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05 | 24 | 2014 VOLUME 19 | ISSUE 21

SUMMER CONCERT SERIES SET TO GO FOR FIFTH SEASON THE ARTS PAGE 19

COMMENT PAGE 8

CANADA POST LOSSES TRUMP HOME DELIVERY POLL

No end-date for cleanup at former Heidelberg Motors site

Breaking the code of silence Memorial planned to honour West Montrose’s Bill Tutte, who was humble to the extreme, never playing up his key role deciphering WWII codes at famed Bletchley Park

Recent legal settlement with region doesn’t alter Imperial Oil’s plan to remediate soil at old gas station on Lobsinger Ln.

WILL SLOAN

STEVE KANNON Underground cleanup efforts at a former gas station in Heidelberg will continue until remediation is completed, unaffected by a legal settlement reached earlier this month between the Region of Waterloo and Imperial Oil. The company is footing the bill for the remediation costs under the direction of the Ministry of the Environment. Work has been ongoing since a 2007 regional project on Lobsinger Line discovered old contaminants, mostly hydrocarbons, on the former Heidelberg Motors site. A settlement reached in April and subsequently approved by regional council, covered legal action stemming from the discovery of the pollutants. Imperial Oil agreed to pay $450,000 to the region, which has run up legal bills of some $260,000. The deal also provides the region indemnity against further contaminants. “I cannot discuss specifics of the settlement in detail without the other REMEDIATION | 4

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Before he was a professor at the University of Waterloo, Bill Tutte broke a Nazi code that helped end the Second World War two years early. [SUBMITTED]

If you had helped bring the Second World War to an end two years ahead of schedule, this might be a fact that you would want to brag about. But William Thomas Tutte – “Bill” to friends and family – lived a life of comfortable obscurity, living in West Montrose and teaching mathematics at the University of Waterloo. But now, a new memorial project in Tutte’s UK hometown of Newmarket, Suffolk aims to put the unknown soldier in his rightful place in history. “‘Modest’ is always the word,” said Richard Fletcher of the Bill Tutte Memorial Fund, speaking by phone from Newmarket. “He could never really discuss what he did, but indeed he never really referred to anything about his wartime work at all. He was a very quiet, humble man who liked nothing better than mathematical puzzles – the more complicated the

TRIPLE MIX

better – and playing chess with his grandchildren.” Tutte was a Trinity College chemistry grad and member of the Government Code and Cypher School in 1941 when he was recruited to join a research team at Bletchley Park investigating enemy codes. The “Tunny” code (now known as the Lorenz code) was being used by the Nazis to connect with elite commanders, with the assumption it was unbreakable. A critical breakthrough came on August 30, 1941, when Hitler sent the same message twice, with the same settings, using abbreviations for common words. Tutte noticed 41 characters used in a repeat pattern, and realized the rotor of the Lorenz machine had 41 teeth. Using “intellect and intuition alone,” Tutte was able to describe all 12 rotors in just a few weeks, and the allies were able to decipher GerCODE BREAKER | 2

PREMIUIML TOPSO 2

LOCATIONS

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2 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

CODE BREAKER: Tutte's hometown in the UK looking to build a memorial for accomplished son FROM | COVER

many’s top-level communications. Tutte’s discoveries were heavily influential in the critical years of 1942 and 1943: the British were able to read Hitler’s traffic directions and supply the Russian allies with Germany’s strategic information and orders of battle. Russia’s victory against Germany at Kursk in 1943 is often cited as a turning point in the war, and Tutte is now credited with having ended the war in Europe by at least two years. While Alan Turing, a contemporary of Tutte’s, would become famous for unlocking the Enigma

code, historians cite the Lorenz code as more complicated and significant. But tensions between Britain and Russia kept Tutte from being recognized: after the war, Russia confiscated the Lorenz machines not knowing the British government had broken the code. The U.K. secretly monitored Russia using Tutte’s discoveries. “Alan Turing gets all the publicity and all the Hollywood movies, which is unfortunate,” said Fletcher. “Although he was important, and he broke the Enigma code, it actually wasn’t quite as strategically important as the Lorenz code, nor indeed was it as difficult to crack.”

Only in the ‘90s did Tutte’s achievement become public, when scientists working to rebuild the British codebreakers’ Colossus computer unearthed his story. By that time, Tutte was a distinguished mathematician at the University of Waterloo, whose algorithms were being used in search engines (a bust of his head is at the Microsoft headquarters in Seattle). In 2001, the year before his death, Tutte was honoured with the Order of Canada. In Newmarket, where he was born, Tutte was virtually unknown until 2011, when the BBC ran the documentary Lost Heroes of Bletchley Park. Within a year, fundraising began on the memorial project. “Every shopping mall or town centre has a bronze of

A memorial is planned for Tutte in his hometown of Newmarket, Suffolk. a famous figure that people look at and sit by, but we wanted to do more than that,” said Fletcher. “We wanted to excite people’s imaginations. We wanted to celebrate the life and work of a great man, but also get people thinking about what he did.” As such, the memorial will include many allusions to Tutte’s discoveries: seven-foot steel panels perforated to resemble punched paper tape; a “squared square” pavement, refer-

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encing the math puzzles Tutte studied as an undergrad; and a 41-toothed wheel to simulate the Lorenz code rotors. “Lots of his students have graduated from Waterloo University, and they’re all around the world,” said Fletcher. We’ve had interest from the United States, from Japan, from Europe, from people who know his work and want to contribute. The society has raised most of the money for the

memorial (University of Waterloo professor Dan Younger is a major patron), but is still seeking donations for its education initiatives, including a Bill Tutte Scholarship for math students. “We’re a horseracing town – we’re not renowned for intellectual achievements,” said Fletcher. “Most of the kids’ aspirations don’t go beyond possibly being a champion jockey. “We’d like to broaden their horizons, and if we can encourage people to take maths or computer sciences at university, we’d love to do so.” To make a donation to the Bill Tutte Memorial Fund, and see the design, go to billtuttememorial. org.uk.

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NEWS | 3

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

Telling stories through quilts There’ll be plenty of that going on at next week's Quilt & Fibre Art Festival WILL SLOAN

Jackie Gross’ grandmother used discarded cigar silks to assemble her quilt over many years. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

Anyone who has received one as a family heirloom knows that every quilt has a story. When the Waterloo Region Quilt & Fibre Art Festival returns for its 19th year, plenty of these stories will have a chance to be told. Take, for example, the one belonging to New Hamburg resident Jackie Gross. In 1921, Gross’ grandmother Josephine Schmalz started the Commercial Hotel in Mildmay, Ontario, with her husband, and began a hobby that would last for years. “They sold cigar and cigarette products in the bar, and each silk was wrapped around each cigar,” said Gross. “The idea was for the men to take them home to their wives. They mostly did pillow tops out of these silks. But when the men discarded them, grandma

gathered them up.” Rather than let the cigar silks go to waste, Josephine stitched them into an enormous, multicoloured quilt. “It would have taken her years to collect the silk,” Gross continued. “She would have had to have gathered them up for years – 10, 15, 20 years – before she had enough to do what she did with it.” When Josephine died in 1986 at age 96, she passed it on to her daughter, and in 1997, Gross became its owner. When asked to describe what the quilt means to her, Gross is succinct. “It was my grandmother’s handiwork – that’s what it means to me more than anything. “People have asked me if I would ever sell it, because it’s been appraised at a fairly high value. They said, ‘You can probably sell this thing and go on a nice trip.’

But it’s my grandmother’s handiwork, so there’s no way I would ever sell it.” The Josephine Schmalz quilt is one of many that will be displayed at the festival, which spans across the region, including St. Jacobs. “It’s all about being inspired,” said St. Jacobs festival chair Lynn Wolf. “To see new ideas and new designs. Certainly there are classes people can take, and people can get up on the new trend, or a new application they hadn’t thought of before.” Wolf continued, “We have some quilts in our exhibit that are stellar, that would win awards. And then we also exhibit things that are like mine – first time out of the gate, and just attempting that art form. I think that helps people get inspired: Knowing that everybody had a starting point at some

time.” The Schmalz quilt and many others will be on display at the St. Jacobs Mennonite Church May 27 to 30, along with daily classes and a Trunk Show featuring guest artist Chantal Lunch on Thursday. Artist Martha Wiens will headline A Sampling of Quilts & More at the St. Jacobs Schoolhouse Theatre (11 Albert St. S), and Tracey Lawko will be the featured artist at the Contemporary Fibre Art show (Silo Weavers, 1441 King St. N.). Those looking for supplies can hit up the Merchant Mall at St. James Lutheran Church (1407 King St. N.) May 28-30. “It’s just seeing beautiful pieces,” said Wolf. “It’s transitioned from bedcovering to something that’s a little more artsy.” For more information on events and times, go to www.stjacobs.com.

Albrecht to promote conversation about suicide Recently lauded for his efforts at prevention, MP embraces #308 conversations campaign SCOTT BARBER Kitchener-Conestoga MP Harold Albrecht plans to engage constituents this summer on the issue of suicide prevention, as part of the Mental Health Commission of Canada’s (MHCC) #308 conversations campaign. “For too long this whole area has been kept in the shadows,” Albrecht explained. “People sometimes assume that if we talk about suicide it could give people the idea, but research shows the opposite is true; we need to open up the conversation.” The MHCC launched the #308 conversations campaign last week, calling on each member of parliament to prioritize the issue to help curb the 3,900 sui-

cides in Canada each year. “We think MPs are uniquely situated in the community to bring people together to have conversations on issues of public concern,” said Stephanie Machel, project director for suicide prevention at the MHCC. “We want members of the community who may not think of themselves as being able to help to start to think differently, and hopefully they will become more aware of people they know who might be at risk and learn support strategies.” Together with MPs from neighbouring ridings, Albrecht wants to organize a conference where teachers, coaches, health care professionals, suicide prevention advocacy groups and families can contribute “information on

HOW TO REACH US

what is already being done to identify gaps that might be there, and to share ideas and best practices.” Albrecht took a leadership role on mental health issues by sponsoring Bill C-300, which gave the Public Health Agency of Canada the mandate to create a national framework on suicide prevention back in December, 2012. Now, Albrecht believes the #308 campaign “will be a great resource for them to come up with an even better framework than they could have without the input from the grassroots across the country.” Last month, the Canadian Alliance on Mental Illness and Mental Health named Albrecht a 2014 champion of mental health for his efforts on Bill C-300

and for raising the political profile of suicide prevention. Despite the accolades and the active involvement on the topic, Albrecht insists he is not an expert. Rather, he is someone who wants “to learn how to help those left behind, to empathize with them and find ways to reduce the deep emotional pain [suicide] causes.” Working in dentistry for 27 years taught Albrecht the importance of prevention since it’s much easier for patients to practice daily dental hygiene than to undergo restorative surgery down the line, he explains. Similarly, research shows that seemingly simple steps can have a big impact on mental health, like sharing family meals around the dinner table

and providing the opportunity for young people to discuss their emotions. Albrecht, a former pastor, also believes that faith should play a role in suicide prevention. “I don’t want mental health workers to ignore the importance of faith just because it has become unSUICIDE | 4

MP Harold Albrecht accepts an award for his work on mental health issues. [SUBMITTED]

PHONE 519.669.5790 | TOLL FREE 1.888.966.5942 | FAX 519.669.5753 | ONLINE WWW.OBSERVERXTRA.COM

$1 BILLION WASTED

Time to put your priorities ahead of Liberal politicians

“Only the Ontario PCs will hold Kathleen Wynne accountable for the Liberals’ billion-dollar gas-plant scandal by calling a judicial inquiry.”

Michael HARRIS


4 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

May not be exactly as shown. While quantities last.

LOOKING TO DELIVER CHANGE

Mothers from across Canada took part in the Steps to Deliver Change Walk on May 10, raising money to go to Save the Mothers in East Africa. The St. Jacobs contingent gathered at the Mill Race Trail and raised awareness of the 800 women who die from pregnancy and childbirth complications annually. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

SUICIDE: Group promoting a national dialogue FROM | 3

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popular to talk about in the public sphere,” he said. Following the passing of his wife Betty shortly after being reelected in May 2011, Albrecht says he suffered intense grief. “Had it not been for my faith in Christ I don’t know how I would’ve survived that year,” he said. “So I am simply saying to people who work with those struggling, if they even have a spark of [faith], acknowledge it and help them find the resources that will encourage that commitment and provide a strong faith community.” Given the sensitive nature of the subject, Machel says MPs must exercise caution. “When you have a conversation about suicide it can be very personal and it can bring out reactions from people who might have had experiences with

Harold Albrecht with his wife Darlene and daughter Arja Albrecht Sanfilippo. it,” Machel said. “So we ask that MPs ensure there is someone with mental health first aid training on site at the meetings, and that at the beginning of each discussion it’s made clear that it’s a safe environment with ground rules for what is appropriate.” Albrecht expects to host a forum in either July or

August this summer. The Waterloo Region Suicide Prevention Council recommends anyone with suicidal thoughts contact the mobile crisis line: 519-744-1813, distress line: 519-745-1166, Kids Health Phone: 1-800-668-6868, Youth Line of Waterloo Region: 519-745-9909, or in an emergency: 911.

REMEDIATION: MOE monitoring work plan FROM | COVER

In Waterloo Region, some of our water comes from the Grand River but most comes from groundwater aquifers. The Region of Waterloo is committed to protecting the quality and quantity of our drinking water sources. Help keep it clean. • Return unused and expired medications to your pharmacy. • Allow more rain to soak into the ground. • Properly store and dispose of chemicals, oils and paints. • Keep your well and septic system in good working order. To learn more, contact: Region of Waterloo, Water Services Telephone: 519-575-4400; TTY: 519-575-4608 Email: wrp@regionofwaterloo.ca Website: www.regionofwaterloo.ca/water

parties’ permission. I can only confirm what has already being reported, which is that the indemnity agreement relates to future regional road works which are not planned at this time," said region lawyer Richard Brookes in an email. Imperial Oil spokesperson Killeen Kelly said this week the settlement would have no impact on the remediation work at the site. The company is pumping contaminants from the location and monitoring the plume “to ensure the work is effective,” she said from the Calgary head office. Though there’s no timeline – “we don’t have an end date at this point” – the work will continue un-

til the cleanup is done. The MOE has determined that the main contaminants at the site are petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs), but there are also smaller amounts of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes) as well as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) related to automotive shop operations. While the work is being carried out voluntarily by Imperial Oil – there’s no control order – the progress is monitored by the ministry. Amy Shaw, the MOE’s district supervisor in Guelph, said an annual review is part of the process. “On October 24, 2013, Imperial Oil met with the ministry to discuss site

cleanup activities to date, as well as the work plan for 2014,” she explained in an email. “The longterm remedial objective for the site continues to be the removal of contaminants through the use of a product recovery system. Phase II of the project began in January 2013, which involves the installation of additional recovery wells.” The plans don’t include a timeline for completing the work. “Given current information, the ministry is unable to ascertain how long remediation efforts will be required at this site.” Kelly said Imperial will continue to pump the contaminants out of the ground, monitoring and removing them through a vacuum-recovery system.


NEWS | 5

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

Wellesley lines up gas tax money With the approval of township council, Wellesley Mayor Ross Kelterborn signed a new municipal funding agreement for the transfer of federal gas tax funds on Tuesday. The federal government shares the gas tax with municipalities on a per capita basis, and the new agreement is projected to provide $1.6 million between 2014 and 2018. With the new agreement, gas tax fund is now permanent federal legislation, and the municipal funding

agreement is now 10 years. Municipal allocations will increase by two per cent in 2016 and 2018.

Plenty of walks for guide dogs

This Sunday and the following one will mark an early start to the dog days of summer. Dog guide days, to be specific. The Purina Walk for Dog Guides is open to people of all ages, fitness levels and abilities. There is no registration fee and 100% of the funds raised will go towards helping provide Dog Guides to Canadians with

disabilities at no cost. On May 25, the Elmira walk takes place at the Kissing Bridge Trail, Arthur Street Entrance at 8 a.m. That same day in Wellesley, a walk gets underway at 12:30 p.m. at the gazebo on Queens Bush Road. The following week, on June 1, Maryhill will be the site of another walk. It’s one of 200 taking place across Canada this spring, raising funds to train dog guides for Canadians with visual, hearing, medical or physical disabilities. To date, the Purina Walk for Dog Guides has collectively raised more than $10 million, including money for the Lions Foundation Canada Dog Guides facility in Breslau.

Wellesley backs water plan Wellesley council agreed Tuesday to endorse the Grand River Conservative Authority’s water management plan. The voluntary partnership of municipalities with provincial/federal agencies is aimed at addressing climate change and reducing the Grand River’s impact on Lake Erie. It advises that Wellesley Township, and other headwater municipalities, continue to work with drainage superintendents and engineers for drain design and maintenance.

As part of a fundraiser for E for Change, supporting a school initiative in Ethiopia, Breslau PS principal Frank Ewald got spoon-fed a pudding lunch by Grade 3 student Taylor Sharpe.

POLICE BLOTTER

Police honour volunteers at special ceremony; auxilliary currently recruiting new members

charged with ‘careless driving.’ The driver of the middle vehicle reported minor injuries.

Waterloo Regional Police honoured its volunteers – members of the Waterloo Regional Police Auxiliary, Ceremonial Band, and Male Chorus – May 13 during Ontario Police Week 2014, which ran May 11-17. “Our volunteers are passionate about Waterloo Region and their generous contribution of time, skills, experience and talent creates unique opportunities to establish additional community connections and partnerships,” said chief Matt Torigian. “We wish to express our deep-

7:36 AM | Joseph Street in Breslau was the scene of a breakin, as a construction shed had been entered. Unknown suspects cut through a fenced area and took several saws. A roll of copper piping was also removed from the shed but left at the scene. Anyone with information should call police or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS, referencing report # WA14106799.

est appreciation to all the volunteers for their selfless service to others and their continuing efforts to enhance public safety and quality of life for all.” Nearly 200 members representing the three volunteer units were on parade in full dress uniforms during the event at Bingemans in Kitchener. The Waterloo Regional Police Auxiliary is currently recruiting for new members and is requesting applications to be submitted by May 30, 2014. See www. wrps.on.ca/volunteers/auxiliary/recruiting for details.

TAKING PRECAUTIONS

Emergency crews were called to the scene of a small structure fire at the Chemtura plant in Elmira on the morning of May 22. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER] M AY 1 3

8:30 AM | Sometime between 1:30 and 8:30 a.m., unknown suspects entered a shed on a commercial property in the 1200 block of Durst Road in Woolwich Township and stole a utility trailer, tools and electrical equipment. Anyone with information is asked to call police or Crime Stoppers (1800-222-TIPS), referencing report #14104219. M AY 1 5

9:00 AM |Police responded to a single-vehicle collision in the 3100 block of Ament Line in Wellesley Township after a blue Honda travelling eastbound lost control on a curve and drove into the ditch. The car’s male driver charged with ‘careless driving.’ There were no injuries. 12:20 PM |A collision in

the 2100 block of Sawmill Road in Woolwich Township brought police to the scene where a woman driving a Chevrolet Malibu westbound on Sawmill Road attempted to make a left-hand turn and was struck by a Ford pickup travelling east on Sawmill Road. The driver of the Malibu was charged with ‘turn not in safety.’ 3:26 PM | A three-vehicle collision occurred at the roundabout near St. Jacobs at Arthur Street and Sawmill Road. The three vehicles involved had been travelling southbound on Arthur Street. When they entered the roundabout, the lead vehicle slowed, but the driver of the third vehicle, a Chevrolet pickup truck, failed to see the traffic slowing and stuck the vehicle in front of it, causing a chain reaction. The driver of the pickup truck was

COLLISION AT T-INTERSECTION

M AY 1 6

5:42 PM | A collision brought police to Arthur Street and Howard Avenue in Elmira after a Saturn rearended a GMC pickup. There were no injuries. The driver of the Saturn was charged with ‘careless driving.’

Police and Floradale firefighters responded to a two-vehicle collision at Listowel Road and Line 86 on May 16 at 10:53 a.m. [SCOTT BARBER / THE OBSERVER]

M AY 1 7

12:45 PM | A two-vehicle collision in Elmira brought police to Snyder Avenue and Second Street. A 57-year-old woman was northbound on Snyder Avenue in a Buick Enclave when she stopped to make a left turn onto Second Street and was rear-ended by an 18-year-old woman driving a Toyota Corolla, also northbound on Snyder Avenue. No one was injured, but the driver of the Corolla was charged with ‘careless driving.’

VANDALISM ALONG THE TRAILWAY

M AY 1 8

5:38 PM | Police were called after a Volkswagen travelling northbound on Arthur Street changed lanes and hit a Kia also travelling northbound on Arthur Street in Woolwich Township. There were no injuries. The driver of the VW was charged with ‘unsafe lane change.’

Vandals struck the Elmira entrance of the Kissing Bridge Trailway, defacing the maps and mural. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

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6 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

Retirement Put on Hold

Whether it’s out of necessity or desire to keep at it, increasing numbers of seniors are opting to stay in the workforce

ELENA MAYSTRUK

Marilyn Curry’s work hours started to shrink to parttime last year and she began to worry. In their early 60s the Elmira office worker and her husband Wayne – retired and working part-time as a school bus driver – are nursing a big dream to relax and see the world. But, uncertain what the future will hold financially for the couple, plane tickets are put on hold for a while. “Going from a full paycheque to half a paycheque, your bills don’t go in half. That’s, unfortunately I guess, life. We were hoping to sell our house and do some travelling but the way things are going right now I don’t know if that’s going to happen,” she said. The prospect of dipping into their life savings and paying the subsequent taxes has the couple struggling with what Curry calls a catch-22. “You need the money and you can’t take it because you are going to get dinged.” The population of seniors and those nearing the retirement years is growing rapidly with the economic and fiscal implications of supporting and employing a growing base of older residents a looming issue, says Susan Eng, head of advocacy at the Canadian Association of Retired Persons (CARP). The category is largely overlooked by the public she says, because of a lingering belief in a system that sees workers retire after age 65. Yet, the number of seniors in the Canadian workforce has doubled from just over 300,000 in 2006 to over 600,000 older workers identified by Statistics Canada in 2013. Canadians aged 60 and over account for about eight per cent of the labour market. “So, in just seven years the number of people 65 and older has doubled. It’s a pretty massive trend. There are about 18 million Canadians in the workforce,” Eng said. Workers like Curry expect to be working past the age of 65 if their work situations fail to improve. With a set of long-learned accounting and office skills she is searching for a second job, hopefully close to her Elmira home. Why do seniors keep working? Well, there’s good news and bad news, Eng notes. Many are living

The house, the car, the kids and grandkids; income stability is still a gamble for residents like Wayne and Marilyn Curry who need to stay in the workforce longer. When it comes to retirement, they’re not sure what the cards hold. longer and healthier lives, enabling them to continue developing beloved careers. Others, affected by recent economic downturns or perhaps burdened by the costs of treating illness or a frail family member, are compelled to stay employed to pay the bills, though little research has been done on the exact ratios. There is evidence that since the 1990s older workers have increasingly delayed their retirement, coinciding with an increased employment rate among that group, according to Statistics Canada. The same set of 2010 data shows this isn’t a particularly new development. Already in 2008 both male and female workers aged 50 expected to stay in the work force an additional 16 years, 3.5 years longer than 50-year-olds in the mid 1990s. Prior to this time period there was a strong trend for earlier retirement due to high public sector deficits and downsizing in the private sector. Today more seniors than ever are seeing the classic idea of their “golden years” postponed, creating a demand for social services. Despite removal of mandatory retirement legislation, meaning seniors don’t have to retire at age 65, Waterloo Region’s resources, like the provincially regulated

Targeted Initiative for Older Workers program, still focuses on the population aged 55-64, though with a few exceptions. “In 2013 we were allowed to bring in 100 people into the program and usually 30 per cent of that is exceptions. We can bring in 30 people who are under 55 – usually people 50 to 55 and people who are over 64. I’ve had clients who have been in their late sixties, given the recession and things like that … just in the last three years I’ve seen a huge increase,” said Lutherwood career consultant Elisha Rivard. Lutherwood works with the Region of Waterloo to provide employment services and staff is seeing an increased number of ageing workers coming through the system. With no programs specifically for jobseekers over the age of 65, there is no age limit to using the region’s employment services outlined by Employment Ontario. Seniors can get a chance to learn or relearn computer skills to glean the resources they need and how to apply for work in a modern environment, Rivard said. Efforts of older workers are successful, and though the region’s cities are continuing to create many high-tech jobs more suitable for younger workers, there are employers who appreci-

ate a seasoned and experienced eye, she noted. Older tradespeople are a good example, as their many years of practical experience on the job appeals to employers. Businesses are hard hit to replace seasoned, unionized and non-unionized employees who usually retire or taper off starting at age 65 due to good benefits and in-demand services, says Art Sinclair, vicepresident of public policy and advocacy at the Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce. “Construction and trucking would come to mind. There are concerns in both of those industries about people retiring and newer workers not being able to come in and fill the jobs.” The problem lies less in education or skill and more in the practical knowledge and behavior acquired through years on the job, he added. Rick Trapp, owner of Elmira construction firm Emerald Homes Ltd., agrees. “I’m not seeing a lot of [older workers] stay, not in our jobsites. But, there definitely is a problem in terms of replacing the older workers with skilled younger workers. It’s just a lack of people being directed into those trades and being properly trained for them.” In Waterloo Region especially,

the workforce is younger than the rest of Canada, according to Chamber of Commerce statistics. Bill Alderson, program coordinator of architecture, construction engineering and technology at Conestoga College, says the key to balancing the exodus of ageing tradespeople and the influx of rookies is for educational institutions and employers to work hand-in-hand. “Employers should realize, and they do in some cases, [that they need to] get in there and start being a partner with the graduates. The education institute cannot put somebody out to step into the shoes of a 20-year employee, practically, that’s almost impossible.” On a broader scale, Sinclair says Waterloo Region can be a difficult area to find employment all around, despite many jobs being available. “It’s kind of unusual since we have companies like Research In Motion [Blackberry] and a lot of the technology-based companies, they have a lot of job openings. But, at the same time there are a lot of people looking for work. Essentially the issue is across Canada: there are jobs without people and people without jobs. There seems to be a mismatch.” In some cases, Sinclair adds, experience and work ethic can


NEWS | 7

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

propel an older worker to fill the available positions despite the stigma of perceived ageism. “A lot of people believe that ageism is holding them back when in reality a lot of employers like to hire people who are older because they have more experience and it brings a new perspective into the workforce. There’s not as much ageism in the workforce as a lot of people 55-plus believe,” says Rivard of the situation. For the unemployed, there are solutions to ageism in the workplace, she notes. Many clients come in looking for training in jobs such as personal support workers, drivers, administration and accounting. Those are professions that have not changed much over the years and could benefit from a person with lifelong experience. Indeed, it seems the market can be surprisingly kind to skilled older workers. There’s been an outpouring of older Canadian workers in the labour market since the economic recovery began in 2009, a TD Economics study in 2012 showed, accounting for one third of all net job gains, yet representing a small portion of the market (eight per cent). Workers aged 70-plus are even part of this demographic with results attributed in part to longer lifespan and more medical options. More surprising was the 100,000 net jobs added in the 60plus age group at the depth of the recession, the study noted. On the flipside of the job spectrum, workers aged 59 and under recorded more than 500,000 in net job losses over the same period. This year the latest Statistics Canada March 2014 Labour Force Survey shows unemployment declining slightly from seven to six per cent across the country. Albeit the trend is driven by an increased number of youth joining the job market, but employment for workers aged 55 and

over has risen by 3.4 per cent (by 114,000) since last March, with almost all the result of an ageing populace. Wellesley resident Dr. Mavis Kerr has been a registered family therapist for over 20 years at Southern Ontario Counseling Centre. Kerr had the opportunity to taper off slowly, having retired in April, at a well-loved profession. But over the years, she has noticed a difference in how coworkers saw her. “I worked in a setting with a handful of therapists who are in private practices together … and everyone assumed I was on the brink of retirement and that I would soon be gone and my perception is that there is a certain amount of ageism, of the young people seeing you as ‘over the hill’ so to speak. Part of it is that the people I’ve worked with for a long time, a lot of them have retired and so I didn’t have the peer group that I used to have,” she said. “Why did I choose to stick around? I still really enjoyed my work; I believe that I did better with a certain level of structure.” Many of Kerr’s former clients were educators, an industry, she has observed, with options for retirement especially in the field of supply work where experienced instructors are in demand. She notes, however, “A lot of them have moral issues about the fact that all of these young people are desperately trying to get into the teaching area and there are no spots for them. Some of us oldies are hanging around and taking places that could be joyfully taken by someone younger.” Canada-wide, provinces are just starting to target the senior population when it comes to job services. Some, like the Third Quarter initiative established in Winnipeg in 2010, are moving faster than others. Created through the Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce,

Wellesley’s Mavis Kerr, a recently retired local therapist, notes ageism exists in the workplace, though many older workers choose to stay due to a passion for their careers. the non-profit job service aims to minimize fears of ageism in the job search. Enjoying recent federal funding, the service has sprawled across the country in order to provide job match opportunities for older workers. Eng observes that the job opportunities, gleaned through soliciting employers who confirm a wish to hire older people, tend to be casual part-time and temporary. But it’s a start. In the meantime, advocate groups find enough fodder in the issue to keep creating new initiatives like workplace re-education, with some uptake from the government. “One of our major focuses [at CARP National] for this year is to target and drill down on how we can help older workers. This is something that we’ve raised in the past and there has been some response by some governments and others who talk about re-training older workers. They acknowledge that there is a special need in this case. One of the things we did of course was to get rid of mandatory retirement at the federal level,” said Eng. Mandatory retirement remained on the federal books until last year, covering federally

regulated businesses like broadcasting, railways, airlines, banking positions and the like. She added, “And, while those places generally didn’t have many people who wanted to keep working because mostly they were unionized and they had good pension plans, there were in some categories, notably pilots, who wanted to keep working. Some people had a need and others just wanted to keep working as a matter of personal right and dignity.” Legislation stopping federally mandated retirement was enacted in December 2011 to take effect one year later to let employers get organized. It finally came into force in December 2012. The changes in government and the non-profit sector are steadily reforming what today’s senior looks and acts like, far from the stereotype of old ladies with blue hair or Max Goldman in 1993’s Grumpy Old Men. The key today is to offer choice and dignity for the elderly in a new fashion. “One expert study presented in a legal case said only 15 per cent of those who would be eligible to have an opportunity to stay beyond the normal retirement age actually does. Eighty-five per cent

just carry on in the normal pattern of retiring when they can. In many cases it’s having the right to choose when you leave, that is more important to them,” said Eng. “The senior of today is not your grandparent’s senior. … Today’s senior is a boomer who just started to turn 65 in 2011 and they continue on with their lives. Whatever they are doing, whatever sports activities, work, travel, they want choice. They want to slow down when they choose, not when somebody else squeezes them out and they don’t expect to have their rights taken away from them simply because of their chronological age.” Though a majority of seniors still choose to retire, the prolonged longevity of seniors is leading advocates and able bodied older workers to vie for more opportunities after the age of 65 to continue careers, achieve comfortable retirement, or access resources for new ventures. Supporters of such ideas are pushing communities and government bodies to accommodate Canada’s elders now more commonly and perhaps aptly labeled as zoomers, boomers, and seniors.

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8 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

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OUR VIEW / EDITORIAL

THE VIEW FROM HERE

Post office issues go well beyond home delivery IF YOU’RE ONE OF those people still receiving mail at your door, chances are you want to keep that service. Canada Post has other ideas, planning to phase out home delivery over the next five years for the third of households that still have a use for their mailboxes. Poll results released this week show 60 per cent of respondents oppose the post office’s plans to replace doorto-door delivery with a community mailbox. The survey of some 1,500 people last month will have swept up people currently enjoying the communal boxes that are part of all new subdivisions. While some are fine with the changes, others yearn for the postal services of the past. Trouble is, the volume of mail continues to decline, leading to losses the corporation says need to be countered by cuts in services. Earlier this month, Canada Post reported an operating loss of $193 million for 2013, with what it calls transaction mail volumes falling by 5.3 per cent. The downward trend has been constant since 2007. The parcel business, on the other hand, has continued to increase, buoyed by online shopping. In 2013, Canada Post employees delivered 5 million more parcels than in 2012, boosting revenues by $93 million. Annual revenues from top e-commerce customers increased 29 per cent, the corporation reports. Packages will continue to be delivered to customers’ doors. With its current labour costs, Canada Post argues it has a much higher cost structure than its competitors in the private sector, a situation it calls unsustainable. The corporation expects nearly 15,000 employees to retire or leave the company over the next five years, more than enough, it says, to allow for the reduction of between 6,000 and 8,000 positions, mainly through attrition. Not surprisingly, that model doesn’t cut it for the unions representing postal workers. The poll released this week was commissioned by the Canadian Union of Postal Workers, which adds a grain of a salt to the findings (just as the sponsor should be taken into account with every survey). While much less militant than in the past, the postal unions have made few friends over the years. With animosity towards public sector unions growing, postal workers will have trouble finding sympathy for their plight, even among those who’d like to keep their home delivery service intact. The union notes that, to date, 61 municipalities – representing close to 30 per cent of the population – have passed resolutions or sent letters in support of door-to-door delivery or opposing the cuts. As well, six municipal bodies or organizations have voiced concerns, including the Federation of Canadian Municipalities’ Big City Mayors' Caucus, representing 22 of the largest cities in Canada and 65 per cent of the country's population. At this point, however, Canadians seem resigned to the changes. Demographics are not in the workers’ favour, as many younger people have grown up with community mailboxes. More to the point, the younger generations simply don’t user letter mail – its existence is irrelevant to them. That they don’t write letters goes without saying, but electronic replacements also extend to bills, cheques and a host of other paperwork that used to be the mainstay of letter carriers. Today, all of that is largely immaterial. Canada Post’s letter delivery isn’t helped by the large hikes in the cost of stamps. Each increase makes the price tag of electronic alternatives – free – that much more appealing.

Never one to pass up a propaganda moment, Harper sees an opportunity to make hay out of longstanding efforts to pull oil from the former Heidelberg Motors site. WORLD VIEW / GWYNNE DYER

India and China: the tortoise and the hare? WORLD AFFAIRS Soon after winning an absolute majority in the Indian parliamentary elections, prime minister-elect Narendra Modi promised “to make the 21st century India’s century.” If he can avoid tripping over his own ideology, he might just succeed. “India’s century” is a misleading phrase, of course, because no country gets to own a whole century. It wasn’t ever really going to be “China’s century” either, although China is a huge country whose economy has grown amazingly fast over the past three decades. What Modi meant was that India, the other huge Asian country, may soon take China’s place as the fastest growing large economy – and it might even surpass China economically, in the end. At first glance this seems unlikely. India’s GDP is currently less than a quarter of China’s although the two countries are quite close in population (China 1.36

billion, India 1.29 billion). Moreover, the Chinese economy’s growth rate last year, although well down from its peak years, was still 7.7 per cent, while India’s grew at only 4.4 per cent. But China’s growth rate is bound to fall further for purely demographic reasons. Due partly to three decades of the one-childper-family policy, the size of its workforce is already starting to decline. Total population (and hence total domestic demand) will also start to shrink in five years’ time. And this doesn’t even take into account the high probability of a financial crash and a long, deep recession in China. India’s growth rate has also fallen in recent years, but for reasons like corruption, excessive regulation and inadequate infrastructure that are a lot easier to fix. And the reason that Narendra Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) won by a landslide was precisely that voters thought he would be better at overcoming these obstacles to growth than the worn-out and deeply corrupt Congress Party. Modi did not win be-

cause a majority of Indians want to pursue divisive sectarian battles that pit Hindus against India’s many minorities, and especially against Muslims. That has always been part of the BJP’s appeal to its core voters, but its new voters were attracted by Modi’s reputation as the man who brought rapid development to the state of Gujarat, which he has ruled for the past 13 years. They want him to do the same thing nationally. They overestimate his genius: Gujarat has always been one of India’s most prosperous states, and the local culture has always been pro-business. It was doing very well even before Modi took power there. Nevertheless, he might well be able to fulfill the hopes of his new supporters, for he arrives in New Delhi without the usual burden of political debts to special interests. The BJP’s absolute majority in parliament means that Modi will not be constrained by coalition allies like previous BJP governments. This could lead to a leap in the Indian growth rate if he uses his power

to sweep aside the regulations and bureaucratic roadblocks that hamper trade and investment in India. He also has a golden opportunity to crush the corruption that imposes a huge invisible tax on every enterprise in the country. Unfortunately, his extraordinary political freedom also means that he will find it hard to resist the kind of sectarian (i.e. antiMuslim) measures that the militants in his own party expect. He cannot use the need to keep his coalition allies happy as an excuse for not going down that road. Nobody knows which way he’ll jump, but it might be the right way. Even some Muslims in Gujarat argue that Modi has changed since he failed to stop the sectarian riots that killed around a thousand Muslims there in 2001. Moreover, the election outcome makes it clear that a considerable number of the country’s 175 million Muslims must actually have voted for him. If he can keep his own hardliners on a short leash, everybody else’s hopes for DYER | 10


COMMENT | 9

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

THEIR VIEW / QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Do you have any key issues in the Ontario Provincial Election?

»»Donna Johnson

»»Thomas Lankowski

Let’s not let the Conservatives get in!

Get rid of the Ontario Municipal Board. They I don’t want any of them, because I can’t trust All I care about is not getting the Liberals back Yeah… I’m sick of all the phone calls. have so much power to control what gets built any of them. in, because they really messed it up. where, and they’re not elected.

»»Catherine Gowland

»»Mark Malko

»»Barry Thomas

"This money should be reclaimed from Ontario 'public servants' and their jaw-dropping sense of entitlement." Tonia Kelly | 10 HIS VIEW / STEVE KANNON

What if they built a police state but no one cared enough to heed the warnings? EDITOR'S NOTES Increasingly, we’re concerned about governments, police agencies and private businesses – none acting in our best interest, rather to the contrary – spying on us. Our carelessness with social media further erodes our privacy, while making it easier for the aforementioned groups to keep tabs on us ... and sell us stuff. Add to the list of threats against your privacy – and even your safety – from the technology we insist on surrounding ourselves with. Everything from our smartphones to our cars and even our TVs can and will be used against us. Sometimes, as in the use of GPS technology in phones, our movements are easily tracked, the better to offer up individualized ads. Out running errands and decide you want to grab a bite somewhere? Your mobile device will pinpoint your location and offer up restaurant sug-

gestions, likely ones from establishments that have paid the search provider. Seems convenient and innocuous enough, right? But that information is also being stored in perpetuity, to be added to the vast array of data collected about you, as well as feeding the overall statistics of not only the service provider, but any group to whom it chooses to sell the data. Theoretically, with your smartphone on, you can be tracked everywhere you go. That information used as a sales tool, and also scooped up by government agencies, with or without legal standing. The extent of the spying is revealed in No Place to Hide, the new book from Glenn Greenwald, the Guardian journalist who brought to light the documents gathered by whistleblower Edward Snowden. The egregious misdeeds of the U.S. National Security Agency and its ilk, still being catalogued, and the spy-caperesque story of how Greenwald came to know Snowden form the basis of the book. In May 2013, Glenn

HOW TO REACH US

Greenwald in a recent interview. Lest you think the NSA has no interest in you, keep in mind that Canada has been a recipient of NSA funds to facilitate spying. Likewise, Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC), a secretive government spy agency, has been complicit in the underhanded deeds, both domestically and as part of the so-called 5 Eyes, the alliance of Australia, Canada, New Zealand, the United Kingdom and the United States, which coordinates its intelligence-gathering efforts. As well, widespread espionage – for military and commercial purposes – drifts right down to the individual level, often infiltrating the basic infrastructure and hardware that’s part of our daily use of the internet. “One of the biggest stories that’s new in the book is this program that really is quite remarkable, which is, all over the world, people buy routers and switches and servers, which are the devices that let corporations or municipalities

or villages provide Internet service to large numbers of people at once, hundreds or even thousands. And there are American companies that are leaders in these products, such as Cisco. And what the NSA will do, whenever it decides that it wants to, is, once somebody orders a product from Cisco, Cisco then ships it to that person; the NSA physically intercepts the package, takes it from FedEx or from the U.S. mail service, brings it back to NSA headquarters, opens up the package, and plants a backdoor device on one of these devices, reseals it with a factory seal and then sends it on to the unwitting user, who then provides Internet service to large numbers of people, all of which is instantly redirected into the repositories of the NSA,” says Greenwald of some of the new revelations in his book. The Snowden documents highlight an unprecedented sabotage of internet privacy. “The documents demonstrate that there have been tens – hundreds of millions, if not billions,

of dollars spent to make certain that the NSA and the GCHQ [the UK counterparts] can listen to any in-flight cellphone calls that they want, from those phones that are embedded on the seats in front of you, and, more importantly, to be able to monitor all Internet activity that takes place over the wi-fi service of a commercial jet,” Greenwald explains, pointing to the pervasive drive to spy on everyone, everywhere. “That shows the institutional mindset, which is there should never be a moment where you can develop the capability to go and speak without their surveillance net. And that’s the reason why they targeted airplanes as the one place left in the world, other than in person in the middle of nowhere, that you can actually speak or do things without their knowledge.” The midflight snooping is just the latest abuse by authorities of the technology, tracking that can paint a fairly thorough picture of your life: where you go, KANNON | 10

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Greenwald set out for Hong Kong to meet an anonymous source who claimed to have astonishing evidence of pervasive government spying and insisted on communicating only through heavily encrypted channels. That source turned out to be the 29-year-old NSA contractor Edward Snowden, and his revelations about the agency’s widespread, systemic overreach proved to be some of the most explosive and consequential news in recent history, triggering a debate over national security and information privacy. It can be argued, however, that we’re clearly not paying enough attention, as few of us take any steps to counter even basic abuses – the Canadian government snooping through your Facebook page, for instance. No Place to Hide details “a surveillance system that has as its primary objective the elimination of privacy globally, by which I mean that everyone’s communications electronically will be collected, stored, analyzed and monitored by the U.S. government,” notes

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10 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

THE MONITOR

VERBATIM

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

The Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act (Bill C-13) would provide telecom companies with criminal and civil immunity for disclosing subscriber information to government agencies. In 2011, for example, nine of Canada's major telecom providers and social media sites received 1.2 million data requests from government agencies. The companies complied in 784,756 cases.

“It is wrong for the OMB to run roughshod over citizens and communities. The OMB should not be used as a tool for developers with deep pockets to destroy prime farmland and shut out local citizens. Those with deep pockets and expensive lawyers should not be driving planning decisions in Ontario. The OMB is broken and it should be overhauled or scrapped.”

The Elmira Raceway made its move to Elora official, as members of the Woolwich Agricultural Society voted May 21 to approve a deal to finance a new facility including 200 slot machines. The $15 million package includes $8.4 million to build new facilities on a 68-acre site near Elora and $3.5 million for infrastructure costs and site work.

»»PEN Canada

»»Mike Schreiner, leader of the Green Party of Ontario, takes aim at the undemocratic

»»From the May 25, 2002 edition of the Observer

way the Ontario Municipal Board can override local planning priorities and the public interest

DYER: Demographics likely

NATIONAL VIEW

to allow India to pass China

FROM | 8

a surge in the economic growth rate may come true. What might that mean over the next decade? It could mean a politically stable India whose growth rate is back up around 7 or 8 per cent – and a China destabilized by a severe recession and political protests whose growth rate is down around 4 per cent. While neither political stability in India nor political chaos in China are guaranteed in the longer run, by 2025 the demography will have taken over with a vengeance. China’s population will be in de-

cline, and the number of young people entering the workforce annually will be down by 20 per cent and still falling. India’s population will still be growing, as will the number of young people coming into the job market each year. That will give India a 3 or 4 per cent advantage in economic growth regardless of what happens on the political front. In the long run both countries may come to see their massive populations as a problem, but in the medium term it looks increasingly likely that India will catch up with and even overtake China in economic power.

KANNON: We're already on the

road to a troubling future FROM | 9

how long you stay, who you’re with and a host of other details they have no business knowing. Period. The Harper government, which has been pushing its own immoral and illicit spying agenda, is back at it again with Bill C-13, the disingenuously named Protecting Canadians from Online Crime Act. It’s supposed to be aimed at cyberbullying, but just like Vic Toews’ attempted end-run on civil rights with the forthe-child-pornographers of Bill C-30, the real goal is to steal your privacy and further the surveillance state.

The “lawful access” legislation would allow unwarranted access to your mobile devices, among a host of other abuses. What the Snowden documents reveal is a systemic attempt to circumvent civil liberties and the rule of law, replacing it instead with the kind of monitoring Orwell or Huxley couldn’t even have imagined at their dystopian best. Real security would outlaw the collection and/or storage of any private data by any organization, corporate or government. The alternative is the road we’re on now, the one that leads to a autocratic police state.

YOUR VIEW / LETTER

Time to take aim at bloated bureaucracy

To the Editor, Except for a few ineffective comments about salary freezes, Kathleen Wynne hasn’t had a constructive thought about the elephant in the room – the Ontario government’s bloated bureaucracy. Presumably she’s content to nibble around the edges

Write a letter to the editor. editor@woolwichobserver.com Check out our rates online at www.observerxtra.com/advertise/media-kit/

of this enormous problem and proceed into the future dragging this parasitic deadweight behind her. For instance, there are almost 12,000 employees in Hydro One and Ontario Power Generation who earn more than $100,000/year (average salary in this group is $127,000). This does not take into account their pensions, benefits, bonuses, or all the employees who earn less than $100,000. The cost of hundreds of thousands of Ontario bureaucrats affects all Ontarians who want either to keep our tax dollars ourselves, or have them spent on any number of worthy causes in our society. This money should be reclaimed from Ontario “public servants” and their jaw-dropping sense of entitlement. It has created a two-tiered system – them and the rest of us who keep them in a lifestyle that we can’t afford for ourselves.

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SPORTS | 11

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

SPORTS BASKETBALL / HIGH SCHOOL

Conestogo girl recognized for academic and athletic prowess A student at Woodland Christian High School, Juliana Thomson has an eye on U.S. basketball scholarship SCOTT BARBER When you first meet Woodland Christian High School student Juliana Thomson, it’s difficult to picture the fierce, intimidating power forward of a provincial champion basketball team. Sure, she’s tall for a 10th grader – nearly 6’2”- but a more articulate and polite teen you won’t find. She’s no Dennis Rodman or Charles Oakley, off the court at least. In fact, the Conestogo resident strikes the balance between school and sports so well she won the Molten all-academic athlete award, an honour given to members of the Junior Elite (Juel) basketball league who demonstrate excellence in both fields. Thomson fits the bill. “I really enjoy math and science,” she said, sitting in the office outside her school’s brand new gym. “If I get the opportunity, I’d love to go to the United States to play basketball and study medicine.” The NCAA is the holy grail for talented young athletes in Canada, with its combination of state-ofthe-art facilities, premier skill-level and potential for full scholarships. It takes a lot of work to get noticed,

NOT SO GREAT OUTDOORSMAN / STEVE GALEA

The real reason it’s raining fish OPEN COUNTRY

particularly outside of the major cities. But the KW Lightning basketball program and the Juel league provide young women like Thomson the chance to gain attention south of the border. “The league is really good at getting us exposure with tournaments in the U.S. and showcase events where scouts come up to watch,” she explained. “A girl from Hamilton just committed to UCONN,” Thomson said, referring to the University of Connecticut’s juggernaut program that won 40 straight games last season on its the way to a second straight national championship. Last year, Thomson’s squad won the provincial tournament, qualifying for the Junior National Championships at the ESPN Wide World of Sports facility in Orlando, Florida. “It was an incredible experience to go up against some of the best players in America,” she said. “I’m a bit small for a power forward, especially down there

I don’t normally carry an umbrella or a shield. But yesterday’s event made me think that I should start. I went out on our back deck, had a coffee and went back inside. Minutes later, I went out again and a sunfish was lying on the deck – which is unusual, to say the least, since we live at least a quarter-mile from the nearest body of water. Fortunately, I have watched enough CSI Miami to ascertain two things: one, the fish was dropped from a great height; two, the evidence doesn’t lie. Knowing a little about sunfish, I immediately ruled out a salmon imitation gone terribly wrong. A sunfish that size could not possibly leap 300 yards over 20 acres of forest – unless it had access to steroids and a good tailwind, which I’m pretty sure it didn’t. That left two possibilities. A passing bird such as an osprey, heron, gull or kingfisher might have dropped the fish on my deck. Or two, it’s raining fish, as was foretold in

Juliana Thomson plays for Woodland Christian High School.

AWARD | 12

GALEA | 14

[SCOTT BARBER / THE OBSERVER]

EDSS puts on its best show at track event Big haul of medals has athletes eyeing regional and provincial competitions WILL SLOAN The fields may have been off-limits for most of spring, but that didn’t stop EDSS students from bringing home the hardware from the Waterloo County Secondary School Athletics Association (WCSSAA) competition. Even with a late and wet spring that kept most sports

indoors, the Lancers made a strong showing at the event at Jacob Hespeler Secondary School May 14-15. “With the weather this year, we’ve been doing a lot of indoor practices, so as a result they actually didn’t get the outdoor practices that would have been ideal for them,” said track coach Lisa Douglas. “If we’re not allowed on the fields, and

they can’t practice their long-jump or triple jump, or can’t throw a javelin or a shot, it’s definitely a challenge. “We got creative and were doing sprints in the hall or whatever, but it was a challenging spring for track and field.” But damp fields didn’t dampen enthusiasm. “They’ve been great,” said

Douglas of the students. “They’ve been very positive, but you could tell that by the time May rolled around, they were really itching to get outside and train more specifically for their events rather than the general conditioning we’d been doing.” Even with the spotty preparation, there was still plenty of rec-

ognition to go around. Gold medals went to

TRACK | 12

A damp spring cut into practice time, but EDSS still brought home medals. [SUBMITTED]


12 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

XT ND! E N KE E E W

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TRACK: Plenty of accolades for EDSS athletes

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Alex Weber (Sr. Boys javelin), Alex Hildenbrand (in the open 1500m steeplechase and the Sr. Girls 3000m). Silver went to Nathaniel Mechler (Sr. Boys javelin), Julia Hildebrand (open 1500m steeplechase), and Sydney Jones (Sr. Girls javelin), Emily Willms (Jr. Girls javelin). Also, bronze medals were handed to Dexter Roth (Midget Boys high jump) and Julie Hildebrand (Sr. Girls 3000m), and fourthplace citations were given to Nathaniel Mechler (Sr. Boys discus), Taylor Rempel (Jr. Girls 800m), Sarah Larke (Jr. Girls 200m), Marlowe Schott (Sr. Girls shotput), and the team of Abby Ziegler, Sadie Richmond, Amy Lacey, Savannah Campbell, and Emily Yeung in the Midget Girls 4x100 relay.

In addition, two athletes were awarded the titles of Overall WCSSAA Midget Male and Female athletes. Savannah Campbell and Owen Read placed first in all three of their events: the 100m, 200m, and 400m allmidget boys/girls races. “It’s pretty exciting,” said Douglas of the two athletes. “As far as I know, in the history of EDSS we’ve never had a double winner for boy-and-girl overall athlete.” The key to success came down to hard work, said Douglas. “It’s probably their level of compete and their dedication to the sport. They’re very specific, and they fine-tune everything they do. They pay attention to the details, as opposed to just running and jumping or whatever. “It’s a step up from the elementary meets they would

have had where everybody shows up and competes: these kids have to pay more attention to detail.” The athletes listed above went on to compete at the Central Western Ontario Secondary Schools Association (CWOSSA) event on May 21-22; the top five in each event will advance to the Ontario Federation of School Athletic Association (OFSAA) West Regionals in Windsor May 30-31, with successful athletes moving on to OFSAA in Mississauga. Douglas says that EDSS has what it takes to go the distance. “It’s easy to get concerned or worried when you see all the other athletes around. It’s important that they just focus on what they’ve been doing, and what they can do, and take control of their performances.”

AWARD: Success in the classroom, on the court FROM | 11

where some of the girls are 6’5”. But that helps me learn how to use my body in different ways to compete and be physical.” The hard work this season culminated with an invitation to the all-star game, which tips off at Ryerson’s Mattamy Athletic Centre on May 24. Outside of rep basketball, Thomson finds time to play on the school volleyball,

badminton and senior level basketball teams, and was recently elected student athletic director. It’s a great deal of achievement for a young woman who only moved to Conestogo (from Cambridge) shortly before starting Grade 9. She modestly attributes the success to her coaches and teachers. “Everyone at the school wants you to succeed in the classroom and in sports,”

Thomson said. “I’m fortunate to be in such a welcoming environment. Being a smaller school, you get to know everyone in different grades so quickly.” The ball continues at tournaments in Illinois and Kentucky with the KW Lightning’s summer team, coached by former Ontario University Association standout and European professional Kerri Jilesen.


SPORTS | 13

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

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14 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

GALEA: Some people just can’t see the obvious when trying to explain such occurrences FROM | 11

the ancient prophecies. I’m a realist, so I ruled out the first. I mean let’s be honest here, when’s the last time you saw a bird drop a fish? Now that we’ve cleared this up, I think it’s time we discuss how the raining down of fish will affect us all. Obviously, the big question is does that sunfish count on my daily limit?

The answer, thankfully, is no. I’m not sure about trout, walleye or other game fish, however. And what if one lands on your deck that is within the slot size limit? Or more fall than the daily limit allows? Or if they fall out of season? A quick perusal of the fishing regulations wasn’t all that helpful regarding these circumstances. So I’m thinking

this will be a question for the conservation officer next time I see one. I actually left this message on our local CO’s voice mail and thus far he hasn’t returned my call. One thing I am a little upset about is that the weather network botched the forecast that day altogether. At no point did they say, “Cloudy, with a chance of sunfish.” Heck,

I would have even been happy with them calling a 10 per cent chance of sunfish. As someone who has taken quite a few sunfish to the head I can assure you that this is a worrisome failure on their part. Believe me, it will be even worse if we have heavier clouds and a chance of pike – if those fish land teeth first, you can say

goodbye to your deck. The good news is that the fish will be fresh and practically delivered to your door. The bad news is that this isn’t normal and if it keeps up will ruin any excuse I have to go on distant fishing trips. Whether this is the first sign of the apocalypse or merely a spinoff of global warming is anyone’s guess. All I know is that it’s prob-

ably a good idea to have a hard hat by the door. Nor would it be overly cautious to keep it handy when the clouds start crowding in. I was telling this to a friend the other day. He just laughed and said this was probably a freak occurrence and was likely a fish that fell from the beak of a passing bird. Some people sure have vivid imaginations.

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SPORTS | 15

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

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16 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

A FESTIVE BUILD-UP TO THE FIREWORKS

OUTPACING THE COMPETITION

The EDSS girls’ slo-pitch team came out ahead of Waterloo-Oxford District Secondary School on Wednesday at Elmira Lions Park, pulling off a 10-9 win. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

Robin in the Hood performers showed off their sword skills and Cameron Klassen scaled the rock climbing wall at the Victoria Day festivies in Conestogo on May 17. [SCOTT BARBER / THE OBSERVER]

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VENTURE | 17

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

VENTURE FOOD FOR THOUGHT/ OWEN ROBERTS

LOCAL FOOD / STARTING SOMETHING NEW

Wellesley farmers’ market is just about ready to launch From an idea bandied about last year, the concept has caught on, with the venture set to open June 7 SCOTT BARBER Wellesley’s food producers and artists will get the opportunity to sell their wares on home field starting June 7 with the opening of the community’s new farmers’ market. In contrast to markets in St. Jacobs or across the region, organizers hope to create a relaxed, intimate environment. “I think a lot of people are tired of the crowds and the bustle at the bigger markets,” Pam Wideman said. “I love St. Jacobs, but who wants to drive out 20 or 30 minutes to shop, or to have to fight with tourists over apples?” The market will take place every Saturday from 9 a.m. until noon at the Wellesley Park Pavilion, operating between June 7 and October 4. After raising the issue via the Women of Wellesley Facebook group, Wideman was overwhelmed by the response. “We wanted to come up with something more than just a market,” she explained. “This can be a place for neighbours to get together to connect and support each other.” Through blogging and social media the idea picked up steam over the winter. “It started out small, with my husband and I just wondering why the farmers around here should have to

take their products out of town,” Wideman said. “But it grew because people are eager for the chance to support local businesses.” So far, there are 10 seasonal vendors signed up to take part each week. Other specialty items, like homemade aprons, dresses and hair ribbons will be sold on a semi-regular basis. The emphasis, of course, will be placed on the food itself, which will consist of baked goods, maple syrup, honey and a co-operative fruits and vegetables table, exclusive to Wellesleyarea farmers. Given the diversity of the offerings of area farmers, the market hopes to have the expected assortment of produce, plants, crafts and baking, but does not want to be limited to that and is open to suggestions for future expansions. “We are going to be a designated farmers’ market,” Wideman said in an interview earlier this year to promote the idea. “The majority of venders will actually be farmers growing their own – there’s no food terminal product.” As an enhancement to the shopping experience, there will entertainment. Live music will be a staple each week, starting with the Kitchener Music Society’s 40-piece band. Opening weekend will also feature a dog agility show and balloon art by Drew Ripley. “Saturdays are a family

New era in animal nutrition targets humans, too FIELD NOTES

your neighbours.” The market’s central location, walking distance for

When it comes to nutrition, it’s safe to say modern farmers are diet conscious about their animals. Farm animals have a whole industry looking after their best interests. Professionals such as animal nutritionists make sure livestock, unlike humans, don’t make bad nutrition decisions. Granted, that option’s mostly taken away from farm animals through production agriculture, with prescribed diets. But where else on earth is a collection of species – beef cattle, dairy cows, chickens and pigs, among them – so closely observed and cared for? Humans’ poor nutritional choices are driving some of the significant advances in animal nutrition that have taken place as a result of research at the University of Guelph and elsewhere. We are a world of animal protein eaters, and there are more of us all the time. Along with eating animal protein, we unfortunately also eat to excess and overly indulge our cravings for fat, salt and sugar. That leaves us

MARKET | 18

ROBERTS | 18

Wellesley farmers’ market organizer Pam Wideman kneels in front of her seedling and sprout garden. day, so it’s a good day to take your family out to the market and support local farmers and business,” she said. “While you’re there,

you can let your kids play while you browse around, and chances are you’re going to be shopping from your neighbours, among

[SCOTT BARBER / THE OBSERVER]

COMMUNITY

GARAGE SALE See the Garage Sale listings in the Classified Section for locations

THIS SATURDAY! MAY 24th 2014


18 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

ROBERTS: Animal nutrition changing along with the public’s perception of its importance FROM | 17

vulnerable to nutritional shortcomings and disease. That vulnerability has helped usher in a new age of animal nutrition – distinguished by research that makes humans, as well as animals, the best they can be. In Canada, Guelph is the overwhelming leader in this field. Almost every senior nutritionist at every major animal feed company here is an animal nutrition graduate from the University of Guelph. That’s a result of the train-

ing they receive from one of the world’s most concentrated core of animal nutrition scientists and associated faculty, as well as from support from the animal feed industry and from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture and Food and the Ministry of Rural Affairs. Guelph faculty members ushered in change. They saw how nutrition must go hand in hand with other animal health matters – housing, welfare, behaviour and disease prevention, among others – to make an animal top of the

line. For example, Guelph researchers have led the way in figuring out the essential role of vitamin E and selenium in superior muscle development and health in livestock. They broke ground internationally by discovering how to incorporate omega 3 fatty acids into eggs and into cow’s milk, which led to enriched eggs and to the popular Dairy Oh! line of milk products. They are leading the world in finding ways to develop what’s called co-

products – such as the leftover protein and minerals from grain used as a feedstock to create ethanol – for sustainable animal feed, so traditional staples such as corn and soybeans can be used to feed humans instead. They are regularly called on to help balance the nutritional needs of exotic animals in captivity. They find new and nasty levels of mycotoxins that are increasingly prevalent in feed stocks as climate changes. And they’ve turned

heads by observing how cancerous tumours shrink when lab animals were fed selenium-enriched feed. Could the same thing happen in humans if they drank milk from cows fed beneficial levels of selenium? They also work with the pet food and aquaculture industries to help develop scientifically sound diets. Where does the basic science in the diet come from? The University of Guelph. The new direction and interest in enhanced food has animal nutritionists

A May day for all those who are hungry WCS making a push to fill its shelves as part of today’s region-wide food drive WILL SLOAN When Woolwich Community Services takes part in the region’s DIG IN Food Drive today (Saturday), director of community supports Kelly Christie says it will be for a very simple reason: “You need to know that there are people in your community that are working very, very hard at minimum wage… and they’re hungry.” In 2013, Woolwich Community Services gave emergency food assistance to 456 people in the township. Today’s region-wide drive is intended to give a shotin-the-arm to it and other food hamper programs outside of the traditional holiday boom times. “It’s coordinated by the

Waterloo Region in an effort to get all the food banks in the region to do a major, one-day food drive, in hopes that the accumulation will be greater than if we were to do individual drives,” said Christie. “Some of the items that we’re really in need of are canned food, canned juice, canned meats like turkey and chicken, pasta sauce, also salmon and tuna. At this time of year, it’s always nice to have condiments, like mayo and ketchup.” Other items listed in the Woolwich Food Bank’s Top Ten include sugar, instant coffee, cookies, flour, shampoo, and toothpaste. In addition, WCS is seeking cash donations for the ongoing maintenance of its food hamper program.

“Our shelves are very light,” Christie said. “We purchase on a weekly basis milk, eggs, margarine, apples, carrots, and bread to put in that hamper so they have something fresh. With the increase in the use of the food hamper program, and the cost of groceries going up, the cash is always in need as well.” Christie added that all of the items and money donated will go to help people within the Woolwich community. “There’s a bus at No Frills, and we’ll be filling up grocery carts and my vehicle, and we’ll bring the food right here to the basement. We’ll have a crew to sort it all in categories, check the expiry dates, and fill our shelves.”

Donations will be accepted at Foodland Elmira, Foodland St. Clements, and Elmira No Frills, May 24 (today) 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. For more information, contact Woolwich community Services at 519-669-5139.

Kelly Christie says WCS needs to stock its larder.

all fired up. Last week, 185 members of the Animal Nutrition Association of Canada came together at the University of Guelph for the 50th annual animal nutrition conference – which coincides with the university’s 50th anniversary. Says Guelph graduate and conference chair Kathleen Shore, ruminant nutritionist for New-Life Mills in Cambridge: “Things have changed and the public sees how animal nutrition affects them too. It’s really energized the profession.”

MARKET:

Family friendly atmosphere, local food and live music FROM | 17

[WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

many Wellesley residents Wideman is quick to point out, is another draw. “I think people will enjoy being able to walk out to the market with their kids and dogs. We are fortunate to have access to such a great spot. We are so excited to finally get going after months and months of planning.” Early birds will be treated to a small opening ceremony shortly after 9 a.m. on Saturday, June 7. To sign up as a vendor, busker or volunteer, contact Pam Wideman at pwidemanphoto@gmail. com.

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY!

Installed & Delivered* Our Regular Price $169/Yard. Compare our price to others who deliver only in a bag for $145.

*Some site conditions may incur extra cost. Minimum 3 Yards for sale price to be in effect. Amounts over 8 yards receive an additional discount. HST extra on all prices listed. Prices subject to change without notice. Sale is valid for a limited time only.

LE ILAB ! A V A OW N

Suite available for immediate occupancy! Let us take the stress out of your life. Call Marlen for complete details and book a tour 519-664-6637 or 519-404-5359

10 WATER ST., ST. JACOBS, ONT. Tel: 519-664-6637 www.stjacobsplace.ca


THE ARTS | 19

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

THE ARTS ON STAGE / LIVE MUSIC

Summer brings the sounds of country Lynn Russwurm’s popular concert series set to return for a fifth year at Elmira’s Gore Park bandstand WILL SLOAN In his Floradale home, Lynn Russwurm is closing down an auction of some of his thousands of country records. “I had about 1,500 items in it; I sold probably about half of it. Close to $9,000 worth. There’s money in it, but it ends up being a lot of work.” This may come as a relief to Russwurm’s guests, who often find themselves hop-scotching over piles of LPs. But at 84, Woolwich’s own legendary singer/ songwriter/ historian/ collector is far from packing it in. “I’m still buying records,” he laughs. “It’s looking for the records that’s the fun part. My son is thinking of taking it over, so if he does, I’ll probably be doing the buying for him. It’s a hard thing to leave alone. I’ve done it for 30 years now, and I enjoy it.” For the fifth year, Russwurm will share his enthusiasm for traditional country via the Elmira Summer Concert Series, sponsored by the Observer.

Peace River Band (top) and Rescue Junction are two of the group set to perform at Lynn Russwurm’s annual concert series. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER / SUBMITTED] Since its first year under Russwurm’s guidance, the series’ weekly audience in Gore Park has swelled from

200 to more than 600, and proven that the demand for old-time country is alive and well.

PUTTING ON

A SHOW? The show must go on! Place an ad in the Observer today: 519-669-5790 | info@woolwichobserver.com

“They used to have Sunday night concerts, and we’d be lucky to get 40 people out, but I could see the

potential,” says Russwurm. “We’d be a country band, next week they’d have a jazz band, or something else – it

wasn’t a steady thing, and people just didn’t bother coming out. I figured we could do better than that, if we’d kept a certain kind of music.” He continues, “If you go to a concert for most of these groups, you’ll pay $30, $40. So, what can you get better?” Plenty of familiar and unfamiliar faces are on the bill this season. Randy Morrison and Flatt River will kick off the series on June 1. A relatively young group from Niagara Falls, the Peace River Band, will take the stage on June 15, with Rural Appetite on June 22; Ridin’ High with Amberley Beattie on July 20; Steve Parkinson & Stony Lonesome on August 3, and Southbound 1,2,3,4 on August 10. Among the younger faces, Russwurm is most excited about Steve Piticco and South Mountain on August 17. “Steve Piticco has won awards a number of times for Top Guitar Player in Canada, and South Mountain are coming back from tour of Europe – they should be pretty hot by then. They’re the ones I’m really excited about.” The rest of the series is padded with long-established acts. Earl Fries, a veteran of the Toronto bar scene who regularly plays CONCERT | 20

Concerts, theatre productions, art tours and more … Showcase your creative events here! Advertise it with a banner in the Observer Arts section.


20 | THE ARTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

CONCERT: Playing to what the audience wants

THE OBSERVER PRESENTS ...

FROM | 19

locally, will perform his biggest show in years on June 8; Rescue Junction and the Muir Family will return on June 15 and 29 respectively; the Commercial Tavern’s Paul Weber will drop by on July 6 (“Paul has a big following – every time we have him here, he gets 200 more people than anyone else,” says Russwurm.) On August 31, the legendary Larry Mercey Trio will close out the season. And on July 27, Russwurm and longtime collaborator Bob Tremblay will return to play as the Two Plus Who, joined by Jimmy Phair, Linda Elder, and Carmen Butchard. “It’s a great crowd to play for – the crowd is really appreciative,” says Russwurm. “We used to play in bars a lot, and you’re part of the furniture there. Here, people come to hear what you do.” One thing that won’t be on the bill is the country music you’ll likely find on FM radio. “Rural Appetite put in some new country last year, and the reaction of the crowd was … lower. Much lower than the traditional stuff. … I’m not saying it’s not good music, it’s just not country music the

Concert Series Sunday Night

Paul Weber will go from the Commercial Tavern to the Gore Park bandstand on July 6. June 29 way us old-timers know it. Muir Family “The crowd is an older July 6 crowd,” he adds. “I have people ask, ‘What’s going to Paul Weber July 13 happen when these older Peace River Band people are gone?’ Well, I July 20 think people grow up and Ridin’ High with Amberley change their musical taste Beattie as they get to that certain July 27 age. There’ll be a new genThe Two Plus Who with eration taking their place.” Jimmy Phair, Linda Elder The Elmira Summer and Carmen Butchard Concert Series kicks off at August 3 the Elmira Gore Park bandSteve Parkinson & Stony stand June 1, 7-9 p.m., and continues every Sunday un- Lonesome August 10 til August 31. Admission is Southbound free. For more information, August 17 visit lynn.russwurm.org. Steve Piticco & South June 1 Mountain Randy Morrison & Flatt August 24 River The Two Plus Who with June 8 Harry Busby, Maryanne Earl Fries Cunningham and Lance June 15 Russwurm Rescue Junction August 31 June 22 Larry Mercey Trio Rural Appetite

up to

50% off

2014

Gore Park, Elmira FREE · BRING YOUR OW

N LAWNCHAIRS · 7-9P

SUN. June 1 Randy Morrison & Flatt River

SUN. June 15 Rescue Junction

SUN. June 29

FREE

cordless upgrade

Muir Family

SUN. July 13 Peace River Band

SUN. July 27 The Two Plus Who

save the

HST

on Custom

(Bob Tremblay & Lynn Russwurm)

w/Jimmy Phair, Linda Elder & Carmen Butchart

Drapery

in-home consultations available.

SUN. August 10 sale ends june 21, 2014

Southbound

SUN. August 24 The Two Plus Who

299 Manitou Drive, Kitchener

IN SUPPORT OF

(between Homer Watson and Wabanaki)

519-893-8687

www.blindsareus.ca

(Bob Tremblay & Lynn Russwurm)

w/Harry Busby, Maryanne Cunningham & Lance Russwurm

M

SUN. June 8 Earl Fries

SUN. June 22 Rural Appetite

SUN. July 6 Paul Weber

SUN. July 20 Ridin’ High

SUN. August 3 Steve Parkinson & Stony Lonesome

SUN. August 17 Steve Piticco & South Mountain

SUN. August 31 The Larry Mercey Trio


CLASSIFIED | 21

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

CLASSIFIED HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

NOW HIRING DRIVERS AZ Driver - We are currently seeking a Hardworking, Energetic and Professional AZ Company driver to join our team. The individual will run Flatbed, Van and Roll tight Trailers. Some experience with Flatbed is preferred but we are willing to train. G Class - We are also seeking a young, Hardworking motivated individual to run our Furniture truck. Duties will include loading and unloading of solid wood furniture to and from Mfg shops, finishing shops and retail stores. Some experience with moving furniture is necessary. All applicants must posses a clean driver abstract and CVOR At EnviroCompany paid benefits. Please apply in person or send your resume and drivers abstract to info@enviro-eze.com

GREEN VALLEY IS looking for a reliable person to work 3 to 4 days a week, with the potential of full time beginning in the fall. Health food experience is not essential, but a retail and customer service background is. We offer an engaging customer service position with competitive pay, ongoing training, and an employee discount. Please email resume to info@greenvalleyhealth. ca or drop one off in person at the store, 9a Church St. W. Elmira. 519-669-1480, fax 519-210-1481.

100% LOCAL

PUBLIC NOTICE

HELP WANTED HELP WANTED IMMEDIATELY on a farm drainage crew. Experience with farm equipment an asset. Call Don at AWF Contractors 519577-9411. NOW HIRING: BOBCAT/ FORKLIFT Operator. Full time days, previous experience operating a Bobcat or Forklift. Valid Forklift licence is an asset. If you are a reliable individual able to work in fast paced environment, please apply with Resume to info@willowbraepallets. com or call 519-664-3688.

TRAINING & LESSONS WSIB APPROVED COURSES by Lifesaving Society. EMERGENCY FIRST AID Saturday, June 7. $85. STANDARD FIRST AID Saturdays June 7 & 14. $125. Valid Student ID for discount. Registration deadline May 31. www.elmtraining.ca click on the first aid link for registration form.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

Candidate Information Session Are you interested in running for Municipal Office? If the answer is Yes, then you are invited! The Region of Waterloo Clerks will be hosting a Candidate Information Session featuring the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing as follows: Tuesday, June 3, 2014 at 6:30 p.m. Waterloo Region Museum 10 Huron Rd, Kitchener Anyone interested in running as a candidate in the 2014 Municipal/School Board Election or learning more about local government is invited to attend this session to find out about: • • • • •

Nomination Process Financial Filing Campaigning/Campaign Period Duties and Responsibilities of Candidates Municipal Conflict of Interest

INVESTORS WANTED FOR Secured Loan opportunities. 1 - 3 year terms available. Interest paid monthly, principal also if required at a rate of 12%. $2500.00 minimum. 519-589-7547.

FOR SALE MAPLE SYRUP 4 litre price $39, available in light, medium or amber. 7387 3rd Line, RR2 Wallenstein, 1 mile west of Yatton. SUNSET GREENHOUSES AT Mervin and Louisa Gingrich is open for business even with construction here. 7279 4th Line, Mapleton. 519-6692043.

AUCTIONS

Format for the evening: 6:30 pm Presentation from Regional Clerk’s Office followed by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing

WED. MAY 28 at 10:00 AM - clearing auction sale of household effects; furniture; antiques; tools; and miscellaneous items to be held at the St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s for an area estate with additions. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 www.Jantziauctions.com

For further information or to register for the event, please contact: Lee Ann Wetzel, Deputy Clerk, 519-575-4410 or lwetzel@regionofwaterloo.ca HOW TO REACH US

CLASSIFIED DEADLINE:

THURSDAYS BY 10AM AUCTIONS SAT. MAY 24 at 10:00 AM - Clearing auction sale of lawn and garden equipment; hand and power tools; household effects; antiques; collectables; and miscellaneous items to be held at 54 Grey Abbey Trail in Cambridge (Hespler) for Linda Gillick. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 www.Jantziauctions.com SAT. MAY 24 at 10:00 AM -Clearing auction sale of snowmobile; lawn and garden equipment; wood working equipment and tools; horse drawn wagons and cutters; furniture; antiques; collectables; and miscellaneous items to be held at 1087 West River Road Cambridge (south end of Cambridge) for Harry Bergsma. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.Jantziauctions.com FRI MAY 30 at 7:00 PM Charity auction of brand new donated furniture and miscellaneous items to be held at the old New Hamburg arena on Jacob street in New Hamburg for the Mennonite Relief Sale. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 www.Jantziauctions.com FRI MAY 30 at 7:00 PM Charity auction of brand new donated furniture and miscellaneous items to be held at the old New Hamburg arena on Jacob street in New Hamburg for the Mennonite Relief Sale. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.Jantziauctions.com SAT. MAY 31 at 8:30 AM Charity auction of approx. 150 quilts furniture; household goods and miscellaneous items to be held the old New Hamburg arena on Jacob Street in New Hamburg for the Mennonite Relief Sale. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.Jantziauctions.com SAT. MAY 31 at 9:30 AM -Large toy and collectable auction of a 6ft Texaco gas pump; pedal cars; tractor trailers; banks; and other collectable toys to be held at 432 Queen St. in Blyth for the complete collection of Sharon Davis (Sharon’s Cars in Minature). Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.Jantziauctions.com

AUCTIONS

AUCTION SALE OF CONSUMER GOODS AT K & K LIQUIDATION AND AUCTION LTD.

1420 HUTCHISON RD, WELLESLEY

MONDAY MAY 26, AT 5:30 PM

SALE CONSISTS OF: Ass’t Fur niture Items; Mattress; Lawn Mowers, Bikes, Ass’t. Electronics; Watches; Swar; Housewares; Kid's & Adult Clothing; Toys; Linens; Hardware Items; Books; Candy; Consumer Goods; Plus a Large Selection of Other Misc. Items. LUNCH BOOTH TERMS; Cash, Interac, Visa, M.C. NOTE: Clothes will be sold in large lots, list subject to additions & deletions. Viewing from 4:00 P.M. day of sale. Owner or auctioneer not responsible for accidents day of sale. Any announcement given verbally day of sale take precedence over written ads. OWNER: K & K Liquidation and Auction Ltd.

519-656-0770 AUCTIONEERS:

GRAY’S AUCTION SERVICE INC., HARRISTON

519-338-3722

AUCTIONS SAT. JUNE 7 at 8:30 AM -Annual 3 ring consignment auction of farm equipment; woodworking and shop equipment; lawn and garden equipment; tools; household effects; new furniture; and miscellaneous items to be held at the Wallenstein Bauman log yard 6408B Yatton Side Rd approx. half km north of Wallenstein. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.Jantziauctions.com WED. JUNE 11 at 10:00 AM - Clearing auction sale of furniture; antiques; tools; collectables; household effects; and miscellaneous items to be held at the St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555. www.jantziauctions.com

#1

NEWS SOURCE IN THE REGION

FARM EQUIPMENT MF 33 SEED drill, 17 run, hydraulic or trip rope, lift, stainless fertilizer bottoms, stainless steel cups, grass seed box $1,850.00. Benn 12 ft sprocket packer, new bearings $1,250.00; AC cultivator frame, suitable for packer, harrow transport $375.00; spreader sides, for NH 680,679 manure spreader, brand new $1,100.00. JD 145 plows, 3 or 4 furrow, 14 inch, used this spring $975.00, Firestone 15.5 x 38 tires, good for duals, 75% tread $475.00. Dan Seifried, Harriston. 519338-2688.

WANTED ROOM WANTED - Single mature male with physical disability looking to rent a room in St. Jacobs, Heidelberg vicinity. I require handicapped accessible accommodation with parking spot. I am completely independent, trustworthy, quiet with a busy lifestyle. I am searching for an affordable place to live. Please contact me at 519-497-9676.

CONTINUED ON PG. 22

THE OBSERVER: WE GET THE WORD OUT!

PHONE 519.669.5790 | TOLL FREE 1.888.966.5942 | FAX 519.669.5753 | ONLINE WWW.OBSERVERXTRA.COM

ADDRESS 20-B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA, ON N3B 1Z9

CLASSIFIED ADS

DISPLAY ADS

519.669.5790 EXT 0

519.669.5790 EXT 104

ads@woolwichobserver.com

sales@woolwichobserver.com

RESIDENTIAL COST $7.50 /20 WORDS EXTRA WORDS 20¢ PER WORD

COMMERCIAL COST $12.00 /20 WORDS EXTRA WORDS 30¢ PER WORD

PLACING A CLASSIFIED WORD AD In person, email, phone or fax submissions are accepted during regular business hours. Deadline for Saturday publication is Wednesday by 5 p.m. All Classified ads are prepaid by cash, debit, Visa or MasterCard. Ask about Observer policies in regard to Display, Service Directory and Family Album advertising.


22 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

FAMILY ALBUM BIRTHDAY

STAG AND DOE

ANNIVERSARY

Look Who’s Turning 80!

Stag and Doe

Happy 40th Anniversary Jim and Marilyn Brearley

Sarah McGillivray & Neil Surnoskie

MEMORIAM

Karl Emil Motz

Jan 10, 1933 - May 23, 2012 His memory is as dear today as in the hour he passed away Loved & remembered, Trudie and Cindy DEATH NOTICES MARTIN, JESSE M. | Passed away on Saturday, May 17, 2014

at Freeport Hospital, Kitchener. Jesse M. Martin of RR 1, Linwood, age 83 years.

Please send best wishes, memories, funny stories, photos, poems to this special 80th birthday email: keithvanholst80@gmail.com. Looking forward to hearing from friends and family! CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

RENTALS 36 MEMORIAL AVE. 2 BR. July 1st. Excellent for seniors, no pets. Non smoker. BBQ for tenants, Coin laundry. Only $850 + utilities and $25 for parking. Please call 519-7443711. ELMIRA - 3 Bedroom semi for rent. Totally updated. $1350/ mth + utilities. Available July 1. Call 519-503-2753. GARAGE AND USED car lot for rent in Bloomingdale. Call Jerry 519-213-1123 or 519-5818859. HOUSE FOR RENT in Wellesley. Storey and a half, 3 or 4 bedrooms. No smoking, no pets. $1300/mth + utilities. Avail. June 14. Call 519-6562972. MOOREFIELD - ONE bedroom apartment, furnished, laundry facilities, parking, deck, electric heat, cable TV, no pets, adult building. References. $795.00 inclusive. First & Last. 519-638-3013.

TRADES & SERVICES MISSIONLIFE FINANCIAL/ RELIEF LENDING Group Debt? Before you settle know all the facts and your options. Call 519-897-8181. Free consultation. PAINTING - 3 Rooms for $300. Call Rob 778-929-5396.

GARAGE SALES

Saturday May 31, 2014 8pm-1am Elmira Legion-11 First St. E.

Join us for an Open House May 24, 2014 2-4 p.m. at the Elmira Legion. Best Wishes Only.

Tickets $10 at the door

Love: The Twins

GARAGE SALES

GARAGE SALES

21 NIGHTINGALE CRES. Elmira. May 24, 7:30 a.m. Queen boxspring & mattress. Kids/baby toys, clothes & books. Train table and a Whirlpool dryer.

GARAGE SALE - May 30, 6-8 p.m., Sat. May 31, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Old folding rocker, display cabinet, Olympus digital camera, skylite and more! 36 Bluejay Rd. Elmira.

5 PHOEBE CRS. Sat. May 24. Antique Juice OMat and Ice OMat, dog crate, pet clippers etc., Hauser patio table & 2 chairs, lamps, child’s rocker, small end tables, Hunter Douglas blinds, youth golf bag, misc. household items.

GARAGE SALE - Sat. May 24, 117 Arthur St. S. Elmira, 9 a.m. Household & furniture.

ANTIQUES, COLLECTIBLES, CHURCH pew, bikes, window air conditioner, records, lamps, toys, lawn mowers +. 25 Duke St. Elmira. Fri. May 23 at noon, Sat. May 24, 8 a.m. COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE - Sat. May 24th, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Wellesley Arena. 1004 Catherine St., Wellesley. Hog dog BBQ, bouncy castle and more..... Organized by AppleTree Community Church.

VISIT US ONLINE:

MOVING SALE. FURNITURE, household items, games, toys, etc. 102 Kingfisher Dr., Elmira. Sat. May 24, 8 a.m. - 12.

GARAGE SALE - Sat. May 24, 34 Duke St. Elmira. 7:30 a.m.- 12 noon. 2 Hoosier cupboards, secretary desk, riding lawn mower, other antiques and miscellaneous items.

MULTI FAMILY YARD Sale. Sat. May 24, 2 Raising Mill Gate, Elmira. 7 a.m. 1 p.m. Wii gaming system, RO water system, hockey equipment, Playbook, towels, Tupperware, pub style table with 4+ chairs, dresser, home decor, girls clothes 7 - 16, ladies clothes medium - 5x, games housewares.

GARAGE SALE - Sat. May 24, 8a.m. 139 Sugar King Dr. Elmira. Furniture, home decor, craft supplies, kitchenware, tools, toys.

MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE - Sat. May 24, 1348 King St. N. St. Jacobs. 8 a.m. - 4. Furniture, tools, household, kids stuff and more.

HOCKEY & BASEBALL Cards - Pages, hard covers. Some Canadian coins, etc. Sat. May 24, 8 a.m. 19 Snyder Ave. N. Elmira. 519-210-0282.

FOR OPTIMUM ADVERTISING RESULTS... THE OBSERVER.

FURNITURE, TOYS, BOOKS, NEW maternity and girls baby clothes. Sat. May 24, 7 a.m. 51 Poffenroth Path, Elmira.

WWW.OBSERVERXTRA.COM

TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING On Tuesday, June 17, 2014 the Council of the Township of Woolwich will hold a public meeting, pursuant to Section 12 of the Development Charges Act, 1997, to present and obtain public input on the Township’s proposed development charges by-law and underlying background study. All interested parties are invited to attend the Public Meeting of Council and any person who attends the meeting may make representations relating to the proposed by-law and background study. The meeting is to be held: Tuesday, June 17, 2014 at 6:00 pm The Council Chambers 24 Church Street West; Elmira, ON In order that sufficient information is made available to the public, copies of the proposed by-law and the background study are being made available as of June 3, 2014. The report will be made available by contacting the Township Finance Department. Phone - 519-669-1647 Interested persons may express their comments at the Public Meeting or in writing, addressed to the Township Clerk, at the above address prior to June 12, 2014.

DOWNSIZED - TILLER, sewing machine, furniture, antiques and much more! Sat. May 24, 53 Snyder Ave. N. Elmira. DOWNSIZING SALE - Sat. May 24, 15 Maple St. access off of Riverside Dr, Elmira. 8 a.m. Variety of household items.

MAKE YOUR OWN HEADLINES IN THE COMMUNITY. THE OBSERVER FAMILY ALBUM IS HERE TO SHARE YOUR FAMILY NEWS.

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

WE NEED YOU! The Township of Woolwich is hiring people to work at the Municipal Election. Over 80 people are needed to run polling locations on the following dates: advance vote days

$ 7 ' 6 2 3 * 5 , 7

$ / . < '

& + , ( / % / , 8 0 5 6 6 ( $ % $ 5 , % - , 6 2 5 / 8 ' ( , 2 7 * + $ + 2 8

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& $ 7 % 2 , 1 : $ 5 2 5 / $ 2 3 5 2 % / , 1 $ < 2 / / 6 & 2 : , 2 % ( 6 ( 7 % 8 5 7 % 5 ' 2 $ + ( 5 6 $ 5 & / 1 $ + , 2 7 , 6 0 , ( ' 2 1

CROSSWORD PUZZLER

% / 2 2 3 / $ 1 $ , 7 + ( 5 ( 6 5 + , 7 + $ & $ & + 2 / ( 5 < ( * * , : $ 6 $ ' , ( 8 ' ' $ , / + ( ' 2 $ 6 . , 3 ( 1 3 8 6 6 3 $ < + 2 7 - 2 ( 5 $ & 7 : + < 7 5

MARTIN, LEONARD M. | Home at last on Friday, May 16, 2014. Passed away at Chateau Gardens LTC, Elmira, at the age of 86 years.

Tuesday, October 7 , 2014 12 PM-8 PM th

Thursday, October 9 , 2014 3 PM -9 PM th

Saturday, October 18 , 2014 10 AM -5 PM election day

Applicants must be at least 18 years old, and attend training sessions being held in September/October. High School Students and Post-Secondary Students are encouraged to apply. To apply, complete the survey online at www.woolwich.ca or fill out a paper application at the Township Administration Building, 24 Church Street West, Elmira. A staff member will be in contact with applicants in August.

More information regarding the Municipal Election can be obtained from the Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office: (519) 669-1647 ext 6004

th

Monday, October 27 , 2014 10 AM â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 PM

648 Exchange: (519) 664-2613 ext 6004


CLASSIFIED | 23

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

Complete Collision Service

THOMPSON’S

Auto Tech Inc.

ARE A

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE. 101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

519.669.8330

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial On-The-Farm Service

FAX: 519.669.3210

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

AFTER HOURS

519.669.8917

519-669-3232

Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

RUDOW’S

CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

AUTO CLINIC

519-669-4400 30 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

RUDOW’S

21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

24 Hour Accident Assistance Accredited Test & Repair Facility

BODY MAINTENANCE AT:

1-800-CARSTAR 519-669-3373

CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

Call Us At 519-669-3373

519-669-7652

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

GENERAL SERVICES “25 years in Business”

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location

Boat Covers | Air Conditioner Covers | Small Tarps Storage Covers | BBQ Covers | Awnings & Canopies Replacement Gazebo Tops | Golf Cart Enclosures & Covers

• Janitorial

• Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off / Pick up Service • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair

•Ratches, Hooks, Straps, Webbing etc. •Canvas, Vinyl, Polyester, Acrylic Fabrics

General Repairs

• Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping

519.595.4830

www.completecarpetcare.ca

6376 Perth Rd. 121 Poole, ON

ROB McNALL 519-669-7607 LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

CONSTRUCTION INC. (519) 569-0772 • Commercial & Industrial General Contracting • Specializing in Concrete Work & Excavation • Retaining Walls

info@trappconstruction.ca www.trappconstruction.ca

• • • •

Stamped Coloured Concrete Demolition Bin Service Machine Bases

Concrete Breaking & Removal

GENERAL SERVICES

MUSIC-LOVER GIFT ALERT!

Various sizes & rates

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE Call

519-669-4964

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

COUNTR Y

’s 60’s / 70

HIGH SCHOOSL BAND

GOSPEL

ROCK

BAUMAN PIANO

SERVICES TUNING & REPAIRS

MORE INFO | 519.669.0541 EMAIL: vinylp2cd@gmail.com

ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd. • 14 ton BoomTruck • 40 ton Mobile Crane

MUSIC TRANSFERS FROM LPs, 45s, 78s, CASSETTES TO CD Your favourite albums get a whole new life on CD after we clean up the clicks, pops and surface noise.

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

JAMES BAUMAN Craftsman Member O.G.P.T. Inc NEW PHONE NUMBER

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TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING

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24 Hour Service (Emergencies only) 7 Days A Week

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ST. JACOBS

GENERAL SERVICES

BIKE SALES & REPAIRS

PROFESSIONAL BIKE MECHANIC ON STAFF

Buy your bike from us and get a FREE annual inspection!

Hardtop and Travel Trailer Rentals 7011 Wellington Rd. 11 RR#2 Drayton ON, N0G 1P0

20

$

PARTS EXTRA

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel:519-669-5537

STORE HOURS: M-W: 8-6, TH-F 8-8, SAT, 8-6, SUN 12-5

(519) 638-3075 (Phone) (519) 505-3076 (Cell) Email:info@riversiderentals.ca www.riversiderentals.ca

AT YOUR SERVICE.

We specialize in getting the word out. Advertise your business services in our directory. Weekly exposure with fantastic results! Call Donna at 519.669.5790 Ext 104.

SPACE FOR RENT

AT YOUR SERVICE.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS SERVICES 100% SUPERIOR QUALITY CUSTOM WOODWORKING

and Insulation

• New & Existing Roofs • Roof Repairs • Cellulose Attic Insulation 519-778-7730

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KENJI ORITA • Custom Kitchens • Custom Furniture • Libraries • Exotic Woods

TEL: +1 (519) 574-6734 oritakenji@gmail.com 20B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA


24 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

www.RobertBrown.com

Sew Special Custom Sewing for Your Home

 Table and shelf glass  Ask for a quote… we install

 WOOD  GAS  PELLET

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FERGUS

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180 St. Andrew St. W.

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888-871-4592

1411 King Street, St. Jacobs

www.RobertBrown.com info@robertbrown.com

www.fergusfireplace.com

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INC

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• Residential • Commercial • Industrial

Custom Drapery Custom Blinds

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Free Estimates

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Over 20 Years Experience

18 Kingfisher Dr., Elmira

Elmira

Tel:

Lois Weber 519-669-3985

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches A Family owned and operated business serving KW, Elmira and surrounding area for over 35 years.

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HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

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COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

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ST. JACOBS

GLASS SYSTEMS INC.

APPLIANCES – FURNACES – FIREPLACES AIR CONDITIONERS – WATER HEATERS SPRING SPECIAL ON AIR CONDITIONING TUNE UP $99, INSTALLED FROM $1999 FURNACES INSTALLED FROM $2499 FRIDGES $499, STOVES $399, WASHERS $399, DRYERS $369, FREEZERS $199 Come visit our show room FREE QUOTES 1 Union Street, Elmira

• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair TEL:

ehc@hotmail.ca (519)-669-4600

Home Improvements

1553 King St. N., St. Jacobs, ON N0B 2N0

519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104 FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

John Schaefer Painting

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

FREE ESTIMATES Interior/exterior Painting, Wallpapering & Plaster | drywall Repairs

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WINDOWS & DOORS

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MURRAY MARTIN | 519.638.0772

7302 Sideroad 19 RR#2., Alma, ON, N0B 1A0

For all your Plumbing Needs. 24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

NOW ACCEPTING VISA OR MASTERCARD

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ELMIRA

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HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

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OUTDOOR SERVICES

AT YOUR SERVICE.

Spring Landscape Maintenance info@apmcontracting.ca

• Lawn Rolling • Fertilizer & Weed Control • Spring Clean Up • Top Soil • River Rock • Fences & Decks • Interlock

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kdetweiler@rogers.com

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OWNER-OPERATOR

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

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Stumping and Grinding

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Shrub & Small Tree Replacement

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OUTDOOR SERVICES COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

YOUR SOURCE FOR YEAR-ROUND PROPERTY MAINTENANCE SPECIALIZED SKIDSTEER SERVICE

LAWN MOWING PACKAGES

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SNOW PLOWING & ICE CONTROL · Trucks, Tractors, Skidsteer

Call: Jeff Basler, Owner Office: 519-669-9081 | Fax: 519-669-9819 Email: ever-green@sympatico.ca

· Offering a quick and easy way to reclaim unused land · Our tracked skid steer equipped with a forestry brush mower can handle any long grass/brush · Trail maintenance and development · Wooded lot Thinning · Pasture Reclaimation · Orchard Maintenance · Industrial Lots · Real Estate Lots · Cottages

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Murray & Daniel Shantz

ALMA, ONTARIO | PHONE: 519.846.5427


CLASSIFIED | 25

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

SPRING MARKET HAS ARRIVED! CALL US TO LIST NOW!

NEW LISTING

$249,900 MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE!

Alli Bauman

Marcia Thompson

Paul Martin

519-577-6248

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

519-503-9533

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

Elmira - This house is larger than it looks with great entertaining space! Equipped with fabulous sunroom or mudroom, separate dining room, main floor bath, living room and large main floor family room. Attached garage is equipped with hydro and gas heat. Sliding glass doors guide you to flag stone patio in fenced yard. Many updates include: Most windows, Furnace and A/C 2014, Roof 2009, ++. Fridge, stove, washer, dryer included. MLS 1424965. Call Alli or Paul Direct.

Elmira - This Elmira Beauty has been updated but still has the Character and charm of an older home. Attractive oak wood work and pocket doors throughout this 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom home with finished basement. Complete with eat-in kitchen, Separate dining room, living room and recroom! Located on nice sized lot with concrete driveway leading you up to huge 20ft x 35ft detached garage/ workshop with hydro. MLS 1424232. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$181,000 LUXURIOUS CONDO!

$598,500 BEAUTIFUL BACKYARD

$272,900 BACKING ONTO PARK

Elmira - Located in mature area this home features open concept living room with hardwood floors and second floor addition 2009. Main floor full bath, Bright kitchen with new cupboards & counter top. Separate dining room with French door walk out to large concrete patio & yard overlooking park! Main floor laundry with skylight, 3 bedrooms including large master bedroom with huge walk in closet. MLS 1424631. Call Paul or Alli Direct.

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

www.homeswithpaul.ca

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

Kitchener – Featuring controlled entry in welcoming lobby. Casual Elegance in this updated 2 bdrm, 2 bath, condo complete w/sep DR & in-suite laundry. Excellent location w/easy access to 401, shopping, Conestoga College & close to trails. Well maintained building w/indoor pool, exercise rm, party rm, sauna & underground parking! Recent updates: Laminate flooring, Baths 2013, Kit cabinets 2009. All appliances incl’d. Just move in & enjoy! MLS 1424165. Call Paul or Alli Direct.

Winterbourne - Located on a quiet street this 3 bedroom 2 bathroom home is equipped with large concrete driveway, double garage and additional storage area. Separate dining room and main floor laundry with walk out to patio. Huge upper floor family room with gas fireplace, lots of windows, sliders to deck and amazing view. Large fenced back yard with pool. MLS 1424241. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$425,900 STUNNING BUNGALOW

$379,900 CORNER LOT

3 Arthur St. S., Elmira 519-669-5426 Call today and book a

FREE

NO-OBLIGATION HOME EVALUATION.

$338,900 YET TO BE BUILT!

Drayton - Beautiful Mansfield III Home. Various Prices and Plans available. Model Home is at 46 Bedell Open: Mon, Tues, Wed 1-7pm and Sat, Sun 1-4:30pm. MLS 1418101. Call Paul or Alli direct.

$329,900 OVER LOOKING GREENSPACE!

Breslau – Approx 2700sqft house located on 3.15 acres. Enjoy sunsets from your bckyrd haven. Tree lined private drive. Complete w/main flr LR, FR w/wood fp, eat in kit & sep DR. Main flr bdrm w/kitchenette & 3pc ens. Side entrance ideal for home office/business. Master bdrm w/8ftx8ft walk in closet & 3pc ens. Fin'd basement featuring lg bar & location for wood stove. Bsmnt bath incl sauna, whirlpool. 648sqft unfinished bonus room above garage. TLC Required. MLS 1414121. Call Alli or Paul direct.

Drayton - This Verdone Model Home has elegant and luxurious features including skylights, tray ceilings and 2 french door walkouts from master and dinette. Ceramic and hardwood throughout the main floor. Kitchen with granite countertops and glass backsplash overlooking dinette and open to great room. 2 walk in closets in the Master Suite and 4 piece ensuite. This home is complete with den, 2nd bedroom, mudroom/main floor laundry and huge finished basement with fireplace. MLS1418095. Call Paul or Alli Direct.

SO LD

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

$389,000 PRIDE OF OWNERSHIP!

Elora – Freehold townhouse w/double garage situated on corner lot backing onto Elora Cataract Trailway. Large eat-in kitchen w/ceramic tile & abundant w/maple cupboards. Bright Living room w/hardwood floors, corner gas fireplace, 2 storey ceiling open to stairs & 2nd floor hallway. Fantastic master bedroom complete w/ensuite & lg walk in closet. Second floor laundry. Bright Finished basement w/recroom, bedroom & bathroom. 2300sqft + finished space. A must see home. Prepare to be impressed. MLS 1414406. Call Alli or Paul direct.

FIND YOUR DREAM HOME IN THE OBSERVER

Bert Martin

FIND YOUR DREAM HOME IN CANADA’S BEST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

BROKER

Remax Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

DIRECT: 519-572-2669

Building in Drayton where homes are affordable

3 Arthur St. S. Elmira www.remaxsolidgold.biz

OFFICE: 519-669-5426

EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

FREE Market Evaluation LEASE SPACE!

Five units from 118 s/f to 2400 s/f. Multi-use. Located in a busy plaza only 15 minutes to K-W. All units have central air and can be modified to suit your needs. Lots of free parking and some store front. MLS. Call Bert for details.

Your referrals are appreciated!

TWIN CITY REALTY INC., BROKERAGE

519-579-4110

msaunders4@sympatico.ca www.KitchenerWaterloo-RealEstate.com

MICHAEL J. SAUNDERS

CUSTOM QUALITY

Sales Representative

OPEN HOUSE Sunday 2-4pm $529,900

Single Family Starting from

GORGEOUS QUALITY

Custom built home featuring 2 x 6 construction, plywood sheathing & attention to detail. Open concept main flr w/9' ceilings, ceramic kitchen, w/o to patio & lrg yard w/ 'mancave' shed. Upper level has 4 bedrooms incl. mstr w/ ensuite. Lower level has lines for infloor heating. MLS $529,900.

$338,900

Visit our Model Home at 46 Bedell Drive, Drayton

Mon., Tues. & Wed. 1-7pm | Sat. & Sun. 1-4:30pm | or by appointment

226-818-5311 | verdonehomes.com


26 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

YOUR DREAM HOME IS HERE!

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

100

We support Woolwich Community Services through

YEARS

SINCE 1913

Elmira Real Estate Services Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage

90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 4, Elmira N3B 3L4

519-669-3192

2013

Elmira@royallepage.ca Bonnie Brubacher Monique Roes Shanna Rozema Robin Hansford-Currie “Helping you is what we do” Broker of Record Sales Representative Broker Sales Representative

www.elmirahomes.ca

OPEN HOUSE | Sat May 24th & Sun May 25th 2-4pm,

Wed May 28 3-6pm | 168 Ridgeview Drive, Drayton th

OPEN HOUSE | Sun May 25th 2-4 pm OPEN HOUSE | Sat May 24th 2-4 pm 204 Park Ave. West, Elmira

7 Crane Drive, Elmira

NEW PRICE! Perfect for the young professional or Empty Nester! Price from $322,900. 2046 SQ.FT. Executive freehold bungalow-loft townhome offered at $345,900, group of 3 units available with 60 day closing, choose your interior colour scheme, hardwood, ceramic, gas FP, gourmet kitchen, double garage & driveway. 1 - 3+ bdrms units available. MLS

$399,900 Amazing family home! Well

maintained, 1815 SQ.FT, open concept main floor layout, huge kitchen with appliances included, walkout to deck & fenced yard, master ensuite, upper flr laundry, finished basement, double garage & driveway. MLS

$424,900 ELMIRA Spacious well cared for updated backsplit, 3 bdrms, 2 baths, hardwood in living & separate dining room, bright kitchen & dinette has walkout to deck, canopy & fenced yard, large family room offers gas fireplace, 4th level rec room! MLS

OPEN HOUSE | Sat May 24th & Sun May 25th 2-4pm, 2 Eldale Rd., Elmira

FREE

HOME EVALUATION Call for details: 519-503-2753

FOR RENT - Elmira - 3 Bedroom semi for rent. Totally updated. $1350/mth + utilities. Available July 1. Call 519-503-2753. ADDRESS: 3 Arthur

St. S., ELMIRA

DIRECT: 519-503-2753

EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net

13 ACRE MATURE SETTING $629,900 DRAYTON AREA One of a kind

2344 SQ.FT Pioneer log home overlooks spring fed pond & countryside, 3 bdrms, 3 baths including main floor master & ensuite, gorgeous kitchen w/appliances & breakfast bar, cathedral ceiling to upper loft finished w/out basement. MLS

100 ACRE HOBBY FARM $869,900 NEAR PALMERSTON/HARRISTON

Impressive Citadel stone home, maple kitchen with island, hardwood flrs, master ensuite, stone fireplace, 9’ ceilings in basement, detached shop, 40 workable, 60 bush. MLS

G.A.

ENTERTAINER’S DREAM $999,000 ELMIRA Over 3/4 acres, inground salt water pool surrounded by landscap-

ing, hot tub w/pergola, detached heated 43’x26’ shop, Custom built bungalow/loft, stunning 2 storey foyer to upper floor loft, gourmet kitchen w/granite & viking appl’s, 3 season Muskoka room with gas fireplace! MLS

Call for your FREE Market Evaluation. WWW. OBSERVERXTRA.COM IS UPDATED EVERY FRIDAY BY NOON.

Nicholls Realty Ltd

84116 Brussels Line, Brussels, ON

Dwaine Nicholls

Office 519-291-2002 | Direct 519-492-2002 nichollsfive@gmail.com

BUYING OR SELLING YOUR PROPERTY? COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL • AGRICULTURAL Serving Huron Perth Counties for 18 YEARS I’m looking forward to offering my knowledge and experience for all your real estate needs.

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD.

FEATURED PROPERTY

45 Arthur St. S., Elmira

BRAD MARTIN

OPEN HOUSE

JULIE

TRACEY

WILLIAMS Broker of Record, HECKENDORN Broker Sales Rep. MVA Residential Res: 519.669.1068 Res: 519.669.8629 Cell: 519.505.0627

BROKERAGE

www.thurrealestate.com

NEW LISTING

Sun May 25th – 2-4pm | 23 Bitternut Place, Elmira LOCATION! Desirable Southwood Park. Close to walking trails and across from a park. Lovely oak kitchen w/’bump out’ dinette & w.o. to concrete patio. Convenient side entry. 3 bdrms. Spacious finished rec. room & washroom in lower level. Private asphalt driveway. Storage shed. MLS REDUCED TO $279,900.

IMMACULATE HOME (joined only by the garage wall). Ceramic in entry & kit./dinette. Sliders to deck and patio (& backing to farmland). 3 spacious bdrms. Finished rec. rm. & 3pc. bath. Lovely hdwd. in all bedrms. Storage shed. Central air. New shingles (to be installed). NEW MLS $299,900.

NEW LISTING

Duplex in Brussels | $195,000

2 - three bedroom units. Great condition! #735860

“THINGS TO DO, PEOPLE TO SEE, PLACES TO SHOW”

dale@kellersellsrealestate.com

®

NEW LISTING GREAT LOCATION – close to schools & rec. centre. Hdwd. in LR and DR. Walkout from dinette to patio & prof. landscaped yard. Lots of counter space in kitchen. Main flr. washroom. 3 spacious bdrms. Ensuite w/ oversized shower, walkin closet. Large fin. rec. room and washroom in lower level. NEW MLS $389,900.

A GREAT ‘FAMILY’ HOME. Open concept main floor. Hdwd. & ceramics on the main level. Cherry kitchen w/island. W/O to 2 tiered composite deck (partly covered) & hot tub. Cheater ensuite bath. Fin. rec. room & ‘craft’ room. 3pc. bath. & 4th bdrm. Furnace, central air & shingles replaced. NEW MLS $394,900.

NEW LISTING

COURT LOCATION – LOVELY WOODED AREA. Four bdrm. home with updated bathrms (3pc. ensuite). Main floor fam. room w/fireplace and walkout to huge deck with 8 person spa. Spacious liv. rm. and formal din. rm. Walkup from bsmt. Extra-long driveway. Fenced yard. A must see! MLS $449,900.

QUIET AREA (w/mature trees). Walkup bsmt. Newer windows, roof. Long asphalt driveway. Hdwd. flrs. on the main level. 4th bdrm. & newer 3pc. bath in lower level. Rec. rm. (w/large windows) & playrm. NEW MLS $329,900. LINWOOD – Unique, custom built home on over 1 acre, backing to greenspace & overlooking the countryside. Main flr. master w/ensuite. Upper ‘loft’ w/lge. bdrm. ensuite & hobby room. 9’ ceilings in lower level w/lge. windows Quality construction & lots of upgrades! Oversized garage. MLS $639,900.

ACRES FOR SALE Township. Productive Farmland 85in Wellesley

519-669-2772

REALTY LTD., BROKERAGE INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

519.500.1865 (Direct)

Dale R. Keller

17 Church St. W., Elmira • 519.669.1544 (Business)

Sales Representative

www.KellerSellsRealEstate.com | dale@kellersellsrealestate.com RR1 Drayton | $224,000 NEW LISTING - 1 acre country property on a paved road, a few minutes from town. 3 bedroom bungalow with attached 11/2 garage. Great starter or retirement. Lots of privacy. MLS. Call Dale for more information.

Palmerston | $169,000

STUNNING CENTURY HOME – Loaded w/character! Century home w/natural woodwork, hdwd. floors & 2 staircases. Cozy liv. rm. w/gas F.P., formal D.R. & main flr. fam. rm. w/built ins. Oak kitchen. Private master w/ensuite & dressing area. Updated bathrms. Detached garage & lovely yard. Very well maintained! MLS $539,900.

Charming updated century home in a quiet neighbourhood, with a large fenced yard and stamped concrete patio to enjoy the outdoors. Inside is an eat in kitchen, a large open great room, office or den, gas fireplace, wood floors, and 3 bedrooms up. Loaded with character. MLS Call Dale

Workable land, recently tile-drained @ 30’ centres. Road frontage at front and back of farm. MLS Reduced to $1,400,000.

The Brighton lll model, by Verdone Homes is one of many exciting models to be built. This two storey home boasts 1730 sq ft of open concept with main floor great room and 3 generous bedrooms upstairs with custom features. Various prices and options available. MLS Call Dale, to have the best selection.

CALL FOR YOUR FREE MARKET EVALUATION

Drayton Ridge | $359,900

For info on these or any other real estate enquiries, Call Dale


LIVING HERE | 27

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

LIVING HERE MILESTONES / INTO RETIREMENT

CHEF’S TABLE/ DIERRE ACHESON

All about the kids, all along

Go fresh for the bevy of seasonal festivities

25 years at the Elmira library was just part of a long career as an educator, one she’s now retiring from WILL SLOAN When you’ve been at a job for 25 years, it can be easy to lose sight of what drew you to work there in the first place. But when children’s librarian Bette Cummings introduced the Baby & Me program at the Elmira Library this year, she got a strong reminder of why she’s spent her life teaching kids. “Just watching them grow and develop is so amazing,” she says. “Just watching them entranced in the book when I read stories. … If you’re going to go into the children’s library, use every chance that you get to work with children.” After 25 years with the Region of Waterloo Library’s Elmira branch, Bette Cummings is packing it in, citing the onset of arthritis (“In the olden days, you had to retire the month you turned 65, so I have four extra bonus years,” she says). Her retirement reception next weekend will bring to a close decades in early childhood education, but she says it was her job in Elmira that was “tailormade” for her interests. Cummings came upon her ambitions early: It was as a kindergarten student that she decided she wanted to be a kindergarten teacher. After an education that included Grade 8 piano and Grade 2 music theory (both mandatory at the time for early childhood educators), she started her career as a Grade 4 teacher

RECIPE NOTES

Bette Cummings knew she wanted to be a children’s educator ever since she was in kindergarten. She took her post at the library in 1989. at Ponsonby Public School in Wellington County. She then started the kindergarten program in nearby Salem, and in 1966 was accepted as a kindergarten teacher at Guelph’s Tytler Public School. In 1972, she stepped down from teaching to raise children, returning briefly as a supply teacher and, in 1988, doing parttime work at the Elmira Nursery School. “I think every teacher should be a parent first, because you understand children better,” she says. “I feel that I

should have known things about children when I was teaching that I didn’t realize – that every child is special, and to try to make that child feel special.” While browsing the Elmira library in 1989, one of the staffers tipped her off to a job opportunity in the children’s section. “It would be more hours here, and because our children were in high school, we said, ‘Go for it,’” she remembers. “Five people interviewed, and I happened to be successful. … The day that I became the children’s

librarian here, there was an author visit, and I actually went up and gave Barbara Greenwood a hug and a kiss.” Over time, Cummings would have the opportunity to rub shoulders with several of the Canadian kidlit greats. “I remember Robert Munsch calling me out of the blue and wanting to know if I would consider having him here to read to children. I just said, ‘When? How many children?’ It was dead silence on his end, and he said, ‘How many

children can the library hold?’ “One young lady hung back and said that she would like to go into writing books. He took her aside and spent a long time giving her suggestions.” Munsch would also come to the Library’s aid in one of Elmira’s most traumatic moments. “When Dan Snyder passed away, we were asked to get specific books that Dan liked – some were Robert Munsch, some were Dr. Seuss. I got enough

The time between spring’s arrival and the dog days of summer can be very busy. In fact, this time of year can actually be busier than Christmas: showers, anniversaries, barbecues and awards banquets ... and the end of school is just around the corner. Yikes. But festivities are a great way to casually get together without much fuss and with a lot of fun. We make a lot of salad for celebrations big and small. We get lots of special requests for the Asian noodle salad, but we have many other seasonal salads to brighten up the table. Planning this type of party allows you to bring in some traditional flavours and add some more adventurous ingredients. With the farmers’ market now offering fresh local produce, rhubarb and asparagus are ready to enjoy. For the more adventurous, here is a salad that is simple and a showstopper for the shrimp lover. The nappa slaw is fabulous on its own as well – simple and fresh is always the way to go. Enjoy.

RETIREMENT | 31

CHEF’S TABLE | 31

[WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

Did You Know … That over time contaminates can form in your vehicles driveline fluid causing premature wear of the differential? This premature wear can lead to rough driving and costly breakdowns. Driveline fluid should be changed regularly, but is different for every vehicle. Talk to your service advisor about what is recommended for your vehicle. – Al

Tel: (519) 669-1082 Fax: (519) 669-3084

20 Oriole Parkway E., Elmira, ON

info@leroysautocare.net

www.leroysautocare.net


28 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

“A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

Kleensweep Carpet Care

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville 519-699-4641

Rugs and Upholstery

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

West Montrose, ON

T. 519.669.2033

COLLEEN

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR M&G MILLWRIGHTS LTD. • Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS

519.669.5105 1540 FLORDALE ROAD

MAY 25 LIONS FOUNDATION OF CANADA Purina Walk for Dog Guides hosted by Woolwich Community Lions Club, Kissing Bridge Trail, Arthur Street entrance, Elmira 9 a.m. (you may wish to register and start walking at 8 a.m.).  All proceeds will help fund dog guide programs - canine vision, hearing ear, service dogs, seizure response, autism assistance and diabetic alert dog guides.  All ages, fitness levels with or without a dog are welcome to participate. Prizes, refreshments. For more info please call 519-669-3645 or redstrokes77@yahoo.com.

E-MAIL: ads@woolwichobserver.com

FREE COMMUNITY EXERCISE CLASSES for seniors. Every Tuesday 1:30-2:30 p.m., 28 Duke St., Elmira, entrance on the corner of Wyatt and Centre streets. No registration required, community members welcome. Questions, call Community Care Concepts 519-664-1900.

MAY 28 SENIORS COMMUNITY DINING AT noon (doors open at 11:30 a.m.). Linwood Community Centre, 5279 Ament Line, Linwood. Cost $11. Community Care Concepts invites you to join us for a hot noonday meal, fellowship and entertainment. Call 519-664-1900 or Toll free: 1-855-664-1900 for more information.

MAY 26 SENIORS LUNCH CLUB AT noon (doors open at 11:30 a.m.). Wellesley Community Centre, Woolwich Memorial Centre, 24 Snyder Ave. S., Elmira (community room). Cost $6. Join us for a noonday light lunch and fellowship. Call Community Care Concepts at 519-664-1900 for more information. FREE COMMUNITY EXERCISE CLASSES for Seniors. Every Tuesday 1:30-2:30 p.m., 28 Duke St., Elmira, entrance on the corner of Wyatt and Centre streets. No registration required, community members welcome. Questions, call Community Care Concepts 519-664-1900.

MAY 27 ELECTRONIC BINGO UPSTAIRS AT the St. Clements Community Centre, 7 p.m. Sponsored by the Paradise & District Lions Club. For more information contact Lion Joe Brick 519-699-4022.

P.O. BOX 247, ELMIRA

www.mgmill.com

MAY 30 THE ELMIRA LIBRARY WILL be hosting a PD Day movie program from 2-3:45 p.m. The movie, Frozen (rated PG), will be showing. Each person of any age must have a ticket. Children 5 an under must be with an adult. Admission includes popcorn and a drink. Contact Elmira Branch Library at 519-669-5477 for information.

MAY 31 ELMIRA KIWANIS PRIME RIB & Lobster Dinner. Lions Hall, Elmira. Dinner only $45; dinner & dance $55. Dinner includes 1-1/2 lb lobster, large serving of prime rib with potato, vegetable & dessert. For tickets call: daytime 519-669-3658, evenings 519-669-1281. Tickets also available in Elmira at Read’s Decorating & No Frills. VISIT THE WTHHS HISTORICAL Room at the Old School, 1137 Henry Street, Wellesley, on Saturday, May 31 between 10 a.m.. and 3 p.m. and enjoy displays and interesting historical facts about Wellesley Township. Free admission. 

JUNE 1

woolwichkin.com

THE ARISS & DIST. Lions Club will sponsor a Walk for dog guides to raise funds for service dogs. Registration after 1 p.m. and the walk at 2 p.m. at Heritage Community Centre, St. Charles St. E., Maryhill. Small BBQ will follow for participants. Pledge forms and further information at purinawalkfordogguides.com. For more information please contact Tedd 519-767-2588. FREE COMMUNITY EXERCISE CLASSES for Seniors. Every Tuesday 1:30-2:30 p.m., 28 Duke St. Elmira, entrance on the corner of Wyatt and Centre streets. No registration required, community members welcome. Questions, call Community Care Concepts 519-664-1900.

21 INDUSTRIAL DR. ELMIRA

519-669-2884

JUNE 3 FREE COMMUNITY EXERCISE CLASSES for Seniors. Every Tuesday and Thursday 9-10 a.m. The Meadows, 29 Water St., St. Jacobs. No registration required, community members welcome. Questions, call Community Care Concepts 519-664-1900.

JUNE 4 DIVINE WOMEN’S CONFERENCE 7:30 p.m., Koinonia Christian Fellowship, 850 Sawmill Rd., Bloomingdale. this beautiful time is all about helping women from every background, age and season of life to know that are valued and precious - lovingly created by God with great potential. (For women Grade 7 and up). For more info visit www.divineconference.com.

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public. Placement is not guaranteed. Registrations, corporate events, open houses and the like do not qualify in this section.

TOTAL

NANCY KOEBEL

HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

Bus: 519.744.5433 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

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Joy! Health Naturally! New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess.

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Darlene Vandermey RNPA, CLWC

building relationships with God, one another and the world

SUNDAYS - 9:00 & 11:00AM WEDNESDAYS - 7:00PM 850 Sawmill Rd, Bloomingdale, ON N0B 1K0 (519) 744-7447 | kcf@kcf.org | www.kcf.org

www.kcf.org/academy

St. James Lutheran Church

9:00am Christian Education 10:15am Worship with Holy Communion Pastor: Hans J. W. Borch Proclaiming Christ through Love and Service

60 Arthur St. S., Elmira 519-669-5591

Sunday, May 25 When Treasures Remain Hidden Join us For

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

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WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

PLACES OF FAITH | A DIRECTORY OF LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP

NURSERY PROVIDED

SUNDAY SCHOOL

Finding The Way Together 47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 www.thejunctionelmira.com

Service at 10:30am Rev. Paul Snow REACH WITH LOVE. TEACH THE TRUTH. SEND IN POWER. 290 Arthur St. South, Elmira • 519-669-3973 www.ElmiraAssembly.com (Across from Tim Horton’s)

HEARING ASSISTED

Sun., May 25th

Zion Mennonite Fellowship -The JunctionSunday School 9:30am Worship Service 10:45 am

11:00am

Partnering with God’s Mission

Discovering God Together

Ron Seabrooke

4522 Herrgott Rd., Wallenstein • 519-669-2319 www.wbconline.ca

St. Paul’s 9:15am Sunday School Lutheran 10:30am Worship Service Pastor: Richard A. Frey Church Sharing the Message of Christ and His Love 27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593 www.stpaulselmira.ca

Emmanuel

Worship: 9:30am Elmira Mennonite Mountain Anthems Church A Cappella Choir

Christian Education for all ages: 11:00am

58 Church St. W., Elmira • 519-669-5123

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SUBMIT AN EVENT The Events Calendar is reserved for Non-profit local community events that are offered free to the 24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

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at Elmira Community Church

SUNDAYS @ 10:30AM Services at Park Manor School 18 Mockingbird Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1459 www.elmiracommunity.org

Sunday, May 25, 2014 9:15 and 11:00 AM Series: Everyday Life With Jesus Teen Challenge Choir 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 www.woodsidechurch.ca

EVANGELICAL MISSIONARY CHURCH Worship Service

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9:45am Sunday School 11:00am Worship Service Hopping Thursday’s 7-8:30pm Programs for all ages 22 Florapine Rd., Floradale • 519-669-2816 www.floramc.org


LIVING HERE | 29

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

Cracking into another tasty Kiwanis fundraiser SCOTT BARBER Thirty-three years in, the Elmira Kiwanis Club continues serving up lobster, prime rib and a night of dinner and dancing to support their many charitable endeavours. On May 31 at Lions Hall, more than 500 hungry patrons are expected to don bibs and crack away at fresh Shediac lobster. Prime rib from Stemmler’s in Heidelberg will also be served, along with salads, potatoes, baked beans and dessert. “This is probably the largest fundraiser that the Elmira Kiwanis Club does each year and everything we make goes back into the community,” Kiwanian

Tom Edge explained. While this year’s party will be familiar to regular attendees, event chair Cynthia Hastings points out that the name, formerly “Lobsterfest,” has been altered to reflect the delicious red meat also on offer. “There are people who don’t come out because they’re not lobster lovers and they think all we serve is lobster,” she said. “By changing the name to the Prime Rib and Lobster Dinner, we’re letting them know that, not only do we serve the best lobster you’ll ever taste, we also serve the best prime rib you’re ever going to find.” Otherwise, Kiwanis members are sticking with

Elmira Kiwanis Club members Tom Edge, Lorne Martin, Ernie Robertson and Eugene Read have a trusty mascot handy as they prepare for the annual lobster dinner on May 31. [SCIOTT BARBER / THE OBSERVER] While the evening promthe setup that has been coming back,” said Edge. ises fun and relaxation for tried and true for three “It’s special because most guests, Kiwanis members decades. people aren’t eating lobster like Edge come ready to “Every year we get great every week, and they also work. feedback from people who get the chance to work “We start at 9 in the enjoy the night, and it off the meal on the dance morning setting up the hall shows because they keep floor.”

and the stages, dressing the tables,” he said. “We work pretty well all day and I can tell you my wife and I often end up going to bed after 1:30 in the morning.” It’s well worth the sweat, he says, to support events like the Elmira Santa Clause parade, local tree planting and the Woolwich Community Service’s backpack program Tickets can be purchased at Read’s Decorating Centre, Elmira No Frills, or by phone 519-669-0342. The early sitting, dinner only, gets going at 4:30 p.m. Tickets are $45. For the later sitting’s dinner and dance at 7 p.m., tickets are $55.

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30 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

STRANGE BUT TRUE / BILL & RICH SONES PH.D.

Focus on shared humanity to counter tendency to dehumanize â&#x20AC;&#x153;the otherâ&#x20AC;? WEIRD NOTES

Q. The most valuable

food source in the ocean -- sunlight -- is completely absent in the depths, making photosynthesis impossible. So scientists were at first stunned to discover lush life forms in the deepest ocean darkness. Just where did their food supply come from?

A. The food and the rotten egg smell found at thermal vents -- those â&#x20AC;&#x153;continental wounds agitated by the planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tremendous heat and laced with sulfurous poisonsâ&#x20AC;? -- both derive from the simple chemical hydrogen sulfide, say

marine biologist Stephen Palumbi and writer (and son) Anthony Palumbi in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Extreme Life of the Sea.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;For all its toxicity, the moleculeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sulfur bonds practically crackle with energy.â&#x20AC;? Bacteria at these vents have mastered â&#x20AC;&#x153;chemosynthesis,â&#x20AC;? or the conversion of the chemical energy of hydrogen sulfide into raw cellular energy. Breaking the sulfide molecules apart, the bacteria can use the resultant chemical energy to fuel microbial growth, allowing them to build new cells and power their metabolism. These deep-sea communities also include a unique set of animals -- worms, bivalves and shrimp -- that have evolved to exploit this microbial abundance. As

ecologist Shannon Johnson succinctly put it: In the blackened deep, â&#x20AC;&#x153;everything has to live with or off of bacteria to survive.â&#x20AC;? Q. What two things in your everyday life are exactly one â&#x20AC;&#x153;astronomical unitâ&#x20AC;? (AU) apart?

A. Often used in astronomy, 1AU is the measure of the distance between the Sun and the Earth, or from the center of the Sun to the center of the Earth, with the distance averaged over one year. It equals some 93 million miles or 150 million kilometers, or the distance light travels in about 8 minutes. This unit can also be useful for â&#x20AC;&#x153;normalâ&#x20AC;? people trying to understand the relative distances within our own solar system, which

according to the Human Mind Project, what is wrong with this sort of animalistic thinking?

can seem overwhelming when expressed in miles or kilometers, according to Brendan McGuigan at www.wisegeek.com. Using astronomical units makes it much easier: â&#x20AC;&#x153;For example, while the Earth is 1AU away from the Sun, the Moon is only 0.0026AU away from the Earth. And while Jupiter, which we think of as being quite far away, is just over 5AU from the Sun, Pluto is a whopping 30 to 50AU away. And if that seems like a long way, consider that the nearest star to our own solar system is 270,000AU away.â&#x20AC;? Q. Rival sides in human conflicts may liken each other to â&#x20AC;&#x153;verminâ&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;pests to be exterminated,â&#x20AC;? leading to outbreaks of â&#x20AC;&#x153;bestial savagery.â&#x20AC;? Yet,

A. Alas, we humans are well known for grouping each other according to how we look, where we live or what we believe, denying those outside our own group â&#x20AC;&#x153;their shared humanity,â&#x20AC;? say the editors of â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Scientistâ&#x20AC;? magazine. It seems the tendency to see others as less than fully human is deep-seated in our psyches -- â&#x20AC;&#x153;dismayingly easy to trigger.â&#x20AC;? Yet far from being a reversion to animal roots, this tendency may be uniquely human. According to cognitive neuroscientist Vittorio Gallese speaking at the launch of the Human Mind Project,

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think that we have any evidence that any other living animal is able to negate the status... of another individual belonging to the same species.â&#x20AC;? The ability to deny another personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s humanity is â&#x20AC;&#x153;probably one of the worst spin-offs of language.â&#x20AC;? Understanding this, we can learn how to make groups more inclusive or can help former enemies work toward reconciliation. As the magazine editors put it, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Remembering our shared humanity is the best way to guard against those who would deny it.â&#x20AC;?

ABOUT THE AUTHORS Bill is a journalist, Rich holds a doctorate in physics. Together the brothers bring you â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strange But True.â&#x20AC;? Send your questions to strangetrue@compuserve.com.

OBSERVER CROSSWORD PUZZLER ACROSS 1. Fly ball just past the infield 6. Single sail vessel 13. Computer monitor, for short 16. Hawaiian island 17. Toward the center 18. Cabinet acronym, once 19. Missionary mother 21. Lowest deck 22. George Gershwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brother 23. Frat letter 24. Ace 25. Brio 26. Cornellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home 30. Flashy jewellery 33. Infection of the small intestine 35. Hey 36. Cokeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s partner 37. Safecracker 38. Sick 40. Elton John, e.g. 41. Uncle ___ 44. Is in the past? 46. Bully 48. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;? in T.G.I.F. 49. Clairvoyance, e.g.

50. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Farewell, mon amiâ&#x20AC;? 52. Corpulent 54. Discompose 56. Be bedridden 57. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Silent Springâ&#x20AC;? subject 59. Sticker 60. Barbecue offering 61. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If only ___ listened ...â&#x20AC;? 62. Bit in a horseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mouth 63. Stagewear for Madonna 65. Be in harmony 68. Hit the slopes 69. Perform 71. Election loser 73. Clerks 77. Hastily programmed 78. Neuter 79. Parenthesis, essentially 80. Alkaline liquid 81. All the rage 82. Bringer of bad luck 84. Inane 89. Be in a cast 90. Eros 92. Accraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s land 93. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ me?â&#x20AC;? 94. Wore 95. Keep after

DOWN 1. Short order, for short 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, ___-di-dah!â&#x20AC;? 3. Bit of binary code 4. Dinghy propeller 5. Go through 6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bye nowâ&#x20AC;? 7. Associate in Nursing 8. Double layer 9. Venezuelan slums 10. Acrylic fiber 11. Big deal 12. Cooking meas. 13. Kind of dog 14. Aired again 15. Country 20. Emmy-winning Lewis 25. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Nightmare on ___ Streetâ&#x20AC;? 26. Slick 27. CafĂŠ alternative 28. Very enthusiastic 29. Pond buildup 31. Pluck 32. College V.I.P. 34. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boysâ&#x20AC;? author 39. Court ploy 40. Code word for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sâ&#x20AC;? 41. Albatross, e.g.

42. Doofus 43. Dash abbr. 45. Number puzzle 47. Fly catcher 50. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I see!â&#x20AC;? 51. Conk out 53. Grinder 55. Small and elegant 58. Honoreeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spot 64. Synthetic resin 66. Breathalyzer attachment 67. Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir. 68. Operative 69. Lower version 70. Ladyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s slipper 72. Santaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vehicle 73. Pish 74. Age 75. Dashing 76. Asian capital 80. Describe 82. Boeing 747, e.g. 83. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Catch-22â&#x20AC;? pilot 85. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Look here!â&#x20AC;? 86. ___ lepton (physics particle) 87. Setting for TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Newhartâ&#x20AC;? 88. Blackguard 91. Therefore































 





































 

























 









 









 





 













































 





 

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LIVING HERE | 31

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, MAY 24, 2014

CHEF’S TABLE: Going fresh FROM | 27

Nappa Slaw with Soba Noodles and Prawns 1 pkg soba noodles, cooked 1/3 nappa cabbage, julienned 1/2 carrot 1/4 bell pepper, 1/6 english cucumber 1/4 golden pineapple, diced 6 mint leaves, chopped 1/2 thumb of ginger, finely chopped 4 tbsp sesame oil 5 tbsp rice wine vinegar 1 tbsp black sesame seeds

  Combine soba noodles, carrot, pepper, cucumber, mint, ginger, diced pineapple, sesame oil, and rice wine vinegar in bowl, mix until evenly coated.  

Prawns with Coriander and Lime

2 tbsp cilantro root, chopped 2 tbsp grated ginger 1 clove of garlic 1 lemongrass (white only), chopped finely

RETIREMENT: Leaving with a full catalogue of memories

1/2 cup vegetable oil 1 tsp ground coriander 20 large shrimp 1 cup cilantro, chopped 1/4 cup lime juice 1/2 cup olive oil 1/2 tsp sugar Salt 20 bamboo skewers

FROM | 27

Place cilantro root, ginger, garlic, lemongrass and ground coriander in a blender to provide a smooth paste; Place the shrimp in a dish and pour the paste over the shrimp. Allow the shrimp to marinate for an hour; Blend the cilantro leaves, lime juice, olive oil, sugar and pinch of salt and set aside; Place a prawn on bamboo skewers and grill on a moderate-low heat; Place the salad on a platter and the shrimp around. Drizzle with the cilantro leaf vinaigrette. Garnish with black sesame seeds.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Never Enough Thyme Catering Inc. was created with one thought in mind ... to create more thyme! Enjoy our food shop, specialty cakes and catering. 83A Arthur St. S., Elmira. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Better Cummings will bid adieu to the library with a reception on May 31. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

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nerve to phone Bob and ask if there was someplace we could meet and he could autograph the books. He asked me to his house and signed all the books.” But when it comes right down to it, working at the library was all about the kids. “I try to make it fun for them,” she says. “I think parents are more aware that children need to be taken places and taught to, not taught at. “When students come in and ask my opinion about something, I would tell them, ‘I might like that book, but you might hate it. You might like a book you pick out that I wouldn’t

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enjoy. You’ve got to open it, make sure it’s for your age level. Every time you don’t know a word you put your finger down. If, at the bottom of the page, there are five fingers down, it’s too difficult for you, but you want a challenge.’” How will she remember her time at the library? “So many wonderful parents, so many wonderful patrons, so many wonderful children… and the staff is phenomenal.” Cummings’ retirement reception will take place May 31 at the Elmira Library, Children’s Department, 1-3 p.m. Remarks will be at 1:30 p.m. No RSVP is required.

315 Arthur St. S., Elmira

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THE OBSERVER | MAY 24, 2014

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dodgeoffers.ca +Your local retailer may charge additional fees for administration/pre-delivery that can range from $0 to $1,098 and anti-theft/safety products that can range from $0 to $1,298. Charges may vary by retailer.

LESS FUEL. MORE POWER. GREAT VALUE. 15 VEHICLES WITH 40 MPG HWY OR BETTER.

Less Fuel. More Power. Great Value is a comparison between the 2014 and the 2013 Chrysler Canada product lineups. 40 MPG or greater claim (7.1 L/100 km) based on 2014 EnerGuide highway fuel consumption ratings. Government of Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption may vary based on driving habits and other factors. Ask your retailer for the EnerGuide information. ¤2014 Dodge Grand Caravan 3.6L VVT V6 6-speed automatic – Hwy: 7.9 L/100 km (36 MPG) and City: 12.2 L/100 km (23 MPG). 2014 Dodge Dart 1.4 L I-4 16V Turbo – Hwy: 4.8 L/100 km (59 MPG) and City: 7.3 L/100 km (39 MPG). 2014 Dodge Journey 2.4 L with 4-speed automatic – Hwy: 7.7 L/100 km (37 MPG) and City: 11.2 L/100 km (25 MPG). Wise customers read the fine print: ◊, ††, Ω, €, ★, *, ‡, †, ➤, § The Smart Choice Sales Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating retailers on or after May 1, 2014. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. All pricing includes freight ($1,695), air tax (if applicable), tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Financing and lease offers available to qualified customers on approved credit. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailer may sell for less. ◊$10,350 in Total Discounts is available on the new 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT model and consists of $7,000 Consumer Cash Discount and $3,350 in Ultimate Family Package Savings. See your retailer for complete details. ††0% purchase financing for up to 36 months available on new 2014 Jeep Cherokee/2014 Dodge Grand Caravan/2014 Dodge Dart models to qualified customers on approved credit through RBC, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Examples: 2014 Jeep Cherokee Sport 4x2 (24A)/2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package (29E)/2014 Dodge Dart SE (25A) with a Purchase Price of $24,495/$19,995/$16,995 with a $0 down payment, financed at 0% for 36 months equals 78 bi-weekly payments of $314/$256.35/$217.88 with a cost of borrowing of $0 and a total obligation of $24,495/$19,995/$16,995. ΩFinance Pull-Ahead Bonus Cash and 1% Rate Reduction are available to eligible customers on the retail purchase/lease of select 2014 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram or Fiat models at participating retailers from May 1 to June 2, 2014 inclusive. Finance Pull-Ahead Bonus Cash will be deducted from the negotiated price after taxes. 1% Rate Reduction applies on approved credit to most qualifying subvented financing transactions through RBC, TD Auto Finance and Scotiabank. 1% Rate Reduction cannot be used to reduce the final interest rate below 0%. Eligible customers include all original and current owners of select Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram or Fiat models with an eligible standard/ subvented finance or lease contract maturing between May 1, 2014 and June 30, 2017. Trade-in not required. See retailer for complete details and exclusions. €$5,125 in Package Value available on the new 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT Ultimate Family Package (RTKH5329G) model based on the following MSRP options: $850 Climate Group, $1,925 Single DVD Entertainment, $1,500 SXT Plus Group and $850 Uconnect Hands-Free Group. $7,140 in Package Value available on the new 2014 Dodge Journey SXT Ultimate Journey Package (JCDP4928K) model based on the following MSRP options: $1,475 Flexible Seating Group, $1,200 Rear Seat DVD, $525 Convenience Group, $2,645 Navigation & Sound Group and $1,295 Sunroof. See your retailer for complete details. ★Discounts available at participating retailers on the purchase/lease of only the following new vehicles. 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan SXT with Ultimate Family Package (RTKH5329G). Discount consists of: $850 in no-cost options and $2,500 DVD Incentive that will be deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. 2014 Dodge Journey SXT with Ultimate Journey Package (JCDP4928K). Discount consists of: $2,495 in no-cost options and $2,500 DVD Incentive that will be deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. Some conditions apply. See your retailer for complete details. *Consumer Cash Discounts are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. ‡3.99% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on new select models through RBC, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Example: 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package (29E) with a Purchase Price of $19,995, with a $0 down payment, financed at 3.99% for 96 months equals 208 bi-weekly payments of $112 with a cost of borrowing of $3,394 and a total obligation of $23,388.63. †4.29% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on new select models through RBC, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Example: 2014 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package (22F) with a Purchase Price of $19,995, with a $0 down payment, financed at 4.29% for 96 months equals 208 bi-weekly payments of $114 with a cost of borrowing of $3,662 and a total obligation of $23,657.39. ➤2.79% purchase financing for up to 96 months available on new select models through RBC, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Example: 2014 Dodge Dart (25A) with a Purchase Price of $16,995, with a $0 down payment, financed at 2.79% for 96 months equals 208 bi-weekly payments of $91 with a cost of borrowing of $1,987 and a total obligation of $18,981.81. §Starting From Prices for vehicles shown include Consumer Cash Discounts and do not include upgrades (e.g., paint). Upgrades available for additional cost. The Best Buy Seal is a registered trademark of Consumers Digest Communications LLC, used under license. **Based on 2014 Ward’s upper small sedan costing under $25,000. ^Based on R. L. Polk Canada, Inc. May 2008 to September 2013 Canadian Total New Vehicle Registration data for Crossover Segments as defined by Chrysler Canada Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC. TMThe SiriusXM logo is a registered trademark of SiriusXM Satellite Radio Inc.

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May 24, 2014