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12 | 01 | 2016 VOLUME 21 | ISSUE 47

LIONA BOYD RETURNING TO ELMIRA ARTS PAGE 19

COMMENT PAGE 6

GOVERNMENTS PUT THEMSELVES AHEAD OF THE PUBLIC

Council gives formal approval to Breslau splash pad

Park Manor students craft Christmas cards for troops Link to returning soldier suffering with PTSD leads to yuletide push from group of Elmira students

STEVE KANNON SCALING BACK THE PROJECT to reduce operating costs, the Breslau Lions Club this week won approval from Woolwich council for a splash pad in the village. The facility is slated to be built adjacent to the Breslau Community Centre, which offers access to water, sewer and hydro services, as well as nearby parking. The club made changes to the project when council expressed concerns about costs associated with operating splash pads planned for Elmira. Revisions include reducing the footprint (to 260 square metres from 350 sq. m.), eliminating a water re-circulating system in favour of a cheaper option, and the installation of water-saving measures Operating costs have now been pegged at about $30,000 a year, with the bulk of it ($25,000) paying for water. While the Breslau pad, like the one planned for Elmira’s Bolender Park, will be built entirely with donated money, annual maintenance and operating costs fall to the township. In a presentation to township council Tuesday night, Janet Elliott of Wellesley-based Openspace Solutions, who’ll be building the facility, outlined some of the features slated for the Breslau park. It’ll feature a mix of 26 SPLASH PAD | 32

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WHITNEY NEILSON

Grade 7 student Abbi Storey initiated a project at Elmira’s Park Manor Public School, which saw Grade 7 students craft homemade Christmas cards to send overseas to Canadian troops. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]

CANADIAN TROOPS OVERSEAS WILL receive a little piece of home this Christmas. Grade 7 students at Park Manor Public School in Elmira made handmade Christmas cards to send to the Canadian military in Afghanistan after Abbi Storey was inspired by a newspaper article she read. “I was working on a letter that I wanted to send to a troop, as something nice to do. And my mom said that she had a friend named Tim Nightingale that would get me an address. And then I thought that maybe I could talk to Ms. McEachern about sending Christmas cards,” Storey explained. Her mom – a friend of Nightingale’s since high school – encouraged her to pursue the idea and she brought it to her teacher, Sara McEachern. McEachern asked two of the Grade 7 classes if they would be

interested and they agreed after hearing Nightingale’s story. “The class thought that it was a good idea to write Christmas cards to send over just because some people might not have other people at home or haven’t talked to them in awhile,” Storey said. Nightingale served in Afghanistan and struggled with post-traumatic stress disorder, more commonly known as PTSD, when he returned to Canada. Storey learned about PTSD and how many soldiers don’t want to go out and ask for help. Nightingale did, and has since recovered from his PTSD. The classes started making the cards last week, getting rough copies done, thinking of notes to write in them, and then making the good copies and adding pictures this week. They’re sending more than 50 cards. CARDS | 2


2 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

CARDS: Students encouraged to give back in keeping with the true meaning of the season FROM | COVER

“We didn’t put names on them. We just put ‘this is for you,’ or ‘to you,’ or ‘whoever gets this,’ or something like that. I believe that they will be distributed to different people,” she said. The cards come with holiday wishes, personal thank yous for their service, and quotes handpicked by the students. Storey encourages students at other schools to give back at this time of year and make someone’s

day through a random act of kindness. “If they don’t have someone at home or they can’t go home for the holidays then they would have [the card] as a pick me up, a feel good thing to look at every now and then,” she said. The activity is a good reminder of the true meaning of Christmas for Storey, and to appreciate the simple things like a roof over our head. “Take the moment and realize what they’re doing and say ‘thank you.’”

Members of the Canadian military stationed in Afghanistan will receive colourful, uplifting Christmas cards from Park Manor’s Grade 7 students. Pictured is teacher Sara McEachern’s 7-1 class. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]

Local MP, MPP host roundtable for doctors dealing with assisted dying regulations WHITNEY NEILSON WITH MEDICALLY ASSISTED SUICIDE coming on stream, doctors with conscientious issues about the practice need more safeguards, say the local Member of Parliament and his provincial counterpart. Kitchener-Conestoga MP Harold Albrecht and MPP Michael Harris are ready to write to The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario about doctors’ concerns regarding assisted dying, and the need for more protection for doctors who aren’t comfortable

with assisting patients in that way. They held a roundtable discussion with local doctors in Kitchener last week to hear their concerns. It focused on Bill C-14, Medical Assistance in Dying, the Hippocratic Oath, The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario’s requirements for referral, other jurisdictions’ referral options and options for Ontario. C-14: Medical Assistance in Dying was passed by the Senate in June. “I think the big thing that people don’t realize is that

in a jurisdiction like Alberta, for example, they have the same federal law. They have found a way to serve their patients, so there are doctors who will do it. And there are doctors who will not do it. And those who will not do it are not obligated to make an effective referral to someone who will,” Albrecht explained. C-14 spent many months under debate in Parliament. Albrecht had argued for safeguards in the bill to protect the conscience rights of physicians and other medical practitioners. That didn’t happen.

The College of Physicians and Surgeons within every provincial jurisdiction is charged with the responsibility of developing a set of guidelines and rules for their doctors to follow. “Michael, as the provincial representative, has been hearing from a number of physicians in his riding, in my riding, very concerned about the fact that in Ontario, unlike almost every other jurisdiction in the world, there is a system in place that actually requires doctors who may have a conscientious objection to participating in any

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way, including effective referral. They are obligated to do that under the current guidelines,” Albrecht explained. He says there needs to be an alternative for doctors in Ontario, like in other provinces to address the needs of both patients and doctors. Albrecht said doctors at the roundtable expressed concern about their ability to practice their chosen profession in a way that does not violate their conscience. “This is not a procedure like any other. This is life and death we’re talking

about,” Albrecht said. He says asking a doctor to help you end your life adds another whole dimension, especially for physicians who have been trained all through their careers to care for people and extend their lives. His provincial counterpart, Harris, says they hosted the roundtable because of what they were being told from doctors in their riding about The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario’s protocol requiring an effective referral for DYING | 5


NEWS | 3

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

Trinity United looking at redevelopment options for site near Elmira’s downtown core Peter Kupfer is leading Trinity United Church’s bid to repurpose its Elmira site to better serve the community via a project that will include an apartment building and multi-purpose space. [STEVE KANNON / THE OBSERVER]

STEVE KANNON THE BEST WAY FOR Elmira’s Trinity United Church to remain a part of the community may be to tear down its Arthur Street building in favour of a mixed-use facility featuring a residential component, suggests a consultant looking at options for the congregation. Addressing Woolwich council last week, Michael Wright from the EDGE program of the United Church of Canada said the Elmira

In the United Church, for instance, where once membership was a million when Canada had a much smaller population in 1965, that number is now 400,000. Mainstream religious groups could see some 30 per cent of their churches close, with those remaining having to come up with new revenue streams to keep the doors open, said Wright. In Trinity’s case, an example floated this week was the construction of a

the church and constructing a multi-purpose building, said Wright. The exact use, including a flexible space to be used for Sunday worship services, would depend on a partnership with a developer and what would be allowable under the township’s official plan designation for the area. Facing a shrinking congregation and declining revenues, Trinity is in much the same position as many mainstream churches, he explained.

group is in the process of reviewing a number of potential uses for the Arthur Street site. They’d like to work with township planners to formalize some of the options, he added. Having examined the possibility of repurposing the existing building – and maintaining the current sanctuary space – and perhaps retaining just half of the structure and building an addition, Trinity is leaning towards demolishing

three-storey, 24-unit residential building. “There are a number of options they’re looking at. The (church) wants to be a part of the community.” Noting the church’s proximity to downtown Elmira and the commercial zoning in the area, Coun. Patrick Merlihan asked Wright if the group was looking at the potential for main-floor retail space as part of any development. He was told that, too, is among the options being

discussed. Trinity has spent the last couple of years sifting through various opportunities, and has hosted public input sessions to generate ideas and feedback. At the end of the process, members decided a full repurposing of the site was the best option for continuing to be part of the community, Peter Kupfer, chair of the church council and of the committee looking into CHURCH | 5

Wellesley adopts new schedule for recruiting and training firefighters WHITNEY NEILSON WELLESLEY FIREFIGHTERS WILL SEE a new pay schedule for training hours under a plan approved this week by council. The changes flow from the township’s new fire master plan. Councillors approved all five recommendations regarding the recruitment and training of firefighters in the township, which were developed with input from the chiefs of all three Wellesley fire stations. Firefighters will now be paid a flat full-day or halfday rate when attending courses and training outside of regularly scheduled practices. They will receive $50 for a half day of one to

four hours, or $100 for a full day of four or more hours. Currently, they’re paid the same rate for extra training as they are for fire calls at $23.35 per hour, equalling $186.80 for a full day course or $93.40 for half a day. This cost limited the number of firefighters able to attend in the past. Township fire chief Paul Redman explained that firefighters had requested more training opportunities. “I think the firefighters are pretty excited to have more training,” he said. The township will also create three trainer positions, one for each station to ensure consistency and a standard of training at each station. They will each

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chief of training right now and his main focus is he’s putting the lesson plans out. Instead of having one person training all the time, we’re bringing it down to a station level and then the plan that I’ve outlined for the trainers is we’ll take on train-the-trainer roles,” Redman said. Wellesley has nine substitute firefighter positions which will be replaced by three full firefighter positions. Currently the substitutes aren’t paid for training and it’s been difficult to recruit and attract dedicated firefighters for those roles. This has the potential to save the township $1,377.63. Firefighters, including substitute ones, are ex-

receive a stipend. Trainers will be responsible for attaining train-thetrainer status in areas such as pump operations and First-Aid/CPR, and then providing that training in house to reduce third party contracting. Trainers could also teach First-Aid/CPR to other township staff during business hours, eliminating the cost of third-party contracting there too. Trainers will need to have or obtain their NFPA 1041 Fire Instructor 1 certification within 18 months of getting the position. Coun. Herb Neher asked if having one trainer would be more consistent. “If they’re training on the same nights or different nights we have our deputy

pected to meet a minimum of 60 per cent attendance for calls, which is about 80 calls for the least busy stations. This equals 48 calls multiplied by $23.35 per hour multiplied by nine substitute firefighters equals $10,087.20. Replacing nine substitutes with three firefighter positions will equal three stipends of $1,782.39 plus the assumed 60 per cent call attendance of $1,120.80 per firefighter, which works out to $8,709.57. Council also approved revisions to the fire department’s hiring process and recruit training program. The recruit program has been designed to provide the fire department with a pool of qualified individu-

als that can be drawn from when openings arise and ensure recruits are trained to provincial standards, meeting all departmental requirements through a tiered training program. Interviews will be conducted by all three stations to develop a two-year pool of qualified applicants. Candidates will be ranked on qualifications, experience, availability, profession, proximity to fire stations and suitability. Based on the number of applicants, each station will create a pool of 10 candidates ranked in hiring order and the list will stay valid for two years or until it is used up. FIREFIGHTERS | 4

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4 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

Church’s nativity scene goes live – really live – this weekend Elmira Pentecostal Assembly takes Christmas back to its origin story with telling that involves live animals LIZ BEVAN THERE’S A STORY AT the root of the Christmas frenzy now in full swing. Telling that 2,000-year-old tale – showing it, in fact – is just what members of the Elmira Pentecostal Assembly had in mind when they organized the church’s first-ever live nativity production. Rachel Bauman and Brian Chamberlain are both helping to organize the

event that opens this weekend. The goal, they say, is bringing back the true meaning of Christmas. “I think so often now, the story of Christmas is removed from schools and so many different aspects of our lives, and it is a story that needs to be told. As a church and as believers, we want to make sure that story is still told,” said Bauman. The outdoor play will take place in the field be-

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hind the Elmira Pentecostal Assembly at 280 Arthur St. S., and with a cast of more than 100, and plenty of live animals, it is set to be an entertaining and informative look at how the Christmas holidays began. “We are going to have donkeys, alpacas, goats, sheep, chickens, horses, mini horses and calves. I think that’s all of them,” laughed Bauman. “Because of the area we are in, and the generosity of the people that live here, animals weren’t hard for us to find.” The play is a churchwide project, with everyone coming together to make it happen. “As much as we are excited about putting on a community event, and reaching out to the community, it is our pastor and all the people that it takes to put something like this on,” said Chamberlain. “Every Saturday, there was been people here working and building, and pretty much every night of the week there has been somebody at the church doing something for the live nativity. Whether it is costume people, or sets.” A live nativity used to be put together by Bethany Missionary Church in Kitchener, but after over 15 years and a change in pastor, they discontinued the live show. It is estimated that some 500,000 people

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Rachel Bauman and Brian Chamberlain are gearing up for this weekend’s live nativity show at the Elmira Pentecostal Assembly. The show is free and will tell the story of Christmas from beginning to end, with live actors and of course, live animals. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER] watched the live nativity in Kitchener, and now, members at Bethany Missionary Church are lending a hand to Elmira Pentecostal. “Through different connections with people and the church, we heard that they were going to be giving their props and sets away. We jumped on board, and we were one of several that got props given to them. A lot of scenery sets, a lot of costumes,” shared Chamberlain, adding that along with items to go in the show, Bethany members were full of advice. “Going into it, that is what Bethany Missionary

Church was saying. We had a chance to chat with some of their people and they stressed how great this was to give to the community, and to even create a community within the church.” The play won’t just focus on the more well-known aspects of the Christmas story, such as Mary and Joseph riding to the inn and being turned away, or the wise men with gold, frankincense and myrrh. The play will take the audience through the entire story all the way to Jesus on the cross. “I think a big part of a lot of Christmas programs are

focused on the birth, but we are going to tell the story right up until the cross, the plan of salvation,” said Chamberlain. “It is the whole story. I have never seen that part of it myself. It didn’t end when the three wise men showed up. That was just the beginning of the story.” There will be five showings of the live nativity and Christmas play: Dec. 3 at 6, 7 and 8 p.m. and on Dec. 4 at 6 and 7 p.m. There is no admission charge, and all guests are invited into the church after each showing for hot chocolate and cookies.

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New hires will go through a two year tiered training program. Everyone hired after Jan. 1, 2017 will be on probation for one year and second class firefighter for the second year.

Lastly, council approved a bi-weekly training schedule for the fire department where firefighters must maintain an 80 per cent attendance in order to maintain their status on fire department. The report

notes the current weekly schedule with a mandatory attendance of 20 practices is not sufficient to maintain a consistent schedule for the firefighters, leaving too many missed practices for those with other commit-

ments. “I think that this is a great idea. I think that some of them were starting to wear out a little bit. I think this is a good way just to scale things back,” said Coun. Shelley Wagner.


NEWS | 5

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

Woolwich back at the OMB No stranger to legal battles at the Ontario Municipal Board, Woolwich is gearing up for another one. Following a closed meeting Tuesday night, councillors approved a plan to support a fight at the quasi-judicial board in support of a decision by the township’s committee of adjustment. The case involves the granting of a minor variance to allow the homeowner at 50 Kraft Dr. near Bloomingdale to build a horse barn on the property. That decision was appealed by a nearby

CHURCH:

Looking for a new role

FROM | 3

the development, said in a later interview. “Our plans are to completely redevelop the site – take down the old church,” he explained, noting a three- or four-storey housing project with market rents aimed at seniors, those with special needs and low-income residents was seen as a high priority. A shared community space, which would be set up on Sundays for worship services, is also part of the plan. “The bottom line is we want to serve the community. It’s badly needed,” he said of the housing project. “We’re really trying to help the community.” Prior to finalizing plans, his group will be consulting with the church’s neighbours, as well as the wider community. They’ve already been discussing options with township planners, as well. Trinity has also started changing its program offerings, including two Sunday services (one traditional, the next contemporary), to reflect its wider focus. At the end of the day, Kupfer said, shrinking congregations mean the church has to expand beyond its conventional role to remain a part of the community. “It’s about building a legacy for the future.”

Kitchener resident, director of engineering and planning Dan Kennaley said. The variance involves the minimum distance separation between the barn to be built and a neighbouring house. The adjusted distance requires a tweak of township regulations, but falls within the provincial rules, he noted.

Santa’s cruisin’ thru Woolwich

Santa Claus is coming to town on Dec. 18 with the Optimist Club of South Woolwich’s annual Santa Cruise. Santa will make his way on a float through Maryhill, Bloomingdale and Breslau

waving to residents and collecting food for the food bank. Last year 1,281 pounds of food was gathered.

Deer hunt goes next week

With deer season open to gun hunters Dec. 5-11, police advise the public to be aware that they may see people in fields or along roadways handling firearms, noting it’s mandatory that all hunters be wearing orange clothing when participating in this hunt. Motorists should be aware that due to hunting activity, deer may be more prone to crossing highways, and should

adjust their driving habits accordingly, police warn.

GRH posts high survival rates

Grand River Hospital has placed in the top ten hospitals in Canada in a comparison of patient survival rates, the third consecutive year it has done so. The results are in the Canadian Institute for Health Information’s latest report on the hospital standardized mortality ratio (HSMR) which measures actual deaths to predicted deaths in hospitals across the country.

The Canadian Institute for Health Information studies 90 Canadian hospitals by comparing actual deaths at the hospital to a predicted number of deaths based upon the health characteristics of patients treated.

Refugee efforts get grant funding Kindred Credit Union has donated $15,000 to support the efforts of two organizations working to welcome refugee newcomers to Waterloo Region. Reception House’s Family Partnership Program and Welcome Home Refugee House, now part of Ray

After more than 30 years, Alma’s Ray Grose hangs up his grillin’ tongs LIZ BEVAN A LONGTIME VOLUNTEER IN the community, Ray Grose is synonymous with barbeque time with groups such as the Alma Optimist Club. Now, his 30-plus years of BBQ beef dinners at the Alma Community Hall will be coming to an end. Last Friday was the last time Ray and his wife Ruth will be providing the beef dinner and gravy for the club’s bi-monthly fundraiser. About three decades ago, Ray even made his own homemade barbeque oven for the feast. “It took lots of welding. Our family owns a factory, Husky Farm Equipment, so we had all the facilities to build it,” he said. “It took me a Saturday, and it is still going.” The special grill, which measures in at more than six feet long, sits in a shed at the Grose family home. “I can fit enough beef in there for 500 people,” he shared. And he’s grilled up dinner for countless people over the years, a volunteer effort he says was just something that needed doing. “I just like helping out the Optimist Club, that’s all. I am a member and our family just helps them out.” Hundreds of people file

into the Alma Community Hall on the last Friday of every other month, just to eat Ray’s barbeque ovencooked beef. “We order the beef out of Toronto, or my wife does, and I just put it on the barbeque and cook it,” he said with a laugh, adding the cooking process is an allnight activity. “It is always top quality beef. I put it on the barbeque about 7 p.m. the night before and it is pretty well done the next morning.” Ray isn’t alone in preparing for the bi-monthly meal for the community. Ruth Grose has been whipping up a big batch of gravy with the beef drippings for the hungry crowds to enjoy. “My grandson helps me and we ... get started (the afternoon of the meal),” she said. “We try to make it the same every year and I have heard that everybody likes it.” There is no big secret behind the gravy, shared Ruth, “I just have my own spices that I put in it.” For Ruth, part of the reason she enjoys lending a helping hand and her kitchen to the Alma Optimist Club is the work they do year-round within the community. “One of their themes is raising money to help the youth in town,” she said. “And we have just kept do-

of Hope, have each received $7,500 grants. Reception House’s Family Partnership Program connects newcomer families with local families or community groups for one year. These connections help newcomer families develop a sense of belonging in their new community as they participate in activities like festivals, sporting events, practicing English, and sharing meals. Welcome Home Refugee House provides refugee new arrivals a year’s housing, together with emotional and spiritual support, church and community connections and skills that foster a healthy and productive life.

DOCTORS:

Concerns in the medical community FROM | 2

Ray Grose carves up some of his barbequed beef ahead of last week’s community dinner in Alma, where he’s been a fixture for more than three decades. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER] ing this every two months for 10 years.” Before the bi-monthly feast, Ruth says she and Ray would cook just four times a year, and before that, just twice a year. “It has been quite a

while,” she shared. With last Friday marking the final time Ray will be donating his time and barbeque to the Alma Optimist Club, residents and club supporters will without a doubt miss his cooking.

medical aid in dying. They felt a full discussion on the issue would help direct them as they try to address it provincially. “We have to respect the law that it is to give Canadians that choice. However, there are concerns from within the medical community, especially physicians, that unlike other jurisdictions like Alberta and B.C. that have effective access through patient navigators, patients or their advocates can in fact dial an 811 number in Alberta and be guided through the system to access service,” Harris said. He describes it as a punitive process in Ontario where physicians can be punished or lose their license for not making a referral to a doctor who will provide assisted suicide. Albrecht and Harris’s next step will be to draft a letter to the CPSO about their concerns, as well as speaking with the Ontario health minister and the Attorney General of Ontario. “Bottom line, other jurisdictions are able to balance the rights of patients to access medical assisted death with doctors’ rights of conscience. We should be able to achieve that same balance here in Ontario,” Harris said.

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6 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

JOE MERLIHAN PUBLISHER STEVE KANNON EDITOR

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OUR VIEW / EDITORIAL

THE VIEW FROM HERE

Governments serve themselves, not the public THE GOVERNMENT IS SLOW, inefficient and wasteful. The findings in the latest report from Auditor General Michael Ferguson apply to Ottawa, but it’s pretty much the same story for every government across the country, and for every year. In fact, Ferguson specifically points out successive governments have ignored the mess and the proscribed remedies year after year. That much is probably not a surprise to most Canadians, who instinctively know the faults to be true. But Ferguson is much more blunt this time in pointing out the self-serving ways of the bureaucracy. It’s something we’ve identified at every level of government: the system is designed to benefit civil servants, not the public they theoretically exist to serve. “We see government programs that are not designed to help those who have to navigate them, programs where the focus is more on what civil servants are doing than on what citizens are getting, where delivery times are long, where data is incomplete, and where public reporting does not provide a clear picture of what departments have done,” Ferguson says of the lack of focus on citizens. There are systemic failures identified year after year, with nothing done in part because the focus is on the administration, not on the outcome. Issues are looked at in isolation rather than as part of a larger breakdown of the bureaucracy. Looking back over years and decades of audits, for instance, puts things in perspective, but apparently the AG’s reports are just put on a shelf to gather dust ... after the obligatory hand-wringing following each new release. Ferguson notes this mindset allows the issues to persist for decades. Administrators are concerned with often trivial internal matters focused on process rather than the public good. “[W]hat about programs that are managed to accommodate the people running them rather than the people receiving the services?” he asks. “What about programs in which the focus is on measuring what civil servants are doing rather than how well Canadians are being served? In such cases, the perception of the service is very different depending on whether you are talking to the service provider or to the citizen trying to navigate the red tape.” If you asked the administrators involved, chances are they’d say they’re doing a great job, in part because they’ve deluded themselves about what the job is about: themselves, not the public. (The politicians always paint a rosy picture about their efforts, even when they know the opposite to be true – it’s one of the reasons people don’t trust them, or the bureaucrats, for that matter.) Ferguson’s latest findings – seven reports detailing criticisms of everything from tax collecting to national defence – show a lack of progress on accountability, tracking finances and long delivery times for services. He was particularly scathing in describing the failures related to the country’s indigenous peoples. As with many files, there has been much talk, but little action. “In just five years, with some 100 performance audits and special examinations behind me since I began my mandate, the results of some audits seem to be – in the immortal words of Yogi Berra – ‘déjà vu all over again.’”

With the local governments reducing services and jacking up the prices of everything from water to waste, some old-school techniques come into play. WORLD VIEW / GWYNNE DYER

Much of Syria falling back under the control of Assad WORLD AFFAIRS EASTERN ALEPPO, THE REBEL-HELD half of what was once Syria’s biggest city, is falling. Once the resistance there collapses, things may move very fast in Syria, and the biggest question will be: do the outside powers that have intervened in the war accept Bashar al-Assad’s victory, or do they keep the war going? Even one year ago, it seemed completely unrealistic to talk about an Assad victory. The Syrian government’s army was decimated, demoralised and on the verge of collapse: every time the rebels attacked, it retreated. There was even a serious possibility that Islamic State and the Nusra Front, the extreme Islamist groups that dominated the rebel forces, would sweep to victory in all of Syria. But then, just fourteen months ago, the Russian air force was sent in to save Assad’s army from defeat. It did more than that. It

enabled the Syrian army, with help on the ground from Shia militias recruited from Lebanon, Afghanistan and Iraq and mostly trained and commanded by Iranian officers, to go onto the offensive. Assad’s forces took back the historic city of Palmyra. They eliminated the last rebelheld foothold in the city of Homs. And last summer they began to cut eastern Aleppo’s remaining links with the outside world. In July, government forces took control of the Castello Road, ending the flow of food and supplies for eastern Aleppo’s 10,000 rebel fighters and its claimed civilian population of 250,000 people. (The real total of civilians left in the east of the city, once home to around a million people, is almost certainly a small fraction of that number.) A rebel counter-offensive in August briefly opened a new corridor into eastern Aleppo, but government troops retook the lost territory and resumed the siege in September. For almost two months now almost nothing has moved into or out of the besieged half of the city,

and both food and ammunition are running short inside. So the resistance is starting to collapse. The Hanano district fell on Saturday, and Jabal Badro fell on Sunday. The capture of Sakhour on Monday has cut the rebel-held part of Aleppo in two, and the remaining bits north of the cut will quickly be pinched out by the Syrian government’s troops. The southeastern part of the city may stay in rebel hands a while longer, but military collapses of this sort are infectious. It is now likely that Bashar al-Assad will control all of Aleppo before the end of the year, and possibly much sooner. At that point he would control all of Syria’s major cities, at least three-quarters of the population that has not fled abroad, and all of the country’s surviving industry. He would be in a position to offer an amnesty to all the rebels except the extreme Islamists of Islamic State and the Nusra Front, and a lot of the less fanatical Syrian rebels would be tempted to accept it. For the many foreign powers that are involved in the Syrian civil war, it

would then come down to a straight choice: Assad’s cruel but conventional regime or the Islamist crazies. Even Turkey and Saudi Arabia, however much their leaders may loathe Assad, could not openly put their armies at the service of the Islamists. (They used to send them arms and money, but even that has stopped now.) And for a newly installed President Donald Trump, it would become a lot simpler to “make a deal” with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin to finish the job of crushing Islamic State and the Nusra Front together. Would the Russians and the Americans then hand over all the recaptured territory to Assad’s regime? Many people in Washington would rather hang onto it temporarily in order to blackmail Syria’s ruling Baath Party into replacing Assad with somebody a bit less tainted, but a deal between Putin and Trump would certainly preclude that sort of games-playing. How could Trump reconcile such a deal with Russia with his declared intention DYER | 8


COMMENT | 7

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

THEIR VIEW / QUESTION OF THE WEEK

How far along are you into your Christmas shopping?

» Carl McCreary

» Chris Martin

» Yvonne Haley

» Agnes Lehtonen

“Only at the very beginning.”

“I haven’t started, but my wife does most of it.”

“I am about two-thirds through.”

“I am three-quarters done because I am going “I haven’t even started yet.” on vacation this week.”

» Vanessa Harrow

“What is the lesson for Canada? Democracy no longer works in the ‘Land of the Free.’” Michael Purves-Smith | 8 HIS VIEW / STEVE KANNON

Expect more of Trump’s ilk as job prospects continue to get bleaker EDITOR'S NOTES THE ELECTION OF DONALD Trump came as a shock to many, but not those who were paying attention to the numbers. No, not the polls – those were almost universally wrong – but to the underlying weaknesses in the economy, most notably the unemployment, underemployment and precarious work. Rosy claims by politicians aside, the decades-long slide in the standard of living has not gone unnoticed by those not benefiting from unethical Wall Street tampering in the economy. Trump tapped into the anger of Middle America, the people who’ve lost their good-paying jobs to the neoliberal forces of globalization, predatory capitalism and subversion of democracy by corporatism. Unlike the progressives – the real kind, not the sellouts touted by the Democratic party – Trump was able to capitalize on the dis-

sent by feeding into some darker parts of the public’s anger, much of them well documented in the aftermath of the election. That the rage is misplaced isn’t an issue yet, but it will be when Trump fails to deliver the kind of change envisioned by those who voted for him – a different kind of disappointment from Barack Obama’s failures to deliver hope and change. Still, the wrath is not without merit, even on this ostensibly less dysfunctional side of the border. Canadians, too, have been embroiled in decades of declining real incomes and the loss of good jobs. Workers find themselves in precarious part-time or selfemployed positions. For many of those lucky enough to find full-time jobs, compensation levels are falling. The prospects for a better future are fading. Again, it’s the numbers that tell the tale. Take, for instance, this week’s release by CIBC of its latest employment quality index. The report, penned by deputy chief economist Benjamin Tal, details a

HOW TO REACH US

unrelated to record high personal debt levels as Canadians borrow to offset changes in the employment market. The report digs deeper to rule out demographic issues that can skew job quality trends, in particular, the declining share of young Canadians and the rising share of older Canadians. For Canadians in their prime working years (age 25 to 54 years), 53 per cent make less than the average wage today, up three percentage points from 20 years ago. “The story is the same: The share of lower-paying jobs has been on the rise,” says Tal. The most significant increase in the below-average paying jobs category occurred among those in the wage range of between 50 per cent and 100 per cent of the average wage in a given year. That group has seen its number rise by close to two million since 1997. Some 6.7 million workers fall into that wage category, indicating stagnation in the middle. There has been some improvement at the bottom

level of income earners, but that is not due to the economy or employers, but to regulation. “The good news is that those at the lowest end of the wage spectrum are seeing relatively healthy wage gains – not due to bargaining power but mostly due to policy changes regarding minimum wages,” he notes. “But the group closer to the middle of the wage spectrum has seen sub-par growth.” Even government claims about job creation have to be taken with a grain of salt, however, given that the country’s population grows steadily each year – hundreds of thousands of new jobs are needed just to tread water, as economist Jim Stanford noted in a study last year debunking the myth of “Canadian exceptionalism” following the 2008 recession. “When Canadian officials boast that the pace of job-creation or GDP growth is relatively high compared to other countries, they neglect to mention that Canada’s economy must generate more growth and jobs, just to stand still. Oth-

er industrialized countries (like Japan or Germany), where population is stagnant or even declining, do not need to generate such significant annual expansion in order to protect existing benchmarks. Similarly, when political leaders claim that the absolute level of employment or production has regained and surpassed pre-recession peaks, they neglect to consider the impact of ongoing population growth in the several years since those pre-recession peaks were reached.” What jobs are created tend to be part-time and precarious is often overlooked by governments falling all over themselves with any “good news” announcement – they have no interest in providing context for any numbers deemed positive. The CIBC report notes that part-time situations account for 90 per cent of all jobs created in the last year. This is not just a blip, however, but represents a structural shift, along with the decline in the quality of KANNON | 8

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steady decline in job quality over the last 20 years, eroding our ability to deal with future economic downturns, which are inevitable. “Is the quality of employment in Canada on the decline? We think so,” says Benjamin Tal of his findings in On The Quality of Employment in Canada. “The share of low-paying jobs in Canada has been on the rise in the past two decades and might provide some insights on the ability of workers, in aggregate, to absorb future economic shocks.” The report finds that the share of Canadians making less than the average wage each year has crept up to nearly 61 per cent from about 58 per cent over the last 20 years. The average wage today is about $25 an hour. “Lower quality employment might help explain the sluggish growth in personal income.” The dimming outlook is not lost on Canadians. Lower quality employment has been the norm for decades, coinciding with the declining middle class. The growing pressures aren’t

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8 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

THE MONITOR

VERBATIM

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

Canada ranks sixth overall while the United States continues to decline—this year dropping to 23rd—in the Human Freedom Index, which uses 79 indicators of personal, civil and economic freedoms to rank 159 countries and jurisdictions around the world. Hong Kong remains the freest jurisdiction in the world, followed by Switzerland, New Zealand, Ireland and Denmark. Canada is tied for sixth with Australia and the United Kingdom.

“Based on all the results of the expert and citizen consultations, the committee’s only legitimate option is to recommend in favour of proportional representation.”

A flight instructor was killed Monday morning after a helicopter crashed shortly after takeoff at the Region of Waterloo International Airport in Breslau. Tiffany Hanna, 29, was performing a routine flight training exercise with a student when the two-seat Robinson R22 helicopter plummeted back to earth. The helicopter crashed into a stormwater pond near a wooded area on the airport property.

» Fraser Institute

» Fair Vote Canada’s President Réal Lavergne notes that of those expressing a

» From the Dec. 3, 2011 edition of The Observer

position in presentations to the federal committee on electoral reform, 88% recommended proportional representation.

DYER: Dictator appears likely

NATIONAL VIEW

to retain control over Syria

FROM | 6

to cancel the agreement the United States signed last March to curb Iran’s nuclear weapons ambitions? Iran is Russia’s closest ally in the Middle East, and if Trump broke that agreement he would be reopening a U.S. military confrontation with Iran. Since this question may not even have crossed Mr Trump’s mind yet, it would be pointless for us to speculate on which way he might jump three months from now. It’s equally pointless to

wonder what kind of deal the Syrian Kurds will end up with. Turkey will want to ensure that they have no autonomous government of their own and are thoroughly subjugated by Assad’s regime. The United States, on the other hand, owes them a debt of honour for carrying the main burden of fighting Islamic State on the ground – but the Kurds are used to being betrayed. All we can say with some confidence at the moment is that it looks like Assad has won his six-year war to stay in power.

KANNON: Economic failures

will fuel a shift to demagogues FROM | 7

jobs on the whole. Look at the numbers and do the math: working more and making less in increasingly crappy McJobs certainly add up to public anger. Critics of corporate capi-

talism, “free” trade deals and policy written by lobbyists have been pointing out the problems for years. Now, many more people have finally seen for themselves that the neoliberal emperor is starkers, and the sight is anger-inducing.

YOUR VIEW / LETTER

Stop in downtown Elmira was a real homecoming To the Editor, RECENTLY, I MOVED BACK to Elmira, after seven years of living in the city. Last week, I decided to revisit a time-honoured tradition of going downtown for Moonlight Madness. Stepping out of my car, I was greeted by the sounds of music: a group of people from Elmira Mennonite Church were standing at the corner of Arthur and Church, singing Christmas carols. I stood awhile, enjoying the much-loved Christmas songs, so beautifully sung in four-part harmony. Groups of shoppers greeted each other, sometimes stopping to chat; I truly felt like I was “home” again.  Then came the announcement that the sing-

ers were moving inside the Kitchen Kuttings Store for a few songs. As almost everyone knows, Kitchen Kuttings is one of Elmira’s success stories: three well-known (and much loved and respected) local women purchased a small cheese store 27 years ago. With hard work and long hours, along with vision and  ingenuity, Elmeda, Lydia and Nancy have built their business into what it is today: a spotlessly clean, bright, good-sized corner food shop, selling quality goods, always busy with local customers as well as those who drive for miles to shop there. No doubt the genuinely warm and personal customer service is part of the draw, for this store, and many others in Elmira.  Standing in that unique shop, listening to the words and harmony of the Christmas song ‘Oh Beautiful Star

of Bethlehem,’ my heart was filled with gratitude; first, for the Christmas season, where we celebrate the birth of the Jesus, Son of God, who came to be our Saviour. I felt grateful for this community, where we can walk along the streets in the evening darkness, without fear; I felt thankful for the hard-working business owners of Elmira, who strive to provide good service, and keep the downtown viable; they deserve our support. And last, but certainly not least, a huge thank you to the folks from Elmira Mennonite Church, who were willing to stand outside, on a cold damp evening, singing the joyful songs of Christmas to warm our hearts and spirits. As I returned home, to my little house in Elmira, I felt truly blessed.

MARIE WEBER | ELMIRA

Goings-on in the U.S. show why we need electoral reform To the Editor, I WONDER IF STEVE Kannon, in his weekly column, hasn’t missed the mark. Middle-class dissatisfaction undoubtedly cost Hillary Clinton some votes, but that was very far from the main reason that she lost the election. I do not excuse the faults that he accuses her of, but I know that she would have embraced the world’s leaders in the spirit of friendship and cooperation, while Trump will confront them as the perfect example of the “ugly American,” an aging, bloviating, immoral, arrogant, demagogical America-firster. Meanwhile, the crisis of the biosphere is evolv-

ing very quickly. We don’t have time for the disruptions and setbacks that will come with his presidency. On Nov. 17, the Washington Post carried this headline, “The North Pole is an insane 36 degrees (F) warmer than normal as winter descends.” And we are told that by 2020 two-thirds of wild animals will be dead! If that is true, we are all on the cusp of a situation that calls for mobilization. Trump, if he is to keep any of his ill-considered promises to the disaffected, will need to mobilize America as well, much as Hitler did Germany prior to the Second World War. Under Trump, America will mobilize in all the wrong directions. What is the lesson for Canada? Democracy no longer works in the “Land of the Free.” Because the distribution of seats in the Electoral College has

not changed in ten years, Clinton now leads Trump in the popular vote by more than two million votes, yet she did not win the presidency. Trump has fewer votes than either of the Republican candidates defeated by Obama. A huge part of his voter base came from people who would die rather than vote for any other party than that of their family’s tradition, no matter how reprehensible the candidate. There is growing and plausible evidence showing that in swing states controlled by Republicans at the state level, e.g. Ohio and North Carolina, the Republicans stole the election through fraudulent voter suppression. Third party (i.e. Bernie Sanders) dissatisfaction led to strong voter boycott. Seven million votes went to Greens LETTER | 17


SPORTS | 9

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

SPORTS NOT SO GREAT OUTDOORSMAN / STEVE GALEA

HOCKEY / JUNIOR B

Never a dull moment after the deer hunt OPEN COUNTRY

Elmira goalie Jonathan Reinhart makes one of 31 saves on Sunday night against Kitchener’s Connor Cole in the team’s loss to the Kitchener Dutchmen. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER] xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

Kings suffer first home loss

Team never found its form en route to falling 4-3 to Kitchener, now look to get on track this weekend LIZ BEVAN

SUNDAY NIGHT WASN’T EASY for the Elmira Sugar Kings. It was their first loss on home ice since the start of the 2016-2017 season. The team hosted the Kitchener Dutchmen at the Dan Snyder Arena, and after struggling from the very first puck drop, never managed to get back on track. The final score was 4-3. Head coach Ty Canal says he isn’t used to seeing the guys chasing the puck like they were on Sunday night. “It didn’t go the way we wanted it to, that’s for sure. The first period was

uncharacteristic of us as well, and we haven’t been playing like that in the first period, for one, and two, we haven’t been playing like that at home. It was one of those games that we didn’t get out of the gate the way we wanted to, and we had to chase all night and it was just unfortunate,” he said. “We couldn’t generate a whole lot that night and we turned the puck over too much, we took some penalties that we shouldn’t have and if we did have any momentum, it stopped in a hurry.” Canal believes the first period of the game showed what the rest of the game

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ally good period for us as well, especially when we are tied, or if we have the lead. Unfortunately, we just couldn’t come out on top in that game.” Along with lackluster game play, the Kings had one player take a particularly bad hit. Mitch Hoelscher was taken to the hospital after being hit into the penalty box on the powerplay. “It is tough to say whether he will be back next weekend, but with the early reports, I doubt it. But, we always hope for the best. You have to make sure that whatever the case is, is that he is healthy. We

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aren’t going to rush anything,” said Canal. “He is a big part of the team, but we want to make sure that he is back where he needs to be. All our guys are, and to play the way we want to play and the way we like to play, we need everyone in the lineup.” Next up for the Kings, an away game versus the Cambridge Winter Hawks, a team they lost to in their last meeting just a couple of weeks ago. “Our guys definitely know that, so I think we are going to make sure that we rebound. We have two KINGS | 10

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WELL I’M HAPPY TO say that last week I reaffirmed my faith in miracles and the power of prayer. Maybe I should explain. You see, on the first Thursday of the deer season, I tagged a fine little buck. And on the following Monday, I butchered it all by myself, without any adult supervision. I did a decent job too. The parts of it that weren’t in our venison stew on Tuesday are now resting comfortably in the freezer, awaiting their next assignment. Those who have spent time in the outdoors with me might tell you the miracle part is I had a successful hunt. They wouldn’t be far off the mark either – but that’s not what I’m referring to. The miracle is I am able to use all ten digits to type this column, despite the fact I butchered my own deer. A lot of people are under the mistaken impression that facing a charging grizzly bear or Cape buffalo is the most dangerous thing a hunter can do. But that’s only because they have never seen the aftermath of a do-it-yourself butchering job.

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THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

KINGS: Prepping for weekend FROM | 9

things,” said Canal. “We lost in Cambridge last time and we lost on Sunday, so the guys are going to be ready for that, to make sure that we can bounce off the carpet after a weekend like this, and I think the big thing is that if we come out strong, then we play better and seem to settle in. Early on, our guys can feed off one another.” On Sunday, the Kings will be back on home ice against the Waterloo Siskins. Elmira has defeated

Waterloo in the teams’ last two meetings. “It is going to be a recovery game for us as well. Losing at home on Sunday, and now the next Sunday, we have to make sure that we come back ready to play the way we need to play,” said Canal. “Waterloo is quick and we have to make sure that we are on our game to play like we should at home.” The puck drops against Cambridge at 7 p.m. on Dec. 3 at Galt Arena. On Dec. 4, the Kings go up against the Siskins at 7 p.m.

Elmira’s Jonathan Reinhart makes a save on Sunday night against Kitchener. Jeff Jordan tries to get the puck away from the Dutchmen.

[LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]

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THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

GALEA: Staying sharp is usually a good idea, but sometimes requires caution ... and band-aids FROM | 9

Even now I shudder at the thought. As I said, I got off relatively unscathed though. In fact, I only had one wound that would have been considered mortal before the advent of modern medical practices – I cut my ring finger just a little. To be clear, when I say just a little what I mean to

say is this year, Jenn didn’t ask me if I arrowed a deer in the house. Last year, was much worse. I had matching band-aids on all five fingers of my right hand – and two on my left – and it got even worse after I finished sharpening the knives. And therein lies the problem. You see, the hunter who wishes to butcher his own deer doesn’t do it to save

money. He or she does it to justify money spent on sharp knives, sharpening apparatus, butcher paper, a grinder, sausage maker and a state-of-the-art firstaid kit. My sharpening process goes something like this. I begin with a scary sharp knife. I know it is scary sharp because I typically cut myself with it after checking it for scary sharpness.

After I have returned from Emerg., I realize that the act of me cutting myself might have done something to deteriorate that knife’s keen edge. So, I get my electric knife sharpener going and sharpen the blade with a coarse, medium and fine belt. This is followed by a few passes on the strop. Then, after shaving the hair off of my arm to ensure the knife is sharp, I go

to the drug store to buy additional medical supplies so I can staunch the bleeding and some Rogaine, so I can try to grow that hair back before Jenn gets home. This is the standard procedure I go through for my skinning, boning, and slicing knives, before, during and after the butchering process. But, as I said, this year was a miraculous year in

that no blood transfusions were required. I did my butchering without any lasting physical harm. I might have to deal with a little post traumatic stress disorder, however – but only because I forgot to clean the blood from my cut out of the bathroom sink before Jenn got home. Also, the UPS lady will not be coming back any time soon.

Flat play, penalty woes put damper on Jacks’ weekend After winning just one of three, Wellesley now looking to step things up against divisional leaders LIZ BEVAN IT WAS A ROUGH-ANDTUMBLE weekend for the Wellesley Applejacks, who paid the price for all of the whistles and penalties en route to taking just two points from three games. After losses to New Hamburg (5-2) and Norwich (54), the Jacks finally broke out to romp over Burford by a score of 8-1. Starting out the weekend, trips to the box set the pace in New Hamburg on Friday night, as the Jacks were unable to get much going while playing shorthanded much of the evening. “We just have to stay away from that stuff. We spent a lot of energy killing penalties that night, and we never really recuperated from that,” explained head coach Brad Gerber. “Things just didn’t really go. We made it 3-2 midway through the third, but we just didn’t seem to have the energy that night to pull it off.” The boys spent a combined total of 18 minutes out of the first period in the

penalty box on calls like roughing, crosschecking, interference and fighting. The Firebirds were able to capitalize. The Jacks hosted the Norwich Merchants the following night, and once again, Gerber says the guys just couldn’t get it right. “It was the same kind of thing. We just didn’t come out on the ice with the work ethic that we need,” he said, adding that he knows the team is capable of more. “We didn’t create the chances, Norwich outworked us. I thought we played only about 10 minutes that night, and we lost 5-4. It just goes to show, that if we play the way we talked about, and how I know we can play, we will be fine, but we have to bring that ethic every night or you aren’t going to win in this league.” Sunday afternoon’s matinee game was a completely different story. The Jacks turned it around and managed to salvage two points from their three-game run last weekend. Gerber says he was pleasantly surprised by the work

The Wellesley Applejacks lost the first two games of the weekend before bouncing back in a big way on Sunday afternoon to defeat the Burford Bulldogs 8-1. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER] the team put in against the Burford Bulldogs on home ice. The final score was 8-1 in favour of the Jacks. “When you have a threegame weekend, sometimes you worry about the third game a little bit with energy levels and guys getting tired, but we played with a

lot of energy,” he said. “It was a nice surprise, and we finally got rewarded with some pucks going into the net for us. We were happy to get at least two points out of the weekend.” Sunday’s afternoon game was the last home game for the Jacks for a little while,

with the Wellesley arena hosting the International Silver Stick tournament this coming weekend. But, soon the Applejacks will be back on home ice for nearly the rest of the regular season. “It is a long time on the road. We have played a

lot of road games already, and after this little stretch here, we only have two or three more road games to go, compared to 10 or 11 at home,” said Gerber. “We are looking forward to getting through this part of the schedule. We had a really busy November. We played lots of hockey in lots of three-game weekends. Then hopefully, we can get some good home wins going there.” During their weekend on the road, the Jacks will be visiting the top two teams in the division, Ayr and Paris. Gerber says the team is prepped for the upcoming challenge. “Ayr are in first place, and we are finally starting to get healthy and getting guys back from suspensions. It is a good challenge for the guys, it really is,” said Gerber. “We talked to them a bit about it after the game on Sunday and more at practice on Wednesday. I think the guys are excited. We have the two teams that are ahead of us, and hopefully we can make up some ground.”

WOOLWICH SEES PLENTY OF HOCKEY AS WILDCATS HOST BIG TOURNAMENT

More than 40 peewee and bantam hockey teams were in Woolwich Township last weekend for the annual Woolwich Wildcats Weekend tournament. Teams from across the province played games at the WMC and the St. Jacobs arena. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]


12 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

LANCERS FALL TO VISITING HURON HEIGHTS

EDSS SWIMMERS GET SEASON UNDERWAY

Coby Martin of the Lancers senior boys’ basketball team keeps the ball away from Huron Heights Secondary School in their Tuesday evening meeting at EDSS. The Lancers lost 63-36. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]

Elmira District Secondary School hosted the first swim meet of the season on Nov. 24 at the Woolwich Memorial Centre. They competed against Bluevale Collegiate Institute, Huron Heights Secondary School and Kitchener Collegiate Institute. Their next meet is today (Dec. 1) at the WMC at 3 p.m. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]

Outdoor rink to be built outside Wellesley arena, council decides WHITNEY NEILSON

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RESIDENTS COULD BE SKATING outdoors at the Wellesley arena by the end of the year after township councillors meeting Tuesday night approved a request from the Wellesley Recreation Service Board. Whether the board will foot the entire $9,000 bill or seek funding from other sources remains to be decided. Board member Jeff Quint said the rink would be under the picnic shelter outside the arena, similar to the one that’s operated outside the St. Clements arena. It’s a small area, but building an outdoor rink on exposed areas such as the ball diamond haven’t proved to be any better due to the grade of the ball diamond surface. The roof of the shelter

helps protect the ice and prolong the outdoor skating season. The funds would cover the cost to install a waterline, tracer wire, and yard hydrant to provide a water source from the Wellesley arena to the picnic shelter, as well as a rink board system around the perimeter of the shelter. The rink boards will be stored in the old fire hall in the offseason. The service board currently has more than $26,000 it’s collected through fundraisers. “There is some concern that the rec. committee bear the entire cost of the project. So there are benefits to having water at the picnic shelter for the farmers’ market, for other events, such as the Don Green ball tournament and what not,” Quint said in

explaining the benefits to the township. Coun. Herb Neher questioned if they should vote on the motion if the service board was unsure if they would fully fund it. Township CAO Rik Louwagie explained council could approve the idea, which would let the service board decide exactly how they will fund it and get the ball rolling, otherwise they’d be waiting until the next council meeting for approval. “The way I see this, if council approves the recommendation as it’s worded right now it does not commit the rec. services board to go ahead and do this work, however it does give them the opportunity to do that, should they decide to go ahead and fund the whole project,” said Louwagie.


SPORTS | 13

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

After coming in second in the Ontario Cup in the summer, the U16 Woolwich Wolfpack girls soccer team came up on the winning side of the Quebec-Ontario Cup last month. The team also won the Tournament of Champions in Ontario, which qualified the girls for the cross-provincial tournament. [SUBMITTED]

Woolwich U16 girls taste victory Winning the tournament of Champions earned team the Quebec-Ontario Cup LIZ BEVAN COMPETING FOR THE QUEBEC-ONTARIO Cup, the U16 Woolwich Youth Soccer Wolfpack emerged victorious against Quebec. Having won the Tournament of Champions in three games, the team went on to Montreal last month to face off against Quebec’s best. “The Tournament of Champions is the tournament you have to win to get to the Quebec-Ontario

Cup,” explained team manager John Tsilogianis. “We played very well in the Tournament of Champions. We won two games and tied one. We worked off our loss to Saltfleet in the Ontario Cup and worked hard for this win.” The team took home the Quebec-Ontario Cup in two games, winning both. Tsilogianis says it wasn’t easy, however. “The first game was in a torrential rainfall, so it wasn’t a very good ex-

perience, but we battled through,” he said. “The second game was a lot more vigorous. The girls on the other team were a bit more aggressive after losing the day before, so it was a very chippy game.” Despite the opposition’s aggressive play, the U16 Wolfpack didn’t let the ball get past them. “For the girls, they were really, really happy. We beat them by two goals on Saturday and it was a squeaker on Sunday,” said

head coach Aldo Krajcar. “The girls were ecstatic. They were really, really happy.” Krajcar credits the girls’ dedication to the sport for their success in Montreal. “They are committed. We practice four times a week when they are in school, and in the summertime when they are not in school, we practice six or seven times a week,” he shared. “We practice like that before an important game. The parents

are committed, the girls are committed and the coaching staff is committed. We all enjoy it. My wife jokes that I love soccer more than her. I don’t, though.” For some of the U16 players, it was their last season with the team, and Tsoligianis says it was a great way for them to go out. “It was also the last game that we played as that team before the new team was formed for this

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coming season. It was bittersweet for some of them, being their last game. It was their goodbye,” he said, adding that the experience was a unique one for the team. “It was something new that we have never been to. It was good for the girls to experience soccer in a different province, how they play soccer and that type of thing. It is exciting any time you get to go away and participate in something so huge.”

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14 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

THE SCORE

WOOLWICH WILDCATS

Tyke: SELECT Nov. 26 vs Hespeler Home: 5 Visitor: 2 Goals: Zack Forwell (4), Liam Straus Assists: Colton Brito, Lucas Frey, Matt Kochut, Evan Hall

Novice: MAJOR A Nov. 27 vs Dundas Home: 6 Visitor: 0 Goals: Adam Lavigne, Adam Bloch (2), Tristan Hill, Spencer Hume (2) Assists: Wade McKenzie, Alex Veitch, MacIvor Zettel, Sutton Meier, Adam Lavigne (2), Mitchell Krasovec (2) Shutouts: Reed Snyder

Novice: MAJOR A Nov. 28 vs New Hamburg Home: 4 Visitor: 0 Goals: Wade McKenzie, Spencer Hume, Sutton Meier, Caleb Paquet Assists: Caleb Paquet, Adam Lavigne, Mitchell Krasovec, MacIvor Zettel, Adam Bloch, Avery Collingwood Shutouts: Carson Waechter

Novice: AE Nov. 24 vs Guelph Home: 1 Visitor: 4 Goals: Declan Martin

Novice: AE Nov. 27 vs Halton Hills Home: 3 Visitor: 5 Goals: Bryce Brubacher (3) Assists: Sam Kruschat, Harrison Hartwick

Novice: LL #1

PeeWee: MAJOR AE

Nov. 19 vs Hespeler Home: 5 Visitor: 1 Goals: Jonah Schmidt (3), Matt Wilkie (2) Assists: Sebastian Abate, Sam Houston, Finn Smith

Nov. 23 vs Erin-Hillsburg Home: 5 Visitor: 0 Goals: Sam Siopiolosz, Nolan Williamson, Mitchell Hartman (2), Sebastian Garrett Assists: Shelby Rempel, Jonathan Staken, Nolan Williamson, Coleton Benham, Daniel Kelly, Corbin Schmidt Shutouts: Jordan Wang

Novice: LL #1 Nov. 20 vs St. Clements Home: 6 Visitor: 3 Goals: Logan McCallum, Jackson Kellough, Brody Habermehl, Matt Wilkie, Jonah Schmidt (2) Assists: Austin Thompson, Finn Smith, Cooper Jones

Atom: MINOR A Nov. 23 vs Centre Wellington Home: 0 Visitor: 3

Atom: MAJOR A Nov. 26 vs Dundas Home: 2 Visitor: 0 Goals: Pacey Camm, Stuart Sinclair Assists: Nathan Martin, Eric Kane Shutouts: Tyler Fisher

Atom: MAJOR A Nov. 29 vs New Hamburg Home: 5 Visitor: 1 Goals: Michael Gear, Mitchell Walker (2), Eric Kane, Ian Leech Assists: Kane Kruschat, Evan Passmore (2), Isaac Lopers, Elijah Weiss, Mitchell Walker, Liam Wood

PeeWee: MAJOR AE Nov. 12 vs Milton Home: 2 Visitor: 1 Goals: Sam Siopiolosz

Bantam: MINOR A Nov. 22 vs Halton Hills Home: 4 Visitor: 4 Goals: Kyle Mulder, Owen Lee (2), Cameron Leonard Assists: Nate Snyder, Cameron Leonard

Bantam: LL #1 Nov. 18 vs Tavistock Home: 2 Visitor: 3 Goals: Tanner Mann, Tyler Newton Assists: Dante Del Cul, James Ormson

Midget: LL #2 Nov. 11 vs Ayr Home: 3 Visitor: 7 Goals: Ben Weigel, Nick Lunz, Mack Wilms Assists: Nick Lunz, Ryan Parrott, Ben Weigel, Corbin Kaufman

Midget: LL #2 Nov. 19 vs Hespeler Home: 6 Visitor: 5 Goals: Mack Wilms (2), CJ Sider (2), Turner Willoughby, Ryan Parrott Assists: Alex Metzger (2), Sullivan Keen (2), Blake

Richardson, Ben Weigel, Eli Baldin, Nick Lunz

Midget: LL #2 Nov. 26 vs New Hamburg Home: 2 Visitor: 3 Goals: Mack Wilms, Ben Weigel Assists: Adam Anstett, Ben Weigel

Midget: LL #2 Nov. 27 vs Plattsville Home: 3 Visitor: 4 Goals: Ryan Parrott (2), Mack Wilms Assists: John Wang, CJ Sider, Ben Weigel, Jon Martin

TOURNEYS

Atom: MINOR AE Nations Cup, Michigan Nov. 25-27 Game 1 vs Fort Wayne Home: 6 Visitor: 6 Goals: Carson Staken (4), Graydon Martin, Tyler Gingrich Assists: Austin Roth, Graydon Martin, Nathan Dyck Nov. 25 vs Troy Home: 1 Visitor: 2 Goals: Taylor Weber Assists: Graydon Martin Nov. 26 vs St. Clair Shores Home: 1 Visitor: 3 Goals: Nathan Dyck Assists: Tyler Gingrich Nov. 26 vs USA Home: 5 Visitor: 1 Goals: Carter Snider (2), Thomas Ferguson, Grayden Martin, Nathan Dyck Assists: Taylor Weber, Thomas Ferguson, Carter Snider, Nathan Dyck

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PeeWee: MAJOR AE Woolwich Weekend Woolwich, Nov. 25-27 Game 1 vs Listowel Home: 1 Visitor: 0 Goals: Sebastian Garrett Assists: Corbin Schmidt, Jonathan Staken Nov. 26 vs Ennismore Home: 7 Visitor: 1 Goals: Lucas Radler (2), Sam Siopiolosz, Nolan Williamson, Mitchell Hartman, Colton Benham, Shelby Rempel Assists: Sam Siopiolosz, Tristan Kraemer (2), Nolan Williamson (2), Corbin Schmidt, Daniel Kelly, Mitchell Brubacher, Sebastian Garrett, Colton Benham Nov. 26 vs Merritton Home: 5 Visitor: 1 Goals: Sebastian Garrett, Corbin Schmidt, Colton Benham, Lucas Radler, Tristan Kraemer Assists: Jonathan Staken, Nolan Williamson (2), Sam Siopiolosz, Tristan Kraemer Nov. 27 vs Owen Sound Home: 3 Visitor: 1 Goals: Sam Siopiolosz, Shelby Rempel, Jonathan Staken

Woolwich Weekend Woolwich Nov. 26-28 Game 1 vs Innisfil Home: 4 Visitor: 6 Goals: Owen Hackert (2), Gabe Hicknell, Ethan Murr Assists: Turner Dulhardt, Jackson Smith Nov. 27 vs Mt. Brydges Home: 8 Visitor: 0 Goals: Josh Moore (4), Turner Dulhardt (2), Ashton Weber, Gabe Hicknell Assists: Andrew Buehler, Ashton Weber, Daniel Grant, Turner Dulhardt Shutouts: Brennan Catton Nov. 27 vs Lambeth Home: 5 Visitor: 3 Goals: Josh Moore (4), Turner Dulhardt Assists: Ashton Weber (2), Owen Hackert, Gabe Hicknell (2), Ethan Murr, Andrew Buehler Nov. 28 vs Woolwich LL #1 Home: 4 Visitor: 3 Goals: Turner Dulhardt (2), Josh Moore, Ethan Murr Assists: Ashton Weber, Turner Dulhardt Nov. 28 vs Innisfil Home: 3 Visitor: 4 Goals: Turner Dulhardt (3) Assists: Gabe Hicknell, Owen Hackert (2), Liam Hunter

ELMIRA JR SUGAR KINGS TOURNEYS

Midget: A Midland Silverstick Midland, Nov. 25-26 Game 1 vs Wawa Home: 1 Visitor: 3 Goals: Noah Zeller Assists: Aidan Ruston, Jordan Gamble Nov. 25 vs Ajax Home: 2 Visitor: 0 Goals: Cole Altman, Noah Zeller

WOOLWICH WILD

Novice: LL #1 Nov. 26 vs Woodstock Home: 2 Visitor: 7 Goals: Cayleigh McQuinn, Brooklyn Pope Assists: Cayleigh McQuinn, Isla McCoubrey

Novice: LL #2 Nov. 27 vs Waterloo #3 Home: 3 Visitor: 3 Goals: Alexa Grundy (2), Mia Medeiros Assists: Grace Gow, Addison Fitzgerald

PeeWee: BB 7100 Nov. 20 vs Huron Home: 3 Visitor: 0 Goals: Teesha Weber, Haylee Clemmer, Jane Hinsperger Assists: Paige Woods, Braelyn Macpherson Shutouts: Mackenzie Koenig

Bantam: BB Nov. 27 vs North Halton Home: 1 Visitor: 1 Goals: Ella Campbell Assists: Abby Burkholder

Bantam: B 7106 Nov. 26 vs Brantford Home: 3 Visitor: 3 Goals: Lexi Runstedler, Delaney Jacklin, Charlise Roth Assists: Zoe Reuter, Megan Pickett, Charlise Roth, Delaney Jacklin

TOURNEYS

PeeWee: BB 7100 Kitchener Fall Fest Kitchener Nov. 25-27 Game 1 vs Huron Home: 3 Visitor: 1

Goals: Carly Bauman, Haylee Clemmer (2) Assists: Teesha Weber, Payton Ravelle, Makenna Mclaughlin, Carly Bauman, Faith Katsube Nov. 25 vs Kingston Home: 3 Visitor: 0 Goals: Teesha Weber, Haylee Clemmer, Jocelyn Pickard Assists: Haylee Clemmer, Paige Woods Shutouts: Mackenzie Koenig Nov. 26 vs Napanee Home: 1 Visitor: 0 Goals: Haylee Clemmer Shutouts: Krista Bentley Nov. 26 vs Huron Home: 4 Visitor: 0 Goals: Haylee Clemmer, Chloe Hislop, Jocelyn Pickard, Paige Woods Assists: Paige Woods (2), Chloe Hislop (3), Haylee Clemmer, Tanis Uhrig Shutouts: Krista Bentley Nov. 27 vs Napanee Home: 2 Visitor: 0 Goals: Chloe Hislop, Carly Bauman Assists: Haylee Clemmer, Payton Ravelle, Makenna Mclaughlin Shutouts: Mackenzie Koenig

WATERLOO WOLVES

Atom: MAJOR A Nov. 23 vs Stratford Home: 7 Visitor: 2 Goals: Tim Hodson (2), Calvin Witt, Hayden Taylor, Mason Mohr, Jackson Andrews, Griffin Beddis Assists: Calvin Witt (2), Easton Oberholtzer, Matthew Ball, Jackson Andrews, Tim Hodson, Ben Yong

Atom: MAJOR A Nov. 27 vs London Home: 3 Visitor: 6 Goals: Calvin Witt, Hayden Taylor, Mason Mohr Assists: Mason Mohr, Matthew Ball, Bryce Martin, Calvin Witt, Jackson Andrews

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PeeWee: LL #2

Assists: Evan Gowing, Aaron Logan, Jordan Gamble Shutouts: Ty Pierce Nov. 26 vs Midland Home: 1 Visitor: 3 Goals: Cole Altman Assists: Mitch Waters

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The Woolwich Wildcats Minor Atom: AE team were gold medal finalists at the Nations Cup in Michigan on Nov. 25-27. Back row: Tyler Gingrich, Austin Roth, Thomas Ferguson, Blake Dueck, Carson Staken, Max Schwartzentruber, Haiden Wagner. Middle row: Graydon Martin, Carter Snider, Wesley Aitken, Bryson Rozema, Taylor Weber, Nathan Dyck. Front row: Reid Deyell, Mitch Roemer. [SUBMITTED]


VENTURE | 15

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

VENTURE FOOD FOR THOUGHT/ OWEN ROBERTS

MAKING DELIVERIES / CRANKING UP THE VOLUME

Post office more than just Santa’s helpers at this point Always busy at Christmas, Canada Post expects record volumes this year as e-commerce shipping volumes rise LIZ BEVAN WITH JUST OVER THREE weeks until kids rush to see what Santa Claus left under the tree, postal workers are scrambling to make sure presents arrive on time for Dec. 25. Mary Cochrane is a member of Canada Post’s Mom Squad, which helps Canadians with their Christmas shipping questions and concerns. She grew up in Waterloo and has family in Conestogo, so she knows how hectic the holiday season can be in the area. Across Canada, the national delivery service gets Canada Post employees ready to help Santa deliver all the presents in the mail in time for Christmas morning. “We know this is going to be a record-breaking holiday season and we are excited to be part of the overall experience,” she said from her office in Toronto. “We hire about 2,500 additional seasonal workers to help our 49,000 postal operation employees get the extra parcels to customers in time. We also arrange to have up to 900 vehicles to help with delivery. The reindeer and the elves need a hand.” Across the country, Canada Post employees are expecting to deliver a million packages a day starting this week, all the way up

until Christmas Eve. “To give you some context, in 2012, we only had two days where we delivered a million packages and we thought that was amazing and the greatest thing ever,” said Cochrane. “But now, for the next three and a half weeks, we expect to be delivering a million packages a day, five days a week. We already anticipate that we will be delivering seven million more parcels than we did in 2015.” It isn’t just the big city post offices that are going above and beyond this year. At the Elmira Canada Post office, employees are adding extra days to their delivery schedule, bringing packages to people’s doorsteps on Sundays. They are also adding a few extra hours to their daily hours to accommodate the expected holiday rush. Cochrane says Christmas presents aren’t the only pieces of mail making their way through the post office this year. Kids across the country are putting pen to paper, asking for their favourite toy or game for Christmas this year. Canada Post handles an average of one million letters to Santa each year, and as long as the letter has a return address, everyone gets a response. “We delivered 1.5 million responses last year. It POST OFFICE | 18

Food sector needs to explain food costs to consumers FIELD NOTES HARDLY ANYONE – JUST 13 per cent of Canadians, according to Farm and Food Care – thinks Canada has among the world’s lowest food prices. But it’s a fact, we do. We spend less on food than consumers in most other nations. So why do we keep thinking we don’t? Survey after survey confirms that we’re constantly wringing our hands over food prices. The latest comes from former University of Guelph researcher Sylvain Charlebois, who stays connected to the university through its food institute. His recent study showed nearly onequarter of all Canadians were concerned about how they’re going to pay for their groceries. Half of the respondents to his survey said they had changed their shopping habits because of fluctuating prices. Nearly 60 per cent said they’ve looked for deals on groceries and stock up on sale items. To me, if you have a family, you are always concerned about how you’re going to pay for groceries, you’re always looking for deals and you’re always stocking up. How else can you

Erin Zlak and Angela Werstine get ready for Christmas at the Elmira Canada Post office on Arthur Street. Employees will be in the Elmira Santa Claus parade on Saturday collecting letters to send to the North Pole. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]

ROBERTS | 18


16 | VENTURE 2016

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VENTURE | 17

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

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Santa Claus made a well received appearance on the Waterloo Central Railway steam train in St. Jacobs last weekend. The train cars were full for the first Santa train ride of the season with families sipping hot chocolate and munching on snacks. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]

LETTER: Referendum not the way to go on reform FROM | 8

and Libertarians. Social media was largely irrational across the entire political spectrum. Many voters, disgusted by Trump’s cynical appeal to the vilest of public impulses, and convinced by the mainstream media that Clinton was a shoo-in anyway, opted not to exercise their democratic responsibilities. Were the Electoral College to arrive at its decision using a proportional count, Hillary Clinton would win the presidency. All this describes a completely broken democratic system. Disproportionately powerful America has not been paying attention to its democratic institutions. The whole world is saddled with the precarious result and Canada, under a firstpast-the-post system, is not immune from a similar electoral catastrophe. The election of the far-right rump conservative party

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(the Reform/Wild Rose faction) that came to be known as the Harper government is a perfect example. That Kellie Leitch, who has spoken with great enthusiasm about the election of Trump and the need to carry his message to Canada, is currently out front of the Conservative leadership race is disconcerting because under first-past-the-post she could become our prime minister. The Canadian Parliament will soon act on the recommendations of the Special Committee on Electoral Reform (ERRE). While we will not likely end up with the current first-past-the-post, the oldline parties may well opt to force upon an uninformed electorate some form of preferential voting. The net result will effectively shut out third parties like the NDP and the Green. We urgently need inclusive, fairly representational

government in order to deal with the evolving crisis of the biosphere. That means some sort of proportional government, the overwhelming opinion of the representations to the ERRE committee, and by a wide margin the choice of successful democracies around the world. Last month, the people of PEI voted in a plebiscite to enact mixed-member proportional voting at the provincial level. The majority Liberals of that province have already voted to ignore the results of the plebiscite. All of us need to demand a proportional system of voting adapted to the peculiarities of Canada. Now is not the time for a referendum. That can come after a couple of election cycles, which will give the electorate a chance to evaluate whatever new system is put in place.

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18 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

ROBERTS: Canadians pay lower rates for food than elsewhere, but do notice when costs are rising FROM | 15

get by? I’m surprised the numbers weren’t higher. But, of course, not everyone buying food is doing so for a family. I think the problem, and the confusion, is twofold. First, the cost of almost everything has steadily risen over the years, so there’s a spill-over effect. Of course you’re concerned about the rising cost of food when you have to make money stretch to pay for higher housing,

utilities and transportation costs, among them. Ask people if they are concerned about how they’re going to pay for items in any of these categories, and they’d likely have a response that parallels their concerns about food prices. Second, there needs to be more attempts to put food costs in context for consumers. That way, if people know where their food dollar is going, they can target wherever they think there might be inef-

ficiencies. It can be an opportunity for each portion of the food chain to explain how it’s cut its margins to the bone, and underline how relatively little we pay for food in Canada. Farmers get pennies on the food dollar. Retailers don’t get much more. Those in the middle, such as processors, make some money, but they’re also providing the kinds of services we ask for – mainly, they’re turning raw commodities into foods we can readily pre-

POST OFFICE: Along with

pare, because we don’t have time or the knowhow to do it ourselves. Price concerns have given rise to some food retailing giants. Others are following along, or trying to distinguish themselves for some unique trait. Zehrs, for example, has an impressive commitment to nutrition. It employs 75 registered dieticians throughout southwestern Ontario, and I can only imagine it’s them who are behind the free-fruitfor-kids basket we saw at

a store recently. What a great concept! And while it’s true that in general, fruit is expensive, so are lattes from Starbucks. It’s up to you how you’re going to spend your food dollars, and what kind of nutrition you’re going to get in return. At the other end of the spectrum, I’m surprised at the way Zehrs has waded into the volume business. On shelves everywhere, and I mean everywhere, was signage advertising volume dis-

counts and teasers that set limits on how many you could buy. Buy two or three at a lower price, and the retailer makes about as much as it did if you bought one at the regular price. But at least you’re buying from them, not someone else. Maybe concerns about meeting grocery costs will be met by this competition, especially as online food shopping grows too. What a fascinating, competitive time to be a grocery shopper.

IN THE MARKET FOR SOMETHING CHRISTMASY

millions of letters to Santa, post office sees surge in mail volume FROM | 15

filled 2,500 mail bags in 2015. Since the program began, we have answered more than 26.2 million letters.” Area residents will have their own chance to send a note to Santa and Mrs. Claus this weekend. Canada Post will be in the Elmira Santa Claus Parade on Dec. 3, with big bags destined for the North Pole. “Some of the top questions that we get are, “why are you so old?” a lot ask about Mrs. Claus and the reindeer and the elves, others ask about Santa’s favourite food, a lot of them ask how he gets around the world in one night, and my favourite, “Am I on the naughty or

nice list?” I think they are hoping for one last chance,” said Cochrane with a laugh. “We love playing that role of Santa’s elves, lending him a hand and helping out.” Letters to Santa can be sent to: Santa Claus, North Pole, H0H 0H0, Canada. They don’t need postage stamps to get there, and Canada Post asks that all letters be put in the mail by Dec. 14 to give Santa and his Canada Post elves a chance to respond in time for Christmas. For parcel and Christmas present delivery, Canada Post has a soft deadline of Dec. 18 for delivery between major Canadian cities before Christmas. Some online retailers have extended deadlines, all the way until Dec. 22.

Natasha Yates, Heather McHendry, Valerie Soehner and Bev Taylor were just some of the vendors at the Christmas Market at Elmira’s Riverside Public School on Saturday morning. The event was raising money for a new playground at the school while getting the public in the Christmas mood. [LIZ BEVAN/ THE OBSERVER]

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SPECIAL GUESTS : St. James Lutheran & Trinity United Choirs

Liona Boyd in Concert

Accompanied by Andrew Dolson Sunday Dec. 11, 2016 | 2:30 pm St. James Lutheran Church, Arthur & Wyatt Streets, Elmira

TICKETS:

$35 Adult • $30 Senior $25 Child/Student Available at: Eventbrite.ca, The Window Box - 8 Arthur St. South, St. James Church Office (mornings)

Proceeds to support St. James Building Restoration Work. Refreshments and Christmas Bake Sale hosted by St. James Youth.


THE ARTS | 19

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

THE ARTS ON STAGE / LIVE MUSIC

ON STAGE / LIVE MUSIC

Putting the classical into Christmas classics Liona Boyd and Andrew Dolson bring “A Winter Fantasy” to Elmira’s St. James Lutheran Church WHITNEY NEILSON CANADIAN CLASSICAL GUITARIST LIONA Boyd returns to Elmira for the second time is an many years with her “A Winter Fantasy” tour. She’ll perform a Christmas show at the same venue as last time, St. James Lutheran Church. But this time she won’t be performing alone. Waterloo’s Andrew Dolson has been touring with Boyd, accompanying her on classical guitar, as well as singing. It’ll be their last concert of the season. The duo met in what can only be described as happenchance. Earlier this year she was at home in Florida and slipped on some cardboard she had laid down to cut coconuts in her garage. She broke both her shoulder and knee and couldn’t move. She yelled until a neighbour heard her and called an ambulance. She spent most of the summer doing rehab for her knee and shoulder. “At that time I didn’t have an accompanist. I was very concerned, thinking how could I ever find a classical guitarist, plus one who could sing and one who was free to be able to travel with me and do some tours,” she explained. As luck would have it, while staying at her sister’s house in Kitchener, their mother picked up Grand Magazine off her coffee

Christmas trees take center stage at Commercial Tavern show Sunday WHITNEY NEILSON

Canadian classical guitar legend Liona Boyd and Wilfrid Laurier University grad Andrew Dolson perform “A Winter Fantasy” on Dec. 11 at St. James Lutheran Church. Church choirs from St. James and from Elmira’s Trinity United Church will perform with the duo. Tickets are available at www.eventbrite.com, at St. James Lutheran Church and The Window Box in Elmira. album that’s coming out of him, as he has a naturally one, A Guitar for Christmas table and noticed Dolson next year. She notes one of went platinum, as the first operatic voice, but can also modeling in it. Reading furclassical album ever to do so the pieces is dedicated to sing her folk repertoire, as ther, she discovered he had Leonard Cohen, from bein Canada. The second one well as pop. a degree in classical guitar fore he died. is called Christmas Dreams. “It’s nice that I can give a and voice. They set up a “I had sent it to him and “The Winter Fantasy is leg up to younger performtime to meet. he loved the piece, so I was very meditative, it’s very ers,” she said. “I just knew right away very happy because he was ethereal, peaceful, relaxShe hopes to record with this guy was special. He’s a friend of mine and I’m ing. It’ll make a great backhim in the future. really able to learn pieces sad that he checked out so ground to people’s ChristThey’ll also be joined by really fast, beautiful guitar early,” she said. mas dinners and things. the voices of St. James Lutechnique, we just love Boyd quit her musical The more you listen to it the theran Church and Trinity playing together and he’s career for six years, while more people love it because United Church’s choirs. over the moon thrilled she tried to find out what it’s beautifully orchestrated “We do a lot of varied about this,” she said. was wrong with her hands, by Peter Bond, who is my things. We do mostly duos, He’s showcased in both terrified that she wouldn’t producer,” she said. some singing and mostly halves of the concert. She be able to play anymore. Boyd also recently fininstrumental in this particnotes he’ll sing ‘O Holy It turns out she has musiished writing the sequel to Night,’ which usually brings ular concert,” she shared. cian’s focal dystonia. her autobiography, titled A Winter Fantasy is the the audience to tears. favourite of her three Christ- No Remedy For Love. It’s She believes he has a BOYD | 20 the same title as her new mas albums. The original bright musical future ahead

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MARYHILL | 20

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MARYHILL’S COMMERCIAL TAVERN IS kicking off the holiday season in style this weekend with Christmas tunes and trees. On Sunday afternoon, everyone is invited to join the Weber Family, Paul, Mike and Sue, as well as West Montrose’s Peter Tillich, for country and Christmas music. Everyone will also get to go home with a one-yearold potted Montrose Charm table top Christmas tree, which is a white spruce. In that vein, Paul Weber and Tillich will sing a special duet of ‘O Christmas Tree’ (O Tannenbaum). Tillich, owner of West Montrose Farms, says the previous shows where they gave out free Baby Blue spruce trees were well received. “It went very well, both of them. We had one in the spring and one in the fall. That was a full house and I would anticipate a full house this time, partly because it’s a Sunday afternoon.” He says they’ll be singing some fun Christmas songs and the hope is that people who come will sing along. He notes Weber will have the tavern all decked out for the holidays come Sunday. Tillich and Weber have been working on the song ‘You

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20 | THE ARTS

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

WOOLWICH COMMUNITY FUND

BOYD: Accident led to fortunate collaboration Helping good people do great things November 28, 2016

On November 15, “National Philanthropy Day”, a newspaper article in The Globe and Mail “Canadians’ Giving Spirit” listed the following statistics: • In 2013, 82% of Canadians made financial donations to a charitable or non-profit organization • Between 2010 and 2013, $12.8 billion was donated by Canadians to charitable or non-profit organizations.

Jim Schwindt – Chair Ted Brough Inga Rinne Grace Sudden

On behalf of the Woolwich Community Fund board, I thank you for your past support and ask you to support the Fund again this year. In 2016, we granted $11,200 to the following groups: • Big Brothers/Big Sisters of Waterloo Region • Hospice of Waterloo Region

FROM | 19

“It’s just the middle finger wasn’t in alignment with the others because the map in the brain actually changes when you do too much of the same thing. Golfers get it if they do golf too much, anything that you do too much,” she said. It turned out to be a blessing in disguise, giving her the chance to test out her singing and songwriting capabilities. “I just decided to quit and reinvent my technique and become a singer-songwriter and I’m just thrilled to be doing this,” she said.

Boyd hadn’t intended to return to Elmira to perform again, as she’s cutting back her performances in small towns to focus more on writing and recording. But since Dolson lives so close and Boyd mentioned to her promoter how much she loved the St. James Lutheran Church in Elmira, she decided to come back again. The show is a matinee performance on purpose to encourage parents to bring their children. “We’ve put a very reasonable price so people can bring their families, which

would be nice because music changed my life when I was 13. I greatly encourage families to bring their kids because it’s so important that youngsters get exposed to good classical music.” St. James Lutheran Church in Elmira welcomes Liona Boyd and Andrew Dolson for “A Winter Fantasy,” a concert of Christmas music on Dec. 11 at 2:30 p.m. Boyd will have her CDs for sale and will stay after the concert to sign them. For more information or to purchase tickets visit www. classicalguitar.com.

MARYHILL: Linking the song list to the trees

• Junior Achievement • Kitchener-Waterloo Symphony (Youth Concerts)

FROM | 19

• St. Jacobs Lions Club All of these grants are used to support youth programmes in Woolwich Township. Out goal is to support the youth in Woolwich Township by providing financial support for existing youth organizations and new initiatives. With your help we can continue and expand this work. Donations of cash or securities may be sent to: Woolwich Community Fund c/o The Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation 29 King Street East Suite B Kitchener N2G 2K4 Please accept our best wishes for the Holiday Season and a prosperous and healthy 2017. Sincerely, Jim Schwindt Chair

Raise Me Up,’ which he expects they will also perform. “This time for sure we’re going to do ‘You Raise Me Up’ and then probably if we do have a second one then I think Paul and I will try ‘Baby Blue’ again to give the people a little variety,” Tillich said. Tillich frequents the tavern’s Thursday night open jams and he notes a woman who regularly stops by teaches German. Sometimes they’ll sing ‘You Can’t Be True Dear,’ which has a lot of German words, and when they sing ‘O Christ-

mas Tree,’ they’ll include a verse in German too, as well as singing German in one more song. “I would certainly want to do ‘O Silent Night’ because we can do one verse in German, the original German,” Tillich said. Given the number of families with German heritage in this neck of the woods, it should go over well. As for the trees, he notes they’ve only been offering the white spruce for the last three years. “I found a white spruce years ago back in the ‘80s that grew very slender up-

right. I dug some this fall and they’re about seven feet tall and probably about a 20-inch diameter,” Tillich said. He says a normal white spruce at that height would be three to four feet across. The ones he grows make great Christmas trees due to their compact size. They’re also “fuzzy,” and almost “teddy bear-like.” The doors open on Dec. 4 at 2:30 p.m., with the music starting just after 3 p.m. at the Commercial Tavern in Maryhill. The cover charge is $10, which includes the tabletop Christmas tree.

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CLASSIFIED | 21

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

CLASSIFIED HELP WANTED

CLASSIFIED DEADLINE:

WEDNESDAYS BY 10AM HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

WANTED RENOVATION CARPENTER

Require experience performing high quality renovation carpentry work. Must be able to operate a variety of hand and power tools with ability to read blue prints. Team player with great communication skills. G license required. This full-time position offers competitive wages with a benefits package (after 3 months).

Reply with your resume and cover letter to kbearinger@waymar.ca HELP WANTED

Our St. Jacobs Retail Store currently has the following opportunity...

Skilled Tradespeople Required

Bookkeeper / Retail Systems Support

Tri-Mach Group Inc. is looking to fill new positions and add to our growing team! We are currently seeking individuals to fill the following positions:

8am to 5pm – Monday to Friday Occasional Weekends

• Millwright Apprentices • Licensed Millwrights

Responsible to the Retail Store Manager for bookkeeping requirements for both Hardware and Furniture Store operations, you will balance and complete payables, accounts receivable tracking for completion and collection, balance daily cash registers, and maintain files. You will handle all daily and monthly balancing of accounts and reporting, prepare operational reports, and ensure timely submission of all information to the Finance Department. Additional responsibilities include maintaining the integrity of POS computer systems, cycle counting, reporting/tracking, and customer service assistance as required through peak retail hours of operation, cashier, phone.

(minimum 5 years’ experience)

• Project Managers

(minimum 5 years’ experience)

• Mechanical Designers

(minimum 5 years’ experience)

For all positions: knowledge of HACCP and CFIA safety standards are considered a strong asset. Tri-Mach Group Inc. is a dynamic and innovative multi-trade service provider for the food, beverage, and pharmaceutical industries. We are proud to be an equal-opportunity employer.

Nieuwland Feed is an independent family owned feed company serving Livestock producers in Ontario. We have an opening for:

AZ/DZ Feed Truck Driver

We offer a competitive salary and great working conditions. If you are interested in becoming part of Home Hardware, please forward your resume, quoting the Bookkeeper (#838), by Friday, December 9th, 2016 to: Human Resources Department, Home Hardware Stores Limited, 34 Henry St. W., St. Jacobs, ON N0B 2N0 E-mail: hr@homehardware.ca (Microsoft Products Only) We will accommodate the needs of qualified applicants under the Human Rights Code in all parts of the hiring process.

Full-time & Part-time - Day Shift position Monday thru Friday & Every 3rd Saturday We Require:  Valid AZ/DZ license  3 year Verifiable Experience  Motivated Driver  Team Player

hr@homehardware.ca

You have good working knowledge of Microsoft Excel, Word, and other computer related skills along with solid organizational, communication and customer service skills. General accounting and retail bookkeeping experience are essential. Working knowledge of in-store POS systems is an asset.

PARADIGM TRUCKING

Please send resumé and driver’s abstract to: Scott Nieuwland at: Fax: 519-638-5221 orEmail: Scott@nieuwlandfeed.com ONLY THOSE WE WISH TO INTERVIEW WILL BE CALLED.

Office Position Available Receptionist position available for a busy large animal veterinary clinic. The position is full-time Monday through Friday and rotation for Saturdays. Duties include reception (taking phone calls, entering daily orders) and other administrative tasks. We provide competitive wages and benefits. Interested applicants should have experience in Microsoft Word / Excel and accounting software, be self-motivated and flexible, have a pleasant telephone manner and good team spirit. Large animal and/or farm experience and knowledge beneficial, but not required. Please submit resume to:

Metzger Veterinary Services 5200 Ament Line Linwood ON N0B 2A0 Fax: (519) 698-0037

GROWING AGAIN!

Tri-Mach Group Inc. 23 Donway Court, Elmira, ON, N3B 0B1

SKILLED TRADESPEOPLE REQUIRED

• Full-Time AZ Company Driver • Part-Time/Casual Driver (some weekends and holidays) We haul agricultural products across US and Canada with well maintained company trucks and trailers (hoppers and end dumps). We offer: •No Chains, No Tarps, Single Drops •EXCELLENT comprehensive benefit packages that start IMMEDIATELY upon hire

Advance Millwrights Inc. is looking to fill new positions and add to our growing team! We are currently seeking individuals to fill the following positions:

• 2nd& 3rd year Millwright Apprentices • Licensed Millwrights

(minimum 5 years’ experience)

Qualifications: •VALID AZ LICENSE •MOITVATED DRIVER (willing to train the right person)

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Call: 519-638-3004 Fax: 519-638-3887 Email: shelly@paradigmtrucking.ca Submit Your Resume and Driver’s Abstract NOW!!!

• Mechanical Designers

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9 SEAT, FULL size passenger van with trailer available for work crews or transportation. Call 519-635-6370.

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We offer excellent competitive wages and benefits. We are willing to train the right person.

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21” SNOW THROWER, 3HP, works great. $95. Call 519742-4727 or 519-239-8175.

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25% OFF ALL in stock electrical products. Boxes, Covers, Switches, Recepticals, PVC, Conduit, Wire, Yard Light bulbs, Connectors, Halogen bulbs, cord ends, twist lock plugs and more, 25% off until it lasts, Elmira Vacuum.9 Church St. E. 519-669-8362.

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More information: www.advancemillwrights.com Submit resumes to: hr@advancemillwrights.com No phone calls, please. Only candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. Advance Millwrights Inc. 21 Howard Ave. Unit#3 Elmira, ON, N3B 2C9

Repair pallets on your farm. For more information call Rob at 519-664-3688 or 519-575-5128.

FOR SALE ALLIS WD45 RC with cultivators - very good. Also 8’ disk and furrow plow and 8’ rear cultivator - all fast hitch. Spare WD for parts. Call 519429-1488 or 519-443-8481. CUB CADETS - models 71, 129, 149. For more information call 519-669-7673. FREE USED MOTOR oil, must pickup. 519-698-2088. LAMINATE - LOTS of instock specials from .99 sf. Wellelsey Home Centre - Flooring Division, 2196 Gerber Rd., Box 10, Wellesley, Ont. N0G 1A0. Phone 519-656-3533. MANY COLLECTIBLES, ARTWORK and Old and Newer Books. Selling 850+ items and much more. Searth “Linwood” to see my kijiji ads, using “view poster’s other ads”. 5150 Ament Line, Linwood (indoors) 519-698-1018. Open most Fridays, Noon - 6pm or call for a personal viewing. MATTRESS AND BOX Spring, new, never used, still in sealed bag. Sacrifice $195. Delivery available. 519-6358737. MATTRESS AND BOX Spring, new, never used, still in sealed bag. Sacrifice $195. Delivery available. Temperpedic Memory Foam Mattress, new, never used, in sealed bag. Like sleeping on a cloud. No pressure points. Bankruptcy sale $595, box spring $200 extra. Delivery available. 519-635-8737. CONTINUED ON PG. 22

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22 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

CLASSIFIED ADS - FROM PAGE 21 FOR SALE

FOR SALE

NATURAL GAS TUBE Heater. 150,000 BTU. Brand new. $1000. Call 519-669-3839. OVEN READY TURKEYS from 18 - 32 lbs. Order now for pick up on Dec. 17th. Lloyd Martin 519-669-4753.

NEW ITEMS ADDED WEEKLY! Visit our 2nd floor clearance centre for mega deals. Back by popular demand- Discount Thursday 25% off lowest ticketed price . Elmira Home Hardware. OPEN Mon - Fri 8 a.m. 8 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. & Sun. noon - 5 p.m.

FOR SALE

THE KINGS AND THE KIDS

RODGERS ELECTRIC KEYBOARD - very good. Tin-clad antique travel trunk - old. Roll-Away cot with foam mattress. Phone: 519-6693244 leave message.

SOFTNER SALT - 20kg bags, minimum 25 bags, skid lots of 56. Delivered in St. Jacobs, St. Clements, Elmira & Linwood areas. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-574-4141 or 519-6692045.

AUCTIONS

HELP WANTED

MULTIPLE ESTATE AND Consignment Auction of furniture, appliances, toys, shop tools, chain saws. Auction to be held at #7213 Line 86 Wallenstein, approx. 6 km west of Elmira. Saturday, December 3, 10:00 a.m. Gerald Bowman Auctions Ltd.

HEALTH & SAFETY / TRAINING COORDINATOR Wallenstein Feed & Supply Ltd. is a fast-paced feed manufacturing facility serving livestock and poultry farmers across Ontario. Our mandate is to provide leadership in the delivery of nutritional solutions and support for our customers in achieving their goals. We have a dedicated team of employees who take pride in making sure we meet or exceed our customers’ expectations. We are accepting applications for a full-time Health & Safety / Training Coordinator. This position is responsible for the Health & Safety program at both our locations (Monkton and Wallenstein) and for all standardized training across the company. The successful candidate will have a Health & Safety designation and 3 to 5 years of experience. A full job description is available at www.wfs.ca. If you are interested in an exciting position with competitive compensation and benefits, please submit your resume via email to recruiting@wfs.ca by December 9, 2016. We are committed to diversity and inclusion, and thank all applicants in advance. Accommodations are available during all stages of the recruitment process.

HELP WANTED

Elmira Sugar King Blair Butchart gets ready to take off on a passing drill with the Novice AE Woolwich Wildcats last Thursday evening. The teams came together for a practice and game of shinny. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]

HELP WANTED

SAT. DEC 3 at 10:00 AM Clearing auction sale of high quality furniture; tools; collectables; and miscellaneous items to be held at 441 Lexington Cres in Waterloo for Gary Sutton. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519 656 3555 www.jantziauctions.com

AUCTIONS WED. DEC 7 at 10:00 AM - Clearing auction sale of furniture; antiques; tools; collectables; primitives; Waterloo County furniture; household effects; and miscellaneous items to be held at the St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s for a Kitchener estate with additions. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. www.jantziauctions. com 519 656 3555. 100 ACRE FARM by Auction To be held at 5100 Line 49 of Perth East Twp. (east off County Rd. 135), approx. 2 miles northwest of Rostock, 9 miles northwest of Stratford, or 6 miles southeast of Monkton, for Rose Marie & The Late John Chalmers, on Wednesday, December 7th @ 1:00 p.m. Gerber Auctions Ltd. 519-699-4451. AUCTION SALE OF Antiques, collectibles, horse related items, household goods & miscellaneous items, to be held at the K.W. Khaki Club, 2939 Nafziger Rd 2 miles south of Wellesley, for The Late Jack & Donna Underwood, Kent Bridge & additions, on Saturday, December 10th @ 10:00 a.m. Gerber Auctions Ltd. 519699-4451. MULTIPLE ESTATE AND Consignment Auction of furniture, appliances, toys, shop tools, chain saws. Auction to be held at #7213 Line 86 Wallenstein, approx. 6 km west of Elmira. Saturday, December 17, 10:00 a.m. Gerald Bowman Auctions Ltd.

PRACTICE MANAGER Established in 1961, the Eldale Veterinary Clinic has been serving Elmira and the surrounding communities for just over 55 years. For your dog or cat we provide veterinary services and routine veterinary care such as vaccinations, surgery, dental care, and preventative health programs.  Our growing practice requires a Practice Manager to support operational and administrative excellence. Reporting to the Owners, you will oversee accounting, human resources, insurance, IT, inventory, scheduling, marketing and client communications and support client satisfaction. You will supervise a team of 20 support staff; including scheduling, performance management, discipline, termination, recruitment, and administration of employee benefits; You will have: • Work experience in a veterinary practice preferred, including small and large animal care; • Understanding of patient care best practices and procedures; • Post-secondary education in Accounting or Administration preferred or equivalent experience;

FOR SALE

Business

• Excellent knowledge and understanding of accounting practices; • Experience using standard accounting software as well as Microsoft Office products, including Excel, Word, and PowerPoint; • Experience using Veterinary Practice management software beneficial; • Demonstrated leadership skills with experience supervising a team of staff; We offer a competitive salary and benefits package. If you are interested in a challenging position working in a dynamic team environment please submit your resume and cover letter in confidence by January 15, 2017, via fax, e-mail or regular mail to: Attention: Carrie Sharpin CHRL, Ward & Uptigrove Consulting & Human Resources

Fax: 519-291-1850 E-mail: carries@w-u.on.ca No phone calls please. We thank all applicants for their interest; however only those candidates selected for an interview will be contacted. Eldale Veterinary Clinic is dedicated to maintaining a respectful, fair and equitable work environment, and welcomes submissions from all qualified applicants. The Eldale Veterinary Clinic is committed to providing a barrier free workplace. If accommodation is required during the selection or interview process it will be available upon request. This job posting is available in an accessible format upon request.

FARM SERVICES BAGGED PINE SHAVINGS Agricultural Spray Lime, 22.5kg. bag; feed grade lime, 25kg. Delivered. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-574-4141 or 519-6692045. FERTILIZER AND SEED GRAIN - at competitive pricing. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-574-4141. ICE SALT & ICE MELT - Ice salt comes in 20 & 40kg’s, Ice melt comes in 20kg bags. Call George Haffner Trucking, 519-574-4141 or 519-669-2045. KILN DRIED CORN & CORN SCREENING Delivered by Einwechter. Minimum 15 ton lots. Call George Haffner Trucking 519-574-4141 or 519-669-2045.

FIREWOOD GERBER’S FIREWOOD YOUR source of quality slabwood and seasoned bodywood. All prices include delivery. No Sunday calls please. 519656-2057.

RENTALS 3 BEDROOM HOUSE in country. 2 kms north of Elmira. High efficiency gas furnace. $800/mth + heat. Available Dec. 1. Call 519669-8106.


CLASSIFIED | 23

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

MORE CLASSIFIED LISTINGS FROM PG. 22 AUCTIONS

AUCTION SALE Of Antiques, collectibles, horse related items, household goods & miscellaneous items, to be held at the K.W. Khaki Club, 2939 Nafziger Rd 2 miles south of Wellesley, for The Late Jack & Donna Underwood, Kent Bridge & additions, on

FAMILY ALBUM BIRTHDAY

In Memoriam Israel ‘Isey’ Weber June 20, 1936 – December 5, 2013

ANTIQUES

HOUSEHOLD ITEMS: including bedroom furniture, cedar chest, china cabinet, Christmas décor, humidifiers, heaters, microwave, Richard sewing machine, furniture, etc. MISC. ITEMS: English & Western saddles. General 14in. floor model band saw. Makita router & table. Drill press. Belt sander. Pressure washers. Garden tiller. Hand, power & cordless tools. Leaf blower. Line trimmers. Garden tools, etc. NOTE – The Underwood’s exhibited champion

You are invited to celebrate with Iris and her family Sunday December 4 from 1 - 4pm at St. James Place Hobby Room. 8 Dunke St. N., Elmira Best Wishes only.

McNabb, Wilfred

Bauman, Melinda

Passed away peacefully at home, with his loving family by his side on Sunday, November 27, 2016 at the age of 77. Born in Owen Sound, son of the late James and Gladys (Cook) McNabb. Wilf had a love of cars, snowmobiles, spending time with family and friends. Beloved husband of 50 years to Linda Ann (Snodgrass) McNabb. Loving father of Reid (Pauline) and Kimberly (Paul). Cherished grandfather of Rachel and Crystal.

AUCTIONEERS:

519-699-4451

Predeceased by brothers Lyle and Elgin, brothers-in-law Russ and Marco.

2827 Hutchison Rd., RR#1 Millbank (Crosshill)

Cremation has taken place. A private family burial will be held at Elmira Union Cemetery at a later date As expression of sympathy, and lieu of flowers, donations to Heart and Stroke foundation would be appreciated. Messages and condolences may be left at: tricitycremations.com

Babies of the

! R A E Y 6

Full colour photo of your little one published in the January 12, 2017 edition.

Sadly missed by Sally, family and friends

OBITUARY

Gerber Auctions Ltd.

MORE CLASSIFIED LISTINGS PG. 26

In loving memory of a dear husband, father, Opa and supporting friend of many. Quietly remembered on this day by those whose lives he touched. Unseen, unheard but always near in spirit.

OBITUARY

Also survived by brothers; Wayne (Marge) and Glenn (Dianne), sister; Joan (Harold), sisters-in-law; JoAnne and Pat. Lovingly remembered by Linda’s family; Don (Huguette), Lawrence (Janet), Gerald (Dorothy), Muriel and Lila.

livestock in both Canada & U.S. Many items in this century home still to be unpacked! See www.auctionsfind.com/gerber for photos. Terms – Cash, debit or cheque with I.D. 10% buyer’s premium.

OBITUARY

Happy 75th Birthday Iris Brindley

SATURDAY, DEC. 10TH @ 10:00 A.M.

/ COLLECTIBLES: Jam cupboard. Poster bed. Arrow back and captain’s chairs. Treadle sewing machine. Granite top table. Steamer trunk. Cedar chest. Harness maker’s benches. Butter churn. Brass & other bells. Oil lamps. Butter bowl & other woodenware. Quilts. Tinware. Paintings & prints (many horse related). Beswick horses and dogs. 2 guitars (1 – GWL). Small accordion. Military ammo box and canteen. Clocks. Cane collection. Footed brass pail. Lightening rod & balls. Selection of older Christmas ornaments. Old Royal Winter Fair catalogues, trophies, prize ribbons, etc. Old books & magazines. Tea figurines. Marbles. Board & other games. McDonalds & “Peanuts” collectibles. Toys. Hummel figurines. Carved goose & ducks. Cameras. China & glass (some coloured). Commemorative china. Cuckoo clock.

IN MEMORIAM

201

Passed away peacefully at her residence, RR 3, Wallenstein, on Friday, November 25, 2016, at the age of 62 years. Melinda (Brubacher) Bauman was the wife of Tobias H. Bauman. Mother of Menno (Ruth) Bauman and Hannah (Ervin) Hoover. Grandmother of Amy, Annie, Mary, and Melinda. Sister of Nancy (Simon) Martin, Marion (Jessie) Bauman, Menno (Nancy) Brubacher, all of Gorrie, and Sarah (David) Martin and Lydian (Henry) Martin, all of RR 3, Wallenstein. She was predeceased by her parents Alvin and Saloma (Weber) Brubacher, brother Daniel, and sister Selina. Interment and funeral service took place at Wellesley Township Mennonite Meeting House. Arrangements entrusted to the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira.

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

Hanford, Brian Peacefully passed away on Monday, November 28, 2016 at Chartwell Elmira Long Term Care Residence (Chateau Gardens) at the age of 71 years. Loving husband and best friend of Dianne (Hamilton) Hanford, of Waterloo, for over 36 years. Dear father of Jordan Hanford of Victoria, BC. Beloved brother of Peter (Anne) Hanford of London. Brian will be lovingly remembered by his niece Kim Wilde and family, nephew Jeremy Hanford and family, mother-in-law Irene Hamilton of Elmira, sister-in-law Janet Stroh and family, and brother-in-law Scott Hamilton and family. Predeceased by his parents Victor and Thora Hanford, father-in-law Ken Hamilton, brotherin-law Keith Stroh, and nephew Luke Stroh. At Brian’s request cremation has taken place. There will be no funeral home visitation or funeral service. A celebration of Brian’s life will be held on Friday, December 2, 2016 from 2-4 p.m. at the Elmira Legion, 11 First St. E., Elmira. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer Society Waterloo Wellington or to Chateau Gardens Auxiliary would be appreciated. Many thanks to the entire staff at Chartwell (Chateau Gardens) for the excellent care given to Brian and his family. Arrangements entrusted to the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira.

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

TO BOOK YOUR FAMILY NOTICE: CALL 519-669-5790 EXT 104 | email: drudy@woolwichobserver.com

DEADLINE: Wednesday by 10am

Deadline for submission & payment

Last Name, First Name

Birth Date | Tow n Parents Names

Monday, January 9, 2017

BOOK EARLY!

Email photos & caption information to: ads@woolwichobserver.com

$40 +hst

20-B Arthur St. N., Elmira | 519-669-5790 | www.ObserverXtra.com |

@woolwichnews |

/ObserverXtra


24 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES

SPACE FOR RENT

THOMPSON’S

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

GENERAL SERVICES

Complete Collision Service

Auto Tech Inc.

ARE A

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.

Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

519.669.8330

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial On-The-Farm Service

FAX: 519.669.3210

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

AFTER HOURS

Advertise your business services in our service directory. Weekly exposure with fantastic results! Call Donna at 519.669.5790 Ext 104.

Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400 30 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

519.669.8917

519-669-3232

Your Business Here!

MUSIC-LOVER GIFT ALERT! COUNTR Y

’s 60’s / 70

HIGH SCHOOSL BAND

GOSPEL

MUSIC TRANSFERS FROM LPs, 45s, 78s, CASSETTES TO CD Your favourite albums get a whole new life on CD after we clean up the clicks, pops and surface noise.

MORE INFO | 519.669.0541 EMAIL: vinylp2cd@gmail.com HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

GENERAL SERVICES

www.biobobs.com

While You Wait

SKATE SHARPENING

Various sizes & rates

Call

4

$ 99 FREE!

Visit our website

www.biobob.com

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE

519-648-3004

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

or

5 PAIR th

PER PAIR Stay Sharp This Winter!

or call today!

519-669-4964

ROCK

FREE ESTIMATES Interior/exterior Painting, Wallpapering & Plaster | drywall Repairs NOW ACCEPTING VISA OR MASTERCARD

22 Church St. W., Elmira

519-503-6033 (CELL)

STORE HOURS: M-F 8-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 10-5

36 Hampton St., Elmira

519-669-5537

800-232-6396

John Schaefer Painting

519-669-2251

Steve Co.

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs. 24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

ELMIRA

519-669-3652

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

The Right Window Treatment Can

Save you

Blinds

“25 years in Business”

by Elite or Mera

In home consultations Wide selection of styles & fabrics 1011 Industrial Crescent St. Clements | 519-699-5411 www.LetUsFloorYou.ca

ATION When you buy 3 or more

Hours: M-F 8:30 - 5:30 Sat 9:00 - 3:00

CONSTRUCTION INC. (519) 569-0772

FREE INSTALL

Evenings By Appointment

• Residential • Commercial • Industrial

• Commercial & Industrial General Contracting • Specializing in Concrete Work & Excavation • Retaining Walls

info@trappconstruction.ca www.trappconstruction.ca

• • • •

Randy Weber

Stamped Coloured Concrete Demolition Bin Service Machine Bases

ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

519.669.1462 Fax: 519.669.9970 Tel:

Concrete Breaking & Removal

18 Kingfisher Dr., Elmira

HOME IMPROVEMENTS SERVICES

WINDOW FASHIONS

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS

GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1553 King St. N., St. Jacobs, ON N0B 2N0

Free in-home Consultations. Call someone you can trust.

• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

A Brand You Can Trust 22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

TEL:

519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104 FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

STORE HOURS: M-F: 8-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

AMOS INC

R O O F I N G

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches A Family owned and operated business serving KW, Elmira and surrounding area for over 35 years.

WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED

CALL JAYME FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE.

519.501.2405 | 519.698.2114 In Business since 1973 • Fully Insured

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL - Design and build -

AGRICULTURAL | RESIDENTIAL FRAMING • ROOFING RENOVATIONS • EAVESTROUGHS

Wayne Martin | 519-504-2016 darwayconstruction@icloud.com | Alma, ON

www.marwilconcrete.ca

519-577-0370

OUTDOOR SERVICES

HOME COMFOR LMIRA T

E

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Patios Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Steps Decorative/Stamped and Coloured Concrete

Since 1998

(519) 669-4600

APPLIANCES – FURNACES – FIREPLACES AIR CONDITIONERS – WATER HEATERS SPRING SPECIAL ON AIR CONDITIONING TUNE UP $99, INSTALLED FROM $1999 FURNACES INSTALLED FROM $2499 FRIDGES $499, STOVES $399, WASHERS $399, DRYERS $369, FREEZERS $199 Come visit our show room FREE QUOTES 1 Union Street, Elmira

ehc@hotmail.ca (519)-669-4600

CONCRETE BREAKING SKID STEER SERVICES • ALL ATTACHMENTS AVAILABLE

CALL ABOUT OUR 28FT FLAT BED SERVICE

CALL DUSTIN AT

226-750-4532

•Final grading •Lawn repair & complete seeding well equipped for large stoney areas •Spike Aerator/Overseeding •Natural & Interlocking Stone •Retaining Walls, Walks & Patios •Help for Top Water & Drainage issue

Murray & Daniel Shantz

ALMA, ONTARIO | PHONE: 519.846.5427


CLASSIFIED | 25

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

MAKING A MOVE? WE CAN HELP! Alli Bauman SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

allibauman@rogers.com

December 3, 1-3pm 18 Brookmead Street, Elmira OPEN HOUSE Saturday,

NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

Elmira - Beautiful 2-storey, 3 beds 3 bath. All appliances incl. Fully-fenced yard, extra deep garage. MLS.

paul@remaxsolidgold.biz

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

226-750-9332

Thinking About Selling? Call today and book a FREE

suewidemanhomes@gmail.com

HOME EVALUATION

December 3, 1-3pm 1 Pheasant Drive, Elmira OPEN HOUSE Saturday,

Mount Forest This 35 acre property features a mix of bush & wet areas. Great building site for future hobby farm, dream home, or perfect retreat location. MLS.

$385,000

$349,900

Sue Wideman

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CALL DIRECT

519-577-6248 519-503-9533

3 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5426 Kitchener - This n e w e r semi-detached home is move in ready! Open concept, 3 beds, 3baths, 129 ft deep lot backing onto green space. Near all amenities! MLS.

Paul Martin

Elmira - Beautiful large maple trees line the yard on this quiet corner lot. Updates-furnace, water softener, reverse osmosis, garage door, windows & granite counter top. MLS.

$198,000

$416,900

$416,900

$419,900

Elmira - Order the finishes that you want in this 1555sqft. 2-Storey, semi-detached Verdone home. MLS.

Elmira - Choose your finishes in this 2 bedroom semi-detached bungalow. MLS.

Drayton – Yet to be built bungalow. Pick your finishes & colors throughout the house. MLS.

Brubacher

Office:

519-669-2772

BROKER

“HELPING YOU IS WHAT WE DO.”

OPEN HOUSE

90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 4, Elmira N3B 3L4

Shanna

519-669-3192

7032 FLORADALE RD., FLORADALE

$849,900 An absolutely beautiful 5.24 acre private mature setting. Many unique and exciting features are included in the property. Remarkable attention to detail in the gorgeous entertainers kitchen offering an oversized granite island, built in Electrolux appliances, infloor heating, separate dining area ideal for entertaining guests. Main floor master suite with 2 way fireplace & lavish ensuite. Detached triple car garage/workshop, basement access to arched brick tunnel leads to press house/wine room with walkout to patio. A must see home. MLS.

BROKER

PARADIGM (ELMIRA) HOMES SOUTHWOOD ESTATES * Front elevation may differ from rendering.

EXECUTIVE freehold town homes now under construction

PRICES STARTING FROM $386,900. Bungalow and

bungalow loft plans. Reserve yours today. Please contact Shanna or Bonnie for details. EXCLUSIVE.

WHAT’S YOUR HOME WORTH? CALL TODAY FOR A FREE HOME MARKET EVALUATION. Private Sale - Open House Sat. Dec. 3 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.

45 Arthur St. S., Elmira www.thurrealestate.com

BRAD MARTIN

JULIE

LUKE

SHANTZ Broker of Record, HECKENDORN Broker Sales Rep. MVA Residential Res: 519.669.1068 Cell: 519.588.7562 Cell: 519.584.4400

Rozema

www.YourFamilyTeam.ca

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 3TH • 1-3PM

LET OUR 50+ YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WORK FOR YOU!

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD.

Bonnie INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED

$448,900

Drayton – Yet to be built Foxwood-model 2-storey. 2076 sqft. Will build to suit. MLS.

BROKERAGE

WOLLE REALTY , BROKERAGE

$389,000

LISTINGS NEEDED! Are you curious about the current value of your property on this hot market? We have a range of buyers looking to take the next step towards their real estate goals. Ask us how we can get you top dollar for your home! *not intended to solicit properties already listed for sale.

CALL FOR YOUR FREE MARKET EVALUATION

PRACTICING JUST LIKE THE JUNIOR SQUAD

7271 4th Line, Wallenstein

$639,000 | 3+1 Bdrm, 5min from Floradale. Many upgrades including, full ICF construction, geothermal, 40yr roof, bonus room above 2 car garage, hrdwd and ceramic floors, concrete driveway, composite deck, concrete patio and much more. Main floor includes foyer, great room, dining room, kitchen with cherry cabinets, laundry, powder room, 2 bdms complete with shared full ensuite, master suite with ensuite, walk in closet, and hottub. Partially finished basement. Dishwasher and over the range microwave are included.

For more information call 226.622.9762

SPACE FOR RENT Your Business Here! Advertise your business services in our service directory. Weekly exposure with fantastic results! Call Donna at 519.669.5790 Ext 104.

The Elmira Sugar Kings ran a special practice on Nov. 24, sharing their hockey talents and expertise with the Novice AE Woolwich Wildcat players, aged eight and nine. The teams played a game of shinny together, as well as ran drills. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]


26 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

ELMIRA PLAYS HOST TO BONSPIEL

MORE CLASSIFIED LISTINGS FROM PAGE 23 PUBLIC NOTICE “PROUDLY REMEMBERING OUR PAS T; CONFIDENTLY EMBRACING OUR FUTURE.�

Community Information Page

P.O. Box 158

24 Church St. W. Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6

Notice of Public Meeting Township of Woolwich Remediation Advisory Committee (RAC)

Thursday, December 8, 2016 519-575-4400 www.woolwich.ca Council Chambers, 2 Floor Administration Building, 24 Church Street West, Elmira 4:00 p.m. Public Meeting

Phone: 519-669-1647 or 877-969-0094 Fax: 519-669-1820 After Hours nd Emergency:

“PROUDLY REMEMBERING OUR PAS T; CONFIDENTLY EMBRACING OUR FUTURE.�

TownshipCommunity of Woolwich Launches New Innovative InformationWebsite Page

P.O. Box 158

24 Church St. W. Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6

We are pleased to announce the launch of our new website on December 2nd, 2016! Visit our new site at www.woolwich.ca.

Phone: 519-669-1647 or 877-969-0094 Fax: 519-669-1820 After Hours Emergency:

519-575-4400 www.woolwich.ca

SMALL ADS, BIG IMPACT. THE OBSERVER CLASSIFIED ADS

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS $ : $ . / 2 & , % 5 $ 1 . , ' / ' ( 6 3 < 6 2 8 . < 5 * $ 9 ( , 5 + , 7 ( 0 ) ( : , 6 ' 7 + ( 3 , $ ) $ ) 5 2 7 < . (

(

' 2 0 < 2

GENERAL SERVICES

( 0 7 5 $ 2 5 5 7 : / < + $ 5 , ; = 6 + $ 1 , &

( 9 ( 1

1 2 5 7 +

' $ % 8 5 % , 2

' : , 6 < 0 3 $ $ 5 3 ' 2 / 8 6 ( / < 7 1 6 / 2

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SUDOKU CHALLENGE

Visit the website at www.woolwich.ca and provide feedback on the site by going to the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Feedbackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; section on the home page. Comments can also be provided by calling 519-669-1647 or emailing woolwich.mail@woolwich.ca.

[WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER]

CROSSWORD PUZZLER

The new website was designed with a few goals in mind including a clean and simple appearance, ease of navigation and content and functionality that was driven by the needs of the end users â&#x20AC;&#x201C; residents, businesses, investors and visitors.

The Elmira & District Curling Club hosted teams from Arthur, Ayr, Elmira, Elora, Fergus, Galt Curling, Galt Country, the Guelph Curling Club, K-W Granite, Plattsville, Stratford and Westmount for the championship of the Home Hardware Bonspiel on Nov. 19.


LIVING HERE | 27

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

LIVING HERE COMMUNITY SPIRIT / MAKING A DIFFERENCE

Wellesley citizenship awards recognize work of volunteers

Wellesley and District Board of Trade honours the contributions of active community members by naming them as the township’s citizen of the year, junior citizen and lifetime award recipient

CHEF’S TABLE/ DIERRE ACHESON

December brings Christmas… and lots of goodies

WHITNEY NEILSON THREE WELLESLEY TOWNSHIP VOLUNTEERS have not gone unnoticed by the Wellesley and District Board of Trade. Henry Brick, Jamie Reid and Maddi Da Rosa each received a Wellesley Citizen of the Year award last weekend. Brick was awarded the Lifetime Award, Reid was given the Citizen of the Year Award and Da Rosa received the Junior Citizen of the Year Award. A retired Waterloo Regional Police officer, Brick was heavily involved in all aspects of the community during his 26 years there. He’s since moved back to Waterloo, but the award is just as special as it would be if he still lived there. “It’s very, very satisfying and it’s a great honour to receive it because it was by the board of trade and that’s a group of volunteers. And they’re looking at me and saying, ‘hey you did a good thing over the years,’” Brick said. His volunteerism includes serving as a member of the Lions Club, collecting for the Arthritis Society, fundraising and coordinating donations for residents who lost their belongings in the Runstedler fire, president of minor sports, coaching softball, a member of the Wellesley Trails Association including helping build a portion of the trail along the pond, driv-

RECIPE NOTES

Maddi Da Rosa was named Wellesley’s Junior Citizen of the Year for her volunteer efforts in the township. She’s one of three Citizen of the Year Award recipients who were awarded last week by the Wellesley and District Board of Trade. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER] considering how involved He notes how he set the spirit of giving back in the ing patients to the hospital his parents are with all example for his grandtownship. for the Cancer Society, and aspects of the community. son Derek Brick who was “Not only do volunteers helping out at the annual Reid has been part of the named Junior Citizen of get involved with projects, Kids and Cops event. Paradise and District Lions the Year last year and how but they mentor and coach, Volunteering was just a Club, the Apple Butter and Bob Reid set the example they set an example and natural thing to do. Cheese Festival committee, for his son Jamie. they present a lot of op“Volunteers make things president of the Wellesley “It’s just part of my reportunities for the younger work, volunteers make Curling Club, coached both sponsibilities. I’ve been a generation to get involved. things happen. Wellesley the Twin Centre Hericanes volunteer most of my adult That is something that is is a particularly good exand Twin Centre Stars, as life and I will continue to not always thought about ample,” Brick said. well as doing volunteer firebe one as long as possible,” with volunteers. You’re inIn his acceptance speech fighting. Brick said. fluencing the next generahe noted how it’s up to the “My dad, he was the CitiJamie Reid is also no tion of volunteers, and to adult volunteers to influstranger to lending a hand, me that is very important,” ence the next generation AWARDS | 29 which isn’t surprising Brick said. and continue on with the

It is a good idea to have the alignment checked on your vehicle, especially if you just put on a new set of winter tires. A poorly aligned vehicle will greatly reduce the life of your tires and can also cause poor handling on wet and slippery roads. Every purchase of four new tires at Leroy’s include a complimentary alignment inspection to make sure your new tires last! – Merlin

IT’S DECEMBER – LET the Christmas entertaining begin! Well, who am I kidding? We had our first Christmas catering three weeks ago. It felt way too early, but for busy people, early is usually better. Our team was lucky enough to be at the Lions Hall for An Affair to Remember last weekend. It was our first time attending that event, and it was great to see so many smiling faces. The night out was a well deserved break after a busy week in the shop. As I looked around the table, I was amazed at how much our little team has grown over the last few years – it takes a lot of people to make our business the success it is. I always feel grateful to be surrounded by such amazing talent and personality. In keeping with the season, our store now has a festive vibe. December is here, and the goodies will be rolling out just about everywhere you go. Perhaps these featuring some holiday staples – cranberries and, of course, chocolate – one will be on offer at your place. Happy cooking! CHEF’S TABLE | 29

Tel: (519) 669-1082 Fax: (519) 669-3084 info@leroysautocare.net 20 Oriole Parkway E., Elmira, ON

www.leroysautocare.net

Accredited Test & Repair Facility


28 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

“A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

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Rugs and Upholstery

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COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

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ST. TERESA OF AVILA Christmas Fundraising Dinner. The meal begins at 6 p.m. Tickets can be ordered through the parish office, Monday to Friday 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. by calling 519-669-3387. Tickets are limited: $16 adults, children 6-12 $8, under 5 free.

Truck & Trailer Maintenance

DECEMBER 4

Cardlock Fuel Management

YOU ARE INVITED TO the Annual Community Carol Sing, an evening of Advent and Christmas Music presented by Elmira area churches at 7 p.m. at St. Teresa of Avila Church. Admission is free. A freewill offering can be made to support Woolwich Counseling Centre. Reception to follow in the church hall. Everyone welcome.

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR

DECEMBER 6 CHRISTMAS READY – HOLIDAY eating, recipe makeover and dining out. Using our OTN technology, Southlake dietitians and diabetes educators will present this interactive workshop from 10 a.m to 12 p.m. at the Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs.

M&G MILLWRIGHTS LTD. • Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

DECEMBER 8 WOODSIDE EVERGREEN FELLOWSHIP FOR Seniors - 10:30 a.m. at Woodside Bible Fellowship, 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira. Grand Harmony Chorus - Songs of the Christmas Season in female barbershop style. Reading: Carol McKinley, Devotional: Pastor Gordon Weight. Suggested

MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS

519.669.5105 1540 FLORDALE ROAD

E-MAIL: ads@woolwichobserver.com

donation $7 includes hot lunch at noon. For more information call Reta Malloy at 519-669-8752.

519-669-8362

DECEMBER 14

www.elmiravacuumelectrical.ca

SENIORS’ LUNCH CLUB AT the Breslau Community Centre. Community Cares Concepts invites you to join us for a light lunch. Cost $6. Call 519-6641900 by Dec. 5 to sign up.

SENIORS’ COMMUNITY DINING - Community Care Concepts invites you to join us for a hot noonday meal at Calvary United Church, St. Jacobs. Cost $11. Call 519-664-1900 by noon on Dec. 12 to sign up.

NEW HORIZONS - ENJOY coffee or tea and a delicious snack. Topic: Walking in the Shoes of an Ugandan Grandmother, Carol Barnhardt, 4G’s Guelph Go Go Grandmothers and the Stephen Lewis Foundation; $2 per person, 10-11:30 a.m. at the Maryhill Community Centre. For more information call Joan Haid at 519-648-2742 or email at jehaid@xplorenet.ca.

BABY FOOD BASICS: 6 months to 1 year. Learn how to make and store baby food, what foods are good for your baby’s age and stage, and learn ways to nurture a “good eater.” Join Robin Hicken, RD for this free session at the Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs, on Monday, 2-3:30 p.m.

DECEMBER 9

DECEMBER 21

COMMUNITY CAN DINE, WHERE the entire community comes together to meet and eat. Please join us at Trinity United Church, Elmira. Dinner is served from 6-7:30 p.m. Menu for this month: Christmas einner (turkey and all the fixings). Pay what you can! Everyone welcome. For more information, please contact Kelly at WCS (519-669-5139) or the church office (519669-5560).

SENIORS’ COMMUNITY DINING AND Seniors’ Lunch Club. Community Care Concepts invites you to join us for a hot noonday meal at Linwood Community Centre. Cost $11. Please call 519-6641900 by Dec. 19 to sign up.

DECEMBER 11 ELMIRA LEGION HUNGRYMAN BREAKFAST to benefit Woolwich Sledge Hockey. Join us anytime between 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Adults $6, 6-10 yrs $3, Under 5 free. All you can eat.

9 Church St. E., Elmira

Tuesday - Friday, 9am-5:30pm

Saturday, 9am-3pm

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DECEMBER 19

DECEMBER 23 HUGS (HEALTH, UNDERSTANDING, GROWTH, Sharing) at the Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs. For parents and children (0-5 years of age) living in the catchment area of WCHC. 9:30-11 a.m. on the second and fourth Friday of every month. Upcoming sessions: Dec. 9, Ho-Ho-Ho Visit with Santa, Christmas activities; Dec. 23, Survival Tips for the Holiday, cookie exchange.

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PLACES OF FAITH | A DIRECTORY OF LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP

Sunday, December 4th 9:15 AM & 11:00 AM

St. James Lutheran Church

9 am: Christian Education 10:15 am: Worship Pastor: Hans J.W. Borch

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Zion Mennonite Fellowship 9:30am Sunday School

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It’s a Wonderful Life

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HEARING ASSISTED

Discovering God Together

Speaker: Les Frey

4522 Herrgott Rd., Wallenstein www.wbconline.ca • 519-669-2319

“The King’s Arrival” (A study of Matthew)

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Elmira Mennonite Church

Worship: 9:30am

Second Sunday of Advent 11 am Introduction to Watchmaker – Abilities and Disabilities by Del Gingrich

REACH OUT

58 Church St. W., Elmira • 519-669-5123

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LIVING HERE | 29

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

AWARDS: Active volunteers encourage others to do the same FROM | 27

zen of the Year I believe in 1994. He’s involved in the Lions Club, the Wellesley Christmas Tyme Parade. I was volunteering with him probably before I was old enough to volunteer. I kind of followed him around for 20 years or so and then got into everything myself,” Reid said. He can’t neglect to mention his mom Susan, who also has been a strong volunteer with the Lions Club, the ABC Festival and the Wellesley Christmas Tyme Parade. He encourages other Wellesley residents to step up and volunteer, mentioning how the community wouldn’t be what it is without the efforts of volunteers. “I see Wellesley as being a great town with a lot of potential. I love the town of Wellesley and I feel the need to give back and help the community,” Reid said. Reid doesn’t pick one volunteer effort as more meaningful than any other, but says the ABC Festival is the largest, being the biggest fundraiser for the village. He, like all three recipients, was surprised to receive the award.

Sauder, the board of trade’s treasurer. Sauder helps run a lot of community activities and when she asked Da Rosa to volunteer, Da Rosa says she had no reason to say no. “I think volunteering to help out with Theatre Wellesley would be my favourite. I am with them their entire season and I help them rehearse their lines and I help with the prompting. I help with costumes and I help with makeup and I’m there for all their tech rehearsals and dress rehearsals and I get to see the final product on stage. It’s very rewarding,” De Rosa said. Volunteering has helped her step out of her comfort zone, something she recommends for anyone thinking about becoming a volunteer. She says the award is humbling because she didn’t know anyone had noticed her work, she was just doing it for fun and to get involved with her new community. “It’s definitely rewarding and people respect that you are out and volunteering. It’s a very small community so you get to know everyone and everyone knows you.”

Henry Brick was named the Lifetime Citizen of the Year and Jamie Reid received the Citizen of the Year Award. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER] “It’s nice to be recognized found out she was nominated for it. for the work that you do. “I help out with Art I’m sure there’s many othRound the Pond every year. ers that deserve it just as I do the button booth and much, if not more than I do. It’s definitely an honour I work with kids all day. I also do the Wellesley Soap and it’s very humbling to Box Derby. I help set it up know that people actually see what you do in the com- and I help with the timing. I’m also in Theatre Wellesmunity and to be recogley. I’ve helped with a few nized for that,” Reid said. of their plays and I’ve been Da Rosa only moved to in one and I’d say that’s Wellesley two years ago but my favourite part of being jumped in feet first. The here,” Da Rosa said. Grade 11 student works at She said her mom played the Wellesley arena and a huge role in getting her volunteers in her spare involved. Her mom intime. She didn’t even know troduced her to Wendy the award existed until she

CHEF’S TABLE: Chocolate and

cranberries are two staples on the menu at Christmastime

FROM | 27

Cranberry White Chocolate Petit Pots de Creme 13 oz milk 1/2 cup 35% cream 2 vanilla beans Or 2 tsp. of vanilla extract 1 egg, 3 egg yolks 4 oz sugar 1/2 cup white chocolate 1/4 cup fresh or frozen cranberries

Scald milk in a small pot with vanilla bean and seeds inside, do not boil. Allow the vanilla paste to steep for 7 minutes.

20-B Arthur St. N., Elmira | 519-669-5790 | www.ObserverXtra.com

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Lots of Floats, Bands, Giveaways & Much More

Entry forms available at www.elmirakiwanisclub.com

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

HUNGRY for MORE?

The Kiwanis Club of Elmira Presents:

Starts at 10am

Whisk egg yolks and sugar for about 2 minutes – it should be light yellow and fluffy. Temper the egg mixture by adding the scalded cream in small increments, whisking all the time. Add chocolate, whisk in. Pour into ramekins or cups, leaving 1” from the top, add cranberries Place in bain marie with the hot water running twothirds up the ramekins. Cover with foil and place in oven at 300 F until middle is jiggly and the outside is firm. Allow to cool and serve.


30 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

STRANGE BUT TRUE / BILL & RICH SONES PH.D.

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had such an impact on the planet that we could enter the Anthropocene WEIRD NOTES

Q. Jurassic, Cretaceous, Pleistoceneâ&#x20AC;Ś and now Holocene, which began some 12,000 years ago â&#x20AC;&#x201D; such epochs comprise a complex geologic time scale, characterizing how Earth evolved. But some scientists are beginning to wonder if the impact of humans on our planet calls for the naming of a new epoch â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the Anthropocene (â&#x20AC;&#x153;anthropoâ&#x20AC;? meaning â&#x20AC;&#x153;humanâ&#x20AC;?). Why seriously consider it? A. Writing in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scien-

tific Americanâ&#x20AC;? magazine, paleobiologist Jan Zalasiewicz describes a number of

human geological signatures which will persist for eons. Since World War II we have extracted and purified enough aluminum to â&#x20AC;&#x153;coat the entire U.S. in kitchen foil,â&#x20AC;? with pure aluminum â&#x20AC;&#x153;becoming part of modern sediment layers.â&#x20AC;? Today the annual production of plastics is â&#x20AC;&#x153;roughly equivalent to the total human body mass,â&#x20AC;? and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve manufactured â&#x20AC;&#x153;about a kilogram (2.2 pounds) of concrete for every square meter (about a square yard) of the earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s surface.â&#x20AC;? Human-created smoke particles falling to the ground worldwide form â&#x20AC;&#x153;a geologically lasting smoke signal.â&#x20AC;? And astonishingly, â&#x20AC;&#x153;humans shift more sediment than natural forces such as rivers and wind do.â&#x20AC;?

At about a third of the mass of all land vertebrates, homo sapiens is now the dominant predator on land and sea. As such, â&#x20AC;&#x153;we are killing so many species that in another century or two the planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s biodiversity could take as catastrophic a hit as the one that happened when the dinosaurs disappeared.â&#x20AC;? Think about it! Q. How does your cell phone make you happy by lying to you?

A. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lyingâ&#x20AC;? in the sense of distracting you from the natural and unavoidable frequent silences that occur during conversation, says Dan Lewis in his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now I Know More.â&#x20AC;? During everyday conversation, there is constant background noise â&#x20AC;&#x201D; air

conditioning, paper shuffling, birds calling. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These tiny background sounds arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t interrupting your conversations, though. Subconsciously, we anticipate them (this is often, in aggregate, called â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;white noiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;), and they act as a signal to our brains that allâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s normal.â&#x20AC;? By one estimate, about 50% of most conversations is silence. When a cell phone speaker lapses into silence, the other conversant with no visual clues wonders aloud: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are you there?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is everything OK?â&#x20AC;? So many cell phone companies include synthetic background noise (â&#x20AC;&#x153;comfort noiseâ&#x20AC;?) to fill in the dead periods. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All the sounds we hear on our cell phones are just data bits being

translated into sound, and transmitting that data takes up bandwidth,â&#x20AC;? so even cell phone â&#x20AC;&#x153;silenceâ&#x20AC;? has a cost. Q. Imagine you run a charity distributing lifesaving water purification chemicals to households in a remote village in Africa, but your stockpile is limited. If you offer the chemicals at no charge, nearly every household accepts them but only about a third actually use them. Wastage would decline if you charge a nominal fee, but even a small fee would discourage the poorest families most in need of water purification. What to do?

nomics professor Pascaline Dupas and her colleagues. The vouchers could then be redeemed for the chemicals at a local retail shop, writes Benjamin Olken in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Scienceâ&#x20AC;? magazine. It turns out that only those who really wanted to treat their water redeemed the vouchersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;reducing wastage by almost 90%â&#x20AC;&#x201D; yet the overall usage rate remained about the same at a third of families. Observes Olken: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whereas money is particularly scarce for the poor, time is not, and so time costs can be used to screen.â&#x20AC;?

A. Introduce a small

Bill is a journalist, Rich holds a doctorate in physics. Together the brothers bring you â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strange But True.â&#x20AC;? Send your questions to strangetrue@compuserve.com.

hassle by offering free vouchers instead of free chemicals, suggest eco-

ABOUT THE AUTHORS

OBSERVER CROSSWORD PUZZLER

ACROSS 1. Up and at â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em 5. Correct, as text 10. Light bulb units 15. Centers of activity 16. Indian load carrier 17. Thai currency 18. Stuff in a muffin 19. Solar system mobile 20. Urban transit system 21. Pirate captain of legend 23. Demolitionistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supply 24. Sideshow spiel 26. Humble in manner 29. First instrument heard in the Beatlesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leaving Homeâ&#x20AC;? 31. 100 qintars 32. Catch a glimpse of 35. ____ as a rock 37. ___ & Gabbana 39. Former French coin 40. A little of this, a little

of that 41. Problem drinker, e.g. 44. A resident of Kyrgyzstan 46. Bad-tempered 47. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ on Down the Roadâ&#x20AC;? 50. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Mariaâ&#x20AC;? 51. Something to kick 52. Word with â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;openedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; or â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;marriedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; 54. Like some humor 55. 1952 Winter Olympics site 56. Stan who created Spider-Man 57. Bookkeeping entry 59. Precious amount? 60. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The coast __ clearâ&#x20AC;? 62. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We ___ People...â&#x20AC;? 64. â&#x20AC;&#x153;La Vie en Roseâ&#x20AC;? singer 65. Alternative to a fade 66. Little one

DOWN 1. Priestly garb 2. Have an effect 3. Superfood 4. If you please 5. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To ___ is human ...â&#x20AC;? 6. Willing sacrifice 7. Neck and neck 8. Word with magnetic or true 9. Home improvement letters 11. Assist in wrongdoing 12. Schoolyard report? 13. Losing come-out roll in craps 14. Baby deliverers, symbolically 16. Gift-tag word 20. Tree thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tapped 22. â&#x20AC;&#x153;__ as I say â&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? 24. Lacking wit or imagination 25. Secretary, e.g. 27. Ace

28. Careless 30. Full-price payers 33. Kind of bean 34. Range of understanding 36. Slap on 38. Algonquian Indian 40. Sinatraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;__ Wayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 42. Get-up-and-go 43. Capri, e.g. 45. Microbe 46. Plate appearance that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t count as an AB 48. Cobblerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tool 49. #13 51. Conversation starter 52. 007â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s doctor foe 53. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;50s audiophileâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s purchase 58. Take the witness stand 61. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Roxanaâ&#x20AC;? author 63. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Listen!â&#x20AC;? 64. Frisk, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;downâ&#x20AC;?

















  





















 







 











 

 

 





















 















OPEN 24 HOURS | 7 DAYS A WEEK

 

 



DELIV SER ERY AVAILVICE Call fo ABLE rD

 

etails

315 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5403



SUDOKU CHALLENGE

HOW TO PLAY: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. We have got you started with a few numbers already placed in the boxes.

    

   

 

 

    

    

 


LIVING HERE | 31

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

New van for EDCL the result of longtime fundraising by Woolwich Community Lions WHITNEY NEILSON IT TOOK FIVE YEARS, countless fundraisers and the efforts of the entire club, but this week the Woolwich Community Lions finally handed over the keys for an accessible van to Elmira District Community Living. It’s been a long time coming, so the group gathered on Monday night to take a look at the van, recognize the community partners who helped make it a possibility, and to celebrate. “It feels fantastic,” said club member Linda Litt. “It’s been a dream of a lot of people for a long time and we really wanted to support the association because they do such wonderful work. We really wanted to support them in a tangible way that would help a number of people over a number of years. It just feels great.” They expected it to take them five years to raise the $60,000 to purchase the van, as they were also working on a commitment for the Lions Resource Centre for Woolwich Community Services, as well as numerous other local and

The Woolwich Community Lions took a moment this week to celebrate five years of fundraising which led to them purchasing an accessible van for Elmira District Community Living. The club and the community partners who helped along the way joined them for dinner at the Lions Hall on Monday night. [WHITNEY NEILSON / THE OBSERVER] national projects, like refurbishing the band stand in Elmira’s Gore Park. They also support a lot of smaller projects, like service dogs and camps for people with autism throughout Ontario. “We looked at a number of different projects within the town that we thought would be helpful for the community, and they came in and made a presentation. ... It was one of a number that we were looking at.

The Elmira District Community Living does such great work that we wanted to help,” Litt said. Their main fundraiser for the van each year was the Drive A Ford event. Ford donated $20 from each test drive during the event towards the project. Elmira Foodland lent them more than half their parking lot for the day each year as well as a classic car show. The Elmira Lions –

their male counterparts – helped them out with a barbeque for the event. “Cowboy Up, every year they came and played, rain or shine. And it was a lot of rain,” she said with a laugh. They added to the proceeds with money from other fundraisers, like Affair to Remember, which ran last weekend and will run again this coming weekend. It’s their largest fundraiser every year.

Blue Box Giveaway Saturday, December 10, 2016, 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.

They also used some of the proceeds from their trivia night in February and their chicken barbeque in the spring. The van will allow residents in wheelchairs to get to and from day programs, doctor appointments and to visit family. “The association works very hard to provide the clients with a rich social life. This gives them the ability to get out and about,” Litt

said. She’s thankful for the community partnerships which have made their goal a reality, and the dedicated group of ladies in the club. “We would not have been able to do it without the community. They have always supported us really, really well. It’s one of the joys of living in a small community where people are so very giving and supportive.”

BIGGE R SIZE!

Where:

Woolwich Memorial Centre, 24 Snyder Avenue S., Elmira (Northwest parking lot behind Lions Hall. Enter from South Street West.) While supplies last

How: n

One per household

n

Proof of residency required

n

First come, first served

The new bigger size will help you recycle more cans, cartons, bottles and jars, but is not mandatory.

Get prepared for the new curbside collection changes starting March 2017! See www.regionofwaterloo.ca/wastechanges for more information. Non-perishable donations to support local the Food Bank are welcome.

www.woolwich.ca 519-669-6026

www.regionofwaterloo.ca/waste 519-575-4400 TTY 519-575-4608


32 | BACK PAGE

THE OBSERVER | THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

LENDING A HAND WITH POINSETTIA SALE

BLOWOUT DEALS!

Charita Horst (left) and Heidi Harris from Kindred Credit Union donated some of their time last Friday to sort and deliver plenty of poinsettias and wreaths for Woolwich Community Services’ annual fundraising sale. [LIZ BEVAN / THE OBSERVER]

SALES START TODAY!

SPLASH PAD: Moving ahead with fundraising FROM | COVER

water features designed to stimulate users’ gross and fine motor skills, installed on a 65-by-50-foot pad As well, there will be “aesthetically pleasing water displays,” she added. After noting her company has built some 75 such splash pads in Ontario, most of them in smaller communities, Elliott was asked by Coun. Larry Shantz if an admission charge was applied to any of the projects. That’s not the case in any of the municipalities, he was told. In response to a question about maintenance costs posed by Coun. Patrick Merlihan, she said the Breslau facility was being designed with relatively few moving parts, which would reduce

the number of parts that would need to be replaced. She estimated annual maintenance costs at $250 to $300, mainly for valves, nozzles and o-rings. Director of recreation and facilities Ann McArthur said her department will be looking at the length of the season and operating hours as ways to help control costs, with an assessment after the first year to determine how to tweak the operation. For Coun. Mark Bauman, however, the costs are most likely at the mercy of the weather. A cool summer will see fewer kids turn up, thus reducing water usage. A hot summer would mean just the opposite, he noted. “It’s really an uncontrollable budget amount,” he

Give the Gift of HOME

said, likening it to the budget for snow clearing. Current plans for the development don’t include washrooms or changerooms, though there will be some overlap with the hours of operation at the community centre. Portable toilets may have to suffice until a longer-term solution comes along. With council’s approval this week, the Breslau Lions can now ramp up its ongoing fundraising efforts, with organizer Jeff Barnard noting the formal endorsement is needed to tap into larger corporate donors in particular. The club is hoping to open the splash pad next year in conjunction with the Lions Club’s 100th anniversary internationally.

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Barrier free:

Local fundraising committee members: Brad Martin, Naomi Freiburger, Dan Driedger, Vi Radcliffe, Grant Bauman, Linda Palmer, Ken Martin, Gloria Martin

• Accessible without steps • Elevator to all floors • Wide doors • Several units have step-in showers

Help us create new barrier-free affordable rental housing in Elmira. DONATE TODAY. CONTACT US TO DONATE: Executive Director

ddriedger@mennohomes.com 226-476-2535

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This project enables people to stay in our community so they can maintain their existing relationships while developing new ones. It avoids placing our most vulnerable community members in situations of isolation. Staying in Elmira also lessens the burden for families, knowing that their loved ones’ housing needs are being met locally.

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1362 VICTORIA STREET N. KITCHENER 519.742.9188 MON-FRI 9AM-9PM SATURDAY 9AM-6PM SUNDAY 11AM-5PM

December 1, 2016  

The Observer