issued a statement saying it has arranged to do a cleanup in the affected

areas. Cars can be taken to two inspection sites in Elmira– Rudow’s CARSTAR Collision Centre and Savage Autobody – while homes and other items will be tackled by a property restoration service. Meanwhile, the company and the MOE continue to look into what happened Monday afternoon, calling any information circulating “speculative.” The investigation into the incident is ongoing and when it is complete the findings will be shared with the public and media in full detail, said Dwight Este, the plant’s environment, health safety and security manager, in an email Wednesday night.

» Saturday, October 02, 2010 KEY DATES

1989: Elmira discovered that industrial chemicals from the Uniroyal factory had poisoned the town’s water supply. 2004: A fire ignited in a

wastewater holding tank and exploded. It soon spread to a second tank, which also exploded.

2006: Fire at the

plant. A tank used in the manufacturing of synthetic oil ignited, sending a thick black plume into the sky visible for more than 20 kilometres.

2009: Chemtura files for

Chapter 11 bankruptcy. With this type of bankruptcy, in most instances the debtor remains in control of its business operations as a debtor in possession, and is subject to the oversight and jurisdiction of the court.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

7 NEWS

Township staying the course at fitness centre Money-losing venture to be monitored as plan put in place to turn things around by year's end osing money since its new fitness centre opened a year ago, Woolwich is holding the course, confident it can turn the operation around. The facility, part of the Woolwich Memorial Centre in Elmira, opened in September 2009 after the township struck a deal with Caledon-based Personal Best Health and Performance Inc. to operate it. Rather than accept other bids to simply pay rent for the space, Woolwich opted to pay the company $11,000 a month, with the idea of having more control over the programming offered at the centre. In the first year of operation, however, there was a shortfall of more than $90,000, as the facility failed to generate anywhere near enough memberships to cover the costs. Revenues were only $42,000. The facility needs to sell 275 annual memberships just to breakeven. While 298 memberships were sold in the first year, most of

runs Personal Best with her husband Barrie, acknowledged there have been some difficulties getting membership numbers to the desired level. It’s not run as a conventional gym. The goal involves more than simply selling memberships, as many of the programs cater to the wider community, not just club members. “The fitness industry isn’t an easy business,” she explained.

“Going forward, I’m confident that we can generate a profit.” New measures such as including use of the pool as part of the membership package and the use of preauthorized monthly payments should help turn things around, said Horndl. Staff has already seen an increase. Since Aug. 16, there have been 126 new members, though only 21 of those were

for a full year. Given the tendency towards short-term memberships, the three-month option may be dropped to encourage longerterm commitment to the facility, she added. “It’s too easy to let their memberships expire.” In voting to maintain the relationship with Personal Best for the time being, Coun. Mark Bauman praised Shepley’s staff for the enthusiasm brought

to public events as the Try a Tri, a minitriathlon organized as part of last April’s Healthy Communities Month. For Mayor Bill Strauss, the positive public feedback warrants giving the company a chance to get on track. “I’ve heard nothing but compliments – just give it a little more time and everything will go forward,” he said.

Elmira's Chateau Gardens opens new shelter OPEN SEASON

» KATIE EDMONDS

L

those were short-term. Since June, the facility has made changes and ramped up marketing to increase membership, WMC business development manager Jen Horndl told councillors meeting Tuesday night. Following her presentation, councillors agreed to keep in place the agreement with Personal Best on a month-by-month basis. Caron Shepley, who

PHOTO

Steve Kannon

Residents of Chateau Gardens gathered the afternoon of Sept. 29 to celebrate the official opening of a new sun shelter in their courtyard. The shelter was dedicated to the residents after a generous bequest from the late Walter Metzger and funds from the Chateau Gardens Auxiliary. On hand to cut the ribbon were Rita Brubacher, Bonnie Wright, Audrey Gleesen, John Hill, Lynne Hipel and Lynne Martin.

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of building their project and the creativity that went into the final product. Some schools have already started brainstorming their ideas, and McNabb says that the ideas are coming from a wide range of places. “The kids have already started taking a look at our school and the energy saving measures that we have in place now, and are thinking about what other kinds of features that we might want to include that would help us to be even greener than we already are. It’s a very neat opportunity for them.”

(St. Jacobs)

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 03

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NEWS 8

THE OBSERVER

Floradale

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PARKVIEW MANORS

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

Fertilizer: Farmer looks to streamline operation these things can be addressed.” Dust and odour issues will likely be front and center when the township’s planning staff reviews the application before bringing back a recommendation to council at a later date, said Kennaley. Noting that MacMillan’s home is just some 90 metres from the farm operation, Coun. Mark Bauman asked Kennaley to determine if minimum distance separation (MDS) regulations come into play in this case.

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 02 minimize the impact. In fact, Brubacher has already taken steps to reduce the chance of odours spreading. Odours, for instance, are most likely to occur when trucks deliver ingredients or when the finished product is transferred to customers’ fertilizer buggies. The mixing already occurs in an enclosed area; putting more of the operation inside should help. “We are aware of the concerns. All of

Magazine: Students will be out there to sell and they are being offered at a lower price than can be found on newsstands. Canadian Living magazine for example, costs only $29 if purchased through the fundraising drive, in comparison to the $47.88 price if bought on newsstands. The magazine drive began this past week and will run until Oct. 13. More information about the fundraiser is available from the school. Subscriptions can be purchased from Park Manor students.

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 05 gram did not even have a child enrolled in the school, begin planning for this event in the summer. “It’s a huge campaign.” The team says that the time spent planning is well worthwhile, they know that they are selling a good product and that both the students and the people buying magazines are getting a good deal. There are more than 600 magazines to choose from

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

9 NEWS

& Business Directory

THE FALL 2010

$ave Energy Costs This Winter 

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NEWS 10

THE OBSERVER

& Business Directory

For the Cottage, Home or Shop... Help reduce rising fuel expenses by installing a wood stove.

p

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Many models to choose from on display!

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THE FALL 2010

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

M-T 9-6; W 9-8; Th-F 9-9; Sat 10-5; Sun 12-4 | www.thecarpetstoreinc.com

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

11 NEWS

& Business& Directory Business Directory

THE FALL 2010 THE FALL 2010

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* Special offer & pricing is in effect until November 30, 2010, at Woolwich Rentals. Prices do not include applicable taxes.

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100 Union St., Elmira, Ontario (Reist Industries)

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Hydro rate hike adds 5% to bills Fee boost 18.5% has to be put in perspective, say officials James Jackson

W

aterloo North Hydro is seeking to raise its fee for delivering electricity by 18.5 per cent next May, which would add $69 a year to the average residential bill in Woolwich and Wellesley townships, bringing it to $1,345. If the 1,100-page proposal is approved by the Ontario Energy Board (OEB), it would equal a five per cent increase over the entire bill. It is the first time since 2004 that any major changes have been made to the rates. “We froze our rates for a while a few years back, now we’re trying to put in a rate increase to play catch-up,” said Mayor Bill Strauss, Woolwich’s representative on the utility’s board. Officials at Waterloo North Hydro, which was a non-profit venture that delivered electricity at-cost prior to 2000, echoed the mayor’s comments. They say that the increase in rates would generate $5 million a year, which is necessary to maintain a reliable system of distributing electricity and promoting conservation, and to help pay for a new $26-million head office, slated to open in Dec. 2011 in Woolwich Township. “[The money is going] back into the business; back in to replacing old assets such as poles, transformers, and lines,” says Albert Singh, vice-president of finance. He stressed that only a small portion of the revenues would be used to pay for the new building, saying it will be amortized over a 50-year period. The utility say that the OEB has regulations against making incremental increases in costs each year, which the hydro company would prefer rather than dumping such a large increase at one time on customers. Under the proposed increase, a bill this time next year will be 12.2 per cent higher than a bill from 2004, which works out to less than a two per cent increase each year, says Rene Gatien, president and CEO of Waterloo North Hydro. But under current regulations, the OEB has determined that companies can only submit a new cost-of-service study every few years, and in 2011 it will be Waterloo North Hydro’s turn. “We don’t like the process where we have to catch up all of a sudden, and we have said to our regulator that this isn’t a good way to treat the customer,” said Gatien. “Folks can understand if we say to them ‘our rate increase is going to be two per cent this year and next year it’s 1.5 per cent.’ They can understand that. When you come along and say 18 per cent, to try and understand the mechanics of how we reached 18 per cent, they don’t care. ‘Why are you hitting me with 18 per cent?’ “We are the size of Toronto Hydro in terms of the area we cover, and we’re replacing stuff that’s 50 years old. And that’s what we’ve got to continue to do. We’ve got to continue to raise the money and continue to ensure we have a good reliable system.”


NEWS 12

THE OBSERVER

THE FALL 2010

Âť Saturday, October 02, 2010

& Business Directory Autumn leaf clean-up T

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he autumn foliage can be beautiful to admire. However, once the trees are past their peak and begin to drop their leaves, autumn can mean lots of yard work for homeowners. A mature tree can have more than 200,000 leaves, most of which will fall to the ground when the cooler weather arrives. Multiply that amount by the number of trees on the property, and one can see what a task removing leaves can be. Depending on the size of a person's property, leaf removal can be an all-day project. However, when done right, one ensures the lawn underneath the leaves continues to thrive and will be in a better position to ride out the winter. For most, a human-powered rake is the best tool for removing leaves. While blowers might seem quicker, they can simply disperse the leaves instead of congregate them for easier disposal. What's more, blowers can be noisy and distribute fuel emissions into the air. It is important to rake deep enough to disturb the thatch or dried up grass and other debris that can form in the lawn. This helps prevent the lawn from suffocation or discoloration. Leaves can be gathered and packed into biodegradeable bags and brought to the local recycling center. They also can be broken down and used in compost. Leaves on their own do not make ideal organic material, so it's best if they're mixed into a compost pile to generate that "black gold" plants love. If there are not many leaves on the property, a lawnmower can be pushed over the leaves to break them up into food for the lawn. However, large quantities of leaves should be raked and removed.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

13 NEWS

Elmira neighbourhood welcomes soldier home from Afghanistan

Wellesley gets its fest on

Katie Edmonds

A

ABC THE PLACE TO BE Throngs of people braved

25.99

$

PHOTOS

» KATIE EDMONDS

the rain Sept. 25 to visit the village of Wellesley for the annual Apple Butter and Cheese Festival. Top, Greg Misener sets up his ‘Nudge Nudge, Where’s the Fudge?’ stand in the Wellesley arena. Above, Jessi Elgood competes in the finals of Wellesley Idol. Right, Volunteer Natasha Runstedler pours one of the festival’s first glasses of apple cider. For more photos of the festival, visit www.observerxtra.com.

Prime Rib

Steaks

s Elmira resident Scott Hahn touched down and stepped off the plane Sept. 16, rain was pouring all around him. It wasn’t the sunniest welcome home for the Canadian soldier home on vacation from Afghanistan, but the yellow ribbons which hugged the trees lining Brookmead Street in Elmira brightened his day significantly. Hahn, 23, joined the Canadian military in 2005 as a reservist following high school. After a few years of weekly training sessions at a facility in Kitchener, he decided that he was ready for travel and signed up for a tour in Afghanistan. “I do presence patrol,” explained Hahn, who worked as an electrician before flying overseas. “It is basically just maintaining a Canadian presence in the country; we talk to the locals a lot and the kids like to come up and talk to us too.” Currently, he is home for a 17-day break from duty; corporals are given the option of taking a vacation anywhere

in the world with their next of kin or using that time to go home for a visit. Hahn chose the second option, noting that his hometown is familiar and welcoming, but also very different from his life overseas. “It feels a bit different being back,” Hahn noted. “You learn to appreciate the little things like plumbing, sleeping in a real bed, and being able to go to the grocery store and buy your own groceries.” For neighbours, and friends, it is just nice to have him home safely. “We are proud to have him as our neighbour and friend,” said neighbour Scott Harris. “Serving our country is not something that many people do, and it takes a lot of sacrifice.” Harris says that kids who live on Brookmead have sent Hahn pictures and letters while he is in Afghanistan and were excited for his return home as well. “He is an inspiration to a few of the kids on the street here; they really look up to him.”

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OPINION 14

THE OBSERVER

OPINION

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

... let’s not have to regret this development because we did not assure its benefits and identify its shortcomings first. Shannon Purves-Smith letter on pg. 16

VERBATIM

I

can’t imagine being told by my mom I can’t swim in the river. The idea of that is appalling to me. ... We need better and independent research, because the water monitoring has been funded by the oil industry.

> Director James Cameron laments the state of the Athabasca River and says he'll help First Nations groups in oil sands battles

THE MONITOR

A

s of July 1, Canada's population was estimated at 34,108,800, up 120,800 or 0.36% from April 1, 2010. Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba posted the highest rates of population growth among the provinces.

> Statistics Canada

EDITORIAL

Latest Chemtura incident puts system to the test

T

his week’s chemical release ended a long incident-free string at Elmira’s Chemtura Canada Co. One officials there would undoubtedly like to have seen continue. The BLE 25, a compound to prevent rubber from oxidizing, that rained down on an area near the chemical plant was the first notable incident since a fire in the spring of 2006. Complaints about odours have become all but nonexistent. It’s been a fairly smooth ride in the interim. While the company has been through the process many times in the past, there’s still much to be learned, apparently. Chemtura alerted the provincial and regional spill centres in short order, but neglected to inform Woolwich Township until some four and a half hours later. Neighbours weren’t kept in the loop, and the delay in

notifying the township meant the Community Alert Network (CAN) system wasn't implemented until about 10 p.m., almost seven hours after the chemical release. Township officials were understandably miffed. Dealing with the impact of the incident and resultant cleanup are the top priorities, but the municipality is already pressing the company to explain how the communication process broke down. The spill appears to have been minor, with no perceived immediate health threats, but officials are pondering what might have happened if the incident had not been so benign. In addition to determining what went wrong such that the chemical made its way into the environment, Chemtura will have to review its communication strategy. Again, because this isn’t the first time the

PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO

1004840 ISSN 1203 9578

WOOLWICH OBSERVER 20-B Arthur Street North, Elmira, Ontario, Canada N3B 1Z9

> COPYRIGHT

Phone: 519.669.5790 Toll Free: 1.888.966.5942 Fax: 519.669.5753

The entire contents of The Observer and online edition are protected by copyright. No portion thereof is to be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the specific permission of the publisher. Reproduction rights can be obtained from ACCESS Copyright located at 1 Yonge St., 1900, Toronto, ON M5E 1E5 FAX: 416.868.1621

Joe Merlihan, Publisher | EXT 107 jmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Steve Kannon, Editor | EXT 103 skannon@woolwichobserver.com James Jackson, Reporter | EXT 101 jjackson@woolwichobserver.com Katie Edmonds, Reporter | EXT 102 kedmonds@woolwichobserver.com

> LETTER POLICY

company has been taken to task on that issue. To be fair, there have been improvements. But given the quiet times of the last few years, a stretch in which management has been all but invisible, there’s a chance things may have become a little complacent. The company isn’t the only one under scrutiny. There have been grumblings about the CAN system, with some in the immediate area of the plant indicating they were never contacted by the automated phone calls that went out. Township administrators were put in the position of defending their actions, noting the company was responsible for the resultant delay in activating the CAN system. On the upside, officials have been able to find some soft spots in the communication system during a

Donna Rudy, Sales Manager | EXT 104 drudy@woolwichobserver.com Pat Merlihan, Production Mgr | EXT 105 pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Matthew French, Production | EXT 108 mfrench@woolwichobserver.com Jon Sarachman, Production | EXT 109 jsarachman@woolwichobserver.com

The Observer welcomes letters to the editor on topics of interest to our readers. Letters may be edited for brevity, grammar, and legal considerations. All letters must be signed and contain the writer’s full name and telephone number for verification purposes. Unsigned or anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. If you have a legitimate concern and cannot sign your name to a letter, please contact the editor to discuss alternative means of resolving the issue. This newspaper declines announcements, poetry and thank-you letters in the opinion section. Maximum suggested length is 500 words.

relatively minor incident. Better to discover the problems in that circumstance rather than in a real emergency. As previous experience with Chemtura-related incidents have shown, the public isn’t always up to speed with the alert system. During the fire in 2006 and the big explosion two years earlier, many residents disregarded or failed to understand the significance of the warnings, opting instead to go about their business or, more alarming still to officials, to flock down to the site to have a look. If they had encountered a toxic spill instead of something more innocuous, the results could have been devastating. While the company would have preferred to avoid this week’s incident altogether, the emergency response and communication systems may be improved because of it.

> CIRCULATION The Observer is an audited controlled circulation publication. Canadian Media Circulation Audit calculates and prepares The Observer circulation reports | 14,812.

> SUBSCRIPTIONS Annual subscriptions are available at a rate of $37.10 (includes GST) for delivery within Canada. Contact the office or email sales@woolwichobserver.com for further details. All issues from 2006 on are available online free of charge.

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> ASSOCIATIONS

The Observer is a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association [OCNA], Canadian Community Newspaper Association [CCNA], Ontario Press Council, and The Greater KW Chamber of Commerce.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

15 OPINION

In autocracies, the son also rises

N

ext week, according to North Koreawatchers, the Korean Workers’ Party (i.e. the Communists) will hold an assembly in Pyongyang to anoint Kim Jong-un, the youngest son of Dear Leader Kim Jong-il, as the successor to his father and grandfather. There is already a song, “Footsteps,” that praises the young man’s qualities as a leader, and lapel badges with his image are already being churned out so that every North Korean citizen can wear one. Egypt is not quite so weird, in the sense that the three generals who have ruled the country for the past 54 years were not actually blood relations, but it is getting weirder. It is universally believed that President Hosni Mubarak, now 82, is grooming his 46-year-old son Gamal as his successor. There were public protests about that in Cairo and Alexandria last week, though the police soon broke them up with the usual arrests and violence. But where does this all come from? How can anybody believe that none of the 85 million Egyptians is better suited to be president than the son of the present incumbent, or that the “Young General,” Kim Jong-un, is the only one of North Korea’s 24 million people who is qualified to rule the country? In fact, nobody does believe it, and neither of these men has a powerful personal following of his own. Moreover, these countries are republics, not monarchies. They may be dictatorial, repressive republics, but the whole notion of dynasties is alien to republics of any sort. So how can this sort of thing happen? In monarchies, the son is supposed to inherit power from his father. In modern monarchies, they don’t usually get much power anyway, since the job

THE VIEW FROM HERE

International Affairs GWYNNE DYER is largely ceremonial, but at least there is a theoretical basis for passing power down in this way. In a republic, on the other hand, there is just no room for the hereditary principle in politics. Power does pass down within families in democratic republics from time to time, as with the Nehru-Gandhi dynasty in India and the Bush family in the United States, but only if the would-be successor can win a real election. The first modern case of an inherited dictatorship was Bashar al-Assad, who succeeded his father Hafez as the president of Syria in 2000. The way he got chosen is quite instructive. Hafez al-Assad was a former air force general who had ruled Syria with an iron fist for 30 years. He did want to keep power within the family, but it was his older son Basil whom he was grooming to succeed him. However, Basil died in a car accident in 1994, and Bashar (who was studying ophthalmology in London at the time) was ordered back to Syria by his father and put into an intensive programme of military and political training. When his father died six years later, Bashar, at the age of 35, was swiftly chosen to succeed him – but how did that happen? Hafiz al-Assad had wanted it to happen, but he was now dead. Why did all the other major players in the Syrian regime, a notoriously ambitious and ruthless group of men, agree to make this inexperienced nobody their leader?

Because they wanted to preserve their own privileges and power, and that could best be guaranteed by letting the old dictator’s son take power. In a oneparty regime, there are no real rules for the succession, and the risk that a struggle between rivals for the leadership will destroy the unity of the party and bring the whole regime down is ever-present. Unless the son of the late leader is a murderous megalomaniac, he is the safest choice no matter how poor his qualifications are for the job. He can lead in name while the real decisions are made elsewhere, and all the powerful people within the regime get to keep their accustomed places at the trough. That is the logic that brought Bashar al-Assad to power in Syria 10 years ago, and it is what creates support within the North Korean and Egyptian regimes today for the elevation of the current dictators’ sons to supreme power after their fathers die. It really doesn’t matter who is up on the reviewing stand taking the salute, as long as the thousand most powerful people in the regime keep their jobs. So Kim Jong-un (now 27 years old) will be acclaimed as the next leader of North Korea by the Party congress – and will probably take up the job quite soon, since his father had a stroke two years ago and is now very frail. Gamal Mubarak will run for president in next year’s “election” in Egypt, and will win because the regime always fixes the elections. But despite the extraordinary durability of these regimes, they are not indestructible. If you can credibly say about some situation that “it cannot go on like this forever,” then the only logical alternative is that it will eventually stop. Just not right now.

THE VOICE The NHL season starts next week. Who do you want to see win the cup?

“Well, I would like it to be the Toronto Maple Leafs but I don’t think it will be.” > Valerie Morris

“I would like to see the Leafs take it – everyone around here would, but I don’t think that will happen.” > Doug Read

BY SCOTT ARNOLD

“I am going to go with Buffalo. It sure won’t be Toronto.” > Roger Lichty

Chemtura officials have been trying to determine the scope of the damage since a rubber additive rained down on parts of Elmira Monday afternoon.

“I am not really into hockey but I would have to say the Montreal Canadiens.” > Anya Janzen


OPINION 16

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

It’s time to challenge the growth mantra M

unicipal elections have long been plagued by low voter turnout. Don’t expect this year to be any different. And that’s a shame, and not only for the obvious reasons. Looking ahead, it just might be that small local democracies play a big role in preserving our way of life. Small and local are already buzzwords in farming: we’re catching on to the fact food produced close to home on family farms provides widespread benefits. In the bigger picture, a return to localized activities and small-scale farming are part of the degrowth model, an alternative to the growth mantra that permeates our culture. Take an issue in the upcoming election, light rail transit. The entire rationale for spending more than a billion dollars – it will top that price tag if it goes ahead, no matter what you’re being told – depends on continued growth. Proponents tell us the train is not needed today, but will be when the population increases by half again. Even at that point, buses might still serve us better, but the train will encourage growth – there’s that word again – in the downtown corridor. This is not an isolated issue. The entire system of government and the economy are both predicated on growth. None of our politicians at any level is talking about reversing that trend, even though constant growth is by definition impossible. Life on a

From the Editor Steve Kannon finite planet makes that clear. The environmental impact of human activity is the clearest indicator of where growth is a problem. We use up nonrenewable resources and we spew pollutants into the air, water and soil. That can’t go on forever. Nor can we continue to pave over land, especially productive farmland, in perpetuity. That, of course, is one of the arguments made in favour of the transit system: the war on suburban sprawl. As French economist Serge Latouche, one of the leaders of the degrowth movement, points out, we live in a society that is obsessed with growth economics – growth for growth’s sake. It’s an obsession that no longer serves us. “What if the very idea of growth – accumulating riches, destroying the environment and worsening social inequality – is a trap? Maybe we need to aim to create a society that is based on quality not quantity, on cooperation and not competition,” he writes in one of his recent treatises on the subject. Our current lifestyle has a dramatic impact on the Earth. We consume at a

rate beyond sustainability, with each of us putting a claim on an increasingly large chunk of the planet’s surface to make possible our consumerist tendencies. The average person in the United States consumes the equivalent of 9.6 hectares of land, in Canada 7.2 and in Europe 4.5. We are a long way from planetary equality and even further from a sustainable civilization which would require consumption levels below 1.4 hectares, even before accounting for population change, he says. While we’ve recognized some of the perils, if only in little ways, our efforts have been largely ineffective. Yes, we separate our trash into various recyclable components. Yes, we look at ways to make items with fewer materials. Yes, we try to get greater fuel efficiency out of our vehicles. But the ecological damage of extreme growth continues because there are more of us consuming more goods as increasing numbers of products come to the market. With technology, we see built-in obsolescence and rapid turnover fueled by our desire for the latest and greatest, for instance. It adds up to trouble today, with more to come if we continue down this road, Latouche argues. “The growth society causes inequality and injustice to rise; the well-being it does produce is often illusory; even for the rich, society is neither convivial nor agreeable, but an anti-society,

sick with its own wealth. The high quality of life that most people in the North believe that they enjoy is increasingly an illusion. They may spend more on consumer goods and services, but they forget to deduct the costs of these things: reductions in the quality of life because of poor air and water and a degraded environment.” With this, Latouche takes aim at what economists have long called externalities: transferring to society the costs of production while the profits go to individuals and companies. If we’re going to change the system, we’re going to have to take aim at that practice. Along with controls over the worst of capitalism’s excesses – what we’ve just seen first-hand in the market meltdown led by the greed of the financial sector – we may have to use market mechanisms to mold the corporate structure into a more civil form. That, says Latouche, means making companies responsible for the total cost of their activities, not just pollution but transportation costs, employment programs and education, for example. The system depends on society – governments and citizens – to bear the cost of the infrastructure, both hard and soft, without which corporations couldn’t operate. Forced to take that into consideration when making business decisions, companies would likely take a different tack, one more local, decentralized and human in scale.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Biogas plan, like all development, should be vetted first To the Editor,  I respond here to a statement in your article in last week’s issue of the Observer concerning the biogas information meeting held on Sept. 22. Your reporter included a remark from Mr. Bert Frey at that discussion that the people who are concerned about the installation of the proposed plant are “against all development and change,” but neglected to mention the admirable repudiation of the accusation by Mr. Ed Speers. He clearly demonstrated that no one involved in the current investigation of this one particular project has been in public action against any other development or change. I have

not heard any such talk from any of the “stop-the-stink” supporters. The legal, orderly objections of residents to the Victoria Glen proposal were influential on the township council, who did indeed vote against it. And local residents who have protested the ongoing polluting practices of Uniroyal/ Crompton/Chemtura have always been in favour of change in the sense of cleanup and remediation, not of destructive actions or a desire to run the company out of town. Mr. Frey’s claim is unfair because it is based only on assumption, and all the more disingenuous because he is a shareholder in the Bio-En

venture. He is self-interested. The citizens who are worried about the effects of the biogas process are likewise self-interested, because they fear their property values will plummet if heavier truck traffic, odours, noise, and safety problems prove to be the price to pay for Mr. Frey’s and Mr. Martin’s future profits. However, these property owners do not pose a threat to the quality of life to other people in town. In complaining, they are trying to protect themselves and others. Development and change are not in themselves acts or instances that are categorically positive or negative, and citizens have the right to question developments or changes

Dyer uses dubious arguments to bolster attack on Catholicism To the Editor,  It is a shame when a well-educated columnist like Gwynne Dyer chooses to let his own anti-religion biases spew forth, as demonstrated in a recent article blasting Pope Benedict and the Church (Observer, Sept. 25/10). First, I question whether Dyer ever read the Pope’s speech in Scotland. I did and I did not see how, as Dyer claims, the Pope equates “God, religion and virtue on one side: Nazis and Communists and a

selfish, hedonistic wasteland of sex and secularism on the other.” The Pope simply compliments Britain’s Christian heritage and its valiant fight against the Nazis. I encourage everyone to go to the source and see for yourself if Dyer is being fair in his accusations. Now, consider the “hundreds or thousands of priests who raped little boys,” claimed by Dyer. According to Pedophiles and Priests: Anatomy of a Contemporary Crisis (Philip Jenkins), less than one

per cent of American priests were accused of these terrible acts. A recent Psychology Today article by Michael Castleman (Mar. 1, 2010), using statistics from the 1996 National Sexual Health Survey involving 8,400 respondents, showed that seven per cent of all respondents were molested. Of these, teens made up 49 per cent and children aged 6 to 10 were 34 per cent. The main culprits who molested children under

> SEE LETTER ON PG. 35

that might affect them adversely. An emergency call from the fire department Monday night to inform of us of yet another Chemtura accident, not the dissent of the people already here, is clearer evidence of what keeps people from coming to Elmira. Let’s not confuse effect with cause. And let’s not support developments that harm and disturb residents and further degrade the environment. I have heard that Mr. Martin feels that community opposition prevents the development of such businesses as a feed mill, pet food plant, feed ingredient processing or agricultural processing, an ag society, foundry, chemical producer or aggregate related, Walmart, Tim Hortons, a grocery store or green field retail development and any that involve the use of trucks in the transport of their goods. Yet local government has already given us most of these businesses (and we weep for downtown Freiburgers). He has every right to develop his property, but please, let’s not have to regret this development because we did not assure its benefits and identify its shortcomings first. Oh, one more thing, about emissions: carbon dioxide is not “harmless.” It’s a greenhouse gas. So is water vapour.

> Shannon Purves-Smith, Elmira


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

17 BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Maple syrup has economic and cultural impacts WLU study looks to measure the importance of the industry and what’s at stake in climate change

» KATIE EDMONDS

s Elmira Maple Syrup Festival goers know all too well, Mother Nature has a way of making her presence known at the annual springtime event. Not only can rain or snow put a damper on the festival day, erratic weather conditions throughout the season can take its toll on syrup production. This is the topic of interest for a small group of researchers from Wilfrid Laurier University who have spent the past few years conducting interviews, gathering data, and synthesizing a wealth of information in order to assess the importance and value of maple syrup to community wellbeing and the potential impact climate change may be having on the industry. “Virtually no research has been done on maple syrup,” explained WLU researcher Brenda Mur-

PHOTO

A

Katie Edmonds

WHAT IT MEANS WLU researchers Brenda Murphy and Annette Chretien are investigating the maple syrup industry as part of their study on its importance and value to community wellbeing.

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phy. “There was work done on the technical end; biology and syrup grading and all that kind of stuff, but nobody was looking at the value of maple syrup to communities, the effect that climate change would have on syrup and what’s actually happening to the trees. There was a huge gap in the literature.” Murphy, alongside a group of educators, masters students and other researchers, have spent a large portion of the past few months chatting to anyone whom they thought might be able to shed some light on the syrup festival; its history, the methods of sap extraction, anything which may be applicable to their study. Festival organizers and volunteers, farmers, equipment salespeople, business owners and township repre-

sentatives were among those interviewed. “It’s amazing to see the social network that has formed around the maple syrup industry here,” said Murphy. “It’s incredible to see the amount of volunteerism, the way it brings community together, the way it gives economic opportunity for people to get their product out there, the way it brings out all the different service groups. And it all revolves around maple syrup.” Climate change, however, may play a larger role than simply forcing festivalgoers to dress accordingly; research shows that it may threaten the region’s ability to produce syrup at all. “My family makes maple syrup from a very traditional context and people keep telling me that the trees are dying,” said Annette Chretien, who is of Métis heritage and who is also

> SEE SAP ON PG. 18

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BUSINESS 18

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

Safety measures make local food even better T

hanksgiving’s pending arrival gives us a cause to think about the origins of the food on our plates, and recognize those who put it there. Sometimes it’s a farmer down the road or down the highway, and sometimes it’s a farmer halfway around the world. Whatever the case, there’s a farmer somewhere to thank for dinner, no matter if it’s a holiday or some other wonderful day that we have on this Earth. Origin-based food choices – particularly local food – continue grabbing the spotlight. Local food advocates got a boost last week when an internal auditor chided the Canadian Food Inspection Agency for not being more watchful of food imports, especially

Food For Thought Owen Roberts from a food safety perspective. The auditor said the agency relied too much on inspectors in other countries to deem exports of bananas and other tropical fruit safe. That pronouncement became a headline and a rallying point for those who claim local food is safer than imports. Now, there’s every reason to think inspectors from any country would want importers to receive nothing but the best. Competition

Today: Casual Fridays. Someday: Casual Everydays.

is fierce, and if anything goes awry, sales dry up. On the flip side, we can’t afford nor reasonably expect a risk-free food system. That doesn’t mean we accept low standards. It means we acknowledge that nothing is perfect and that problems are inevitable. The key is to be as vigilant as possible. The inspection agency’s auditor cast doubt on other countries’ vigilance, suggesting that we should count more on our own expertise than theirs. Safety can be a political football. It can be used to keep out exports by putting unreasonable, irrational demands on them – in some cases, demands that not even domestic producers could meet. As consumers, we seem prepared to pay for quality (well, sometimes). But I wonder if we’re really prepared to pay for safety? Or do we just expect it happens because we entrust the government to keep us out of harm’s way? The inspection agency didn’t say much about the safety of domestic food, perhaps because there’s an army of government food safety employees working behind the scenes to keep breakfast, lunch, dinner and snacks as trouble-free as possible. Usually they’re invisible, even though they might be right under your nose. In fact, you might have brushed against them as they shopped quietly for products that for some reason have caught the

attention of their employers, and are destined for extensive testing. The Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs and the University of Guelph keep an eye on provincial food safety, conducting voluntary and mandatory testing, and helping producers and processors with quality control to abate or address problems. A couple of items they watch are those many people have on their tables on the holiday weekend, maple syrup and apple cider. That’s local food at its finest, as long as safety measures as followed during processing and preparation. Depending on growing conditions and processing, apple cider can contain a toxin called patulin. Lab services can screen for it before it becomes a problem. Maple syrup came under scrutiny several years ago in New England when inspectors there found it contained unacceptable levels of lead, a result of solder used on older equipment. Producers everywhere became aware of the problem and fixed it by upgrading their gear. As a result, over the past four years, maple syrup samples in Ontario that were over the acceptable limit (0.5 part per million) dropped to one per cent, from six per cent. Local food is fantastic. As Thanksgiving approaches, let’s show our appreciation for those who produce it – and those who help keep it safe.

Sap: Understanding maple syrup's role as part of Canadian culture > CONTINUED FROM PG. 17

Let’s figure it out.

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working as a researcher on this project. According to a study done at the University of Vermont Proctor Maple Research Center, changes to the industry to date are relatively small and subtle but will have major ramifications in the not-too-distant future. The maple sap flow season is starting and ending earlier. The growing season is somewhat longer. Although on the surface, these would seem like positive effects, the distribution of plants is dictated primarily by two climatic factors, temperature and precipitation. If the forecasts of models of temperature and precipitation are cor-

rect, and the northeast regional climate continues to warm as projected, researchers expect that the maple industry in the U.S., and similarly areas in southern Canada, will become economically unsound during the next 50-100 years as the conditions for sapflow become less prevalent. “If the projections are correct, we are going to lose the trees in the south; the lower range of the maple syrup producing area,” said Murphy. “The trees will migrate north but by the time you reach the Canadian Shield, you have a mixed-forest area with rocks and acidic soils and conifer trees. They will no longer have the lovely area for maple trees

that we have here.” But despite a growing concern about the effects of climate change on production, the team has found local producers of syrup and the community that surrounds the truly Canadian product to be quite resilient. Since starting the Elmira portion of their study this past summer, the team is even more motivated to pursue the research and publish applicable findings. “We want to understand what maple syrup is to us. It is part of our Canadian identity, it’s part of our heritage, part of our legacy,” said Chretien. “And the thought of losing that is something that we need to explore, it’s important.”


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

19 LIVING HERE

LIVING HERE

Take 100% responsibility for your life Get healthy Stay healthy Barney Kuntze

W

> SEE OKTOBERFEST ON PG. 23

> SEE FITNESS ON PG. 22

PHOTO

» SUBMITTED more than just a beer festival, however. Throughout the nine-day festival, there are more than 40 events for people to attend, including barrel races, helicopter rides, a bocce ball tournament, and even a 100-km bike race called the Tour de Hans near Hubertushaus, with the winner given the privilege of tapping a keg at the end of the race. “It’s hard to find something not to do during the festival.” And the father of three appreciates how the festival caters to all age groups, from grandparents down to the smallest child. “There are a lot of family and cultural events to the point that we don’t just tap beer out of the keg. We do have kegs that we use for non-alcoholic events. We will even do root beer.”

hat would happen if we lived in a world where everyone took 100 per cent responsibility for their health and well being? What would happen if we all decided to eat healthy, real, local or organic foods, drink only purified natural water, exercise every day, get some sun, sleep eight hours a night, take a chill pill, meditate, love more and hate less? What would that look like? Do you think we would have less disease and illness? Do you think we would have fewer issues with health care? Do think more people would be happy? I do! What would happen if we all decided to take care of ourselves and stopped relying upon someone else to give us the next new drug or our government to come up with a health care plan to take care of our very sick, overweight, de-conditioned out of shape population? Hmmm, makes you think, doesn’t it? I have been in the health and fitness industry for almost 10 years and now, more than ever, it’s apparent that we all need to wake up and start taking control of our health, our lives, and our happiness. Stop blaming your schedule for your sedentary lifestyle. Stop blaming your partner for your unhealthy eating. Stop blaming those around you if you are unhappy. I have heard all the excuses. The only one you can ever blame is you: take a look in the mirror.

ANoTHEr oKToBErFEST IS oN TAP Kevin Schmitt (left), Brigitte Budaker, Miss Oktoberfest Jessica Wulff and Art Primosch ready the keg for tapping

at last year’s Oktoberfest celebration.

It’s time to roll out the barrel

Actually, there’s not much rolling, says the keeper of the Oktoberfest kegs, Elmira’s Kevin Schmitt James Jackson

A

side from Onkel Hans and Miss Oktoberfest, one of the most recognizable faces of the annual Bavarian festival are the keepers of the keg – the men who watch over the iconic beer keg at the festival. For more than 10 years, Elmira resident Kevin Schmitt has had that honour. With the annual festival set to get underway again next week, he’s got his hands full again. “There are times when you have to keep an eye on it, because people like it as a collectible,” said Schmitt. “We tap the ceremonial keg to open the festival, and at the end of the festival we actually put the bung back in the keg to close the festival. There is a certain mystique that goes with the keg.” As the keeper of the keg, Schmitt is entrusted to ensure that not only the kegs remain safe, but that the beer that goes

into the keg is fresh, and that the participants enjoy their time at the festival, because “it’s all about the experience.” Yet there isn’t as much testing as one might assume – “there are liquor laws against that,” Schmitt said with a laugh – but the keepers do ensure the beer is properly handled by keeping the contents at the correct temperature and with the right amount of pressure. “Because the worst thing is bad beer.” Schmitt has been a volunteer at the Oktoberfest in Kitchener for 15 years, and has a strong family tie to the event. His father emigrated from Hamburg, and was involved with the first Oktoberfest in the region back in 1969 at the Concordia Club in Kitchener. But it takes more than just a little family history to become a keeper of the keg. It is a lot of hard work, and is a serious

commitment. There are only two primary keepers of the keg, with several others training to some day reach the position. Yes, training. “You don’t want it to be too warm, otherwise you get too much foam,” Schmitt explained about the beer. “There is a balance point between pressure and temperature, so it takes years of experience and learning to handle it properly.” And all that training is certainly necessary for the opening day of Oktoberfest. The festival starts around 6:30 a.m. for the keepers of the keg, and it doesn’t end until 12:30 a.m. the following morning, with nine different kegs tapped over those 18 hours. “It’s a long day, and each one [keg tapping] is a ceremony of itself. There are a lot of things that go on.” Despite his role, Schmitt is adamant that Oktoberfest is

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LIVING HERE 20

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

Illustrating the science behind

th an re

Bio-Filter

Steve Kannon

Liquid Receiving

T

he provincial government is currently reviewing a plan to build a biogas facility in Elmira. If the company gets the go-ahead, Bio-En Power Inc would build a $12-million facility at 40 Martin’s Lane. The cogeneration unit would produce 2.8 megawatts of renewable electricity – enough to power 2,200 homes – and 3.4 mW of heat. The system uses an anaerobic digester to convert organic material into biogas and fertilizer. It will be fed by waste material, including livestock manure, food waste, used cooking oils and other fats and the like. A diesel generator converted to work with methane will generate electricity to be sold back into the grid, while steam heat produced could be sold to neighbours such as the pet food mill. The project is based on Austrian technology in widespread use in Europe, where there are some 7,000 biogas facilities in operation. In its application to the Ministry of the Environment, the company is seeking to use up to 12 million litres of water annually. As well, the facility would handle up to 750 tonnes of organic material daily, though the average would be about 245 tonnes. The biogas process involves a multistep fermentation process: the breakdown of organic substances until they become methane, employing a highmoisture anaerobic environment. The proponent points to a variety of advantages of anaerobic digestion: > Landfill and land application diversion > Pathogen reduction > Protects groundwater and surface water resources > Captures nutrients for reuse and reduces use of inorganic fertilizers > Reduces greenhouse gas emissions > Promotes carbon sequestration An entirely closed system, there is little chance of odours escaping, the company maintains. The entire process would be carried out indoors, with the only emissions being the exhaust from the generator – similar to a household furnace – and the venting to exchange the air, as trucks will drive right in to the building. All outgoing air will pass through a biofilter. Because its anaerobic digester uses water as an input and not as part of the processing, Bio-En expects to make little if any demands on municipal services: Water will come from rainwater and runoff collection, as well as from water extracted from the process itself. Each megawatt of electricity generated though this renewable process diverts 7,000 tonnes of carbon dioxide.

Solids Receiving

Solid Organics Mixing Unit

Contrary Bin Storage

1

Pretreatment Tanks

Main Digester Tanks

Digestate Load Pump

6’ Tall Person

Illustrations by Matthew French

Potential Biogas Yields The following chart illustrates the amount of biogas (m3) obtained by processing one tonne of material: INPUT Baking wastes Waste grease Canola cake, 15% fat Waste bread Molasses Skimmed grease Food waste Grass silage (1st cut) Green maize Grass Potato peelings Whey Liquid swine manure

OUTPUT 657 600 552 486 469 400 220 195 155 103 68 39 36 m3 biogas/tonne

Composition of Biogas Biogas is primarily composed of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) but its composition depends on the type of material fermented Carbon Dioxide Methane Water Vapour Nitrogen Oxygen Hydrogen Ammonia Hydrogen Sulfide

O i a e 3 d a c


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

21 LIVING HERE

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Anaerobic Microorganisms

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Pretreatment Tank

Compressor Agitator Sump Pump Heating Pipe

Organic material is fermented in an air-tight anaerobic environment of between 35°C and 55°C. Carbohydrates, fats and proteins are decomposed and converted into methane.

25m

Anaerobic microorganisms seen here magnified x10,000, digest biomass and emit biogas, a mixture of methane (50-70%) and carbon dioxide (30-50%)

2

Main Digester Tank

Agitator Tractor Agitator Agitator Heating Pipe

Stirring units grind and mix the substrates into a homogenous mass using the least amount of energy possible.

The biogas is captured and temporarily stored in a double membrane container consisting of two high-strength, gas impermeable, reinforced fabric membranes.


LIVING HERE 22

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

Add some warmth to a salad now that fall’s arrived A

s far as we’re concerned, now is the best time to go to market (and yes, this may contradict what we may have said in the past while shopping at market during the summer!). Nonetheless, nothing beats a Thursday market trip when the sun is still hot, the air is cool, and the farmers’ stands are full to the brim with giant squash, leafy kale (look for this recipe next week!) and perfect carrots. Nothing beats a good butternut squash soup, but because we like to take the ordinary and turn it into something extraordinary, a fantastic method to cook squash is to ‘ribbon’ it with a vegetable peeler to produce long, thin strands. Then one simply has to sauté it (quick cooking over high heat) in a little bit of butter. This ensures that the squash gets slightly cooked and coated with all of the lovely butter flavor, but still retains a bit of a crunch. To enhance the squash flavor even more, try ‘browning’ the butter first: add cold butter to a medium-hot pan, let it melt and sizzle until the butter ‘foam’ calms down, and then a light brown colour will appear as well as a nutty aroma. At this point add the squash to stop the butter from burning. What we’ve done here is combined the sautéed squash with mixed greens, a unique vinaigrette with nuts and dried fruit, and topped it off with some crumbled goat’s

Apricot and Pistachio Vinaigrette

From The Chef's Table

> 2 tbsp pinot grigio vinegar

Kirstie Herbstreit & Jody o'Malley

> 2 tbsp Lemon juice > 1 tsp local honey > 1/2 tsp Dijon mustard > 6 dried apricots > 1/4 cup pistachios, soaked in water for

Warm Fall Vegetable Salad Serves 4-6 > 2 tbsp butter

15-20 minutes

> 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil > Salt and pepper, to taste

> 2 cups of butternut squash, peeled into ‘ribbons’

> 1 large carrot, peeled into ‘ribbons’ > 8 cups mixed greens or spinach > 1/2 cup crumbled goat’s cheese > Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste > 1 recipe Apricot and Pistachio Vinaigrette (see below)

cheese. A salad worthy enough to start an elegant Thanksgiving dinner. In a large frying pan melt butter over medium-high heat; allow to brown lightly then sauté squash and carrot, just until tender crisp; season with salt and pepper; Divide greens between 8 plates; top with warm vegetables and then drizzle with vinaigrette; top with

goat’s cheese. Blend together the vinegar, lemon, honey, mustard, apricots and pistachio; Drizzle in 2 tablespoons of oil a few drops at a time, then gradually whisk in remaining oil in thin stream; Season to taste with salt and pepper.

> Chefs Kirstie Herbstreit and Jody O’Malley

are both Red Seal certified chefs. Together they run the company YouCanCook2, specializing in interactive dinner parties. You can also find them cooking at Entertaining Elements in St. Jacobs,where they hold private dinners for eight people. To contact the chefs, visit their website www.youcancook2.com.

Fitness: You’re responsible for you > CONTINUED FROM PG.19 Somewhere down the line our priorities got mixed up and our cars, our homes, our iPods, laptops and cell phones became more important than our health and happiness. We are a nation of people who need to look within and start realizing we are the answers to some very serious questions. We have the power to heal our bodies, our minds, our hearts and our world. It starts with taking complete responsibility for our lives. Once we make that decision we will start a chain reaction of change. A very needed change.

Start drinking more water; Start exercising more (at least 30 minutes, 5-6 days week); Start eating foods that will nourish you (organic fruits, vegetables, meats and nuts); Start sleeping more (8 hours); Start believing in yourself and loving yourself; Start a daily prayer time or meditation or just take time to slow down and breathe! You have the power to change your health, how you feel, what you think and your destiny. Take complete responsibility for your life.

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THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, October 02, 2010

23 LIVING HERE

SUDoKU

THE croSSWorD

HoW To PLAY: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. You already have a few numbers to get you started.



       

   



     

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HArD

WorD SEArcH + $ 9 $ 1 $ 9 . & $ , 5 2 + 7

2 % , 0 % $ % $ 1 ( 7 = ' $ 2

1 8 ( 1 6 ( 5 & 6 ( 2 8 / 1 .

Abu Dhabi Accra Agana Amman Ankara Apia Bamako Bern Cairo Caracas Cayenne

, ' 1 $ / $ 5 0 $ / ( ' 1 2 <

$ + 1 3 & 7 < 1 6 3 2 ) 2 , 2

5 $ $ $ ( 0 $ $ 4 8 , 7 2 + 6

Dacca Dakar Doha Hanoi Havana Honiara Lima Lome Male Manila Mbabane

$ % 6 + 0 $ 2 . $ 0 0 $ 1 2 $

, , 5 2 * $ 8 5 9 $ ' 8 = 6 ,

% $ 0 $ . 2 1 2 2 $ % 5 2 / 1

1 * 1 $ $ 8 ' , . 1 7 ) 2 2 7

6 $ ' 1 8 / ( $ / 3 , 3 7 0 '

Moroni Niamey Nuuk Oslo Ottawa Praia Quito Road Town Rome Saint-Denis Sanaa

6 & $ . < $ 5 ( 1 $ 5 7 : / (

8 & & $ < ( 1 1 ( ' $ $ 2 , 1

9 5 & 5 2 $ ' 7 2 : 1 0 , 0 ,

Seoul Sofia Suva Tehran Tirane Tokyo Tunis Vaduz Vienna Yaounde Yaren

> SoLUTIoNS: Find the answers to all of the puzzles on pg. 33

$ $ $ $ < + 1 , $ 0 ( < 0 $ 6

AcroSS



1. Police, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;theâ&#x20AC;? 4. A person who is gullible 10. Small ornamental ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; bag 14. Hangup 17. City on the Yamuna River 19. A congenital cleft in the middle of the upper lip 21. Ball material 22. Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir. 23. Able to be seen through with clarity 25. An explanation or critical interpretation 27. Very small 28. Associate 30. Rattles 31. Arctic ___ 32. Carnival attraction 33. Grassland 35. Critical 36. Assn. 37. A bunch of 38. Shabby 40. ___ Grove Village, Ill. 41. A small piece of cloth or paper 42. Boston newspaper 43. Copy cats? 44. ___ Wednesday 46. Again 50. Its motto is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lux et veritasâ&#x20AC;? 51. Dope 54. Egg cells 55. Bleed 56. Checkers, e.g. 57. ___ and outs 58. Blow off steam? 59. Breezed through 61. Allocate, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;outâ&#x20AC;? 62. Little bird 65. Apprentice 68. Single 71. Greater omentum 74. Bygone bird 76. Successive generations of kin 80. Film crew member 81. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ say!â&#x20AC;? 82. Starch resembling sago that is obtained from cuckoopint root 83. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Star Trekâ&#x20AC;? rank: Abbr. 84. Handel oratorio 85. ___ nut 87. A hard medicated paste made of lard or oil mixed with wax or resin 89. A member of the dynasty that ruled England















 



























 



 



 

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92. Arrow poison 93. A collection of excerpts from a literary work 95. Located or occurring above the eye socket 97. A metric unit of volume or capacity equal to 10 litres 98. Perlman of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cheersâ&#x20AC;? 99. Jointed and nearly leafless desert shrub 100. Do, for example 101. Cousin of -trix 102. Breed 103. Favor 104. ___ gestae

DoWN 1. A sugar comprising one glucose molecule linked to a galactose molecule; occurs only in milk 2. Roman general who was governor of Britain 3. Old World woodpecker with a peculiar habit of twisting the neck 4. Blacken





















 

5. â&#x20AC;&#x153;2001â&#x20AC;? computer 6. Poor and often mischievous city child 7. Strain 8. Newbie, of sorts 9. A city of central China 10. #13 11. Someone who collects taxes for the government 12. The chief solid component of mammalian urine 13. A person who shows no gratitude 14. Deliver 15. A member of the Uniat Church 16. German mathematician and astronomer who made accurate measurements of stellar distances 18. ___ Minor 20. Ace 24. Big ___ Conference 26. Horse racing chiefly Brit (of a bet) made on the same runner 29. Amorphous mass 32. Dust remover

























34. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Concentrationâ&#x20AC;? pronoun 37. Informal term for a mother 38. Engage in 39. A masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in arts and sciences 45. Accident 47. A Judd 48. Little people 49. A young person of either sex 51. Father of Paris 52. Postal scale unit 53. Attack 58. Pillbox, e.g. 60. Point 63. Parrot 64. Bear 66. Loose long overcoat of heavy fabric; usually belted 67. Used in specifying adjacent dimensions 68. Ashes holder 69. Home, informally 70. Plural of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;? 71. Campaign 72. Afflict

73. To a higher intensity 75. Either of a pair (or series) of alternative forms of a gene that can occupy the same locus 76. Pretense 77. Bowls 78. A painting that is applied to a wall surface 79. Consumer Reports employee 80. Floor consisting of open space at the top of a house just below roof; often used for storage 84. Second-year students, for short 85. Mac 86. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Brockovichâ&#x20AC;? 88. Bounce back, in a way 90. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no ___!â&#x20AC;? 91. Copy 92. Jam 94. Cal. col. 96. Bauxite, e.g.

Oktoberfest: The largest event outside of Munich > CONTINUED FROM PG. 19 Oktoberfest isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just a nine-day festival for Schmitt, either, but a 365day commitment. He is the chairman of the Convention Committee for Oktoberfest, the committee that oversees the kegs, and their job is to organize and execute Oktoberfest celebrations throughout the year. Schmitt said he has tapped a keg at nearly any event imaginable, from stag-and-does to company mergers, and that he attends between 40 and 50 events each year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; on top of the nine-day festival in October. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I travel as far south as Sarnia and Buffalo. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been up to Kes-

wick, Collingwood and Creemore. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just being the keeper of the keg; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s being an ambassador of the festival so we can deliver the best experience.â&#x20AC;? For Schmitt, the job and the title are well worth the effort. The Oktoberfest celebration in KitchenerWaterloo is the largest one outside of Munich; overseeing its kegs something he would never trade. More than 700,000 people attend the festival annually, delivering about $1.5 million back into the community and to local service groups. Altogether, the festival will raise $18 million directly and indirectly through economic activity in the region such as restaurants, ho-

tels, shopping and the like. It isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just the economic boost that makes it such a valuable part of the region, though. Schmitt is proud of the role he plays in visiting schools and helping spread the Bavarian culture to those who might not get the chance to taste the fantastic food or hear the wonderful music without Oktoberfest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What a lot of us say is that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re throwing a party for our closest 700,000 friends,â&#x20AC;? he said with a laugh. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Can you imagine the logistics behind that? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what we do.â&#x20AC;? This years Oktoberfest celebrations kick off on Oct. 8 in Kitchener Civic Square at 11:15 a.m.


SPORTS 24

THE OBSERVER

SPORTS

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

Kings win back to back Elmira squad follows road win in Waterloo with 6-3 home victory over Leamington

A

fter last weekend’s performance on the ice at the Dan Snyder Memorial Arena, perhaps a better name for the Elmira Sugar Kings would be The Comeback Kings. The local team trounced the Leamington Flyer’s after being down 2-0 at the end of the first period. The rebound in play was capped by three goals in the final five minutes of the game, bringing the final tally to 6-3. Coming off of a 4-0 win against the Waterloo Siskins the previous night, the players began Sunday’s game a bit less prepared than they should have been, said head coach Geoff Haddaway. “When we play a good game like the one against Waterloo, it’s easy to think, ‘Well, we played well last night. Why wouldn’t we do the

same again tonight?’ But we need to remember that what happened yesterday means nothing. Each game is a new start and it could go either way.” When the puck dropped at the top of the first period, the Flyers took charge quickly. Less than 30 seconds in, a giveaway by the Kings’ defence led to a pass to Leamington’s Kody Polin, who connected with forward Marco Canzoneri for an easy one-timer which put them on top early. Throughout the first five minutes of play, it seemed as though the Kings were simply trying to keep up with the Leamington team. A high sticking call at the seven-minute mark undid a clean tipped-point shot, keeping the Kings off the scoreboard.

» KATIE EDMONDS

Newcomer Cory Genovese takes the puck down the ice to score his first goal of the season as Sugar Kings beat the Leamington Flyers 6-3 Sept. 26 at the Woolwich Memorial Centre.

Katie Edmonds

PHOTO

NOTCHING NUMBER ONE

IN SEARCH OF AN OUTLET Jonathan Rizzo looks for an open

But when the Kings came out of the dressing room for a second time, they were a whole new team. For the last two periods of the game, the Sugar Kings outplayed the Flyers and outshot them 30 to 17. “I didn’t say anything too dramatic in the change room between periods,” said Haddaway with a laugh. “I could go in there and yell and scream, but I didn’t. The leaders on our team did a great job of motivating the other guys. We could let the first period continue to be negative throughout the game, or we could respond and push back and in the end, that’s what we did.” The Kings were playing more quickly, more sharply and more confidently, with their efforts paying off around eight minutes into the second period. Some solid forechecking along the

man during game action last Sunday.

> SEE KINGS ON PG. 26

For Proven Leadership, Experience and Service to the Community,

e t o V Pat

McLean OCTOBER 25TH

www.mcleanformayor.ca


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

25 SPORTS

This round is on me: lending a rifle has its perils A

Not-So-Great Outdoorsman Steve Galea and, by sheer will, turned it into a giant slayer of the highest order. He’ll probably kiss it once or twice too. Following this, he’ll ask what I have taken with that rifle lately. And when I mention that it’s my back up deer rifle – since I much prefer my little .243 – he’ll suggest that I give the rifle to a good home – namely, the one that he lives in.

visits your place and the talk gravitates towards firearms. Then, when you bring out the old H-5000 and he asks what it has taken, you very matter-of-factly say “oh just moose and deer.” You don’t provide details or even a story. Instead, you just look off into the distance, remain vague and smile ever so slightly – this behaviour, by the way, is the mark of a veteran gun lender. Despite all this, in the end you just have to help a fellow hunter out when he or she asks. It’s really just a matter of common decency and, as sad as it is, there’s nothing you can do to change the outcome. Except, maybe ask to borrow his new shotgun while he’s gone.

With all this going on, you might wonder why lend a rifle to anyone at all? Well, the answer is simple. First, if he or anyone in his hunting party does manage to tag a moose then he’ll feel obliged to provide me with a few steaks and roasts, which are excellent. This effectively doubles my chance of eating moose this year. But there’s another more insidious reason too. You see, this particular rifle has never killed a moose – it has only been used on deer. Still, it would be nice to be able to honestly say that my old H-5000 has taken moose too. That’s the kind of subtle thing that you appreciate when another hunter

The first outing for First Elmira Cubs

SUNDAY October 3, 2010

St Jacobs Naturopathic Clinic

COIN

Naturopathy, Massage Therapy and Reflexology

Dan Snyder Memorial Arena at 7:00 PM

Health Care For The Whole Family

» PAT MERLIHAN

HAPPY CAMPERS First Elmira Cubs attended the annual Dorchester Cuboree near London Sept. 24-26. The pack participated in a myriad of activities. At left, Shawn Wilson takes a turn at the marble role, while DJ Campbell (middle) shows he's pleased about being at camp. Cubs could participate in repelling down 30 feet; here Dylan Leis gets a hand from one of the volunteers.

PHOTOS

bout a month or so ago, my brother asked me to lend him a rifle for an upcoming moose hunt. If it were anyone but my brother, I might have said no. You see, despite all appearances, lending a rifle is a very delicate matter. Aside from the fact that I need to provide the registration card with it, there are certain responsibilities that are suddenly thrust upon the lender. It’s quite complicated, in fact. For instance, if my brother shoots a moose, he’ll readily attribute this feat to superior hunting skills, incredible marksmanship, clean living, stellar woodsmanship, an intimate knowledge of the animal’s behaviour and anatomy as well as a vast, unearthly intelligence far beyond the understanding of mortal man. If he misses, he’ll blame me for lending him a lousy gun. Forget about the quality of the rifle – in this case a customized Husky H-5000 in 30-06 with an excellent scope. Forget that, from a bench rest at the range, its nice 3.5-pound trigger will help me place my pet hand-loads into 1.5inch groups all day long at 100 metres. Forget that the barrel and stock have been shortened to make it handier in the bush. Or that its Mauser bolt action is as slick as butter. If he misses a moose, that rifle and me are solely to blame. Don’t get your hopes up either; things won’t be much better if he shoots a moose. In fact it might be worse. Heck, every time he visits after that, he’ll ask to see the rifle so he can recount the story of how he took a mediocre bit of wood and metal

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SPORTS 26

THE OBSERVER

Jacks bounce back to paste Sailors

Kings: Teams shows perseverance in comeback > CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

James Jackson

» JAMES JACKSON

A

PHOTO

boards led to a 2-on-1 situation close to the net; a give-and-go between Brady Campbell and Spencer MacCormack gave MacCormack just the chance he needed to get an easy tip-in for Elmira’s first goal of the game. Then, just moments later, Brennon Pearce managed to score a rebound goal off a quick shot through traffic on the faceoff to tie the game up at 2-2. Elmira’s new recruit this year, Cory Genovese, scored his first goal of the season, just before some more strong fore-checking from the Flyers allowed Leamington forward Matt Ogden to rifle it to the top shelf before the second buzzer rang. The third period looked like it might push the teams into overtime as the score stayed at 3-3, a stalemate, for the majority of the period. But the Kings stepped up their game even further and notched yet another two points, with Jarred Parent and Andrew Smith scoring one apiece. With time running out, Leamington gave it a last ditch effort and pulled the goalie, which led to an open-net goal by Zach Salomon with just one second left. “As a coach, you look for benchmarks as you go through the season, and one thing you want to be able to say is that you can come from behind and win a hockey game,” said Haddaway. “We were able to take a situation that could have been a negative, and turn it into a positive.”

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

CELEBRATE GOOD TIMES The Kings make merry after doublling up on the the Leamington Flyers, coming back from being down by two in the first period.

fter the Apple Jacks opened the season with a loss to the Tavistock Braves, coach Kevin Fitzpatrick said his team showed there hadn’t been enough time to practice early on. Last Sunday, the Port Dover Sailors fell victim to a refocused Wellesley squad – a 10-2 drubbing. Coach Kevin Fitzpatrick said the lopsided victory was the result of hard work, and some practice. “We’ve had one practice since then [loss to Tavistock],” he said. “And even after one practice you can see a big improvement in our breakouts and with our special teams.” The Jacks scored twice on the powerplay, as well as added a shorthanded goal in the second period. They also killed off all five Port Dover powerplays. Fourteen players picked up at least one point, with seven players collecting more than one. Michael Forster led the charge with two goals and three assists. Wellesley dominated each period of play,

doubling up on the shots 64-32. They registered 19 shots in the first, 23 in the second, and 22 in the third, and if it not for Sailors goaltender James Kerst, who stopped 37 of 44 shots before he was mercifully pulled in the third period, they could have had even more. “Their goalie played very well,” said Fitzpatrick. Wellesley opened the game by scoring early and often. Corey Way (Rob Hinschberger) scored 4:19 into the first period on the powerplay, and the Jacks closed the period with two quick goals from Justin Roeder (Spencer Aspden) at 17:18, and a second from Way (Michael Forster, Mark Hamilton) just 19 seconds later. Fitzpatrick said the lopsided score had little to do with his coaching strategy. “I just stressed at the beginning of each period that it was a nothing-nothing game. That they just go out and play hard every shift.” Other goal scorers for Wellesley were Forster (Way), Roed-

> SEE JACKS ON PG. 29

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

27 SPORTS

Floradale Fire Station

FIRE HALL OPEN HOUSE INFORMATION FOR

Friday, October 1, 2010 5:00pm - 9:00pm

Be sure to stop by and see the displays, smoke house, fire extinguisher training, demonstrations, safety videos, door prizes, refreshments & more!

Maryhill Fire Station

Saturday, October 2, 2010 2:00pm - 5:00pm

Be sure to stop by and see the displays, smoke house, fire extinguisher training, demonstrations, safety videos, door prizes, refreshments & more!

St. Jacobs Fire Station

Wednesday, October 6, 2010 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Be sure to stop by and see the displays, smoke house, fire extinguisher training, demonstrations, safety videos, door prizes, refreshments & more!

OCTOBER 3RD TO 9TH

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Wednesday, October 6, 2010 6:30pm - 8:00pm

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SPORTS 28

THE OBSERVER

Don’t Get Burned E

ach Station Open House will be holding a contest for Woolwich school children to do a home fire safety inspection check sheet. Each station will draw from the sheets entered to win a bicycle. The inspection sheets will be distributed through out Woolwich schools. Anyone not receiving a inspection sheet may contact the Woolwich Fire Department at 519-664-2887. There will be public education information on all aspects of fire saftey, includent smoke alarms, use of candles, and home escape plans at all Open Houses. There will be Fire extinguisher demonstrations, Auto extrication Demonstrations, Police cruser and ambulance displays. Each station will hold a BBQ, Door prizes and Safety Quizzes for anyone who wants to partake.

FIRE HALL OPEN HOUSES

A new season begins FORAGE KING 3950 9500 Steffler Rd. Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z3 Phone: 519-664-2752 Fax: 519-664-3695 Email: sales@mkmartin.ca

“Quality Farm Equipment” Since 1969

Brian L. Shantz LTD

BUILDING CONSULTANTS • SITE PLANNERS brian.blshantz@golden.net

519-747-2280

BACK IN ACTION Woolwich Sledge Hockey hosted their

second annual season opener Sept. 25 at the McLeod Arena at the WMC. Here, players Brendan Blanchard and Cameron Sinclair take to the ice.

The Quality You Demand, the Service You Deserve. Farm - Auto - Truck - Industrial and we have On-the-farm service

35 Howard Ave. • 519-669-3232

• Carpet • Tile • Vinyl • Hardwood • Sico Paint www.floorsfirst.com/stclementsheartandhome/ 1011 Industrial Cres. Unit #2 • 519-699-5411

A FINE DISPLAY An exhibition game between the 2009

Ontario Sledge Hockey League Champions, the Windsor Ice Bullets, and the 2010/11 Canadian Women’s Sledge Hockey Team highlighted the event. Christina Picton shows the fans how it’s done.

Conestogo Fire Station

Wednesday, October 6, 2010 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Be sure to stop by and see the displays, smoke house, fire extinguisher training, demonstrations, safety videos, door prizes, refreshments & more!

Linwood Fire Station

Friday, October 8, 2010 6:00pm - 9:00pm

Be sure to stop by and see the displays, smoke house, fire extinguisher training, demonstrations, safety videos, door prizes, refreshments & more!

Wellesley Fire Station

3044 Sawmill Road, St Jacobs, ON., N0B 2N0

519-664-3796

Read’s SINCE 1961

Decorating

Specializing in Paint & Wallcoverings

27 Arthur St. S. • 519-669-3658

Elmira Insurance

» KATIE EDMONDS

Stay Fire Smart

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

Be sure to stop by and see the displays, smoke house, fire extinguisher training, demonstrations, safety videos, door prizes, refreshments & more!

PHOTOS

Saturday, October 9, 2010 10:00am - 12pm noon

45 Arthur St. S., Elmira • 519-669-5484

DEMO TIME Following the game, the public was invited

to come out and try sledge for themselves. Here, Ashley Goure demonstrates fine form during the exhibition game.


» Saturday, October 02, 2010

29 SPORTS

The basketball season has officially begun at EDSS T

he senior and junior girls opened their seasons on the road on Tuesday afternoon against Cameron Heights Collegiate Institute. The junior girls won 5126, led by Tessa Charnuski with 16 points and Krista Weirs with 11. The senior girls had a different result, however. They lost 5326, led by Lydia Frey with 10 points and Kaitie Martin with 6. “We lost a few girls from last year and we’re still trying to get the new girls up to speed, but we’re not expecting a big dip, and I think by the

end of the year we’ll be back to where we were last year,” said the senior girls head coach Brian Carter, adding the team has been very competitive the past few years and has represented the region at CWOSSA the past two years. EDSS are also hosting their 7th annual girl’s basketball tournament yesterday (Friday) and today. Carter encourages the public to come out and watch. “There is no admission, we aren't looking to raise money,” he said, adding that a small entry fee for teams is used to cover referee costs. “A few people in the com-

munity might want to come by and catch a couple games.” The tournament this year features 10 teams, six from the junior level and four from the senior level, and each team is guaranteed three games with their entry fee. “The basketball season is so short, so we organized the tournament just to help with the development of the player’s skills, and to face some greater competition,” Carter explained. The tournament began at 12:30 p.m. yesterday (Friday) and wraps up with the championship game tonight at 8:30 p.m.

Jacks: Team bounces back, now preparing for its home opener > CONTINUED FROM PG. 26 er shorthanded (Rob Hinschberger) and Justin Milne (Eric Parr, Jake Steenson) in the second period, and Shawn Fitzpatrick (Forster, Geoff Parr), Forster on the pow-

erplay Way, Stephen Lewtas), Fitzpatrick with his second (Lewtas, Forster), and Matt Aspden (Josh Herd, Parr) in the third. Almost lost in the victory was the performance of Jacks goaltender Zak Wager, who

BRC Mechanical Inc. is introducing our new line of Carrier heat pumps. Come see us at the Rockton Fair for show specials. UP TO

$8,750

IN REBATES ARE STILL AVAILABLE

was solid while stopping 30 of 32 shots, including 14 in the first period. The Jacks home opener is Oct. 9 at 7:30 p.m. at the Wellesley arena when they take on the Burford Bulldogs.

» KATIE EDMONGS

James Jackson

IN ACTION

PHOTO

THE OBSERVER

Joseph Read & Joseph Psutka What are you guys up to? We are running laps as our gym class warmup. We do three laps around the school. Is gym your favourite class at school? Yeah, definitely. What is your favourite gym class activity?

We are celebrating our

FIRST

ANNIVERSARY! Join us October 2-9 for refreshments

.

519.648.2222

Number one in home comfort...naturally.

www.brcmechanical.com

Locally owned and operated. 92 Woolwich St., S. Breslau, Ontario

We really like Arena Football. I think we are playing today. What advice would you give to someone who is just starting out as a runner? Set a goal. Run a little farther than you did the last time. Keep pushing yourself.

Bauman Laser & Electrolysis

Pre-order your Thanksgiving centerpiece and we’ll enter your name into a draw for a gift certificate.

Contact us for more information.

RUNNERS

Creative Floral Designs / Home Decor

PhotoRejuvenation: For Younger Looking Skin

PhotoRejuvenation is a series of Intense Pulsed Light (IPL) treatments that diminish imperfections that make our skin look aged. IPL treatments can reduce sun damage, brown spots, rosacea, generalized redness, wrinkles, spider veins and broken capillaries. IPL offers immediate results with a pleasing overall skin tightening effect and glowing skin with little or no downtime. A highly effective treatment alternative for active acne and acne scarring . Call 519-669-0237 to book your appointment today!

Hours: Closed Monday | Tues-Thurs 9:30-5 | Fri 9:30-5:30 | Sat 9:30-4:30

2239 Floradale Road Floradale, ON

519-669-9761

35 Arthur St. N., Elmira


CLASSIFIEDS 30

THE OBSERVER

CLASSIFIEDS

hELP WANtEd

tRAINING & LESSONS

Learn Guitar

Our St. Jacobs Distribution Centre currently has the following opportunities...

Material Handlers

BRING IN THIS AD FOR 2 FREE LESSONS*

Part-time Students 10 - 20 hours/week

Forward your resume, referencing “Part-time Student - Material Handler” in the subject line, by October 8, 2010 to: Dayna Walton, Recruitment, Human Resources Department, Home Hardware Stores Limited, 34 Henry St. W., St. Jacobs, ON, N0B 2N0, E-mail: hr@homehardware.ca Ph: (519) 664-4975 (Microsoft Documents Only)

hELP WANtEd

hr@homehardware.ca

Rate of pay: $10.50 per hour

Mike’s Music 519.669.5885

hELP WANtEd

Welder & Fabricator Needed We are looking for a mechanically inclined person to do welding and fabricating work. Candidate must have MIG welding skills, and brake & shear experience would be an asset. We offer competitive wages, steady hours, benefit package, and a great work environment. If you are a self-motivated team player please submit your resume to:

Bauman Manufacturing Ltd 3 Industrial Drive Elmira Ont N3B 2S1 Fax: 519-669-2431 sales@baumanmfg.com

hELP WANtEd

>>Full

Time Sales clerk required. Must be able to work Saturdays adn one evening a week. Apply in person with resume to Stemmler Meats & Cheese, 3031 Lobsinger Line, Heidelberg.

>>Mar-Dale Transport (1985) Ltd. Full time AZ Livestock Driver. Clean abstact, local/long distance. Contact Neil 519-669-3392. >>Help wanted in Bakery. Hillcrest Home Baking. Call 519-669-1381. WORK WANtEd

>>Looking for fulltime work. North Waterloo, Elmira area. Roofing & general labour experience, Fall Arrest Certified, drivers licence. Call Rob 519-664-2161. Journeyman Electrician Commercial, industrial and residential experience required. Valid driver’s licence required. Competitive wage and benefit package provided. Send cover letter and resume by

FAX to 519-698-9920 ESA Licence # 7000438

COMPUtERS

tRAdES & SERVICES

COMPUTERS - LAPTOPS

Sales and Service

• Manufacturing of Landscape & Snow Removal Equipment • Custom Manufacturing and Machining • Agricultural, Industrial, Transportation & Construction Equipment Repairs

CALL FOR DETAILS

>>Experienced

Mennonite Cleaning lady. In Elmira area only. Call Darlene at 519-669-2285, evenings.

FOR SALE

>>Seasoned Firewood. Call 519-669-4108.

Come see our showroom at:

>>Wallenstein General Store Inc Fall Sale, Oct. 4-16. 15% off clothing & fabric, 10% off housewares, giftware & fleece throws. While quantities last. 519-6692231. >>Women’s Golf Clubs – Professional Tourney quality. Drivers, irons, wedge, putter, bag $135. Men’s Golf Clubs – Deluxe Package McGregor tourney. Drivers, irons, wedge, putter, bag. $135. 226-749-3584. >>Mattress/Boxspring, new, never used, still in sealed bag. Sacrifice $195. Delivery available. 519-635-8737. >>Matching Set, light oak crib and change table. Noah’s Ark bumper pads, crib skit and curtains. Call 519669-0265. >>M a t t r e s s / B o x s p r i n g . Plush quilted orthopedic quality. Twin size, A1, can deliver. $185. 226-7493584. >>Passport Photos, Gun licences etc. $10. Brian’s Photo, 57 Arthur St. S., Elmira. 519-210-0608.

We get you

Results.

519.669.1501

100 Union St., Elmira, ON Toll Free 1.877.467.3478

112 Bonnie onnie Crescent, Elmira r ra

519-669-5551

*Valid for New Students ‘til June 2011 One per person.

>>Dining Room sideboard Buffet. As New! 48”w x 42”h. Solid golden honey pine. Paid $985; sell $385. 226-7493584, St Jacobs.

PLACING A CLASSIFIED AD | Classified ads can be obtained in person, by phone, fax or email from Monday to Thursday 8:30am-5pm or Friday 8:30am-4pm. All classified ads are prepaid. Deadline is WEDNESDAYS by 4pm.

Commercial 20-Word Ad $12.00 (Extra Words 30¢/word)

•Personalized, one-on-one •Various styles & methods •Beginners to advanced •Competitive Rates

As a member of the Warehouse team, you will help maintain service levels to Home’s Dealers, pick/pack product for orders, and load/ unload product on/off trailers. You are at least 16 years old, able to perform physical activities including walking, standing, bending, and lifting, and are available to work every Friday, and Saturdays and Public Holidays as posted. Excellent attention to detail, and good reading, writing, and number skills are required.

Residential 20-Word Ad $7.50 (Extra Words 20¢/word)

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

FOR SALE

>>Fall

Sale – Wallenstein General Store Oct 4 – 16. Schneider’s Mozarella Grillems’ 600g $3.99; Mushroom or white popcorn 50 lb $28.99; 5 lb $3.45; Bergeron margarine 2 lb $2.49; Little John oats 25kg $$27.99; Ital Pasta macaroni $1.39; Schneider’s Blue Ribbon Bologna $2.59 whole, $2.69 sliced; peanut butter 10kg $35.99; Eagle Brand sweetened condensed milk 300 ml $3.59; Quaker Harvest/Life/Corn Bran 540750g $3.59; Lipton’s onion/ chicken noodle soup mix 4 pack original 2/$5.00; cake mix 510-515g 3/$5.00; Hunts pudding cups 3/$4.00; Nature Valley or Quaker granola bars 2/$5.00; Club House seasoning mix .99; Mazola 100% pure corn oil1.42l $4.99; Giant Roasters marshmallows 790g $3.99; Kraft Miracle Whip 890ml $4.49; Dole Pineapple juice 48oz $2.49; Green Giant frozen vegetables 750g $2.89; Uncle Ray’s chips 130-300g .99 - $1.89; Ravine mushroom pieces and stems .89; Shirriff pie filling 160-175g $1.29; Hershey Chipits 300g $2.69; Cream of Mushroom soup 284ml $1.00; Glad Easy Tie garbage bags 10 pac 2/$5.00; Pine Sol all purpose cleaner/ VIM spray 750-828ml $3.29; Mean Green degreaser cleaner 948ml $4.29; Palmolive dish detergent 500-625-850ml $2.49’ Majesta jumbo 8s bathroom tissue $5.99; Glad Easy Tie kitchen catchers 24s $2.39. While supplies last. 519-669-2231.d

www.reistindustries.com

PEtS

FOR SALE

RENtALS

>>Bunkbeds! New! All solid >>Cute,

wood, golden honey pine. Twin/twin $360; twin/double $460. Custom mattresses twin $89; double $139. Total prices, delivered. 226-7493584.

>>Gogo Travel Scooter, rechargable battery; Patriot wheelchair, padded seat, high contour back; Tens+ Stimulator Kit. All in good condition. 519-669-5956. >>Fall Sale – Wallenstein General Store Oct 4 – 16. Hardware Specials – 15% off all fencing wire, fencing hardware, tee posts, wooden snow fence (excluding fence posts); Estwing hammers, Lufkin tape measures, Fatmax tape measures, Fatmax chaulk line, all tin snips, 5” vise grips & pouches, 17 pocket carpenter aprons, smoke alarms, reflective safety harness-betls, Garrity life lightes, phones, volley balls, all thermometers, all barn forks, all wheel barrows. Specials: Shopro 16’ & 25’ 2 piece tape measure set $7.99. Heavy duty utility knives $1.99. Heavy duty white plastic mail boxes $58.99; custom name plates $12.95 each. While supplies last. 519-669-2231. LIVEtStOCK

cuddly farm pups. >>Elmira – 2 Bedroom Collie/balck lab cross. Ready apartment for rent. $850/ to go. Call 519-638-2642. mth + hydro. Available Oct. 1, references. 519-669-5751.

GARAGE SALES

>>MOOREFIELD - one bedroom apartment, furnished, laundry facilities, parking, electric heat, cable tv, no pets, adult building. References. $695/mth inclusive. First & last. 519>>GarageSale – Sat. Oct. 638-3013. 2 at 7 a.m. Rain or shine. Children’s clothing and toys. 9 >>Upstairs Office Space - 3 Nighthawk Lane Elmira. rooms available from $450 per month depending on size. tRAINING & LESSONS Includes heat & hydro. Main floor in an active real estate >>Yes You Can! Play guitar office. Call Mildred Frey, 519now witha prfessional trained 669-1544. well established teacher. Bob Wilhelm Guitar Studio >>Apartment For Rent. now accepting students. Large beautiful one bedroom Classical, electric, bass and apartment in St. Clements. accoustic guitar, all styles. Newly redone paint, floor, Phone 519-669-5371. etc. Floor heating! Reserved Approximately >>Tutoring from a certified parking! 10 mins from Waterloo. teacher. First two months $5 Appliances, heat and water off per session. 519-591-1666 included. No smoking, no or www.oneofakindlearning. pets. First and last required. com $785/month, available Oct. 1. 1-519-404-8879. >>Garage

Sale – Sat. Oct. 16, 7 a.m., 1122 Geddes St. Hawkesville. Silver, furniture, glassware, baby items and much, much more.

StORAGE

>>Off Season Storage. 519638-2756. BUSINESS OPPORtUNItY

>>10

Canadian Arcott ewe lambs born in Feb. 2010. Also 2 ram lambs. John M. Martin, 7224 Blind Line, RR4, Elmira, On.

Meet the teacher night at Conestogo PS

>>Interested In Running Your Own Business? Elora Gorge Animal Hospital is currently looking for a groomer to set up their own business in our veterinary hospital. We are a new facility that is growing in clientele & services. Pet grooming is another service we would like to offer. Our facility has a raised tub, ample sized room with grooming table, steel cages and large runs for larger pets. Our own laundry on site. Please contact Dr. Linda Franchetto @ 519-846-8400 or email: eloragorgeah@ gmail.com

tRAdES & SERVICES

>>CDR Accounting Services – Income Tax (E-file0 Services. Small business accounting, payroll & gov/t filings. Chuck Downs, 95 Aspen Cres. Elmira. 519669-1498, cell 519-5691744. >>House Sitter Available for Snowbirds in Elmira. Non-smoker, retired business professional. Very responsible, reliable, respectful of people’s belongings. Available for 1-6 months. References available. Email: dziner2003@rogers.com or 1-647-987-8776.

fun at meet the teacher night at Conestogo Public School on Sept. 16. Hadley Mustakas (left) and Danny Schaefer (middle) get their faces painted, while Jaden Rundstedler tries her hand at mini-putt.

PHOTOS

A FUN StARt tO thE YEAR Children and parents alike came out to enjoy the fall fair

» JAMES JACKSON

>>Welcome To Grant’s Hands On Therapy. Gentle touch or deep muscle treatments, WANtEd tO BUY excellent for recent injuries or >>Wanted - 6ft used long term ailments. Call 519snowblower, single auger, 577-3251. Grant Brubacher, reasonable. Call 519-884- Certified Deep Muscle Therapist. 4366.

www.

.com

IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

31 CLASSIFIEDS

WOOLWICH MEMORIAL CENTRE Fitness Centre Open House Join us at the WMC on Monday October 4th from 9:00 am to 5:00 pm And 7:00 to 9:00 pm for a Fitness Centre Open House Come out, have a tour of the facility and take some time asking our expert trainers all of your Fitness Questions. There will be a variety of draw prizes as well as a chance to Win a free 1 month Fitness Membership Fitness Centre 519 669-1647 x 7011

MUNICIPAL ELECTION WORKERS NEEDED! The Township requires election workers for the Breslau and Maryhill areas as well as spares to work the Municipal Election on Monday, October 25, 2010. To be eligible to work you must be able to attend one of the training sessions scheduled on October 20, 2010 at 1:00 p.m. and October 20, 2010 at 6:30 p.m. at the Township Administration Office, 24 Church Street West, Elmira in the Council Chambers, 2nd Floor. If you are interested in working the Municipal Election please contact the Township office at (519) 669-6009 to obtain an application form.

NOTICE OF WATERMAIN FLUSHING OPERATION The Township of Woolwich will be engaging in a watermain flushing program from Monday October 4th, 2010 to Friday October 8th, 2010 And again from Tuesday, October 12th, 2010 to Wednesday, October 13th, 2010 Between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. Watermain flushing is performed at this time of low water usage to minimize its impact on water service. Please refrain from using excessive amounts of water during this time period (i.e. doing laundry, using the dishwasher, etc.)

DIDN’T RECEIVE A BILL? Non-receipt of a tax bill does not waive your obligation to pay and you may incur a penalty. If you did not receive a bill, contact the Tax Collector as soon as possible at (519) 669-6016.

The flushing process may cause discoloured water and a reduction in pressure. It should be noted that both of these conditions are temporary and not harmful. If discolouration occurs, open a cold, hard water tap in the basement until the water runs clear before resuming regular consumption. In some situation this may take 5 to 10 minutes. If, however, either of these conditions persist, please contact Roy Garbotz, Water and Wastewater Supervisor at 519-669-6045 or 519-6642613 ext. 6045 or Cynthia Lean-Martin, Administrative Assistant at 519-669-6041 or 519-664-2613 ext. 6041

Marion Pollard, CMTC (A) Manager of Revenue/Tax Collector

The Township of Woolwich appreciates your patience as we work to improve the quality of drinking water throughout the Township.

THE SECOND INSTALLMENT OF 2010 FINAL PROPERTY TAXES IS DUE FRIDAY OCTOBER 15, 2010 SUPPLEMENTARY TAX DUE DATE OCTOBER 29, 2010 NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDING ALERT: If you have been paying taxes on land only, you may be subject to a Supplementary Tax Bill later this year.


CLASSIFIEDS 32

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

2010 MUNICIPAL ELECTION Election Day is October 25, 2010 between 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. You are entitled to vote for Mayor, Regional Chair, Municipal Councillors and French Public School Board Trustee. Some residents are also eligible to vote for the Fluoridation Question.

Advance Vote #2

Friday, October 15, 2010 - 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Township of Woolwich Administration Building - 1st Floor 24 Church Street West, Elmira

NEW FOR 2010!

Advance Vote #3

Saturday, October 16, 2010 - 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Breslau Community Centre - Fire Place Room 200 Woolwich Street, Breslau

Voter Identifi cation Requirements Voters voting at a voting place must show ID prior to obtaining a ballot. Each of the following options is prescribed as the proof of identify and residence that a person may present for the purposes of subparagraph 52 (1) 1 ii of the Municipal Elections Act: Option 1: An original copy of a document, if the document shows the person’s name, qualifying address and signature. (example: Ontario Driver’s license or Ontario Health Card (photo card) Option 2: An original copy of a document, if the document shows the person’s name and signature, presented together with an original copy of another document, if the document shows the person’s name and qualifying address. (example: Canadian Passport and Property Tax Assessment Notice or Certifi cate of Canadian Citizenship and a utility bill for hydro, water, gas, telephone or cable TV) Family Friendly Voting Locations Please note that children are welcome to accompany you at the Township’s poll locations. If you are not available to vote on Election Day you can vote at one of the Advance Voting Days, which are: Advance Vote #1

Thursday, October 7, 2010 - 3:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Woolwich Memorial Centre - Community Room 24 Snyder Avenue South, Elmira

Find out if you are on the Voter’s List The Preliminary List of Electors for the Township of Woolwich, indicating the names of those persons entitled to vote at the Municipal Elections, is currently available for review upon request at the following locations: • Township of Woolwich Municipal Office, 24 Church Street West, Elmira • Woolwich Memorial Centre, 24 Snyder Ave S., Elmira • Elmira Library, 65 Arthur Street South, Elmira • St. Jacobs Library, 29 Queenway Drive, St. Jacobs • Bloomingdale Library, 680 Sawmill Road, Bloomingdale (rear of Bloomingdale United Church) You may also contact the Municipal office by phone at (519) 669-6009 to find out if you are on the Voters’ list. Applications for inclusions, additions, corrections to, or deletions from the list may be made by an elector by completing and filing a form available at the Office of the Clerk, 24 Church Street West, Elmira during regular office hours, Monday to Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

COMMITTEE OF ADJUSTMENT NOTICE OF HEARING OCTOBER 18, 2010 On Monday, October 18, 2010, at 5:30 p.m. the Committee will meet in the Council Chambers of the Municipal Offices, 24 Church Street West, Elmira to consider the following applications. All persons interested in the applications may attend and may contact Nancy Thompson at 519-669-6040 or 519-664-2613 (ext. 6040) regarding meeting details. Email: nthompson@woolwich.ca. The Committee will also consider signed, written submissions for or against the applications if submitted to the Township of Woolwich no later than 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, October 12, 2010. Submissions can be forwarded by mail or hand delivery to: Township of Woolwich, Attn: Jeremy Vink, P.O. Box 158, 24 Church Street West, Elmira, ON N3B 2Z6 or Fax 519-669-4669 or Email jvink@woolwich.ca. MINOR VARIANCE APPLICATION A21/2010 – Martin Hagen PROPERTY: 158 Woolwich Street South, Breslau, GCT Part Lot 115 PROPOSAL: The applicant is requesting permission to: • recognize the existing reduced lot frontage of approximately 25 metres, whereas 30 metres is required; • recognize the existing reduced lot width of approximately 25 metres, whereas 30 metres is required; and • recognize the existing reduced side yard setback of approximately 1.1 metres whereas 1.2 metres is required; in order to permit a 173 square metre addition to the existing single family dwelling. The property is zoned Settlement Residential (R-1) and contains a single family dwelling and accessory building. The attached garage and frame shed are proposed to be demolished and replaced by the addition. Further information about the applications may be obtained from Engineering and Planning Services at 519669-6038 or 519-664-2613 (Ext. 6038). DATED this 2nd day of October, 2010 Jeremy Vink, RPP, MCIP Senior Planner Engineering & Planning Services

MUNICIPAL ELECTION NOTICE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE (ASL) INTERPRETER SERVICE AVAILABLE AT ADVANCE POLLS Election Day is October 25th. Electors who cannot make it to their Poll on Election Day can vote at any one of the three Advance Polls that the Township is holding before Election Day. As a service to residents who communicate using American Sign Language (ASL), the Township is providing an ASL Interpreter at the following locations to provide assistance if needed: Thursday, October 7th Woolwich Memorial Centre, 24 Snyder Avenue South, Elmira In the Community Room ASL Interpreter will be available: 6:00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. Advance Poll Regular Hours: 3:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. Friday, October 15th Township of Woolwich Municipal Office, 24 Church Street West, Elmira Main Floor ASL Interpreter will be available: 2:30 p.m. until 4:30 p.m. Advance Poll Regular Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. Saturday, October 16th Breslau Community Centre (Fireplace Room) 200 Woolwich Street South, Breslau ASL Interpreter will be available: To Be Determined Advance Poll Regular Hours: 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. The ASL Interpreter will only be available at the dates and times shown above. The Interpreter service will not be available on Election Day, October 25th. If you need additional information on this service or have comments about the provision of the service, please contact the Township’s Accessibility Coordinator at vhummel@woolwich.ca.


THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, October 02, 2010

33 CLASSIFIEDS

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need a good strategy for counting cards Q

For â&#x20AC;&#x153;counting cardsâ&#x20AC;? at blackjack, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need some speedy math skills and a sound strategy. What is the strategy?

Strange But True

A.

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll need to bet more when the dealerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shoe -- a device for holding multiple decks -- is rich with big cards, detail the editors of Wired magazine. Success takes time and a bankroll of at least 400 times your standard bet. Using the classic Hi-Lo method, you start with zero at the shuffle. Then for every 10 or face card or ace that hits the table, subtract a point; for every 2 through 6 card, add a point (the 7, 8 and 9 count as zero points). When possible, let cards cancel each other out to save time. Before each hand, divide your count by the estimated number of decks left in the shoe (tip: guess the number of decks in the discard and subtract that from the total number used in the game-usually six). When your total hits +2, â&#x20AC;&#x153;bet like a big dog.â&#x20AC;? Words of caution: Be inconspicuous. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t move your lips as you calculate or bet too many chips. Count-

Bill & Rich Sones ing cards isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t against the law, but a suspicious pit boss will show you the door or just signal the dealer to shuffle, wiping out your boosted odds and setting the count back to zero. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Granted, all this work will win you only a 2% edge at best, but what have you got to lose? (Oh, yeah, all that money.)â&#x20AC;?

Q.

How does an elephant manage to move 5 tons of bulk, step after step after step?

A.

To find out, researchers in Thailand had trainers ride 34 elephants down 8 metres of forcesensing plates at different speeds, then combined the data with video to map out the forces exerted at each point along the way, explains Jocelyn Kaiser in Science magazine. While human runners exert peak force of

At the amusement park, too much round-and-round riding is starting to make you feel queasy. You need to lie down -- fast! -- but the only place to do this is along a radius to the car. Should you lie with your feet or your head toward the center of the circle?

Q.

A.

Q.

Physicists answer that if you lie with your feet towards the hub of rotation, there is nothing to give your gutful of food an inward acceleration and so it will tend to move up your gullet, says Keith Lockett in Physics The natural frequency of a four- in the Real World. Biologists say that being sick has nothing to do with the leaf clover, as reported in the journal Crop Science, is a mere 1 per forces on your stomach but rather is due to your perception of speed and 10,000 plants. acceleration. With your legs toward Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about your chance of flipping 13 heads in a row. Yet the genet- the center, your head will experience ic variable for producing four leaves a bigger acceleration than your feet -- making you feel sick. has been identified sufficiently that â&#x20AC;&#x153;So perhaps the physicistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; answer breeders might soon be able to grow is right but for the wrong reason.â&#x20AC;? more of this variety -- meaning the bottom could be about to fall out of >> Send STRANGE questions to brothers Bill the four-leaf clover business. From and Rich at strangetrue@cs.com

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking over a four-leaf clover that I overlooked before.â&#x20AC;? Lucky you! But how lucky exactly, and why might this good luck be coming to an end soon?

A.

PLACES OF FAITH

HEARING ASSISTED

St. Teresa

Welcome to

Calvary United

Catholic Church

St. Jacobs

No God, No Hope; Know God, Know Hope! Celebrate Eucharist with us Mass times are:

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira â&#x20AC;˘ 519-669-3387

48 Hawkesville Rd. â&#x20AC;˘ 519-664-2311

ELMIRA

Minister: Rev. Dave Jagger Sunday Worship: 10:55am

Sun Oct 3rd

Discovering God Together

519-669-2319 | www.wbconline.ca

Sunday Worship 9:30 am - 10:30am

1151 Snyderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Flat Rd., Bloomingdale â&#x20AC;˘ 519-745-2411

2 First St., Elmira â&#x20AC;˘ 519-669-5030

www.bloomingdalemennonite.com

Gale

Series: Life in Jesus

#2 â&#x20AC;?Here is My Lifeâ&#x20AC;?

Church

SUNDAYS @ 10:30AM 5 First St., Elmira â&#x20AC;˘ 519-669-1459 Services at John Mahood www.elmiracommunity.org Public School

SUdOKU - EASY         

        

        

www.

        

        

        

        

        

SUdOKU - hARd         

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

.com

IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH

200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira â&#x20AC;˘ 519-669-1296

        

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St. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lutheran Church

10:30am Worship Service 9:15am Sunday School Pastor: Richard A. Frey www.stpaulselmira.com

27 Mill St., Elmira â&#x20AC;˘ 519-669-2593

Check out our website www.woodsidechurch.ca

CROSSWORd

PUZZLE SOLUtIONS

Sunday School during service

Minister: Rev. Dr. Linda Bell

OfďŹ ce Hours: M-TH 9-Noon & 1-3 â&#x20AC;˘ E galepresbychurch@golden.net

9:15 and 11:00 AM

How To Deal With Difficulty

Summer Worship 10:30am

Presbyterian www.galepresbyterian.com Church 2 Cross St., Elmira â&#x20AC;˘ 519-669-2852

Sunday, October 3, 2010 - Oct 3 -

@ 11 am Daniel 1:1-7 Ron Seabrooke

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Making Faith Liveâ&#x20AC;?

Sundays - 9:45 am Family Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday School for all ages

Visit our website at: www.wondercafe.ca 21 Arthur St., North â&#x20AC;˘ Church Office 519-669-5560 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our mission is to love, learn and live by Christâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s teachingsâ&#x20AC;?

SUNDAY SCHOOL

4522 Herrgott Road, Wallenstein

Bloomingdale Mennonite Church

Trinity United Church

NURSERY PROVIDED

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

Upbeat Family Worship & Sunday School 10:00 am

Wheelchair accessible â&#x20AC;˘ Nursery Care provided â&#x20AC;˘ Hearing Assisted

Sat. 5pm, Sun. 9am and 11:15am

Sunday School During Worship

being â&#x20AC;&#x153;in the cloverâ&#x20AC;? to being overclovered and lucky no more. (New Scientist magazine)

three times their body weight, an elephant hits the ground with at most 1.4 times its weight, as reported in the Journal of Experimental Biology. Even at top speed, an elephantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s center of mass moves up and down only a centimeter -- not quite a â&#x20AC;&#x153;glideâ&#x20AC;? but close, said the researchers. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mind-boggling that they were able to get data this good,â&#x20AC;? concludes Duke University animal locomotion expert Daniel Schmitt.

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Free plays, tickets to hockey games, prizes, contests & more!

IN PRINT. ONLINE. IN PICTURES. IN DEPTH.


CLASSIFIEDS 34

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

REAL EStAtE

For all the property details visit

FEATURED LISTING

OPEN HOUSE Sat. 2-4 194 Brookmead

www.homeswithpaul.ca

$194,900

$431,900

Paul Martin

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OPPORTUNITY KNOCKS

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CALL DIRECT

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ATTRACTIVE OPEN CONCEPT IN DRAYTON

Independently Owned and Operated 180 Weber St. S., Waterloo

HOME HOME 519-669-3074 OFFICE OFFICE 519-888-7110

EMAIL paul@remaxsolidgold.biz ONLINE www.homeswithpaul.ca

INLAW SET UP

84X250 LOT FOR SALE $229,000

$294,000

BROKERAGE

TWIN CITY REALTY INC.

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD.

BROKER AGE Independently Owned & Operated

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage | Independently Owned and Operated

Great property on the edge of town, approx. 21 acres workable, the rest is wooded with a large portion of maple trees, 1.9 acres is inside an industrial designated area. $599,900 MLS

ADDRESS: 4-B Arthur St. S., ELMIRA • EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net DIRECT: 519-503-2753 • OFFICE: 519-669-5426

LOOKING FOR A HOME? Find local open house locations listed here every Saturday.

Wonderful bungalow with 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, hardwood, huge finished rec room, A/C, beautiful big lot with fruit trees. Move-in condition and priced to sell - won’t last long.

$284,500

519-669-2772

MVA Residential

Res: 519-669-1068

JULIE HECKENDORN Broker Res: 519-669-8629

TRACEY WILLIAMS Sales Rep. Cell: 519-505-0627

good value-updated windows, furnace, cac, & shingles. Refaced cabinetry. Rec. rm, 4th bdrm. office & 3 pc. in lower level. MlS $264,900.

Mature lot. Laminate & ceramic on main flr. Gas fireplace. Some replacement windows. Main flr. laundry & 3 pc. Garage. MlS $264,900

location! 72’x165’ private lot. Furnace & CAC (2004). Extra-deep garage. Walkout to patio. Fin. rec. rm., games rm. & 2 pc. Long driveway. MlS $309,900

Wooded lot. 2500 sq. ft. bungalow. Walkout bsmt. Ensuite bath. Two fireplaces. 2 bdrms. washroom & lge. rec. room. MlS $369,900.

Yatton - country property w/ updated kitchen w/island, windows, doors and shingles. Upper level family room. 4+ bdrms. Main flr. laundry. MlS reduced to $419,900.

countrY living - outside Alma. .72 acre. Immaculate 3 bdrm. Huge kitchen w/walkout. Walkup from garage. Detached insulated workshop. MlS $439,900.

cuStoM built 4 level backsplit. Maple kitchen. HUGE family room. 4 bdrm. 3 baths. Backs to farmland! Dble. garage w/stairs to bsmt. MlS $439,900.

eXcePtional. 1900 sq. ft. condo. Quality construction. Fin. rec. room. Elevator. Lge. garage. Retire in style! MlS $413,500

519-669-1544 24hrs

17 Church St. W., Elmira REALTY LTD., BROKERAGE

www.peakrealestate.com

Independently Owned and Operated

Wendy Taylor

Mary Lou Murray SALES REPRESENTATIVE

BROKER MANAGER

Two storey 3 bed and 3 bath room home on a half acre lot, open concept, high speed fibre optic internet available. $317, 900 MLS

wendy.taylor1@rogers.blackberry.net

marylou@mmrealestate.ca

LIS TIN G

Now supporting Habitat For Humanity. $499,900 - New Hamburg NE W

3 Bedroom back split. 1 1/2 bath, open concept with eat in kitchen & dining room with fireplace, semi finished basement, private lot, scenic view of Conestoga River Valley, in the friendly village of Glen Allan. $289,000 MLS

Sales Representative p

BRAD MARTIN Broker of Record

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, OCT. 3, 2-4 P.M. 102 FIRST ST. W., ELMIRA Just Listed!

.5 acre don’t miss this chance to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. Within 40 minutes KW, or Guelph. High speed internet is available with fibre optic. Starting at $66,000 MLS COUNTRY LOTS

3 bedroom country bungalow with high speed internet available open concept. Master ensuite, main floor laundry, large 2 car garage, new ready to move in. Hobby shop allowed. $319,900 MLS

45 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

Sandy Somerville

519.885.0200

LEON MARTIN

Enjoy the spectacular view overlooking town along Nith River. Well built 3 bedrm/4 bath brick bungalow features a steel roof (08), finished walkout basement, 2 decks, professionally landscaped and more! Too many updates to mention. Shows AAA! MLS Call Mary Lou

$379,900 - Ayr Well kept home on .31 acre in Village of Ayr. Entertaining will be a pleasure in the parklike, fully fenced backyard with stamped concrete patio and hot tub. Hardwood, ceramics, master ensuite and more!!! MLS Call Mary Lou,

Thinking of Buying or Selling call or email today! “You dream...We’ll work.”

floradale - Opportunity knocks! Business opportunity and/or storage. 2 bldgs w/ approx. 4680 sq. ft. MlS $214,900

www.thurrealestate.com


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

35 CLASSIFIEDS

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

ALLI NORRIS

BILL NORRIS

OFFICE:

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CELL:

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CELL:

FAX:

HOME FAX:

HOME FAX:

180 Weber St. S., Waterloo, ON N2J 2B2

519-577-6248

519-888-7110 519-888-6117

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

4B Arthur St. S. Elmira • www.remaxsolidgold.biz OFFICE: 519-669-5426

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

519-588-1348

519-669-9885

519-669-9885

allinorris@rogers.com

BERT MARTIN, BROKER

billnorris@rogers.com

UNIQUE COUNTRY PROPERTY!

This home offers country kitchen, dining room, living room with gas fireplace, main floor 4 piece bath, main floor master, four bedrooms and 4 piece bath on second floor, rec & games rooms, laundry and workshop in basement. Three car detached garage and two story barn. MLS. $549,900.

$597,000

9 ANITA DR., ST. CLEMENTS Gorgeous executive home on a quiet street in the small town of St. Clements. Main floor laundry, three fireplaces, master ensuite, workshop, in-ground irrigation system. Immaculately landscaped lot (.42 acre) with great street appeal. 700 sq. ft. Nanny/ In-Law suite. Minutes to North Waterloo.

OFFICE SPACE for lease in busy plaza only 10 minutes from Waterloo. 3 to 4 offices, reception area, conference room, waiting room and bathroom. Lots of parking space.

Your referrals are appreciated!

Please feel free to call us for all your Real Estate needs! www.elmiraandareahomes.com ELMIRA REAL ESTATE Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage SERVICES

519-669-3192 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

BONNIE BRUBACHER Broker of Record

SHANNA ROZEMA Broker.

DARREN ROMKEY Sales Rep.

LAURIE LANGDON Sales Rep.

DALE KELLER Sales Rep.

Letter: Know the facts before taking shots at the church

The Fall Market is ready to Harvest! Let Team McNeil Help you ‘pick’ your perfect home!

MONIQUE BRUBACHER Sales Rep.

THIS WEEK WEEK'SS FEATURE PROPERTIES

OPEN HOUSE!

17 ,

90

Sunday, Oct. 3, 2-4pm - 255 Lemon Grass Cr., Kitchener

$4

PARADIGM (ELMIRA) HOMES 22 ROBERTA STREET

0

OPEN HOUSE - SUNDAY 2-4PM

Hawthorne Model, 3 bdrm, 4 bath. Spacious kitchen w/breakfast bar open to great room w/tray ceilings, plus upper level den. Partly finished bsmt w/full bath. Party deck w/ hot tub! Plus so much more! Come check it out! MLS

$370,900 | For this beautiful spacious 2,000 sq ft plan, open concept kitchen/ dining and great room. 3 bedroom, 2 bath. 59

,9

00

RESTORED CENTURY HOME!

$3

$312,900 | Base price for 1,580 sq ft 4 bedroom, nearing completion on Knapp Street.

Steps to Victoria Park & Newly developed Tannery. Family room addition, updated baths, finished attic. Wrap around porch & large yard. Just move in and enjoy! MLS

NEW CONSTRUCTION $299,900 | Paradigm Homes offers “The

90

0

A DREAM COME TRUE!

$4 48 ,

Pinto” 1500 sq ft 3 Bedroom, Master Ensuite. Familyroom with fireplace, spacious kitchen with breakfast bar. Great location close to amenities. Exclusive

Huge Lot! 3 bdrm, 3 bath custom bungalow. Large Chef’s Kitchen w/granite and oversize island. Finished basement w large rec room. Central Air, Vac, Natural Gas & Fenced yard! Call today to view! MLS

OPEN HOUSE SUN. OCT. 3RD 2-4 534 DANSBURY DRIVE, WATERLOO

4,

90

0

NEW PRICE STUNNING CONDO!

$2 2

$349,900 | Beautifully maintained and updated 5 year old North Waterloo Home. Lovely maple kitchen, all appliances included, 9’ ceilings, walkout to deck, finished walkout basement, large master with ensuite and huge walk-in closet, 1.5 car garage, dbl drive! NEW MLS

Downtown Condo includes 1 bdrm + den, hrdwd floors, upgraded kitchen, in-suite laundry, appliances included, w/out to your private patio! A Must See! MLS

YEAR ROUND TRAILER PARK

50 0

WELCOME HOME

Bungalow on large lot! 3+ bdrms, eat-in kitchen open to FR w/fireplace. Deck, workshop & shed! Loads of space! Dbl Garage & new driveway! Come take a look! MLS

$3 26 ,

$74,000 MARTIN GROVE VILLAGE | Near St. Jacobs Farmer’s market! Some updates, laminate flrs, windows, high eff gas furnace, appliances incl, 2 bdrms plus den, 4-piece bathroom, monthly fee includes, property taxes, water, land lease and snow removal. MLS

COUNTRY LIVING

$259,900 DRAYTON | One owner home; pet and

BEAUTIFULLY TREED LOT

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME!

$3 F 04RO ,9 M 00

smoke free home. Enjoy small town living with city amenities including Drayton Festival, schools, new library and medical centre. Above ground pool on a large fenced lot which backs onto school property. MLS

Conestoga Model to be built by quality builder. 10 Plans to choose from! Limited lots left! Start building today! MLS

$275,000 GLEN ALLAN | This great family home has had many updates including the kitchen, windows and wiring. Patio off family room. Insulated shed 20 x 30. MLS

$395,000 ELMIRA | .44 acre lot on edge of Elmira, featuring a large country kitchen, gas fireplace in bright rec room. Note extra shop/ garage for your hobbies! Quick possession available. NEW MLS

ONLY 30 MIN. TO WATERLOO

$3 F 04RO ,9 M 00

HOT NEW LISTING

$282,000 WELLESLEY BUNGALOW | Great

519-579-4110

village setting on a 99’ wide lot. 3 Bedrooms, 1½ baths, finished rec room. MLS

Warren McNeil*

2.52 ACRES COUNTRY

Bedrooms, 4 Baths, Amazing kitchen, fieldstone fireplace, balconies, walkout basement, natural woodwork and so much more. Geothermal heating, 15 Minutes to Elmira. MLS

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

12 were parents, caregivers, other relatives or caregivers. Others mentioned by the victims included teachers, neighbors, doctors and parents’ friend/coworker. Dyer would probably find it difficult to explain how not one of those victims in the survey mentioned Catholic priest. Dr. Charol Shakeshaft, who penned a report on sexual misconduct for the U.S. Department of Education, has been quoted by CBS News as stating “the physical sexual abuse of students in schools is likely more than 100 times the abuse by priests.” The fact that sexual abuse of children should happen at all is a horrific fact, but to paint priests in this manner is grossly unfair when the overwhelming majority are innocent of such charges. Dyer then attacks Pope Pius XII for helping the Nazis, as if this were a historical fact, ignoring the great deal of scholarly work examining this issue. Again, even a quick read of the literature reveals that scholars are still debating this topic and for Dyer to make this statement as a historical fact is irresponsible. Finally, Dyer totally jumps into left field by claiming that Benedict and many other leaders of religion believe that “only fear of God makes people behave morally.” I

defy Dyer to find this in the catechism of any faith. The catechism of the Catholic Church does not state this. Protestant churches, through Sola Fide, would vehemently deny this. I suspect almost all world religions would disagree with Dyer. Again, Dyer does not cite any sources, for the simple reason that there is none. In fact, Dyer further claims that “Religion does not make people behave better; It makes them behave worse … The more religious a particular society or region is, the more of that sort of stuff happens.” He then quotes Gregory Paul, whose work has been questioned by many reputable scholars. Gregory Paul, by the way, is a paleontologist, not a sociologist, by training. A n t i - C at h o l i c i s m , and anti-Christianity as a whole, appears to be the last bias that the media allows to be printed without needing to be checked for facts. It is a shame that the Observer, which I highly regard as a newspaper, has chosen to print Mr. Dyer’s poorly researched and inflammatory column. Perhaps there is a reason why Mr. Dyer’s column has been slowly discontinued in papers across Canada. I urge the entire Observer’s readership to go to the sources and decide for themselves whether any of Mr. Dyer’s article has merit.

>>David Wang, Elmira

Mapleton Model to be built or choose from 10 other plans! Impressive standard features! Quality Builder! Call Team McNeil Today! MLS

RETIRING OR FAMILY

$717,000 6 YEAR CAPE COD BEAUTY! | 3+

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 16

Melanie McNeil*

Colleen Mader*

www.clickthathouse.com www.elmirarealestate.ca

Team

McNEIL

www.facebook.com/TeamMcNeilRemax *Sales Representatives

VISIT OUR MODEL HOME IN ELMIRA Tues, Wed, Thurs 2 - 7pm Saturday 1 - 5pm Sunday 1 - 4pm

TWIN CITY REALTY INC., BROKERAGE

Located at 198 Brookmead St. | Signs posted Model Home 519-669-4558


CLASSIFIEDS 36

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

FAMILY ALBUM ANNIVERSARY

ANNIVERSARY

Happy 60 Anniversary th

Edgar & Rebecca Martin

ANNIVERSARY

Happy 60 Anniversary th

Vern & Gerrie Porter

ANNIVERSARY

Happy 40 Anniversary th

Mom & Dad

We are celebrating on

Sunday, Oct. 10, 2010 with an Open House from 3-5 p.m. at Wallenstein Bible Chapel. Best wishes only With Love: Your Family

Otto & Sue Plein

Oct. 7, 2010

Love your family WEddING

BIRthdAY

October 3, 1970 Love, Chris & Sarah Plein, Matt & Melissa Guerin & your 5 grandchildren

StAG N’ dOE

Stag & Doe

Happy 80th Birthday

Joel Rickford & Alyssa Flood

Bernice Metzger

Happy 50th Anniversary Peter & Margaret Metzger October 1, 1960

Congratulations on reaching this milestone! You’ve shown all of us the true meaning of love and commitment. Your love and devotion to each other, your family, and your community is truly inspirational. Much Love Always ~ Your Family and Friends

REUNION

RITTER REUNION October 17, 2010 at St. Jacobs Community Centre

For further information contact Alethea 519-780-5496 CARdS OF thANKS

Their family is pleased to invite everyone to an

OPEN HOUSE

Oct. 9, from 1:30-4:30pm at Elmira Legion.

The parents of Melanie Downey and Aaron Livings are pleased to announce their marriage. The wedding took place in a beautiful outdoor ceremony in Jasper, Alberta on Sept. 10, 2010.

Best Wishes CARdS OF thANKS

Card of Thanks

Saturday, October 9th, 2010 8pm-1am Elmira Lions Hall 40 South Street West, Elmira Come join us for a night full of fun! Games, dinner, raffles, and lots of dancing! Tickets: $10/person available at the door or call 519-616-7174.

Thank You

A very special thank you to our children, daughters-in-law, grandchildren, families wedding party for making our 50th anniversary a special occasion, also our many friends & neighbours, family from Nova Scotia. We thank you for the many cards & gifts. Perc & Joyce dEAth NOtICES

Lending a tidy hand

>>BASt, Anna Mae – Anna Mae Bast, 84, formerly of Akron, Pennsylvania, entered into rest at Maple Farm Nursing Center , on Tuesday, September 14, 2010. She was born in Wellesley, Ontario.

Devries

>>BRUBAChER, Sarah (Mrs. Melvin B.) – Surrounded by her loving family, Sarah passed away peacefully on Sunday, September 26, 2010 at Grand Reiver Hospital in her 71st year, of Elmira.

» JAMES JACKSON

Please continue to pray for our family as we daily live our lives remembering Andy, Dad & Grampa in so many small ways. He is and absolutely will be missed. Praise God for eternal life. Lucy Devries, David & Sandra, Matthew & Melissa, Stephen & Kahley & families.

>>BAUMAN, Aden h. – Passed away in Elmira on Thursday, September 23, 2010, at the age of 82.

PHOTO

Please accept our deepest and most heart felt thanks to all of you. We’ve felt your prayers, held your hands, received your hugs, listened to your kind words of sympathy and encouragement and so much more. As a family we will never forget the sincere love and devotion we have received from you over the last 2 & 1/2 years. We are especially thankful for the care Andy has received over the past years from Dr. Neable, Dr. Omole, Dr. Boutell and nurses at LMH and Grand River Cancer Clinic. We are truly grateful for the love, support and tender care from the CCAC nurses, Adrianna, Carol-Ann and Teresa, we are truly blessed with having you in our lives. To our friends and neighbours in the Briton area, thank you for the beautiful Sunburst Locust Tree, it will be a reminder of Andy’s bright and positive outlook on life. Our church family at Woodside Bible Fellowship, Pastor Dan, the praise team for the wonderful celebration of Life and Faith for Andy. The ladies who served the wonderful luncheon, thank you. To Monty, Dan & Grace at Dreisinger Funeral Home for your caring and professional help through this difficult time. To everyone else for the food, flowers, cards and donation to Youth for Christ, your thoughtfulness is very much appreciated.

LIONS SERVE Erik Westermann (left) and Dennis Lougheed were part of a group of St. Jacobs Lions Club members who took to the road Sept. 18 to clean up garbage along Sawmill Road between the roundabout and Conestogo.

>>MARtIN, Urias M. – Peacefully on Thursday, September 23, 2010 at Listowel Memorial Hosptial, Urias M. Martin, in his 80th year, formerly of Floradale. >>PERKES,

Brenda, diane (nee Zettler) – Passed away on Sunday, September 26, 2010 at Sunnyside Home at the age of 50 with her family by her side. Local relatives are her daughter Mallory Martin and her husband Derek of Elmira.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

37 CLASSIFIEDS

SERVICE PROS AUtOMOtIVE

AUtOMOtIVE

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

Body Maintenance

at

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

ARE A

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.

AUtOMOtIVE

THOMPSON’S

AUtOMOtIVE

21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial • On-The-Farm Service

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519-669-3232

CRANE

ONLY FROM CHEM-DRY

Worlds Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

Renovating? Let us do the clean up

RENOVATION CLEAN UPS! Call for Details • Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location • Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off and Pick up Service • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair • Janitorial • Grout Cleaning • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping www.completecarpetcare.ca

ROB McNALL

519-669-7607

LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

519-669-7652

30 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA

CARPEt CARE

CARPEt CARE

Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400 CONCREtE

• 14 ton BoomTruck • 35 ton Mobile Crane

Learn More Online at...

519-664-9999

OFFER

ST. JACOBS

Chem-Dry Acclaim ® 61 Arthur St., N Elmira

519-669-3332

24 Hour Service 7 Days A Week

CONStRUCtION

519.669.8330

1-800-CARSTAR

AFTER HOURS

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519-669-3373

FAX: 519.669.3210

519.669.8917

CONCREtE FOUNdAtIONS

WEICKERT& MEIROWSKI Concrete Foundations Limited

Ltd.

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Call for estimate

Willis Martin

DRAYTON, ON

dECORAtING

Read’s Decorating

SINCE 1961

CONSTRUCTION

Design/ Build Agricultural/ Residential

-Framing -Roofing -Renovations -Repairs

519-669-3082

Specializing in Paint & Wallcoverings For all your home decorating needs

519-669-3658 27 Arthur St. S., Elmira

LAWN MAINtENANCE

hEAtING ANd AIR CONdItIONING

24 Hour Accident Assistance

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

budurl.com/SAVE139

6672 Ruggles Rd. Floradale RR#2 Wallenstain, N0B 2S0

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd.

Back 2 School FREE ROOM

AUtOMOtIVE

Complete Collision Service

AUTO CLINIC

Auto Tech Inc.

Call Us At

519-669-3373

AUtOMOtIVE

519-638-2699

YES... WE DO RESIDENTIAL WORK!

6982 Millbank Main St., Millbank 519-595-2053 • 519-664-2914

SERVICE PROS

GLASS SERVICES

THIS SPACE

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS

GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

IS FOR RENT

FREE ESTIMATES • Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

Call today to get your business listed!

519.669.5790

TEL: 519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

www.ObserverXtra.com

FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

PAINtING

MEdICAL tREAtMENt ER RS OVYEA 10

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada Established 2000

20 years experience

F. David Reimer

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

> Excavating > Trenching > Backfilling > Fine Grading > Overseeding & Top Dressing > Lawn Seeding

Murray & Daniel Shantz

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications: ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

www.reimerhbot.com

ALMA, ONTARIO

PHONE:

GLEN

BIRMINGHAM PAINTING & DECORATING

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING • WALLPAPERING OVER 40 YEARS EXPERIENCE!

PLUMBING

519.846.5427 FAX: 519.846.5134

19 First St. E., Elmira

519-669-1131 519-669-3362

519-669-2251 36 Hampton St., Elmira

OUtdOOR SERVICES

AMOS

PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIALISTS! BRUBACHER LTD.

519-669-0220

63 Arthur Street S., Unit 3, Elmira, ON, N3B 2M6

ROOFING

SELF StORAGE

YOUR C.J.

For more information call:

free estimates interior/exterior painting wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

Various sizes & rates

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE

Call

519-669-4964

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

R O O F I N G

INC

PAINtING

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches Serving Elmira and Surrounding Area for over 30 years!

CALL SCOTT SEILING FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE. CALL NOW AND BOOK FOR SUMMER!

519.698.2114 In Business since 1971 • Fully Insured

>Booking for Snow Removal >Complete Lawn Maintenance >Flower bed maintenance

>Commercial & Residential >Booking for Fall Cleanup

Phone: 519-669-1188 Fax: 519-669-9369 27 Brookemead, St, Elmira kdetweiler@rogers.com


CLASSIFIEDS 38

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

SERVICE PROFESSIONALS ROOFING

PLUMBING

SALt

Locally Owned & Operated

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

Since 19 96

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs.

Steel Cedar Shingles Fully Insured Thousands of satisfied customers!

24 HOUR SERVICE

Call or email Mike for your FREE estimate.

ELMIRA

519-669-3652

519.669.4484 benderroofing@gmail.com

SIGNAGE | VINYL & dIGItAL

Now Booking For:

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

• Fall Clean-up (Leaf Removal) • Commercial & Residential Snow Plowing • Top Dressing/Overseeding • Lawn Maintenance/ Landscaping • Mowing Packages Available • Mulch Delivery & Installation Telephone

FREE BAG In troductor y Offer

> Superior Salt Products > Fast, Friendly Service > Convenient Delivery Times > Discounts for Seniors

Taking Salt to Peoples’ Basements Since 1988

519-747-2708 Waterloo www.riepersalt.com

Jeff Basler Owner|Operator

Logos & Graphics Large format printing Decals & Safety Stickers

519-664-1809 1600 King St. N., Unit #18

ST.JACOBS

FAST, FRIENDLY SERVICE AT COMPETITIVE PRICES!

ever-green@sympatico.ca

889 Bridge St. E. Waterloo (Corner of Bridge & McMurray)

tREE SERVICE

FREE ESTIMATES

20 parts extra

E

519-648-3004

www.biobobs.com

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102 ELECtRICAL

WAStE MANAGEMENt

•Removal of Trees or Branches of Any Shapes or Sizes in Almost Any location •Hedge trimming •Branch Chipping •Stump Grinding

519-669-1836 Thomas Martin Volumes September Ad:Layout 1 30/08/10 10:56 AM Page 1 PUBLIShING

or

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

519-888-1007

E

519-896-7700 tROPhY

$

Pick-up or Delivery

T R

Waterloo Region • Woolwich Township

With an expert spring tune up

tREE SERVICE •Tree Trimming & Removal • Aerial Bucket Trucks • Stump Grinding • Arborist Evaluations • Fully Insured & Certified • Certified to Work Near Power Lines

Inspections for Real Estate Septic System Repairs & Restoration Catch Basin Cleaning

GET YOUR BICYCLES READY

Triple Mix • Top Dressing Screened Top Soil • Sands Gravels • Natural River Rock NEW N IO LOCAT

519-505-0985

BICYCLE SALES & REPAIRS

www.remingtongraphfix.com

Vehicle Lettering

Mobile

Septic Tank Cleaning

We call Elmira home but we service the surrounding area.

graphfix ltd.

BILL SCHENKEL

519-669-9081

BIKE REPAIR

SOIL LOCNEW ATI ON

Signs & Banners

SEPtIC

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES Your Source for year round property maintenance

TOP QUALITY RESIDENTIAL ROOFING SYSTEMS

Steve Co. Steve Jacobi

PROPERtY MAINtENANCE

Golden Disposal Waste & Recycling Services a division of 1678834 Ontario Inc.

• Roll Off Containers • Curbside Garbage Removal • Registered Hauler for OTS Tire Program • Total Trash Removal of • Apartments, Estates, Insurance, Residential sites • Locally owned and operated since 2001 P.O. BOX 111 Breslau, On. N0B 1M0 goldendisposal@bellnet.ca

Ken Kolpean Julie Lavigne-Kolpean Tel: 519-744-5246 Fax: 519-744-5295

519-744-5246 www.goldendisposal.com Serving Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge/Elmira/Guelph areas

• Residential • Commercial • Industrial

Randy Weber ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

519.669.1462 Fax: 519.669.9970 Tel:

18 Kingfisher Dr., Elmira


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

SERVICE PROS ELECtRICAL

39 CLASSIFIEDS

COMMUNItY EVENtS CALENdAR “A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Kleensweep Carpet Care

Call 519-505-4706 Derek Martin

ECRA/ESA: 7006936

West Montrose, ON

T. 519.669.2033

COLLEEN

Cell: 519.581.7868

2204 Floradale Road, Floradale

Truck & Trailer Maintenance

BUILdING dESIGN

Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR

FENCES

FARM GATES FOR SALE John M. Martin 7224 Blind Line RR4 Elmira, Ont. N3B 2Z3

1X1X100 WALL

SQ. TUBE

16’....................$154 14’....................$140 12’....................$122 10’....................$107 8’......................$85

dEAth NOtICES PERKES, Brenda Diane (nee Zettler): Passed away Sunday, September 26, 2010 at Sunnyside Home at the age of 50 with her family by her side. Cherished mother of Dr. Christopher Perkes of Toronto and Mallory Martin (Derek) of Elmira. Beloved daughter of Helen Zettler and the late Gerald (2004). Dear sister of Barry Zettler of Elliott Lake, Sharon Jacquot (Henri) of Kitchener, Bryan Zettler (Cat) of Hamilton and Jason of Kitchener. Brenda will be fondly remembered by former husband Robert Perkes. Also missed by many nieces, nephews, cousins, aunts and uncles. Brenda’s family received relatives and friends on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 pm at the Henry Wasler Funeral Home, 507 Frederick St., Kitchener, 519-749-8467. Prayers were offered at 8:30 pm Tuesday evening. A funeral service was held in the chapel on Wednesday, September 29, 2010 at 11:00 am followed by a reception. Cremation. A memorial mass was held at St. Annes’ R.C. Church (268 East Ave., Kitchener) on Friday, October 1, 2010 at 10:00 am with Fr. Mark Sullivan officiating. As expressions of sympathy, donations to Sunnyside Home Foundation would be appreciated by the family in recognition of the loving care they provided for Brendas at Pioneer Tower (cards available at the funeral home). Visit www.henrywalser.com for Brenda’s memorial.

• Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

519.669.5105

P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

TOTAL HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

519.664.2008

25 Industrial Dr., Elmira, On.

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

NANCY KOEBEL

Home: 519.747.4388

Results.

www.cooperators.ca

519-699-4641 www.freybc.com

OCtOBER 1

>>Chip n’ Dip Book Club is for 10-12 year olds and is held the

>>Tom Howell’s Fish Fry at St. last Tuesday of the month from Teresa of Avila Parish Hall, 19 Flamingo Dr. Elmira. Two sittings 5 & 6:30 p.m. Adults $14, children (ages 5-12) $6; children under 6 free. Advanced tickets can be purchased at the Church Office (519-669-3387) from 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Monday to Friday until Sept. 29.

>>Revelations Quartet 7 p.m.

Music with a strong gospel message and an evening with an abundance of laughter. Waterloo North Presbyterian Church, 400 Northfield Dr. W. 519-888-7870.

>>Park Manor P.S School’s 10th

Annual Magazine Fundraising Campaign. Students of Park manor School are once again offering magazine subscriptions (new or renewals) as their main fundraising inititative. The monies raised help fund several in-school programs, offset the expenses of off campus activities, update our reading programs and so much more. Should you wish to place an order, please contact either a Park Manor student or call Valerie at 519-669-4708.

OCtOBER 5

7-7:45 p.m. Ask library staff for details. Space is limited. For more information call the Wellesley Branch of the Region of Waterloo Library at 519-656-2001.

>>BNI,

Business Networking International K-W chapter guest speaker, Dr. Elsie Frickey, Chiropractor. East Side Marios, 450 King St. N.,Waterloo 11:30 – 1 p.m. Guests Welcome. For more information contact rreed@ barrycullen.com

OCtOBER 7

>>Storytime for children ages

3-5 at Linwood Branch of Region of Waterloo Library. A story time program for children 3 to 5 years old. Join us for stories and fun activities on Thursday afternoons from 2-2:45 p.m. starting Oct. 7. Space is limited. For more information call or visit the library 519-698-2700.

>>Health Education Series 10:45-

11:45 Topic: Substituting ‘good” fats for “bad” fats in cooking and baking. Presented by Karen Reitzel, Registered Dietitian. No registration required. Free event. Woolwich Community Health Centre.

OCtOBER 8

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Suite 800, 101 Frederick St., Kitchener

• Total Denture Care “The RightDay Coverage • Same Service For You” on Repairs and Relines • Metal Partial - Soft Relines •Since Implants 1987 - DentureTech •Since DENTURE SPECIALIST 1995 - Denturist

Denture

DENTURE Vinolea Jahandari DD

• ELMIRA Total Denture Care • Same day service on and relines 15repairs Memorial Ave., Since 1987 - DentureTech • Elmira Metal Partial - Soft Relines 1995 - Denturist (Behind Bank of Montreal) • DENTURE SPECIALIST

519.669.1535 KITCHENER

FREE CONSULTATION 519.744.9770 ELMIRA • Total Denture Care KITCHENER 519-669-1535 • Same Day Service519-744-9770 15 Memorial Ave., Elmira (behind Bank of Montreal) on Repairs and Relines • Metal Partial - Soft Relines • Implants • DENTURE SPECIALIST

Elze’s Vinolea Jahandari DD

Win Wi Wines ine nes es

FIRST $25OFF BATCH

ELMIRA

519.669.1535 15 Memorial Ave., Elmira

(Behind Bank of Montreal)

NEW CLIENTS ONLY KITCHENER

519.744.9770

29 Church St. W., Elmira

519.669.0799

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess. Elmira & Surrounding Area

>>Caregiver Coffee Hour at >>H.U.G.S Program 9:15-11:45 Chateau Gardens from 10-11:30 a.m. Topic: Communication Strategies – presented by Cara from the Alzheimer’s Society. For more information call Cara at 519742-1422 or Lorraine at 519-6643794.

a.m. For parents and their children (0-5 yr). Topic: Talking clearly. How to recognize he need for speech therapy and where to go for help. Presented by Laurie Wiseman for Kidsability. Woolwich Community Health Centre, 519-664-3794.

3-5 at St. Clements Branch of Region of Waterloo Library. A storytime program for children 3 to 5 years old. Join us for stories and fun activities on Wednesday afternoons from 1:45-2:30 p.m. starting Oct. 6 or Thursday mornings from 9:30- 10:15 a.m. starting Oct. 7. Space is limited. For more information call or visit the library 519-699-4341.

>>Children’s

Programs at Wellesley Brand of the Region of Waterloo Library. Toddler tales for children 24-36 months held Wednesday mornings 9:30-10:15 a.m. starting Oct. 6.

>>Storytime is for children ages

3 – 5 held Wednesday mornings 10:45-11:30 a.m. starting October 6 or Thursday afternoons 2-2:45 p.m. starting Oct. 7.

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763

elmirawelcomewagon@sympatico.ca

OCtOBER 14

>>Storytime for children ages >>Come Read With Me – 6:45-7:30

Bus: 519.895.2044 ext. 217

We get you

FREE CONSULTATION Bus.:519.669.2632

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville

OCtOBER 6

SANYO CANADIAN

DENTURE Allen Morrison Insurance Inc.

OCtOBER 3 MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS

Since 1987 - DentureTech Since 1995 - Denturist

Home Auto Business Farm Investments Life

Rugs and Upholstery

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates

24 Hour Emergency Service

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

p.m. at Elmira Branch Library. An evening family storytime program recommended for patrens/ caregivers and children 3-7 years old. Join us Thursday evenings. Read, play games and learn about literacy in fun ways. Drop in! It’s free! For more information call the Elmira Branch Library 519-6695477.

519.669.2884 Summer is Here! 21 Industrial Dr., Elmira

OCtOBER 15

>>Canadian Bible Society Gospel

Sing – Fri. Oct. 15 with “Rescue Junction” & “Schwartz Family Ministries.” Sat., Oct. 16 with “Schwartz Family Ministries” & “Watchman Quartet.” Woodside Bible Chapel, 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira. No tickets required. Freewill offering. For more information: Gladys at 519-669-1292.

CORPORATE WEAR PROMOTIONAL APPAREL WORK & SAFETY WEAR | BAGS T-SHIRTS | JACKETS | HATS

245 Labrador Drive | Waterloo

519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com


BACK PAGE 40

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, October 02, 2010

There is only one.

ClimateMaster Tranquility NextEnergy is the Canadian partner of ClimateMaster, the world’s largest and most experienced manufacturer of geothermal heat pumps. Call NextEnergy today and put our 30 years of experience to work in your home.

In Partnership with:

519-669-2707 • www.nextenergy.ca


October 2, 2010