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02 | 16 | 2017 VOLUME 22 | ISSUE 07

VET TECH’S WAY WITH ANIMALS NETS AWARD LIVING HERE PAGE 24

COMMENT PAGE 6

PUBLIC INCREASINGLY DISTRUSTFUL OF GOVERNMENT

Wellesley looking to revisit its kennel bylaw after applications reveal gaps

No new industrial land for Hawkesville, council decides

WINNING WAYS BEFORE PLAYOFFS

Opponents out in force Tuesday night as Wellesley looks at requests for more employment land in the township’s smaller settlements

LIZ BEVAN CONCERNED ITS KENNEL BYLAW was going to the dogs, Wellesley council is likely to make some changes after a pair of applications revealed some holes in the existing legislation. Specifically, the township is grappling with the issue of proximity and limiting the number of kennels on any one property. Meeting Tuesday night, councillors discussed two applications for kennel applications, a process that raised questions about how the businesses are regulated and whether to introduce a limit on the number of kennels in the township. In the first application, a Linwood resident requested permission to put a second kennel on a single lot that is already home to two residences and a kennel operation. The existing bylaw doesn’t speak to such circumstances. Coun. Shelley Wagner took issue with the proximity of the two kennels, “It isn’t divided into separate lots, but both have their own individual addresses and the one owner already has a kennel, so now there are going to be two kennels on one property,” she said, adding that current policy allows one kennel per nine acres. “I assume the farm is more than 18 acres. My concern would be what happens when someone KENNELS | 5

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having difficulty working within current bylaws, he said. Expansion of Chervin Kitchens is the last thing Mira vanKatwyck wanted to see, however, noting Hawkesville’s area is already 44 per cent industrial lands. “This size of industry is just too close to homes, playgrounds and other facilities where young and old, live and play,” she told councillors. “We have a growing concern over the past few years for the real potential for an imbalance between residential and industrial lands in Hawkesville as new businesses come into our town and others have really expanded. It seems to me that Hawkesville already provides ample employment opportunities for residents within our township and further.” Beth Frank, who lives on Orville Court in Hawkesville, questioned how

LIZ BEVAN

Elmira District Secondary School’s senior girls’ volleyball team defeated Waterloo Collegiate 3-1 on Feb. 9, earning them a spot in the quarter-finals on Feb. 14, where they lost to second-place Jacob Hespeler Secondary School. Here, Jasmine Montague tips the ball over the net. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]

DESPITE PRESSURE FOR MORE industrial land, sought-after parcels in Hawkesville, Wallenstein and Crosshill will remain agricultural, at least for now, Wellesley councillors decided this week. That decision sat well with most of the residents who crowded into council chambers Tuesday night. Much of the opposition was directed at a call to make an additional 8.9 acres available for industrial use in Hawkesville, principally at the request of Chervin Kitchens. The property will continue to be earmarked as agricultural, which safeguards it against the kind of development that would have come from labelling it as employment land. Marvin Bauman of Chervin Kitchens argued unsuccessfully for the employment lands. The business is outgrowing its current operations and staff is

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2 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

Community groups have a blooming winter in store for Family Day at Elmira’s WMC LIZ BEVAN DESPITE SNOW AND SLUSH, there is going to be a little bit of springtime in Elmira this Family Day. With Winter in Bloom, community groups are coming together to fight the winter blues on Monday. This is the second year the event is being held at the Woolwich Memorial Centre, where it’ll be open to the whole community. Helen Grainger of the Elmira and District Horticultural Society says the event started last year as just a fun idea for families in Elmira. “We have these spray bottles filled with red, green and blue food colouring and water. As families came

in to the WMC, whether it was for the free skate or to go swimming, we invited them to take these bottles and spray some colourful gardens in the snow,” she said. “Everybody that did it told us what a great idea it was, so we just had to do it again this year.” What started as a small idea has grown into a fullday event – it starts at 9 a.m. and runs until 3 p.m. “It was an idea that Carl Thompson from the Kiwanis Club came up with. He approached us at the horticultural society because he thought that painting colourful gardens was in keeping with what we do,” she said. “Then Randy Smith from the Optimist Club had some chili

As with last year, visitors to Winter in Bloom can use spray bottles to add some colour to the snow. Grainger. “We had someone tell us they are going to be doing a snow-dance for more snow to fall before Monday, but I am not sure how well that is going to work.” The long-term forecast is calling for warm temperatures and lots of sunshine

that we thought would be good to serve.” Winter in Bloom adds a little colour to the dreary white and grey snow and slush. “It is just such a fun activity for the whole family. We are hoping for a bit more snow, though,” said

[SUBMITTED]

for Family Day. However, even if there isn’t very much snow, there will still be lunch. At 1 p.m., the Optimist Club will be serving up chili dogs for a donation. Grainger says this is just the beginning of Winter in Bloom, with the different

community groups brainstorming some more ideas for next year. “It is just a fun thing for people to do. We are just beginning and we have so many ideas that we are just beginning to talk about for the years after this,” she said. “Now, we are just planting the seeds and we’ll see where it goes from there.” Also at the WMC on Family Day, Feb. 20, the Elmira Sugar Kings Junior B team will be facing off against the Kitchener Dutchmen at 2 p.m. Ticket prices for the game are reduced for children. There is also a free skate (10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.) and free swimming (11 a.m. to 1 p.m., 1:30-3:30 p.m.).

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NEWS | 3

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

Provincial demands for paperwork put a growing demand on municipal resources WHITNEY NEILSON EXCESSIVE REPORTING DEMANDED BY Queen’s Park is proving increasingly timeconsuming for Ontario’s municipalities, which are chafing under the unnecessary paperwork. An Association of Municipal Managers, Clerks and Treasurers of Ontario (AMCTO) report, entitled Bearing the Burden: An Overview of Municipal Reporting to the Province, explains creating and maintaining various mandatory reports to the province is a significant financial and productivity drain. AMCTO consulted with government professionals through a sector-wide survey of more than 300 municipal managers. While most of them said they believe reporting is important, 75 per cent said provincial reporting is “too time consuming and onerous.” Nearly half of respondents (48 per cent) said the provincial reporting requirements are affecting their ability to offer municipal services. Some municipalities must file less than 90 reports annually, while others are responsible for more than 200. Woolwich Township director of finance Richard Petherick says he’s felt the strain himself in his department. Two of the easier reports they’re required to complete annually are one on council remuneration and another on what they spent on development charges. “The one that we do that is a lot more involved and it takes a long time to do, it’s what they call the financial information return. So it’s essentially taking everything that we have recorded from our assets, our liabilities, revenue, expenses, on everything that we do. It has to be done in the Ministry of Municipal Affairs template,” Petherick explained of some of the paperwork involved. He says this requires a very involved spreadsheet you have to do which takes months to complete because of the level of detail. And in 2009 when municipalities had to start recording their tangible capital assets, that was another level they had to report on, which is now becoming part of the financial information return as well. “The good thing is you can say, especially for Woolwich, you can match up what’s in our financial information return to our audited statements and we do that on purpose. It’s not unlike other municipalities, they do the same thing. It’s an easy RESOURCES | 4

CBC series is pure bunk, say local Mennonites It’s not just the drug smuggling and violence, as television show’s depiction of Mennonites gets many of the details wrong CBC’s fictional drama Pure misrepresents more than one group of Mennonites, according to modern Mennonites who’ve watched the show and academics such as Prof. Marlene Epp.

WHITNEY NEILSON CBC’S FICTIONAL MENNONITE MOB drama “Pure” wrapped up its initial run this week, and Mennonites who’ve seen the show won’t be shedding any tears if it doesn’t get picked up for a second season. Barb Draper, editorial assistant at Canadian Mennonite Magazine and member of Floradale Mennonite Church, says there’s a sense of dismay from modern Mennonites at the inaccuracies in the show. “Let me put it this way, I couldn’t watch it – partly because it’s not the kind of thing I watch – but just from watching the trailers, the connection that they drew between the different kinds of Mennonites – and they used horse-and-buggy Mennonites – it just seemed so inappropriate and untrue. There’s no

way that I could get over the fact that it wasn’t believable,” Draper said. She’s heard from those who’ve watched the full season that it’s disappointing to see them get the accents, clothing, buggies and even the church’s architecture wrong. And there’s concern those who are unfamiliar with Mennonites here in Ontario will believe what they see on TV. “In fact I’ve heard people say, ‘oh we had this conversation and we don’t know much about Mennonites, but is that what they’re really like?’ So that is a concern and it seems unfair for CBC to use it as a sensational setting when it’s not,” Draper said. The show follows Mennonite pastor Noah Funk, who gets tangled up with “Menno Mob” leader Eli Voss. Draper expects the Old Or-

[SUBMITTED / CBC]

smuggling is occurring. “Then there’s the LowGerman speaking community, those who we would call Mennonites from Mexico, who do have cases of drug smuggling, but do not drive horse and buggy or dress like Old Order Mennonites. I think both of those communities are really misrepresented in the show. Yes it’s fictional, it’s entertainment, but there’s already so much misunderstanding and confusion about conservative Mennonite groups that I think the show just contributes to that,” Epp said. CBC responded by saying Pure is “inspired by a real story, but is ultimately a work of fiction.” They said they never intended to offend members of Canada’s Mennonite communities. PURE | 28

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der Mennonite community isn’t aware of how they’re being depicted in the show since they don’t own televisions. Marlene Epp, dean and professor of history and peace & conflict studies at Conrad Grebel University College in Waterloo, has watched the entire season. “It’s tasteless from the point of view of lots of gratuitous violence, which is so at odds with the Mennonite community,” Epp said. As someone who teaches Mennonite studies and tries to educate people about Mennonites, she says it’s disconcerting that the show’s producers have mixed up different Mennonite groups. She says they’ve misrepresented in particular the Old Order Mennonites, as it’s that community that is presented as the ones within which drug

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4 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

Letter soliciting for puppies raises suspicions about buyer’s intentions Area farmers among those who received written requests, with SPCA now investigating WHITNEY NEILSON SOME WOOLWICH RESIDENTS ARE concerned by letters that showed up in their mailboxes last week by someone offering to buy their puppies. “Certainly the manner in which this was sent around is certainly interesting, to say the least. We’d like to be able to speak to the person to find out exactly what their intentions are, with regards to that. The contents of the letter itself doesn’t appear to be nefarious in any way,” said Ontario SPCA inspector Scott Sylvia. Numerous rural homes in Floradale, largely farms with barns that were clearly being used, received the letters in their mailboxes last week. The letter offers cash in exchange for puppies and claims to provide dogs for volunteer programs with “universities, government offices and senior homes to provide puppy therapy where little puppies get the opportunity to be socialized before they go to their forever homes.” Pandora Wilhelm is one of the residents who received the letter in her mailbox. She’s spoken to 14 others who have as well. She contacted the Orangeville police, the Waterloo

Regional police and the Kitchener-Waterloo Humane Society, who passed it on to the Ontario SPCA. She’s heard from residents who don’t share her concerns and think it’s someone just looking to resell them in Toronto, but she’s not convinced. The letter was signed by “Winston H.” When she called to find out if he was legitimate, she says he got defensive and rude, refusing to give her his last name or tell her what agency he was affiliated with. The phone number on the letter has since been disconnected. He also said the letters were mailed, despite having no postage or return address. “It would have had to have been multiple people to deliver the amount of letters that were delivered. There’s no way one person was able to do that all in one afternoon because it went all the way from Floradale all the way out towards Drayton and Alma too,” Wilhelm said. Sylvia agrees that the lack of a return address on the envelope as well as only one phone number on the letter are both concerning. “The manner in which it was done certainly is not something that we’ve

seen of late. Again, we’d like to be able to clarify what’s going on with this person, if they do have any animals in their possession how are they dealing with that, that type of thing,” Sylvia said. Wilhelm said she’s worried the prospective buyer wants puppies for dog baiting or dog fighting because of the breeds he was looking for. “When I contacted him he was very specific about what breeds he was looking for, he was looking for the rare breeds and he didn’t want any of the docile breeds. He was looking for Malinois crosses or pit bull crosses,” Wilhelm said. She recalls in the late 1990s there was a Winston in the Orangeville area running a puppy mill that was shut down. “You don’t buy a whole litter of puppies with a good intention, in my opinion,” Wilhelm said. Sylvia says anyone who receives a letter like this and is concerned about it should contact the Ontario SPCA and their local police department. “The baiting of dogs or the use of bait animals is

RESOURCES:

Municipalities forced to file all kinds of reports, useful or not, with no sign of slowing

FROM | 3

This is the letter that some rural residents from Floradale to Alma received last week from a “Winston H.” offering to buy puppies. The letter is being investigated by the Ontario SPCA and has drawn concern from some residents. [SUBMITTED] encouraging residents to something that we haven’t contact the Ontario SPCA if seen too often, but when they have further informait is seen you’re seeing it tion about the letter as well with a case of somebody as if anyone else receives a who’s inexperienced when letter like this. it comes to dog fighting. “When you see an ad like They’re starting out or it this, take into considermay even be at a street ation where it may be comlevel.” He notes dog fighting is a ing from. Don’t respond to very clandestine operation, it. Pass it on to the authorities so we can have a closer making it difficult to track look at what’s going on.” and to investigate. He’s

reconciliation between the two, but to get to that level of detail it’s a lot of work on our staff to get it done,” Petherick said. He notes there’s plenty of other work they’d rather be doing than filling out reports, but from his perspective he understands why the province makes these reports mandatory. “There has to be that accountability to the province, at least from the financial end of things. One of the things that also has to happen in order to have your financial information return accepted by the province, it meets a bunch of balances and checks in the system, so if you’re missing information and things don’t balance, it basically won’t let you file it. It’ll say ‘nope, you’ve got critical errors, you can’t do it.’ But it also has to be signed off by the township’s auditor.” Time spent on reports like these could be used for other projects that could make things more efficient for the department, like finishing the update to the township’s asset management plan, which is currently underway.

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NEWS | 5

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

POLICE BLOTTER

Joint effort sees police, fire officials looking into suspicious fires A SERIES OF FIRES in abandoned structures has prompted a multi-jurisdictional investigation. Criminal Investigators from Wellington County OPP, West Region OPP Support Unit, Guelph Police Service, Halton Police Service along with the Office of the Ontario Fire Marshal Emergency Management (OFMEM) and surrounding fire departments continue to investigate a number of unsolved, suspicious fires of abandoned structures in their respective jurisdictions, police report. To date there have been a total of 14 fires that are being treated as suspicious and will be investigated as such until proven otherwise. The police are urging the public to report any suspicious vehicles or people in their community.  Any person with information regarding these

incidents should contact Det. Constable Heidi Pautsch or Det. Constable Kevin Detweiler from the Wellington County OPP at 1-888-310-1122. Should you wish to remain anonymous, you may call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477 (TIPS) or submit a tip online at www.csgw.tips. You may be eligible for a reward from Crime Stoppers of up to $2,000.

Police offer tips for owners of abandoned or vacant buildings: Secure unlocked structures • Consider motion sensing cameras • Request neighbours to watch the property • Make regular visits to view the property •

FEBRUARY 9

12:00 PM | Police conducted a commercial vehicle enforcement initiative at Farmers Market Road in St. Jacobs. As a result, 15 commercial vehicles were inspected. Of the 15 inspections, five were placed out of service for major defects. Twenty-one offence notices were issued. Some of the ongoing offences included defective brakes, expired annual inspections, daily trip inspections and vehicle overweight. Two seizures were also made under the Tobacco Tax Act, and the Controlled Drug and Substances Act. FEBRUARY 11

6:10 PM | Wellington County OPP received a report of a broken-down vehicle in which the driver was possibly impaired in Mapleton Township. The female driver asked a witness for assistance getting her 2013 Dodge started so she could drive home. The witness, an off-duty OPP officer, detected the strong

odour of alcohol on her breath and noted obvious signs of impairment and placed her under arrest. An on-duty officer arrived at the scene, observed the signs impairment and re-arrested the driver and transported her to a local OPP operation centre for further testing. As a result, the 48-year-old North Perth woman was charged with ‘care or control while impaired’ and ‘care or control over 80 mgs.’ She is to appear in Guelph Criminal Court on Mar. 3 to answer to the charges. FEBRUARY 12

1:30 AM | Waterloo Regional Police responded to a car dealership in New Hamburg for a report of a break-in. A male seen leaving the lot in a stolen vehicle was arrested. A handgun was seized from the vehicle along with some break-and-enter tools. Regional police are working together with the OPP on a suspected related matter that occurred north of London earlier that night involving the same male suspect.

KENNELS: Changes are coming FROM | COVER

with 150 acres comes along and says, ‘I am going to put up four different kennels on my property.’ Where is our regulation on that?” Chief administrative officer Rik Louwagie confirmed the current bylaw was “silent” on limiting the number of kennels per property. “It just says a kennel can have no more than 35 dogs. It does not say how many kennels you can have per property,” he said, recommending councillors amend the bylaw. The second application came from a Wellesley resident looking to start a kennel operation on his nephew’s property next door to his own. Councillors opted to approve the application, siding with a staff recommendation to waive a requirement that a kennel owner live on the property where the operation is located. Here, too, Wagner took issue with the application.

“If you are going to run a kennel, you really should be there to supervise the operation and know what’s going on. That is not to say they aren’t going to be there every day, but I think we have that in our bylaw for a reason,” she said. “I think it is pretty plain and simple: It is contrary to the bylaw.” Supervision and regulation of kennel operations in the township was called into question, as well. Coun. Peter van der Maas requested that staff look at clarifying and maybe adding to the current policies. “There is very little governance and oversight for kennels in general. I think if we are going to be granting licenses, we might have a little bit more of an obligation to ensure there are standards being met,” he said. “There seems to be little on a provincial level, but there are other townships that have more comprehensive governance and regulation.”

LAND: Council weighing the need for industrial lots against maintaining residential areas FROM | COVER

council could make a final decision on employment lands when some of the information they had was not accurate. “The Ministry of Environment and Climate Change guidelines were consulted, yet after reviewing the proposed expansion of Chervin, the Region of Waterloo noted numerous inconsistencies,” she said. “Active lots on Orville Court were noted as vacant in the noise study results, there were conflicting berm heights listed, missing information on site plans and incorrect addresses throughout the reports. How can council ensure its citizens a well-founded decision will be made when presented with incorrect information? How will this foster compatibility?” For Dave Sargent, industrial lands directly adjacent to what is now a quiet residential area just doesn’t

make sense. Companies already established there aren’t following the rules already, he maintained, so why give them more room? “My blood is boiling. There is a massive parking lot on agricultural land, there is a smell and the noise, and what they are asking you to do is let the fox in the hen house when they promise not to do anything wrong,” he said. “People move here to get to our piece of heaven, not to live next to noise and pollution.” For Bauman, re-designating the land would allow for a much-needed expansion to the existing building, including an additional 20,000 square feet of floor space, along with more parking and changes to the septic system. “I am trying hard, but I am probably not trying hard enough. I have 165 employees that I need to keep satisfied as well,” he

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making a final decision, but Mayor Joe Nowak was against the idea, pointing out that this has been ongoing since last fall. “I thought I was going to make a decision, but after tonight, I really want a chance to digest this,” said Neher. Coun. Shelley Wagner, however, said the township’s obligations for

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employment lands had already been met in Hawkesville, echoing statements from some of the speakers from earlier in the meeting. “They talked about the hectares that are currently commercial/industrial/institutional and just to put it in perspective, 44 per cent of the settlement area is either commercial, industrial or institutional. That

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6 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

JOE MERLIHAN PUBLISHER STEVE KANNON EDITOR

COMMENT

DONNA RUDY SALES MANAGER

WHITNEY NEILSON REPORTER

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OUR VIEW / EDITORIAL

THE VIEW FROM HERE

Our distrust of institutions continues to grow THE CANADIAN PUBLIC MAY not have reached the same boiling point that’s propelled populist movements in the U.S. and Europe, but we may simply find ourselves behind the curve. Many of the same problems that have led to a decline in the distrust of government and the desire for change exist here, with public sentiment shifting in a familiar direction. The latest indictor is the Edelman Trust Barometer, findings released this week by global communications firm Edelman. The survey finds Canadians are increasingly concerned about issues often associated with populist movements such as the Donald Trump phenomenon and shifts to the right in Europe: immigration, globalization and our economic future. One in two people surveyed agree with the statement that the influx of people from other countries is damaging Canada’s economy and national culture, for instance, while 80 per cent of people think the elites who run institutions are out of touch with regular people. Furthermore, 61 per cent of people do not have confidence that Canada’s current leaders will be able to successfully solve Canada’s challenges, and 48 per cent also agreed that globalization is taking us in the wrong direction, the survey found. Troublingly, Canadians aren’t immune to the issue of misleading information, alternative facts and outright lies. One in three people surveyed reported they would support politicians who can make their lives better even if they exaggerated the truth; 55 per cent say they don’t listen to people or organizations they disagree with and that they are more than 3.5 times more likely to ignore information that supports a position they don’t believe in. These results, Edelman reports, show Canada is experiencing the echo chamber effect that is magnifying the crisis in trust. What’s more, for the first time since Edelman started tracking the general population – this is the 17th year – Canada finds itself among countries who distrust their institutions. Trust in business, media and government is in trouble. Less than half (49 per cent) of Canada’s general population trust key institutions – government, media, business and non-governmental organizations (NGOs). These recent findings reflect a trend not only in Edelman’s annual barometer, but in other reviews of public perception, including the annual corruption index. In other studies, fewer than 40 per cent of Canadians trust the legal system, for instance. That number drops below 30 for business and union leaders, as well as the media. It’s lower still for government, with trust for politicians typically hovering in the 10 per cent range, pretty much at the bottom of the list. In the 1960s, 80 per cent of Canadians trusted governments to ‘do the right thing’. These days, the level of support has fallen to somewhere in the neighbourhood of 20 per cent. Most Canadians distrust government and big business and their cynicism towards politicians is increasing. Trust in government has plummeted from a high of 58 per cent of Canadians in the late 1960s to less than a quarter of us today who’ll state that they trust government always/most of the time. In fact, it’s surprising some of us still think any of our leaders will in fact look out for anybody other than numberone. Certainly, the evidence says otherwise, indicating the survey numbers, like our trust, will continue to sink.

What’s that old expression? When the only tool you have is a hammer, everything looks like a chance to nail the taxpayer ... WORLD VIEW / GWYNNE DYER

Sane ways to deal with the “maniac” in Pyongyang WORLD AFFAIRS “THIS GUY, HE’S LIKE a maniac, OK? He wiped out the uncle. He wiped out this one, that one. I mean, this guy doesn’t play games. And we can’t play games with him. Because he really does have missiles. And he really does have nukes.” So spoke President Donald Trump in Iowa in January. North Korea flighttested a ballistic missile on Saturday night that landed off Japan’s west coast, so what will he do now? What can he do? And is North Korea’s 33-year-old dictator, Kim Jong-un, really a maniac? South Korea’s foreign ministry certainly thinks so: “North Korea’s repeated provocations show the Kim Jong-un regime’s nature of irrationality, maniacally obsessed in its nuclear and missile development.” The same word was used a great deal after North Korea tested nuclear weapons in January and September of last year.

But why would it be maniacal, or even irrational, for the North Korean leader to want nuclear-tipped missiles that can reach the United States? After all, the United States not only has nuclear-tipped missiles that can reach North Korea; it has enough of them to eradicate the country twenty times over. If it is not maniacal for the United States to have them, why is it maniacal for the North Koreans? Because American leaders are responsible, they explain, whereas Kim Jong-un is a maniac. Begging your pardon, but isn’t that argument rather circular? The United States is the only country that ever developed nuclear weapons with the deliberate intention of using them. It was at the end of the Second World War, when tens of millions had already been killed, and moral restraints had largely been cast aside. But the United States never used its nukes again, even when it still had a monopoly on them – and all the other known nuclear powers got them in the name of deterrence: stopping somebody else from

using nuclear weapons on them. The Soviet Union developed them to deter the United States from launching a nuclear strike. Britain and France got them to deter the Soviet Union. China got them to deter all of the above. And Pakistan and India each developed them because they suspected the other country was working on them. Only Israel developed nuclear weapons for use against enemies who did not already have them (and it still refuses to confirm their existence, although it is common knowledge in the strategic community). But Israel got them out of fear that its people would be “driven into the sea” if it lost a conventional war, back in the 1960s when it was conceivable that it could lose such a war. The intention was still defensive. So why can’t the rest of the world believe that North Korea is doing this in order to deter an American nuclear attack? North Koreans have lived 65 years with the knowledge that the United States could do that whenever it wanted,

and it is not maniacal to take out a little insurance against it. The North Korean regime is brutally repressive and given to foaming at the mouth over minor slights. But since it has actually kept the peace for 64 years (while the United States has fought three large wars and many small ones), it is hard to maintain that it is maniacally aggressive. So why say it? Because if you don’t characterise North Korea as insanely dangerous, then you cannot justify forbidding it to have ballistic missiles (which several dozen other countries have) and nuclear warheads (which nine countries have, and another four had briefly before giving them up). Since none of the great powers want North Korea to have them, and they control the United Nations Security Council, they have managed to get special UN bans on both ballistic missiles and nuclear weapons for North Korea. Maintaining that the Pyongyang regime are maniacs is part of the program, but it does DYER | 8


COMMENT | 7

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

THEIR VIEW / QUESTION OF THE WEEK

What are your plans for Family Day on Monday?

» Parker Allen

» Fraser Allen

» Rosemarie Hartman

» Carter Snider

» Cruz Renon

“Going to the Sugar Kings game.”

“Playing X-Box.”

“Working that morning.”

“Playing video games.”

“Watching hockey.”

“It would be better if the ban worked, since the world has more than enough nuclear powers already. ” Gwynne Dyer | 6 HIS VIEW / STEVE KANNON

It’s borrowing, not sound policy, that’s propping up the middle class EDITOR'S NOTES JUSTIN TRUDEAU APPEARS TO have pressed all the right buttons in his meeting this week with U.S. President Donald Trump, which included touching on one of his favourite topics: the plight of the middle class. Trudeau made the fate of the middle class the central piece of his election campaign. There’s been much rhetoric since then. Likewise, workers and their futures were a key component in Trump’s ascendancy to the Republican nomination and, ultimately, the presidency. But, as with past leaders, there’s been much more talk than action when it comes to actual improvements in the lot of middleclass workers. In decline for decades, our standard of living has been propped up by massive amounts of borrowing – i.e. smoke and mirrors. Long gone are the days when rising productivity

in the economy was shared among pretty much everyone – that was when the “rising tide lifts all boats” arguments still held water – replaced by most of the benefits going to the few. The resultant long-building anger is what Trump tapped into. Elsewhere, particularly in Europe, other political movements are doing the same. While it’s true we have much more stuff than was the case in the moreprosperous postwar years, that’s an illusion brought on by there simply being more stuff to have. And readily available credit to buy it, and buy it now, patience no longer being a collective virtue. That it’s an illusion is clear in the numbers. Average incomes have been more or less stagnant for more than 30 years. Debt levels, however, have exploded. Quarter after quarter, we hit new levels of indebtedness, both total household debt (which includes mortgages on increasingly out-of-reach homes) and consumer debt (i.e. credit cards, lines of credit). By the middle of

HOW TO REACH US

an increase of four per cent from last year (34 per cent). And this is no short-term blip, BMO notes. Despite three quarters (75 per cent) being very concerned over the consequences of taking money from their RRSP and 73 per cent saying they are familiar with the tax penalties or rules for repayment (in the case of a homebuyers withdrawal) when withdrawing from their RRSP before age 71, one in five do not expect to ever pay it back (19 per cent). Fueled by more than our consumer society’s lust for trinkets, the debt load is increasingly tied to everyday purchases as we try to deal with our sinking standard of living. Studies have repeatedly indicated a trend, with more than half of indebted Canadians borrowing just to afford day-to-day living expenses like food, housing and transportation. For these people, there is little hope for improved financial condition. Singleparent families, retired Canadians, and those with annual household income

of less than $50,000 face a bleak financial situation. This is no accident, however, as the middle class has been under assault for ages. Studies in Canada and the U.S. show parents today are increasingly convinced their children will be less well off than they were. The figures back up that sentiment, as the great prosperity that flowed out of the postwar years in particular succumbs to constant attack. The majority of us have seen real incomes decline. Studies show the gap between rich and poor is growing, even during the best of economic conditions. Canada’s richest one per cent are taking more of the gains from economic growth than ever before in recorded history. The 1%ers have become the rallying point for a renewed look at inequalities and inequities in our economic system. Little wonder, as from the beginning of the Second World War to 1977, the income share of the richest one per cent dropped from 14 per cent to 7.7 per cent; by

2007 they’d made a comeback, as the richest one per cent held 13.8 per cent of incomes; since the late 1970s, the richest one per cent has almost doubled its share of total income; the richest 0.1 per cent has almost tripled its share of total income; and the richest 0.01 per cent has more than quintupled its share of income. The average earnings of the richest 10 per cent of Canada’s families raising children were 82 times that earned by the poorest 10 per cent of families. That is approaching triple the ratio of 1976, when the ratio was around 31 times. The after-tax income gap has never been this high in at least 30 years, and it has been growing faster than ever since the late 1990s. That trend has continued in earnest, as little was done to curb the excesses and outright criminality of the deregulation that spawned the 2008 global economic meltdown. The financial sector resumed business as usual, as seen by the large increase in the KANNON | 8

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last year, for instance, total household debt surpassed the entire national GDP for the first time ever. Canadians owe more than $1.70 for every dollar of disposable income. Borrowing up, savings down – the trend isn’t new. Most alarmingly, we’re borrowing for everyday expenses – unable to pay the bills – not just for big-ticket items or even trinkets. Likewise, we’re raiding what savings we do have to cover day-to-day expenses, as noted in an RRSP survey released last week by BMO Financial Group. Though showing funding a home purchase remains the top reason Canadians withdraw money from their RRSPs (30 per cent), they continue to dip into their retirement savings for living expenses (21 per cent) and debt repayment (18 per cent). According to the study, Canadians withdrew an average of $17,213 from their RRSPs this year, an increase of $1,305 from last year ($15,908) and 38 per cent of Canadians have withdrawn money from their RRSP before age 71,

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8 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

THE MONITOR

VERBATIM

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

Farmers in Ontario returned 125,981 kilograms of obsolete and unwanted pesticides and 12,080 kilograms of livestock and equine medications in the most recent collection blitz of obsolete agricultural waste.

“Canada is not immune from the impact of the global trust crisis. In fact, we’re seeing similar trend lines as our neighbours in the United States. Canadians are telling us they are worried about their futures and don’t trust our institutions to fix their concerns.”

With more warehouse space, a “state-of-the-art” receiving area and a little more office room in mind, the latest expansion got underway at the Home Hardware distribution centre in St. Jacobs. Additions to the centre totaling $16 million are expected to be complete by June, in time to answer the increased requirements of dealerships growing in size and number.

» CleanFARMS

» Lisa Kimmel, president and CEO of Edelman Canada, on the 2017 Trust Barometer

» From the Feb. 19, 2005 edition of The Observer

showing declining confidence in institutions such as government

DYER: Nukes a deterrent for

NATIONAL VIEW

North Korea, as with others

FROM | 6

frighten those who are not in on the joke. It would be better if the ban worked, since the world has more than enough nuclear powers already. However, the ban is essentially unenforceable, and the heavens will not fall if North Korea does get a few nuclear-tipped ICBMs one of these days. It will never have very many, and they will not be used for some lunatic “first strike” on countries

that are tens of times more powerful. They will be for deterrence, only to be launched as an act of revenge from the grave. Just like everybody else’s. What can President Trump do about this? He could try bribing North Korea into suspending its work on missiles and bombs. That worked once before, but not for very long. There is really nothing useful to be done. And what will he say about it? Nobody knows, probably including him.

KANNON: Expanded credit

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derivatives market – aka speculation. Instead of regulating the industry, eliminating some of the most egregious practices, governments in effect handed a blank cheque to those who caused the meltdown. What little was done is at risk of being rolled back in the U.S. by Trump, who’s hinted he’ll go beyond that in eliminating consumer protections, for instance. As with drops in cor-

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SPORTS | 9

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

SPORTS NOT SO GREAT OUTDOORSMAN / STEVE GALEA

HOCKEY / JUNIOR B

Kings split weekend games, drop to second place

After a sound pummelling of Brampton, Elmira unable to keep the pace in loss to first-place Listowel WHITNEY NEILSON

THE ELMIRA SUGAR KINGS have just four regular season games left to inch back into first place after a win and a loss on the weekend and a 5-1 loss in Kitchener on Tuesday night. A three-goals-per-period flow paced the Elmira team to a 9-3 victory over the Brampton Bombers on Feb. 10. “I thought we were doing the little things really well. We had a little bit of an eight, nine minute lapse that they scored a couple quick goals on us but other than that I thought the little things were getting done from everybody in the line-up,” said head coach Ty Canal. Keanan Stewart, Mitch Hoelscher and Jake Brown each knocked a puck in the net in the first period. Zack Cameron, Anthony Azzano, Brown, Austin Ulett, Ethan Skinner and Hoelscher picked up the assists. It was much of the same in the second as Mitch Hoelscher, Quinten Bruce and Cameron brought the tally to 6-0 for Elmira heading into the final frame. Brown, Skinner, Stewart, Bruce and Spencer Comelli assisted. The Kings pulled ahead to 7-0 with a goal from Skinner (Hoelscher, Brown), before Brampton finally found some momentum and scored three times on Tyler Mazzocato in less than four minutes.

Bombers goals came from Jarret Woon Sam (Rico Rossi, Andrew Borgatti) and Deaglan Small (2), helped in by Dante Sheriff (2) and Brandan Fisher (2). Hoelscher (Brown, Skinner) added his third of the night to earn him a hat trick and Bruce (Skinner, Cameron) sunk Elmira’s ninth to close out the game. Mazzocato made 43 saves compared to the Brampton goalies’ combined 25 saves. At home on Sunday the Kings couldn’t recover from Listowel’s 4-0 lead. Canal notes they’ve had some good battles with Listowel this season, including beating them in their own barn the last time they met. The Cyclones started scoring in the first with goals from Jakob Lee (Holdyn Lansink, Riley Robertson) and Jamie Huber (Cullen Mercer, Lee). They added another two by 5:04 in the second from Tommy Hoogars (Blake Nichol) and Brady Anderson (Nichol and Hoogars). “They’re a team that works hard and competes and is coached well. They play hard and that was something that we knew we were going to have to match and you just can’t give up opportunities. KINGS | 11

Taking a swing at better stats in angling OPEN COUNTRY THIS HAS BEEN MY one of my best ice fishing seasons – and not just because I haven’t been able to make it out all that much. No, the reason is that I have caught trout one out of every two times I have been out. If this were baseball, we would say I have a .500 hooking average or ‘HA’ for short. And .500 is good in any sport. I’m not sure why ice anglers have not yet adopted a baseball-like system for statistics but it seems to me that this would be a perfect addition to the sport. It makes sense on so many levels. Like baseball players, most ice anglers spend an awful lot of time sitting on the bench waiting for something exciting to happen. And when they are not on the bench they are either like pitchers in that they hope for a lot of strikes or like batters in that they want at least one good one over the plate. I know this is preliminary, but let me suggest a few stats that might prove useful. I’m thinking HDA is where we should start. It stands for Hole Drilling Average, which describes the percentage of times

The Elmira Sugar Kings battled the Listowel Cyclones at the WMC on Feb. 12, finishing with a 6-3 defeat. Josh Slegers has six goals and 15 assists this season. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]

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10 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

Jacks looking to advance Friday night

Wellesley can close out opening-round series against Navy Vets with a Game 6 win in Woodstock WHITNEY NEILSON THE WELLESLEY APPLEJACKS ARE heading to Game 6 in the first round of playoffs after posting two victories and a loss against the Woodstock Navy Vets over the weekend. The Jacks led the series 3-1 heading into Sunday afternoon’s game and could have taken the series then, but fell 5-4 in overtime. On Friday in Wellesley, the Jacks took a 3-0 win with goalie Ryan Hergott making 29 saves. Shaun Pickering struck first on the power play in the first, helped by Nick Mercier and Jordan Hoekstra. In the second, Mario Alyas added one of his own, assisted by Mercier and Nathan Schlupp. Uttley scored the third and final goal on the power play, unassisted. There was no scoring in the third. Both teams spent plenty of time shorthanded as Wellesley was handed 57 minutes in penalties, while Woodstock tallied 49. “That was actually a

very good game,” said head coach, Brad Gerber. “I think anytime you get a shutout in this league you’re doing all the things right. We’re quite pleased with that win and a good solid win in Game 3 there.” The teams faced off in Woodstock the following night, where the Jacks came out victorious once again with a 3-1 win. Neither goalie let anything past him in the first. The Jacks got on the board with a power play marker from Kyle Soper (Mercier) in the second. The Jacks pulled ahead in the third with a goal from Brady Gerber (Brenden Goran, Sean McEwan). Woodstock earned their lone goal late in the game when they pulled their goalie to add an extra attacker and Dylan Wettlaufer (Kurtis Christo, Chris Jensen) put the puck past Hergott. Uttley sunk the puck on an empty net to finish the game with the win. Both teams spent considerably less time in the box. Wellesley spent 14 minutes

The Woodstock Navy Vets pushed their best-of-seven series to Game 6 on Sunday afternoon when they defeated the Wellesley Applejacks 5-4 in overtime. Here, Ryan Hergott keeps the puck from bouncing into the net. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER] stock’s Jensen (Andrew also had good goaltending shorthanded, to WoodBruder, Christo) and stock’s 24. Hergott made 33 from Ryan Hergott when Wellesley’s Jordan Hoekswe needed it. It takes a big saves. tra (Uttley, Greg Huber). team effort and everyone “We went down there buying into the program,” and it was pretty much the Gerber said. same as the night before. Facing elimination, the Playing very well at both Navy Vets put everything ends of the ice and just they had into Sunday’s shutting them down. We game to pull out the overtime win. Woodstock took an early PRACTICE HOME FIRE ESCAPE PLANNING ON FAMILY DAY lead with two goals in the first four minutes. Austin Richardson (Justin Elms, Chris Nauts) and Dan Haig (Wettlaufer) scored. “They needed to come Township of Woolwich – Chief Rick Pedersen is urging out and play, they had families in Woolwich to practice their home fire escape nothing to lose, their backs plan as part of Family Day on February 20, 2017. were against the wall. At “Most fatal fires occur at night when everyone is asleep, so that is the same time though, it was our chance to put why it is so important for everyone to know what to do when the that team away. We were smoke alarms sound”, said Fire Chief Rick Pedersen. “Everyone a little disappointed that should know what to do and where to go to get out safely.” we couldn’t. We came out a little flat, which kind of surprised all of us on the coaching staff,” Gerber said. INSTALL SMOKE ALARMS CHILDREN/SENIORS MEETING PLACE Cal Jefferies let fans Determine who will be Install smoke alarms on every storey Choose a meeting place outside, breathe a sigh of relief with responsible for helping young and outside sleeping areas. It’s the such as a tree or a lamp post, children, older adults or anyone law. For best protection, install where everyone can be his shorthanded, unassistelse that may need assistance. smoke alarms in every bedroom. accounted for. ed goal to finish the period with Wellesley down 2-1. Kyle Soper leaps onto his teammates as Alex Uttley comes to celebrate after Spencer Both teams earned one Brick scored in the third period on Sunday goal apiece in the second, afternoon. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER] UNDER SMOKE CALL FIRE DEPT. FIRE ESCAPE PLAN with goals from WoodIf caught in smoke, get low and go under the smoke to the nearest safe exit.

CHECK ALL EXITS Check that all exits are unobstructed and easy to use. Once out, stay out. Never e er re-enter re-en entter a burning building. building. building

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Wellesley tied it up finally on a marker from Spencer Brick (Uttley) in the third. But a power play proved fruitful for Woodstock’s Elms, assisted by Chris Thompson and Wettlaufer. With just over five minutes to go, Brady Gerber slipped the puck in the Navy Vets’ net to tie the game 4-4. Huber and Uttley assisted. In overtime, with the first team to score winning, Wellesley found themselves with the loss as Wettlaufer (Austin Sine, Bruder) scored to keep the Navy Vets alive and heading to Game 6. “I thought as the game went on we got better and we battled all day. I give the guys some credit. There was a lot going on [on Sunday] and they played through lots of adversity and they kept plugging away to get to overtime,” Gerber said. Gerber notes Hergott was steady in net for the team in all three games. He also commends captain Cal Jefferies for continuing to step up his game. “He’s a real leader on and off the ice. He doesn’t take a shift off, he just works so hard and his intensity and his will to win is just, you can’t coach that. You have that or you don’t. We’re more than pleased with how Cal’s bringing his game right now,” Gerber said. Now it’s time for the Jacks to refocus and be ready to finish this series on the right side. Gerber says they’ll have to execute with and without the puck and play a patient game. The Jacks will look to wrap up the best-of-seven series Friday when they head to Woodstock for a 7:45 p.m. game. If Woodstock wins, they’re back in Wellesley on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. Elsewhere in their division, Ayr has wrapped up their series defeating Burford in four games. Norwich sent New Hamburg packing in five games. And Paris and Tavistock are tied 3-3 heading to Game 7. “It’s a feeling like no other when you lose in overtime like that, when you can put a team away, especially on your home ice. I think it’s a feeling they don’t want to feel again, so I think that’s motivation enough right there.”


SPORTS | 11

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

GALEA: Adding a stats line to hunting and fishing might not be such a good idea after all FROM | 9

that an angler drills holes when he goes out with other anglers. This is possibly the most useful stat we could report upon. Anyone who has earned a .975 or better HDA can fish with me anytime. If you come in at under .200 don’t even bother asking. And that’s the whole point of this. Stats are essentially

supposed to help someone unfamiliar with the competitor get a sense of what their strengths and weaknesses are. That’s why the BES (Bring Extra Snacks) average is also highly instructive. Anyone with less than .100 BES isn’t ever going to be on my team. We can’t have two players with the same weakness. Ice Slipping Percentage (ISP) would go along with

Hole Immersion Average (HEI) and MBSI (Minnow Bucket Step In) percentage so that you would know immediately if you were dealing with a clumsy angler, which is highly desirable on the slow days. Of course, we’d have to include stats that are important to fishing too. Strike Percentage (SP) and Logs Hooked (LH) average immediately come to mind. Then there is the

previously mentioned HA and Tip Ups Missed (TUM) percentage. Oh, and it wouldn’t hurt to have a Minnow Purchasing (MP) stat too. Plus, the two most telling stats BFP and EFSP – the former is Big Fish Percentage and the latter is Exaggerated Fish Size Percentage. You want to fish with an angler who has a high EFSP and low BFP. There are probably

more stats you could use to describe an ice fishing angler’s characteristics but these are certainly a good start. If every ice angler had a card of him or herself that had these percentages on the back, it would be much easier to decide who you wanted to fish with. Plus we could trade them. Then again, maybe it’s best to keep stats right out of fishing and hunting al-

together. Stats, after all can be interpreted two ways, especially when the stat is near the middle of the range. Take my .500 hooked average, for example. Some angling armchair experts might say the glass is half empty. Others might say the glass is half full. But the true experts – the guys that actually go out – would know that the contents are merely frozen.

Two EDSS ski team members each pick up bronze medals at WCSSAA meet LIZ BEVAN

Sugar Kings goalie Jon Reinhart blocks Listowel’s shot in Elmira’s 6-3 loss on Sunday. He made 31 saves that game. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]

KINGS: Keeping an eye on the scoreboard and

the standings as the regular season winds down FROM | 9

Those types of teams are going to capitalize on them, especially when we’re getting away from not just systems, but the way that we want to play,” Canal said. Elmira’s Comelli put his team on the board in the second on a long shot, assisted by Brown. Hoogars added his second goal of the night later in the period, helped by Anderson and Chayse Herrfort. Listowel’s Anderson (Nichol, Chet Phllips) added one more in the third and Elmira’s Andrew McIntyre and Bruce (Klayton Hoelscher) added two for the Kings, but it was too late in the game. Jon Reinhart made 31 saves for Elmira. The Kings spent 40 minutes in the penalty box, which changes momentum. “It changes the ice time, you lose that consistent flow and you lose that type of the mindset of going

from offense to defence having to worry about those little things and I thought Listowel did a lot better job blocking shots too, I noticed. When you’re killing penalties and blocking shots, it’s tough to get momentum because you’re always chasing,” Canal said. “I think this is good for us, to see how our guys rebound and see how they come together and hopefully we can get playing the way we want to. We gave up too many shots again and that’s something we definitely need to get under control,” Canal said ahead of Tuesday night’s game. On Tuesday night the Kings faced off against the Kitchener Dutchmen, where Valentine’s Day provided a loss, not roses and chocolates. The Kings will visit the Waterloo Siskins for a 7:30 p.m. matchup on Feb. 18. They’re home for a 2 p.m. game against Kitchener on Feb. 20, Family Day, at the Woolwich Memorial Centre.

EVEN WITH THE WARM weather lately, two Elmira District Secondary School alpine skiers hit the slopes last week, earning the school a pair of bronze medals. The Waterloo County Secondary School Athletic Association (WCSSAA) meet was held Feb. 9 at Beaver Valley Ski Club near Collingwood, where Dayna Bowman and Markus Krepstakies took home third place in their respective races. Head coach Dave Vandenberg says Krepstakies has been a top skier for the school for a couple of years now, so it wasn’t a surprise to see him place. Bowman on the other hand, is a first-time competitor for the school. “This was the first time that we had seen her race. She is a Grade 9 student and she was competing

against 20 racers from all age groups. She was competing against Grade 12 students. It was a great result for her,” he said. Of Krepstakies, Vandenberg says he expected nothing less. “Markus has been one of our top skiers for three years now. He has always been solid and he has always had good times, so it really wasn’t a surprise,” said Vandenberg. Krepstakies, a Grade 12 student at EDSS, was less than three seconds behind second place. His first run was completed in 44.38 seconds, and his second, in 42.15 seconds. Bowman was less than two seconds out of second place. Her first race she posted a time of 55.28 seconds. She completed the second run in 52.62 seconds. Vandenberg says he expects to see more from her at the next level of competition.

The two skiers are at Beaver Valley Ski Club today, competing in the Central Western Ontario Secondary Schools Association alpine ski meet. “Of course, it is more difficult competition, but Danya’s time was very close to the silver medal time at WCSSAA. I think she definitely has the potential to get another medal,” he said. Vandenberg says Krepstakies will most likely get a spot on the Central Western Ontario Secondary Schools Association (CWOSSA) podium as well. “Markus has had solid numbers for years,” he shared. The two skiers could eventually make their way to the Ontario Federation of School Athletic Associations (OFSAA), the provincial competition, on Feb. 27 if they place high enough in their categories.

2017 Registration ONLINE Registration now available at:

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Season set to begin week of May 15 through July 15

Registration Deadline: March 31, 2017

*Weather Permitting

South Woolwich Minor Baseball Co-Ed House League DIVISIONS

AGES

RATES

GAME NIGHT(S)*

T-Ball Division.................................(2013, 2012).................$65 ........................... Tuesday Minor Rookie Division......................(2011, 2010).................$65 ........................... Monday Major Rookie Division......................(2009, 2008).................$90 .................. Monday/Wednesday Junior Division................................(2007, 2006).................$90 .................. Monday/Wednesday Senior Division........................... (2005, 2004, 2003) ............$90 .................... Tuesday/Thursday Intermediate Division................. (2002, 2001, 2000) ............$75 .................... Tuesday/Thursday

*Game nights are subject to diamond availability

For more information please contact: Terry Kraemer, League President: woolwichbaseball@gmail.com or Laurie Wittie, Vice President: laurie.wittie@gmail.com


12 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

JUNIOR LANCERS DEFEAT GALT, BUT FALL TO FOREST HEIGHTS IN QUARTER-FINALS

The EDSS junior girls’ volleyball team earned a decisive 3-0 victory over Galt Collegiate Institute on Feb. 9. They then went on to lose to Forest Heights Collegiate Institute 3-0 on Tuesday in the quarter-finals.

[WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]

THE SCORE

WOOLWICH WILDCATS

Tyke: SELECT Feb. 11 vs Caledon Home: 2 Visitor: 0 Goals: Zack Forwell (2) Assists: Lucas Frey, Cruz Balog Shutouts: Ben Hacock, Cohen Hamburger

Tyke: SELECT Feb. 12 vs Milton Home: 1 Visitor: 2 Goals: Zack Forwell

Novice: MAJOR A Feb. 9 vs Guelph Home: 3 Visitor: 1 Goals: Mitchell Krasovec, Sutton Meier, Zack Forwell Assists: Spencer Hume, Avery Collingwood, Carter Weir, Alex Veitch, Lucas Benham, Luke Wood

Novice: MAJOR A Feb. 11 vs Guelph Home: 2 Visitor: 5 Goals: Spencer Hume, Sutton Meier Assists: Mitchell Krasovec, Adam Lavigne, Tristan Hill

Novice: LL #2 Feb. 11 vs Ayr #1

Home: 2 Visitor: 3 Goals: Luke Forbes (2) Assists: Anand Ghali

Novice: LL #2 Feb. 11 vs Cambridge White Home: 5 Visitor: 0 Goals: Grace Gow (3), Alexa Grundy (2) Assists: Hailey Thom (2), Leah Hunter, Elle Clemmer, Alexa Grundy, Callie Gruhl Shutouts: Lyla Naughton

Novice: LL #3 Feb. 12 vs Twin Centre Home: 2 Visitor: 1 Goals: Jordan Martin, Wyatt Swijters Assists: Chris Yorke, Oliver Horn, William Krubally, Jaden Zhou

Atom: MINOR A Feb. 11 vs Brampton Home: 2 Visitor: 0 Goals: Josh Carson, Keaten Kidd Assists: Connor Goebel, Ethan Burkholder, Evan Woods, Owen Weppler Shutouts: Ayden Schaap

Atom: MINOR AE Feb. 11 vs Caledon Home: 3 Visitor: 4

Goals: Tyler Gingrich, Nathan Dyck, Carson Staken Assists: Carter Snider (2), Thomas Ferguson

Goals: Matthew Ramage (2) Assists: Jack Hacock, Benjamin Lipp, Jakob Geimer

Atom: MINOR AE

Atom: LL #1

Feb. 12 vs Hespeler Home: 3 Visitor: 3 Goals: Carter Snider (2), Mitchell Roemer Assists: Auston Roth, Carson Staken, Wesley Aitken

Feb. 6 vs Twin Centre Home: 4 Visitor: 4 Goals: Tanner Armstrong (2), Adam Short, Evan McDowell Assists: Tanner Armstrong, Hunter Lance, Evan McDowell

Atom: MAJOR A Feb. 11 vs Dundas Home: 2 Visitor: 4 Goals: Eric Kane, Ian Leech Assists: Stuart Sinclair (2), Liam Wood

Atom: MAJOR A Feb. 13 vs Dundas Home: 5 Visitor: 1 Goals: Mitchell Walker, Pacey Camm (2), Ian Leech, Andrew Chumley Assists: Pacey Camm, Stuart Sinclair, Evan Passmore, Michael Gear, Liam Wood, Ian Leech, Eric Kane

Atom: LL #1 Feb. 5 vs New Hamburg Home: 2 Visitor: 4

Atom: LL #1 Feb. 12 vs Ayr Home: 3 Visitor: 1 Goals: Evan McDowell, Jakob Geimer, Adam Short Assists: Tanner Armstrong, Matthew Ramage

Atom: LL #2 Feb. 12 vs Hespeler #2 Home: 7 Visitor: 1 Goals: Ethan Adams, Ben Lowther, Patrick McCarthy (3), Owen Tettman, Dawson Brubacher Assists: Ben Lowther, Dawson Brubacher, Ethan Adams (3), Andrew Zettler, Connor Airdrie

Atom: LL #3 Feb. 5 vs Plattsville

Home: 4 Visitor: 0 Goals: Declan Johnson (2), Myles Hunter, Lucas Hubbard Assists: Myles Hunter, Lucas Hubbard (2), Evan Yorke, Ben Hibbard Shutouts: Connor Huber

Atom: LL #3 Feb. 11 vs Hespeler #2 Home: 6 Visitor: 0 Goals: Brody Schaefer, Declan Johnson (2), Myles Hunter, Ben Hibbard, Hayden George Assists: Hayden George, Myles Hunter, Declan Johnson, Brody Schaefer Shutouts: Connor Huber

PeeWee: MINOR AE Feb. 8 vs Stoney Creek Home: 3 Visitor: 2 Goals: Jonathon Enns (2), Nathan Lipp Assists: Michael McDonald, Owen Brown, Ryan Wingrove, David Taylor (2), Jett Renon

Bantam: MINOR A Feb. 11 vs New Hamburg Home: 5 Visitor: 4 Goals: Carter Servais (2), Kyle Mulder, Tyler Martin, Cameron Leonard

Assists: Kyler Austin, Michael Hayes, Easton Gowing (2), Nate Snyder, Owen Lee

Midget: LL #2 Feb. 10 vs Tavistock Home: 0 Visitor: 4 Midget: LL #2 Feb. 11 vs Beverly #1 Home: 3 Visitor: 2 Goals: Ben Weigel (2), CJ Sider Assists: Nick Lunz (2), Sullivan Keen, Corbin Kaufman, Jon Martin

WOOLWICH WILD

Rookie: LL RED Feb. 11 vs Grand River Home: 1 Visitor: 6 Goals: Lauryn Kidd

Rookie: LL RED Feb. 12 vs Grand River Home: 4 Visitor: 8 Goals: Lauryn Kidd (2), Audrey English, Presley McFadden

Atom: LL Feb. 11 vs Cambridge Home: 1 Visitor: 2 Goals: Hailey Mueller

PeeWee: LL Feb. 12 vs Stratford Home: 2 Visitor: 4 Goals: Annie Sargent, Kyla Bloch Assists: Emily Sargent, Payton Karn

PeeWee: BB 7100 Feb. 11 vs Wilmot Home: 1 Visitor: 0 Goals: Haylee Clemmer Assists: Tanis Uhrig Shutouts: Mackenzie Koenig

Bantam: B 7106 Feb. 11 vs Walkerton Home: 1 Visitor: 5 Goals: Megan Pickett Assists: Lexi Runstedler, Delaney Jacklin

Bantam: BB Feb. 8 vs North Halton Home: 3 Visitor: 0 Goals: Shae-Lynn Martin, Avery Bender (2) Assists: Landyn Meadows, Sydney Dettweiler (2), Evie Adam Shutouts: Cailyn Wilkie

Bantam: BB Feb. 11 vs North Halton Home: 5 Visitor: 1

Goals: Evie Adam, Shae-Lynn Martin, Abby Burkholder, Maddy Goss, Blythe Bender Assists: Abby Burkholder (3), Avery Bender, Hannah Carr, Evie Adam, Ria Hamilton, Landyn Meadows

Bantam: BB Feb. 12 vs Waterloo Home: 1 Visitor: 1 Goals: Ella Campbell Assists: Alana Bauman, Evie Adam TWIN CENTRE HERICANES

PeeWee: LL Feb. 13 vs Kitchener Red Home: 1 Visitor: 0 Goals: Kayla Foy Assists: Emma Sommer Shutouts: Kirsten Livingston

WATERLOO WOLVES

Webster

Atom: MAJOR A Feb. 5 vs London Home: 2 Visitor: 5 Goals: Jackson Andrews, Griffin Beddis Assists: Tim Hodson

Atom: MAJOR A Feb. 11 vs Hamilton Home: 4 Visitor: 2 Goals: Riley Webster, Hayden Taylor, Griffin Beddis, Calvin Witt Assists: Tim Hodson, Jackson Andrews, Matthew Ball, Hayden Taylor, Griffin Beddis

Atom: MAJOR A Feb. 12 vs Hamilton Home: 2 Visitor: 1 Goals: Hayden Taylor, Declan Uniac Assists: Tim Hodson (2), Declan Uniac, Hayden Taylor

Atom: MAJOR A Feb. 4 vs Brantford Home: 3 Visitor: 3 Goals: Matthew Ball, Griffin Beddis Assists: Hayden Taylor, Griffin Beddis, Riley

SUBMIT TEAM SCORES & PHOTOS ONLINE

EDSS GIRLS’ HOCKEY SQUAD SUFFERS DEFEAT AT HANDS OF HURON HEIGHTS

The EDSS girls’ hockey team fell 4-1 on home ice to Huron Heights Secondary School on Monday afternoon at the WMC. Their final regular season game was on Wednesday versus Sir John A. Macdonald Secondary School. The Elmira team was tied for second in the league with a 7-2 record as of Monday. [WHTINEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]


SPORTS | 13

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

Elmira curlers qualify for provincial competition next month LIZ BEVAN FOR THE SECOND YEAR in a row, Team Pidgeon from the Elmira Curling Club will be competing against Ontario’s best. The intermediate women’s team, made up of

skip Mary Pidgeon, Twyla Gilbert, Colleen Coughlin and Jackie Gidge, will be attending the provincial competition next month after winning a qualifying tournament in Huntsville, Ont. this past weekend. The women were unde-

feated at the qualifier. “We came out on the A-side,” said Gilbert. “We didn’t lose a game all weekend. The whole team played very well. It felt awesome.” First up, Team Pidgeon won against Team White

EDSS BOYS DEFEAT CAMERON HEIGHTS

from Ennismore, Ont., 10-3. Later that afternoon, the Elmira team took on Team Allan from the Barrie Curling Club. Their third win of the day was against Team Pipes from Burlington. The provincial qualifier was one of four last weekend. Even though the team won all three of their games, Gilbert says travelling to a new curling club can present a challenge for the players. “Their ice is different, and every place you go, the rink is different. You could get into so many technical reasons like the type of water they have there, the kind of rocks they use,” she said, adding that Pidgeon had the biggest job in Huntsville. “There

are a lot of things that can create a challenge. Mary is the skip and she is the one who calls the game, so she has to figure all of that out quicker than everyone else, usually.” All four team members have full time jobs, families at home and obligations to other curling teams, but Gilbert says that is all part of the game. They are all avid curlers who don’t require too much practice time ahead of competitions. “We always try to get together before a competition, but there isn’t a lot of spare ice time in Elmira - it is very busy during the week,” she said. “We still curl in our regular leagues, but trying to get everyone together and make that

work can be hard. If we don’t get together, we still all understand the game and that there are commitments that need to be attended to.” The team will be heading to Fenelon Falls, Ont. on Mar. 1 to play seven matches against teams from across Ontario. Gilbert says she hopes they win it all, but to her, success would mean winning more games than not. “Of course, winning would be awesome, but we are looking for a winning record. We play seven games no matter what, so if we can win four, that would be a success,” she said. “I personally believe it would be a great accomplishment if we came away with a winning record.”

Sidewalk clearing tips Clear the snow as soon as you can so a snowy sidewalk doesn’t become an icy one. Do not use salt or de-icers to melt snow. Sprinkle salt or de-icer on icy areas only and give it time to work. Create traction with non-clumping kitty litter or sand to reduce the potential to slip.

The EDSS boys’ hockey team defeated Cameron Heights on Tuesday afternoon 4-3. Mitch Esbaugh scored two goals, with Alex Turchan and Cade Schaus adding to the tally. The boys will be playing in the post-season qualifiers today at 2 p.m. against WCI in Waterloo. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]

SOCCER PLAYERS TAKE IT INDOORS

Salt impacts our water.

CURB THE Elmira resident Adrian Martin organized a soccer tournament, called DMDI Family Futsal, at Max’s Sports World in St. Jacobs on Jan. 28. Teams from Elmira, Waterloo, Kitchener, Toronto and Hamilton participated, totaling more than 75 players on eight teams. The tournament’s goal was to foster community relationships through soccer. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]

SALT curbthesalt.ca We all have a role to play.


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14 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

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VENTURE | 15

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

VENTURE FOOD FOR THOUGHT/ OWEN ROBERTS

TECHNOLOGY / SITE SELECTION

Elmira site proposed for electrical system battery backup facility NextEra Energy’s development would occupy a location adjacent to biogas plant if zoning approved WHITNEY NEILSON A RENEWABLE ENERGY OPERATION could be setting up shop next to Elmira’s Bio-En Power biogas plant by the end of this year if council approves a zoning bylaw amendment later this month. IBI Group, on behalf of NextEra Energy, is proposing to amend the industrial zoning with a site-specific provision to permit the development of an electrical energy battery storage facility as a primary use on 1.73 hectares of the property. The company has applied for changes to 50 Martin’s Lane in Elmira’s north end, where the facility is proposed to be built. The land, owned by Marbro Capital, is adjacent to the biogas plant. NextEra Energy’s project director Neil Watlington explains they were selected by the Ontario Independent Energy System Operator after they put out a request for proposals two years ago looking for a company to provide an energy storage solution for the IESO. They were awarded the contract in November of 2015. “The energy storage technology comes enclosed in modular prebuilt trailers, so it would basically take up about half an acre in the Marbro park right next to the Bio-En facil-

ity. It’s about two acres for construction, about half an acre once we’re done and it’ll look like there’s a trailer that’s parked there with some electrical equipment around it,” Watlington explained. They’re not 100 per cent certain how many there will be but they expect there will be six small buildings which look like shipping containers. They can store about two megawatts of energy and also release two megawatts of energy. “We’re continuously connected to the grid and we’re charged up like a [uninterruptible power supply] would. And then when the system operator decides that it’s beneficial to release energy as a generator to help balance the supply and demand of energy then they’ll release from the storage. We’re basically a balancing system to the grid.” They hope to start construction in the summer and have it operating in late fall-early winter. The inside of the buildings look like computer rooms with racks and cables and boxes. “The batteries are basically pouches. They’re independent pouches, they’re not like the cylinder type that you would normally see in the drugstore, for example. But they are modular also, so you can pull one out and put another one in,” Watlington

FIELD NOTES

NextEra Energy Resources plans to build a two megawatt battery storage facility in Elmira next to the Bio-En plant. These photos show what that looks like on a larger scale at their Green Mountain facility in Pennsylvania, which is a 10-megawatt operation. sion in the province. explained. This will be the first built “It is the beginning of They’ve been operatin Ontario, with a second a type of service that may ing in Canada for nearly planned for Parry Sound. a decade and have eight The company has its sights ELECTRICITY | 16 operating storage facilities. set on additional expan-

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Europe trade deal will hasten change in farming

CHEERS WERE HEARD ACROSS Canada Wednesday morning – at least for the most part – when the European Union parliament voted in favour of a landmark trade deal with Canada, called the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA). It’s designed to unite the markets of 35 million Canadians with 500 million Europeans. That is huge for Canadian agricultural products. The deal will take a while to kick in. But some people here worry that eventually, European imports will displace similar homegrown products. They won’t, if Canadian products are better and competitively priced. And there are some products in Europe that are unique to that continent. So why not give Canadians access to them, as long as the trade is fair? One challenge to farmers on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean is harmonization. It’s fine that politicians have opened the borders. But regulatory agencies are going to have their say now. And if they don’t like what they see, such as production practices they disapROBERTS | 16

GET THE WORD OUT IN THE OBSERVER.

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16 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

ROBERTS: Trade deal provides opportunities,

but also poses challenges to some producers FROM | 15

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prove of, then what? This raises a particularly thorny question of antibiotic overuse. The World Health Organization calls antibiotic resistance one of the biggest threats globally to global health food security and development today. The use and misuse of antimicrobials in humans and in animals has increased the number and types of resistant organisms. In agriculture in Europe, antibiotics are no longer used to promote growth in animals. But they are allowed here, and in some cases they’re used too much. Microorganisms such as bacteria have become better at preventing treatments such as antibiotics from killing them or inhibiting their growth. Antibiotics are incredibly over-prescribed, not just in agriculture but in human medicine too. People often take them unnecessarily, when they have symptoms such as fever that can be caused by a virus and is not controlled with an antibiotic. In nature, bacteria con-

stantly mutate and change to fight whatever is attacking them. First there’s a few that resist and survive efforts to kill them; they reproduce, and then there are millions, then billions, then trillions. They fight back against antibiotics like they do any other threat. An action plan has been endorsed by Canada, the United States and member countries of the WHO, to tackle the problem. The action plan’s goal is to ensure, for what the organization says is for “as long as possible,” continuity of successful treatment and prevention of infectious diseases with “effective and safe medicines that are quality-assured, used in a responsible way, and accessible to all who need them.” Countries have been urged to put the plan into action, adapting it to their national priorities and specific contexts, and mobilizing additional resources for its implementation. Governments committed to have in place, by May of this year (when the next World Health Assembly is held), their own action plan on antimicrobial re-

sistance, aligned with the global plan. Their plans are to cover antimicrobial medicines in animal health and agriculture, as well as for human health. Canada’s plan is still under development. But there are many signs from government officials, researchers and others about what it could and should contain. AMR is accepted as a huge problem, one of the biggest ever in agriculture, and there’s no doubt an exporting nation like Canada must have harmonized standards with major trading partners. While the global plan is being designed and debated, researchers suggest producers look at their own farms. This begins with analyzing what you’re using for antimicrobials on your farm, and how much. Then determine why you’re using them, and if management alternatives could perhaps produce similar results. Finally, bring your veterinarian into decisions you make about new directions in disease control. Change is going to happen. The European trade deal makes it more real than ever.

ELECTRICITY: Providing flexibility in the grid FROM | 15

help eventually in having better quality of service and lower costs as it helps recycle, in a way, electricity, and at the same time also provides flexibility

to the old technology grid where things were very rigid. This now provides more flexibility to electricity and the way it’s served and delivered,” Watlington said. Communications manager Bryan Garner notes

they’re the largest developer of renewable energy in North America from the wind and the sun, and are increasingly getting involved in storage technology. He explains in a period of peak demand, in the summer for air conditioning, for example, an IESO can draw on the existing battery storage and release it to the grid to meet the demand, rather than calling on a new power plant to fire up a turbine. The electricity system in Ontario at times relies on backup power from its gas-fired plants to make up for periods when solar and wind are unavailable, for instance. The NextEra arrangement stores such power when it’s generated, allowing it to be used when needed. “It is an exciting and innovative use of battery technology that really helps improve the quality of electric service and the efficiency of it, and it can also be a cost-effective way of managing the grid,” Garner said. A public meeting to discuss the zone-change application is set for Feb. 28 in Woolwich Township council chambers.


THE ARTS | 17

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

THE ARTS ON STAGE / LIVE MUSIC

Young violinist joins KWS for pair of concerts A rising star, Benjamin Beilman to perform with local symphony in presentation of works by Jean Sibelius

Violinist Benjamin Beilman will join the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony in performing the works of Jean Sibelius Feb. 17 and 18 at the Centre In The Square.

LIZ BEVAN HAVING PLAYED WITH ORCHESTRAS all over the world, up and coming violinist Benjamin Beilman will be taking the stage with the Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony. Beilman is one of the hottest violinists in the classical music world, having won plenty of awards for his music and skill. He has played with the Philadelphia Orchestra, at Carnegie Hall, with the Chicago Symphony and many more across Europe and North America.

The K-W Symphony has been trying to book him for two years, and now, music director Edwin Outwater says they are thrilled to have him on their stage. “We are very excited and we are very lucky to have him here,” he said. “We are introducing the Region of Waterloo to one of the most exciting young violinists in the world right now.” On both Feb. 17 and 18, Outwater will be conducting the symphony ensemble and Beilman on a trip through famed Finnish composer Jean Sibelius’ best works. Sibelius is one

of Outwater’s favourite composers, and he says he can’t wait to share the beauty of his music with the audiences at the symphony. “I would say that what I really love about Sibelius is that his music is incredibly deep. It is an emotional and transporting experience to listen to his music,” he shared. “It very much mirrors being out in nature, that feeling you get from listening to Sibelius’ music is very similar to some of the most breathtaking moments outdoors that a lot of people experience in their lives.”

[SUBMITTED]

Outwater will be adding a visual aspect of the show, helping classical musiclovers really get into the mood for Sibelius. “These are obviously great works of art that we are playing and they have incredible depth and many, many layers, various meanings that are possible and they can make different impressions on different people,” he said. “Sometimes after just one listen, and just one live experience it can leave people in all sorts of different states, so what I do in KitchenerWaterloo sometimes, is

give a quick overview of the pieces and it is more about how I personally feel about the music than a lecture. It is more about sharing than teaching. We use visual aids there, with images. The music is full of imagery and we want to unlock the audiences’ imagination and kind of affirm the feeling they may have while they are hearing the sounds.” He hopes the audience takes the feeling they get at the performances with them everywhere they go. “You go to a movie or hear a piece of music or see

a play and you go home to sleep and you want them to dream about it, really. For me, the combination of those images we are showing, and the sounds they heard to combine and gestate in their imagination. I want it to stay with them.” The two performances are on Feb. 17 and 18, and start at 8 p.m. at Kitchener’s Centre In The Square. Both will feature Beilman and his violin. Tickets start at $29 for adults and $13 for kids. They can be purchased by visiting www. tickets.kwsymphony.ca or by calling 519-745-4711.

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18 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

CLASSIFIED

CLASSIFIED DEADLINE:

WEDNESDAYS BY 10AM PUBLIC NOTICE

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

AUCTIONS

DOUBLE RING

PUBLIC NOTICE TAKE NOTICE that pursuant to the Funeral Burial and Cremation Services Act, RSO 2012 Meadow Grove Mennonite Church has made an application to the Township of Woolwich to construct a church (meeting house) and a cemetery associated with the horse and buggy community at 5800 Weisenberg Road. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION interested parties may contact the Meadow Grove Mennonite Church at 519-836-5494. Or make written submissions to the Registrar, Cemeteries Regulation Unit, Ministry of Government and Consumer Services, 5775 Young Street 15th Floor, Toronto, On. M7A 2E5

Loving God … Loving our Neighbour

Full time position available in our orchard market store. Successful applicant will arrange produce displays and provide friendly customer service. Some lifting required. Applicant must have good communication skills and be available Saturdays.

Please send resume to: hr@martinsapples.com or 1420 Lobsinger Line, RR #1, Waterloo, ON, N2J 4G8.

HELP WANTED

Receptionist / Office Clerk A position of Receptionist/Office Clerk is available for a competent individual to perform various administrative and clerical tasks to support a busy and fast paced large animal veterinary office. The successful candidate will undertake a variety of activities in the office ranging from answering the phone and filing to basic bookkeeping. An effective Receptionist/Office Clerk has the ability to work diligently to help maintain smooth office operations. You must be reliable and hardworking with great communication skills. The ideal candidate will also be familiar with office software, equipment and procedures. Knowledge of large animal and/or farm experience is beneficial, but not a requirement. The position is full-time Monday through Friday with rotation for Saturdays.We offer competitive wages and benefits. Responsibilities • Answer the phone to take orders, messages or redirect calls to appropriate colleagues • Maintain files and records so they remain updated and easily accessible • Utilize office appliances such as a photocopier, printers etc. and computers for word processing, spreadsheet creation etc. • Assist in office and organization procedures • Perform other office duties as assigned Requirements • Proven experience as Receptionist/Office Clerk or other clerical position • Familiarity with office procedures and basic accounting principles • Working knowledge of office devices and processes • A fast typist with knowledge of stenography and taking dictations • Apt knowledge of MS Office • Excellent communication skills • Very good organizational and multi-tasking abilities • High school diploma

Metzger Veterinary Services 5200 Ament Line Linwood ON N0B 2A0 Fax: (519) 698-0037

office@metzgervet.com Only selected candidates will be contacted for an interview

HOW TO REACH US

HELP WANTED

The Administrative Assistant works three to four hours per day from Tuesday through Friday and is paid a competitive hourly wage. Attendance at Sunday morning worship services is not required but we do expect a respect for Christian values and a person who enjoys working in a church setting. Please apply to:

RETAIL STAFF

WCS Thrift Shop is hiring a customer oriented person with retail experience and the ability to work with volunteers to meet the program objectives of the agency. Duties include sorting, pricing, creating displays, and general store appearance. Some heavy lifting required. Part-time 18 hours per week on average. Apply by Feb 22, 2017 with resume: Woolwich Community Services 5 Memorial Ave. Elmira, ON N3B 2P8 Email: leighanne_wcs@yahoo.ca Fax: 519-669-4210 Only interviewees will be contacted.

We are a welcoming community church looking for an Administrative Assistant to support our staff in planning and delivering programs within our church and throughout our community. We need a person with energy and enthusiasm who works well both on a team and independently. The successful candidate is very accurate and organized with excellent skills in written and oral communication, Word and other Microsoft Office software, website maintenance and event planning. For a complete job description, see www.floramc.org

FloradaleMennoniteChurchHR@gmail.com by February 27, 2017. The position is available immediately.

HELP WANTED

STEMMLER’S of Heidelberg is looking for motivated individuals for Full Time Retail Positions for Day & Afternoon Shifts.

Benefits & Profit sharing. Email resume to:

terry@stemmlermeats.ca

Together Making A Difference

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

Part time Registered Nurse (RN) required for busy medical office. Please send resumé to: elmiramedicalclinic@gmail.com

HORSES WATERLOO COUNTY HORSE Sale to be held at OLEX, Sat. Feb. 25 at 10 a.m. To consign or for more info call 519595-3307.

HELP WANTED

PART TIME PRODUCTION

Have you ever driven by our mill and wondered what it would be like to work at Wallenstein Feed & Supply? We are accepting applications for part time production opportunities bagging and cleaning equipment and floors. Hours are 3pm - 6pm, two to three evenings per week. This will increase to two to three full days per week during the summer, leaving you with lots of spare time to enjoy your summer. The positions require hard-working, responsible individuals with excellent attention to detail and strong organizational skills. If you are interested in a rewarding work life please submit your resume via email to recruiting@wfs.ca by March 3, 2017.

FULL TIME ESTHETICIAN needed for a busy salon in Elmira. We are currently looking for a talented Esthetician who is able to perform manicures, pedicures, waxing,facials, relaxation massage. If you are responsible, dependable, hardworking and honest then you will fit in with our dedicated team. Please submit your resume to CarouselSalonandSpa@ gmail.com or call Dayna at 519-669-2786.

CLASSIFIED LISTINGS

We are committed to diversity and inclusion, and thank all applicants in advance. Accommodations are available during all stages of the recruitment process.

MULTIPLE ESTATE & CONSIGNMENT

AUCTION of Furniture, Antiques, Shop Tools & Farm Support Items Sale to be held at #7213 Line 86 Wallenstein approx. 6 km west of Elmira

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25 AT 10:00 A.M. Shop Tools : Lincoln Stik welder, large heavy duty bench vice, bench grinder, tool box w top box, bench top drill press, floor jack, scroll saw, 14” band saw, table saw. alum step and extension ladders, cordless tool kit, bar clamps, air tank, laser level set, portable air compressor, Halogen work lights, mitre saws, tables full of good hand tools, far too much to list. Appliances: Mid sized chest freezer, upright freezer, mini fridge Antiques: light coloured swing mirror dressers, 3/4 bed complete, small record player, blanket box, bow front cabinet. Rare Milk Bottles: 4 cream toppers , some with ladles, 1 N.R. Martin Elmira (damaged), 1 Evenholme Elmira, 1 Wayside, Waterloo, 2 Martin’s Dairy Waterloo, 3 Burkhardt’s Kitchener, 1 Farmer’s Dairy. Furniture: 3 pc double size waterfall bedroom set, double ped cherry dining table w 6 chairs and matching 4 door china cabinet, 3 section wall unit, drop front desk w hutch, sewing cabinets w drawers, shuffle board, beige recliner chair, glider rocker w ottoman, wooden rockers, curio cabinet, Queen bed frame, large white 2 door closet, 2 door wardrobes, wood table w 5 chairs, pedestal table w 4 chairs, office chairs, brown leather love seat, white floral sofa w chair, brown sofa, brown love seat, wood office desks, cedar chest, book shelves, night stands, extension tables w leaves and much more. Misc: power treadmill, lamps, quilts, piles of bedding, jogging stroller, salad master w cones, stainless mixing bowls, vacuum cleaners, tables full of household items, too much to list. 2 large farm wagon loads of new hardware items. Notes: We will be selling with 2 auction rings most of the day well over 1000 lots the building is packed full. You name it we have it.

Gerald Bowman Auctions & Appraisal Ltd. RR2, Drayton, ON N0G 1P0 Office: 519-638-5708 For full listing & photos visit our website: www.bowmanauctions.ca

HELP WANTED

PART-TIME HELP WANTED Some weekday afternoons and some Saturdays needed. Good communication, Customer Service skills, Job includes Sales, Service, Orders, Computer parts look up, Displays, Stocking shelves, Receiving, Basic Mechanical knowledge of Small Repairs to Vacuums.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 19

Interested applicants may apply at ELMIRA VACUUM 9 Church St. E. Elmira

PHONE 519.669.5790 | TOLL FREE 1.888.966.5942 | FAX 519.669.5753 | ONLINE WWW.OBSERVERXTRA.COM

ADDRESS 20-B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA, ON N3B 1Z9 PLACING A CLASSIFIED WORD AD

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DISPLAY ADS

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In person, email, phone or fax submissions are accepted during regular business hours. Deadline for Thursday publication is Wednesday by 10 a.m. All Classified ads are prepaid by cash, debit, Visa or MasterCard. Ask about Observer policies in regard to Display, Service Directory and Family Album advertising.


CLASSIFIED | 19

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

CLASSIFIED ADS CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18 AUCTIONS

AUCTIONS

AUCTION SALE

AUCTION SALE

Of Antiques, household goods, coins & miscellaneous items, to be held at the K.W. Khaki Club, 2939 Nafziger Rd. 2 miles south of Wellesley, for Petersburg & New Hamburg family’s, on

AUCTIONEERS:

Gerber Auctions Ltd. 519-699-4451

2827 Hutchison Rd., RR#1 Millbank (Crosshill)

WORK WANTED 2 MEN AND a Trailer demolition, junk removal, garage clean up - yard work, downsizing/moving, odd jobs. Free estimates, fair prices. For the things you can’t or don’t have time to do call Gary 519-577-1750.

HEALTH CARE BOWEN THERAPY YOUR choice for effective treatment of specific health conditions or wellness maintenance. KEVIN BARTLEY, Professional Bowenwork Practitioner, Clock Tower Wellness Centre, 69 Arthur St. S., Elmira. 519-669-0112. Every Body is Better with Bowen!

“PROUDLY REMEMBERING OUR PAS T; CONFIDENTLY EMBRACING OUR FUTURE.”

Of property; car; household effects; furniture; antiques; tools; and miscellaneous items to be held at 81 Centre St. in Elmira for Olga Doll on:

Community Information Page

SATURDAY MARCH 25 AT 10:00 AM

PROPERTY: CONSISTING of a charming, well insulated, vinyl sided bungalow with attached single car garage. Main floor has living room; kitchen; 2 bedrooms; 4 pc bath. Finished basement has kitchen; family room; 3 pc bath; utility room; and cold cellar with walk out to garage. House is heated by an oil furnace with a newer oil tank. House has air conditioning; water softener. Property is a nice sized 110ft x 72ft corner lot with interlocking brick driveway; garden shed; green house; beautiful flower and vegetable garden; front and side porches. Property is in excellent condition and has been well maintained over the years with many updates. Location, Location, Location, situated in a sought after private residential area, walking distance to down town. OPEN HOUSE FEBRUARY 25 FROM 12 TO 2PM OR BY APPOINTMENT.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY, 25TH @ 10:00AM. Oak china ANTIQUES/COLLECTIBLES: cabinet, bowed sides, claw feet. Oak ext. table with leaves (1/4 cut). Dresser. Blanket box with drawer. Spinning wheel. Half gallon Bernhardt & Ziegler, Berlin jug. Welding, Brantford 2 gallon flowered crock. 1900’s wooden sign from Millbank train station. Dominion Royal Tires metal sign (tire display). Metal signs. Labatt’s porcelain beer tray. Kuntz & Red Cap porcelain ashtrays. Red cap coasters. Crocks. 1950’s cap guns. Honey, peanut butter & other tinware. Wooden spools & bobbins. “Fire Outs”. Stenciled boxes. Cane collection. Vintage pennants & sports patches. Costume jewelry. Early Waterloo County books. Original Berlin merchant advertisements, etc. Early Family Herald livestock photos. Gas station maps. Original KitKat clock. Lobster trap. Early printer plates. 1970’s and early 1980’s hockey cards. Antique tools. Nice selection of china & glass. HOUSEHOLD: Ext. table & chair sets, bookcases, mattress sets, etc. Tools & tool chest. COINS: Selection of Canadian & foreign coins to sell at 11:00 a.m. See www.auctionsfind.com/gerber for photos & complete list. Terms – Cash, debit or cheque with I.D. 10% buyers premium.

PUBLIC NOTICE

AUCTIONEER:

Jantzi Auctions Ltd. Wellesley | 519-656-3555 www.JantziAuctions.com

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY MORTGAGE WANTED. 300 thousand 1st mortgage required for a three year term for a commercial building with an appraised value of 400 thousand, plus fifty thousand in equipment. 519-589-7547.

FOR SALE HILLTOP FABRICS SPRING Sale. February 20 February 25. Open every day that week. 10% off storewide. 4785 Perth Line 67, Milverton. 519-595-4344.

FOR SALE SPRING SALE AT Country Lane Fabrics. Feb. 13 25. 10% less on all fabrics, quilt batts, hosiery, gloves, boxed cards, table flex, rubber stamps and accessories. Specials at $6.00/yrd, selected items 1/2 price. 519-664-0701.

AUCTIONS 35TH ANNUAL HEIFER Relief Sale Of approx. 100 heifers, semen, embryos, and related items, To be held at the Carson’s Auction Facilities, Highway 86, in Listowel, for The Mennonite Central Committee, on Friday, February 17th @ 11:00 a.m. Gerber Auctions Ltd. 519-699-4451.

P.O. Box 158

24 Church St. W. Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6

NOTICE TO RESIDENTS

TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the Township of Woolwich intends to adopt the following 2017 budgets as required by section 290 of the Municipal Act, 2001, as amended: • Tax-supported operating budget; • Capital budget; • Water budget; and • Wastewater budget; Phone: 519-669-1647 or 877-969-0094 Fax: 519-669-1820 After Hours Emergency: 519-575-4400 www.woolwich.ca at its regular Council meeting on February 21, 2017 at 7:00 PM. This Council meeting will be held in the Council Chambers, Municipal Office, 24 Church Street West, Elmira. Richard Petherick, CPA, CMA Director of Finance & Treasurer “PROUDLY OUR PAS T; CONFIDENTLY EMBRACING FUTURE.” FUNERAL, BURIAL, ANDREMEMBERING CREMATION SERVICE ACT,OUR 2002 NOTICE OF DECISION Community 24 Church St. W. The Corporation of the Township of Woolwich Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6 P.O. Box 158

Information Page

TAKE NOTICE that on September 20, 2016 Council for The Corporation of the Township of Woolwich approved the establishment of a church (meeting house) and cemetery associated with the horse and buggy community to be located at 5800 Weisenberg Road to permit a church (meeting house) and cemetery on a 1.3 ha portion of the property identified as 6049 Line 86. AND FURTHER TAKE NOTICE that the applicant, Registrar or any person with an interest therein may, within 15 days after publication of this notice refer the decision to the Ontario Municipal Board for a hearing. Further information may be obtained by contacting Nancy Thompson, Administrative Coordinator / Planning Assistant at 519-669-1647 or toll free 1-877-969-0094 ext 6040 or by email nthompson@ woolwich.ca. Dated at The Corporation of the Township of Woolwich this 16th day of February, 2017. Phone: 519-669-1647 or 877-969-0094 Fax: 519-669-1820 After Hours Emergency:

AUCTIONS FRI. FEB 17 at 11:30 AM Annual heifer auction of approx 100 heifers; wood carvings and much more for

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY PRINTING SERVICES

the Mennonite Central Committee to be held at Carson’s Sales Arena 5531 Perth Line 86, Listowel. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519 656 3555 www.jantziauctions.com

519-575-4400 www.woolwich.ca

CLASSIFIED LISTINGS CONTINUED ON PAGE 22


20 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

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CLASSIFIED | 21

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Happy Family Day!

Donating back to the community we call home.

Elmira - Open concept with cathedral ceiling in the family room, patio doors to deck with great open view and gas BBQ hook-up. 3 bedrooms, luxurious ensuite plus walk-in closet in the master. Spacious rec room, office, garage with gas heater. All appliances included and gas rough-in for kitchen stove. MLS SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

519-577-6248 519-503-9533 226-750-9332 allibauman@rogers.com

paul@remaxsolidgold.biz suewidemanhomes@gmail.com

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

$529,900

Kitchener - Located in a sought-after neighbourhood, this is the fixer upper you have been looking for. Work to be done but a larger lot and a great neighbourhood make it all worthwhile. MLS.

Linwood - Only 15 min to Waterloo, this bungalow backs onto greenspace with a spacious lot, fully fenced yard and empty space on one side. Steel roof, large living room, dining area with patio doors opening to a beautiful deck for your morning coffee. Recreation room includes wood burning unit. MLS

$419,000

D L O S $424,900

5 Floor Plans to Choose From. CALL FOR DETAILS

$325,000

Independently Owned and Operated

3 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5426

ELMIRA - Features updated flooring through-out, freshly painted, walk-out basement, double car garage, larger corner lot, all appliances included and much more! MLS.

NEW LISTING

Semi-detached Homes Available!

ELMIRA

Alli Bauman Paul Martin Sue Wideman

NEW LISTING

May your home be a place where friends meet, family gathers and love grows.

Call today Thinking About Selling? and book a FREE HOME EVALUATION

WISHING EVERYONE A WONDERFUL FAMILY DAY WEEKEND!

Shanna

Bonnie

Rozema

Brubacher

BROKER

BROKER

WOLLE REALTY , BROKERAGE INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

“HELPING YOU IS WHAT WE DO.”

LET OUR 50+ YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WORK FOR YOU!

We donate a portion of our commission from every house sale to the Woolwich Community Services

www.YourFamilyTeam.ca 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 4, Elmira N3B 3L4

519-669-3192

FLORADALE 5.24 ACRES | $849,900

BROKERAGE

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. Office:

519-669-2772 45 Arthur St. S., Elmira www.thurrealestate.com

Escape to this countryside retreat of beauty, charm and peacefulness! SPACIOUS 3300 SQ FT HOME offering a captivating mainfloor master bedroom and luxurious ensuite, a wow kitchen complete with granite and built-in appliances. Both Dining and Living room are generous in size, ideal for large gatherings of friends and family, a magnificent stone fireplace offers its warmth on a cold winters night There are 2 additional bedrooms and bath on the 2nd floor. Partially finished huge basement with 3 piece bath. Detached triple car garage/workshop and ample parking on the newly paved drive. A Must See, call for your appointment today. MLS.

BRAD MARTIN

JULIE

LUKE

SHANTZ Broker of Record, HECKENDORN Broker Sales Rep. MVA Residential Res: 519.669.1068 Cell: 519.588.7562 Cell: 519.584.4400

WELLINGTON RD. 12, DRAYTON

INVENTORY IS LOW. WE HAVE BUYERS WHO NEED HOMES. CALL TODAY FOR A FREE MARKET ANALYSIS.

PETER BENNINGER REALTY, BROKERAGE Independently Owned & Operated

519-742-5800 • 508 Riverbend Dr., Kitchener OPEN HOUSE: Saturday and Sunday 2 to 4 25 Expo Dr., St. Clements • For a private viewing call/text me directly.

$579,900 3 Bedrooms / 3 bathrooms. Spacious finished rec. room with bar. Newer large deck is ideal for entertaining or soaking up the morning sun. This well maintained and cared for home should not be missed.

No obligation, free home evaluation!

5195006004

Call or text my cell number

gdraper@coldwellbankerpbr.com

$599,900

82 Mornington St., Stratford

Century home with much of its original character. 4 bedrooms (with closets). Larger lot than most on street. Beautiful original hardwood flooring. Stained glass windows. This home has been loved and enjoyed by the same family for close to 50 years.

Modern Thinking, Traditional Values!

DEADLINE FOR HELP WANTED ADS IS WEDNESDAYS BY 10AM

$1,690,000 RARE OPPORTUNITY Approx. 11,000 sq.ft. of garage & shop space – set up for highway truck & trailer bays. Extremely clean & well maintained. Offices, washrooms, board room, parts room etc. HUGE paved parking lot. Separate shop, 24’ x 35’ + detached garage 28’ x 40’. Wood storage bldg. 30 acres – systematically tile drained. NEW MLS.

CALL FOR YOUR FREE MARKET EVALUATION

SPACE FOR RENT Your Business Here! Advertise your business services in our service directory. Weekly exposure with fantastic results! Call Donna at 519.669.5790 Ext 104.


22 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

REAL ESTATE AND CLASSIFIED ADS CONTINUED AUCTION CNC Mills & Inspection Equipment - Bankruptcy Liquidation

BANKRUPTCY

®

AUCTION

REALTY LTD., BROKERAGE

to be held ONSITE at

INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage | Independently Owned and Operated

519.500.1865 (Direct)

Dale R. Keller

519.747.0231 (Office)

NEW LISTING$331,160

APM Consortium #4 - 490 Sheldon Drive, Cambridge

Sat Feb 25 th 10 am

Sales Representative

410 Conestogo Road, Unit 210, Waterloo, ON N2L 4E2

www.KellerSellsRealEstate.com | dale@kellersellsrealestate.com

We have been instructed by the BDO, Trustee/Manager for APM Consortium, to liquidate the equipment and vacate the building.

Drayton | $349,500

2 - 06/07Haas VF4 VOP-D CNC Milling Machines 1 - 06 Haas VF2 VOP-D CNC Milling Machine 2 - 03/04 Haas VF2 VOP-C CNC Milling Machines 1 - 2000 Haas VFO CNC Milling Machine Tos Kurim FA5B-V Mill* 2 -10/15hp Air Compressors Toolex Geared Drill/Mill* Pure Air HT Air Dryer 2- Deburring Stations* Sunnen Hone* Tooling Mitutoyo BRT-a910* 120+ #40 Tool Holders Hardness Tester * 30+ HD Machine Vises * Granite Tables Full Range of Inspection tools * De-Magnetizer, Tool Boxes, Work Benches, Drill Press, Grinders, Computers * Office & Warehouse Equipment * Pallet Cart, Skids of Billet Aircraft Aluminum, Utility trailer, Etc

Look at the spacious yard of 100 ft by 175 ft ( plus a bonus 25 ft) deep.3 bedroom 3 bath, 2 gas fireplaces, vaulted ceiling, large front porch, dble garage 24 x 22.  Edge of town, backing onto farm land. Don't delay. Call Dale. MLS For info on these or any other real estate enquiries, Call Dale

$331,160

Retirement living at its best, no steps from the curb to the kitchen sink. This 1 bedroom bungalow with an office is the ideal size for this time in your life. Pick your colours and finishes in the home of your dreams. There are options available including a second bedroom. This is a new subdivision in Milverton about 35 minutes from KW. This is a new home that will be built. MLS.

More NEW HOME plans + lots available! ADDRESS: 3 Arthur St. S., ELMIRA DIRECT: 519-503-2753 EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net

AUCTIONS MON. FEB 20 at 4:00 PM - Farm Toy Auction of approx 300 farm toys; tractor trailers; precision; banks; etc to be held at the St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s for area collectors. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519 656 3555 www. jantziauctions.com WED. FEB 22 at 10:00 AM - Clearing auction sale of furniture; collectables; household effects; antiques and miscellaneous items to be held at the

St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s for an area estate with additions. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519 656 3555 www.jantziauctions.com SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 10:00 A.M. Double ring Estate and Consignment Auction of shop tools, furniture, antiques and collectibles etc. Sale to be held at #7213 Line 86 Wallenstein, approx. 6 kms west of Elmira. Gerald Bowman Auctions & Appraisals Ltd. 519-638-5708.

AUCTIONS AUCTION SALE OF Tractors, machinery, sap equipment, household effects and miscellaneous items, to be held at 7491 - 6th Line Mapleton Twp. (5 miles northwest of Floradale or 9 miles southeast of Drayton, for Amsey and Mary Ann Gingrich, on Wednesday, March 15th @ 10:00am. Gerber Auctions Ltd. 519-699-4451. AUCTION SALE OF Tractors, machinery, JD Gator, lawn mowers, household effects, antiques and miscellaneous items, to be held at 4322 Weimar Line, Wellesley Twp. (approx. 2 miles west of Bamberg or 3 miles north east of Wellesley, for Marvin and Charlotte Cober, on Saturday, March 18th @ 10:00 a.m. Gerber Auctions Ltd. 519-6994451.

AUCTIONS SATURDAY MARCH 25, 10:00 A.M. Double Ring Consignment and Estate Auction of farm machinery and farm support items, furniture, antiques, tools etc. Sale to be held at #7213 Line 86 Wallenstein, approx. 6 kms west of Elmira. Gerald Bowman Auctions & Appraisals Ltd. 519-638-5708.

Check Website for pictures - www.mrjutzi.ca PARTIAL LIST ONLY!!! No Buyer’s Premium!!! VIEWING: Friday Feb 24th, 2017, 1 pm to 4 pm TERMS: $500 Cash Deposit on Each major unit.

Balance by noon Mond Feb 27 by Cash, Interac or Bank Draft, for immediate Removal, or as announced.

M.R. Jutzi & Co

FARM SERVICES BAGGED PINE SHAVINGS Agricultural Spray Lime, 22.5kg. bag; feed grade lime, 25kg. Delivered. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-574-4141 or 519669-2045. FERTILIZER AND SEED GRAIN - at competitive pricing. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-574-4141.

DIVISION OF 6583347 ONTARIO INC.,

PROFESSIONALS IN THE ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AND APPRAISALS OF COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, CONSTRUCTION, MUNICIPAL EQUIPMENT & VEHICLES 5100 FOUNTAIN ST. NORTH, BRESLAU, ONTARIO, N0B 1M0

www.mrjutzi.ca

FARM SERVICES

519-648-2111

FARM SERVICES

ICE SALT & ICE MELT - Ice salt comes in 20 & 40kg’s, Ice melt comes in 20kg bags. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-574-4141 or 519-669-2045.

KILN DRIED CORN & CORN SCREENING Delivered by Einwechter. Minimum 15 ton lots. Call George Haffner Trucking 519-574-4141 or 519-669-2045.

MORE CLASSIFIED ADS CONTINUED ON PAGE 23

ELMIRA BLOOD DONOR CLINIC Sophia: Blood Transfusion Sunday 6:30am

Give Blood … to save lives. The Next Elmira Clinic: Thursday, February 23rd 2017 from 2:00pm - 8:00pm

This Elmira Blood Donor Clinic announcement is brought to you by these community-minded businesses

at Lion’s Hall, Elmira

Various sizes & rates

• Fabrics • Men's Wear • Ladies Coats • China • Glass Ware

22 Church St. W Elmira

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE 100 South Field Dr. • 519-669-4964

Bus: 519-698-9930 Res: 519-698-2213

RR #2 Wallenstein, Ontario

519-669-5353

Breakfast • Coffee • Soups • Sandwiches • Donuts • Muffins • Bread • Pies • Cookies

Mon. Closed · Tues.-Fri. 8-6 · Sat. 8-5 2192 Floradale Rd. ~ Floradale, On.

Hours: Mon to Sat 6am to 5:30pm | Closed Sundays & Holidays

(519) 669-1381

TOWN COUNTRY SANYO CANADIAN The Quality You Demand, the Service You Deserve. Farm - Auto - Truck - Industrial and we have On-the-farm service

35 Howard Ave. • 519-669-3232

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

33 Industrial Dr. • 519-669-1591

CLM

FENCING

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

GENERAL DELIVERY, ARISS ONTARIO N0B 1B0

MODULAR BUILDINGS MOVING & LEASING

PROFESSIONAL WORK • AFFORDABLE PRICES

2170 FLORADALE RD., FLORADALE • 519-669-2183

GUELPH: (519) 822-8929 CAMBRIDGE: (519) 654-7068 FAX: (519) 822-7481

CALL 1 888 2 DONATE for more information or to book an appointment. Visit www.blood.ca


CLASSIFIED | 23

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

FAMILY ALBUM ANNIVERSARY

IN MEMORIAM

Happy 50thAnniversary ! John & Linda Hastings

OBITUARY

Marie Reimer (Foerster) April 2, 1941 - February 19, 2015 Her Smile Though her smile is gone forever and her hand we cannot touch We have so many memories of the one we loved so much. Her memory is our keepsake with which we’ll never part God has her in His keeping we have her in our hearts.

There are three things that will endure ‌ faith, hope, and love. And the greatest of these is Love !

Sadly missed, never forgotten, Marg Steffler and her family

Love from family and friends.

DEATH NOTICES DIETRICH, SISTER MILDRED (SISTER M. EDWARDINE) CSJ | The Congregation of

the Sisters of St. Joseph in Canada (Hamilton) are saddened to announce the death of Sister Mildred Dietrich at St. Joseph’s Residence, Hamilton, 2017 in her 73rd year as a Sister of St. Joseph. She was born in St. Clements.

MARTIN, ISRAEL M. | November 8, 1935 February 7, 2017 Passed away peacefully at his residence, RR2, West Montrose on Tuesday, February 7, 2017, at the age of 81 years.

DETTWEILER, RAYMOND “CLARKE� | 1929 - 2017 Passed

away peacefully while living in long-term care at Chartwell Nursing Home, Elmira on Tuesday, February 7, 2017 at the age of 87.

SHERK, MANASSA B. | Passed away at his residence, RR 1, St. Clements, on Friday, February 10, 2017, at the age of 78 years.

LEGRAND, STEVEN GEORGE

| July 29, 1956 - January 28, 2017 Passed away in Elmira.

CLASSIFIEDS FIREWOOD GERBER’S FIREWOOD SERVING you for over 10 years. Your #1 source of quality slabwood and bodywood. Delivery available. 519-656-2057.

WANTED DO YOU THINK you may be psychic? You should join our Paranormal research team. Contact Mary at 519-6699242 or email: merriefritz@ gmail.com

WANTED - BARN Pigeons. Turn your pests to cash. Call 519-505-6364.

Martin, Esther H.

Passed away peacefully on Saturday, February 11, 2017 at his home, in his 75th year. Albert Weber, of RR 1, Linwood, was the husband of Nancy (Bearinger) Weber. Father of Betty and Mark Sittler and Mary and Melvin Brubacher, all of RR 1, Linwood. Grandfather of 10 grandchildren. Brother of Levi and Barbara Weber of Chesley, and Nancy and John Bowman of Linwood. He was predeceased by his parents Jesse and Annie (Frey) Weber. Relatives and friends called at the home of Melvin Brubacher, 3424 Lichty Rd., RR 1, Linwood on Sunday, February 12, 2017 from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. and Monday, February 13, 2017 from 2-5 p.m. A family service was held at the home on Tuesday, February 14, 2017 at 9 a.m., then to Linwood Mennonite Meeting House for burial and public service. Arrangements entrusted to the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira.

Passed away peacefully at his home on Wednesday, February 15, 2017, in his 84th year. Ion Gingrich, of RR 1, Elmira, was the beloved husband of the late Viola (Martin) Gingrich (2011). Dear father of Amsey (Wilma) of RR 1, Elmira, Vera (Luke) Martin of RR 2, Kenilworth, Leonard (Betty), Ruth Gingrich, and Verna Gingrich, all of RR 1, Elmira, Allen (Anna) of RR 2, Drayton, Marvin (Loreen) of RR 4, Kenilworth, and Lester (Shirley) of RR 1, Elmira. Grandfather of 48 grandchildren, 6 step-grandchildren, 28 great-grandchildren, and 8 stepgreat-grandchildren. Brother of Elvina (Mrs. Laverne) Martin. Predeceased by his parents Seranus and Magdalena (Shoemaker) Gingrich, a sister in infancy, sister Melinda Gingrich, brother Omer (Ellen) Gingrich, brother-in-law Laverne Martin, a great-grandson, and daughter-in-law Esther Gingrich. Visitation will take place at the home of Leonard and Betty Gingrich, 5710 Arthur St. N., RR 1, Elmira, on Thursday, February 16, 2017 from 12:30-5 p.m. and 6-8 p.m. A family service will be held at the home on Friday, February 17, 2017 at 9 a.m., then to North Woolwich Mennonite Meeting House for burial and public service.

Esther H. Martin, died on Friday, February 10, 2017 at her home at RR # 4 Listowel in her 82nd year. Esther was formerly of RR # 2 Elmira and RR # 1 St. Jacobs. Sister of Simon H. and Selina Martin of RR # 5 Lucknow. Also survived by 30 nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her parents, Aaron & Leah (Hoffman) Martin, 3 brothers Allan H. Martin, Melvin H. Martin, Abner H. Martin, and sister Mary Ann (Mrs. Abner G. Martin) and 1 niece and 1 nephew. Friends called at the home of Edward M. Martin (4345 Line 83, RR # 4 Listowel) Saturday and Sunday from 2-6 p.m. Funeral service was held at the home of Edward M. Martin on Monday, February 13, 2017 at 9:00 a.m. then to Klear View Mennonite Church, RR # 4 Listowel for further service and burial in the adjoining cemetery. Arrangements entrusted to Mark Jutzi Funeral Home, Milverton.

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

1 BEDROOM, FURNISHED house for rent in Linwood; approx.. 1200 sq ft. $800/ mth plus utilities. Available March 1st. Call 519-505-5077. LINWOOD - 110 sq. ft, one room office space with washroom. Additional space available if needed. $300/ mth + utilities. Call Don 519698-1018.

KEEP YOUR CUSTOMERS

IN THE KNOW ADVERTISE IN THE OBSERVER

Call: 519-669-5790 or Visit: www.observerxtra.com

< & $ $ : ' : $ 6 1 , / ( 7 < 5 . ( $ , 5 6 7 % ( + , ( * 2

5 2 % $ 9 < : ( 0 5 < $ 2 $ 1 1 5 + 2 ' 2 3 $ / 3 $ 5 ( , 6 0

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0 0 < 6 3 $ 5 ( : + ( $ / % / $ 7 ' 2 9 < , 6 6 ( $ ' 6

CROSSWORD PUZZLER

8 1 3 $ , '

Call: 519-669-5790 or Visit: www.observerxtra.com

Gingrich, Ion S.

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS 0 2 2 1 / , 7

PLACE A FAMILY ALBUM NOTICE!

Weber, Albert F.

RENTALS

ROLEX, OMEGA, POCKET Watches, antique clocks, gold rings, jewellery, coins, toys, militaria, records, musical instruments, toys, any gold or silver items. Call Terry @ 519-242-6900, or 519-210-0551 or email: gallamore@golden.net. We pay cash!!!

GO AHEAD, MAKE THEIR DAY.

OBITUARY

Âť CONTINUED FROM PG. 22 WANTED

Bruce Frederick Parker passed away on February 4, 2017, at 70 years of age. He was a farmer and rancher by day, and also a guide outfitter. Bruce was born April 12, 1946 and raised in Elmira, Ontario. He went West at an early age and resided in the Cleardale, Alberta area most of his life. Bruce is survived by his children Ginger, Jeremy , and Jill and his 11 grand children, all of the Worsley and Fairview Alberta area, and his sister Janet Brown of Elmira. He was predeceased by his parents Frederick and Alice Parker and by his with Charlotte (2014). Service was held at Cornerstone Baptist Church in Fairview, Alberta on February 10th.

OBITUARY

GOW, MELVIN ROY | Peace-

fully, at Stratford General Hospital, Stratford on Saturday, February 4, 2017, Melvin Roy Gow, of Grand Bend, age 75. Local relatives are his daughter Patty Hachman and her husband Murray of Elmira.

Parker, Bruce F. 1946 - 2017

OBITUARY

OBITUARY

Arrangements entrusted to Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira.

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

Winfield, Janet Irene

Peacefully passed away on Thursday, February 9, 2017, at Chartwell LTC â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Elmira, at the age of 66 years. Dear mother of Randall and Rachel Freeman of Kitchener. Loving grandma of Trinity and Alexander. Also survived by her brothers Randy Kirch and Kathy Beisel of Elmira, and Duanne and Tina Kirch of Guelph. Predeceased by her parents Lloyd Kirch (Nov. 1992) and Gertrude Austin (nee Hennige, June 2007). Dianne was a lifelong member of the New Apostolic Church in Elmira. At Dianneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s request, cremation has taken place. There will be no funeral home visitation or funeral service. A family graveside service will take place in the spring. Arrangements entrusted to Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira.

Passed away at home on Thursday, February 9, 2017, at the age of 81 years. Janet (nee Whale) Winfield was the beloved wife of the late Lorne Winfield (1992). Loving mother of Phyllis Winfield, and Doris Winfield and her husband Glenn Ward. Loved grandmother of Alyssa, Lauren, Emily and Rachel. Dear sister of Jack (Ann), Wes (Joyce), George (Marion), Mae (Bob) Rahn, and Sharon (Howard) Carey. Janet was a dedicated grandmother and a retired teacher. Family and friends were welcomed on Sunday, February 12, 2017 from 2-5 p.m. at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, 62 Arthur St. S., Elmira. A funeral service was held on Monday, February 13, 2017 at 11 a.m. at Calvary United Church, 48 Hawkesville Rd., St. Jacobs. Interment followed at Calvary United Cemetery. In honour of Janet, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario.

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

OBITUARY Freeman, Dianne (nee Kirch)


24 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

LIVING HERE CHEF’S TABLE/ DONNA GINGRICH ACHIEVEMENTS / LAUDED BY PEERS

Big-time love of animals nets some big-time recognition

Finding just the right mix for muffins

Laurelwood Veterinary Clinic’s Purvi Patel named Vet Tech of the Year at international award ceremony in Florida, beating out 600 nominees en route to the title LIZ BEVAN EVER SINCE PURVI PATEL was a child growing up in Malawi, she knew she wanted to work with animals. Now, her hard work as a veterinary technician at the Laurelwood Veterinary Clinic on Benjamin Road has earned her the honour of Vet Tech of the Year at the 2017 PetPlan Veterinary Awards. Selected from among more than 600 nominees for the award, Patel says it was a surreal experience from start to finish. “To be honest, I was just honoured by the nomination on its own. It started with 600, to the final six, then the final three are flown to Florida,” she said. “The other two nominees I was up against have been practicing for decades, a lot longer than I have. It was just such a surreal moment and such an honour. There aren’t many Purvi Patels I could have been confused with, but it’s true, you kind of go, ‘wait, did they just say my name?’” She realized her love of helping animals while growing up in Africa. Her family lived in Malawi and she says dogs were just a part of her everyday life there. Unfortunately, there isn’t much in the way of veterinary medicine in the developing world. “They definitely don’t have the same medical resources that are in North

RECIPE NOTES

Purvi Patel, a veterinary technician at the Laurelwood Veterinary Clinic on Benjamin Road, has won an award for being the best vet tech in North America. Here, she looks over Knuckles in the clinic’s pharmacy room. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER] trades. We wear a lot of diflocated in Ridgetown, Ont. ing and it was just tragic. America for human mediferent hats. On any given and run by the university. It was really awful. I think cine let alone veterinary day, we are doing dentistry, For the past four years, she for me, seeing that, that medicine, but most people we are doing surgery, we has been working at the was a pivotal moment for do have dogs on their are doing x-rays, we are Laurelwood Veterinary me. I wanted to make sure properties. It is mostly for doing lab work, working Clinic. that I don’t feel this helpsecurity because the crime with clients on education – For her, the best part of less again and that no other rate is higher. We had four the job is helping those that there are just many differowner should either.” big German shepherds and ent tools in your belt that can’t help themselves. Her career in veterinary they were beautiful dogs,” you can use.” “The profession chooses medicine began when she she shared. “But unfortuShe says it is a unique you. You have to have a earned her bachelor of scinately, if they fall ill, there profession to be in, espenatural affinity and affecence in animal biology at really is nowhere to take cially considering the fourtion for animals,” she said. them. That is a big struggle. the University of Guelph. legged patients she sees on “My favourite part of being Then, she attended one of Two out of my four dogs a veterinary technician the best veterinary technipassed away. There was AWARD | 27 is just being a jack of all cian schools in Canada, no help, they were suffer-

MUFFINS MAY NOT BE as popular now as they were a few decades ago but they are still widely available. There are times when a muffin is just the thing – breakfast while you are running out the door, a substantial snack or an extra at brunch. I have experimented with healthy muffin recipes containing oat bran or flax seeds or whole-wheat flour and wheat germ. Somehow they just don’t hit the spot! And eating them seems a chore. So when I made this recipe for Lemon Crumb Muffins I was ecstatic. They are moist and delicately lemon. And they are fancy enough for company! This makes more than a dozen muffins so you can freeze some or give them to a friend. Try making them in a mini muffin tin for an afternoon coffee party (or tea if you insist) and you will be in for a scrumptious treat. CHEF’S TABLE | 27

Are you thinking about buying another car?

Even if it’s a certified vehicle you may want to bring it in for a pre-inspection. A quick check for any problems can save you money in the long run. Feel free to stop by. We would love to assist you in making the best decision for your vehicle needs. – Merlin Frey

Tel: (519) 669-1082 Fax: (519) 669-3084 info@leroysautocare.net 20 Oriole Parkway E., Elmira, ON

www.leroysautocare.net

Accredited Test & Repair Facility


LIVING HERE | 25

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017 “A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Kleensweep Carpet Care

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR • Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS

519.669.5105

E-MAIL: ads@woolwichobserver.com

9 Church St. E., Elmira www.elmiravacuumelectrical.ca

FEBRUARY 20

FEBRUARY 27

MARCH 9

WINTER IN BLOOM AT the Woolwich Memorial Centre, Bring your family for fun activities from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. A chili dog lunch will take place from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. (donations accepted.)

COMMUNITY CARE CONCEPTS INVITES you to join us for a hot meal, fellowship and entertainment at Woolwich Memorial Centre, Elmira. The meal is served at noon, cost is $6. Call 519-664-1900 or 1-855664-1900 by noon Feb. 23.

THE WOODSIDE EVERGREEN FOR Seniors invites you to attend “Is It Alzheimer’s?” Nancy Martin RPN & Lindsay Wilson, educators. Devotional: Paster Ron Seabrooke, Music: Alee Wiens. Starts at 10:30 a.m. at Woodside Bible Fellowship. Suggested donation $7 includes hot meal at noon.

ELMIRA & DISTRICT HORTICULTURAL Society education meeting, 7:30 p.m. at Trinity United Church, Elmira. David Hobson will speak about “The lighter side of gardening.” Members are free, non-members $2. Please bring shoes or slippers. New members welcome.

FEBRUARY 21 TUESDAY LUNCHEON AT GALE Presbyterian Church at 11:30 a.m. The meal includes ham & scalloped potatoes, bun, salad, cheesecake, and a beverage for $12. To order takeout, please call 519-669-2852.

FEBRUARY 22

M&G MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

Everything Vacuum

519-669-8362

T. 519.669.2033

Truck & Trailer Maintenance

All Makes & Models

www.freybc.com

West Montrose, ON

Cell: 519.581.7868

Repairs Service Se

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville 519-699-4641

Rugs and Upholstery

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates

COLLEEN

Vacuum Sales,

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

COMMUNITY CARE CONCEPTS INVITES you to join us for a hot meal, fellowship and entertainment at the Linwood Community Centre. The meal is served at noon. Cost is $11. Call 519-664-1900 or 1-855-664-1900 by noon Feb. 17. UNDERSTANDING MENTAL HEALTH: SIGNS and symptoms, what helps, resources, 6:30–8:30 p.m. Laura McShane, CMHAWW, at Woolwich Community Health Centre, St. Jacobs. Please call 519-664-3794. No charge. Everyone welcome.

FEBRUARY 28 PLEASE JOIN US FOR a Shrove Tuesday, pancakes and sausage supper from 5-7 p.m. at West Montrose United Church. Hosted by the Women’s Social Group. Free-will offerings appreciated. For more information please call Joan 519-669-2432. All welcome.

MARCH 2 CAREGIVERS SUPPORT GROUP. JOIN this informal group of caregivers who are acquainted with the struggles you experience. We meet at the Woolwich Community Health Centre, St. Jacobs from 10–11 a.m. Please call Julie at 519-664-3794, ext. 229.

MARCH 4 KW BRAIN TUMOUR WALK is hosting a Community Garage Sale at St. Teresa’s Church hall starting at 8 a.m. Have items to donate? Email Renee BTWalkKW@ braintumour.ca to arrange item pick up/drop off.

Tuesday - Friday, 9am-5:30pm

Saturday, 9am-3pm

Quality & Service you can trust.

NEW HORIZONS FOR ZOOMERS, boomers and seniors has guest speaker Jim Rodger, coordinator of the Prime Ministers Statues and Educational Resources Advisory Committee. Lecture topic: The Prime Ministers Home is our Castle. Please join us, 10 a.m. at the Maryhill Community Centre, 58 St. Charles St. E., Maryhill. Admission is $2. Enjoy tea or coffee and a delicious snack. SENIORS LUNCH CLUB AT Breslau Community Centre. Community Care Concepts invites you to join us at noon for a light lunch and fellowship. Cost: $6. Call 519-664-1900 or toll free: 1-855-664-1900 to sign up.

21 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.2884 | martinselmira.com

MARCH 15 SENIORS LUNCH CLUB AT Wellesley Community Centre. Community Care Concepts invites you to join us at noon for a light lunch and fellowship. Cost: $6. Call 519-6641900 or toll free: 1-855-664-1900 to sign up.

MARCH 27 SENIORS LUNCH CLUB AT Woolwich Memorial Centre. Community Care Concepts invites you to join us at noon for a light lunch and fellowship. Cost: $6. Call 519-664-1900 or toll free: 1-855-664-1900 to sign up.

SPACE FOR RENT Advertise here for great weekly exposure in Woolwich & Wellesley townships.

CALL Donna to book this space today!

1540 FLORDALE ROAD P.O. BOX 247, ELMIRA

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SUBMIT AN EVENT The Events Calendar is reserved for non-profit local community events that are offered free to the

public. Placement is not guaranteed. Registrations, corporate events, open houses and the like do not qualify in this section. 24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

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PLACES OF FAITH | A DIRECTORY OF LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP

St. James Lutheran Church

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10:15 am: Worship

Pastor: Hans J.W. Borch Proclaiming Christ through Love and Service

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Zion Mennonite Fellowship 9:30am Sunday School

10:45 am

Don’t Judge a Book by its Cover

10:45am Worship Service Finding The Way Together 47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 www.thejunctionelmira.com

Discovering God Together

Service at 10:30am Rev. Paul Snow REACH WITH LOVE. TEACH THE TRUTH. SEND IN POWER.

200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 www.woodsidechurch.ca

290 Arthur St. South, Elmira • 519-669-3973 www.ElmiraAssembly.com (Across from Tim Horton’s)

TRINITY UNITED CHURCH

Worship: 9:30am The Ten Commandments Respect for Covenant

SUNDAY WORSHIP 9:30am - Contemporary Worship 11:00am - Traditional Worship Clergy: Rev. Sue Campbell

Fred Lichti preaching

58 Church St. W., Elmira • 519-669-5123

REACH OUT. KEEP FAITH ALIVE, ADVERTISE HERE.

REACH OUT Spread the word, advertise your service here every week.

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The King’s Speech Jesus on Judging

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26 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

STRANGE BUT TRUE / BILL & RICH SONES PH.D.

Give in to cravings? Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all Pavlovâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dog in response to the siren song of food WEIRD NOTES

Q. What makes some of us all but powerless in the presence of a cruller? A. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Food cues. These make you eat more,â&#x20AC;? answers Yale University neuroscientist Hedy Kober in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Discoverâ&#x20AC;? magazine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The sight of food, the smell of it, even just a picture of it â&#x20AC;&#x201D; they all make us want it. Just like the classic example of dogs drooling at the ring of a dinnertime bell, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s out-and-out Pavlovian â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a conditioned response to a stimulus.â&#x20AC;? And just like dogs, we need food but also like it.

The explanation has neurobiological origins: One system regulates our need for food and is controlled mainly in the lower region of the brain, regulating hormones that make us feel hungry or full and responding to energy balance signals. The second, our hedonic reward system, is complex and not well understood, though research shows that it makes us want to eat, even when weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not hungry. While the two systems arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t completely separate, â&#x20AC;&#x153;no amount of satisfying that hunger will shut it down.â&#x20AC;? Call it â&#x20AC;&#x153;the siren song of food.â&#x20AC;? As Kober describes it: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I remember afternoon meetings when there was no earthly reason I should be hungry, staring down

the damn cruller. The meetings were long. I stood no chance. I am Pavlovâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dog. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re all Pavlovâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dogs.â&#x20AC;? Q. Babies in TV or films are frequently depicted crying. How are they made to do this?

A. Practicing midwife

Terri Coates of Salisbury, Wiltshire, UK, and midwifery adviser for the BBCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Call the Midwifeâ&#x20AC;? TV show has a lot of experience handling babies on film sets, she writes in â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Scientistâ&#x20AC;? magazine. Regulations about babies on a film set are understandably restrictive: They are required only for a few minutes at a time, so they and their parent or chaperone wait in comfort off camera. Though the set

is made as baby-friendly as possibleâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;calm, warm and quietâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;one necessary disruption involves costume changes. Because most babies donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like being disturbed to be dressed or undressed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;the change is made as late as feasible, so the baby is kept with the parent until the last possible moment.â&#x20AC;? Also, the actor handling the baby will have rehearsed the scene and ideally met the baby beforehand. As for the crying, Coates explains: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Babies quickly pick up adult feelings and emotions, so an anxious actor usually ends up holding a crying child. Babies are not made to cry on cue, so any crying that is caught on camera is serendipitous.â&#x20AC;?

Q. When lightning gets to really lighting things up, how extreme can things get?

A. You can call the stuff extreme and in rare instances the term fits electrifyingly well, as in one case in Oklahoma some years ago, when a streak was clocked at 5.7 seconds and measured crossing over 300 kilometers of sky, roughly the distance from Washington, D.C., to New York City, says Thomas Sumner in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Science Newsâ&#x20AC;? magazine. Outdoing this one by plenty was a single lightning flash in southern France in 2012 that â&#x20AC;&#x153;lit up the sky nonstop for 7.74 seconds, enough time for light to make about three round trips from Earth to

the moon.â&#x20AC;? These two flashes have been recognized by a World Meteorological Organization committee as the world record holders for lightning distance and duration. Though lightning flashes used to be defined as lasting a second or less, scientists can now accurately track much longer flashes, so the committee recommended dropping the time limit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As scientists get better looks at lightning, these records may be gone in a flash.â&#x20AC;?

ABOUT THE AUTHORS Bill is a journalist, Rich holds a doctorate in physics. Together the brothers bring you â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strange But True.â&#x20AC;? Send your questions to strangetrue@compuserve.com.

OBSERVER CROSSWORD PUZZLER ACROSS 1. Ancient Egyptian embalmed body 5. Tree that yields a chocolate substitute 10. Assignments 15. Allowing connection 16. Go off course nautically 18. Monkeesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; singer, _____ Jones 19. Apply, as pressure 20. Saturnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife, in myth 22. Is no longer 24. You and I 25. Bell or Barker 26. Bread in many deli sandwiches 27. Catch a few Zâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 28. Christieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Death on the ___â&#x20AC;? 30. Knotted-pile Scandinavian rug 32. Jewel â&#x20AC;&#x153;You Were Meant for __â&#x20AC;? 33. When repeated, a 1997 Jim Carrey comedy 35. One learning the ropes 37. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Green Gablesâ&#x20AC;? girl

39. Otherwise 40. Ego counterpart 41. Barely make, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;outâ&#x20AC;? 43. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Hobbit: __ Unexpected Journeyâ&#x20AC;?; 2012 film 44. Diamond 46. Blender sound 47. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who cares?â&#x20AC;? 48. â&#x20AC;&#x153;__ as I say â&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? 49. Margarine, basically 52. ___ moss 53. Exist 54. Gloomy atmosphere 55. It makes a splashy entrance 56. Gardenerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s purchase 57. Honolulu locale 58. Reduce, as expenses 59. Things worn 60. Start and end of the Three Musketeersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; motto 61. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;? affliction? 62. Plenty of sites for builders 63. ___ bat; ready to swing 65. Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last words 66. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Men always hate most what they ___ mostâ&#x20AC;?:

Mencken 67. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The coast __ clearâ&#x20AC;? 68. Value-added service, abbr. 70. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The very ___!â&#x20AC;? 72. Lays down the lawn DOWN 1. Like a romantic evening, maybe 2. Pro bono 3. Belonging to me 4. Sign of boredom 6. Zoologist Fossey 7. ___ talent (natural skill) 8. Walkie-talkie word 9. Next to 10. Low-tech missile 11. Domestic bovine 12. Bone-dry 13. Give it a whirl 14. Animal in a roundup 17. One taking orders 21. Masseurâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s workplace, maybe 23. Mr. Stallone, for short 25. Drain cover 29. Clear, as a disk 31. Rigging support

32. Kind of pad 34. Kind of center 36. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walking on Thin Iceâ&#x20AC;? singer 38. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forget it!â&#x20AC;? 42. Do-it-yourselferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s purchase 45. Become waterlogged 46. Having the benefit of careful counsel 50. Canal sites 51. Venus or Mars 52. Afghan coin 53. Famous 54. ___ de deux 56. Good, in the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;hood 57. That man 58. Thomas Magnum was this 59. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Monopolyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; square 64. 1992 Robin Williams movie 65. A kind of crowd 66. First name of singers Costello and Presley 69. Brouhaha 71. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life ___ We Know Itâ&#x20AC;?















 



























 















 









 





























 

  











 

OPEN 24 HOURS | 7 DAYS A WEEK

  

DELIV SER ERY AVAILVICE Call fo ABLE rD







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LIVING HERE | 27

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

CHEF’S TABLE:

Going for a more satisfying muffin experience FROM | 24

1 Tbsp. lemon juice 3 cups all purpose flour 1/3 tsp. baking soda 1/2 tsp. baking powder 1/3 tsp. salt Topping; 1/3 cup all purpose flour 1/3 cup white sugar 2 Tbsp. softened butter Glaze; 1/4 cup white sugar 2-1/2 Tbsp. lemon juice

Lemon Crumb Muffins 2 cups white sugar 4 eggs 1 cup sour cream 1 cup butter, melted 1-1/2 Tbsp. grated lemon zest

In a large mixing bowl, put white sugar, eggs, sour cream, butter, lemon zest, and lemon juice. Whisk until all is combined. Add flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt.

Stir gently with a spatula until dry ingredients are moistened. Spoon into greased or paper-lined muffin tins. For topping, combine ingredients; mix with a fork. Sprinkle topping evenly over muffin batter. Bake at 350º F for approx. 25 minutes. Let cool 5-10 minutes, then remove them from the pan. Combine glaze ingredients and drizzle over warm muffins. Serve warm!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Donna is the author of A Taste of Nostalgia Cookbook, which is available by calling 519-638-5791 or email donna.atasteofnostalgia@gmail.com.

AWARD: A good goal for those who love animals FROM | 24

a daily basis. “It is a selfless job. You don’t get told ‘thank you,’ your patients are generally terrified of you, they don’t understand that you are trying to help them,” she said. “There isn’t that much gratification in that way, like there would be in human medicine. It can make it that much sweeter, though: you are helping an animal that doesn’t even know that you are helping.”

She believes earning the Vet Tech of the Year award wouldn’t have happened if it hadn’t been for the team she works with at the Laurelwood clinic. “I have been here long enough that we are all friends. Everyone can tell when someone needs an extra hand, or a bit of extra support,” she said. She also has some advice for young people looking to get into the veterinary world as a career. It isn’t

easy, but it is possible. “I would tell them to get as much experience as you can. It is tough to break into the field. Volunteer somewhere. Even if you are too young to work at a clinic, volunteer walking dogs at the humane society or in your neighbourhood. Maybe it is pet sitting – just anything that you can do. It can be hard to get in if you don’t have the experience, so do what you can with what you have,” she said.

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OFFER ENDS FEBRUARY 28 Exceptional exists for less than you think. **$1,000 discount on MSRP available on lease, finance or cash purchase of new and unregistered 2017 Jetta, Passat, Golf (except GTI and R models), Golf SportWagen 1.8T Trendline FWD and 1.8T Comfortline FWD, and Tiguan 2.0T Comfortline and 2.0T Highline models. †Lease payments of $391/$190 on the Tiguan Comfortline / Jetta Trendline must be made on a monthly basis and cannot be made weekly. Weekly equivalent payments shown for information only. Limited time lease offer available through Volkswagen Finance, on approved credit, based on a new and unregistered 2017 Tiguan 2.0T Comfortline / Jetta 1.4T Trendline model with 6/5-speed automatic/manual transmission. $1,795/$1,625 freight and PDI included in monthly payment. 60-month term at 2.49%/1.49% APR. $689/$589 down payment (including $100/$0 air-conditioning levy, $10 OMVIC fee, $22 EHF (tires), $58 PPSA fee and up to $499 dealer administrative fee), $440/$240 security deposit and first monthly payment due at lease inception. Total lease obligation: $24,149/$11,989. Discount of $1,750/$1,150 (includes $1,000 extra bonus cash discount) is already included in the lease amounts mentioned above. 80,000-kilometre allowance; charge of $0.15/km for excess kilometres. License, insurance, registration, options and applicable taxes are extra. Dealer may sell or lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Offers end February 28, 2017 and are subject to change or cancellation without notice. Models shown: 2017 Tiguan 2.0T Highline automatic transmission, $39,624 / 2017 Jetta 1.8T Highline automatic transmission, $30,751. Vehicles shown for illustration purposes only and may include optional equipment. Visit vwoffers.ca or your Volkswagen dealer for details. “Volkswagen”, the Volkswagen logo, “Jetta”, “Golf”, “Passat”, “Tiguan”, “4MOTION”, “TSI”, “Highline”, “Comfortline” and “Trendline” are registered trademarks of Volkswagen AG. “Golf SportWagen” and “SportWagen” are trademarks of Volkswagen AG. © 2017 Volkswagen Canada.

MONTHS†


28 | BACK PAGE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017

PURE: Series has caused quite a stir, says prof. FROM | 3

“For the purposes of this story, the producers deliberately created a fictional community in order to not point fingers at any specific community because they didn’t want to single out a group of real people and subject them to unfair scrutiny,” the CBC said in a statement. They went on to say they appreciate that Mennonites are known to be “very law-abiding, exemplary people.” But, the story of a Mennonite mob involved in the drug trade is real, despite the show’s Mennonite characters, their community and the choices they make being fictional, not accurate. Epp says it’s caused quite a stir in the local modern Mennonite community. “Many modern Mennonites are talking about it. Most of them stopped watching it after a few episodes because they thought it was so ridiculous. Most are quite critical of it.” She hadn’t heard much about the show until a few days before the first episode aired in January. She found the trailer “bizarre” and wondered where the show’s creators got their information. As she watched the show she became even more perplexed. “It’s not that I would say television network should never do shows about Mennonites, but if you’re going to do a show about Mennonites, do your research. Get your scenario somewhat right and do something that’s in good taste,” Epp said. She notes in some communities, people are quite upset and a Mennonite conference in Winnipeg wrote letters to the CBC, opposing the show. Epp is hopeful most Canadians who’ve watched the show are suspect enough of television to realize the story doesn’t

FAMILY DAY

OUR HOURS

MONDAY CLOSED TUESDAY 9AM 9PM WEDNESDAY 9AM 9PM

WEEKEND! -- FEBRUARY 16-19 --

Pure wrapped up its first season this week, not to the dismay of local Mennonites. [SUBMITTED / CBC]

“Yes it’s fictional,

it’s entertainment, but there’s already so much misunderstanding and confusion about conservative Mennonite groups that I think the show just contributes MARLENE EPP to that.

represent Mennonites in Canada. “It’s not that Mennonites are immune from violence, but this is pretty farfetched stuff. And I think also for the Low-German speaking community, Mennonites from Mexico, for whom there have been problems with drug smuggling, it suggests that this is at the heart of the church community, when I think for the most part those are more isolated cases on the part of people who are really on the fringe of the community or have left it altogether,” Epp said. And some people already view Old Order Mennonites as if there’s something wrong with them because they don’t drive cars or use technology at the level most Canadians do. Epp worries what negative perceptions and opinions could evolve from having

them also perceived as being involved in the drug trade here in Canada. But she’s also cautiously optimistic people watching it will become curious about the various Mennonite populations in Canada and go on to learn more. “The show tries to explore some interesting themes. It does explore the contrast between good and evil and it does try to get at the notion of evil and sin existing within these so called pure communities and the dilemmas of people trying to live in God, the dilemmas they face. I think the show actually is probing at some really important and interesting questions. So I’ll give them that credit, but they do so in a way that can be problematic.” As a Mennonite herself, she’d like the public to know Mennonites are no more perfect or “pure” than anyone else. The ones she knows don’t engage in criminal activity and just want to live in peace on their land and with their neighbours. “I think the CBC does have a responsibility even if they’re using fictional stories to represent beliefs and traditions of real people in Canada accurately. And they’re simply not doing that.”

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February 16, 2017  

The Observer

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