Page 1

SUN’S OUT, SALE’S ON! PATIO FURNITURE CLEARANCE SALE VISIT OUR SHOWROOM FOR DISPLAYS AND STYLES LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

ELMIRA CANADIAN TIRE 325 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA • 519-669-2727

IN STOCK ONLY, WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

07 | 12 | 2018 VOLUME 23 | ISSUE 27

A LUCKY FRIDAY THE 13TH IN MARYHILL ARTS PAGE 18

COMMENT PAGE 6

MAKING NOISE ABOUT A NEW BYLAW IN WELLESLEY

WELLESLEY / COUNCIL

Kennel application sparks Wellesley council debate about the place of dog breeders in the township

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com

Tragedy ends Elmira couple’s national milk tour

FAISAL ALI THE GROWING NUMBER OF kennels in the township and mounting opposition gave Wellesley councillors pause for thought Tuesday night, giving rise to a discussion about dog breeding in general. Debate was sparked by a kennel application from Linwood residents Kenneth and Linda Brubacher. The bid was opposed by a delegation of concerned citizens who implored councillors to reject the application and apply a moratorium on all future kennel businesses. The residents claimed that the township needed stronger and more thorough safeguards to ensure the animals’ welfare, at breeding operations in particular. “At present, a petition has been circulating throughout the township and businesses, including Wellesley veterinarians who support this initiative,” said delegate Cheryl McCabe, addressing councillors. “We are ensuring that old and new residents are aware of what is happening in their town, and most are shocked and prepared to share their concerns.” Ultimately, council approved the kennel license, which will be for Australian shepherds and golden retrievers, finding no fault with the dog breeder’s application. KENNEL | 2

Henk and Bettina Schuurmans were driving across the country on a tractor to support Canadian dairy producers before tragedy struck in Saskatchewan.

VERONICA REINER ELMIRA’S HENK AND BETTINA Schuurmans’ national milk tour ended in tragedy on Monday morning, when their John Deere 6430 was rear-ended by a semi-truck on Saskatchewan’s Highway #16 West. Bettina, 55, was killed in the accident. Henk was transported to the Royal University Hospital in Saskatoon with critical

injuries, but has since been stabilized by doctors. The driver of the truck was not injured. It’s quite common for farmers to drive their equipment on the main highways in Saskatchewan, according to RCMP spokesman Cpl. Rob King. “Farmers are using the main highways to transport their equipment all over the place,” said King. “They just have to have

[SASKATCHEWAN MILK ASSOCIATION]

proper signage and be riding on the shoulder, usually. But this was a fairly small tractor, compared to most of the tractors that are running. Usually, it’s a huge 12-wheel one.” The news of the collision came to a shock to their family and friends, who cheered them on just around two weeks prior. They MILK TOUR | 2

Landscape Lighting Enhance & Enjoy your property into the night.

Showroom, Retail & Commercial Sales: 650 Weber St.N.Waterloo@ Benjamin

519.888.9992 www.StoneLandscapes.ca


2 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

KENNEL: While granting latest application, township will look to address public’s concerns FROM | COVER

Township chief administrative officer Rik Louwagie suggested that councillors evaluate the breeder’s request for a kennel license according to the bylaws as they currently are. Councillors did agree to imposing a temporary moratorium on dog kennels until township staff can explore what, if any steps could be taken to address the delegations’ concerns – a process that may take staff a few months to complete. However, the effect of the moratorium is somewhat diminished as council is adjourning for their sum-

mer break until the end of August – it will be unable to grant any more licenses in the meantime. McCabe said that there was overabundance of puppies and dogs in the region, and there is currently a sufficient number of kennels to meet demand. “There are enough kennels in our township right now to satisfy – to over-satisfy – a need, when there are an excess of dogs looking for homes,” she said. McCabe pointed to the banning of selling dogs and cats at pet stores in several municipalities in Ontario, suggesting the supply was above the demand.

Cambridge adopted a ban on all for-profit stores selling pets in 2016, Toronto a ban on selling dogs and cats in 2011, Ottawa also in 2016. Coun. Herb Neher, however, said that many breeding kennels were specialized, producing particular purebred species. “But many of these kennels are specialized, right?” he asked. “Are they?” responded McCabe. “Some of the current kennel owners are just puppy makers. They’re not breeders in the sense of breeding you a non-allergic dog, or a show dog. They’re breeding.”

Despite concerns about the animals’ welfare, there has not been any recorded instances of animal abuse in Wellesley Township, where kennels are inspected on a yearly basis. “Are you are aware of any kennels within our township that are treating the dogs inhumanely in any way?” asked Mayor Joe Nowak. “I don’t go to the kennels, so, no, I do not,” said McCabe. Answering questions on behalf of the applicants was Kenneth Brubacher’s father, who said Kenneth was a lover of animals. The senior Brubacher,

also a dog breeder, said the operation was topnotch. “We’ve got floor heating in, we’ve got different temperatures on different sets of the floors so the dogs can pick a cooler floor, warmer floor. It’s insulated better than the house we live in,” he said. The floors, he noted, are covered in shavings. They will be building a new building for the kennel, with Brubacher noting that it would be a “heavy investment” for them. Puppies are weaned after six weeks, said Brubacher, while dogs are kept breeding for about six years. “We like to re-home the adults in about six years. We don’t

breed them every heat. No, we’re not here to get as many pups out of each female as we can. We have never done that.” Wellesley has approximately 22 kennels in the township, though the number includes non-breeding kennels as well. Woolwich, by contrast, only has 11 licensed operations. “Nobody is blaming the kennels,” stressed McCabe. “We’re saying we need to stop right now where we are – there are plenty of kennels in the township, and let’s get a handle on the puppies that are being born now. There’s not a need for more puppies.”

MILK TOUR: Couple was looking to promote Canadian dairy in face of supply management critique FROM | COVER

were documenting details from their trip in their personal log book, as well as through social media using the hashtag and handle of @CDNMilkTour. The couple was travelling across Canada to promote and inform the public of the importance of protecting local dairy farms, having worked in the industry for nearly 30 years. They have five adult children. The owners of the Milky Wave farm near Floradale left for the trip on June 23, and were visiting all of the larger cities to deliver their message. Their plan was to be back in Elmira for their oldest son’s wedding on September 8. Attached to their tractor was a giant plastic cow, Maple, to promote the dairy theme. There was also a

sign fixed to the tractor that read “Keep my milk 100% Canadian,” and another attached to the back that read “Honk if you support quality milk produced by Canadian farm families.” Just days before the tragedy occurred, the two were enjoying their time, talking to media outlets and radio stations, exploring beautiful Canadian sights, as well as receiving plenty of support from the community. “We’re currently in Regina, Saskatchewan,” said Bettina said in a phone interview Friday. “There’s unbelievable support here. People are all thumbs up and waving and are really supportive. It’s actually the whole trip like last night, when we came in through Regina it’s all honking the horns, so it’s really, really good, yeah. We get approached all the time

because that cow just really stands out, and people like to take the pictures and wherever they stop like ‘oh we love you guys,’ and ‘keep up the good work.’ It’s overwhelming. People are supportive. They stand behind it. It’s all 100 per cent Canadians, I think.” “Canadians are very supportive of what we’re doing,” said Henk Schuurmans in an interview. “They know what we’re

talking about and with supply management being in the news lately, they know what it’s all about, and they’re the best at knowing we should go with our local dairy farms.” Their goal was to draw support for Canada’s supply management system, which is under attack from the U.S. in trade talks. “We try to keep the U.S. milk out of Canada,” explained Henk. “With

Trump ... you know, Trump is doing quite a bit in the news to attacking supply and management. He wants to get rid of the oversupply of milk in the U.S. and dump it into Canada. So that’s why we have to stand up for our dairy farmers and the rural community to keep the high standard of milk that we make here in Canada as the number one priority for the Canadians.”

“So everybody is involved actually in this process, and people understand that,” said Bettina. People are really proud of their communities.” The RCMP investigation is ongoing. A GoFundMe page been set up to cover the cost of the funeral as well as other costs to the family at www. gofundme.com/henk-ampbettina-schuurmans-ampfamily

A FINE NIGHT FOR MUSIC IN THE PARK

WEEKLY SPECIALS Specials from July 16th – July 21st

Fresh Center Fresh Striploin Steaks Cut Pork Chops

10.99

$

REG. PRICE

$13.99 /lb

2.99

$

REG. PRICE

$3.59 /lb

Store Made 12x4oz

Store Made Deli Sliced

Beef Burgers

Bologna

14.99

$

REG. PRICE

$15.99 ea

Store Made

Pepper Bacon Ends

3.49

$

REG. PRICE

$4.99 /lb

3.49

$

REG. PRICE

$4.49 /lb

Store Made Sliced

Peameal Bacon Ends

2.99

$

REG. PRICE

$3.49 /lb

3031 Lobsinger Line, Heidelberg 519-699-4590 Mon. - Wed. 8-6; Thurs. - Fri. 8-8; Saturday 7:30-5 Visit us online at www.stemmlermeats.ca

Elmira’s Gore Park was completely filled on July 8 to watch Wendy Lynn Snyder perform at the bandstand. The Sunday Night Concert Series continues with the New Cumberland Band on July 15. [VERONICA REINER / THE OBSERVER]


NEWS | 3

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

Cleanup efforts complicate land deal for St. Jacobs seniors’ bldg. STEVE KANNON A ST. JACOBS SENIORS’ home got more than it bargained for in acquiring a small piece of surplus land from Woolwich Township: a cleanup bill that has topped $130,000. The remediation expenses factored into council’s decision to charge just $2 for the unused road

allowance at 33 Front St. The 340-square-metre property had been valued at $18,000, but Sprucelawn Apartments for Seniors Inc. picked up all the costs, including legal fees, to facilitate the transfer of land. The non-profit housing complex has long used the land as a driveway/parking lot, but the company’s formal purchase of the prop-

erty as well as the neighbouring lot at 2 Isabella St. paves the way for a 30-unit expansion. Sprucelawn’s agreement to take on the cleanup costs of the land, formerly part of railway spur line and a municipal road, was an essential part of the deal, said Dan Kennaley, the township’s director of engineering and planning services.

The goal was to protect the township from liability, similar to the process that was used to sell the Elmira pool to a private group after the opening of the WMC. In acquiring a Ministry of the environment “record of site condition,” Sprucelawn had to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) such as benzopyrene and napthalene – oil

and coal tar derivatives, for instance – from the property. The work has been carried out, with the contaminants hauled away and replaced with clean fill, an expansive undertaking, he said. “The $2 reflects the fact that the record of site, including remediation efforts, was $130,000,” said

Kennaley of the sale price. The nominal fee is also in keeping with the township’s support for seniors’ housing, he added. While the final details are still being worked out, the sale ends a process that started in the fall of 2016 when the township signalled its intent to declare SENIORS | 4

WELLESLEY / MUNICIPAL ELECTION

WOOLWICH / MUNICIPAL ELECTION

There’ll be a race for mayor in Wellesley

Application deadline draws near for 2018 municipal election

Just one ward seat being contested at this point with two weeks until deadline to file nomination papers VERONICA REINER BERNIA WHEATON WILL BRING her unique combination of a long rural history and background as an economic development officer to a key position in Wellesley Township. Wheaton has registered as a candidate for mayor of Wellesley, running against incumbent Joe Nowak. This year’s election will be electronic, with no paper ballots. The goal is to make voting more convenient and accessible. The only other Wellesley council race so far is in Ward 3, where first-term incumbent Peter van der Maas is being challenged by Joyce Barker. Two other incumbents, Ward 1’s Shelley Wagner and Ward 4’s Carl Smit, are seeking re-election. In Ward 2, currently held by longtime Coun. Herb Neher, no one has filed nominations papers, with the July 27 deadline just two weeks away. For now, it remains a two-way race for the mayoralty. “At the minimum, whether I win or lose, people have a choice,” said Wheaton. “And I think in rural communities, we don’t always have a choice. Sometimes only one person runs for a position, and they’re acclaimed; that’s not choice. So at minimum, that’s what we’ve accomplished is that people get to choose from A or B.” Wheaton has worked for the Rural Oxford Economic Development for the past 13 years. The purpose of the role is to improve the

economy of an area by attracting new businesses, working with municipalities, and identifying opportunities for growth and development. One of her key focuses in the campaign is communication. “That’s because that’s very important to me, as part of my day job, as part of my family relationships, I think communication is so important,” said Wheaton. “I think that when you have a difficult message to communicate to the community, you need to be able to articulate it in a way that they will understand.” Wheaton also stressed transparency towards the public with council decisions. “I think we could probably do a better job, and I’ve heard that from the community, this isn’t just my own opinion,” said Wheaton. “And they say, ‘decisions get made and we don’t hear about it until a tree gets planted, or a sidewalk goes in. We don’t hear about it until something actually happens.’ We also need to do a better job of listening to the community and gathering their input so that we can make informed decisions. Because council isn’t just about the opinions of five people. It’s about those five people representing their voters.” Melissa Schenk owns a video production company and has worked with Wheaton consistently over the years. “She’s really open to hearing everybody’s opinWELLESLEY | 28

Just one newcomer seeking a seat on Woolwich council FAISAL ALI SCOTT MCMILLAN WAS ELECTED in 2014 as the voice for Woolwich and Wellesley townships on Waterloo Region District School Board. Four years later, and McMillan is once again seeking a public mandate, only this time from the residents of Woolwich Ward 1 (Elmira) to serve as a township councillor. As of yesterday, McMillan is one of three candidates to have entered their name into race for Ward 1, which represents the township’s populous Elmira area and has two seats on the council. There are still two weeks left in the nomination period, however, which ends July 27 at 2 p.m., and people may still submit their applications to run in the election until then. “I really enjoy municipal politics,” said McMillan, an Elmira resident and native, about his reasons for running for council. “I think it’s where the rubber meets the road, it’s where you get the opportunity to have a direct impact on people’s lives,” he explained. “It’s why I enjoy being involved in elected politics at this level, so that’s why I’m running for council to try and help people and the try and make a direct impact on the lives of people in Woolwich Township.” While being a familiar name of the ballot, McMillan may still face an uphill battle as he takes on two current incumbents, Patrick Merlihan, and Julie-Anne Herties, both of whom are seeking another term. Although currently a councillor, Herteis did not

Currently a trustee and chair of the Waterloo Region District School Board, Scott McMillan will be running in October’s election for a seat Woolwich council. McMillan is, so far, the only newcomer running for office in the township. [FAISAL ALI / THE OBSERVER[ run for the position in the last municipal election. Rather, she was appointed to the position earlier this year when Scott Hahn stepped down in January due to time constraints. Herteis previously served as Woolwich councilor from 2010 to 2014, but did not seek reelection in 2014. In the running for Woolwich mayor, incumbent Sandy Shantz currently remains uncontested in the race. In Woolwich Ward 3, the area covering the southeastern half of the township including the settlements of Breslau, Maryhill, Conestogo, Winterbourne and West Montrose, so far

only the ward’s two incumbent have filed their nomination papers. Ward 3, like Ward 1, has two seats on township council. Both Murray Martin and Larry Shantz will be running for reelection. Shantz will seeking his second term on the council, while Martin previously served as councillor from 1994 to 2010, then since 2014. Ward 2, meanwhile, is still bereft of contenders. Longtime councillor Mark Bauman plans to retire. The ward, which covers the northwestern half of the township, excluding Elmira, has only one seat on the council. Having served for the

past four years as a school board trustee, two years of which were spent as the board chairperson, McMillan notes how the role has helped prepare him for the responsibility of councillor. He points to previous school board chairs who had benefited from the experience and gone on to excel in politics, such as Mayor Sandy Shantz and Kitchener-Conestoga MP Harold Albrecht. With a constituency of 460,000, supporting 60,000 students and 8,000 employees, and a budget of $760-million – second only in size to the regional ELECTION | 4


4 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

SENIORS: Woolwich to transfer surplus land to

Sprucelawn Apartments after $130K cleanup

FROM | 3

the land surplus, with the goal of a “targeted sale” to Sprucelawn rather than offering the land to the public, he explained. Woolwich’s surplus land process gives that option to council, which conducted most of the deal in closed sessions. Just before breaking for the summer on June 26, council finalized the closing up of the unused road to clear the way for the sale, with the details now available following some legal consultations, according to chief administrative officer David Brenneman. The disposition of the land follows similar treatment of an old railway spur line used by a previous mill operation located on the property at 1441 King St. N. The spur line was removed and portions of the railway lands were

WELLESLEY / COUNCIL

New Wellesley noise bylaw clears one more hurdle at council Tuesday night FAISAL ALI

Land acquisition is part of a planned expansion at the seniors’ complex in St. Jacobs. conveyed as lot additions to the various abutting properties, including the Front Street road allowance and the Sprucelawn property. Brian L. Shantz, the planning consultant for Sprucelawn, said the organization would be bringing

a proposal for an expansion to the township once the land deal is finalized. The project will need official plan and zoning changes from Woolwich, with the timing of actual construction dependent on future funding.

ELECTION: Information available to prospective

DESPITE A BIT OF wrangling and fine tuning over the semantics, the new noise bylaw being proposed for Wellesley Township received a tentative seal of approval from councillors Tuesday night, bringing it one step closer to becoming the law of the land. Councillors once again combed over the document, which at seven pages is significantly larger and more detailed than the current one-and-a-half page noise bylaw in effect. Specifically perplexing to Coun. Carl Schmidt was a line in the new bylaw prohibiting “persistent or repetitive yelling, shouting, hooting, whistling or singing” at night. Schmidt pointed out that if persistent

yelling and hooting was only prohibited at night, then that implied that it was allowed persistently during the daytime hours. “I don’t know why we’re allowing any of that, at any time,” he said, emphasizing the words persistent and repetitive. “That kind of becomes annoying if you’re allowed to do it, other than outside 11 p.m. to 7 a.m.” “I kind of like hooting” mused Coun. Peter van der Maas. “I was just thinking, when I win the lottery I might do a lot of those things,” added Joe Nowak. Schmidt suggested that those noises be prohibited at all times, if they are persistent or repetitive. As the bylaw will need a legal review before it can be made into law, councillors ultimately decided to approve the cur-

rent draft as is, and ask the legal expert’s advice. Whereas the current bylaw is fairly vague in what constitutes a “noise likely to disturb the inhabitants of Wellesley Township” (for which there is a potential $50 fine), the bylaw being proposed lays out, in much greater detail, what noises kinds of noises would be permissible. The new bylaw also includes time periods where certain noises can be considered a breach of the bylaw. Currently, the noise bylaw says that any unusual “noise likely to disturb the inhabitants of Wellesley Township” could be an infraction. Ultimately though, as bylaw enforcement in the township is complaint driven, a noise bylaw is only enforced if a grievance is first called in.

BENJAMIN ROAD COLLISION DRAWS ATTENTION

candidates and to those newly elected to office FROM | 3

government itself – he says he’s prepared for a new role. “I think that that ability to sit there at that table, and make decisions that affect 460,000 people, and have tens of millions of dollars riding on those decisions, I think it creates a level of confidence that can help when you’re at a table like Woolwich Township. So I think my experience at the school board is the thing that distinguishes me against the people who are so far nominated to run in

Ward 1,” he said. The nomination period is open for another two weeks, and with one seat currently uncontested, there is ample opportunity for other newcomers to join the fray and give a go at municipal politics. Training is provided for newcomers on council, while role of township councillor is generally scheduled with the expectation that councillors may work their own fulltime jobs. “I think that is one thing that people sometimes don’t realize,” says town-

ship deputy clerk Jeff Smith, about the time constraints of being a councilor. “So our meetings are at 7 p.m., we usually have two to three meetings a month. But council members also typically have to do a lot of reading for those meetings.” There are further details on the requirements and expectations of municipal politicians on the Woolwich website, notes Smith, while anyone interested in learning more are also encouraged to reach out to the township for more details.

Emergency crews responded to a collision between a Jeep and a police detective van at 864 Benjamin Rd. in St. Jacobs on July 10. There were minor injuries, but damage was not substantial. [VERONICA REINER / THE OBSERVER]


NEWS | 5

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

A sign of the times in St. Jacobs Two of the three “temporary” stop signs installed in St. Jacobs during the reconstruction of King Street will be made permanent. The fate of the third has yet to be determined. Woolwich will install posts and signs for the stops at Queensway Drive and Princess Street and at Water Street and Abners Lane, council decided last month. The stop sign at the intersection of

Young and Hachborn streets will be coming while the township carries out a study to determine if traffic flows warrant a permanent sign. Woolwich is currently going through a process to remove the one stop sign. It has to notify residents around the area, and post a warning sign that the stop sign will be removed. “It won’t be removed for at least a few weeks,” said director of engineering and planning Dan Kennaley. What’s called a warrant study will be done after school resumes in September to provide a more accurate traffic count. That should allow for staff

to present a study to council later in the fall, he said.

Home sales down, prices up June home sales through the Multiple Listing System (MLS) of the KitchenerWaterloo Association of Realtors were down 12.8 per cent compared to last month and down 15.6 per cent compared to last year’s June, which was the second highest on record. A total of 604 residential properties sold in June compared to 716 the same time

last year. On a year-to-date basis there have been 3,096 home sales during the first half of the year, a decrease of 19.1 per cent. Residential sales in June included 365 detached (down 21.2 per cent compared to June 2017), and 151 condominium units (up 6.3 per cent) which includes any property regardless of style (i.e. semis, townhomes, apartment, detached etc.). Sales also included 38 semi-detached homes (down 29.6 per cent) and 43 freehold townhouses (down 15.7 per cent).   The average sale price of all residen-

tial properties sold in June increased 5.2 per cent to $489,584 compared to the same month a year ago. Detached homes sold for an average price of $575,003 an increase of seven per cent compared to June of last year. During this same period, the average sale price for an apartment-style condominium was $314,180, an increase of 13.2 per cent. Townhomes and semis sold for an average of $378,562 (up 10.8 per cent) and $391,830 (up 2.9 per cent) respectively. The median price of all residential properties sold last month was up 5.9 per cent compared to June of last

year at $450,000, and the median price of a detached home during the same period increased 9.5 per cent to $520,000. The association listed 850 residential properties in K-W and area last month, down 21.5 per cent compared to June of 2017, but fairly close to the historical (2007-2016) average of 859. The number of active residential listings on the MLS system to the end of June totalled 1,030, which is 11 per cent higher than June of last year but still significantly below the historical (2007-2016) ten-year average of 1,728 listings for June.

POLICE BLOTTER

Age, sex a factor in aggressive driving statistics THE ONTARIO PROVINCIAL POLICE laid close to 213,000 speeding charges and more than 4,800 street racing charges against Ontario drivers in 2017, says a new report of compiled figures. The summer months sees a crackdown on speeding and other forms of aggressive driving. “When you speed, follow too closely, fail to yield right-of-way or engage in road rage behaviour, you are not just breaking the law. You are contributing to preventable road deaths on OPP-patrolled roads every year that are linked to these aggressive driving behaviors,” said OPP Deputy Commissioner Brad Blair in a release. With 75 people dying in speed-related collisions on OPP-patrolled roads in 2017 (a five-year high), the OPP revealed who their biggest speeding offenders were

Speeding charges ( females by age group): 25 to 34 years: 17,433 charges 35 to 44 years: 12,817 charges 45 to 54 years: 11,541 charges  The youngest male age group (16 to 20 years) accounted for 5,939 charges while their female counterparts drew 2,699 charges.   Among the street racing charges (for driving more

JULY 3

JULY 5

11:00 AM | Police received a report about an earlier incident in which an unknown suspect was observed trying to open a locked door to a garage at a residence on Queen Street in Elmira. The suspect was unable to gain entry and then attempted to steal a bicycle found beside the garage. The suspect is described as a white male, thin build with short buzzed hair.  Police are reminding residents if they see or hear anything suspicious to call the Waterloo Regional Police at 519-5709777 or 9-1-1 if a crime is in progress. 

7:02 AM | Sometime overnight, a pickup truck parked on Stillwater Street in Elmira was entered and various tools were taken. Police are asking anyone with information regarding this theft to contact the Waterloo Regional Police Rural Detachment at 519-570-9777, ext. 4320 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800222-TIPS (8477). Police are also reminding residents to make sure their vehicles are locked, anytime they are unattended and do not leave valuables inside their vehicles.

JULY 4

12:02 AM | A 25-year-old Waterloo woman driving a white Acura east on Kingfisher Drive in Elmira, approaching the intersection at Barnswallow Drive failed to stop at the stop sign and struck a black Dodge driven by a 19-year-old Elmira man. There were no injuries reported and both vehicles were towed from the scene. The driver of the Acura was charged with ‘failing to stop at the stop sign.’

4:44 PM | A 38-year-old Waterloo woman driving a white GMC SUV was stopped for a red light on Arthur Street at Oriole Parkway in Elmira when her vehicle was struck from behind by a green GMC van being driven by a 33-year-old Harriston man. No injuries were reported and both vehicles were driven from the scene. The Harriston man was charged with ‘careless driving.’

last year.    Among last year’s speeding charges, close to 148,000 were issued to male drivers, with female drivers drawing over 65,000 charges.    Speeding charges (males by age group): 25 to 34 years: 37,498 charges 35 to 44 years: 27,959 charges 45 to 54 years: 26,212 charges

JULY 7

8:00 AM | A break, enter

CHECKING IT OUT TO BE SURE

than 50 kilometres per hour over the posted speed limit), males drew more than 4,100 charges, while close to 760 were issued to females. Below are the top three male/female age group offenders:      Street racing charges (males by age group): 25 to 34 years: 1,382 charges 21 to 24 years:  968 charges 35 to 44 years:  622 charges   Street racing charges ( females by age group): 25 to 34 years: 260 charges 21 to 24 years: 155 charges 35 to 44 years: 130 charges  Among the youngest age group, 447 street racing charges went to 16 to 20 yearold males, compared to 91 charges laid against females in the same age group.

and theft to a residential property in the Township of Perth East is under investigation by members of the Perth County OPP. The incident occurred during the early morning hours when unknown suspects gained entry to the property and removed a generator, an electrical cord with adaptor, and the wooden boxed ashes of two deceased family pets. The generator is described as a black and yellow Champion 9000 watt with electric start.  The generator, cord and adaptor have an approximate value of $1000.00. The boxes containing the ashes were marked with the names “Buddy” and “Lucky.” Anyone with information is asked to call police at 1-888-310-1122.  Should you wish to remain anonymous, call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or submit a secure web-tip at www.pccrimestoppers.ca, where you may be eligible to receive a cash reward of up to $2,000. 8:00 AM | A theft from a construction site occurred during the early morning hours, with Perth County OPP reporting that a

A reported dust trap fire on a rural St. Clements property prompted a significant response from Wellesley Township firefighters on Monday. All three stations were called to the scene. [FAISAL ALI / THE OBSERVER]

cement mixer was removed from a residential construction site in the village of Milverton. The Stone model masonry mixer is described as yellow with a blue bonnet with a value of approximately $4,500. The unit would have required a vehicle to transport it from the area.  10:00 PM | The Wellington County Ontario OPP were conducting a Reduce Impaired Driving Everywhere (R.I.D.E.) check on Wellington Road 21, Inverhaugh when the driver of a black SUV entered the stop. While speaking with the male driver, officers formed the opinion that he was under the influence of alcohol. A roadside screening test was conducted which resulted in a fail. He was arrested and brought to a local OPP operations centre for further testing. As a result, a 41-year-old Kitchener man was charged with ‘driving with over 80 mgs of alcohol in 100mL of blood.’ A 90-day Administrative Driver’s Licence Suspension and seven-day vehicle impoundment were initiated as per statute. He is scheduled to appear in Guelph Court on July 31.

Scott Grainger & Cynthia Hastings are pleased to announce the merger of their practices in

Waters, Hastings g & Grainger ger Professional Corporation

OUR SERVICES:

Real Estate Purchases, Sales and Mortgages Wills, Powers of Attorney and Estates Criminal, Family and Civil Litigation Corporate Law, Business Transactions and Restructuring Notaries Public Cynthia L. Hastings BA (Hons) LLB

Scott A. Grainger LLB

Friendly, Experienced & Passionate legal representation with high integrity from your local, full service law firm Former Assistant Crown Attorney

21 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-1641 | whglaw.ca


6 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

JOE MERLIHAN PUBLISHER STEVE KANNON EDITOR

COMMENT

DONNA RUDY

PATRICK MERLIHAN

SALES MANAGER

PRODUCTION MANAGER

REPORTER

GRAPHIC DESIGN

REPORTER

GRAPHIC DESIGN

FAISAL ALI

VERONICA REINER

NIK HARRON

CASSANDRA MERLIHAN

PUBLICATION MAIL AGREEMENT NUMBER 1004840 | ISSN 12039578

OUR VIEW / EDITORIAL

THE VIEW FROM HERE

Nuisances a risk on both sides of noise bylaws EVEN IN THE TOWNSHIPS there’s no escaping the din of modern society. From traffic noise to the constant hum of the devices we rely on daily, there’s never really a quiet moment. Most of us have acclimatized to that reality, but there are whole classes of other noises, from barking dogs to blaring stereos, that come with a set of problems and a set of rules to try to make living in close proximity to one another a bit more manageable. Those rules are what Wellesley Township is grappling with just now in reviewing its noise bylaw, an exercise not uncommon to municipal government. Few people would take issue with the municipality taking action in the case, for instance, of an incessantly barking dog. Everyone within earshot would welcome the intervention. The same goes for other noise-related complaints – loud parties, stereos routinely cranked to 10, homeowners often eager to use power tools early in the day or late at night, to name a few. These instances are universally disruptive, and are precisely why enforcement is necessary: some people just aren’t considerate of their neighbours. Where there has been some pushback from the public is on the prospect of overzealous enforcement against the common sounds of living, including the kind of outdoor festivities that people enjoy in the summer. Nobody wants a visit from the ‘fun police’ bent on quashing the joy out of living, already a threat in our over-regulated nanny state. Think, for instance, of the always problematic municipal ticketing schemes, particularly bad with parking. Everyone it seems has a story about overzealous enforcement. That’s especially true in larger cities, where parking is enforced largely as a cash grab to, among other things, pay for expensive enforcement regimes. To be sure, busy cities do require some kind of order, otherwise people would park inappropriately with abandon, and there would be little turnover in available parking spots. But horror stories abound, as do altercations between municipal employees and the people they’re supposed to serve. While parking is nowhere near that kind of problem in the townships, there are issues. Ideally, enforcement in those circumstances would come would a light touch – education rather than punitive action, for instance – in keeping with the township’s rural lifestyle. That extends to neighbours being more, well, neighbourly in settling disputes. Speaking of which, with noise issues there’s also the risk of residents at odds with neighbours lodging complaints strictly to settle a perceived score – a tit-for-tat situation that can quickly escalate, dragging the municipality into the mess. The key is to avoid regulations and actions that have little benefit to the community, which, after all, is the sole reason for rules to exist. If they’re petty, they’re not worthy of consideration. There is a place for intervention – you can’t mandate courtesy and common sense, but you can deal with those who violate social norms. People have a right to expect their quality of life to be undiminished by government decisions. Failure to ensure that demands a way for officials to change course. In reality, the township is in a no-win situation, as everyone feels put out by the process, even in cases where the violation is clear. But that’s no reason not to ensure the process is fair and that actions are only undertaken as appropriate.

Just a couple of weeks to go for those concerned about the public good to get themselves on the ballot for this year’s municipal elections. WORLD VIEW / GWYNNE DYER

UK still has no realistic position for Brexit as time runs out WORLD AFFAIRS EVEN WITH DONALD TRUMP scheduled for a brief visit to the United Kingdom this week amid massive protests, it’s still ‘all Brexit, all of the time’ in the sceptred isle – and the long struggle over the nature of the deal that will define Britain’s relationship with the European Union post-exit allegedly reached a turning point last weekend. “They had nothing else to offer. They had no Plan B. She faced them down,” said a senior government official about the hardline Brexiteers after Prime Minister Theresa May got them to sign up to a socalled ‘soft Brexit’ at a crisis cabinet meeting July 6. But the armistice between the ‘Leave’ and ‘Remain’ factions in her fractious Conservative Party lasted less than 48 hours. On Sunday morning hard-line Brexiteer David Davis, the ludicrously titled Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union,

reneged on his short-lived support for May’s negotiating goals and resigned in protest. Then Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson followed suit, claiming that May’s plan meant “the (Brexit) dream is dying, suffocated by needless selfdoubt.” The sheer fecklessness of the ‘Brexit dream’ is epitomized by Johnson, who first compared May’s negotiating plans to “polishing a turd”, then came round to supporting them for about 36 hours, and finally resigned, saying that they would reduce the UK to a “vassal state” with the “status of a colony” of the EU. Yet at no point in the discussion did either of them offer a coherent counterproposal. And what is all this Sturm und Drang about? A negotiating position, devised by May with great difficulty two years after the referendum that yielded 52 per cent support for an undefined ‘Brexit’, which could never be accepted by the European Union. Its sole virtue was that it seemed possible to unite the ‘Leave’ and ‘Remain’ factions of the Con-

servative Party behind it. But the unity imposed by May broke down before the weekend was over. All four of the great offices of state – prime minister, chancellor (finance minister), foreign secretary and home secretary (interior minister) – are now held by Conservative politicians who voted Remain in the referendum. Yet they are unable to persuade their party to accept even a ‘soft Brexit’ that preserves Britain’s existing access to its biggest trading partner, the EU. The Brexiteers’ power lies in their implicit threat to stage a revolt that overthrows May, fatally splits the Conservative Party, and precipitates an early election that brings the Labour Party to power. They may not really have the numbers to do that – it’s widely assumed that a majority of the Conservative members of parliament secretly want a very soft Brexit or no Brexit at all – but May dares not test that assumption. So, horrified by the prospect of a Labour government led by Jeremy Corbyn (who is regularly portrayed

by the right-wing media as a Lenin in waiting), the Conservatives are doomed to cling desperately to power even though they can probably never deliver a successful Brexit. And the time is running out. The United Kingdom will be leaving the European Union on March 29 of next year whether there is a deal that maintains most of its current trade with the EU or not. In practice, the deadline for an agreement is next October, since time must be allowed for 27 other EU members to ratify the deal. If there is no deal, the UK simply ‘crashes out,’ and chaos ensues. The volume of trade in goods and services between the United Kingdom and the rest of the EU is so great, and the preparation for documenting the safety and origins of goods and collecting customs on them so scanty, that the new border would simply freeze up. That would cause great difficulty for many European enterprises, but for Britain it would be a catastrophe. As an exDYER | 8


COMMENT | 7

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

THEIR VIEW / QUESTION OF THE WEEK

How are you beating the heat?

» Joe Stanaitis

» Kelly Sergi

» Rick Mikael

» Shannon Van Eykeren

» Tyler Medeiros

“Drink lots of water or blast the air conditioning.”

“By going to the splash pad with your kids.”

“Air conditioning and iced tea!”

“By staying in the shade.”

“I drink a lot of water and make sure to jump in my pool whenever the chance comes.”

“There is so much wealth around that if we harnessed the excess we could pay everyone the basic income.” Ingrid von Hausen | 8 HIS VIEW / STEVE KANNON

Yet another example of a system that puts profits ahead of the public good EDITOR'S NOTES AS WHOLESOME AS MOTHER’S milk. What could be better? Money, of course. Corporate profits trump babies’ health, each and every time, at least if you’re the U.S. administration. A new report shows American delegates to last spring’s World Health Assembly meeting in Geneva tried to block a resolution in favour of breast-feeding that called for controls on the inaccurate or misleading marketing of breast milk substitutes. Acting in the interests of infant formula manufacturers, the American contingent used threats after attempts to water down the resolution. “The confrontation was the latest example of the Trump administration siding with corporate interests on numerous public health and environmental issues,” reports the New York Times. “In talks to renegoti-

ate the North American Free Trade Agreement, the Americans have been pushing for language that would limit the ability of Canada, Mexico and the United States to put warning labels on junk food and sugary beverages, according to a draft of the proposal reviewed by The New York Times.” It’s another example of how talk about free trade has little to do with trade – and even less with freedom. In fact, NAFTA and the types of deals that followed – CETA, TPP and their ilk – are all about corporate control, subverting the public good in the name of profits as blatantly as moves to protect the $70-billion baby food market put money ahead of the health of mothers and children. “The Americans also sought, unsuccessfully, to thwart a WHO effort aimed at helping poor countries obtain access to lifesaving medicines. Washington, supporting the pharmaceutical industry, has long resisted calls to modify patent laws as a way of increasing drug availability

HOW TO REACH US

health care services in Canada. TPP-like agreements are no longer primarily about reducing traditional trade barriers. Instead, they’re about policies that have nothing to do with comparative advantage, policies that are often designed to lead to higher consumer costs and concentrated corporate power. So, the TPP has little to do with trade – and recall that free trade deals have largely been harmful to most Canadians and their working- and middle-class counterparts in the U.S. – but everything to do with increasing the wealth of a few while killing jobs and driving up prices here. On that, many critics – Nobel laureates included – agree. Many see it as an end-run around sovereign nations and their ability to protect the public good – already a dubious enterprise, given the corrupt and co-opted governments we elect. There will be a loss of governance, higher prices – changes in rules about intellectual property and patents will drive up the cost of items from pharmaceuticals

to music – and a downward pressure on wages. We know, of course, that sweeping trade agreements have largely been harmful for our economy, encouraging the kind of globalization that has gutted the manufacturing sector in Ontario, as it has even in the U.S. heartland. Language in existing deals such as NAFTA becomes even more pronounced in CETA and the TPP, allowing for end-runs around national governments, essentially constraining their powers. In many ways, its continued deregulation by stealth, as governments would be handcuffed. As parties to the negotiations, they do so willingly, attempting to hide from the public the desire to turn more power over to corporations. Once the agreements are in place, national governments can simply wash their hands of any issues raised by their citizens. It’s a corporate-friendly agenda, to the detriment of other priorities citizens may have, turning over the levers of control from public hands to private.

It can be argued that liberalized monetary policies and trade deals that favour corporate interests over the well-being of citizens have eroded our standard of living for three decades. The cure, we’re told, is yet more deregulation and globalization, essentially offering a drowning man more water instead of a lifejacket. It’s the angst over sweeping changes to our economies that has help fuel the rise of populist movements, from the perpetrator of Make America Great Again to Syriza and Podemos. In the case of the U.S., “buy American” provisions have a popular ring to them, just as retaliatory “buy Canadian” movements have taken off in reaction to tariff wars and the Tweeter in Chief’s badmouthing of allies. The actualities of the trade wars the U.S. have embarked on don’t make sense, but the sentiment does, particularly to the ever-important base. In principle, Western countries under strain from the KANNON | 8

PHONE 519.669.5790 | TOLL FREE 1.888.966.5942 | FAX 519.669.5753 | ONLINE WWW.OBSERVERXTRA.COM

ADDRESS 20-B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA, ON N3B 1Z9 LETTERS

in the developing world, but health advocates say the Trump administration has ratcheted up its opposition to such efforts,” the newspaper reports this week. The trouble is that increasingly deals such as the Trans-Pacific Partnership – ironically, one of Trump’s targets in a war that includes bogus stances on NAFTA and even trade itself – aren’t about trade, as tariffs pre-Trump were already zero or so close to it as to be irrelevant. No, these deals, and the TPP in particular, are about enshrining corporatism and eliminating national government control over unfettered capitalism in all its abusive glory. Moving farther along the “trade” deal continuum, new deals such as the TPP enshrines the right of corporate profit over good public policy, the environment and even people’s lives. Corporations can and will sue governments for impeding profits, able to claim massive compensation from governments if they’re unable, for instance, to offer private

Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Observer. Include name, address and daytime phone number. Unsigned letters must contact Editor for publishing consideration. Keep letters under 350 words. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. This newspaper declines announcements, poetry and thank-you letters.

EDITORIAL

ADVERTISING

PRODUCTION

PUBLISHER

519.669.5790 EXT 103

519.669.5790 EXT 104

519.669.5790 EXT 105

519.669.5790 EXT 107

editor@woolwichobserver.com

ads@woolwichobserver.com

production@woolwichobserver.com

publisher@woolwichobserver.com

COPYRIGHT The entire contents of The Observer and online edition are protected by copyright. No portion thereof is to be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the specific permission of the publisher. Reproduction rights can be obtained from ACCESS COPYRIGHT located at 1 Young St., 1900, Toronto, ON M5E 1E5 | 416.868.1621

PRESS COMPLAINTS & ASSOCIATIONS The Observer is a member of the Ontario Press Council which considers complaints against member newspapers. For more information contact www.ontpress.com. The Observer is a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association [CCNA], Canadian Community Newspaper Association and The Greater KW Chamber of Commerce.


8 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

THE MONITOR

VERBATIM

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

A new indicator shows Canada ranks 20th among countries participating in the UN’s ambitious global effort to address the world’s 17 toughest social and environmental problems, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). A new online tool accessible to the public shows Canada is below its peers on Climate Action and Reduced Inequalities, in particular.

“Canadians should be shocked to learn that nearly 50 per cent of youth in Canadian jails are Indigenous. We should be gobsmacked to learn that 98 per cent of girls in Saskatchewan jails are Indigenous. In Manitoba, approximately 80 per cent of both girls and boys in custody are Indigenous.”

A new subdivision for Conestogo got the nod this week as councillors approved the necessary zone change. Featuring 21 lots for single-family homes, the project is slated for lands fronting on Sawmill Road, just east of Golf Course Road. The houses, on large lots, would start at $375,000. The 10-acre site is owned by Klondike Investments.

» United Nations

» Corey Shefman, a lawyer representing Indigenous peoples, persons and

» From the July 12, 2003 edition of The Observer

organizations, says to call these incarceration numbers a crisis would be the understatement of the century

DYER: Don’t bet on the UK soon

NATIONAL VIEW

coming to its senses on Brexit

FROM | 6

ample, two-fifths of the components for cars built in the UK are sourced from elsewhere in the EU. Yet most of the time available for negotiating a soft Brexit has already been wasted, and Britain still does not have a realistic negotiating position. This preposterous situation is almost entirely due to the civil war within the Conservative Party between the Brexit faction and the rest. The only reason that there was a referendum at all was because former prime minister David Cameron thought that a decisive defeat in a referendum would shut the Brexiteers up and end that war. He miscalculated. The Brexiteers spun a fantasy of an oppressive EU that was the cause of

YOUR VIEW / LETTER

Universal basic income is the way to go To the Editor, I AM SICK AND tired of all the bleating about minimum wage, drug plans, insurance, job creation, our health care system and the like. The solution is quite simple: at age 18, every citizen of Canada, regardless of status, is

FEATURE ITEM:

PORK CHOPS $ 2.99

given a basic income that is just enough to keep you alive. This would replace welfare, disability pensions, old age pensions, veterans pensions, etc. Anyone who wants to have a better income can go out and get a job, part time or whatever. Deadbeats, people who just don’t want to work, people who can’t work for health reasons will be provided for. I’ve worked as a volunteer for 20 years. I am sure

CENTRE CUT

/lb

Reg.$3.75/lb

STEWING BEEF

FRESH CUT

$

SMOKED

$

DELI SLICED

$

TURKEY THIGHS REGULAR BOLOGNA

3.99/lb

Reg.$5.55/lb

3.99 /lb

Reg.$5.35/lb

2.99/lb

Reg.$3.99/lb

2065 Floradale Rd. Elmira, ON. Our plant is 100% Gluten Free

PHONE: 519-669-2300 TOLL FREE: 844-669-2300

HOURS: Tuesday - Friday 8am - 6pm Saturday 9am - NOON Sunday CLOSED

HOME | AUTO | FARM | LIABILITY | COMMERCIAL

OUR POLICY — YOUR PROTECTION SINCE 1927

45 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519.669.5484 elmirains@bellnet.ca

that there are people like me who can help to get the work done for free or a small stipend. Jobs are becoming fewer and fewer: the robots are going to do a lot of the unpleasant, dangerous, repetitive jobs. Job creation is costing us a lot of money, with probably not very good results. It also encourages inefficiency. In my experience volunteering, I can get a lot done in my morning stint, probably six hours’ worth. There is so much wealth around that if we harnessed the excess we could pay everyone the basic income. We don’t even have to go after the 1%. If some of those astronomical salaries that some people are paid were reduced a bit we could scrape together enough to pay everyone the basic income. I have no head for figures, but I challenge anyone out there who likes to play around with ideas to figure it out.

INGRID VON HAUSEN | NEW HAMBURG

all Britain’s troubles and sold it to the nostalgic older generation, the unemployed and underemployed who were looking for somebody to blame, and sundry nationalists of all colours. They narrowly won the referendum with the help of a rabidly nationalist right-wing press, spending well beyond the legal limits in the campaign – and, it now appears, with considerable support from Russia. (The biggest contributor to the Brexit campaign, megarich investor Arron Banks, met the Russian ambassador at least eleven times during the run-up to the referendum and the subsequent two months.) There’s still a chance that reason will prevail before the UK crashes out of the EU, of course. But the odds are no better than even.

KANNON:

Trade wars are easier than doing right FROM | 7

influx of overseas goods and the insidious trend of outsourcing to offshore locales, which have been more pressing concerns than trade with our U.S. neighbours, with whom we have much more in common on every front ... until recently, that is. Buying locally, especially from small producers and retailers, is the perfect tonic for the globalization that has destabilized the financial system, weakened the domestic economy and lowered the standards and safety of the goods we consume. It may not be that simple, but simplicity and sloganeering are the hallmark of the types of populism we’re seeing in the U.S.


FARM SAFETY | 9

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

FARM SAFETY

Don’t Learn Safety Rules by Accident Make Safety a Habit. Be prepared.

SAFETY FIRST WHEN VISITING A FARM

The nursery rhyme does not state, “Old MacDonald had a farm and on this farm there was a bunch of dangerous things.” But maybe it should?

Farmers perform an essential service, providing food and other products that consumers commonly take for granted. The inner workings of a farm are something to treat with respect. Most of the families who live and work on a farm understand the potential hazards of such an environment. However, individuals visiting a farm may be unaware of these dangers. Understanding farm safety helps keep everyone safe.

According to the organization Kids Health, the age groups at greatest risk for injury on farms are children ages 3 to 4 and teenagers ages 13 to 14. Most injuries can be prevented, though, with a little education and precautionary measures.

Machinery There are many different forms of machinery on a farm to help keep it working efficiently. These items can pose serious safety risks. Although tractors are the type of farm equipment that causes the most injuries, some adults still think it is safe to allow children to ride along.

Injuries that may result from farm machinery include pinching of clothing or parts of the body, where a person may become trapped in the gears or components of equipment; cuts from equipment that shears crops; bruising or cuts from projectiles thrown by mowers or other field equipment; and crushing or trapping injuries from machinery that falls or tips over.

Animals Part of the excitement of visiting a farm is seeing and petting the animals. Although many animals may be docile and domesticated, they can still be unpredictable. Animals

that are startled by yelling or loud noises also may become restless and dangerous. Children should understand that animals may unintentionally cause injuries. It may be in a horse’s defense mechanism to kick when it is scared. To avoid such injuries, never approach animals from behind. Also, when baby animals are present, a female may be protective of her brood and go on the defensive. Another inadvertent injury that may occur is from bacteria or viruses from the animals. Animal feces may contain bacteria, and there may be other microorganisms on

the animals themselves. It is a smart idea to always wash your hands after handling a farm animal to prevent the spread of disease. Here are some other precautions that can be taken when visiting a farm. • Don’t allow children to wander around unsupervised. • Rides on farm equipment should be discouraged. • Before starting machinery, operators should locate children and other guests and clear them from the work area. • Don’t allow children near machinery. • Children under the age of

16 should not be allowed to operate any farm vehicles. • Watch for hand tools or other equipment, and keep children away from them. • Do not touch animals unless a farm worker allows it. Then follow his or her instructions. • Don’t provoke farm animals or attempt to startle them. • Supervise children around ponds, feeding troughs or manure lagoons. It only takes a few inches of water to pose a drowning risk. Farms are interesting places to visit, especially for children. Safety should always be a priority when visiting a farm.

FORAGE KING

Bus: 519-698-9930 Res: 519-698-2213 ELMIRA, ON

(519) 669-2256 | (519) 577-9411

39500 Steffler Rd. Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z3 Phone: 519-664-2752 Fax: 519-664-3695 Email: sales@mkmartin.ca

“Quality Farm Equipment” Since 1969

CLEAN FIELD SERVICES INC. Clean fields, higher yields Seed-Fertilizer-Custom Spraying R.R. #2, Drayton, Ontario | N0G 1P0 Tel. 519-638-3457 | cleanfieldservices.ca | sales@cleanfield.biz

Think Safe

Discover the many reasons to choose The Co-operators as your farm insurer. From insurance plans made especially for farmers to Farm Succession Plans to keep your family on the farm, choose The Co-operators.

519-698-2082 | 1-800-265-8735 | www.jfm.ca

Stay Safe

Allen Morrison Allen Morrison Insurance Inc. 25 Industrial Drive Elmira, Ontario allen_morrison@cooperators.ca (519) 669-2632

www.cooperators.ca

The Co-operators is the leading Canadian-owned multi-product insurance company.

Home Auto Life Investments Group Business Farm Travel


10 | FARM SAFETY

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

Mar-Dale

Transport (1985) Ltd. Order Buying of Stockers Livestock Trucking 669-3392 Floradale, ON

ATV’s are useful and fun on the farm; safety precautions are a must You know your farm like the back of your hand; but the same can’t be said for many of your workers, especially if they are young, new, or returning after a time away. And that can put them at risk of injury. So how do you convey details like hazards on the farm to them in a comprehensive and consistent way? An orientation program can help. Start with the basics. Review harassment and

working alone policies, basic safety rules, and restrictions. Economical, versatile and fun, allterrain vehicles have long been indispensable tools on Canadian farms and ranches. But as the size, power and popularity of ATVs has increased, so too has the potential for serious injuries. Why not review the facts about ATVs and make sure you and your family are riding safe? 

1.800.265.6126 |

“It doesn’t take much to roll an ATV,” warns Canada Safety Council’s resident off-road expert Mike Prud’homme. “And there’s nothing fun about an ATV rollover. If you have 600 pounds plus gear falling on you, it’s going to be hard to push off.”   If you use an ATV for work or recreation, follow these safety precautions to reduce your risk:  1. Train up. A few hours in a Canada Safety Council

ATV course could save your life. 2. Suit up. Wear a helmet, eye protection, long pants, long sleeves, gloves and non-skid shoes for every ride.  3. Ride the right size. Always follow the manufacturer’s recommendations. Adult-sized ATVs are not appropriate for children under 16.  4. Ride by day. Even on familiar terrain, low light and reduced visibility will

ELECTRICAL WHOLESALE

ELECTRIC MOTORS | GENERATORS | AUTOMATION CONTROL

63 Union St., Elmira | 519-669-1842 PROVIDING EMERGENCY AND PREVENTATIVE HEALTH CARE FOR:

Your Pets ELDALE VETERINARY CLINIC

Your Horses & Farm Livestock ELDALE VETERINARY SERVICES

150 Church St. W | Elmira | Phone: 519-669-5672

LOOK UP

LOOK OUT AND LOCATE THE POWERLINES

Local & Long Distance lat eds • Stepdecks R.R.#1 West Montrose | www.grandridge.ca

519-669-3388 • 1-877-711-9677

Remember to keep equipment at least 3 metres away from powerlines.

265 Katherine St. S. 1km south of Winterbourne

www.cribit.com • 519-664-3701

BLOOMINGDALE FARMS LTD. Custom Farming ROB BAUMAN Cell 519-242-7902 STEW MARTIN Cell 519-502-8746

519-570-9160 | RR#1 BRESLAU

Drayton Elora

Listowel Clifford

519-638-3008 1-800-263-9818


FARM SAFETY | 11

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

Day-old chicks • Started pullets Broilers • Ready-to-lay Ducks • Turkeys increase the chances of a mishap. Park your ATV after dark and in poor weather. 5. Never take passengers. Most ATVs are not designed for doubling. Do not attach passenger seats to your ATV.   When using ATVs for farm chores, be extra cautious when hauling or towing.  1. Lighten up. Check your owner’s manual for load limits and resist the temptation to over load. Use proper tie-downs to secure your load and properly distribute the weight. Weight distribution is extremely important. Any load will affect the performance and stability of the vehicle, so adjust your driving accordingly. 2. Don’t alter your ATV. Adding after-market passenger seats or other implements will affect the weight distribution and stability of the machine, increasing the likelihood of tip-over and rollover accidents.

Go over standard operating procedures and other farm-specific practices and procedures such as livestock handling, farm vehicle usage, equipment servicing and safe zones where children or pedestrians may be present. Share specific hazards associated with your farm operation. Let workers know how they will learn about safety issues and how they can bring concerns to management. How often will safety meetings be held? Who will conduct inspections? How are incidents handled and reported? Clarify who should be notified for each specific situation. Go over PPE requirements and expectations and provide training on their proper use, care and maintenance. Do you require safe footwear, respiratory, hearing, or other forms of protection to be worn? And share your emergency contacts, locations of emergency equipment such as first aid kits, extinguishers, eye wash sta-

tions, muster points, rescue plans and emergency responsibilities with all new workers. Emergency response protocols should be a critical component of your orientation program. When it comes to orientation, young workers (16 to 18 year olds) need the most support. They tend to generalize their skills from one task to another, feel they are immortal and “can’t be hurt,” and believe they possess the size and strength to overcome any problem. Don’t take their word for it. Make sure to train, supervise and

coach them in a way that matches them with suitable job tasks. New workers need a different approach, with a focus on on-the-job training. Don’t assume that they will know how to do something on your farm, even if they have performed a similar task at another operation. Every farm is different, so review all relevant points with new workers while they are actually doing a specific job task. Then evaluate their capability to perform the work according to your expectations.

18 Arthur St. N. | 519-669-2561

• Quality Drainage Systems • Backhoe Service A family tradition since 1921

Arthur, ON • 519-848-3113 • 877-669-1440 www.martindrainage.com

-A complete line of quality feeds for Dairy, Beef, Swine, Poultry and Horses. -Animal health products -Custom nutritional programs -Grain Banking -Organic Feed

Hatchery Ltd. “Quality Chicks in Brown Egg Breeds”

80 Northside Drive St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0 www.freyshatchery.com Tel. 519-664-2291

Fax 519-664-3491

Mount Forest Tel: 519-323-1880 Tavistock Tel: 519-655-3777 Toll Free: 1-800-265-2203

 Custom Machining & Repairs  Spline Cutting  Large Turning  Keying (Internal & External) CNC Turning & Milling 1-800-265-8858 519-669-5143 www.wfs.ca

“Family Owned Since 1938”

7293 Line 86 Wallenstein Ph: 519-669-5176

MACHINE & REPAIR INC.

RYAN WEBER 519.669.2198 63 Union St., Elmira www.rytechmachine.ca

PLASTIC | STEEL FIBER | WOODEN

519-664-2958 855 Arthur Street South, Elmira, ON N3B 2Z2

Licensed Grain Elevator Crop Inputs and Services Pioneer Brand Products R.R.#1 Waterloo

519-744-4941


12 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

SPORTS LAWN BOWLING / AN ANNUAL TRADITION

Canada Day means tournament time for the Elmira Lawn Bowling Club

NOT SO GREAT OUTDOORSMAN / STEVE GALEA

Experience brings some nutty behaviour OPEN COUNTRY

Members of the Elmira Lawn Bowling Club participated in their annual Canada Day tournament on July 8. The winner of the event was Cathy Grominsky.

VERONICA REINER THE WINNER OF THE annual Canada Day tournament held July 8 at the Elmira Lawn Bowling tournament was 91-yearold Cathy Griminski. “The lady who won our tournament on the weekend is turning 92 this week,” said Denise Lowe, a member of the Elmira Lawn Bowling Club for the past six years. “And she won. And she’s been bowling for many, many years – she’s awesome, and she’s from the Elora club. She is so much fun to be around. Just a wonderful, very funny, vibrant lady.” “I don’t even know how long I’ve been lawn bowling; a long, long time,” said Grominsky. “That was a good day on the Canada Day tournament, it really was. Like we haven’t really been winning; that’s the first one we won first prize.” “That’s Blondie Griminsky,” said the president of the Elora Rocks Lawn Bowling Club, Dolly Guadagno-Simpson, in reference to Cathy’s nickname. “Elmira does have a Canada Day tournament; I

wasn’t there this year.” Lowe also pointed out that anyone from age 9 to 92 can enjoy the simple outdoor sport of lawn bowling. “People think oh, you have to be old to play it,” said Lowe. “But you don’t. There are junior teams, like young teams, which go to provincials. You don’t have to be old to enjoy lawn bowling!” The club has served the community for nearly a century. Today, 84 members get together on Tuesday and Thursday evenings to participate in the sport. The club hosts many themed lawn bowling events, such as a craft beer memorial tournament and children’s lawn bowling tournament. Prizes are presented to the winners of such events, with occasional events handing out participation prizes to everyone. Events can occasionally get competitive because of this, said Lowe. The type of prize is generally in line with the theme of the sponsor. “For the meat market, everyone will get a prize consisting of some

type of meat,” said Lowe. “For the craft beer tournament, it consisted of beer. The others are money prizes. The money depends on how many teams we get, and the money gets divided amongst the winners.” Club members often have a close-knit relationship with one another. “It’s a very social club,” explained Lowe. “For me especially, it’s just a nice, close-knit, fun place to

[VERONICA REINER / THE OBSERVER]

go. You can go and congregate and just have a nice time. You know we have jitney with other clubs in the district. And we take turns on Friday afternoons going to each other’s club. And then a group of us go out for lunch. ... Lawn bowling is a very social thing.” Their next tournament will be hosted on August 15. More details are available online at www.elmira lawnbowlingclub.org.

THIS MORNING I WAS talking to a hunting buddy of mine who raised a question that I guarantee has never been uttered at any highsociety cultural event. He asked right out of the blue, “Have you ever been in a fight with an eastern gray squirrel?” This, in a nutshell, is why I prefer the company of outdoorsy folks. Most people, I think we can agree, would not ask this type of question unless they’ve been to the punch bowl five or six times too many. But, for the angler and hunter, this is one of those telling questions that provide a great deal of insight about the outdoors experience of the person being asked. Also it’s one of the truly great conversation starters. Someone with little to no outdoors experience would quickly respond, “Of course I haven’t!” They’ll answer indignantly too, as if to suggest that getting into a physical altercation with a squirrel is not even within the realm of possibility, which is OK, because as I said, they are inexperiGALEA | 13


SPORTS | 13

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

GALEA: An outdoorsman would have to be nuts to pass on a good squirrel-brawling story FROM | 12

enced and don’t know any better. A person with a mid-level of outdoors experience would probably counter with, “No, but I was once in a yelling match with one and if my wife didn’t pull me away things could have got out of hand.” A relatively experienced person would counter with the question, “Does a hockey fight count?” (The answer is no, unless it was in the pre-helmet days.) Finally, someone at my high-level would reply, “Yes, but it’s not something I’m proud of.” And, quite

frankly, this would be a huge lie – if you’ve handled yourself well in a squirrel fight, you can’t help but be proud. When I mentioned I’ve been there too, my friend replied, “They are tough, little buggers aren’t they?” That’s the understatement of the year. The only reason squirrels don’t box professionally is that they have a nasty habit of climbing trunks. I won’t get into details over why an outdoorsman gets into a fight with a squirrel –although, I will say, in many cases, it’s solely to impress a woman.

The point is, if you are a highly experienced outdoors enthusiast, sooner or later you will find yourself bare knuckle brawling with squirrels. Also, if you know a highly experienced outdoors enthusiast who denies this, it’s probably because he didn’t fare too well. There’s no shame in that either. Squirrels are good fighters. Not to brag, but when I was younger, I was a regular at some of the toughest birdfeeders in town. I didn’t go looking for fights, but I was not the kind of guy who was about to back

GETTING THE RUST OF THOSE BATS

too. And he even admitted as much. Even so, I had to ask. “Well, how did it go? What’s the squirrel look like?” I won’t divulge the details but apparently, you can’t re-live those glory days.

down either. Now that I have matured a little, I realize how silly this was. I mean somebody could have really gotten hurt. Tom, the buddy who called me and asked the question this morning, is old enough to know better

And, between you and me, that’s probably the last squirrel fight my buddy who, like me, is on the downhill slide to 60 will ever get into. Was it worth it? Let’s just say his wife was impressed.

“PROUDLY REMEMBERING OUR PAS T; CONFIDENTLY EMBRACING OUR FUTURE.”

Community Information Page

P.O. Box 158

24 Church St. W. Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6

JULY REC CORNER Woolwich Memorial Centre Fitness Summer Special! $50 (July 9 – August 31) Beat the heat with a swim and a workout in our air-conditioned facility for less than $1 / day! Don’t delay, sign up today!

Have you registered for summer camp yet?

Check out our amazing programs for ages 5-10 & 9-14. Register today at www.woolwich.ca

Summer SWIMMING LESSONS – register now!www.woolwich.ca 519-575-4400

Phone: 519-669-1647 or 877-969-0094 Fax: 519-669-1820 After Hours Emergency:

Join us for weekly or daily swimming lessons, and be Water Smart this summer!

Woolwich Memorial Centre Upcoming Events July 13 Rock n’ Roller Skating – Retro Rewind 5:00-8:00 pm July 15-21 National Drowning Prevention Week 1:15-3:15 pm Join us during the week as we host special events highlighting Water Safety and ways to keep you and your family safe, during our daily public swims! July 20 Swim to Survive Fundraiser 1:15-3:15 pm FREE Swim Entrance is by donation, as we challenge you to complete the “Swim to Survive” standard! This Lifesaving program offers 3 free swimming lessons to all grade 3 and 7 students in the Township. August 15 Program & Sport Info Night 4:30-6:30 pm. Free Public Skate 4:30-5:30 pm.

Breslau Community Centre

Food Truck Feasts Wednesdays (July & August) 4:30-8 pm Get out and play your way – every day! Call 519-669-1647 x 7001 for more information

Present this ad at the Woolwich Memorial Centre to receive one free visit “PROUDLY REMEMBERING OUR PAS T; CONFIDENTLY EMBRACING OUR FUTURE.” to the Fitness Centre or a Fitness Class!

Community Information Page

Offer valid until September 2, 2018. Limit one per person with no valid membership within the last month. Must fill out a PAR-Q form. For more information contact the Fitness Centre at 519-669-1647 ext 7011 or fitness@woolwich.ca. For our fitness class schedule visit www.woolwich.ca

P.O. Box 158

24 Church St. W. Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6

NOTICE: Elmira Union Cemetery and St. Teresa Cemetery

The Township of Woolwich has submitted a New Cemetery By-law to the Registrar under the Funeral, Burial, and Cremation Services Act 2002. This By-law is subject to the approval of the Registrar under the Funeral, Burial, and Cremation Services Act 2002. Bereavement Authority of Ontario 647-483-2645 or 1-844-493-6356 For information, or to make copies please contact: Jodi Young at 519-514-7025 The New Cemetery By-law may be reviewed or copied at the Woolwich Memorial Centre (24 Snyder Ave. S., Elmira). Proving that it’s never too late in the day for a bit of softball, the Elmira Rusty Bats rec. teams were at Elmira’s Lions Park June 28 for a friendly game. [FAISAL ALI / THE OBSERVER]

Phone: 519-669-1647 or 877-969-0094 Fax: 519-669-1820 After Hours Emergency:

WE TREAT FEET! xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

519-575-4400 www.woolwich.ca

Don’t let sore feet rain down on your summer! Call SOS Physiotherapy TODAY!

Is the heat of summer in worn out shoes and flimsy sandals ruining your feet?

If you have FOOT PAIN come to the professionals that know how to TREAT your FEET.

5 1 9 •6 6 9 •1 2 1 2

w w w. s o s p hys io th erapy. c a

3 Wyat t

S t .

Jam es St

E a s t

S St ur th Ar

Hands on physiotherapy, exercises, taping, and possibly orthotics from our friends at Kimberly Rau & Associates.

W al ke

r St

Church St

Wy

ELMIR A att

St

E

E


14 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

20 UP TO

DISCOVER WHAT REALLY DRIVES YOU WITH OUR INNOVATIVE LINEUP.

2018 CRUZE

2018 TRAX

%

OF MSRP CASH PURCHASE CREDIT

ON SELECT NEW 2018 MODELS IN STOCK THE LONGEST*

2018 EQUINOX

2018 SILVERADO

CHEVROLETOFFERS.CA

OFFERS END JULY 31ST

THE 2018 SILVERADO 1500

20

%

UP TO

=

OF MSRP

$15,000

CASH PURCHASE CREDIT ʵ

ON SELECT NEW 2018 SILVERADO 1500 MODELS IN STOCK THE LONGEST BASED ON MSRP OF $75,000

HIGH COUNTRY MODEL SHOWN

THE 2018 EQUINOX UP TO

$5,700

CASH PURCHASE CREDIT Ω

OR

ON SELECT NEW 2018 EQUINOX MODELS IN STOCK THE LONGEST BASED ON 15% MSRP OF $38,000

LEASE SELECT 1LT FWD MODELS FOR $138 BI-WEEKLY, THAT’S LIKE:

$69

1%

@

WEEKLY

LEASE RATE

THE 2018 CRUZE

20

UP TO

%

=

OF MSRP

FOR 60 MONTHS WITH $1,000 DOWN PAYMENT WHEN YOU APPLY FOR THE GM CARD OR $1,500 DOWN PAYMENT

$5,200

PREMIER MODEL SHOWN

CASH PURCHASE ˠ CREDIT

ON SELECT CRUZE SEDAN MODELS IN STOCK THE LONGEST BASED ON 20% OF MSRP OF $25,995

PREMIER MODEL SHOWN

ALL ELIGIBLE 2018 MODELS COME WITH

CHEVROLET

COMPLETE CARE

2 YEARS/48,000 KM COMPLIMENTARY

OIL CHANGES.

Δ*

5 YEARS/160,000 KM POWERTRAIN WARRANTY. Δ

4G LTE WITH BUILT-IN WI-FI HOTSPOT +, INCLUDES 1 MONTH OR 3 GB OF DATA (WHICHEVER COMES FIRST) FROM VEHICLE DELIVERY DATE.

ʵ$75,000 MSRP applies to new 2018 Silverado 1500 Double Cab Custom Edition 4X4 models at participating dealers in Canada. Purchase price of $75,000 includes $1,795 Freight but excludes license, insurance, registration, dealer fees and taxes. Dealer may sell for less. Offer may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives. GM Canada may modify, extend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without notice. See dealer for details. Ω $38,000 MSRP applies to new 2018 Equinox LT with automatic transmission models at participating dealers in Canada. Purchase price of $38,000 includes $1,795 Freight but excludes license, insurance, registration, dealer fees and taxes. Dealer may sell for less. Offer may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives. GM Canada may modify, extend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without notice. See dealer for details. ˠ$25,995 MSRP applies to new 2018 Cruze Sedan LT with Automatic Transmission models at participating dealers in Canada. Purchase price of $25,995 includes $1,700 Freight but excludes license, insurance, registration, dealer fees and taxes. Dealer may sell for less. Offer may not be combined with certain other consumer incentives. GM Canada may modify, extend or terminate this offer, in whole or in part, at any time without notice. See dealer for details. ∆ Whichever comes first. Conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details. *Limit of four complimentary Lube-Oil-Filter services in total. Fluid top-offs, inspections, tire rotations, wheel alignments and balancing, etc., are not covered. Conditions and limitations apply. See dealer for details. + Visit onstar.ca for vehicle availability, details and system limitations. Services and connectivity vary by model and conditions as well as geographical and technical restrictions. Requires active connected vehicle services and data plan. Data plans provided by AT&T or its local service provider. Accessory Power must be active to use the Wi-Fi hotspot.


SPORTS | 15

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

FASTBALL / ROAD TO THE NATIONALS

Elmira Expos sit atop of the South Perth Men’s Fastball League Team is gearing up for a series of large tournaments, including some local play in Tavistock this weekend FAISAL ALI THE ELMIRA EXPOS ARE standing at the top of the South Perth Men’s Fastball League as they head into the annual Cephas Roth Tournament in Tavistock this weekend. Elmira is not only dominating at the local ball yards, however, as new this year, they will be heading to the Softball Canada championships in Nova Scotia later this summer. For the Expos, playing at the nationals will be a new addition to their tour, which also sees them compete at the International Softball Congress World Tournament in Kitchener in August. “We’ve been good this year. We’re 6-2 in our league. We just won the Ponsoby Tournament this past weekend, and we finished second in the ISC world qualifier,” said Travis Martin, one of the original members of the Elmira squad. The Expos was created as a men’s team, but has its roots going back to Martin and his friend’s peewee days. The ISC tournament, which is being held in Kitchener, will see the Expos rubbing shoulders with some immense competition coming from across Canada and the States. Locally, teams like the Kitchener Hallman Twins, the Six Nations United Chiefs, and the Toronto Batmen might prove to be Elmira’s toughest competition. Added to the mix are visitors such as the Los Angeles J&B Bombers, the Kansas City Monarchs and the Clifton Park New York Gremlins. “It’s pretty much from all

over Canada and the U.S. that teams comes from,” noted Martin. However, against these challenging, and in many cases much larger teams, the Expos were able to hold their own at the world qualifier last month, ranking 11 out of the almost 50 teams battling it out. Their performance at the Qualifiers was easily enough to earn them a spot out of the 36 teams moving on to the world championship in Kitchener. The Expos have been a regular at the ISC competitions, but for the first time in the team’s history, they will also be playing at the Men’s and Master Men’s Canadian Fast Pitch Championship, which is being held in St. Croix, N.S. “We’ve been accepted to go as one of the teams from Ontario,” said long-time Expos coach Don Freeman, who shares the responsibility with co-coach Kevin Wellwood. Freeman, it’s fair to say, has been involved with the Expos since before the Expos even existed, back when the team’s originals, like Travis Martin, were still playing in the kids’ leagues. Freeman began coaching the players back when they were playing peewee. His son was part of the team, and as they grew up, Freeman frequently continued to mentor the kids. Eventually, the kids grew up and started their men’s team, the Elmira Expos, to continue playing the sport they enjoyed. “When they got up to men’s group, the Expos pretty much asked me I’d come back to them, so I did. So anyways, I’ve been

“ We’ve been good this year. We’re 6-2 in our league. We just won the Ponsoby Tournament this past weekend, and we finished second in the ISC world qualifier”

with the Expos ever since. Which is the original group of boys that came out of peewee,” said Freeman, though adds that the Expos have seen a number of new additions since then. While the Canadian championships will be a new experience for the team, Freeman notes that’s not necessarily true of all the players. “Back in midget we won back-to-back Canadian championships,” he recalled. “And then in junior we were second once, and third once at the Canadians. And now that we’re men’s, we only went to the ISCs – we’ve never gone to the Canadian championship for men’s.” The Expos will be heading to Nova Scotia for the nationals, which run from August 29 to September 2. A little closer to home, the team will be playing at the Cephas Roth Tournament this weekend. However, the big event to go to, suggests Freeman, will be the ISC tournament in Kitchener, which will be at the Peter Hallman ball yard from August 11 to 18. “There’s a group of fairly local teams that are going to be around at that time and at that week. So if you have any love for softball, come down and watch – we could always use a few fans cheering for us,” said Freeman.

50% OFF REGULAR PRICE*

JEWELLERY SUMMER CLOTHING HATS & SCARVES

SALE STARTS JULY 12TH *WHILE QUANTITIES LAST

HOURS:

1 Union St., Elmira THE SHOPS AT ROXTON

519-669-3072

www.elmiragif toutlet.com

MON-WED 9:30-5:30 THURS-FRI 9:30-7:00 SAT 9:30-5:30

Visit Martin’s:


16 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

VENTURE FOOD FOR THOUGHT/ OWEN ROBERTS

PAY SCALES / WEIGHING IN

Living wage movement sees some growth in the area Ontario Living Wage Network gets boost from Kindred Credit Union as others take message to heart FAISAL ALI THE LIVING WAGE MOVEMENT has gained considerable momentum in Waterloo Region and in communities across the province. Spurred on by local community groups and businesses, from Brantford and Chatham to Halton, Windsor and Simcoe, more and more employers are seeing the benefits of providing a living wage. While very much a locally driven movement, these groups are partnering together to create a single, province-wide living wage program that will allow any business in Ontario to become a certified living wage employer. “We came together to really create some consistency with living wages across the province,” explains Anne Coleman, an employer program manager with the Ontario Living Wage Network (OLWN), a collection of the province’s living wage organizations, and a volunteer on the Waterloo chapter’s steering committee. “Both with the living wage calculation but also with an employer certification program.” As the program manager for the OLWN, Coleman helps businesses take the steps needed to become registered living wage em-

ployees. Unlike a minimum wage, which is legally mandated, a living wage is represents the minimum a fulltime employee would need to earn to cover his or her family’s basic expenses. In Waterloo Region, that wage was calculated at $16.10 an hour for 2018, above the recently increased minimum wage of $14. In Toronto, by contrast, the last available numbers from 2015 set that wage as $18.52. What actually constitutes a living wage will vary greatly from community to community, depending on factors like housing prices and rent, the availability of government subsidies and programs such as child benefits, which makes the program difficult to adopt universally. To that end, Coleman explains the OLWN is creating a set standard that will allow any community to calculate what their living wage is. Currently, there are 15 communities in Ontario that have their living wages listed with the OLWN, while three more are in the process of calculating their local living wage. “Our goal is to have all communities across the province release their living wage rates at the same time each year,” says Coleman. That will not

First was last this year for planting in Ontario FIELD NOTES

Bruce Taylor is the president of Enviro-Stewards, a certified living wage employer in Elmira. only allow employers and employees to get valuable information on what a living wage would be in their area, but also allow businesses to register as living wage employers under the same set of standards.

“The idea is that we wanted to make sure that an employer in Waterloo Region was being certified and recognized in the same way as an employer in, for example, Muskoka or Kingston,” says Coleman.

In Waterloo Region, the living wage movement has grown considerably since it first started in 2014. Back then, there were 10 groups certified as living wage em-

HARD TO BELIEVE, BUT in Ontario, “spring” planting only finished a few days before summer. Usually, it’s much earlier. Higher heat units and warm seedbeds mean Ontario’s extreme southwest is usually the first region in the province to be planted with corn and soybeans. If you know anything about the southwest, you’ll know that humidity there can be devastating, much worse than our region. But this year, the southwest was the last to plant. It finally wrapped up just two weeks ago. Very, very unusual. Here’s why. A cold April in the southwest – the coldest on record, in fact – was followed by intermittent and spotty rain through most of May and early June. Although the rain wasn’t overwhelming, it was steady enough to keep many producers out of their fields. There would be a break for a couple of days, but not for long enough to dry out fields and warm up the seedbed. And that put producers way behind. “Producers in this part of

LIVING WAGE | 17

ROBERTS | 17

[FAISAL ALI / THE OBSERVER]

Sore Feet? Shoes don’t fit?

Want to Maintain Good Feet?

11 Church St. E, Elmira, ON 519-669-3030 | info@footfoundation.ca | www.footfoundation.ca

We are at your service to act on the issues. ALL work done in house in a timely manner.

Custom Footwear • Custom Orthotics • Major Footwear Alterations Standard Orthopedic Footwear Sales • General Repairs


VENTURE | 17

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

ROBERTS: Farmers at the mercy of the weather FROM | 16

the province are not used to being the last to get their crops planted,” says Dale Cowan, senior agronomist at AGRIS and Wanstead co-ops. Later in June, the rain stopped long enough for many fields to be planted. Given the wet spring, producers expected rain to start again … but for the most part, it didn’t. Anticipated patterns didn’t repeat. That meant some of the soybean crop, which is planted after corn, was sewn into dry soil and sat dormant. Although there was no moisture to carry disease, there was no seed growth, either. The same thing would happen in your own garden – plant a seed and don’t water it, and see what happens. Very little, at best. The same thing goes for farmers’ fields. Most farmers in the southwest don’t irrigate their fields. Based on historical patterns, they expect enough rain to fall to meet their needs. But as we know, something is hap-

pening with the climate. Farmers can’t count on traditional weather patterns with much confidence. Finally, a broad rain fell June 19-20. That started germination. And with the hot weather that followed, so did plant development. However, on the July holiday weekend and through the early part of last week, with the heat soaring to 40-plus degrees on the humidex in many parts of Ontario, some fields actually started to get too dry. Corn enjoys the heat, but wheat in particular is experiencing some heat stress. “In three days, we went from ‘It’s too wet, I’ll never get on my land’ to ‘Will we ever get a rain?,’” says Cowan. Should conditions not worsen – including no drought – Cowan says the southwest crops will have no problem catching up, given the area’s high heat units. “If we get a good mid-July and August, we’ll be OK.” All this is a reminder

of why farming can be a tough occupation. Besides all the humanmade challenges farmers face – including, recently, the likes of Donald Trump and trade tariffs – there’s the ongoing battle with nature they encounter every growing season. We implore farmers to farm sustainably, by our standards, and produce high quality food. When they try to beat insects or plant disease with some form of crop protection, we implore them to be more natural. When they do, and their cost of production spikes because their yields drop, we complain that the cost of food is too high. True, farmers need to tune in to consumers’ concerns. But likewise, consumers need to be aware of what farmers are up against. It’s not as easy as planting a seed, sitting back and watching it grow, as farmers in what is usually our province’s earliest and most productive growing region have shown.

LIVING WAGE: Mindful of employees’ welfare

Notice of Study Completion Wastewater Treatment Master Plan (WWTMP) Update Background The Region of Waterloo (Region) is responsible for treating wastewater at its 13 wastewater treatment plants and 7 wastewater pumping stations. The Region’s WWTMP recommends the long-term wastewater treatment strategy for these facilities. The WWTMP was last updated in 2007 and planned to the year 2041. In light of recent trends in wastewater flows and population growth, regulatory requirements, and climate change, the Region has updated this Master Plan. This update assessed the current status of wastewater treatment facilities and updated the preferred wastewater treatment strategy to the year 2051, in an environmentally sustainable and economically viable manner, consistent with the Region's Strategic Plan. The Process The Region has completed the WWTMP according to the requirements for a Master Plan project under the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA). The study completes Phases 1 and 2 of the Class EA process using community feedback in the decision-making to find a preferred approach. This notice places the Master Plan on the public record. The Result The WWTMP developed recommendations for individual facilities to accommodate future growth and level of treatment needs. General recommendations were also identified that would benefit all Regional wastewater facilities. A summary of the components of the preferred plan includes: Growth: To accommodate future population growth, expansions are recommended in the short-term for the Waterloo, Elmira and St Jacobs Wastewater Treatment Plants (WWTPs) and the Spring Valley, Morningside, and Baden Wastewater Pumping Stations. In the medium term, expansions are recommended for the Hespeler and Wellesley WWTPs. Level of Treatment: New regulations are anticipated for WWTPs to meet targets for reducing phosphorus. Upgrades are recommended for the phosphorus removal treatment at the Waterloo, Hespeler and Preston WWTPs to meet the new requirements. Regional Wastewater Recommendations: WWTMP recommendations that will benefit all Regional facilities include continued focus on watershed management, decreasing inflow and infiltration, energy management, industrial pre-treatment, asset management and renewal, water re-use, and resource recovery. Details of the preferred wastewater approach resulting from the WWTMP are provided in the Master Plan report. Master Plan Report Available for Review

Carita Horst, Sophia Kinch, Brooke Nafizger and Mary Martin at the Elmira branch of Kindred Credit Union, which guarantees a living wage to everyone it employs. [FAISAL ALI / THE OBSERVER] FROM | 16

ployers, says Coleman, but the number has since increased to 55 and counting. For Brent Zorgdrager, CEO of Kindred Credit Union, a certified living wage employer in Elmira, the fiduciary case for paying a living wage to their employees is abundantly clear. “For ourselves, with our own employees, why wouldn’t we want to have employees who are paid a living wage, who can think about serving our customers ... without having to at the same moment figure out, ‘Where am I going to get the money for dinner? How am I going to afford a dental appointment for one of the kids? An optometrist appointment?’ “It’s great to put service staff in front of our customers who don’t have to worry about the necessaries in life. And I don’t think that just applies to banking, I think that applies to many

industries,” says Zorgdrager. Kindred was one of the early supporters of the local living wage movement, and this year contributed $10,000 to help fund Coleman’s role as an employer program manager, which in turn will help the movement spread across the province. “It’s a great news story in growth in Waterloo Region and if we can have it also take root in other communities throughout Ontario, we can magnify the impact this has on, not just the employees, but their families, the well-being of their children and their just overall health and wellness,” said Zordrager. Bruce Taylor, president of the Elmira-based Enviro-Stewards, another certified living wage employer, agrees. Beyond the moral case, he notes that paying a living wage upfront allows communities to avoid

much greater expenses in the longer term. “It’s not right if both parents work full-time and still need to take advantage of a food bank because they can’t cover their [expenses]. So paying a living wage is a way of internalizing costs that some others externalize,” he says. Conversely, people earning below a living wage are more likely to require social assistance and welfare, which essentially transfers and magnifies the expense from the employer to the taxpayer. Anyone interested in learning how they can become certified as a living wage employer, or what steps they would need to take to get there, can visit www.livingwagewr.org, says Coleman, as well as reach out to her. She adds that besides businesses, governments too can value greatly by adopting the living wage program.

Copies of the Wastewater Treatment Master Plan report are available for your information at the following locations from July 16 to September 14, 2018, Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.: Regional Clerk’s Office 150 Frederick Street, 2nd Floor Kitchener

City of Kitchener Clerk’s Office 200 King Street West Kitchener

City of Cambridge Clerk’s Office 50 Dickson Street, 2nd Floor Cambridge

City of Waterloo Clerk’s Office 100 Regina Street South Waterloo

The documents are also available for download on the Region’s website at: https://www.regionofwaterloo.ca/en/living-here/current-projects.aspx#wwtmp Please send information requests or comments to: Nicole Sapeta, B.A.Sc., P.Eng. Project Engineer, Water Services Region of Waterloo 150 Frederick Street, 7th Floor Kitchener, Ontario, N2G 4J3 Phone: 519-575-4757 ext. 3682 Fax: 519-575-4452

Erin Longworth, M.Eng., P.Eng., PMP Manager, Wastewater Planning CIMA+ 5935 Airport Road, Suite 500 Mississauga, Ontario, L4V 1W5 Phone: 905-695-1005 ext. 6722 Fax: 905-695-0525

E-mail: nsapeta@regionofwaterloo.ca

Email: erin.longworth@cima.ca

Please provide all written comments to the Region of Waterloo by Friday, September 14, 2018. Information will be collected in accordance with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act. With the exception of personal information, all comments will become part of the public record. This notice was first issued on July 10, 2018.


18 | THE ARTS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

THE ARTS ON STAGE / LIVE MUSIC

Friday the 13th a Lucky day in Maryhill Fresh from Mariposa, Zachary Lucky and his band perform tomorrow night at the Commercial Tavern STEVE KANNON HAVING SPENT LAST WEEKEND playing for festival audiences – he was up in Orillia for the Mariposa Folk Festival – Zachary Lucky is changing gears this weekend, starting with a much more intimate show Friday night in Maryhill. “I really love playing places like the Commercial Tavern,” he said down the line from Toronto as his band prepared for Mariposa. “You can get up there and play for two or three hours, stretch yourself. It really gives you a chance to play songs from all over the catalogue.” With six recordings under his belt and another set to be released, the country/folk singsongwriter has plenty to draw on. Lucky can be called a troubadour for more than his relentless touring, his songwriting being very much centered on telling the tales of the people he meets and places he goes. He writes “story songs” and sometimes resists labels such as “country” or “folk” – it’s about looking at the human condition and telling some tales set to music. “The music I do, first and foremost, I want to tell a story,” he said,

pointing to the broader categorization of roots music. “The last record we did (Everywhere A Man Can Be) was very geographical. We were doing shows across the U.S. and that’s reflected,” he said, adding that it also touches on his move to Ontario from Saskatchewan. His newest songs stem from his recent foray into fatherhood. “The inspiration is always changing.” He points to the likes of Townes Van Zandt, Guy Clark and Merle Haggard as influences on his style. He’s also been compared to Gordon Lightfoot and Kris Kristofferson. His own journey into music came through a more rockoriented experience with the live music scene in Saskatoon – heavy rock and punk – though the songs he started writing in high school were folky. His grandfather was Canadian country music legend Smilin’ Johnny Lucky, though his parents weren’t musical per se. “I grew up with normal suburban music,” he laughed, pointing out to his parents listening to the likes of the Eagles, Styx and AC/ DC. In fact, he learned to play guitar at church rath-

er than at home. Getting involved with rock bands early on, he just assumed that being a musician meant touring exhaustively, sometimes three or four months at a time. That experience really shaped his songwriting. “I really found my sound out on the road,” he said, a process that still continues. That sound is “drastically different” today from where he started, but still remains about telling stories. While Lucky played in rock bands during his teens, as he entered his twenties he began releasing a series of EPs displaying writing and performing skills far beyond his years. That groundwork culminated with his 2010 full-length debut, Come And Gone, and its 2012 follow-up, Saskatchewan, which firmly established him on the national scene. As his music has evolved, he could only hope that fans would come along for the ride, picking up new ones along the way. “Your hope is that people will really take time to listen to what you’re doing.” When you’re telling stories from experience, especially from making so many stops, there are always going to be more to write about. That’s the troubadour spirit. “You never run out of road,” he proclaimed. The road takes him to the Commercial Tavern Friday evening

(July 13). Tickets are available at the venue, 1303 Maryhill Rd., or by calling 519-648-3644. For more information, visit www.commercialtavern.ca.

S

E

L

M

I

R

A

S

E

R

I

E

S

T

UNDAY CONCER GORE PARK, ELMIRA, 7-9 PM FREE - BRING A LAWN CHAIR

Saskatchewan transplant Zachary Lucky brings his troubadour-style mix of country and folk to the Commercial Tavern tomorrow night (Friday). [SUBMITTED]

JULY 15 THE NEW CUMBERLAND BAND Sponsored by


CLASSIFIED | 19

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

CLASSIFIED HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

CLASSIFIED DEADLINE:

WEDNESDAYS BY 10AM

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

BRIDGELAND TERMINALS LIMITED

G ol d e n W e ar e l oc at e c on

V a l l e y F ar a q ual ity p d in A r th tin uin g gr f ol l ow in

m s I n c . e s tab l is h e d in 198. r oc e s s or of m e at p r od uc ts , ur , O n tar io an d d ue to our ow th w e ar e s e e k in g t h e g t o j oin our te ma .

F ul l T im e G e n e r a l L ba our e r s D ay & A f te r n oon S h if ts vai l ab l e Interested applicants must be able to work in a cold environment, possess a strong work ethic, have great attention to detail and be willing to work either day shift or afternoon shift.

I n te r e s te d pa p l ic an ts ar e in vi te d to s ub m it th e ir r e s um e an d c ove r l e tte r to h r @ vfg .c a or b y f ax t o 519483470 Golden Valley Farms Inc. is committed to providing accessible employment practices that are in compliance with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (‘AODA’). Applicants are asked to make their needs/requirements for the purpose of accommodation under AODA, known to Human Resources when they are contacted for an interview.

Licensed 309A Electrician Required Require Experience Installing rigid conduit. Must be able to read drawings and turn into finished jobs. Require WHIMIS, Fall Arrest Training, and Skyjack / Lift training certification. Experience running small jobs desirable. Travel to Job-Sites required. Benefit plan and company sponsored RRSP after 3 months. Please direct resumés to: Tim Ropp Operations Manager Ziegler Electric Ltd. 101 Bonnie Cres. Elmira, ON N3B 2Z5 FAX: 519-669-1343

� Casual AZ Truck Driv er ��

Ph: 519.664.2642 • Fx: 519.664.3598

www.conestogocarpenters.ca sales@conestogocarpenters.ca

Send resumes to:

Enjoy the satisfaction of learning the hands-on trade of Carpentry! Experience the excitement of crafting a complete home, from framing to finish!

fi www.rig arus.com

Based in St Jacobs for over 35 years, our approach is to train our employees in all areas of residential & agricultural construction, including framing,timber work, siding & finish. This allows our carpenters to take a sense of ownership and satisfaction in each project we do, as well as giving them the opportunity to learn the wide array of construction skillsets needed to complete the project. The following position is available:

Full-time Carpenter / Framer

Full Time

FRAMING & TRIM CARPENTERS required for a growing construction company based in Hawkesville. Country Lane Builders is committed to being a leader in the construction industry, always looking for continual improvement, safety, quality products & service. Experience preferred but not required. If interested please send your resume to

sales@clbuilders.ca Country Lane Builders will provide accommodation during the hiring process. We would like to thank all applicants, however, only those under consideration will be contacted.

HOW TO REACH US

Experience an asset, but not required. Offering competitive wages & profit sharing If you are interested in joining our experienced team, submit your resume to sales@conestogocarpenters.ca, or fax; 519.664.3598. We want to thank all applicants, but will only contact those selected for an interview.

Protrans is actively seeking career minded professional AZ drivers for local tank truck carrier Bridgeland Terminals Limited. Local and long distance trips. Preference will be given to applicants with strong work ethic, who are team players and have good communication skills. The company has a great wage, benefit, bonuses and profit sharing programs. For further details; Call Jim Taglietti at 519-622-6901 or toll free at 888-213-3375 or email Taglietti.jim@protrans.ca.

G ol d e n W e ar e l oc at e c on

V la l e y F ar a q ual ity p d in A r th tin uin g gr f ol l ow in

m s I n c . e s tab l is h e d in 198. r oc e s s or of m e at p r od uc ts , ur , O n tar io an d d ue to our ow th w e ar e s e e k in g t h e g t o j oin our te ma .

I n d us tr ial

E l e c tr ic ian

T o qua lify you must hold an industrial electrician trade certification. Y ou will be requi red to diagnose, trouble- shoot, maintain and repair any electrical or related equi pment. Y ou should be able to perform mechanical repairs. B asic working knowledge of pneumatics, hy- draulics, P L C ’ s and A C / D C drives is requi red.

I n te r e s te d pa p l ic an ts ar e in vi te d to s ub m it th e ir r e s um e an d c ove r l e tte r to h r @ vfg .c a or b y f ax t o 519483470

Riepert Salt and Supplies is looking for courteous and reliable local delivery drivers who are not afraid of a little hard work. Riepert Salt and Supplies has been delivering water softener salt, safety salt and pool salt to homes and businesses throughout Kitchener- Waterloo and the surrounding area for the last 30 years. We offer: Steady year round work Clean well maintained equipment Weekly pay cheque Overtime We require: 25 years old plus Valid G or DZ license Clean Drivers abstract Physically Fit Join our team today Send Your Resume to: Operations@RiepertSalt.com Phone 519-747-2708 Fax 519-747-5810 Riepert Salt & Supplies Inc. 66 Schaefer St. Waterloo ON N2L 4C5

FIND IT IN THE OBSERVER

Layer Farm south of Elora looking for full time year round individual to gather eggs and general barn work. Day time hours, Monday - Friday with occasional weekends. Willing to train, starting wage $15-18 depending on qualifications.

Send resume to: corey.anneke@stickneyfarm.ca or call: 519-830-1230

LISTINGS

HELP WANTED JANITOR REQUIRED PART-TIME. Experience in janitorial or custodial work required. Ability to work independently and perform manual work. Send resume by July 21/18 to: elmirabranch469@gmail.com

Golden Valley Farms Inc. is committed to providing accessible employment practices that are in compliance with the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act (‘AODA’). Applicants are asked to make their needs/requirements for the purpose of accommodation under AODA, known to Human Resources when they are contacted for an interview.

FULL-TIME CUSTOMER SERVICE REPRESENTATIVE Shiels Electric - Kitchener, ON Work Hours: 8:00AM - 4:30PM. Pump and motor knowledge an asset, will train right individual. Responsibilities include: Manage incoming calls and customer service inquiries. Dealing with customers at the counter: process orders and cash sales. Work in a team environment and complete other tasks as requested. Qualifications to include: Completion of High School. Customer service and cash experience an asset, good communication and telephone skills. Some heavy lifting involved. If interested, please email resume to: info@shielselectric.com

HELP WANTED NURSERY WORKERS NEEDED seasonal fulltime. Pay rate $14.00/hour. Working hours 7 a.m. - 5 p.m., 6 days per week. Work includes field potting, weeding in field and containers, truck loading, digging etc. Must be willing to work in all weather conditions and weekends. No education , no experience required. Own transportation required. Police clearance needed. Please send resume to: West Montrose Farms Ltd., 1614 Halm Road, West Montrose, ON. N0B 2V0.

HELP WANTED PETRO CANADA ELMIRA Looking for part time and full time help. Apply in person to 110 Earl Martin Dr.

FOR SALE FUJI PERFORMANCE HYBRID bike comes with spedometer, Serface headlight and tail light. 519-846-2312. LAWN FERTILIZER AND LAWN SEED - Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-574-4141 or 519-669-2045. CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

PHONE 519.669.5790 | TOLL FREE 1.888.966.5942 | FAX 519.669.5753 | ONLINE WWW.OBSERVERXTRA.COM

ADDRESS 20-B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA, ON N3B 1Z9 PLACING A CLASSIFIED WORD AD

CLASSIFIED ADS

DISPLAY ADS

519.669.5790 EXT 0

519.669.5790 EXT 104

ads@woolwichobserver.com

sales@woolwichobserver.com

RESIDENTIAL COST $7.50 /20 WORDS EXTRA WORDS 20¢ PER WORD

COMMERCIAL COST $12.00 /20 WORDS EXTRA WORDS 30¢ PER WORD

In person, email, phone or fax submissions are accepted during regular business hours. Deadline for Thursday publication is Wednesday by 10 a.m. All Classified ads are prepaid by cash, debit, Visa or MasterCard. Ask about Observer policies in regard to Display, Service Directory and Family Album advertising.


THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 19

AUCTION

REAL ESTATE

FOR SALE MATTRESS AND BOX Spring, new, never used, still in sealed bag. Sacrifice $195. Delivery available $35. 519-635-8737.

Commercial Space For Sale

OVEN READY ROASTERS. Order for pick up Aug. 10. Ornan Martin 519-669-3377.

AUCTIONS AUCTION SALE OF 37 acre farm, tractors, machinery, and miscellaneous items, to be held at 8437 Sideroad 13, of Wellington North Twp. (approx. 4 miles northeast of Arthur off Highway 109), for Cheryl and the Late Leonard Brubacher, on Friday, July 13th @ 10:00 a.m. Gerber Auctions Ltd. 519-699-4451 or 519-698-0138.

2.5 acres | 4 Bays with overhead doors | 6400 sqft shop area. 1600 sqft office area. Currently being used as a tire shop. | 600 volt 3 phase power. Ample parking, large fenced-in outdoor storage area M-1 and M-2 Zoning. | Phase 1 and Phase 2 Environmental have already been done.

DOUBLE RING CONSIGNMENT and estate auction of farm machinery, farm support items, lawn and garden equipment, furniture, antiques, household effects. Sale to be held at #7213 Line 86 Wallenstein approx. 6 km W of Elmira. Saturday July 14 at 10:00 a.m. Gerald Bowman Auctions. 519-638-5708. WED. JULY 18 at 9:45 AM- Clearing auction sale of furniture; antiques; tools; household effects; collectables; and miscellaneous items to be held at the St. Jacobs Community Centre in St. Jacobs for an area estate with additions. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519 656 3555 www.jantziauctions.com

Call Rob @ 519-465-0479 or rob@oktireelmira.com for inquiries. FARM SERVICES 5 MIL B&W Bunker Plastic, Silostop Oxygen Barrier and Gravel Bags. Free delivery within 30 Km of Millbank if ordered before Aug 15 2018.Call Murray Bauman 519-501-2258.

CONTINUED ON PG. 23

AUCTION

Kurtz Auctions Inc.

CLEARING / ESTATE AUCTION DATE: Saturday July 21, 2018 @ 10:00am

LOCATION: 5461, Hwy 86, 1km north of Guelph Auto Mall PREVIEW: Friday July 20, 1:00-4:00pm and Sale Day 9:00 am Consisting of Furniture, Appliances,Tools, Vehicles, Scissor Lift & Misc.

AUCTION Municipal, Police, Repo, Fleets & Others Monthly PUBLIC Vehicle

AUCTION SALE

AUCTION

St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s

WEDNESDAY JULY 18 AT 9:45 AM

PARTIAL LIST: solid wood cherry Gibbard

dining room suite (4 door china cabinet, table with 2 leaves and 6 chairs) Pride lift chair newer; coffee and end tables; pine dresser with mirror; sofa table; wooden file and drafting cabinet; dresser and mirror; couch; oak extension table with 5 leaves; oak side board with mirror – nice; rocker; oak music stand – unique; maple chest; waterfall cedar chest; washstand; marble top bakers; rack; old table with drawer; table and 4 chairs; record player; quantity of records; 2 drawer maple side table; swivel top TV table; anniversary clock; fan; glass door display cabinet; chrome table and 4 chairs; Euro pro portable sewing machine; souvenir spoon collection in display case; oak table; magazine stand; side table; Danby chest freezer – newer; captain’s chair; exercise bike; rattan table and 4 chairs; book shelves; maple toy box; small cedar chest; maple bookcase; assorted chairs; table and floor lamps; artwork; Royal Daulton’s; sliding shower transfer bench; Toby jugs; French provincial dresser; vintage items; crocks; jugs; oil lamps; wash board; quantity of older glass and china; depression; crystal; bedding; linens; towels; cookware; kitchenware: Torro power max snow blower – newer; Poulan electric chain saw; Greenwork hedge trimmer; seat on wheels; butcher items; sump pump; lantern; cordless drills; weed eater; tool boxes; torches; shop vac; generator cord water can; bird feeder pole; bag cart; post pounder; Featherlite step ladder; variety of hand; power; and lawn and garden tools.

AUCTIONEER:

Jantzi Auctions Ltd. Wellesley | 519-656-3555

to be held at

BRESLAU AIRPORT ROAD AUCTION COMPLEX 5100 FOUNTAIN ST, North, BRESLAU (Kitchener)

Sat July 14th 9:30 am 2 -2014 EXPLORER’S 5 - 13/14 TAURUS AWDs 5 - 10/13 Dodge CHARGERS 2 - 12/13 Chev IMPALAs 2012 Ford ESCAPE XLT 4x4 2012 Ford E250 Ext C/V 2011 Chev 3500 Diesel Van 2011 Crown Victoria Interceptor 2010 Ford EDGE SEL AWD 2-09/10 Grand CARAVANS 3 - 2009 Dodge Sprinter Diesel Vans 2007 GMC 3500 Cube Van 2007 GMC Sierra 2500HD P /U 2- 08/10 Pontiac G5/G6’s 2009 Dodge AVENGER SE 4dr 2008 Chrysler PT Cruiser E-Z-GO (E)/Yamaha (G) Golf Carts 3 - 5T TA Equipment Trailers

Check Website for Daily Updates No Buyer’s Premium or Penalty !!! VIEWING: Friday July 13th, 2018, 1 pm to 5 pm TERMS: $500 Deposit Major Items, or as announced

M.R. Jutzi & Co DIVISION OF 658347 ONTARIO INC.,

PROFESSIONALS IN THE ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AND APPRAISALS OF COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, CONSTRUCTION, MUNICIPAL EQUIPMENT & VEHICLES 5100 FOUNTAIN ST. NORTH, BRESLAU, ONTARIO, N0B 1M0

www.mrjutzi.ca

FIND IT

www.JantziAuctions.com

IN THE OBSERVER

HELP WANTED

We’re Hiring AZ Drivers!

Furniture / Appliances

Kenmore 15 CU/FT SS 2 door Frost free fridge, like new//Maytag glass top 30" electric stove(white)// Gibbard walnut 9 pc an�que dining suite c/w 6 chairs, Very Nice//French Provincial Bed set(white)// An�que Needle Point Occasional Chair&o�oman//Oak Nursing Rocker//Bow front MAH curio cabinet circa 1930//wrought Iron glass top sunroom set, 4 chairs and table//Round Oak table// 2 pc wicker chest of drawers c/w side cabinet//Variety of single box spring & matress sets, clean//Tea wagon//Nes�ng tables//Variety of Bed in Bag, matress bed sets(new)//Lots of misc lamps, Occasional pieces& pictures//Stained glass etc.// An�que Singer Sewing Machine// Grandfather Clock

Tools & Misc

Husqvarna 16" Model 240 Chainsaw, like new//Jackall Jacks// Ba�ery Chargers//Hydraulic Cylinders//Tool boxes//fire Ex�nguishers//wrenches//4" Bench VISE//Sockets// Swivel Casters//Good variety small tools with lots not men�oned Cra�sman 20HP Lawn Tractor C/W 42" Deck, Engine needs work, selling As Is

Vehicles & Scissor Li�

SkyJack Scissor Li� (electric) - Model # 6832, year 2000; Li� Capacity 1000 LB, Extends to 32' Works and looks like new; needs ba�eries, Selling As Is. 1987 Olds Cutlas, 142,000 Km, All original, one owner, Estate car, Selling As Is 1994 Camaro Z28, 5.7Ltr, 138,800 KM, Selling Cer�fied & e-tested

NOTE

THIS WILL BE A FULL SALE WITH LOTS NOT MENTIONED AS NEW ITEMS ARRIVING UP TO SALE TIME. CHECK WEBSITE FOR UPDATES. FULL CONTENTS OF A WATERDOWN HOME, PLUS LOTS MORE

Terms

Cash and/or Debit. We also accept cheque with proper ID.

10% buyer's premium. Any announcements day of sale take precedence over ads Auc�oneer, Auc�on company or proprietors not responsible for accidents, injury, damage or loss of property on sale day

Kurtz Auctions Inc. / Auctioneer: Brian S Kurtz (519)836-0342 Email: brian@kurtzauctionsinc.com

Web Site: www.kurtzauctionsinc.ca

519-648-2111

We’re Hiring AZ Drivers to Join Our Team! ENJOY GETTING INVOLVED WITH OUR CUSTOMERS. GREAT BENEFITS & NEW INCREASED PAY, $25/hr. RECOGNITION BONUS! LOCAL WORK SAFE AND WELL MAINTAINED EQUIPMENT

FUN ENVIRONMENT BRINGING PRIDE TO YOUR WORK EVERY DAY! Ideal: 1 year experience operating trucks / trailers / roll-offs.

Join a great team! Permanent, full time job Don’t miss this chance! Apply today! Email to: truckdriver@sanimax.com 270 Arthur Street North, Elmira

Sanimax strongly supports equality in employment.

THE OBSERVER SPECIALIZES IN GETTING THE WORD OUT!

sum

20 | CLASSIFIED

PLACE AN AD IN OUR CLASSIFIED SECTION TODAY! Call: 519-669-5790 or Visit: www.observerxtra.com


CLASSIFIED | 21

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY GENERAL SERVICES

AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES

Auto Tech Inc.

Diesel & Auto Repairs Inc. Various sizes & rates

519-669-8459

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE Call

519-669-4964

Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

20A Arthur St. N Elmira ON

519-669-4400

“Mechanics You Can Trust”

30 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

(Formerly The Kids Diesel Shop)

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

Accredited Test & Repair Facility

WHERE TIRES ARE A

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial On-The-Farm Service 35 Howard Ave., Elmira

519-669-3232

SPACE FOR RENT

THOMPSON’S

TIRE

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS

GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1553 King St. N., St. Jacobs, ON N0B 2N0

• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

“25 years in Business”

BIKE SALES & REPAIRS

CONSTRUCTION INC.

PROFESSIONAL BIKE MECHANIC ON STAFF SEE US FOR

Window & Screen

(519) 569-0772 • Commercial & Industrial General Contracting • Specializing in Concrete Work & Excavation • Retaining Walls

REPAIRS 22 Church St. W., Elmira

TEL:

519-669-5537

519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

• • • •

Stamped Coloured Concrete Demolition Bin Service Machine Bases

Concrete Breaking & Removal

STORE HOURS: M-W 8-6, TH-F 8-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

info@trappconstruction.ca www.trappconstruction.ca

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

AMOS

WINDOW FASHIONS

INC

R O O F I N G

- Design and build -

AGRICULTURAL | RESIDENTIAL

A Family owned and operated business serving KW, Elmira and surrounding area for over 35 years.

FRAMING • ROOFING RENOVATIONS • EAVESTROUGHS

Wayne Martin | 519-504-2016

Free in-home Consultations. Call someone you can trust.

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED

Brands You Can Trust

CALL JAYME FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE.

519.501.2405 | 519.698.2114

darwayconstruction@icloud.com | Alma, ON

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537 or 1-844-866-5537 STORE HOURS: M-F: 8-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

In Business since 1973 • Fully Insured

homewindowfashions.ca

• Residential • Commercial • Industrial Randy Weber

ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

www.rwelectricltd.com 18 Kingfisher Dr., Elmira | 519.669.1462

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

Steve Co.

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

Visit our website

www.biobobs.com or call today! 519-648-3004

or

The Right Window Treatment Can

Save you

For all your Plumbing Needs. 24 HOUR SERVICE

800-232-6396

by Elite or Mera

In home consultations Wide selection of styles & fabrics

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

Steve Jacobi

Blinds

1011 Industrial Crescent St. Clements | 519-699-5411 www.LetUsFloorYou.ca

ELMIRA

519-669-3652

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

Interior/exterior Painting, Wallpapering & Plaster | drywall Repairs

519-503-6033 (CELL) 519-669-2251

36 Hampton St., Elmira

APPLIANCES – FURNACES – FIREPLACES AIR CONDITIONERS – WATER HEATERS SPRING SPECIAL ON AIR CONDITIONING TUNE UP $99, INSTALLED FROM $1999 FURNACES INSTALLED FROM $2499 FRIDGES $499, STOVES $399, WASHERS $399, DRYERS $369, FREEZERS $199 Come visit our show room FREE QUOTES 1 Union Street, Elmira

ehc@hotmail.ca (519)-669-4600

Hours: M-F 8:30 - 5:30 Sat 9:00 - 3:00

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Patios Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Steps Decorative/Stamped and Coloured Concrete www.marwilconcrete.ca

Evenings By Appointment

519-577-0370

OUTDOOR SERVICES Since 1998 LOCALLY OWNED & OPERATED

Residential & Commercial Sales, Service & Installation FURNACES | AIR CONDITIONERS | WATER HEATERS FIREPLACES | AIR FILTRATION | HUMIDIFIERS HRVʼS | BBQ LINES | GAS PIPING

CONESTOGO

CALL 519-206-0336

BOOK APPOINTMENTS ONLINE

www.koebelhcm.com

•Final grading •Lawn repair & complete seeding well equipped for large stoney areas •Spike Aerator/Overseeding •Natural & Interlocking Stone •Retaining Walls, Walks & Patios •Help for Top Water & Drainage issue

Murray & Daniel Shantz

ALMA, ONTARIO | PHONE: 519.846.5427

SPACE FOR RENT

John Schaefer Painting FREE ESTIMATES

RA HOME COMF ELMI (519) 669-4600 ORT

FREE

INSTALLATION When you buy 3 or more

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL


22 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

REAL ESTATE

SENDING LOVE AND SUPPORT TO OUR DAIRY FARMERS July 14th, 10am-12pm OPEN HOUSE Sat. 20 Oriole Pkwy W Elmira

NEW LISTING

Sue From

Alli Bauman

226-750-9332

519-577-6248

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT suefrom17@gmail.com

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

$769,900

allibauman17@gmail.com

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

THANK-YOU FOR CHOOSING RE/MAX!

$374,900

Completely renovated 3 bedroom 3 bath side-split on desirable Oriole Parkway treed lot. Open concept featuring a stunning, modern custom kitchen with 9’x6’ island and spacious adjoining dining room with gas fireplace. Bright family room with large windows and wood stove, master with ensuite, deck, office, rec room and extra rooms for storage. Many updates including kitchen and bathrooms by Elmira Kitchen & Bath, flooring through-out, electrical, plumbing, most trim and doors, most windows, professionally painted, insulation topped up, new garage door and much more! Brussels - Charm & Elegance in this updated and lovingly maintained 4 bedroom Century home. Covered front porch (24x10) with original stained glass details, 10' ceilings with crown moulding, amazing woodwork, beautiful banister, build in cabinet and much more. Custom kitchen with 2 pantries, new stainless sink & faucet and quartz countertops. Formal dining room, breakfast nook, two separate living spaces and a walk up attic with potential. Updated bathrooms and main floor laundry. Come take a look and be impressed!

3 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5426

Elmira - Spacious Century Home - Perfect for your growing family! Large principal rooms, eat in kitchen and 4 bedrooms including a master with private balcony. High baseboards and 9ft ceilings throughout, with modern updates such as flooring and a brand new 4pc bathroom. Partially fenced private yard with fire pit and shed. Walk up from the basement to the insulated heated garage. Close to down town and the new Riverside P.S. - Call today to make this your home!

NEW PRICE

$425,000 Step into the expansive living space and be wowed by this one of a kind residential property on a huge lot! Enjoy all the benefits that small-town living has to offer right here in Glen Allan. This fully renovated church was built in 1887 and the character has been maintained in the 12’ ceilings and deep window wells with a bright and airy feeling throughout. Fully updated in the last 10 years including a single detached garage. You will not want to miss this rare opportunity!

$560,000

Mapleton - Enjoy peaceful country living and open views in this spacious bungalow with a finished basement on nearly one acre. The property comes with a Large Heated Shop (28x50), 2 Garden Sheds, immaculate yard and gardens. With ample parking and all appliances included, you don’t want to miss this one!

D L O S $629,000

SELLING? CALL US FOR A FREE MARKET EVALUATION.

A portion of each sale commission is donated to The Woolwich Community Services.

Bonnie

Brubacher

BROKER

PERFECT IN-LAW SET-UP $749,900 WELLESLEY Finished

top to bottom offering 3 bdrms, 3 baths including main floor master & lovely ensuite. 8' & 10' ceilings throughout, hardwood floors, gas fireplace, maple kitchen has granite counter tops, breakfast bar & appliances, garden door to the private deck & treed lot. Walk-up basement complete with wetbar, games & rec.rm. MLS

$699,000 ELMIRA Welcome to this mature wooded lot in a desirable area of Elmira. 2267 sq ft 2 -storey offers 3 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, hardwood, ceramics, fully finished basement, with fireplace, and games area. Walkout to tiered deck and mature lot 65' x 133'. Double car garage. MLS

HELPING YOU IS WHAT WE DO…

Shanna Rozema

BROKER

FREEHOLD BUNGALOW TOWN HOMES

BUILT BY PARADIGM (ELMIRA) HOMES PERFECT FOR EMPTY NESTERS. FALL CLOSINGS AVAILABLE. PRICED AT $459,900 These executive style bungalow towns offer all

main floor conveniences. Open concept layout, gorgeous custom kitchens complete with island/breakfast bar, hardwood floors in the great room, gas fireplace and walkouts, master offers a walk-in closet and full ensuite bath with walk-in shower, main floor laundry/mudroom, central air conditioning, privacy fencing + more included! Call today for further details and to reserve your unit today! Located in the South Parkwood subdivision on Burloak Drive. EXCLUSIVE

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage | Independently Owned and Operated

Milverton – Bring your family home to Milverton! This brand new two storey 1848 sq ft house will come with 9’ ceilings, 3 bedrooms and 3 bathrooms, including a master ensuite. Constructed with high quality workmanship, located on a quiet street and backing onto woodlands, this is the perfect place to raise your active family. Milverton offers many amenities including a beautiful rec centre with an arena, outdoor pool, sports fields and playground plus a weekly Farmers Market from June-October. This vibrant community is just waiting for you to come and be a part of it.

$449,000

ADDRESS: 3 Arthur St. S., ELMIRA DIRECT: 519-503-2753 EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net

$524,900 ELMIRA This completely finished 1689

S.FT Two storey backs onto greenspace in a wonderful family neighbourhood. Double car garage & driveway. Just move in and enjoy, 3 bdrms, 4 bathrooms including ensuite, ceramic foyer, open concept main floor layout with attractive kitchen offers island and appliances, walkout to spacious deck. Situated in the Riverside School district! MLS

3 SINGLE DETACHED LOTS LEFT!

ARE YOU THINKING OF BUYING OR SELLING IN 2018? CALL US TODAY AND WE CAN HELP YOU ACHIEVE THIS!

ELMIRA OFFICE: 519-669-3192 | www.YourFamilyTeam.ca | 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 4

Independently Owned and Operated wendy@wendytaylor1.com 24hrs 519-747-0231 24hrs

Wendy Taylor BROKER

www.peakrealestate.com

Thinking of Buying or Selling call or email today!

OPEN HOUSE

72 First St. W., Elmira

Saturday, July 14, 2018 2-4pm

Private Sale House For Sale - 8 Weigel Ave., Elmira $450,000 - 1035 sq. ft. brick bungalow, attached garage. New high efficiency furnace/central air. 2 bedroom, 3 pc. bath, living room and large kitchen and living area on main floor. Large finished rec. room and 3 pc. bath and sauna in basement. 519-669-5378

NEW PRICE

FIND A HOME. SELL A HOME. THE OBSERVER IS THEPLACE TO BE.

$459,900 ELMIRA – This centrally located 3 bedroom, 2 bath

bungalow on 60x130 pool sized lot shows AAA. Situated in a mature neighbourhood, this nicely maintained, all brick home is within walking distance of all Elmira schools, Gibson Park and the Woolwich Rec. Centre. Many updates! MLS 30650863 Call or email Wendy Taylor to view.

“You dream...We’ll work.” Free, no obligation, opinions of value


CLASSIFIED | 23

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

REAL ESTATE

FAMILY ALBUM

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. OďŹƒce:

519-669-2772 45 Arthur St. S., Elmira www.thurrealestate.com

BRAD MARTIN

JULIE

LUKE

SHANTZ Broker of Record, HECKENDORN Broker Broker MVA Residential Res: 519.669.1068 Cell: 519.588.7562 Cell: 519.584.4400

LET OUR 65+ YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WORK FOR YOU! 57 FALCON DRIVE, ELMIRA Updated from top to bottom! Open concept L.R., dining area & kitchen (lge. island) with hdwd. floors & feature wall. Recent updates include shingles, most windows, flooring, exterior doors, trim & some interior doors and flooring. Oversized window in rec. room w/gas fireplace. TWO updated bathrooms. 4th bdrm. Heated garage. Deck off kitchen. A MUST SEE! MLS

$534,900

78 GERBER MEADOW DR. WELLESLEY You won’t be disappointed with this custom built home that is tastefully decorated! Hdwd. & ceramics on main level. Main floor den/office w/walkout. Covered rear porch & concrete patio. Some infloor heating (2 heat zones – great for utility costs!) Lovely kitchen w/walkin pantry & spacious dining area. Huge master bdrm. & 5 pc. ensuite. Partially fin. bsmt). MLS Reduced.

$629,900

11 PURPLE MARTIN COURT, ELMIRA Location! Lovely wooded lot on a quiet crescent. Spacious 4 level sidesplit offers lots of space for the growing family! Spacious master bdrm w/ensuite bath. Main flr. laundry, family room addition w/gas heatstove as well as a large liv. room. Fin. rec. room w/fireplace, bdrm/office w/lge window and 2 pc. washroom. Lots of storage! Walkup bsmt. Enjoy the morning sun on the large front porch. Dble. garage, long driveway. MLS

$699,900

37 BRISTOW CREEK DR. ELMIRA You’ll love the open concept in this 4 level backsplit with lovely Chervin kitchen w/large island. Spacious dining area. Open concept to lower level family room w/gas fireplace and walkup to back yard with concrete patio & pergola and backing to greenspace. Two bathrooms, 4th bedroom & office/playroom. Shingles (2012) furnace (2018). MLS

$499,845

6569 YATTON SIDEROAD 18 YATTON – A rare find! Country setting with a 48’x30.5’ hobby barn.2,557 sq.ft.sidesplit with large rooms. Woodstove in liv.rm. Large dining room w/walkout. Main floor family room w/sliders to deck overlooking acres of wooded area (behind the property).Main flr.office& laundry. Deep double garage + mudroom. 12’ height in unfin. bsmt. FOUR bdrms. MLS

$839,900

62 POFFENROTH PATH, ELMIRA

$429,900.

FAMILY ALBUM DEADLINE WEDNESDAY BY 10 AM

BROKERAGE

CELEBRATION OF LIFE

ANNIVERSARY

“Time for me to go now, I won’t say goodbye; Look for me in rainbows, way up in the sky. In the morning sunrise when all the world is new, Just look for me and love me, as you know I loved you.�

Happy 60th Anniversary Dan and Muriel Albrecht July 12, 1958

Friends and family are invited to join in a celebration of life for Tiffany Elizabeth Kerr. The Secret Garden Tea House 61 Metcalfe St. Elora, ON July 22, 2018 from 3:00 to 6:00pm A day to honour a life that was taken too soon, but lived to the fullest. Please join us as we reminisce and share stories about her wild and adventurous spirit, infectious laugh, and her true heart. At 4:00pm we will raise our glasses in a “Toast to Tiff�. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Leukemia/BMT Unit at Vancouver General Hospital through the VGH/ UBC Foundation at www.leukemiabmtprogram.com or a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

Congratulations Mom and Dad on 60 years of love and commitment!

IN MEMORIAM

OBITUARY

All our love, your family.

C. Joshua Weber

Bowman, Naomi Martin Passed away at her home on Monday, July 9, 2018 at the age of one year and eight months. Naomi is the daughter of Enos and Hannah (Martin) Bowman of Crosshill; sister of Elsie and Betzy; granddaughter of Allen S. Bowman of Crosshill and Anson and Rebecca (Bowman) Martin of Linwood. She was predeceased by her paternal grandmother Lovisa Bowman (2009) and sister Barbara (2013). The family received their relatives and friends at the family home. Interment and funeral service were held at Crosshill Mennonite Meeting House on Thursday July 12, 2018. Arrangements entrusted to Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira.

Aug 22, 1997 - July 15, 2008 Its been 10 years, and we’re doing Okay. Cause we have faith that we’ll see you again some day. Forever in our Hearts, Colin, Rhonda, Mikayla, Jordan and Julissa.

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com FARM SERVICES

BUYING BROKEN GOLD rings, chains, gold teeth, diamond rings, estate jewellery, Rolex, Omega Bretling wrist watches etc. Old pocket watches, rock & roll, jazz records, toys, sterling silver items, coins, paper money. gallamore@golden. net Terry at 519-242-6900, Elmira.

KILN DRIED CORN & CORN SCREENING Delivered by Einwechter. Minimum 15 ton lots. Call George Haffner Trucking 519-574-4141 or 519-669-2045.

CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

FARM SERVICES

OAT & PEAS FOR FORAGE COVER CROPS - Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-5744141 or 519-669-2045.

BAGGED PINE SHAVINGS Agricultural Spray Lime, 22.5kg. bag; feed grade lime, 25kg. Delivered. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-574-4141 or 519-669-2045.

This spotless semi w/oversized garage shows AAA. Light maple kitchen w/stainless appliances. Hardwood floor in L.R. 2 pc.powder room. Three tastefully decorated bedrooms (3 pc. ensuite bath). L-shaped rec. room/playroom is great for a young family. Walkout from D.A. to brick patio, manicured, fenced lot. Dble. Driveway. A Must see MLS

WANTED

WANTED TO BUY - Harley BSA or Triumph, soft tail. 519-699-4461.

TRADES & SERVICES

IN MEMORIAM

RON’S DRYWALL AND Renovations. Over 35 years experience. Please call 519-496-7539 or email ron. spncr@gmail.com

In Memory of Shirley Braid who passed away 10 years ago, July 17, 2008.

LOST & FOUND ATTENTION LOBSINGER LINE Thieves! You have stolen a very old, distinctive 5 gallon gas can with gas. With all your people talking, spreading rumors, how will your friends live with this. Return complete can and there won’t be any charges.

Always remembered and loved by your family.

CALL FOR YOUR

FREE MARKET EVALUATION

HOFFMAN, RUTH - Peacefully at Derbecker’s Heritage House in St. Jacobs on Sunday, July 1, 2018 in her 83rd year.

)



,

5



WORD ADS WORK Small ads, big results. Generate big business, in small ways. Call Donna at 519.669.5790 Ext 104.



(



$





2

,

1

1

(



*



8





5

,

2

6

(



+



(



5

+ $

$

3

8

7



(

(



7

/

0 6

;



/

(





WILKINSON, GARY RALPH - Passed away peacefully on Thursday, July 5, 2018 at Grand River Hospital, KW Health Centre, Kitchener. Gary resided in Wellesley and was 74 years old.

(

7



5

$

1

7

5

&

+

$

3

,

6

8

(

6

9

(



2 5



5 $ 1

1

7

(



$ 6





7



(

'

8



,

$

1

6

5

8

6

7

,

/

$

(

&



+



(



,

/

'

(

,

2

(

1 * 2



5

6

+

(





8

7

7

5 *

$

 

/

7

(

0 2



(



0 $

1

(

<

6

$

/





6

1

8

7

1



7

(

7

2

(

6

1

7



$

2

8



(

0 (



<

(

'



1

:

7

3





7

,



0 0 (



/





8 *

* 2

1

$



$

7



7



 



$



3

 



5



5



$

 



(

6

2

(



(

6

/ 

$

5 

$



' +

1 2 $



5 6

6

(

8

6



5

0 (

1

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

SUDOKU CHALLENGE

FALK, ELIZABETH ANN â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bettyâ&#x20AC;? (nee Leis) - Peacefully surrounded by her family at St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hospital, Kitchener on Friday, July 6, 2018. Betty of Wellesley in her 88th year.



CROSSWORD PUZZLER

DEATH NOTICES

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS


24 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

LIVING HERE CHEF’S TABLE/ DIERRE ACHESON

GIVING / STARTING EARLY

A gift of self from those who have to those who don’t Elmira girl makes a second Locks of Love hair donation to help another young person in need

A healthier way to quench your thirst

VERONICA REINER HAIR TODAY, GONE TOMORROW is nothing new to 10-year-old Ava Leigh Hansen, who this week made her second donation to Locks of Love, a nonprofit charity that provides hairpieces to financially disadvantaged children. The Elmira girl again gave up 10 inches of her hair, which was cut at Guys and Dolls Salon and Spa on July 10. It’s a cause that’s dear to her heart, prompting another contribution. “I donated it twice,” said Ava Leigh of the endeavor. “When I did it before, it was also at 10 inches. Two of my aunts have had cancer before ... so, I just thought it would be cool to do it for other kids who have had that happen to them before.” The generosity runs in the family. “Her cousin did it recently again,” said her father, Lawrence Hansen. “That may have been a little more motivation to go ahead and make the cut again.” The exercise was quick and painless, taking less than a minute to complete. Locks of Love gives these wigs to anyone under 21 in Canada and the United States suffering from a medical condition that causes hair loss. The majority of the children helped by Locks of Love lose their

RECIPE NOTES

Ten-year-old Ava Leigh Hansen of Elmira this week made her second dontation of hair to the Locks of Love charity, giving up her tresses Tuesday at Guys and Dolls Salon and Spa. [VERONICA REINER]

hair due to alopecia areata, a medical condition that has no known cause or cure. Ava Leigh lives in Elmira with her father, mother and younger brother. She attends John Mahood Public School. She and her family just came back to Elmira from overseas. “We actually have been

living overseas for two years,” said Lawrence Hansen. “My wife and I are both teachers and just wanted to have an experience with the family and try something different. Elmira’s a great town, but it’s also a small town. So we wanted to try something new, and to give our kids an experience too, to see more

of the world.” To donate to Locks of Love, donors must be willing to part with a minimum of 10 inches measured tip to tip as that is the length needed for a hairpiece. The hair must be in a ponytail or braid before it is cut and must be clean and completely dry before it is mailed in.

We offer complimentary roadside assistance to each of our customers! This is made available to every customer who purchases $25 or more in vehicle maintenance per year. Feel free to ask us if you have any questions! We are here to make maintaining your vehicle stress free. -Al

Locks of Love was started in 1997 by Madonna Coffman who developed alopecia in her 20s and lost all her hair. Her daughter developed it too at four years old and Coffman decided to take on Locks of Love fulltime. More details of the charity are available online at www.locksoflove.org.

LOOKING FOR SOME HELP to cool down this summer? As we struggle to keep the heat and humidity at bay, takeout is always an easy fix. There is no need to reach for a sugary drink to cool down, however. Sadly those drinks can contain a quarter to a third of our recommended daily caloric intake. Kombucha is a great alternative and better for you. This sweet fermented tea features cultured yeast and natural bacteria. Kombucha and its tiny bubbles can provide many health benefits including an improvement in your gut health. Our little shop is now CHEF’S TABLE | 27

Two locations in Elmira to serve you better

20 Oriole Parkway E. | 47 Industrial Drive

Tel: (519) 669-1082

www.leroysautocare.net

Accredited Test & Repair Facility


LIVING HERE | 25

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

Vacuum Sales,

“A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Kleensweep Carpet Care

Repairs Service Se

Rugs and Upholstery

All Makes & Models

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates

Everything Vacuum

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

West Montrose, ON

T. 519.669.2033

COLLEEN

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR

E-MAIL: ads@woolwichobserver.com

519-669-8362

JULY 15

AUGUST 5

AUGUST 26

ELMIRA SUNDAY CONCERT SERIES. Free at Gore Park, Elmira 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy The New Cumberland Band.

ELMIRA SUNDAY CONCERT SERIES. Free at Gore Park, Elmira 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy. Fred Lewis & Riding High performing.

FINAL PERFORMANCE OF THE Elmira Sunday Concert Series. Free at Gore Park, Elmira 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Bring a lawn chair. Rick Loucks & Southbound performing.

JULY 22

AUGUST 12

SEPTEMBER 7

ELMIRA SUNDAY CONCERT SERIES. Free at Gore Park, Elmira 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy Nelson Family Bluegrass

ELMIRA SUNDAY CONCERT SERIES. Free at Gore Park, Elmira 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Bring a lawn chair and enjoy Gerald Davidson perform.

HOLD THE LINE FESTIVAL at Fertile Grounds Farm, 1560 Carmel-Koch Road, St. Agatha. Join us for cycling, music, local food, craft beverages, & camping. For more information visit www.holdthelinewr.org

JULY 29

AUGUST 19

ELMIRA SUNDAY CONCERT SERIES. Free at Gore Park, Elmira 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Bring a lawn chair. Lance Russwurm performing.

ELMIRA SUNDAY CONCERT SERIES. Free at Gore Park, Elmira 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Bring a lawn chair. U Turn performing.

VISIT OUR WEBSITE TO EASILY SUBMIT YOUR EVENT

M&G MILLWRIGHTS LTD. • Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS

519.669.5105 1540 FLORDALE ROAD

www.elmiravacuumelectrical.ca Tuesday - Friday, 9am-5:30pm

Saturday, 9am-3pm

Quality & Service you can trust.

21 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.2884 | martinselmira.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT The Events Calendar is reserved for non-profit local community events that are offered free to the public. Placement is not guaranteed. Registrations, corporate events, open houses and the like do not qualify in this section.

Education and Treatment

Your First Step to Better Hearing

observerxtra.com/event-list/

519-669-9919 charlene@bauerhearing.com 25 Industrial Drive, Elmira

P.O. BOX 247, ELMIRA

SUBMIT AN EVENT The Events Calendar is reserved for non-profit local community events that are offered free to the

www.mgmill.com

9 Church St. E., Elmira

public. Placement is not guaranteed. Registrations, corporate events, open houses and the like do not qualify in this section. 24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

TOTAL

NANCY KOEBEL

HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

Bus: 519.744.5433

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. 652 Waterbury Lane, Waterloo

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby?

St. Jacobs & Aberfoyle

It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess.

One of North America’s BEST model railways

MODEL RAILWAY

Elmira & Surrounding Area

VERMONT Castings

1440 King St. N, Bldg. 3, St. Jacobs

519-664-3737 | www.stjacobsmodelrailway.com

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763

519.664.2008

Hours: SAT 10AM to 5PM, SUN 12 Noon to 5PM Follow our yellow signs on King St.

psgingrich@hotmail.ca

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

PLACES OF FAITH | A DIRECTORY OF LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP

9:30 am: Worship

St. James Lutheran Church

SANYO CANADIAN

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

60 Arthur St. S., Elmira 519-669-5591

NURSERY PROVIDED

SUNDAY SCHOOL

HEARING ASSISTED

Sunday, July 15th

Pastor: Hans J.W. Borch Proclaiming Christ through Love and Service

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

10:45 am

Transformed Speaker: Randy Hoffman

Discovering God Together

4522 Herrgott Rd., Wallenstein www.wbconline.ca • 519-669-2319

Service at 10:30am Rev. Paul Snow REACH WITH LOVE. TEACH THE TRUTH. SEND IN POWER. 290 Arthur St. South, Elmira • 519-669-3973 www.ElmiraAssembly.com (Across from Tim Horton’s)

Elmira Mennonite Church

Earnest Prayer

Zion Mennonite Fellowship

Acts 12

10:00am

Tia Ruza, Ministry Inquiry Program Intern

Sunday Worship Services 47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 zionmenno.com

58 Church St. W., Elmira • 519-669-5123

Emmanuel

REACH OUT.

EVANGELICAL MISSIONARY CHURCH

KEEP FAITH ALIVE, ADVERTISE HERE.

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com

Birdland Plaza, 112 Oriole Parkway, Elmira 519-669-1459 LifeNorth.Church

Worship Service

Sundays 10:30am

ecelmira.com

519.669.5030

REACH OUT Spread the word, advertise your service here every week.


26 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

STRANGE BUT TRUE / BILL & RICH SONES PH.D.

More than just the beach, sand is yet another item weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re depleting rapidly WEIRD NOTES

Q. The Black Death,

or plague, devastated Europe, North Africa and Asia for about a decade in the mid-1300s, claiming 30-60% of Europeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population and 33% from the Middle East (figures for North Africa were difficult to estimate). The Scandinavian countries, being somewhat apart from Western Europe, were relatively safe until hit by historically bad luck. What happened?

A. To keep the plague at

bay, Norway had come up with a rather simple plan to quarantine merchant ships at the dock until they could

be inspected, says Dan Lewis on his â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now I Knowâ&#x20AC;? website. If there were any signs of disease, the ships were turned away; otherwise, the crew and supplies were granted entry. As Lewis tells it, this is the story of â&#x20AC;&#x153;How the Dead Brought Death to Norwayâ&#x20AC;?: In 1349, an English ship carrying a shipment of wool ran aground near the harbor city of Bergen; all the crew members were dead, having succumbed to the plague one by one during the journey. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ghost shipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; could have ended up basically anywhere (or even stayed at sea basically forever), but unfortunately for Norway it crashed into its coast.â&#x20AC;? The shipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rats escaped the ship and went on to infest the country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;From there, the Black Death

spread into Sweden and Russia, too, leading to countless more deaths.â&#x20AC;? Q. Do you have any sand in your kitchen? And what do you know about the â&#x20AC;&#x153;sand mafiaâ&#x20AC;? of India?

A. If you have common salt and sugar in the pantry, then technically you have sand, since sand is defined â&#x20AC;&#x153;as any material made up of grains within a specific size range,â&#x20AC;? says physicist Sylvia Morrow in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Discoverâ&#x20AC;? magazine. It is typically composed of silica, quartz crystals that have broken down to about a millimeter in diameter. For beach sand, add fragments of coral, shells and other natural materials. In the utilitarian sphere, huge amounts of sand are mined to make concrete, and in fact an illegal world-

about hair have also grown. Can you â&#x20AC;&#x153;bustâ&#x20AC;? the following: #1. Hair can be grown to any length. #2. Cutting hair will make it grow faster. #3. Hair grows back thicker after itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s shaved off.

wide sand market has recently â&#x20AC;&#x153;exploded,â&#x20AC;? valued in 2013 at about $16 million a month. Indiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sand mafia is notorious for using violence, bribery and coercion to maintain its lucrative business of illegally collecting and selling the material. And that is a matter of great concern globally: Like fossil fuels, sand is a finite natural resource that takes centuries to form, and humans are using it at prodigious rates, so much so that â&#x20AC;&#x153;in 2014, the U.N. Environmental Program declared that sand mining was causing â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;unequivocalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; environmental problems.â&#x20AC;? Q. Hair comes in all kinds of varieties: long, short or in between, thick or thin, straight or curly, full or balding. Over time, myths

A. #1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The maximum length of a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hair is genetically predetermined,â&#x20AC;? says Ashley Breeding in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Preventionâ&#x20AC;? magazine. According to David Kinsley of the World Trichology Society, the anagen, or growing phase, controls whether people can grow hair down to their feet or not beyond their shoulders. The average phase lasts 3-6 years, with hair growing about a half inch per month. So, a person with a 3-year cycle will grow 18 inches of hair, while one with a 6-year cycle can grow

hair to 3 feet. #2. This segues directly into mythbuster two: Basically, cutting hair wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t alter its normal, biologically determined growth rate or overall texture, adds Kiki Cavie, a Paul Mitchell art team member. But shorter hair often looks and feels thicker. #3. And finally, from the Mayo Clinic: â&#x20AC;&#x153;using a razor can leave body hair with blunt tips that might feel coarse when it grows back, leading to the illusion that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more of it.â&#x20AC;? It may also seem more noticeable or darker, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS Bill is a journalist, Rich holds a doctorate in physics. Together the brothers bring you â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strange But True.â&#x20AC;? Send your questions to strangetrue@compuserve.com.

OBSERVER CROSSWORD PUZZLER ACROSS 1. Falls as fast as a hammer on the Moon 6. Be bombastic 11. Calendar abbr. 13. Grassland 14. Mixed ancestry 17. Deterioriates after improvement 19. Reliable 21. Dash lengths 22. Inhalation and exhalation 24. Musical Muse 26. P.I., e.g. 27. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop! 28. Emmet 29. Some people canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take them 32. Going to the dungeon? Take this. 34. Ant 35. Not under, over or on.

36. Andean land 37. ___ tide 39. Not under, over or in 40. __ you __, or __ you ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t my baby? 41. Its motto is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Industryâ&#x20AC;? 43. Language of Lahore 45. Not under, over or in, backwards. 46. World of Vulcanism 47. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ me!â&#x20AC;? 49. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buona ___â&#x20AC;? (Itali an greeting) 51. Halftime, myself 52. Occupy a point in space 57. â&#x20AC;&#x153;... or ___!â&#x20AC;? 59. Experienced and wellrespected. 64. Currently at war with Canada 65. She dances on the sand 66. A man, by the power of Grayskull! 67. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m all right, Jack, keep

your hands off of my stack

23. The __ Crowd





25. Enclose









68. Evil sands

30. Reservoirs

70. Glut

31. Randy stallions

71. Death of them is high drama, apparently

33. There can be only __ Highlander!

DOWN

38. Hearing, band, help

1. Stop the burninâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;!

42. Log it as not digital

2. Kind of lineup

44. Fish eggs



3. Oolong, for one

48. Stunning fish

4. Half a pennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth



50. Noble 86

5. Village president

53. ___-friendly

6. Logical operator

54. Break

7. Bluster 8. To the same degree

55. This will bring focus and clarity

9. Deed

56. ___ nitrate

10. Otalgia

58. â&#x20AC;&#x153;No problem!â&#x20AC;?

11. Reporterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on it

60. Deception

12. Blessed Welsh

61. Density symbol

15. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no ___!â&#x20AC;?

62. Not from

16. Case, tough, and bolt. 18. Australian runner

63. From one to a shining one

20. Whistle blower

69. Happens before noon













 









 





























 

 

 









 









 



 





























SUDOKU CHALLENGE

ATTENTION:

WORLD TRAVELLERS Bring your Observer, snap a pic with it when on vacation, send to the Observer and get published in a future edition.

SUBMIT PHOTOS ONLINE: www.ObserverXtra.com/travel/submit-observer-abroad



HOW TO PLAY: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. We have got you started with a few numbers already placed in the boxes.

  



 

                    


LIVING HERE | 27

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

A FINE DAY FOR BUGGING OUT IN HEIDELBERG

CHEF’S TABLE:

Refreshments

FROM | 24

making smoothies and iced drinks, just a healthy version. Delicious and good for you should be the criteria for any food choice. Happy blending.

Kombucha Slushy

2 cups frozen mixed berries 1-1/2 cups kombucha 1 lime, juiced 1 Tbsp. local raw honey Place all ingredients in a blender. Start blending on low speed and gradually increase your speed until fully puréed. Pour into glass and enjoy!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Never Enough Thyme Catering Inc. was created with one thought in mind ... to create more thyme! Enjoy our food shop, specialty cakes and catering. 83A Arthur St. S., Elmira. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

The Kitchener-Waterloo & Area Bug Club hosted their 37th annual event “Bug Out” on July 8 at the KW-Optimist Club in Heidelberg. Awards were given for a variety of categories, such as Best in Show and Spectator’s Choice. The event drew in attendees from all across Ontario, from Sarnia to North Bay. [VERONICA REINER / THE OBSERVER]

ELMIRA BLOOD DONOR CLINIC

Give Blood … to save lives.

The Next Elmira Clinic: at Lion’s Hall, Elmira

Friday, July 20th, 2018 from 2:30 - 8:30 pm

THE ELMIRA BLOOD DONOR CLINIC ANNOUNCEMENTS ARE BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITY-MINDED BUSINESSES:

• Fabrics • Men's Wear • Ladies Coats • China • Glass Ware Mon. Closed · Tues.-Fri. 8-6 · Sat. 8-5 2192 Floradale Rd. ~ Floradale, On.

1.800.265.6126 |

(519) 669-1381

TOWN COUNTRY

Various sizes & rates

FENCING

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE 100 South Field Dr. • 519-669-4964

OPEN 7am to Midnight | 7 DAYS A WEEK DELIVERY SERVICE AVAILABLE Call for Details

315 Arthur St. S., Elmira • 519-669-5403

SANYO CANADIAN MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

The Quality You Demand, the Service You Deserve. Farm - Auto - Truck - Industrial and we have On-the-farm service

35 Howard Ave. • 519-669-3232

33 Industrial Dr. • 519-669-1591

CLM

22 Church St. W Elmira

519-669-5353

GENERAL DELIVERY, ARISS ONTARIO N0B 1B0

MODULAR BUILDINGS MOVING & LEASING

Breakfast • Coffee • Soups • Sandwiches • Donuts • Muffins • Bread • Pies • Cookies

PROFESSIONAL WORK • AFFORDABLE PRICES

2170 FLORADALE RD., FLORADALE • 519-669-2183

Hours: Mon to Sat 6am to 5:30pm | Closed Sundays & Holidays

GUELPH: (519) 822-8929 CAMBRIDGE: (519) 654-7068 FAX: (519) 822-7481

CALL 1 888 2 DONATE for more information or to book an appointment. Visit www.blood.ca


28 | BACK PAGE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, JULY 12, 2018

WELLESLEY: Newcomer enters the mayoralty

race, taking on incumbent in fall election FROM | 3

ions, but also making sure also that everyone is wellinformed,” said Schenk. “The choice is available, versus it’s just ‘oh hey, let’s just cash this and not let anybody know what’s going on.’ I think it’s really great that there’s that transparency.” Another key point of Wheaton’s campaign is the growth of the local businesses in the Wellesley Township. “We need to manage the growth to ensure we don’t become a ‘bedroom community,’” explained Wheaton. “Where people go off to work in the city every day, and they do their shopping in whatever city they work in, and they come home to their little sanctuary, and they’re not engaged in the community, they’re not involved; it’s just a place for them to sleep at night in a quiet peaceful community. And then they leave again the next day. I want to avoid that long term. And if we don’t have a good plan for growth, that could be where we’re headed.” A final key point of her

SUMMER SALES!

4 DA ON

4 DAYS ON LY!

THURSDAY 9-9 FRIDAY 9-9 SATURDAY 9-6 SUNDAY10-5

SW L

CK

CK

TO IN S

TO IN S

2MM PAD ATTACHED

12.3MM THICK LAMINATE

Bernia Wheaton is challenging Wellesley Mayor Joe Nowak. campaign is acting as a strong voice for the rural community, having a particular soft spot towards small town life. “With the exception of the five years I spent at university, I’ve spent my entire life in rural southern Ontario,” said Wheaton. “I was born and raised on a farm. Went to a rural high school. I went to Listowel District High School.” “She’s just very honest,

transparent, dedicated, hardworking person that is there to make a difference,” added Schenk. “And I love her whole philosophy of ‘expect more.’ She expects a lot of herself, and she expects a lot from others. And I think as a mayor, that’s what you should be expecting. Is to expect the best from your town or your city. So she’s an amazing candidate, I think she’ll do a great job.”

95

12.3MM THICK LAMINATE

1

¢

$ 37

HOT NEW PRODUCT

HOT NEW PRODUCT

from

per sq ft

REG 2.99

K TOC

from

per sq ft

REG 2.99

IN S

AC4 - 5MM CLICK VINYL

1

12 V

12X24 CLICK VINLY TILES

1

$ 77

$ 77

5 MM THICK!

6.3 MM THICK!

per sq ft

REG 4.99

K TOC

1

$ 57

per sq ft

REG 3.19

PLUS NO TAX! K TOC

WAFFLE PATTERN CARPET

2

$ from

57

per sq ft

REG 5.19

W

PLUS NO TAX! IN S

MODERN LEDGESTONE

3

97

per sq ft

REG 8.99

WOW! HOT BUY! WWW.

W

K TOC

IN S

from

per sq ft

REG 4.99

IN S

2-TONE FRIEZE CARPET

$

from

K TOC

IN S

from

FR PL

K TOC

IN S

from

9

from

MDF PRIMED WHITE BASEBOARDS 3 7/8 ” 5¼” 5½”

67¢ $1 57 $1 67 / LIN FT

/ LIN FT

/ LIN FT

.COM

1362 VICTORIA STREET N. KITCHENER 519.742.9188 MON-FRI 9AM-9PM SATURDAY 9AM-6PM SUNDAY 10AM-5PM

9 6

M BA

July 12, 2018  

The Observer

July 12, 2018  

The Observer