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ELMIRA MAN TO HELP BLIND KIDS IN RWANDA LIVING HERE PAGE 24

COMMENT PAGE 6

H1N1 PUTS A BIT MORE FOCUS ON THE FLU SEASON

Few questions as Woolwich budget process starts rolling

Backyard rink a labour of love Elmira couple does all the prep work ... and then hopes the weather cooperates

Councillors quickly approve staff proposals rolled out for four departments in first of three special meetings slated for January

WILL SLOAN The backyard rink – generations of Canadians have eagerly awaited its icy splendor as temperatures have fallen beneath the freezing mark. And few backyard rinks are as involved as Chris and Christine Allison’s on Robin Drive, which, based on anecdotal evidence, has earned a reputation as the finest of its kind within Elmira’s borders. With hand-painted ads for local businesses (such as Lazer Video, Chemtura, and yes, the Woolwich Observer) that resemble Andy Warhol paintings, it certainly remains the most elaborate. Outdoor speakers and a scoreboard keep it equipped for skating, curling, hockey, or, if Jack Frost fails to show up, lawn-bowling. “It probably took a couple months,” said Chris, recalling its construction half a decade ago.“We started in August and put the white on the boards, and probably had them painted by November. We started RINK | 13

STEVE KANNON

Christine and Chris Allison, with daughters Octavia and Odessa, get ready for another winter in their Elmira backyard. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

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Woolwich councillors moved quickly at last week’s special budget session – the first of three – approving the budgets of four departments with little scrutiny and fewer questions. Cleared to go January 9 were the 2014 financial plans for the chief administrative office, council and information services, finance, and fire. The go-ahead included yet another expansion to the staffing ranks in the form of two full-time positions to replace a contract position (junior bylaw enforcement officer) in the clerk’s department and a part-time job (chief fire prevention officer) in the fire department. The bylaw officer bumps the current $50,000 expen-

diture to $75,000. Deputy clerk Val Hummel noted the township has had trouble filling its enforcement positions and more trouble keeping people in place. The fire department now adds another full-time job to the tune of $86,000 from the current budget allocation of $47,000. In discussing the change for the fire prevention officer, township fire chief Rick Pedersen pointed to an increase in duties mandated by the Ontario Fire Marshal’s office, including the rollout out of mandatory carbon monoxide (CO) detectors and new inspections of long-term care homes. There’s been no one in the part-time position since 2012. A full-time position would draw more BUDGET | 2

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2 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

Woolwich doles out extra grants from 2014 budget Feeling generous, Woolwich council doled out another $45,000 of taxpayers’ money to some local organizations while meeting last week in the first of three budget sessions. Woolwich Community Services’ building campaign was the biggest winner, approved for a $25,000 donation. The Chemtura Public Advisory Committee will receive $10,000. And there’s $5,000 each for the

Elmira Maple Syrup Festival’s 50-year celebration and the Expressive Café, a group for aphasia sufferers, often stroke survivors, that meets at the Woolwich Memorial Centre. Each of the grants reflects requests made last year that were put on hold until the 2014 budget deliberations. Elmira resident Frank Austin of the Expressive Café was on hand January 9 to remind councillors of the work his group does. The weekly social interaction at the WMC allows

working with speech therapists and interacting with peers. “These kind of things inspire me to say, ‘we’ve got to do more,’” he said, noting the additional funds will allow the group to do more for its members. Acknowledging that most of the group’s members come from outside Woolwich Township, Coun. Julie-Anne Herteis led the charge to help fund its work – “I would still like to support them in any way we can.” Given that the group draws from other communities in Waterloo Region and Wellington County, Coun. Mark Bauman suggested Austin seek funding from other municipalities as well, with Woolwich helping to spread the word. Mayor Todd Cowan said he would draft a letter of support and raise the issue with his counterparts. Bauman, in turn, championed the one-time $10,000 input for CPAC, arguing the money would help the volunteer committee with experts analysis and input on the vast array of technical data generated by Chemtura’s efforts to

stroke victims to work on their communication skills. Aphasia, usually the result of a stroke or brain injury, impairs the ability to use or comprehend words. As a result, sufferers may become isolated due to their difficulties with communication. The group allows victims to work on those skills in a supportive environment. Austin said he regularly sees participants gaining more confidence through their involvement with the group, citing the benefits of

THE CLEANUP CONTINUES

The effects of the ice storm were still lingering on Wednesday, as Matt Horst cleaned up the debris in Elmira. The town’s waste disposal transfer station is accepting branches and other debris free of charge today (Saturday); branches will also be taken as part of regular garbage pickup. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

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remediate the aquifer under Elmira. He also called on Chemtura and the Ministry of the Environment to match the contribution, saying the province should certainly be doing more. “We’ll try to guilt the provincial government into helping us out,” he said of the Woolwich funding. With WCS, the donation to the “Sometimes ...” campaign will help the agency with the construction of a new headquarters at the corner of Church Street and Memorial Avenue in Elmira, a long-vacant property once home to Procast Foundries. The new building will be much more spacious than the 900 square feet (plus small basement) at 73 Athur St. S. At 7,500-sq. ft., the new facility will incorporate a larger reception area, private offices, a larger food bank area, a community room, public workspace, and WCS’ thrift

shop, currently located in a rental space elsewhere in downtown Elmira. While the Elmira Maple Syrup Festival had been looking for $10,000, council opted for half that amount. The money is to be applied to some extras in store for the 50th festival (the first event was held in 1965). On the group’s list of additional spending for 2014 is $10,000 to commission original artwork from Peter Etril Snyder, with limited edition prints to be sold, $5,000 for customdesigned souvenir maple syrup bottles, and another $5,000 for a volunteer appreciation night. Money for the new grants won’t come from tax revenues, council decided. Instead, the township will use part of an expected $372,000 windfall from Waterloo North Hydro and an anticipated extra $27,000 from assessment growth in 2014.

BUDGET: Looking to increase

township payroll again FROM |COVER

qualified candidates, he said. Everyone in the department feels the job is so important that none of the firefighters will take a pay increase in 2014, preferring the money be channelled into the position, he added. “They’re all kicking in their bit,” said Pedersen, noting the wage will stay at $22 per hour. Also in the department’s budget is $20,000 for adjustments in the fire master plan covering Maryhill and Breslau. The Maryhill station is in need of some $500,000 in repairs – the floor is sinking and the roof must be replaced – so the study will look at whether it makes sense to renovate or replace the building. As well, with growth in Breslau and the eventual need for a station there, the coverage area will have to be looked at.

A third position, engineering technologist, has been pitched for the engineering and planning services budget. Entirely new, it would add $94,000 to the growing payroll. Overall, the township budget for 2014 sees operating expenses of $13.8 million, up 4.4 per cent from the $13.2 million in last year’s budget. On the capital side, the township sees spending of $7,053,846, an increase of 3.5 per cent from a budget of $6,808,220 in 2013. The extra spending is to be funded in part by a tax increase of 1.5 per cent. That would add $9.44 to the township portion of the average tax bill, using an assessed value of $269,000, said director of finance Richard Petherick. As well, homeowners will pay another one per cent as a special infrastructure levy, adding $6.23 on average.

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NEWS | 3

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

Conditions just right for potholes, adding to drivers’ woes ELENA MAYSTRUK Big temperature swings usher in a freezethaw cycle that’s hard on the roads. Add in significant snowfalls that bring out the plows and icing that requires repeated passes by salt trucks and you’ve got a recipe for what’s cooking on several roads in the townships just

now: potholes. “The difficulty this year is that December, even into January, has been quite busy from the plowing perspective. So it’s been hard to allocate resources to deal with this,” said Richard Sigurdson, manager of engineering at the Township of Woolwich. “It’s definitely been

holes are being filled in as time and money allow. Woolwich staff spends about $48,500 on labour, equipment and materials to patch potholes annually. Wellesley Township spends about $20,000 annually on the same, and though Wellesley roads escaped the brunt of the weather’s defacement so far, general manager of community

an issue. It always seems we’ve got one of these situations in January and sometimes multiple times in the year. But nevertheless we did have a couple of days when we were able to dedicate some crews to cold-mixing some of these more problematic areas,” he added. Funds and crews are stretched thin and the

services Kevin Beggs says much of that budget is used up by the end of each year. As of December Wellesley had spent $19,664 on road maintenance in 2013. Herrgott Road requires the largest number of patch-ups. As well, there are a few minor potholes in the other villages, he added. Herrgott Road is

also slated to be resurfaced in the summer, which should cut down significantly on the amount of weather damage in the future. “We’ve got a few odd [potholes] in the villages but very little. At this time there have been no major issues. I’m very impressed POTHOLES | 5

Wellesley expects status quo budget as process gets underway for 2014 WILL SLOAN Meet the 2014 Wellesley budget, same as the 2013 Wellesley budget. After a pair of consultation meetings on January 9 and 13 at the township office, Wellesley councillors are waiting on recommendations from staff for this year’s budget, expected to be along the lines of recent years. Still in its early stages, the budget is expected to be within the $6-7 million range, said Theresa Bisch, treasurer of the township. Bisch also said there would likely be a small tax increase in line with recent years (the increase was 2.6 per cent in 2013). “We’re just working with our 10-year forecast of how we’re going to run the township,” said Ward 4 Coun. Paul Hergott on Wednesday, adding that residents shouldn't expect any significant changes to services. “I think we’re going to have a status quo [budget] – that’s my sense at this point,” said Jim Olender, councillor for Ward 3. “We don’t want to step back. We’re trying to keep mo-

mentum going forward as far as infrastructure – roads and bridges that we have to maintain. We’re trying to factor that in and make sure we’re not going to have to make a substantial increase in anything.” Olender cites improvements to Herrgott and Moser Young roads, and topcoats on streets within the settlement areas that already have primary coats. “There are certain things that we have to do: some of the roads that are partially done, they have to have the finish on them, because if you don’t put the finish on them, you might as well not have started them.” Road projects were put on the backburner this time two years ago, when a sluggish local economy (owing to modest business and construction growth) led to $50,000 in road construction cuts. Cuts were also made to reserves for recreation, emergency evacuation, and a new fire station. The budget will be a topic of discussion at the next committee meeting, scheduled for January 28 at 6:45 p.m. The public is encouraged to attend.

HOW TO REACH US

EE RY FR IVE L DE

Nancy Zajac (left) and colleague Natasha Niebel have some fun with jeans at Conestoga Mall. Zajac will be at the WMC to collect more for the Teens for Jeans campaign during the Sugar Kings home game on Sunday. Donations are going to WCS and other local charities. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

Teens for Jeans campaign enlists Elmira Sugar Kings manager at Conestoga Mall’s Aeropostale store. She brought the campaign to the town and Woolwich Community Services (WCS). “Last year we didn’t hit our goal but it was difficult for everybody, we found. We hit just under 800 pairs so that’s pretty phenomenal. Our goal this year is 1,000 again. I’d say 60 per cent of the jeans we got in were because of these hockey games: they really make a difference.” The three teams have had a longstanding friendly competition on who will collect more jeans for the campaign at their respective games, Zajac said. Locally, jeans will be

ELENA MAYSTRUK Employing the Elmira Sugar Kings once again this year, the Teens for Jeans campaign is coming to the Woolwich Memorial Centre tomorrow (Sunday) to collect blue jeans. The fifth year for the Aeropostale clothing company campaign for teens in need, this will be the third year the Kings have helped out along with fellow Junior B teams the Waterloo Siskins and Kitchener Dutchmen. While the teams’ involvement is all in good fun, for a good cause, a certain amount of competitiveness is a plus for organizer Nancy Zajac of Elmira,

collected during the Sugar Kings game, which takes place at 7 p.m. on Sunday and again on January 26 and February 2. Collection bins will also be available at the Kitchener Dutchmen home games January 26 and 28 and the Siskins’ home games January 19 and February 8. The campaign will donate jeans to Woolwich Community Services, Ray of Hope, House of Friendship and others, with Zajac gradually giving the pairs away as the need arises at each organization. WCS has been a priority for the campaign since Zajac started organizing it locally. The success of the Kings’ involvement is an-

other hats-off to the community spirit in Woolwich, she said. “We do our in-store campaign and that goes so far. I had this brainstorm three years ago – this will be our third year with the hockey teams. It’s something that brings our community together and, living in Elmira, I know how important the Sugar Kings are to everybody. I think it might have been when we were competing for Hockeyville Canada, that’s maybe what inspired me. There was such an outpouring of support from the hockey community.” The winter sport also JEANS | 4

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4 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

Region keeping an eye on return of H1N1 flu WILL SLOAN Nobody likes getting a needle, but nobody likes getting the flu either. As of Wednesday last week, 98 influenza cases had been reported in the Waterloo Region so far this season, with 18 hospitalizations before January 1 and one confirmed flu-related death. These numbers are lower than recent years (there were 38 hospitalizations and six flu-related deaths before January 7, 2012, for instance), but still serve as a reminder to get those immunizations before it’s too late. “We certainly have experienced increased activity in the last three weeks or so, but compared to last year, which was very busy, we’re definitely seeing a slower season,” said Kristy Wright, manager of infectious diseases for the Region of Waterloo’s Public Health department. “Flu seasons are very unpredictable and they vary from year to year in terms of their timing, severity and length. The good news is that this year, we have a vaccine that is a very good match to the circulating strains of the flu.” This year’s predominate strain is H1N1, which was first seen in 2009 and responsible for 20 of the first 53 confirmed cases reported this year. H1N1 typically affects a younger demographic, with most of the cases between six months and 49 years of age. This year’s vac-

cine was designed to cover the H1N1 strain. “The vaccine actually changes every year based on what strains are circulating across the ocean,” said Wright. The region’s one death so far was a patient between the ages of 40 and 64 with underlying medical conditions. “What a lot of people don’t realize is, even if you are immunized that doesn’t mean you won’t necessarily get the flu. But what it does is it reduces the complications of influenza as well: death, hospitalization, reducing of chronic health conditions.” She added, “Other ways include washing your hands frequently; coughing into your sleeve instead of your hands; if you’re sick, stay home to avoid transmitting to other people; and nutrition and exercise to keep yourself well.” In light of the Norwalk virus outbreak at Grand River Hospital last weekend (the stomach virus affected four patients), this is sensible advice at any time of year. However, Wright notes that the flu vaccine remains the most effective way to prevent the spread. Public Health particularly recommends immunization for those with chronic health issues, persons over 65 and under 5, and pregnant women. While the region’s public health clinics are over, flu shots are still available at pharmacies and family doctors.

Wellesley forum looks at the impacts of full-day kindergarten Event hopes to answer parents’ questions ahead of program’s rollout in township ELENA MAYSTRUK All-day kindergarten rolls out in more rural schools next fall, generating questions from another group of parents about to find themselves on new ground. In a community like Wellesley Township where many families have young children, childcare is a growing issue, said Krista Schott, supervisor of Inspiring Minds Early Learning Centre, one of the organizers of a community forum on January 22. The event will help parents figure out their options for childcare. “We received feedback from many parents in our community that they wanted more information about full-day kindergarten. The regional school board had offered some open houses in the fall but they were all within Kitchener, Waterloo or Cambridge. We invited the school board to come

out to a rural area to talk about full-day kindergarten to put the parents at ease,” Schott said this week. The other half of the event will focus on childcare options in rural areas. As the township’s population increases, parents are finding they’re running out of options in rural areas. The issue is apparent at the centre, where spots fill up fast, she noted. “We have an extensive waiting list here. We realize we can’t provide care for everyone who needs it, so there are other options. Potentially, there are more options with full-day kindergarten with the extended day programming and the youth development program.” In addition to the programs the Wellesley centre will offer, a partday program starts in September, running daily from 9:30 a.m. to 2:35 p.m. Other options for parents

include Wellesley’s preschool, home care, the extended day program run by the school boards and a youth development program through the YMCA. The school board’s extended day program for four- and five-yearolds runs in connection with the core program of full-day kindergarten delivered by early childhood educators. It will be offered before the regular school hours at the start of the weekday and continue at the end of the day. An outpouring of questions from the community shows there are several issues that need to be addressed in the upcoming event, said Schott. “People do want licensed care and there is a demand for it. I think it shows that sometimes there is not enough care available.” Parents at the Inspiring Minds had several concerns, she added. “They wanted a bit of a

comparison on how [fullday kindergarten] is the same as childcare, how is it different than childcare. What happens if their child is tired? What happens if they needs help in the washroom – some of the personal care things? Do they have to attend every day? What is the program like on a day-today basis?” Inspiring Minds Early Learning Centre in Wellesley will be hosting the early learning and full-day kindergarten community forum on January 22 at the Wellesley Community Centre, 1000 Maple Leaf St., running from 6:45-9:40 p.m. The forum will consist of an information fair and presentations by the Ontario Early Years Centre, Waterloo Region Public Library, and guests from the Waterloo Region’s public and Catholic school boards. Visit wellesleycommunityforum.eventbrite.ca to register.

JEANS: Involvement of hockey teams has boosted effort FROM | 3

helps the community keep stay mindful of the principle of the campaign: to keep folks warm in the brisk weather this season. “When we are trying to

clothe people to keep them warm it just makes sense. Hockey is a winter sport, it helps people think of the cold.” The Teens for Jeans Campaign has partnered with Aéropostale and Do-

Something.org for several years and collected more than 2.5 million pairs to donate to homeless teens, according to the Do Something Canada website. In 2011 some 12,000 schools across the United States,

Canada, and Puerto Rico participated to collect a record-breaking 1,000,000 jeans in four weeks. Donations can also be made at various schools and the Aeropostale store in Conestoga Mall in Waterloo.

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NEWS | 5

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

Way cleared for Elmira gas station Plans for a new gas station in Elmira got the go-ahead this week when Woolwich councillors approved a zone-change application permitting underground fuel storage tanks. The decision permits 2070227 Ontario Ltd. to put the fuel underground when it adds a gas station, convenience store and automatic carwash to its site at 110 Earl Martin Dr., currently home to a manual carwash. All of the proposed new uses, including a gas station with

above-ground tanks, are permitted under the existing zoning. The change was needed to lift the prohibition on underground tanks, a legacy of Elmira’s longstanding contamination issues involving groundwater in the aquifer. Planning staff, in consultation with Chemtura, which is treating the groundwater via a nearby well, the Grand River Conservation Authority and Region of Waterloo, determined the tanks posed no threat given the safety precautions – double-walled tanks and pipes, electronic monitoring, automatic shutoffs – that will be put in place.

Regional taxes hiked by 1.86% Property owners in Waterloo Region will see a 1.86 per cent increase in the regional portion of their tax bills, as council this week approved the 2014 budget. The increase of 1.05 per cent for regional services and 0.81 per cent for police services will add another $32.58 to the average household’s ever-increasing tax bill. The region’s share of taxes accounts for about half the bill, covering a range of social services, police and

ambulance, housing, transit, waste management and the like. “We worked to strike a balance between funding important services while keeping the tax increase low,” said regional Chair Ken Seiling following Wednesday’s vote. “While everyone may have their specific preferences, Regional Council needs to balance all the demands it faces.”

Safety awards for trucking firms Some area firms were among the winners announced this week by the Truckload Carriers Association, which

recognizes the safest fleets in North America through its National Fleet Safety Awards. Among the 18 winners in six mileage categories are Division II’s (5-14.99 million miles driven) first-place finisher Brian Kurtz Trucking Ltd. of Breslau (second spot went to nearby MacKinnon Transport Inc. of Guelph). In Division IV (25-49.99 million miles), second spot was claimed by Erb International Inc. of New Hamburg. The division winners will be recognized at an awards ceremony to be held during TCA’s annual convention, March 23-26 in Grapevine, Texas. They will also be recognized during TCA’s

safety & security division annual meeting, May 18-20 in St. Louis, Missouri.

Record number pass through YKF The Region of Waterloo International Airport (YKF) this week announced 2013 was another record-breaking year for passenger traffic. A total of 138,733 passengers travelled through the air terminal building, a 15 per cent increase over 2012, which was also a record-breaking year. The airport recorded 106,923 aircraft movements (a landing or a takeoff), an increase of 3.2 per cent over 2012.

POLICE BLOTTER

COLLISION CROWDS ELMIRA INTERSECTION

Woman dies the day after twovehicle collision near Drayton A Mapleton woman died following a two-vehicle accident near Drayton on January 10. Wellington County Ontario Provincial Police responded to a serious collision on Wellington Road 8 near Wellington Road 12 in Mapleton Township at approximately 6:16 p.m. Police say a 2002 Chevrolet driven by Clara Showalter, 69, of Mapleton was westbound on Wellington Road 8, and attempted to turn into a private drive-

way when an eastbound 2007 Chevrolet, driven by a 19-year-old Mapleton Township man collided with Showalter’s vehicle. Guelph-Wellington Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and Mapleton Fire Rescue attended the scene. Showalter was transported to a local hospital by ambulance and later transferred to Hamilton General Hospital, where she succumbed to her injuries the following day.

JANUARY 6

JANUARY 9

8:00 PM | Blowing snow caused whiteout conditions and drifts starting on the evening of January 6 to January 7, causing many vehicles to become stuck in drifts and subsequently abandoned. Roads were closed where possible and several warnings posted for the public to avoid the roads. A multitude of vehicle issues occurred over the two days, but no injuries were reported or charges laid. All accidents were deemed weather-related.

6:56 AM | A 27-year-old New Hamburg man eastbound on Carmel Koch Road in Wellesley Township lost control of his vehicle on icy roads and slid into the ditch. There were no injuries or charges.

JANUARY 8

5:31 AM | A 54-year-old Breslau man driving a grey Toyota southbound on Shantz Station Road near Menno Street east of Breslau lost control after hitting a snowdrift and struck a Dodge Ram being driven by a 29-year-old Cambridge woman. There were no injuries and no charges laid.

JANUARY 11

1:58 AM | A 21-year-old Ariss woman lost control of her vehicle on icy roads and struck a tree while travelling in the 5000 block of Crowsfoot Road in Woolwich Township. She was not injured or charged. The accident was deemed weather-related. 12:40 AM | A New Hamburg home burned to the ground. The fire at 49 Waterloo St. was quickly controlled by firefighters and no one was injured. Officials estimated damage to the property at $400,000. The cause of the fire is still under investigation by Waterloo Regional Police detectives.

Traffic was slowed on Arthur Street in downtown Elmira where a car and northbound transport truck collided in the right lane just before the Church Street intersection on Tuesday around 9:40 a.m. The car was struck on the driver’s side door. No one was injured but one of the drivers was charged with starting from a stop in an unsafe manner. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

POTHOLES: Freeze-thaw cycle wreaking havoc on pavement FROM | 3

so far this year,” Beggs said. Travelling through Elmira, be prepared to swerve on Park Avenue, Wyatt and Union streets, Floradale Road and Barnswallow Drive. In Breslau, watch out for rough patches on Menno Street. It’s not just the weather that’s creating a bumper crop of holes this year, Sigurdson added. Some roadways are just not up to the task of surviving a harsh winter. “Some of the streets just don’t have an adequate base or pavement structure and the combination of some just being older; they just don’t

survive as well when they go through these thaw-freeze events.” Potholes appear when water freezes in cracks or openings in the asphalt and expands. This creates more pressure on already cracked roads. When a pothole forms – usually as temperatures hover around the freezing point – unless repairs are made, it can

A stretch of Barnswallow Drive near the Church Street turnoff in Elmira is one of the problem areas for potholes in Woolwich. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

grow in size chipped away at by the elements and passing vehicles. These days, pothole season is emerging at several times in the year and Woolwich staff are out patrolling in search of the most problematic divots to deal with on a priority basis. “It’s definitely early, but it seems to be a common pattern where we get some of these events in January,” Sigurdson said. To report problematic potholes in the community call the Woolwich engineering department at 519-669-604. In Wellesley, email the roads department by visiting the website at www.wellesley. ca.

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6 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

JOE MERLIHAN PUBLISHER STEVE KANNON EDITOR

COMMENT

DONNA RUDY SALES MANAGER

ELENA MAYSTRUK REPORTER

WILL SLOAN

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OUR VIEW / EDITORIAL

THE VIEW FROM HERE

Return of H1N1 puts flu measures on the agenda WITH FLU SEASON BEARING down on us, hype about the influenza A (H1N1) virus is building back up, though thankfully not at the levels we saw in 2009. A vaccine for the strain is included in this year’s flu shot. While there has been a renewed outbreak in parts of Canada, H1N1 hasn’t reached the kind of numbers seen when the virus first began to circulate. That said, the H1N1 influenza, the most common flu virus in Canada this year, has a higher than anticipated mortality rate, which has medical experts wondering if it's virulence has increased. As of the start of the week, there were 10 confirmed deaths in Alberta attributed to H1N1, as well as one in British Columbia, six in Saskatchewan, six in Ontario, one in Quebec and two in Nova Scotia. According to the Public Health Agency of Canada, 96 per cent of this year's lab-confirmed influenza is type A (H1N1). The virus is unusual in that it appears to affect younger people more than other strains of seasonal influenza. People aged 20 to 65 are being hit harder than usual, comprising 52 per cent of flu cases. Normally, 80 per cent of people who die from seasonal flu are 65 years of age or older, but during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic, between 62 and 85 per cent of those who died were younger than 65. In Canada, seasonal flu normally contributes to approximately 20,000 hospital admissions and between 4,000 and 8,000 deaths annually. During the H1N1 pandemic in 2009, the virus caused more than 284,000 deaths worldwide, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). At that time, the World Health Organization declared H1N1 as a pandemic virus. However, the virus is now circulating like a seasonal influenza virus. The CDC received an unusually high number of reports of severe respiratory illness among young and middleaged adults in the last two months of 2013. The World Health Organization, which is tracking the virus worldwide again, says the H1N1 flu remains a mild threat. Most people who contract it experience only mild symptoms, with the illness passing within a week, much like any other flu. While there’s been a downgrading of H1N1’s impact, we’re still being told to take precautions, beginning with frequent hand-washing. The Ontario Medical Association, which last week called on employers not to jam up the system with requests for sick notes, wants people to stay at home if they’ve got the flu. Requiring notes only forces sick people to go out in public, increasing the risk of spreading the virus. It also uses up already-taxed resources to little advantage. “I can’t stress it enough going to work while sick is bad for you and potentially worse for your colleagues. Staying home to rest will help you to manage your illness and prevent others from getting infected,” said OMA president Dr. Scott Wooder. “Think about those around you, and please don’t take the flu to work.” Children, seniors and those living with chronic diseases are more susceptible to the flu and are at a greater risk from its complications, the doctors stress. Following a few basic guidelines such as coughing and sneezing into an elbow, using hand sanitizer, and washing hands frequently will help prevent the flu.

Taxing residents and spending other people's money are given all the scrutiny council deems necessary for due diligence. WORLD VIEW / GWYNNE DYER

Revolution fatigue at play in Egyptian vote WORLD AFFAIRS General Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who led the coup against Egypt’s elected president last July, has one of the finest collections of military headgear in the entire Middle East. Perhaps that’s why he has still not admitted that he plans to become the next president: he can’t decide which hat to throw into the ring. His own explanation for his shyness comes straight out of the Aspiring Dictator’s Handbook: “If I nominate myself, there must be a popular demand, and a mandate from my army,” he told the state-owned paper Al-Ahram. “When Egyptians say something, we obey, and I will never turn my back on Egypt.” Egyptian generals are deeply patriotic people, and three others before Sisi have sacrificed their own desire for a quiet life in order to rule Egypt: Gamal Abdel Nasser (1956-70), Anwar Sadat (1970-81) and Hosni Mubarak (1981-2011). In fact, the last three years

have been the only time in the life of the great majority of Egyptians when a general has not been running the country, and Sisi seems ready to make the supreme sacrifice too. A mandate from the army shouldn’t be hard to get, since he runs the whole organization. And as far as “popular demand” is concerned, Sisi is clearly planning to use a “yes” vote in this week’s referendum on the new constitution as proof that the people want him for president. The new constitution will be the third in four years. It replaces the one that was written and adopted (also by referendum) during the brief, unhappy rule of President Mohamed Morsi, who took office on June 30, 2012 and was overthrown on July 3, 2013. It removes the “Islamic” changes that Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood wrote into the last one, which should appeal to secular Egyptians, but that’s not what makes it attractive to General Sisi. The new clauses that only a soldier could love include one that gives the Egyptian military the right

to appoint the defence minister, and another that says the military budget will not be subject to civilian oversight. It also retains the much-criticized clause that allows civilians to be tried in military courts. Sisi reckons enough civilians will vote for it anyway, some because they hate the Islamists and some because they are just tired of all the upheavals. Maybe they will, because the whole Arab world is suffering from revolution fatigue: the “Arab awakening” has caused such turbulence that many people would find a return to the old dictatorships almost comforting. It’s true even in Syria, where some of the rebels are starting to talk about making a deal with the Assad regime in order to isolate the Islamist extremists and hasten the end of the war. There has been no war in Egypt, but about a thousand of Morsi’s supporters were massacred in the streets of Cairo by the “security forces” last summer, and the Muslim Brotherhood has been declared a terrorist organization. There have been

many thousands of arrests, not only of senior Muslim Brotherhood members but recently of secular critics of the of the military regime as well. Egyptians are frightened and exhausted, and Sisi apparently thinks they will gratefully accept a return to army rule (behind a democratic facade). But his nervousness is showing: there’s barely a wall in Cairo that is not covered with “Yes” posters and pictures of Sisi, while people trying to put up “No” posters get arrested. Sisi is probably right to be nervous. In late September, three months after the coup, Zogby Research Services carried out an extensive opinion poll in Egypt for the Sir Bani Yas Forum in Abu Dhabi. It revealed that confidence in the army had already dropped from 93 per cent to 70 per cent, and it probably has gone on dropping. General Sisi and former president Morsi had almost equal support in the country – 46 per cent for Sisi, 44 per cent for Morsi (who now faces trial for “incitDYER | 8


COMMENT | 7

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

THEIR VIEW / QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Should the township and regional budgets put staff cuts ahead of tax hike?

»»Guy Arsenal

»»David Groulx

Definitely cuts. Raising taxes is never a good idea, we pay enough taxes.

We could raise taxes a little bit but a lot of A good balance of both people are having trouble financially. I don’t want to cut staff because that would just cause more problems.

»»Ben Stevens

»»Al Felice

»»Emma Melitzer

Have it status quo. The money goes as far as it I think they should raise taxes. I don’t feel right goes. Can’t keep raising taxes and I don’t want cutting people from their jobs. to cut people’s jobs.

"Really, it’s a little disconcerting having elected officials dropping the ball like this." James Gingrich | 8 HIS VIEW / STEVE KANNON

The myth of amalgamation and perils of bloated bureaucracies EDITOR'S NOTES Most residents have seen bloated bureaucracies, runaway spending and lack of fiscal accountability become a matter of course at one or both levels of municipal government. The complaints are becoming more vocal, but still not anywhere near enough for the self-serving bunch at the helm to take note. Changes are necessary – sweeping, in most cases – but we should hastily step away from any suggestion of amalgamation as any part of the solution. In fact, as it’s long been argued here and elsewhere, such a move would only make matters worse. That hasn’t stopped the regular resurgence of the idea in Waterloo Region. Perhaps the latest study will finally drive a stake through its heart. “The conclusion is very strong: amalgamation didn’t reduce the size of municipal government,” says Prof. Timothy Cobban,

who teaches political science at Western University. His latest study on the issue was the subject of a presentation at a council meeting in Hamilton, where forced amalgamation in 2001 created a mess, with undoing the measures back on the agenda there. Cobban found there are more people on municipal payrolls than ever before, despite the number of municipalities in Ontario falling to 445 from 850 following an edict from Mike Harris’ Conservative government of the day. Cobban and his team looked at data over a 30year period: 15 before the amalgamation decision, and 15 after. Between 1981 and 1996, municipal governments in the province grew by a total of 23.9 per cent, adding another 39,191 positions. From 1996 to 2011, overall growth was 38.8 per cent, representing 104,200 jobs. That adds up to some 270,000 people on municipal payrolls today versus 160,000 in 1995. And the cost? Some $750 million in 2011 compared to less than $200 million in 1981.

HOW TO REACH US

ways been a non-starter. Whether protecting their turfs or fighting off the loss of independence, critics have been right to dismiss a concept whereby the seven existing municipalities in Waterloo Region would be wiped out in favour of one. The case against consolidating seven municipal governments into one über-government at the region is as weak today as it was during the height of the Harris Tories’ ill-fated amalgamation frenzy. Removing direct local representation for a gamble on reduced costs hasn’t paid off, and never will. Moreover, people have ties to their communities, and like to have direct access to their municipal politicians, who have the largest impact on their day-to-day lives. While optimizing some services may be advantageous – over the years, we’ve seen that happen with police services and, more recently, transit – but that’s a far cry removed from discussing single-tier government. Even talks to regionalize fire protection or water and sewer services

seem doomed to eternal bickering. In the townships, the loss of direct say over planning and other issues is too big a price to pay. An amalgamated region would see precious little rural representation at the table. As it now stands, Woolwich and Wellesley each have just one place on regional council, which doesn’t amount to much. But each remains autonomous for the most part, able to control its future at the local council level – in the absence of that structure, the priorities of the cities could quickly overwhelm each of the four rural townships. The smallest municipalities must retain the right to say “no” when it comes to incursions from the city. The fate of the development lands in Breslau, for instance, is in much better hands at Woolwich council than it would be if the cities were calling the shots – just look at the poor development legacy visited on the residents of Kitchener and Waterloo. Studies of Ontario municipalities amalgamated when that was in vogue

with the Harris government show cost-savings to be non-existent. There may be benefits, but they’re not financial. And years afterwards, few people are doing cartwheels over the moves. Business groups are often the ones pushing for amalgamations, typically emphasizing the savings mantra. Depending on the political climate, they’re joined by people who like the idea of sending politicians packing, the appeal of fewer councillors. Again, nice idea in theory, but the savings are miniscule – one-half of one per cent of the total budget goes to council administration. While there can be a bit of initial cost savings by casting off duplicate senior staff members, it doesn’t take long before most of the money is eaten up by the middle managers who are added to help administer a larger population and the services offered to them. Anyone still harbouring thoughts of amalgamation should heed the words of former Toronto deputy KANNON | 8

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The growth in spending and the size of the workforce outstrips population growth. Some of it can be explained, however, by the downloading of programs that also came with the Harris years, forcing municipalities to take on new services, Cobban says. Some, but not all. Nor does that explain any reversals when the Liberal government began uploading some costs – the regional government, for instance, simply spends the money elsewhere, most notably on wages, rather than reducing staff and passing the savings on to residents. In such cases, local taxpayers get no relief, but also have to pay more in provincial taxes to cover the still-present costs. This report, as with others before it, paints a clear picture of what amalgamation – the topic that refuses to die here – would really mean: more bureaucracy, less cash in our pockets and another assault on democracy, representative government and accountability. Amalgamation has al-

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8 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

THE MONITOR

VERBATIM

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

In another example of open and accountable goverment, the Conservatives have denied an access to information request for the working text of the Canada-European Union Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA), unnecessarily depriving Canadians of the information they need to pass judgement on CETA, and of any opportunity to alter the deal before it is signed.

“When it comes to decisions on spending hard-earned taxpayers’ dollars, the majority of you councillors leave a lot to be desired.”

Hawkesville residents agreed at a public meeting Jan. 13 to pitch in part of the labour needed to replace the Hawkesville Community Centre's leaky roof. The volunteer labour dropped $5,000 from the price, taking the project to $18,000.

»»Council of Canadians

»»Harald Drewitz, who regularly keeps an eye on Kitchener council, shares an

»»From the Jan. 17, 2004 edition of the Observer

opinion that applies to just about every municipality

DYER: Fatigue likely to undo

NATIONAL VIEW

much of the Arab Spring

FROM | 6

ing his supporters to carry out premeditated murder” and various other alleged crimes). But Morsi’s trial was postponed last week from January 8 to February 1, allegedly because bad weather prevented him from being flown from his prison in Alexandria to Cairo for the trial. That’s a rather long spell of bad weather, and besides it’s only two and a half hours by road from Alexandria to Cairo. One suspects that the military regime did not want Morsi to make his first public appearance since the coup just before the referendum.

The Zogby poll also revealed that an overwhelming majority of respondents blame the last military regime, under Hosni Mubarak, for the problems facing Egypt today. All in all, this is hardly a firm foundation on which to complete the counterrevolution and build a new military regime. The likeliest outcome of the referendum on the new constitution this week will be a modest majority for the “Yes,” but on a very low turnout. If it is lower than the mere 33 per cent who voted in the referendum on the last constitution in 2012, then Sisi may have to reconsider his plan to run for the presidency.

KANNON: Politicians, staff

make bad decisions continually FROM | 7

mayor Doug Holyday, who was the mayor of Etobicoke during the amalgamation in the GTA. Now an MPP, he supported the move at the time, unlike many of his counterparts, pointing to mergers in the corporate world. “There were companies amalgamating throughout the world that were doing it, for good reason, and I thought those good reasons should apply here,” he tells the Toronto Star, adding he’s not surprised to learn the size and cost of municipal governments in

Ontario is larger than ever. “I watched it happen.” A major problem was the lack of political will on the part of municipal leaders, who did not strongly enforce cuts in the number of jobs in their offices by getting rid of redundant positions, the paper reports. “Bureaucracy just by its nature grows, unless it’s fought with.” Words to remember not only should amalgamation proposals arise again, but also as municipalities work on their budgets, with little talk and even less action when it comes to curtailing the bureaucracy.

YOUR VIEW / LETTER

Woolwich must aim for higher standard To the Editor, Thank you, thank you, thank you for your insightful editorial of January 11 (A clear example of what happens without oversight). All I seem to see in the press is “I don’t know, I don’t know,” and “we just

need to concentrate on getting WMC back to functioning as soon as possible.” Does that mean that the whole local government is unable to do anything else or is it really an attempt to avoid this issue in the hope that it will just go away? Find the person or persons responsible for this blatant incompetence, and trim our bloated payroll a little bit. We must hold our governments to a higher

standard than in the past. If they don’t or can’t measure up then replace them at election time.

DEAN PIESNER, CONESTOGO

WMC incident shows lack of oversight To the Editor, Re: Lack of security system prompts township review (Observer, Jan. 11/14). Ruby Weber states, and I quote, “ It was never a decision at council” in regards to omitting a security system at the WMC. Was that lack of due diligence on a project of this size? An afterthought in the roughly $100,000 of damage? Really, it’s a little disconcerting having elected officials dropping the ball like this. We need a vetting process to get the best advocates on our behalf.

JAMES GINGRICH, ELMIRA

Taking time to remember and give thanks

YOUR VIEW / OPINION

To the Editor, As a former crew member who worked with Richard Rank for many years, I found it very fitting to be part of the overflow crowd to pay tribute to Richard at his celebration of life service. However, I feel disturbed that no one from the Woolwich administration spoke in recognition of his longtime service, after all, he was on duty at the time of this tragedy. At the time of this writing, and upon conversations with former colleagues, it appears no communication of support had been extended by supervisors during these tough times. The workers' many long hours are appreciated, I hope.

Groups of people have always found a way to create drama within their relations – so much so that it seems instinctive of human nature. Rob Ford’s political scandals are just another example. Whether observing teenage girls in the halls of a high school or politicians in the Senate, the creation of unnecessary drama seems to be a natural occurrence within human relations. Evaluating Rob Ford’s case specifically, the theatrical ripples of the Toronto mayor’s current public scandals are examples of society’s ‘need’ for drama. It is evident that Ford’s inability to professionally lead a city needs attention. Everyday folk have become so absorbed in the wrongdoings of the

K. “DUTCH” NOOT, WINTERBOURNE

Rob Ford saga shows we really do enjoy a good drama, even if it's a negative Toronto mayor that they have overlooked the defect of his fellow politicians, media and Canadian citizens: their augmentation of pointless, childish drama. There are three parties responsible for the over-analysis of Ford’s inappropriate actions as a mayor. First on this list are Ford’s fellow politicians. Theoretically, these leaders publicly bash the mayor’s abilities as a politician out of fear for the wellbeing of the City of Toronto (which some can admit as true). Frankly, the main motive of the majority of these politicians is likely to increase their political power by disgracing Ford until he is eliminated as a potential candidate in the next election process. OPINION | 23


SPORTS | 9

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

SPORTS HOCKEY / JUNIOR B

Kings see highs and lows in the course of a couple of games Team rebounds from poor play in loss to Cambridge Winter Hawks with solid win over Guelph Hurricanes WILL SLOAN As the old saying goes, “You win some, you lose some,” and the Elmira Sugar Kings had plenty of both last weekend. A downbeat tone was set on January 11 when the Cambridge Winter Hawks buried the Kings 5-1, but the Elmira boys rebounded the next day with a 7-1 pasting of the Guelph Hurricanes. “One hundred per cent different,” said head coach Jeff Flanagan of the games. On Saturday, “Our effort level was very low. All over the ice – offensive zone, neutral zone, d-zone, battles, taking pucks to the net. When we had the opportunity to score, the effort wasn’t there, which led to the score not going in our favour.” Alex Mutton, assisted by Adam Capagnolo and Brodie Whitehead, scored Elmira’s only goal of the night, at 19:41 of the first period. Otherwise, Cambridge dominated, with two goals in the first period, one in the second, and two more in the third. “I think a lot of it was preparation,” said Flanagan. “We had played a not-great game last Sunday [January 5] against Stratford, and I think we thought that was an anomaly – we’d have a good week of practice and come in just fine without doing the

The weird thing about outdoorsmen is that they pay entirely too much attention to the love life of the animals they hunt. The moose and deer ruts are two examples of this. Ask any hunter when he last made love to his wife and you’ll just get a shrug. Ask him when the deer rut happened two

years ago and he’ll tell you. That’s why I was surprised at Jenn’s awkward reaction when I told her that the squirrel rut was on. She actually seemed embarrassed by the statement. And so did all the people within earshot at that fancy restaurant. Strange, I know. You’d think people would want to know about the love life of our biggest tree rat. You’d also think that anyone who had as much detailed information about it as I have would be shown a bit more reverence. OK, they had enough respect to open the patio dining area especially for me. (As far as I know this is the first time ever in Janu-

Sugar King Mitch Klie stakes a position outside the Guelph Hurricanes net on Sunday. Elmira beat Guelph 7-1 after a 5-1 loss Saturday against Cambridge. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

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work.” By contrast, the Kings were strong out of the gate against the Guelph Hurricanes, with three goals in the first period – Cash Seraphim (Zac Coulter, Craig Johnson) at 14:15; Brett Parsons at 15:48; and new player Eric Palazzo (Mitch Klie, Coulter) at 17:15. Guelph scored at 19:35 to wrap up the first period, but Elmira dominated the second with four more goals: Justin Cooke (Rob Kohli, Cass Frey) at 2:49; Brad Kobryn at 10:25 and 16:45; and Adam Campagnolo (Kobryn, Mitch Wright) at 19:54. “The difference was, our effort all over the ice was excellent,” said Flanagan. “Our commitment to the little things – supporting players, blocking pucks – shows the difference in effort level, which changes the scoreboard.” Despite the lopsided score, the Hurricanes never let up. While Elmira outshot the rivals 15-8 and 18-8 in the first two periods, Guelph flipped it 11-7 in the third, in which nine of the Kings went to the penalty box. While the Hurricanes KINGS | 13

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¤Based on 2013/2014 EnerGuide highway fuel consumption estimates. Government of Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption will vary based on powertrain, driving habits and other factors. See retailer for additional EnerGuide details. 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package – Hwy: 7.9 L/100 km (36 MPG) and City: 12.2 L/100 km (23 MPG). 2013 Dodge Dart AERO – Hwy: 4.8 L/100 km (59 MPG) and City: 7.3 L/100 km (39 MPG). 2014 Dodge Journey 2.4 L with 4-speed automatic – Hwy: 7.7 L/100 km (37 MPG) and City: 11.2 L/100 km (25 MPG). Wise customers read the fine print: €, •, *, ♦, †, ∞, § The First Big Deal Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating retailers on or after January 7, 2014. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. All pricing includes freight ($1,595 – $1,695), air tax (if applicable), tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailer may sell for less. €$8,100 in Total Discounts is available on the new 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package model and consists of $8,100 in Consumer Cash Discounts. •$19,995 Purchase Price applies to the new 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package (29E) and includes $8,100 Consumer Cash Discount. $16,995 Purchase Price applies to the new 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) only. $19,995 Purchase Price applies to the new 2014 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package (22F) only and includes $2,000 Consumer Cash Discount. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on select 2013/2014 vehicles and are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. ♦4.99% lease financing of up to 60 months available on approved credit through WS Leasing Ltd. (a wholly owned subsidiary of Westminster Savings Credit Union) to qualified customers on applicable new 2012, 2013 and 2014 models at participating retailers in Ontario, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailer may lease for less. See your retailer for complete details. Examples: 2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Canada Value Package (29E)/2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A)/2014 Dodge Journey Canada Value Package (22F) with a Purchase Price of $19,995/$16,495/$19,995 leased at 4.99% over 60 months with $2,599/$3,029/$3,779 down payment, equals 260 weekly payments of $49/$49/$49 with a cost of borrowing of $3,834.80/$2,718/$3,494.10 and a total obligation of $14,567.80/$14,661.40/$14,619.80. †0% purchase financing for up to 36 months available on new 2013 Dodge Dart models to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank and TD Auto Finance. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailer may sell for less. See your retailer for complete details. Example: 2013 Dodge Dart SE (25A) with a Purchase Price of $16,995, with a $0 down payment, financed at 0% for 36 months equals 78 bi-weekly payments of $217.88 with a cost of borrowing of $0 and a total obligation of $16,995. ∞NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Contest begins November 27, 2013 at 9:00:00 a.m. ET and ends February 28, 2014 at 11:59:59 p.m. ET. Contest open to legal residents of Ontario who have reached the age of majority at the time of entry. One (1) entry per person. To enter, you must visit any participating Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge and Ram retailer during the contest period and purchase/finance/lease any new 2012, 2013 or 2014 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge or Ram vehicle (excluding SRT Viper models). Four (4) grand prizes available to be won, each consisting of a pair of VIP tickets and trip to watch the 2014 Battle of Ontario in Ottawa on April 12, 2014. Tickets are for April 12 ONLY. Prize includes round trip travel for two and two night’s hotel accommodation (if required). Approx. retail value: $5,000 per prize. Mathematical skill-testing question required. For complete contest rules, including no purchase means of entry, go to: www.chrysleroffers.ca/battleofontario. §2014 Dodge Grand Caravan Crew Plus shown. Price includes Consumer Cash Discount. 2013 Dodge Dart GT shown. 2014 Dodge Journey R/T AWD shown. Price includes Consumer Cash Discount. Based on U.S. market and vehicles under $18,000 US. For more information, visit www.kbb.com. Kelley Blue Book is a registered trademark of Kelley Blue Book Co., Inc. **Based on 2013 Ward’s upper small sedan costing under $25,000. ^Based on R. L. Polk Canada, Inc. May 2008 to September 2013 Canadian Total New Vehicle Registration data for Crossover Segments as defined by Chrysler Canada Inc. ❖Real Deals. Real Time. Use your mobile device to build and price any model. The Best Buy Seal is a registered trademark of Consumers Digest Communications LLC, used under license. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC. TMThe SiriusXM logo is a registered trademark of SiriusXM Satellite Radio Inc.

DON_141000_KC_Cara_Jou_Dart_First.indd 1

1/10/14 5:20 PM


SPORTS | 11

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

GALEA: There’s much we can learn about love by keeping a close eye on the animals out in nature FROM | 9

ary.) And although it was a little cold, I felt that venue was fitting as it allowed me to have a natural backdrop as I explained some of the more interesting facts of squirrel romance. I even think it was a brilliant idea when they closed the sliding door as it forced me to actually mime the moves. I guess when they drew the curtain the idea was that the shadow that

the streetlight threw on it would provide the actual illusion of a buck squirrel in the mood for love. Again, a piece of theatrical brilliance, although it appears to me that you lose a little when you can’t hear the squirrel “love noises” I was replicating – just ask anybody in the small crowd that formed on the adjacent sidewalk. The point here is before the police asked me to cease and desist, people

were getting a bit of an education. Which is good, because to the untrained observer, the squirrel rut looks a lot like squirrels chasing each other all over the place and then spontaneously breaking out into a Miley Cyrus concert.   This, needless to say, is the kind of thing outdoorsmen consistently pay attention to whenever they are out in the woods. And I can’t help but think that

this is why women are drawn to those of us who know a little about the reproductive cycle of everything from earth worms to elk. I’m pretty sure there isn’t a woman alive who would ever forget the sight of her man making a mock scrape. Unless I’m completely misreading the signals, there’s something about a man pawing up dirt and squirting half a bottle of artificial buck urine in

that spot that reeks of the language of love. Once, I actually watched a woman swoon at the sight. I’m writing this now because Valentine’s Day is rapidly approaching – sometime in March, I believe – and I think it’s prudent that we outdoorsmen use what we have learned over a lifetime of nature observation to keep the flame of love burning bright. Call me a hopeless ro-

mantic, but I am now actually planning an ice fishing outing with my Jenn. I can hardly wait to show her the heart I’ll make in a nearby snowbank. This, I envision will happen after I present her with a dozen emerald shiners and a romantic card with several of the spaces punched out, so that she’s halfway there to another dozen minnows. Don’t say I never learned anything from the squirrels.

Jacks keep it close in three-game weekend Come-from-behind shootout win over Ayr sandwiched by pair of well-played losses to the Merchants and Centennials WILL SLOAN According to Mitch Albom, “Life is a series of pulls back and forth.” The Wellesley Applejacks might have felt the same last weekend, playing a trio of games that saw momentum shift between them and their rivals. Narrow losses on Friday and Sunday to the Norwich Merchants and the Ayr Centennials bookended a Saturday shootout victory over Ayr. Ayr and Norwich, the third- and fourth-place teams in the Mid-West Junior C League, are both ahead of Wellesley in the rankings. For head coach Rob Way, last weekend’s tight races prove the Jacks can go toe-to-toe with tough rivals. “Saturday night against Ayr, we’re losing by two goals, then the kids fought back, tied it, and we went into the shootout. And yesterday, very competitive, could have went either way,” said Way on Monday. “I was really happy with the compete level of the kids. They did not quit and they showed they can compete with anybody in the league.” Wellesley scored the first goal on January 10, with Brett MacDonald (assist: Taylor Doering) sinking one at 6:19. The Merchants then pushed to a lead with goals at 11:51 and 14:38. Despite the opposition, the Jacks staged a comeback with goals at 1:42 and 4:19 in the third period by Troy Williams (Luke Rose, Josh Heer) and Rose (Alex Stoody, Doering). Norwich countered with goals at 9:34 and 15:46, but with less than a minute to go, Alex Stoody (Doering) tied the game at 19:12. The Merchants finally snatched a 5-4 victory at 2:56 in overtime. On January 11, the Applejacks and the Ayr Cen-

Sean McEwan (above) kept an eye on the puck, and Luke Rose (below) gave his rival a shock as the Wellesley Applejacks took on the Ayr Centennials January 11. The Jacks managed a 6-5 shootout win. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

tennials were with each other every step of the way. Wellesley’s Felix Lantaigne (Reid Denstedt, Williams) got the ball rolling with a goal at 3:30, and Ayr matched it at 9:04. Ayr scored again at 11:34 in the second period, but Doering (MacDonald) matched it at 13:55. The third period was a back-and-forth battle. Ayr scored at 8:42 and 9:27; Wellesley’s Rose (Parker Wood) and Sean McEwan (MacDonald, Wood) bounced back at 9:55 and

12:40. Ayr surged ahead at 13:33; Doering (Lantaigne, Denstedt) tied it again at 18:32. The action continued into overtime, with Wellesley finally eking out a 6-5 win in the shootout. It was much the same display when the Jacks again battled the Centennials on January 12. Yes, Ayr scored the first two goals (at 4:28 in the first and 0:27 in the second), and yes, Wellesley tied it up in the second period at 10:55 and 15:35 (courtesy of Cody Tapsell and Cal Jeffries). Ayr surged ahead with two more goals, at 16:09 and 1:12 in the third; Cody Tapsell (Jeffries) put Wellesley back on the board at 9:35. Ayr strengthened its lead at 11:06; Luke Rose scored one more for Wellesley at 15:03. When the goals were tallied, it was Ayr that came out on top of the 5-4 final. How can the Jacks turn more of those narrow losses into narrow wins? Way says the key is discipline. “We made it harder on ourselves to compete than we needed to because of the penalties we took,” he said. He added that a second referee on the ice – mandated as of January 1 – has kept all players on their toes. Still, Way continues to see improvement in the team, despite the mixed results. “When we got behind in the game on Friday or Saturday, earlier in the year the team wouldn’t have battled back to get the tie and win one in overtime. For me, the real positive was the compete level – the will to win is better than it was in October.” In Delhi Friday night, the Jacks are back at the Wellesley arena Saturday and Sunday for a pair of games against the Norwich Merchants. Game times are 7:30 and 7 p.m. respectively.


12 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

THE SCORE

WOOLWICH WILDCATS

Hartman x2, Cole Seabrook, Seb Garrett, Carter Cousineau

Jan 4 vs. Erin-Hillsburgh Woolwich: 1 Erin-Hillsburgh: 3 Goals: Seb Garrett Jan 9 vs. Milton Assists: Connor Waters, Lucas Woolwich: 3 Milton: 0 Radler Goals: Tyson Roth, Liam Wood, Jan 5 vs. Arthur Stuart Sinclair Woolwich: 3 Arthur: 1 Assists: Evan Passmore, Sam Goals: Simon Shantz, Gavin Ratcliffe Wilson, Cole Seabrook Shutout: Justin Strohoff Assists: Kolin Weigel, Cole Jan 12 vs. Erin-Hillsburgh Seabrook, Gavin Wilson, Sam Woolwich: 4 Erin-Hillsburgh: 1 Siopiolosz Goals: Brady Martin x2, Nathan Jan 9 vs. Hespeler Snyder, Liam Wood Woolwich: 0 Hespseler: 2 Assists: Liam Wood, Aiden Warne, Sam Ratcliffe Atom: LL #1 Jan 14 vs. Halton Hills Jan 12 vs. Twin Centre Woolwich: 3 Halton Hills: 2 Woolwich: 2 Twin Centre: 1 Goals: Sam Ratcliffe x3 Goals: Barett Assists: Nathan Martin, Liam Assists: Noah Wood x2 PeeWee: AE Novice: LL #3 Jan 12 vs. Orangeville Woolwich: 6 Orangeville: 2 Jan 10 vs. LL #4 LL3: 4 LL4: 0 Goals: Travis Weber x2, Zac Goals: Owen Brown x3, Nathan Pickard x2, Jackson Hale, Mackenzie Willms Lipp Assists: Jackson Hale x3, Assists: Hunter Brown, Evan Gruhl, Mike MacDonald, Emmett Mackenzie Willms, Zack Pickard, Ben Weigel, Ryan Belanger Weissenboeck

Novice: TYKE SELECT

Shutout: Jake Wingrove

Jan 11 vs. Paris Woolwich: 3 Paris: 0 Goals: Nathan Lipp x3 Assists: Mike MacDonald, Cody Dawson, Hunter Brown

Novice: LL #4 Jan 11 vs. Ayr Woolwich: 1 Ayr: 7 Goals: Mason Spark Jan 12 vs. Twin Centre Woolwich: 3 Twin Centre: 2 Goals: Andrew Chumley, Mason Spark, Gabe Hicknell Assists: Calum Heimbecker, Nathan Wong

Atom: MAJOR AA Jan 10 vs. Milton Woolwich: 6 Milton: 3 Goals: Tyler Martin, Cole Slade, Owen Lee x2, Kyler Austin x2 Assists: AJ Mitchell, Colton Schmitt, Tyler Martin, Cameron Leonard x2, Owen Lee, Evan Roth Jan 14 vs. Oakville Woolwich: 0 Oakville: 1

Atom: MINOR A Jan 11 vs. Halton Hills Woolwich: 6 Halton Hills: 2 Goals: Mitchell Young, Lucas Carson x2, Brett Moser, Zack Bender, Tyler Brezynskie Assists: Liam Eveleigh x2, Andrew Gear, Carter Rollins, Tyler Brezynskie x2, Reid Burkholder, Lucas Carson Jan 12 vs. Halton Hills Woolwich: 7 Halton Hills: 0 Goals: Zack Bender x2, Lucas Carson x3, A.J. Shaw-McMahon, Brett Moser Assists: Lucas Carson, Nolan Bridge, Shelby Rempel, Carter Rollins, Ian Speiran, Tyler Brezynskie Shutout: Colin Bray

Atom: AE Dec 20 vs. Hespeler Woolwich: 5 Hespeler: 2 Goals: Sam Siopiolosz, Lucas Radler, Gavin Wilson x2, Seb Garrett Assists: Gavin Wilson x2, Mitch

Catton, Alex Metzger, Daniel Gllant, Quinn Young, Hayden Fretz

MIDGET SQUAD WINNERS OF SILVER IN GUELPH

Midget: MAJOR A Jan 8 vs. Halton Hills Woolwich: 11 Halton Hills: 0 Goals: Tyler Seguin x6, Scott Martin, Matthew Leger, Grant Kernick, Josh Kueneman, Luke Brown Assists: Matthew Leger x3, Cole Lenaers, Timothy Shuh x5, Grant Kernick x2, Matthew Lair, Adrian Gilles x2, Luke Brown, Josh Kueneman Shutout: Quade Hunter-Rhodes Jan 11 vs. Hespeler Woolwich: 4 Hespeler: 3 Goals: Grant Kernick, Matthew Leger, Josh Kueneman, Adam Cook Assists: Alex Uttley x2, Colin Conlin x2, Jason Dunbar, Timothy Shuh, Tyler Seguin

Midget: LL #2

Jan 10 vs. LL #1 LL2: 2 LL1: 4 Goals: Cole Burkhart, Josh Totzke Assists: Nick Langer Jan 12 vs. LL #3 PeeWee: MINOR A LL2: 4 LL3: 4 Goals: Blake Doerbecker x2, Jan 11 vs. Oakville Woolwich: 1 Oakville: 0 Connor Runstedler, Joe Dubue Assists: Blake Doerbecker, Goals: Cameron Martin Jordan Luis x2, Connor Assists: Nathan Taylor Runstedler, Dan Rennie, Luke Shutout: Simon Huber Charter, Joe Dubue Jan 12 vs. Hespeler Woolwich: 7 Hespeler: 0 Midget: LL #3 Jan 8 vs. Paris Goals: Matt Fleischmann x2, Cole Chipman, Keaton Woolwich: 2 Paris: 0 McLaughlin, Nathan Curtis, Ben Goals: Tristen White, Alex Wittmer, Brett Allen Taylor Assists: Jake Clemmer x2, Jesse Assists: Alex Taylor, Noah Martin x2, Matt Fleischmann, Taylor, Adam Elliott Nathan Taylor, Cole Chipman, Shutout: Chace McCallum Blake Roemer Jan 10 vs. Ayr PeeWee: LL #2 Woolwich: 8 Ayr: 0 Goals: Nick Berlet x3, Tristen Jan 10 vs. Twin Centre Woolwich: 5 Twin Centre: 3 White, Noah Reitzel x2, Calvin Cressman, Jacob Cornwall Goals: Matthew Thaler x3, Assists: Calvin Cressman Connor Kroetsch, Max Nitsche x2, Jacob Cornwall x2, Noah Assists: Tim Brunkard x2, Matt Reitzel, Tristen White x2, Brubacher x2, Ian McGregor, Duncan MacDonald, Nick Berlet, James Wang, Brendan Grant, Brendan Taylor Zac Downs Shutout: Chace McCallum Jan 11 vs. LL #1 LL2: 2 LL1: 2 Jan 12 vs. LL #2 LL3: 4 LL2: 4 Goals: Matthew Brubacher x2 Goals: Calvin Cressman x2, Assists: Brendan Grant Tristen White, Alex Taylor Assists: Adam Elliott, Duncan Bantam: AE MacDonald, Nick Berlet, Alex Jan 11 vs. Hespeler Taylor Woolwich: 4 Hespeler: 0 Goals: Devin Williams, Benton HOCKEY Weber x3 TOURNAMENTS Assists: Matthew Uhrig, Garrett Reitzel, Justin Uhrig, Nick Atom: AE Campagnolo Chedoke Select Tournament, Hamilton | Dec 27-29 Shutout: Riley Weigel Game 1 vs. Hamilton Jan 12 vs. New Hamburg Hamilton: 1 Woolwich: 5 New Hamburg: 3 Woolwich: 1 Goals: Cole Seabrook Goals: Alex Turchan, Matthew Uhrig x2, Nick Campagnolo x2 Assists: Gavin Wilson Assists: Garrett Reitzel x2, Game 2 vs. Brantford Devin Williams x2, Alex Woolwich: 3 Brantford: 1 Turchan, Matthew MacDonald, Goals: Sam Siopiolosz x2, Gavin Tim Mayberry, Mitchell Rempel Wilson Assists: Gavin Wilson x2, Sam Bantam: LL #1 Siopiolosz Jan 11 vs. Tavistock Woolwich: 1 Tavistock: 6 Game 3 vs. Burlington Woolwich: 5 Burlington: 0 Goals: Liam Catton Goals: Sam Siopiolosz x2, Seb Assists: Daniel Gallant Garrett, Cole Seabrook, Gavin Jan 13 vs. Paris Wilson Woolwich: 2 Paris: 3 Assists: Gavin Wilson x2, Seb Goals: Hayden Fretz, Liam Garrett, Mitch Hartman, Connor

Goals: Tyana Bruins, Olivia Bolender Assists: Blythe Bender, Nicole Beam Shutout: Kylie Zacharczuk

Jan 8 vs. Wilmot Twin Centre: 1 Wilmot: 3 Goals: Tyana Bruins Assists: Nicole Beam

Midget: BB Jan 13 vs. South Huron Twin Centre: 3 South Huron: 1 Goals: Lauren Brick x2, Rebecca Vitello Assists: Pam Hammer x2, Carley Scheerer, Roslyn Mainland, Carly Bender

HOCKEY TOURNAMENTS

Bantam: LL Kyla Kowalik Memorial Tournament, New Hamburg | Jan 10-12 Game 1 vs. Wilmot Twin Centre: 0 Wilmot: 1 Game 2 vs. Guelph Twin Centre: 0 Guelph: 0 Woolwich Wild Midget BB claimed silver at the Guelph Girls Hockey Tournament on January 5. Players: Corrine Roesink, Marlee Kernick, Claire Hanley, Gillian Olsthoorn, Cassandra Tuffnail, Jen McDonald, Megan Lair, Meghan Martin, Tori Martin, Rachel Weber, Emily Willms, Sydney Shutout: Riley Barnhardt Game 3 vs. Walkerton Meunier, Amber MacPherson, and Lauren Lesage. Coaches: Steve Hanley, Karen Lair, Larry MacPherson, Brian Tuffnail. [SUBMITTED] Twin Centre: 6 Walkerton: 2 Waters x2 Weber, Josh Monk, Cameron Game 5 vs. Kanata Goals: Natalee Dietz x3, Atom: BB Charlotte Birell, Sadie Woolwich: 5 Kanata: 0 Hoy, Jacob Voisin Shutout: Quinn Brown Jan 11 vs. Niagara Richmond, Gabe Kalbfleisch Goals: Cassandra Tuffnail x2, Jan 12 vs. Plattsville Game 4 vs. Brantford Woolwich: 2 Niagara: 2 Claire Hanley, Gillian Olsthoorn, Assists: Haley Burton x4, Twin Centre: 1 Plattsville: 6 Woolwich: 4 Brantford: 2 Goals: Carly, Haylee Grace Kalbfleisch x3, Janessa Meghan Martin Goals: Aidan Krueger Goals: Gavin Wilson, Mitch Pretorius, Kate Seip, Natalee Assists: Maddy Assists: Cassandra Tuffnail x2, Assists: Brock Krulicki Hartman x2, Sam Siopiolosz Dietz, Elena McKee, Sadie Megan Lair, Gillian Olsthoorn, Jan 12 vs. Mississauga Assists: Sam Goebel Richmond Jan 13 vs. Waterford Jen McDonald Woolwich: 5 Mississauga: 2 Twin Centre: 5 Waterford: 1 Game 5 vs. Cooksville Shutout: Lauren Lesage Goals: Sydney x2, Ella x2, Goals: Brock Krulicki x2, Daniel Midget: BB Woolwich: 0 Cooksville: 3 Haylee Game 6 vs. London Orillia Tournament | Jan 10-12 Rudy x2, Aidan Krueger Game 6 vs. Erin-Hillsburgh Woolwich: 0 London: 2 Assists: Carly x2, Delaney K., Game 1 vs. Orillia Assists: Daniel Rudy x2, Brock Woolwich: 7 Erin-Hillsburgh: 0 Haylee, Maddy Krulicki, Alex Kaufman, Josh Twin Centre: 3 Orillia: 1 TWIN CENTRE Goals: Gavin Wilson, Cole Monk Goals: Pam Hammer, Kayla Lee, Atom: C STARS Seabrook x3, Tyler Brubacher, Erika Lebold Sam Siopiolosz, Mitch Hartman Jan 11 vs. Ancaster TWIN CENTRE Assists: Lauren Brick, Carly Assists: Sam SIopiolosz x5, Woolwich: 1 Ancaster: 1 Atom: LL #1 HERICANES Bender, Jill Sebben Mitch Hartman, Gavin Wilson, Jan 9 vs. New Hamburg Goals: Payton Ravelle Cole Seabrook, Keith Mikel, Game 2 vs. Barrie Twin Centre: 4 Intermediate: LL Lucas Radler, Sam Goebel, Seb Assists: Faith Katsube Twin Centre: 2 Barrie: 4 New Hamburg: 0 Jan 12 vs. Stratford Garrett Bantam: B Goals: Barett x2, Blake, Thomas Twin Centre: 3 Stratford: 3 Goals: Roslyn Mainland, Erika Shutout: Quinn Brown Lebold Assists: Blake x2, Noah, Jan 10 vs. Mount Forest Goals: Becky Jantzi, Becky Assists: Baylie Parnell, Rachel Christian Woolwich: 2 Mount Forest: 0 Cornwall, Shannon Jewitt Bantam: LL #2 Drake Bradford Tournament | Jan 11-12 Goals: Brianna Kuchma, Dana Assists: Cassie Hergott, PeeWee: REP Game 3 vs. Waterloo Schaffner Mackenzie Van Bargen Game 1 vs. Water Guys North Jan 9 vs. Twin Centre Twin Centre: 1 Waterloo: 1 Shutout: Hannah Bettke Woolwich: 4 Twin Centre: 4 Ingersoll: 2 PeeWee: REP Goals: Carly Bender Water Guys North: 5 Goals: Brock Krulicki, Curtis HOCKEY Assists: Jill Sebben Jan 5 vs. Stoney Creek Goals: Noah Rawlinson x3, TOURNAMENTS Butler, Tyler Munro, Daniel Rudy Twin Centre: 2 Stoney Creek: 0 Tegan Schaus Assists: Aidan Krueger, William Assists: Tegan Schaus x3, Noah Midget: BB Rawlinson, Brendan Knipfel, ATOM B HERICANES TAKE GOLD Guelph Tournament | Jan 2 Nathan Horst x2, Ryan Diemert Game 1 vs. North Halton Game 2 vs. Waterloo Woolwich: 3 North Halton: 0 Woolwich: 4 Waterloo: 3 Goals: Jen McDonald, Cassandra Goals: Tegan Schaus x2, Tuffnail, Claire Hanley Brendan Knipfel, Riley Shantz Assists: Gillian Olsthoorn, Tori Assists: Noah Rawlinson x2, Martin Nathan Horst x2, Owen Lucier x2, Ryan Diemert, Riley Shantz Shutout: Lauren Lesage

Game 2 vs. Niagara Woolwich: 4 Niagra: 3 Goals: Jaycee Kaufman, Sydney Meunier, Cassandra Tuffnail, Jen Novice: REP B McDonald Jan 9 vs. Kitchener Assists: Amber MacPherson x2, Woolwich: 1 Kitchener: 0 Toni Martin x3 Goals: Kyla Bloch Game 3 vs. Guelph Assists: Ayla Brubacher, Woolwich: 0 Guelph: 1 Madison Martin Game 4 vs. Stoney Creek Shutout: Gwyneth Martin Woolwich: 4 Stoney Creek: 2 Jan 11 vs. Kitchener Goals: Gillian Olsthoorn, Woolwich: 3 Kitchener: 0 Cassandra Tuffnail, Rachel Weber, Claire Hanley Goals: Brooke Rempel x2, Taylor Schmitt Assists: Gillian Osthoorn x2, Tori Martin x2, Megan Assists: Kyla Bloch, Tia Zettle, Lair, Cassandra Tuffnail, Jen Kayla Shantz, Amy Dueck McDonald, Amber MacPherson Shutout: Gwyneth Martin

WOOLWICH WILD

The Twin Centre Hericanes Atom B ladies finished strong to capture the top spot at the Orillia Hawks tournament in Orillia on January 12. After a slow start, the team saved their best games for the elimination round. Sunday morning the Hericanes defeated the North Simcoe Capitals in the semi finals with a score of 4-2. On Sunday afternoon the Hericanes faced their rivals, Wilmot Wolverines in the final gold Medal game. The score ended in a 3-1 victory for the Hericanes. Back row: Stephanie Gudet, Rick Higgins, Wayne Jantzi, Mike Haid. Third row: Nicole Hehn, Emily Krueger, Bella Kuchma, Avery Haid. Second row: Claire Higgins, Avery Bender, Katya Yusim, Kara Dietrich, Marlee Fraser, Lauren Skanes,Megan Jantzi Front: Katie Lee. [SUBMITTED]


SPORTS | 13

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

KINGS: Team will have to work at reducing penalty calls: coach FROM | 9

couldn’t translate their effort into goals, they did earn respect from Flanagan. “They’re very young – I don’t think they have a 20-year-old on their team – so they work hard right to the end. They’re gritty, they try to get under your skin. … As the year goes on,

they’re getting better and better.” Excessive penalties, which have plagued the Kings in the past, continue to be an area of concern for Flanagan, but he notes that progress has been made. “The last five or six games we’ve done a good job of getting penalties down. Tonight, I think our

emotions ran high. Guelph did a good job getting under our skin and trying to get our ire up. It’s a constant battle for us. “We’ve got our thumb on the guys about taking penalties, and now we’ve got two extra players [forward Eric Palazzo and defenseman Steve Jaldouski], so there’s always the threat of:

if you take bad penalties and you take them consistently, you’re going to find yourself out of the lineup.” The Kings are in Brampton Friday before returning to the WMC on Sunday afternoon to face the Kitchener Dutchmen, the firstplace team in the GOJHL’s Midwestern Conference. The game starts at 2 p.m.

RINK: Now it’s all about keeping an eye on the weather forecast FROM | COVER

“We started with a few, and each year we added. Maybe next year we’ll move some of the small ones and add big boards, and eventually get it full height all the way around.” Each board has taken between 10 and 15 hours to paint. Christine added, “Our neighbour said, ‘Oh, it must have taken you a long time to collect all those boards.’ We said, ‘Actually, we painted them!’” And it’s not simply a matter of hosing the yard and waiting for a perfect surface. The 40-foot rink is built on a slight hill, and Chris always starts the season early by leveling the surface. Originally built so daughters Octavia and Odessa could practice skating, the rink has evolved into the

Chris and Christine Allison make sure the libations are flowing at their annual Winterfest. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

centerpiece of the Allisons’ annual Winterfest event, which brings 40-50 of their friends for an afternoon of tin-can curling, skating, hockey, and generous libations in mid-January. “With all the technol-

ogy these days, people are busy,” said Chris. “I think it’s just one of those oldtime things. Everybody likes getting together.” What keeps them coming back each year? “The beer,” laughs Christine. But seri-

ously, “It’s back to the basic – we’re roastin’ wieners. … It’s something to look forward to, and it’s something to do, because after Christmas there’s really nothing.” But while backyard rinks in general, and the Allisons’ in particular, have become beloved seasonal staples, the cold weather can be as fickle as your hometown hockey teams. With winter often delaying itself until February, how does the backyard rink owner cope? “We’ve had years where we’ve had ‘Snowless Fest,’ because we just didn’t have any,” laughed Chris. “Yeah, we did lawn-bowling.” “We did it out on the yard, and everything was so muddy and mucky that year,” added Christine. “But we still did the fire and the fish …”

THE FUTURE OF HOCKEY

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SUBMIT SCORES ONLINE: Could these be the future Maple Leafs? Twin Centre Minor Hockey’s athletes-in-training took to the Wellesley arena for the 15th annual Kids & Cops event on January 11. The Wellesley Applejacks, Waterloo Region Police Department, and Kitchener Rangers were on hand to teach the ins-and-outs of hockey. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

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14 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

VENTURE FOOD FOR THOUGHT/ OWEN ROBERTS

TECHNOLOGY / LIGHTING IT UP

It’s all about the right light Smaller greenhouse producers rely on Mother Nature, while artificial lighting makes some inroads ELENA MAYSTRUK Even In the coldest days of the season here, for some people imports can’t compare to freshly grown local produce, which can only be grown in a greenhouse just now. This time of year, light and heat management in local greenhouses is a priority. While larger indoor growing operations are moving to the use of artificial lighting – this according to a Farm Credit Canada (FCC) report using data from the federal government, McGill University, GE Lighting and tomato company Savoura – smaller growers continue to rely on traditional methods. “It’s certainly not the norm yet in the greenhouse industry,” said Stuart Horst of Floralane Produce in Elmira. His greenhouse tomatoes, grown with natural sunlight and heated with a natural gas system, will be ready for harvesting in several weeks. In winter, monitoring 24-hour average temperature is most important: too warm and the plant burns more sugar than it produces, says the FCC report. Horst suggests too much warmth and not enough sunlight causes plants to over-stretch towards their light source, becoming thinner and weaker. “It’s a big challenge. We just try to manipulate the plant so that it doesn’t stretch for light. We just keep the greenhouse cooler on those days – the plant gets very thin trying to find light. We run the greenhouse a little cooler and are satisfied with less growth,” In lower winter light, Horst reduces the temperature in his acre of greenhouses, signaling plants to produce less energy, then on bright sunny days the temperature is ramped up to allow more growth. “There’s very little artificial lighting that’s used in Canada, period. While

it’s technology that’s been around for a number of years, we look at somewhere like Europe – where there’s more uptake on artificial lighting than there has been [in Canada] – they would be the leaders when it comes to utilizing the technology,” said FCC spokesperson Dave Orosz. Also, more light doesn’t necessarily mean more fruit. “There is no advantage in providing more hours of light per day, as an excess of light might result in a loss of yields,” said Audrey Boulianne, production coordinator at Savoura, a Quebec company specializing in greenhouse tomatoes. Rather the artificial lighting, whether lightemitting diode (LED) lights or conventional highpressure sodium (HPS) lamps could help Canada’s producers compete with producing countries with plentiful natural heat and sunshine. The FCC report notes there is a continued greater demand for fresh local produce, potentially fuelling the demand for artificial lighting to extend growing options. LED lights provide that option at a lower operating cost than traditional lighting systems. That vision is a long way off for most Canadian producers, however. Emerging in Europe, so far LEDs are used experimentally in the United States and Canada for growing but are used widely now to light up homes, streets and holiday lights. The new technology may result in more economical use of space, increased yields and more efficient use of energy than HPS counterparts. But how feasible is this technology for local, smaller greenhouse operations? “It’s wildly expensive for a small grower, they’d have to be pretty big,” said St. Jacobs Country Gardens’ Linda MacLeod-Biglow. For the plants she grows, a conventional greenhouse

Producers getting on board to support the farm lobby FIELD NOTES

Natural light streams into the Floralane Produce greenhouse in Elmira where sunlight and temperature regulation work to optimize tomato growth on sunny days and prevent over-stretching of the plants on cloudy days. A few larger greenhouses in Canada use artificial light for growing, while smaller operations stick with sunlight. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER] with natural lighting is enough; a more elaborate setup would be unprofitable. “Let’s just say it’s expensive. I think it could add 50 per cent to the cost of

a greenhouse. In general, there has not been a lot of uptake on growing crops under lights,” said Orosz. There are about half a dozen or less artificially-lit growing systems in Que-

bec, Ontario, British Columbia and Alberta. The reason? While cost is a main concern, it’s the “leap of faith” required LIGHT | 15

When farmers aren’t busy farming, it turns out they’re busy lobbying the government with ideas, strategies and suggestions to keep farming vibrant. A new members’ survey by the Ontario Federation of Agriculture, the province’s largest general farm group, shows many farmers are dedicating time to contacting representatives at all three levels – municipal, provincial and federal. In fact, nearly 60 per cent of the 1,700 farmers who participated in this poll said they have contacted at least one political representative. And almost one-quarter said they’ve contacted officials at all three levels within the last two years. Does that level of engagement make them activists, or just concerned citizens? Whatever the case, this high percentage is music to the federation’s ears. General manager Neil Currie says the organization is “very pleased with this level of member involvement.” Understandably so. The federation’s main function is lobbying, which the survey respondents said should indeed be a big part of what the group does. But the federation has also been urging farmers to get involved themselves. Don’t leave it all to headquarters, it says – no matter what the level of credibility, people get tired of hearing from the same source all the time. Instead, take action yourselves. Let elected officials know what’s on your minds and establish relationships ROBERTS | 15


VENTURE | 15

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

LIGHT: Extending the season

ROBERTS: Consumer support a key part of farming’s future FROM | 14

Philips Horticultural LED lights are used in a greenhouse. Energy efficient LEDs are an emerging technology in European greenhouses and are used experimentally in Canada. [SUBMITTED] FROM | 14

for the change that gets to a lot of growers, Orosz added. The expensive investment may not yield profits until 10 to 15 years after installation. “I’d love to have artificial lighting. It’s the cost – it’s a big thing. We figured natural lighting all along. It’s just when we start growing more and more year ’round, is when we start thinking artificial lighting.

The harvesting part is not year ’round,” Horst said. He has been in talks with fellow growers on the subject but so far an artificial lighting system is still off in the future. Instead Horst focuses on his tried-andtrue natural methods and even as the greenhouse is closed until the new harvest comes in, his workers are caring for the plants soon to be ripe with red fruit.

with decision makers. Here’s why. There’s no substitute for politicians hearing directly from a constituent—particularly one who feeds a great many of your constituents! How can politicians help farmers keep doing their job? That advice is what politicians need to hear, and more than once every few years at the ballot box. Says federation executive member Debra PrettyStraathof: “OFA relies heavily on member participation to help carry a united farm voice to government officials and policy makers on legislative changes,” she says. “Individual farmers, speaking the same message, can have a tremen-

dous impact on government and policy makers.” The survey revealed some other important information. For example, the federation wanted to know how federation members were lobbying politicians. That knowledge has a big impact on communication campaigns. And while it might be trendy to say the preferred choices were social media, the fact is they weren’t— meetings, phone calls and letters were the top three ways members engaged their elected officials. So just like print media prevails in agriculture, so do traditional forms of communications. But then, after all this effort, what was the re-

sponse? Well, I’d say it was kind of disappointing. Two thirds of members who contacted a politician got a response most commonly by phone calls, letters and email. Further revealing was that farmers were motivated to contact politicians by three main subjects: land use, government regulations and farm income or support programs. To me, that further underlines how farmers’ agendas and consumers’ interests have yet to marry. I don’t see local food, GMOs, animal welfare, wind energy or any of the public hot buttons on that list of farmers’ issues. But hopefully it’s a

Community Parks, Recreation and Culture Strategic Master Plan The Township of Wellesley is undertaking a Community Parks, Recreation and Culture Strategic Master Plan to guide the development and delivery of recreation programs, facilities, culture, parks, sports fields, trails and open space for the next 20 years.

Public input is critical to identify the issues, trends, and future priorities. There are many opportunities to participate in the process including: Completing a web survey (active until January 31, 2014). Visit www.surveymonkey.com/s/WellesleyMP to complete the survey. Hardcopies are available at the Administration Office. Attend the future Community Gathering Forum. Visit the Township website for announcements or contact Brad Voisin below if you are interested in attending. Attend the Public Meeting / Open House to present the draft Plan (spring 2014). Visit www.wellesley.ca for project updates and announcements.

Should you have any questions regarding the Township's Community Parks, Recreation and Culture Strategic Master Plan, please contact: Brad Voisin, Director of Facilities | Phone: 519-699-4611 | E-mail: bvoisin@wellesley.ca

teachable for farmers. The things you approach government about – your burning issues – are not shared by consumers. So, it’s either time to educate consumers and get them to care about such issues, or change your emphasis. Let politicians know you can’t farm with too many land use restrictions, with too much red tape and without enough support from on high. But don’t forget to underline to them your role in the things consumers care about – in particular, a safe, wholesome, affordable food supply. Let consumers know you understand their needs. Their support is pivotal to the future of farming.


16 | THE ARTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

THE ARTS ON STAGE / LIVE THEATRE

A common thread in life’s experiences Different takes a matter of perspective in the Elmira Theatre Company’s production of If We Are Women WILL SLOAN Anyone who has ever had parents knows that they are out-of-touch fuddy-duddies who have no idea how people behave in the real world. Anyone who has ever had kids knows that they’re immature, hormone-crazed young’uns with no understanding of how the world works. There’s a good chance you’ve agreed with both of these fundamental truths at some point or another, although almost certainly not at the same time. Those worlds collide in If We Are Women, the latest production by the Elmira Theatre Company. This cross-generational comedydrama brings two grandmothers, a daughter, and a granddaughter together at a beach house in Connecticut, where the family is in the midst of a crisis. It’s the night of the granddaughter’s prom, and after spending the night with a gentleman caller, she announces she’s ditched her plans to go to Yale in the autumn, and is running away with the love of her life. For the older women, this youthful exuberance is very familiar.

Deb Deckert, Lisa MacNeil, Megann Friesen, and Sherry Heine keep it all in the family for ETC’s new production, opening February 7. “The two grandmothers and the mother, they talk about how they grew up and what happened in their first loves, and you see the young blossoming ones,” said Joe Brenner, producer of the play. “They’re trying to tell the granddaughter, ‘y’know, don’t make the mistakes we did,’ but every generation has to have its own life. “Anybody that is middleaged will really get a lot out

of this story, because you’ll be thinking about your past too,” he continued, “I think the audience will like it because they’ll really get to know each character.” The play, written by Joanna McClelland Glass, was a longtime favourite of Susan Jennings, director of the production. “She always loved it,” said Brenner. “She actually read it back in 2005, and she just waited until she thought it

[WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

was the right time and right group to do it with. She calls it a ‘funny, sad, and eloquent tribute to the lives of women.’” “Funny, sad, and eloquent” is surely a difficult balance to strike. How does ECT tackle it? Not surprisingly, it’s a matter of casting. “It was difficult,” said Brenner. “We did two rounds of auditions, and then we had callbacks. We narrowed it down to two for

each role, and then had callbacks and had them read together again. Sometimes you just get that reading where it gels – yes, these are the people.” The resulting cast includes“four wonderful women,” said Brenner: high-school-age newcomer Megann Friesen, along with local theatre vets Deb Deckert, Sherry Heine, and Lisa MacNeil. “The other three have been onstage for years,

and some have won awards. It’s very much an acting piece.” A key challenge for the cast is making each character accessible to each member of the audience, no matter the age. “I think different ages will have a different perspective,” said Brenner. “I think young people recognize and probably see it more through the granddaughter’s eyes, whereas a grandparent will definitely be able to see it through their life experience. … Your age may allow you to relate to one character more than another.” However, he added, “The characters are very well-developed, and I think you get everybody’s story. I think you can understand where everybody is.” If We Are Women runs February 7-16, Thursday, Friday, Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 2:30 p.m., at the Elmira Theatre Company (76 Howard Ave.). Tickets are $19 and available at the Centre in the Square box office – 519-578-1570 or 1-800-265-8977, or at www. elmiratheatre.com. A limited number of tickets may be available at the door.

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CLASSIFIED | 17

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

CLASSIFIED HELP WANTED

CLASSIFIED DEADLINE:

THURSDAYS BY 10AM JUNIOR SQUAD FALLS TO PRESTON

HELP WANTED

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308A or 308R Sheet Metal Installer Tri-Mech Inc. is a mechanical company specializing in Gas Fitting, Hydronic Heating, Geothermal, Furnaces, Air Conditioning and High Pressure Cleaning Systems. We service Agricultural, light commercial and residential systems. Applicants should be able to work with minimal supervision and have good customer relation skills. Applicants are invited to submit a letter of application or resume by fax to 519-638-3342, or by email to jobs@trimech.ca

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is currently accepting resumes for: HELP WANTED

REQUIRED IMMEDIATELY: TOWER – FOREMEN, LEAD HANDS AND RIGGERS The successful applicants will have a minimum of 2 years experience and have a thorough understanding of wireless antenna systems, tower installation procedures, and/or ground works. We are a future-focused organization that offers dynamic career opportunities, an attractive compensation package including: bonus program; medical coverage; group RRSP program and more. More information about this opportunity can be found at: www.trylon.com

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Aerial Technician/Rigger Shipper/Receiver Civil Construction Foremen AZ Truck Driver Excavator Operators

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The junior Lancers fell to Preston High School 51-29 at EDSS on January 14. Points were scored by Dexter Roth (7), Aaron Weigel (5).

www.rigarus.com for more info HELP WANTED

Please forward your resume to: Recruiting, Trylon, 21 South Field Drive, Elmira, Ontario, N3B 0A6. Fax: (519) 669-8912 E-mail: careers@trylon.com

HELP WANTED WANTED PART TIME Housekeeper; Looking for a reliable, energetic helper 2 days per week. Tasks will include cleaning, tidying, laundry, cooking and organizing. Monday and Thursday 9 to 2. Contact 519741-6274 (Conestogo).

TRAINING & LESSONS QUILTING CLASSES BEING held in Elmira. January to May. Call Deb 519-669-8894 for details.

AUTOMOTIVE 2007 HYUNDAI AZURA. 135 kms, one owner. Car loaded and in A1 shape. Wife wanted new SUV. Call 519-669-2212 .

RENTALS ELMIRA - 1 Bedroom. Updated and cared fro unit. Looking for mature working or retired individual. No pets, non smokers please. $570 + utilities. Call 519669-2212.

HOW TO REACH US

[ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

7877 WELLINGTON RD. 8 P.O. BOX 248 DRAYTON, ON. N0G 1P0

Experienced HVAC Installer Tri-Mech Inc. is a mechanical company specializing in Gas Fitting, Hydronic Heating, Geothermal, Furnaces, Air Conditioning and High Pressure Cleaning Systems. We service Agricultural, light commercial and residential systems. Applicants must hold a minimum G2 license, be able to work with minimal supervision, have good customer relation skills, and be willing to be on-call for emergency service on a rotating schedule with other team members. Applicants are invited to submit a letter of application or resume by fax to 519-638-3342, or by email to jobs@trimech.ca

PHONE 519.669.5790 | TOLL FREE 1.888.966.5942 | FAX 519.669.5753 | ONLINE WWW.OBSERVERXTRA.COM

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18 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES

TIRE Complete Collision Service

WHERE TIRES

THOMPSON’S

Auto Tech Inc.

ARE A

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE. 101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

519.669.8330

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial On-The-Farm Service

FAX: 519.669.3210

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

AFTER HOURS

519.669.8917

519-669-3232

Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

RUDOW’S

CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

AUTO CLINIC

519-669-4400 30 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

RUDOW’S

21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

24 Hour Accident Assistance Accredited Test & Repair Facility

BODY MAINTENANCE AT:

1-800-CARSTAR 519-669-3373

CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

Call Us At 519-669-3373

519-669-7652

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

GENERAL SERVICES “25 years in Business”

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location

Boat Covers | Air Conditioner Covers | Small Tarps Storage Covers | BBQ Covers | Awnings & Canopies Replacement Gazebo Tops | Golf Cart Enclosures & Covers

• Janitorial

• Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off / Pick up Service • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair

•Ratches, Hooks, Straps, Webbing etc. •Canvas, Vinyl, Polyester, Acrylic Fabrics

General Repairs

• Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping

519.595.4830

www.completecarpetcare.ca

6376 Perth Rd. 121 Poole, ON

ROB McNALL 519-669-7607 LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

CONSTRUCTION INC. (519) 569-0772 • Commercial & Industrial General Contracting • Specializing in Concrete Work & Excavation • Retaining Walls

info@trappconstruction.ca www.trappconstruction.ca

• • • •

Stamped Coloured Concrete Demolition Bin Service Machine Bases

Concrete Breaking & Removal

GENERAL SERVICES PC TUNE UPS | REPAIRS : IN-HOME | ON SITE OR FREE PICK UP / DELIVERY ELMIRA AREA

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HOME IMPROVEMENTS SERVICES

Industrial • Commercial • Agricultural

SteelKore Inc.

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ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd.

GENERAL SERVICES

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WE’RE AT YOUR SERVICE. We specialize in getting the word out. Advertise your business services here. Get weekly exposure with fantastic results. Call us at 519.669.5790.

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519-669-0003

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RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs. 24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

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519-669-3652

John Schaefer Painting FREE ESTIMATES Interior/exterior Painting, Wallpapering & Plaster | drywall Repairs

NOW ACCEPTING VISA OR MASTERCARD

519-669-2251 36 Hampton St., Elmira


CLASSIFIED | 19

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

Sew Special

KENJI ORITA • Custom Kitchens • Custom Furniture • Libraries • Exotic Woods

TEL: +1 (519) 574-6734 oritakenji@gmail.com 20B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA

• Residential • Commercial • Industrial

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Custom Drapery Custom Blinds

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Tel:

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• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches A Family owned and operated business serving KW, Elmira and surrounding area for over 35 years.

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CALL JAYME FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE.

519.501.2405 | 519.698.2114 In Business since 1973 • Fully Insured

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

RA HOME COMF ELMI (519) 669-4600 ORT

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS GLASS SYSTEMS INC.

APPLIANCES – FURNACES – FIREPLACES AIR CONDITIONERS – WATER HEATERS SPRING SPECIAL ON AIR CONDITIONING TUNE UP $99, INSTALLED FROM $1999 FURNACES INSTALLED FROM $2499 FRIDGES $499, STOVES $399, WASHERS $399, DRYERS $369, FREEZERS $199 Come visit our show room FREE QUOTES

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Home Improvements

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• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

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TEL:

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General Construction | 12 Years Experience Residential & Agricultural • Barns / Shops Decks & Railings • Poured Concrete • Driveways & Sidewalks Siding, Fascials, Soffits • Interior Renovations

Call Lawrence Metzger

519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

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FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

WINDOWS & DOORS

ROOFING | SIDING | SOFFIT & FACIA DRYWALL INSTALLATION

MURRAY MARTIN | 519.638.0772

7302 Sideroad 19 RR#2., Alma, ON, N0B 1A0

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

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Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Decorative/Stamped and coloured concrete

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CONESTOGO

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519-638-2699

519-664-3800 877-664-3802

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

www.RobertBrown.com

 Table and shelf glass  Ask for a quote… we install

519-664-1435

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OUTDOOR SERVICES

READ’S DECORATING SINCE 1961

Frameless Showers & Railings

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FOR ALL YOUR HOME DECORATING NEEDS. 27 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

519.669.3658

Services

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Lawn Maintenance Programs | Spring Clean-up Flower Bed Maintenance Programs Leaf Clean-up and Removal | Soil & Mulch Delivery & Installation | Snow Clearing & Removal | Ice Control 27 Brookemead, St, Elmira P: 519-669-1188 | F: 519-669-9369

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KEVIN DETWEILER

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COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

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Storm damaged fallen trees/branches Cutting/removal

Shrub & Branch Removal & Chipping

Technical Tree Falling/Cutting/ Removal

Stumping and Grinding

Preventative Maintenance Limbing and tree pruning

Shrub & Small Tree Replacement

Call: Jeff Basler, Owner | Office: 519-669-9081 | Fax: 519-669-9819 Email: ever-green@sympatico.ca

OUTDOOR SERVICES COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

YOUR SOURCE FOR YEAR-ROUND PROPERTY MAINTENANCE SPECIALIZED SKIDSTEER SERVICE

LAWN MOWING PACKAGES

· weekly, biweekly services

FULL FLOWER BED MAINTENANCE · weeding, pruning, dead heading, planting, flowerbed edging, mulch delivery & installation

TOP DRESSING & OVERSEEDING · Triple Mix topsoil & sure start overseed grass seed

SNOW PLOWING & ICE CONTROL · Trucks, Tractors, Skidsteer

Call: Jeff Basler, Owner Office: 519-669-9081 | Fax: 519-669-9819 Email: ever-green@sympatico.ca

· Offering a quick and easy way to reclaim unused land · Our tracked skid steer equipped with a forestry brush mower can handle any long grass/brush · Trail maintenance and development · Wooded lot Thinning · Pasture Reclaimation · Orchard Maintenance · Industrial Lots · Real Estate Lots · Cottages

Just Gardens Complete Garden and Lawn Maintenance

Anita Soehner Clean Up | Mulch

Planting | Garden Design Lawn Maintenance All Your Gardening Needs

226.476.2039

Cell | 519.504.5934

rozell_soehner@yahoo.ca

INTRODUCING OUR PIC BUCKET For digging through frozen ground! And light demo where clean up as you go is a benefit.

• • • •

Trenching Excavating Demo Back fill compaction plate

Murray & Daniel Shantz

ALMA, ONTARIO | PHONE: 519.846.5427


20 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Don’t Wait, Now is the Time to List!

$314,900 2 CAR GARAGE + 2 DRIVEWAYS = AMPLE PARKING Elmira – Front and rear driveways allow for 6 car parking or trailer parking and double garage. As soon as you walk in the door you will see for yourself a mix of modern & classics. From French door walkout to side deck to concrete countertops this home has been renovated extensively! Convenient mudrm off garage & completely renovated & updated kit. Open concept MF w/LR, Sep DR & kit. Partly fin’d basement w/RR. MLS 1341452 Call Alli or Paul direct.

A DONATION will be made with every home bought or sold by Paul or Alli.

Paul Martin SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL DIRECT

519-503-9533 www.homeswithpaul.ca

Alli Bauman SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-577-6248

Home Evaluation!

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

3 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5426

YOUR DREAM HOME WAS JUST LISTED IN CANADA’S BEST COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER

KEEPING WATCH OVER OUR COMMUNITY KEEPING YOU IN-THE-KNOW ABOUT THE PEOPLE, EVENTS, AND NEWS IN OUR COMMUNITIES. OBSERVERXTRA.COM

OBSERVER W O O L W I C H

A N D

W E L L E S L E Y

T O W N S H I P S

IN PRINT. ONLINE. IN PICTURES. IN DEPTH.


CLASSIFIED | 21

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Bert Martin

100 YEARS

BROKER

Remax Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

DIRECT: 519-572-2669

3 Arthur St. S. Elmira www.remaxsolidgold.biz

OFFICE: 519-669-5426

EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

FREE Market Evaluation HOME with WORKSHOP!

$315,000

Your referrals are appreciated!

BROKERAGE

Elmira Real Estate Services Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage

of combined service to HELP you!

90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 4, Elmira N3B 3L4

519-669-3192

Elmira@royallepage.ca Bonnie Brubacher

www.elmirahomes.ca

Older 2 story home backing to farm land offers 6 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, 3 kitchens, possible in-law suite, 24' x 48' two story workshop. Located on the edge of town. MLS. Call Bert Martin for an appt.

Broker of Record / Owner

OPEN HOUSE | Sat Jan 18th 2-4 pm

Monique Roes

Sales Representative / Owner

Shanna Rozema Broker /Owner

“Helping you is what we do”

OPEN HOUSE | Sat & Sun 2-4 pm

4132 Line 83, Hesson

150 Brookmead Street, Elmira

ELMIRA BEAUTY $569,900 Sought after 2 yr old bungalow, finished top

$392,500 15 mins West of Elmira (hwy 86 West, turn

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD.

We support Woolwich Community Services through

49+ YEARS

SINCE 1913

left on Perth Line 121, right on Line 83) Beautiful ½ acre setting. Well maintained & updated 4 bdrm bungalow, large country kitchen w/walkout to deck. Amazing newly finished basement space for entertaining, geo thermal heat, dbl garage, detached heated shop. MLS

$369,900 Brand new Paradigm built 4 level sidesplit,

gorgeous maple kitchen w/4 stainless appl., hrdwd & ceramic, family rm offers gas f/p and walkout, master ensuite, dbl driveway. MLS

to bottom, natural maple hardwd floors, attractive white kitchen offers island/breakfast bar, quartz counter tops & appl., dining area overlooks the living room w/gas fireplace, walkout to deck, master ensuite, large finished basement. MLS

45 Arthur St. S., Elmira Office:

519-669-2772 www.thurrealestate.com

BRAD MARTIN Broker of Record, MVA Residential Res: 519.669.1068

JULIE HECKENDORN Broker

Res: 519.669.8629

TRACEY WILLIAMS

Sales Rep. Cell: 519.505.0627

NEW LISTING

$209,900

A GREAT STARTER HOME – Close to public school. Newer laminate floors in L.R. and all bdrms. Most windows have been replaced. Gas furnace replaced in 2011. Unfin. bsmt. Att’d garage w/newer door. Deep lot. NEW MLS

EYE-CATCHING IN HAWKESVILLE $387,000 Large 2950 sq.ft 4 bdrm family home, open

concept main floor offers hardwood flrs, bright kitchen w/breakfast bar/island open to the dining area, cozy family room has a woodburning f/p, main floor laundry, master ensuite, spacious yard. MLS

$395,000

$459,900

QUIET CRESCENT – FOUR bdrm. home with 3 updated baths (3pc. ensuite), main flr. family rm. w/fireplace & w/o to a HUGE 2 tiered deck with 8 person hot tub. Fenced yard. Open concept kit./D.A. to fam. rm. Formal D.R. and liv. rm. This home is carpet-free & tastefully decorated. Extra-long dble. driveway & dble. garage w/newer door. MLS

throughout, 3 bdrms, 2 baths, open concept main floor w/ceramic floors, large dining area overlooks the family rm w/engineered hardwood flrs & walkout. MLS

Building in Drayton where homes are affordable

$419,900

outside of Drayton. Inviting Pioneer log home offers exposed logs, cathedral ceiling to upper loft, open concept main floor, updated kit w/quartz counter tops, main floor master w/ensuite. MLS

Dorinda Orser & Kathleen Anne Clyson Sales Representatives

Unit# 15C 370 Highland Road West Kitchener, Ontario Canada N2M 5J9

Direct: 519-547-1559 | Office: 519-745-7000 kaclyson@rogers.com

CUSTOM QUALITY Single Family Homes Starting from

Visit our Model Home at 46 Bedell Drive, Drayton

Mon., Tues. & Wed. 1-7pm | Sat. & Sun. 1-4:30pm | or by appointment

HAWKESVILLLE BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY – Operate your own business & live in the spacious, well maintained, 3 bdrm. dwelling. Presently a catering business (seats 54) but this property has endless opportunities! 1400 sq.ft. of commercial space. Single garage + lots of pkg. MLS

ONE OF A KIND $629,900 13 acres, mature trees, pond & wildlife just

Call for your FREE Market Evaluation.

NEW LISTING CONESTOGO – Quiet area, close to school and downtown. Spacious dining area w/ walkout to patio. Stone fireplace in the L.R. (w/parquet flr) and a gas fireplace in the rec. room. Newer floor in games room. 5 pc. bathrm (ensuite privilege) 1.5 garage (extra deep!). Dble. driveway. NEW MLS

DRAYTON BACKSPLIT $299,900 Exceptionally well maintained and updated

226-818-5311 | verdonehomes.com

$340's

ATTENTION INVESTORS AND DEVELOPERS! $1,200,000 Opportunity knocks. Prime future development, rural residential and agricultural land set on 24 acres. Build your private estate home or hold as an excellent investment for your future. Minutes from the St. Jacob’s farmer’s market.

LANCERS POST SHUTOUT VICTORY AGAINST CAMERON HEIGHTS

CALL FOR YOUR FREE MARKET EVALUATION LET OUR 50+ YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WORK FOR YOU!

PRIVATE SALE OPEN HOUSE

SUN. JAN. 19, 2014 | 1-3 PM 915 PERKIN CR., LISTOWEL, ON

$389,500 Updated raised bungalow in one of Listowel’s most desirable neighbourhoods. Easy 30 minute commute to KW. Move-in ready with extensive upgrades completed. Enjoy the in-ground pool!

For full listing details see www.comfree.com access code 450599 or call 519-291-4487 to arrange a viewing

WWW.OBSERVERXTRA.COM

The EDSS boys’ hockey team skated to a 4-0 victory over Cameron Heights January 9. Spencer Brick, Josh Shantz, Jason Gamble, and Kyle Wideman scored on home ice at the WMC. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]


22 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

ELENA MAYSTRUK

tournament for the kids and youths, games inside for the less-outdoorsy participants, a clown and face painter, and all hats will come off when musician Erick Traplin takes the stage in front of the kids. Coming back for its second year is Casino Fest, a casino night event put on by the Lions Club. “We have a breakfast in the morning. It used to be put on by the firemen but now it’s just called the Snofest Breakfast. It gets older people a chance to come out and do something, give them a break. Then we have events for the kids,� Sebben said. The Linwood Snofest, then, stays a tradition in the community for another year, and it’s not the only one.

Breslau is also rolling out its third annual Winterfest on the weekend of February 7-9 complete with Family Movie Night at 6:30 p.m. at Breslau Evangelical Missionary Church, Saturday indoor and outdoor activities at the community centre from 10 a.m.-3 p.m., pancake breakfast on Sunday 8-11 a.m. 9 ($5 per person; children under 4 are free) and skating at the pond from 1-4 p.m. In the same vein, Elmira will celebrate Family Day February 17 at the Woolwich Memorial centre. Heidelberg residents should keep an ear to the ground as the village’s annual Winter Fun Day (February 17) may be cancelled due to unforeseen circumstances, organizers said this week.

TRUSTED SOURCE. NO OTHER SOURCE REQUIRED TO GET THE FULL STORY.

        

        

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THE CHALLENGE

Though the season is young, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not uncommon for the winter blues to begin taking flight as the holidays retreat into memory and the gray monotony of February rolls in. That sends us scrambling for the warmth of a hearty soup and the comfort of television and couch. But thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also the chance for a break or two courtesy of some winter festivals on the horizon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had it since, maybe, 1979. I think for five, six or seven years we stopped but brought it back in the 2000s and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been going strong ever since,â&#x20AC;? said Linwood recreation committee member Lori Sebben, who is helping with the Linwood Snofest

on February 8. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What it does is, I find, at least in wintertime around in Linwood anyway, you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get out much unless you are running to a hockey arena. But you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get out and see people, your friends who maybe you havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen since the fall. It kind of gives a change for people to come out.â&#x20AC;? Several hundred people attended the event last year, which speaks to its popularity and maybe to the eagerness of residents to chase away the winter doldrums. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We were kind of debating on whether or not we should just do this every other year and then we heard from a lot of people that they wanted to see it brought back every year.â&#x20AC;? There is a sno-pitch

& 2 9 ( 1 $ ' , ( 8 % ( $ 5 ' 1 $ 5 & 6 , 6 + 2 3 . + 2 % 2 % 2 2 : $ / / 5 , $ * ( 1 2 5 6 ' 2 6 3 5 , 1 & 5 ( ( $ $ + , 1 5 1 $ 6 ) $ %

CROSSWORD PUZZLER

Events offer up an escape from the winter blahs

OBSERVER PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com

PUBLIC NOTICES

NOTICE TO THE RESIDENTS OF THE TOWNSHIP OF WELLESLEY TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the Township of Wellesley intends to discuss the draft municipal budget for the year 2014 at the regularly scheduled meeting on January 28, 2014 commencing at 6:45pm in the Council Chambers, 4805 William Hastings Line, Crosshill. Should you wish to address Council or if you require further details or information, please contact Theresa Bisch, Treasurer Township of Wellesley at (519) 699-3954 or email: tbisch@wellesley.ca

We need your input! The Region of Waterloo is developing a Master Plan which will guide future development for the Region of Waterloo International Airport for the next 20 years.

Come to our Public Information Session to learn more about the project and provide feedback. This is the first of two public information sessions that will be scheduled. The purpose of the first session is to obtain feedback from the community on various possible development options. Event: Date: Location:

NOTICE TO OWNERS OF LIVESTOCK

Ontario Wildlife Damage Compensation Program The Ontario Wildlife Damage Compensation Program was launched in July 2011. Through this program, the Township of Woolwich may compensate owners for the cost of livestock killed or injured by coyotes. Additional information is available at www.ontario.ca/predation. Farmers must have a valid Farm Business Registration (FBR) Number and Premises ID Number to be eligible for the program. Call 1-866-327-3678 for information about obtaining an FBR number. Call 1-877-424-1300 about obtaining a Premises ID Number. To Apply for Compensation: If your property is located in the Township of Woolwich and you have had livestock killed or injured by coyotes, report the situation to the Township within 48 hours. You must retain the remains of the kill for inspection by the Townshipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Livestock Valuer. To notify the Township of damage to livestock, or to ask questions or request an information package, call the Township at (519) 669-6005 or (519) 669-1647 ext. 6113

Times:

Airport Master Plan Public Information Session Thursday, February 6, 2014 Waterloo Region Museum 10 Huron Road, Kitchener 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 8 p.m. Brief introductory presentation at the top of every hour: 4 p.m., 5 p.m., 6 p.m. and 7 p.m.

For more information visit: www.waterlooairport.ca/masterplan If you require accessibility assistance to participate in this event please contact us in advance at: 519-648-2256 or TTY: 519-575-4608. Under the Municipal Act, personal information such as name, address, telephone number and property location that may be included in a submission becomes part of the public record. Questions regarding the collection of this information should be referred to the Regional Clerks Office.


CLASSIFIED | 23

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

FAMILY ALBUM ANNIVERSARY

IN MEMORIAM

IN MEMORIAM

Don & Shirley Bott

Audrey Marie Smalldon

Edwin Morden

Invite you to their Open House to celebrate their

50th Wedding Anniversary

Nov. 9, 1922 - Jan. 18, 2010

July 30, 1928 - January 22, 2013

CELEBRATE YOUR FAMILY IN THE OBSERVER Our Family Album is the perfect place to show the people you love how much you care!

Saturday, January 25, 2014 2:30 - 4:30 p.m. Alma Community Centre 51 Simpson St. E. Alma Come to visit - bring your best wishes only!

IN MEMORIAM

OBITUARY

Jesse Taylor

Love Forever & Always Your Friends and Family

DEATH NOTICES BATE, MAXINE | Passed away peacefully January 9, 2014 at Freeport Hospital BATTJES, MARY FRANCES | Jan. 8, 1930 - Jan. 15, 2014 Passed away peacefully surrounded by her family on Wednesday, January 15, 2014, at Grand River Hospital, at the age of 84 years.

BENDER, ELMA | Elma passed into the presence of her Lord and Saviour, peacefully on Sun., Jan. 12, 2014 with family at her side. She resided at Nithview Community, New Hamburg. Local relatives are her sons Arnie Bender and wife Barbara of Wellesley and Maynard Lila Bender and wife of Conestogo.

OBITUARY

Passed away peacefully at Heritage House in St. Jacobs on January 13, 2014, in her 75th year. Beloved mother of son Jan and his wife Tami, and their children, to whom she was a very proud grandmother, Abe and Serena. Survived by her siblings George (Almeda), Marie (Gordon), Emerson (Janice), Susan, Harvey (Mary), Selina (Van), Naomi (Laverne), Anna (Alan), and many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sister Lena, brother Jacob, and her parents Abraham and Melinda Frey. At Judy’s request, cremation has taken place and a memorial service to celebrate her life will take place at the Dreisinger Funeral Home Chapel, Elmira, ON, on Saturday, January 18, 2014 at 11 am. If desired, donations in memory of Judy can be made to the Woolwich Community Services Food Bank.

SHOWALTER, CLARA (MARTIN) | Peacefully, passed away, to be with her Lord, on Sat., Jan. 11, 2014, at the Hamilton General Hospital, surrounded by her family and friends. Clara was 69 years old and resided near Drayton.

June Yvonne Julia Shipley was born June 12, 1929 to parents Emma and Jacob Saddler and died peacefully at home in Elmira on Sunday morning, January 12, 2014. She was the loving wife of William Shipley for 59 years – deceased November 10, 2012. She was a graduate of St. Mary’s School of Nursing in 1950 and the Toronto University School of Nursing in 1951. She was a lifelong member of St. Paul’s Lutheran Church, Elmira, and served on many committees. Loving mother of Carol Moller (Michael) of Waterloo, David (Bonnie) of Crosshill and Mike of Elmira. Survived by loving granddaughter Samantha Rose Shipley, sister Doris Ritter of West Montrose, sister-in-law Barbara Roberts (George) of Hamilton, brotherin-law John Burnham of Tennessee, and many nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by brothers Louis and Merner Saddler, sister Norma Bolender and brothers-in-law Laudvell Bolender and Arthur Ritter. There will be no visitation or funeral service. Cremation has taken place. As expressions of sympathy, donations may be made to St. Mary’s General Hospital Foundation or Canadian Diabetes Association and may be obtained by calling Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira (519-669-2207).

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

OPINION: Try to pay less attention to the Rob Ford sideshow FROM | 8

national media – from columns to radio talk shows – that accounts for the rapid spread and constant coverage of Ford’s every move. In fact, The Canadian Press recently reported that Ford’s total TV coverage, if all broadcast consecutively on a single network, would have come just short of four years worth of airtime. However, media does not thrive without the support of its consumers – the third cause of unnecessary drama surrounding Ford’s story. It’s unclear why people find Ford’s story interesting enough to make it the start of every conversation. They’re concerned about Toronto’s economic success? (Honestly, not a valid reason for the majority of Toronto citizens.) They’re angry that their

Love Joyce, Family, Friends

OBITUARY

Shipley, June

Schaafsma, Judith

Time passes, memories stay, Never forgotten, especially today, Gone are the days we used to share, But in our hearts you’re always there, Never more than a thought away, Loved and remembered everyday.

Fondly Remembered by Family & Friends

One year has passed and still you stay as near and dear as yesterday

hard-earned tax dollars are managed by a crack addict? (Understandable.) They find joy in relishing in the faults of a person more publicly disgraceful than themselves? (Hopefully untrue.) Or, most likely, they possess a human tendency toward the creation and spreading of drama. But of course, every dramatic situation has its major source – in this case, it’s Ford’s stupidity. At this point, Ford must recognize the damage he is causing Toronto’s reputation and how absurdly negative of a role model he is for the next generation of Canadians. He should take a political leave – possibly lifelong – to focus on rehabilitating his mental health. By this point in Ford’s political scandal, citizens should have recognized the current mayor’s unmistakable inability to successfully lead a city. Therefore, instead of

Roth, Vicki Passed away peacefully surrounded by her loving family on Sunday, January 12, 2014 at Hospice Wellington, at the age of 62 years. Beloved wife for 42 years of David Roth of RR 2, West Montrose. Loving mother of Jeff, Matt and Jasmine, all of Elmira. Devoted momma of Charlise, Dominic and Tyson. Sister of Elaine Butler, Sheila Bell, Rob Hoban and Lisa Charters. Also lovingly remembered by her many nieces, nephews and cousins. Predeceased by her parents William and Mary Hoban. The family received their relatives and friends at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira on Wednesday, January 15th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. followed by cremation. A memorial service to celebrate Vicki’s life will be held at the Elmira Mennonite Church on Friday, January 17th at 11 a.m. Interment of cremated remains will take place in Elmira Mennonite Cemetery. In Vicki’s memory, in lieu of flowers, donations to MCC or Hospice Wellington would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Thank you to nurses and staff at Hospice Wellington, the CCAC nurses, and the doctors and nurses at the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre for their care and support.

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

focusing on the newest addition to Ford’s ‘favourite drugs list,’ Canadians must concentrate on the way in which Toronto’s wellbeing will be maintained. Frankly, I recognize an abundance of similarities between the drama surrounding Ford’s political scandal and theatrical gossip created by teenage girls at local high schools. Like the high school drama queen, Rob Ford needs recognize and discontinue his inappropriate behaviour. Like Miss Popular’s friends, we Canadians must focus on the process by which Toronto’s reputation and well being will be restored – not Ford’s absurd crack-show.

ROSLYN MAINLAND, WELLESLEY Roslyn Mainland is a Grade 12 student at Waterloo-Oxford District Secondary School.

MAKE YOUR OWN HEADLINES IN THE COMMUNITY. THE OBSERVER FAMILY ALBUM IS HERE TO SHARE YOUR FAMILY NEWS.


24 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

LIVING HERE CHEF’S TABLE/ DIERRE ACHESON FOREIGN AID / MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Leading by example Elmira man will apply his firsthand knowledge when he travels to Rwanda to help boost skills of blind children WILL SLOAN Being blind isn’t easy in the best of circumstances. In a third-world country, without an infrastructure to support and educate the vision-impaired, life can seem hopeless. But “hope” is exactly what Dave Van Der Molen wants to bring on February 2, when he travels to Rwanda for a one-month trip to educate the country’s blind children. “It’s all new to me,” said Van Der Molen, an accomplished blind professional who plans to lead by example. “To give them hope is the main thing. Anything on top of that is just a bonus.” However, he added, “In order for them to actually be employable, they’ve got to have tools in their hands, they’ve got to be trained, and they’ve got to be literate. We’ve got to start somewhere. The more they can prove they can do, the better the chances are they’ll be hired and that funding will be available.” That’s why Van Der Molen is coming equipped with essential tools for visually impaired education. If fundraising efforts are successful, he’ll have a supply of abacuses, braille paper, and full-page plastic braille slates for arithmetic, reading, and writing. Van Der Molen’s path to Rwanda started when he met Deborah Gleason, who has been travelling

to the developing world to teach blind and deaf-blind children for the past decade. There is no organized Canadian charity effort for such missions: Gleason works with international organizations and stays with a family in the area. “I just fell in love with the people on the first trip, and keep going back,” said Gleason. “It’s the experience of a lifetime. “I’ve had lots of comments from people after the first trip I made, ‘The youth should go there, they’re so spoiled in the West.’ I said, ‘I have to refute that – I met so many young people.’ It’s so inspiring – they gave up two, three months of their lives to live in very poor conditions to help.” Gleason and Van Der Molen became acquainted when she looked to him for resources to help at a wedding, the first between two blind people in Rwanda’s history. Van Der Molen was intrigued by her charity work, and next month he’ll finally take the plunge. This will be Van Der Molen’s first trip to Africa – on his blog you can see pictures of him getting his Twinrix shots. “I’ve always wanted to go to the Third World and teach – this is the first opportunity I’ve had,” he notes. Despite the natural trepidation, Gleason says the move is easier than expected. HOPE | 27

Keeping some simple, healthy snacks on hand RECIPE NOTES

Dave Van Der Molen is raising money this weekend to bring abacuses and other supplies to blind children in Rwanda. His one-month trip starts February 2. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

On March 1, 2014 from 10am-12:30pm Kelly of Kelly’s Garage will be performing a complimentary women’s car care clinic at our shop. She visited us last year and the clinic was a huge success! Kelly will be teaching the basics of preventative car care maintenance. Seating is limited so contact melanie@leroysautocare.net to register today!

20 Oriole Parkway E., Elmira, ON N3B 0A5 Tel: (519) 669-1082 Fax: (519) 669-3084 info@leroysautocare.net

www.leroysautocare.net

I cannot believe we are halfway through the first month of the new year, even as we’re busy planning for the year and creating new menus and items for the store. Our team is also looking to find alternatives for our friends looking to make healthy choices for their busy days on the go. There are many ways to bring healthy alternatives to your diet. Part of it is planning, which can be difficult for people who are so busy. There are many nights that I am thankful I have a store with so many yummy foods to take home. Much like the mechanic’s car being the last to get serviced, the last thing I think about is what to make for dinner. We prepare and stock our kitchen with items that are ready to go for those many busy nights, and for making lunches for the next day. Lately, there have been many vegan or gluten-free recipes. I find this sometimes scares people and they think it either has no flavour or isn’t meant for them. I choose to think CHEF’S TABLE | 27


LIVING HERE | 25

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014 “A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

Kleensweep Carpet Care

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville 519-699-4641

Rugs and Upholstery

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

West Montrose, ON

T. 519.669.2033

COLLEEN

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR M&G MILLWRIGHTS LTD. • Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS

519.669.5105 1540 FLORDALE ROAD

JANUARY 18 BOARD GAMES IN BRESLAU - 1-11 p.m. at Breslau Community Centre, 100 Andover Dr., Breslau. Admission $2. Enjoy playing board games? Come out and meet others in your community with a similar interest. There will be a wide variety of games to choose from or bring your favourite game to play. New people always welcome. Children under 16 welcome to attend and participate if accompanied by a parent who is participating. For more information boardgamers@rogers.com.

E-MAIL: ads@woolwichobserver.com

TUESDAY LUNCHEON - GALE Presbyterian Church, 10 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira. Menu: ham, or vegetarian quiche, salad, roll, carrot cake & ice cream; $10.

and encourage dialogue between different faith groups in the region. Free parking. Complimentary refreshments, an opportunity to widen your circle.

ALL TOGETHER TUESDAYS AT Gale Presbyterian Elmira. Come out 7-8.30 with your kids or grand kids JK to Grade 6 for a bible story, a crafty activity, a game in the fellowship hall and a snack. Questions call Lisa 519-669-2852 or email lisa.galepresbyterian@gmail. com Please bring - indoor shoes and water bottle.

JANUARY 27

TEAM AUSTIN IS HOSTING a fundraising spaghetti dinner and silent auction at St. Teresa of Avila parish hall, 19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira, 4 p.m. to support our friend Austin Whittom who is battling lueukemia. Two sittings, 4:30 & 6:30 p.m. Tickets: Adults $12 each; students 4-13 yrs $6 each; pre-school to age 3 free. All proceeds from the silent auction will be donated to the family. For tickets call St. Teresa of Avila school office 519-669-8843.

JANUARY 20 ELMIRA & DISTRICT HORTICULTURAL Society meeting; 6:15 p.m. at Trinity United Church (please use back entrance), 21 Arthur St. N., Elmira. Speaker: David Hobson, garden writer for The Record. Please bring a canned food for the food bank. Renewed or new memberships $10. In advance call Mary Austin 519-669-2617.

JANUARY 21 BINGO UPSTAIRS AT THE St. Clements Community Centre sponsored by Paradise & District Lions Club; 7 p.m. For more information contact Joe Brick 519-699-4022.

JANUARY 28 BINGO UPSTAIRS AT THE St. Clements Community Centre sponsored by Paradise & District Lions Club; 7 p.m. For more information contact Joe Brick 519699-4022.

JANUARY 23

WOOLWICH COMMUNITY LIONS IS hosting a new funraiser - Trivia Challenge - Lions Hall, Elmira, 7 p.m. (doors open 6:30 p.m.). Prizes, cash bar, snacks. You and 7 of your smartest friends can challenge other teams - winning teams will receive a cash prize sponsored by Elmira Pet Products. Limited space available. For more information please email wclctrivia@gamil.com or call Marnie 519-210-0252.

JANUARY 25 SPAGHETTI DINNER & SALAD Bar. Royal Canadian Legion, 11 First St. E., Elmira. Two sittings - 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets call the Legion at 519-669-2932. Adults $10; children 5-10 yrs $4; under 5 yrs $2.

JANUARY 26 ALL LADIES INTERFAITH EVENT 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. at Breslau Community Centre. Come and build bridges

519-669-2884

JANUARY 31

FEBRUARY 6 THE LIONS CLUB OF Elmira Bingo – 7 p.m. at Elmira Lions Hall, 40 South St. Elmira. All proceeds go to support the many projects of the Lions Club of Elmira. For more information call 519-572-2669.

CORPORATE WEAR PROMOTIONAL APPAREL WORK & SAFETY WEAR | BAGS T-SHIRTS | JACKETS | HATS

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public. Placement is not guaranteed. Registrations, corporate events, open houses and the like do not qualify in this section.

TOTAL

NANCY KOEBEL

HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

Bus: 519.744.5433 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

Joy! Health Naturally! New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess.

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities.

Elmira & Surrounding Area

• Natural Nutritional Supplements • Lifestyle Choices • Weight Loss Program

SANYO CANADIAN

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

VERMONT Castings

519-698-0300

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

Suite 102, 40 Weber St. E., Kitchener

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763

519.664.2008

psgingrich@hotmail.ca

Darlene Vandermey RNPA, CLWC

St. Teresa building relationships with God, one another and the world

Catholic Church No God, No Hope; Know God, Know Hope! Celebrate Eucharist with us Mass times are:

Sat. 5pm | Sun. 9am & 11:00am

SUNDAYS - 9:00 & 11:00AM WEDNESDAYS - 7:00PM 850 Sawmill Rd, Bloomingdale, ON N0B 1K0 (519) 744-7447 | kcf@kcf.org | www.kcf.org

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

Sunday, January 19 We Are Ambassadors

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

NURSERY PROVIDED

SUNDAY SCHOOL

Zion Mennonite Fellowship -The JunctionSunday School 9:30am Worship Service 10:45 am Finding The Way Together 47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 www.thejunctionelmira.com

Sunday School at 9:30am

Service at 10:30am Rev. Paul Snow REACH WITH LOVE. TEACH THE TRUTH. SEND IN POWER.

www.kcf.org/academy

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

www.myaimstore.com/joyhealthnaturally

PLACES OF FAITH | A DIRECTORY OF LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP

290 Arthur St. South, Elmira • 519-669-3973 www.ElmiraAssembly.com (Across from Tim Horton’s)

HEARING ASSISTED

Sun., Jan. 19th 11:00am

Reflecting His Lordship Discovering God Together

Matt Robinson

4522 Herrgott Rd., Wallenstein • 519-669-2319 www.wbconline.ca

St. Paul’s 9:15am Sunday School Lutheran 10:30am Worship Service Pastor: Richard A. Frey Church Sharing the Message of Christ and His Love 27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593 www.stpaulselmira.ca

Emmanuel

Worship: 9:30am Elmira Mennonite Series on the Church Sermon on the Mount Christian Education for all ages: 11:00am

Sunday, January 19, 2014

58 Church St. W., Elmira • 519-669-5123

9:15 & 11:00 AM

REACH OUT. www.OBSERVERXTRA.com

21 INDUSTRIAL DR. ELMIRA

SUBMIT AN EVENT The Events Calendar is reserved for Non-profit local community events that are offered free to the 24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

KEEP FAITH ALIVE, ADVERTISE HERE.

woolwichkin.com

SENIORS COMMUNITY DINING AT noon (doors at 11:30 a.m.) Linwood Community Centre 5279 Ament Line, Linwood. Cost: $11. Community Care Concepts invites you to join us for a hot noon day meal, fellowship and entertainment. Call 519-664-1900 or toll free: 1-855-6641900 for info.

THE LIONS CLUB OF Elmira Bingo – 7 p.m. at Elmira Lions Hall, 40 South St., Elmira. All proceeds go to support the many projects of the Lions Club of Elmira. For more information call 519-572-2669.

Check Us Out Online!

SENIOR LUNCH CLUB AT noon (doors open at 11:30 a.m.). Woolwich Memorial Centre, 24 Snyder Ave. S., Elmira (community room). Cost $6. Join us for a noonday light lunch and fellowship. Call Community Care Concepts at 519-664-1900 for more information.

JANUARY 22

JANUARY 19

P.O. BOX 247, ELMIRA

www.mgmill.com

KIN KORNER

www.freybc.com

SUNDAYS @ 10:30AM Services at Park Manor School 18 Mockingbird Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1459 www.elmiracommunity.org

Christianity & Neighbouring Faiths Guest Speaker: Dr. James Beverley 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 www.woodsidechurch.ca

EVANGELICAL MISSIONARY CHURCH Worship Service

Sundays 10:45am

makingfaithlive.com

519.669.5030

9:45am Sunday School 11:00am Worship Service Hopping Thursday’s 7-8:30pm Programs for all ages 22 Florapine Rd., Floradale • 519-669-2816 www.floramc.org


26 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

STRANGE BUT TRUE / BILL & RICH SONES PH.D.

Even at rest, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re burning calories equivalent to a 100W lightbulb WEIRD NOTES

Q. The great scientist Isaac Newton (16431727), formulator of â&#x20AC;&#x153;gravity,â&#x20AC;? never married, nor even had a romantic relationship of note, we are told. So it takes a high flight of fancy to picture Newton falling in love and writing a poem to his beloved. Just for fun, try to imagine â&#x20AC;&#x153;Newtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Love Poem,â&#x20AC;? as did Ilya Yashin of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, writing in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Physics Todayâ&#x20AC;? magazine. A. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Moon, my dear,

is in a constant fall. It desperately tries to follow a

straight line, but our massive Earth (not knowing it at all!) attracts it with a force I recently defined. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Moon, my dear, is always in a fall. And so am I. And so, by God, am I. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in a constant fall in love with you. I cannot leave my orbit, but even if I dared, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d still attract me with a force proportional to your heart times mine over the distance squared. I try to follow my drab lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s linear course, in which a vapid day succeeds a vapid day, but a relentless, sweet, infatuating force, though doing zero work, curves my soulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s flight your way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;... Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s break the laws and crash into each other! Infinityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the limit of our bliss as separation goes to

zero. I would rather not live at all, than live without you, Miss.â&#x20AC;? Q. What relationship can be drawn between each of us and that 100watt light bulb brightening our desk?

A. As a warm-blooded

species, many of our behaviors are governed by our need to maintain body temperature, says Louis Bloomfield in â&#x20AC;&#x153;How Everything Works: Making Physics Out of the Ordinary.â&#x20AC;? Resting, we convert chemical potential energy into heat at about 80 calories-per-hour. Even when weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing no work, our heart keeps pumping, we keep synthesizing useful chemicals and we keep thinking. Interestingly, 80 calo-

ries-per-hour is a measure of power equal to about 100 watts (W), just like a 100W light bulb; with more activity, more heat energy will be produced. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This steady production of thermal energy is why a room filled with people can get pretty warm; 100W may not seem like very much power, but when a hundred people are packed into a tight space, they act like a 10,000W space heater and the whole room becomes unpleasantly hot.â&#x20AC;?

Q. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paindrops keep falling on your head...â&#x20AC;? Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Scientistâ&#x20AC;? magazine up to with a headline like that? A. Both the size and the falling speed of a given

raindrop will affect the pain it inflicts, wrote science teacher David Muir of Edinburgh, UK. In practice, drops bigger than about 5 millimeters (mm) break apart due to air resistance; a 5-mm-diameter drop reaches terminal velocity of around 9 metres per second, depending on temperature and humidity. This means that, beyond a certain point, the height from which a drop falls has no bearing on the pain it can impart. Muir found that a 4-mmdiameter drop falling two floors into a puddle produces a splash or â&#x20AC;&#x153;bounceâ&#x20AC;? of about 50 mm, from four floors about 150 mm, and six floors just over 200 mm â&#x20AC;&#x201D; this last not surprising since drops probably reach

terminal velocity after falling about five floors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our experiments show that a drop 4 mm in diameter falling six floors onto skin feels like being hit by grains of rice from a few metres away; 5-mm drops have slightly greater terminal velocity but are almost twice as heavy. This means they have about twice as much energy and are mildly painful when falling onto skin from six floors up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thanks to bald colleagues for their assistance.â&#x20AC;?

ABOUT THE AUTHORS Bill is a journalist, Rich holds a doctorate in physics. Together the brothers bring you â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strange But True.â&#x20AC;? Send your questions to strangetrue@compuserve.com.

OBSERVER CROSSWORD PUZZLER ACROSS 1. Group of 13 6. Converts maltose to glucose 13. Little devil 16. French farewell 17. Alkaloids found in the poppy 18. Indicates maiden name 19. Santa Claus feature 20. Easy 21. Kind of approval 22. Doze (off) 24. ___ king 25. Husk 26. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s measured in radians 30. Self obsessed people 33. Merchant 35. Prefix with night or day 36. King of the road 37. Seek damages 38. Holiday mo. 39. Blue 42. Ghostâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cry 44. Cardinal 46. Cry of mock horror 47. Attempt 48. Spleenwort

51. Assume 53. Cause of wrinkles 54. Cartridge contents 55. Chain letters? 57. ___ Zeppelin 58. Common conjunction 59. Health resort 60. Aggravate 62. Instrument interface 65. John ___ 66. Triumphant 69. Gush 73. Slender 74. Algonquian Indian 75. ___ welder 76. Thanksgiving side dish 77. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What a relief!â&#x20AC;? 78. Install 81. Cake topper 86. Genetic info carrier 87. Untouched 88. Waterwheel 89. Marvelous, in slang 90. Accelerate 91. Objectives DOWN 1. Subway alternative

2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ to Joyâ&#x20AC;? 3. By means of 4. Always, in verse 5. Boring pest 6. Mildew 7. Bananas 8. Charge per unit 9. Make fit 10. Elite military unit 11. Member of Cong. 12. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;___ la vie!â&#x20AC;? 13. Prefix with red 14. â&#x20AC;&#x153;M*A*S*Hâ&#x20AC;? extra 15. Rings 23. Half of binary code 25. Assist 26. ___ Wednesday 27. Density symbol 28. Shoemaker 29. Ribbon holder 30. Fencing sword 31. An independent ruler 32. Ni 34. Bingo 38. Take off 39. Arts space 40. Branch

41. Blondeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s secret, maybe 43. Prayer 45. Pulled off 48. Blanched 49. Back, in a way 50. Open, in a way 52. 18-wheelers 56. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Good one!â&#x20AC;? 61. Caffeine source 63. Batman and Robin, e.g. 64. Any doctrine 65. Expire 66. Patience, e.g. 67. Proof of identity 68. Furnish with a rim 69. Winter warmer 70. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life forceâ&#x20AC;? 71. Doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s order 72. Refinement 76. Cry of pain 78. ___ and outs 79. 40 winks 80. Ancient cross 82. Doveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sound 83. George Gershwinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s brother 84. Common soccer score 85. Neon, e.g.







































 



























 













 



 



 







 

 













 





















































SUDOKU CHALLENGE

Northfield

HOW TO PLAY:

Chiropractic.ca

Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. We have got you started with a few numbers already placed in the boxes.

ď ľ Direct Insurance Billing ď ľ Evening Appointments ď ľ Low Intensity LASER Tx Dr. Harold Paisley

  

  

          

   

call 519-886-3191 | 99 Northfield Dr., E., Waterloo

www.northfieldchiropractic.ca



 

 


LIVING HERE | 27

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, JANUARY 18, 2014

HOPE: He can show blind children what can be done if they’re given the tools to succeed FROM | 24

“It is a bigger transition when you come back than it is to go over there,” she said. “I go over there, I stay with a family, and immediately my diet is beans and rice, and I go to bed. I remember getting in the shower for the first time when I came back – you just turn the tap and there’s water. It’s like, ‘Wow.’” Van Der Molen, who works at the Canadian Council of Christian Charities in Elmira, is proof that disability need not prohibit a career. “There’s a school at a province near where Dave will be teaching, and they asked me to talk to the

kids,” said Gleason. “Just to hear, ‘You know someone who’s blind who has a job? And they pay him? And he can do what?’ It’s a beginning to show even the sighted people that they can do things.” Van Der Molen is looking to raise $4,000 to purchase supplies, as well as cover airfare and accommodations. To donate, and keep track of his Rwandan adventure, visit brailleforrwanda.com. Woodside Bible Fellowship (200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira) will also hold a fundraising lunch January 19 at 12:30 p.m. Cost of the meal $5 per person or $20 per family, with additional donations encouraged.

Dave Van Der Molen is joined by Deborah Gleason, who has been helping blind children in Rwanda for the past decade. There is no organized Canadian charity for this cause. [WILL SLOAN / THE OBSERVER]

CHEF’S TABLE: Healthy snacks can be cut into portions and frozen for a later “crisis”

Sunflower and Apricot Granola Bars 1-3/4 cups rolled oats 2/3 cup sunflower seeds 1/3 cup wheat germ 1/2 tsp ground ginger 1/2 tsp salt 2/3 cup dried apricots, chopped 2/3 cup local honey 1/4 cup packed brown sugar 1/3 cup sunflower oil FROM | 24

of them as healthy alternatives: fewer refined sugars, ingredients that are good for you, no added preservatives and truly tasty. If you are feeling like you need a treat, look for recipes made with apple sauce,

whole grains or nuts. Don’t leave the whole pan on the counter to be devoured – I know this is a tough one. Put it in the freezer, wrapped in portions, then you have something to grab at another time of crisis. Happy cooking.

Place honey, sugar, and oil in a sauce pan on low. Stir consistently and heat until the sugar has dissolved; In a large bowl place oats, sunflower seeds, wheat germ, ginger, salt

your oven; Remove from the oven and allow to cool, then cut into bars. Wrap in plastic wrap and store in an airtight container.

Fudgy Flourless Brownies and apricots. Pour the honey mixture over the dry ingredients and mix well so the ingredients are coated in the honey; Line a 9x9 pan with parchment paper and spoon the prepared mixture into the pan; Bake in oven at 350 F for 25 minutes or until edges are golden, which may take longer depending on

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Put butter and chocolate in a bowl, place in microwave and melt on medium heat, about 2-3 minutes;

Never Enough Thyme Catering Inc. was created with one thought in mind ... to create more thyme! Enjoy our food shop, specialty cakes and catering. 83A Arthur St. S., Elmira. Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Public Notice to All Members of the Corporation

SERGER

A FORTED I LIM ONLY! E TIM

6oz semi-sweet chocolate, chopped 1/4 cup butter 1/4 cup apple sauce 1 tsp vanilla 4 egg whites 2/3 cup granulated sugar 1 cup ground almonds

Using an electric mixer, beat egg whites, on medium to high speed. Gradually beat in the sugar. Beat until the egg mix hits the high peaks and is glossy. Gradually fold in the chocolate with no streaks. Finish by adding in the ground almonds; Bake in a parchmentlined 9x9 pan. Bake until both the edges and centre are firm. A toothpick will come out with some crumbs, but this is a moist brownie. Enjoy.

CLEARANCE

A SPECIAL GENERAL MEETING of the

WOOLWICH COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE

3 Bonus Feet $100 Value

Will be held on

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2014 6:30-7:00 P.M. 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs in the Clint Rohr Room

• 4/3 Thread serger • Colour-coded lay-in threading • Differential Feed • Free Arm

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COUNSELLING SERVICES FOR: INDIVIDUALS (INCLUDING CHILDREN), COUPLES, FAMILIES AND GROUPS Walk-In every Thursday 1:45 – 7:00 | Last appointment @ 5:30

Serving the K-W Area for Over 35 Years W

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HOURS OF OPERATION RVI

C E W H AT

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Monday to Tuesday..............9:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. Wednesday to Friday...........9:30 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. Saturday................................9:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.

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5198846981

Specializing in Diversity Registered Play, Art & & Cultural Inclusivity Music Therapists 177 Albert Street West Corner of Albert St., W. & Seagram Dr.

519-884-0710 x4967

For a complete list of services available visit us at:

www.glebecentre.wlu.ca


28 | BACK PAGE

THE OBSERVER | JANUARY 18, 2014

t n e v E g n i n e p O Grand th

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JANUARY 18, 2014  
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