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Animated about Pixar opportunity > STORY ON PG. 15

VOLUME.....16 ISSUE..........21

SATURDAY, MAY 28, 2011

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Council orders Collision near Wallenstein claims Kitchener man peer review of Jigs Hollow A gravel pit’s visual impact James Jackson

Kitchener man is dead following a two-car crash west of Elmira Wednesday afternoon. The head-on collision occurred around 1:15 p.m. near the intersection of Line 86 and Mallott Road, just outside of Wallenstein. 74-year-old Gerald Wagner, one of the drivers, was pronounced dead at the scene after firefighters and other emergency crews attempted to revive him using CPR. Wagner was travelling westbound on 86 when the collision occurred. A passenger in the vehicle, a 70-year-old Waterloo woman, was taken to hospital by ambulance with non-life- threatening injuries. The driver of the other vehicle, a 56-year-old West Montrose woman, was eastbound at the time of the crash and was airlifted to hospital with non-life- threatening injuries after the jaws of life were used to extricate her from the vehicle. There were no other passengers in the car. Sgt. Mike Hinsperger of the Waterloo Regional Police traffic services division said police are still investigating the cause of the crash, but say alcohol, speed, weather and road conditions

Steve Kannon

R

WEEKEND WEATHER

COLLISION PROVES FATAL A paramedic rushes » JAMES JACKSON

to the scene of a two-car collision on Line 86 west of Elmira on Wednesday afternoon. The driver of one of the vehicles, 74-year-old Gerald Wagner of Kitchener, was pronounced dead at the scene.

PHOTO

esidents opposed to a gravel pit proposed for Winterbourne won a small victory this week, as Woolwich council pressed to have a visual-impact study reviewed by a third party. The move counters a planning staff recommendation against forcing a peer review of a study previously submitted by Kuntz Topsoil, Sand and Gravel. Staff maintained its position there would be “no unacceptable visual impacts” from the pit, planned for 125 Peel St. In a split decision May 24, however, councillors vote 3-2 in favour of the peer review, siding with residents who argued both the applicant’s consultant and township staff had failed to identify the full extent of what a gravel pit would look like in the midst of the pastoral Winterbourne Valley. The decision follows a persuasive presentation last month > SEE GRAVEL ON PG. 06

SATURDAY Cloudy

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SUNDAY

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> SEE FATALITY ON PG. 05

27°

Opinion...............10 Business.............13

Living Here..........15 Sports...............18

Entertainment...22 Classifieds.........23


NEWS 2

THE OBSERVER

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front-end loaders and miscellaneous farm equipment, to sell associated parts and to repair the equipment they make on site. The sale of the land to Tube-Line is conditional on obtaining the necessary zone change. No one spoke against the proposal at Tuesday’s public meeting, but the township received one letter from a neighbour concerned about noise from forklifts. Head noted loading would be done at the rear of the building, away from neighbours. Renovations to the existing structures would include soundproofing. As well, where the wood-processing business saw 15 trucks a day accessing the site, the new use would require only five. The May 24 meeting was for information only – no decisions will be made until planning staff have reviewed the application and report back to council at a later date.

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vacant industrial site west of Elmira could be home to an established farm-equipment manufacturer under a plan discussed in a public planning session at Tuesday night’s meeting of Woolwich council. Tube-Line Manufacturing, currently located near Wallenstein in Wellesley Township, is looking for room to expand. The 18-acre site at 6455 Reid Woods Dr., already home to three industrial buildings, fits the bill, planner Sam Head told councillors. The company is running out of room at its current location. The move to Woolwich would bring 35 jobs, with the possibility of more due to expansion. Tube-Line makes balewrappers and loaders for farm use. The land is currently zoned agricultural with a site-specific provision to allow for the previous business,

Elmira Wood Products. A zone change is needed to accommodate the proposed new use, explained director of engineering and planning Dan Kennaley. Prior to the woodprocessing company, the site was home to an egg-grading operation. Allowing Tube-Line to relocate there would bring the site back to its farm-related roots, said Head, a planner with Kitchener-based Dryden, Smith and Head. Because most of the site is covered with buildings, parking lots and drives, it can’t be used as farmland. In fact, it hasn’t been farmed in decades, he added. “This is zoned as prime agricultural land, but it’s not agricultural in any way.” Vacant for about two years, the site’s previous use was not farm-related. Under the proposed new zoning, Tube-Line would be permitted to manufacture bale-wrappers,

*May not be exactly as shown. While quantities last. IN STOCK ITEMS ONLY.

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» Saturday, May 28, 2011

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

3 NEWS

> Woolwich seeks insurance boost for volunteer firefighters

WINNING LINEUP

EDSS students Tyler Hackbart (left), Candace Kuepfer, Christine Brown, Sam Lanesmith and Emeka Agada all performed at the National Shakespeare Festival in Toronto.

Colin Dewar

T

he immortal bard, William Shakespeare, is alive and well at Elmira District Secondary School. The students from DJ Carroll’s drama class have earned a first-place finish at this year’s National Shakespeare Festival held in Toronto. The festival is a multidisciplinary arts festival held simultaneously at schools across Canada. Students select a scene from one of Shakespeare’s plays and develop it for the competition. Students progress through a preliminary in-school festival to the National Festival weekend held May 14 in Toronto.

A group called Shakespeare in Action runs the event and this is the second year the festival has been held in Canada. Six weeks ago, an adjudicator was sent out to EDSS to over see the scenes performed by the drama students. “He loved all our scenes and invited us all to come to Toronto to perform,” said Carroll. “Usually schools have two or three scenes but we brought eight, which is fantastic for the kids.” Throughout the festival, students are mentored by professional theatre artists and then during the national festival, the students present their work to a public audience, including three

professional adjudicators. “We had a chance to showcase our talents and out of that showcase one of our scenes won first place for all of Canada,” said Carroll. Scholarships were handed out to students from different schools for the intensive summer program at Shakespeare in Action. There were eight scholarships offered to students at this year’s festival, of that eight, four students, Sam Lanesmith, Emeka Agada, Candace Kuepfer and Tyler Hackbart came from EDSS. To top it all off, Carroll won the Shakespeare teacher-of-the-year award for the second year in a row. “I got a double whammy this year, I won an award

PHOTO

» COLIN DEWAR

Taking a bow

and my students came out on top,” said Carroll. The students participated in workshops during the day, performed in the afternoon and in the evening were invited to watch the company perform A Midsummer Night’s Dream. “They were invited to a show which was phenomenal for them because they got to work with the actors during the day and then watch them perform in the evening, it was a great treat.” Carroll was proud of all his students that performed at the festival. “This small school in Elmira is kicking some big city schools’ butts and showing off that we can perform in the arts.”

Aaron Spurgeon wins 2011 Children’s Hero Award James Jackson

E

very day countless random acts of kindness and heroics go unrecognized and unrewarded throughout our community. Today (Saturday), Elmira resident Aaron Spurgeon and several other Waterloo Region children were acknowledged for

those acts in a very big way. Spurgeon was named one of the recipients of the annual Waterloo Region Children’s Safety Village Children’s Hero Award. More than 17 children were nominated for the award this year, with the top seven submissions chosen for the award.

“We are pleased to once again acknowledge the heroic efforts of the children in our community,” said Lee Fitzpatrick, chair of the Waterloo Region Children’s Safety Village. “The efforts of these children demonstrate the importance of the skills learned through educational programs offered at

the Children’s Safety Village.” Spurgeon was nominated for the award due to his selfless nature and for thinking of others. For his ninth birthday back on Mar. 26, he decided to ask for donations to Kate’s Kause instead of

> SEE AWARD ON PG. 05

Woolwich will push for an increase in life insurance payouts for volunteer firefighters killed on the job, hoping to convince the region’s three other rural municipalities to join in the plan to raise the benefit to $150,000 from $100,000. The move comes at the request of township council in reaction to the recent incident in Listowel in which two volunteer firefighters died on the job. As a member of the Waterloo Region Municipalities Insurance Pool, the township needs the consent of North Dumfries, Wellesley and Wilmot to make changes. Boosting the coverage to $150,000 would see the township pay out an additional $1,330 a year in premiums to cover 140 firefighters. The current cost for the $100,000 benefit is $5,220. Director of finance Richard Petherick told councillors boosting the coverage to $200,000 would double the added amount ($2,660), while a target of $250,000 would triple the extra costs. The $150,000 level was seen as something that all the municipalities could agree to without incurring significant costs. Petherick, who will raise the issue at the next meeting of the insurance pool members, said he is optimistic the other townships will back the additional $50,000 coverage.

> New roofs for pair of buildings The rainy weather has revealed not one, but two leaky roofs at Woolwich recreation facilities. This week, council voted to spend up to $7,500 to reshingle the roofs at the lawn bowling clubhouse and the Lions Park fieldhouse in Elmira. Director of recreation and facilities Larry Devitt said the repairs, unexpected and unbudgeted, would be covered by drawing on the township’s property maintenance reserve fund.

> Fireworks now set for tonight Cancelled due to rain, the Victoria Day fireworks display scheduled for May 23 in Conestogo will go tonight (Saturday) instead. Organized by the Conestogo-Winterbourne Optimist Club, the event gets underway at 6 p.m. with kiddy rides and hot dogs. Admission is $5 per family.

O U R S T R AT E G Y H A S A N N U A L I Z E D R ET U R N S O F 1 6 . 1 % † A Y E A R S I N C E 1 9 8 4 Paul Lauer | Investment Advisor & Financial Planner 519-747-6927 | paul.lauer@rbc.com | www.rbcds.com/paul.lauer Professional Wealth Management Since 1901 † The Strategy Focus List is a list of recommended securities that may form the basis for an investment portfolio strategy. The Strategy Focus List is not a mutual fund. The indicated rate of return is the historical annual compounded total return since Dec 31, 1984, as of Feb28, 2011 but does not reflect applicable taxes, account and transaction fees, which would lower actual returns. The indicated rate of return assumes additions and deletions from the list are priced using previous day closing values. As a result, the beginning and ending prices used in the Strategy Focus List model are not subject to actual market fluctuations and your portfolio return may vary from our results. Past performance may not be repeated. RBC Dominion Securities Inc.* and Royal Bank of Canada are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. *Member-Canadian Investor Protection Fund. ®Registered Trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. RBC Dominion Securities is a registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. ©Copyright 2011. All rights reserved.


NEWS 4

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

LAW & ORDER

Report of suspicious driver lands theft suspect

>>3:18 PM | A two-vehicle

collision occurred at the intersection of Church Street and Snyder Avenue in Elmira. A silver Dodge Ram collided with a white GMC minivan. No injuries were reported. There was minor damage to the vehicles. The driver of the Dodge Ram was charged with an unsafe lane change.

>>4 PM | Police and firefighters

responded to a call about a vehicle on fire at Northfield Drive East and Sawmill Road in

May 22 >>10:43 AM | Two garden gnomes were stolen from a Park Ave West property in Elmira. The missing gnomes are of a Mennonite boy and girl and a skunk. Police have no suspects at this time.

>>5:49 PM | Police pulled over

a vehicle that was swerving all over the road at Victoria Street and Shantz Station Road heading toward Kitchener. A 45-year-old Woolwich man was charged with

SALE

‘impaired driving.’ The man gave two breath samples, both double the legal limit.

May 23 >>10:40 AM | A black 2004

Grand Prix was taken with out permission from an Aspen Crescent address in Elmira. The suspected car thief, a woman from London, also stole a wedding ring from the same address. Before the woman was able to leave the Waterloo Region she was pulled over and arrested for impaired driving. The suspect had previous impaired driving charges and was subsequently charged with ‘drive disqualified.’

>>3:46 PM | Police responded to

shots fired in Floradale. Two men

- Weigela - Euonymous

>>9:44 AM | Police responded

to a call from a resident on Daniel Avenue in Bridgeport. The resident found screws in the tires of their vehicle, a 2002 Dodge Caravan. There are no suspects at this time.

May 25 >>9:12 AM | A bike was recovered at the plaza on Industrial Drive in Elmira. The bike was located between New Orleans Pizza and the Perk Coffee Shop. It may be claimed by its rightful owner at the Elmira detachment.

CONTAINED TO SMALL AREA Mapleton firefighters work to expose the wall of a shed where a fire broke out May 19 on the 8th Line near Wellington Road 17, northwest of Elmira. Investigators believe the fire started when a piece of machinery overheated. No major damage was reported.

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reported at a construction site on Country Squire Road in Woolwich Township. When police arrived they discovered the latches to a bin were cut and there were DeWalt tools missing. Police have no suspects at this time.

» JAMES JACKSON

May 20

Conestogo. When police arrived they saw smoke coming from the vehicle but no fire. On further inspection it was discovered that the vehicles bearings were red hot and smoking. The vehicle was towed from the scene.

>>8:25 AM | A break-in was

PHOTO

man collapsed at the St. Jacobs Farmers’ Market. EMS responded to the call and discovered the man had recovered, but decided to bring him to the hospital as a precaution.

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>>11:43 AM | A 70-year-old

Machinery sparks fire call

were found along Floradale Road and admitted to doing a little target practice. Police would like to remind residents that firearms cannot be fired within the boundaries of a settlement area. Violations can be met with a $500 fine.

Hwy. 86

to a collision involving two vehicles at Line 86 and Floradale Road. When police arrived they discovered a vehicle had T-boned another. One of the drivers was charged with ‘failure to yield right of way.’

A

hatchback. The driver was suspected of being involved with a theft at a local golf course a few months ago. Police located the driver and identified him forwarding the information to detectives to follow up with an investigation.

(St. Jacobs)

>>5:55 AM | Police responded

suspicious vehicle and male driver were reported along Hopewell Creek Road, near Shantz Station Road about 2 p.m. on May 20. The driver was described as white, 30 to 40 years old with dark hair and facial hair driving a small grey

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

RESCUE ATTEMPT

Rescue workers try to revive Gerald Wagner following a two-car collision Wednesday.

Fatality: Seeking info > CONTINUED FROM COVER were likely not factors. Investigators believe one of the drivers may have crossed the centre line into the opposite lane. Police closed Line 86

between Herrgott Road and Listowel Road for several hours during the investigation and anyone with information is asked to contact traffic services at (519) 650-8500, ext. 8856.

Award: Good deeds > CONTINUED FROM PG. 03 presents. In the end the party raised more than $400 which he donated to the local charity, named after Kate Meissner who suffers from Angelman Syndrome and whose parents are trying to raise $150,000 to build an allaccess playground for her and other children with special needs. AS is a neurogenetic disorder that affects one in 15,000 people. “Angels” as they are sometimes called, can have little or no verbal skills, poor gross and fine motor skills, and possible seizure and sleep disorders. The event will be held at the Waterloo Region Children’s Safety Village located

AARON SPURGEON at Waterloo Regional Police headquarters, where winners will receive a trophy and a certificate presented by local sponsors and by the chiefs of the local police and fire services. To be nominated for the award, children must reside in Waterloo Region and are in junior kindergarten through to Grade 8.

5 NEWS

Developer seeks more flexibility at St. Jacobs power centre Steve Kannon

E

asing restrictions on the types and sizes of businesses that can locate there would help bring in more tenants, say the operators of the power centre in St. Jacobs. To that end, King/86 Developments is seeking Official Plan and zoning changes for the Smart Centres site on Farmers Market Road, making a case for the idea at a public meeting Tuesday night in Woolwich council chambers. Kiet Ngo, representing Smart Centres, said the goal is to broaden the number of businesses that could set up shop at the power centre under the service commercial zoning designation, including professional services. The company also wants to remove restrictions that require restaurants, with only two exceptions, to be larger than 5,000 square feet. Current restrictions on the site are making it difficult to lease space there, he said, noting only about half of the permitted 305,000 square feet has been built. A planning and mar-

CALL FOR ENTRIES

keting report prepared for the company shows the requested changes would generate more business without having any negative impact on existing operations in the Woolwich and Waterloo, said Bernard Tang of Malone Given Parsons. He noted the service commercial designation is more restrictive in Woolwich than in other municipalities. And a marketing assessment shows smaller restaurants are common in power centres – 90 per cent are smaller than the 5,000 sq. ft. limit. Smart Centres has used up one of its exceptions with the 1,800-sq.-ft. Arby’s restaurant. There is interest from other operators, including A&W and Sunset Grill, but the current zoning means the company has had to turn away prospective clients. “Easing that would assist in attracting more tenants,” said Tang. While no one spoke against the proposed changes – a big difference from the earlier fights over the Walmartanchored big box development – Marcus Shantz of St. Jacobs-based Mercedes Corp. argued

the township should look at the restrictions on the entire area known as the stockyard lands. His company, which operates the farmers’ market and outlet mall, among other ventures, has also been squeezed by the historical limitations placed on development there. For example, some 9,000 sq. ft. in the outlet mall – about 10 per cent of the total space – sits empty because of the restriction that says only manufacturers can operate stores there. His concerns struck a chord with Mayor Todd Cowan, who suggested the township needs to ensure it’s not limiting business opportunities because of past notions about development at that site. But Coun. Allan Poffenroth, reflecting some of the arguments made during the height of the power centre debate, said the township should take into account the potential negative impacts on downtown Elmira and Uptown Waterloo, arguing against “carte blanche” changes. Woolwich does have plans for a comprehensive review of stockyards development,

which would include its impact on the overall commercial picture in the township, especially on the Elmira core. That study was slated for this year, but was pushed back during budget deliberations. Director of engineering and planning Dan Kennaley said the bigpicture issues would be incorporated when his staff reviewed King/86 Developments’ applications in advance of preparing a recommendation report for council at a later date.

> Aviation day at the airport Thinking of a career in aviation? Simply curious about what goes on behind the scenes at the Region of Waterloo International Airport? Co-hosted by WaterlooWellington Flight Centre and Great Lakes Helicopter, the Aviation Career & Fun Day on today (Saturday) will provide some insights. Visitors can meet air traffic controllers, aircraft maintenance engineers, avionics technicians, border services officers and many others. There will be helicopter and airplane rides, static displays – both rotary and fixed wing, demonstrations, a barbecue at the Runways Café, and fun activities for children. Running from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., the family event is free.

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NEWS 6

THE OBSERVER

SPECIAL FEATURE

Horse Week

We are pleased to announce that Horse Week will begin Saturday June 4th and run until Saturday June 11th.

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Extruded Equine and Pelleted Feed For All Life Stages

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

Gravel: Council's decision is the latest hurdle for applicant > CONTINUED FROM COVER by Winterbourne resident Jan Huissoon, who showed a series of photos of the landscape Conestogo and Winterbourne residents could expect to see if the Kuntz proposal goes ahead. Along with the photographs, his illustrations of what the site would look like with berms and 20-metre gravel stockpiles in place hit the mark. Addressing councillors Tuesday night, Huissoon said the massive size of the stockpiles would blight the landscape. “They will definitely be a very visible eyesore, especially those of concrete rubble waiting to be crushed, and will detract significantly from the cultural experience of the Winterbourne Valley.” In agreeing to the peer review process, council did, however, set up a potential conflict should the issue end up at the Ontario Municipal Board, which seems likely as a result of an appeal by the applicant or by the resident groups determined to prevent a gravel pit adjacent to their neighbourhoods. In the event of an appeal, staff wouldn’t be able to defend a position contrary to its stance on visual impacts, meaning Woolwich would have to hire an outside planner to discuss visual impacts. Mayor Todd Cowan, Coun. Bonnie Bryant and Coun. Julie-Anne Herteis weren’t swayed by that issue, opting to vote in favour of the peer review option. Noting there are five gravel pit applications under consideration – with a sixth expected shortly – Cowan argued in favour of a consistent approach, making all applicants face similar requirements when it comes to studies and subsequent reviews. Voting against the motion, Coun. Mark Bauman objected to the visual impact review

on the grounds that the process would be too subjective. Unlike noise studies, for instance, where quantifiable decibel levels can be set and measured, there’s no objective measure on the aesthetic side, he said, calling the review “another delaying tactic” that means more expense for the applicant. Kuntz Topsoil, Sand and Gravel’s planning consultant also decried the delay. David Sisco of the IBI Group said his client has been cooperative through the whole process, noting the company has been working away at the long list of conditions – including groundwater and well monitoring – imposed by the previous council when it gave tentative approval to the gravel pit last November. The township and the applicant remain wide apart on two key issues: a sunset clause and what’s known as vertical-zoning, essentially controlling how close to the water table aggregate can be mined. Similar issues are at play with other gravel applications. Sisco said the Ministry of Natural Resources opposed both restrictions, which could lead to another OMB battle. Both the township and Region of Waterloo are challenging the province’s stance against vertical zoning in an OMB appeal regarding the new Regional Official Plan.

> Gravel tender contract awarded Woolwich will spend $89,000 this year to upgrade five gravel roads in the township. Meeting this week, councillors awarded a contract to Donegan’s Haulage to supply and place some 9,677 tonnes of gravel at a cost of $8.98 per tonne. Roads slated for new gravel include Woolwich/Guelph Townline Road, Greenhouse Road, Kramp Road, Wurster Place and Rider Road. Gravel roads have a new surface applied on a 10-year maintenance cycle.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

7 NEWS

Sugar Kings' head coach steps down A

James Jackson

provincial Junior B hockey title under his belt, Elmira Sugar Kings head coach Geoff Haddaway this week announced his resignation after four seasons with the club, saying he just had a gut-feeling it was time to call it quits. “Every year you reflect on whether you want to keep coming back, and there are lots of things to consider every year,”

he said. “Around early March, right before the playoffs actually, I just started to wonder if this was going to be it.” Haddaway, a math teacher at Preston High School in Cambridge, enjoyed tremendous success behind the bench since he first arrived to start the 2007 season. The Kings beat Cambridge in six games that year to win the Cherrey Cup and also claimed the Herb Parker Trophy

for the best record in the division, 30-7-8-3. Haddaway also took home coach-of-the-year honours that season, but the Kings couldn’t lay claim to the Sutherland Cup, losing to the Tecumseh Chiefs in six games. In 2009 the team suffered a disappointing six-game defeat to the Kitchener Dutchmen in the opening round of the playoffs, and in 2010 they lost in six games to the eventual Sutherland Cup

victors the Brantford Golden Eagles in the division semi-finals. Haddaway had difficulty summing up his time in Elmira, saying that each year he had a fantastic group of players, a supportive group of volunteers, and the best hockey fans in the entire league behind him, and although he enjoyed the ride of the team’s most recent playoff success, he also didn’t want it to end.

“I probably can’t put in words and do it justice how I feel about this team, this organization, and the community. They’ve just been so supportive. I am just so lucky to have those experiences and I can’t thank everyone enough for providing me with such a great place to coach.” For now he plans to stay involved with the Kings, but from a distance as a scout, and he looks forward to re-

turning to Elmira from time to time to cheer on the team and reminisce about his four years behind the bench. “Any time I show up in Elmira it’ll be to watch a game, buy a 50/50 ticket, and clap when the team scores a goal. So I’m looking forward to that,” he said, adding that “whoever they hire for the next coaching position is walking into the best coaching job in the league.”

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THE OBSERVER

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

Woolwich to extend credit for car-share program er Transit make route 21 – connecting Elmira and St. Jacobs to Conestoga Mall in Waterloo – a permanent fixture before backing the carsharing venture. Director of finance Richard Petherick argues the two services are complementary. With a permanent bus route, some households might be convinced to stick with one car rather than two, using the car-share program to augment public transit, he told

Steve Kannon

G

rand River CarShare this week moved closer to setting up shop in Elmira, as Woolwich council agreed to extend the organization a $30,000 line of credit. The money would help purchase the initial fleet of three cars proposed for the town. The decision is tied to the fate bus of service to the community, however. The township wants to see Grand Riv-

councillors meeting May 24. He also pressed for a condition that would see the loan repaid in full before any extensions to the five-year term. Interest charged on the loan would be the same rate the township receives for its cash investments, ensuring no loss of revenue. “The top priority is safeguarding our $30,000 investment,” he said. The dollar amount is the same as arrange-

ments with the cities of Cambridge, Kitchener and Waterloo, as well as the region. Founded in 1998, Grand River CarShare (GRCS) now has 400 members sharing 16 vehicles. The $30,000 represents the cash needed to finance the three-car minimum initial fleet, explained Jason Hammond, president of the non-profit organization. GRCS currently has 17 members in Elmira, and is looking for 50 in order to justify moving into the

area. “This is a great step forward for bringing CarShare to the township and empowering citizens to reduce the number of cars they own.” said Hammond of council’s decision Tuesday night. While welcoming council’s support, Hammond raised concerns about tying the line of credit to the GRT bus route, an issue over which his organization has no control.

9 NEWS

Waterloo Region is currently operating the bus service on a trial basis until the end of the year, after which Woolwich residents will be on the hook for the $450,000 annual cost of route 21. Before making a decision on the fate of the route, township council is looking for feedback from residents. To that end, a public meeting is set for June 7 at 7 p.m. in the community room at the Woolwich Memorial Centre in Elmira.

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OPINION 10

THE OBSERVER

OPINION

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

[T]he scenic view of the Winterbourne Valley will be dominated by a 20-foot berm and 65-foot high stockpiles. Rose and Peter Bettiol letter on page 12

VERBATIM Defence is a strong supporter of Ontario’s Green Energy Act and Ethenvironmental FIT program. Today’s announcement demonstrates the province’s commitment to renewable energy generation in Ontario, contributing to job growth, clean air and healthy communities

> Environmental Defence executive director Rick Smith reacts to Thursday's announcement of 700 new clean energy projects under the FIT program

THE MONITOR ealized net farm income amounted to $4.5 R(46.1%) billion in 2010, an increase of $1.4 billion from 2009 as the decline in operating costs outpaced a slight decrease in receipts. The increase in 2010 followed a 16.6% drop in 2009.

> Statistics Canada

EDITORIAL

Old fears and limitations no long apply at King/86

W

ith the developers of the St. Jacobs power centre at Woolwich council this week looking to expand the list of potential offerings at the site, there were no crowds of people speaking out against the proposal. In fact, there was no one there at all to oppose the move. That’s a far cry from the early days of the Walmart debate. When the proposal for a power centre opposite the St. Jacobs Farmers’ Market first appeared, it was a much different story. The meetings were moved to larger venues, such as the community centre, to accommodate the hundreds of people looking to contribute their two cents’ worth, largely in opposition. The battle moved on to the Ontario Municipal Board, where a settlement was eventually reached allowing the project to proceed. After years of delay, the new open-

ing date was January 1, 2004. Then came another hurdle: Waterloo Region demanded improvements to the King Street overpass and Hwy. 85 on/off ramps. The resultant negotiations added to the wait, as did the environmental assessment needed to study the impact of the bridge reconstruction. Eventually, however, the power centre opened, beginning with the Walmart store. Little, if anything changed. There was none of the fallout predicted by opponents: no discernible impact on downtown Elmira or the core in Waterloo. In that light, the easing of restrictions requested by King/86 Developments makes sense. The market has changed, and Smart Centres needs to be able to adjust, in part due to long delays that saw many prospective tenants build elsewhere. The restrictions were put in place

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Joe Merlihan, Publisher | EXT 107 jmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Steve Kannon, Editor | EXT 103 skannon@woolwichobserver.com James Jackson, Reporter | EXT 101 jjackson@woolwichobserver.com Colin Dewar, Reporter | EXT 102 cdewar@woolwichobserver.com

> LETTER POLICY

in part due to fear of the unknown and in part as a concession to the very vocal opponents. Time has shown that none of the hysteria surrounding the project was warranted. It’s just another in a long line of retail developments, paling in comparison, for instance, to The Boardwalk development on Ira Needles Boulevard on the west side of Kitchener and Waterloo. The retail picture is much different today than it was a decade ago when the Walmart debate was at its peak. Since that time, Waterloo has seen extensive growth in its de facto power centre at King Street and Northfield Drive, just minutes from the St. Jacobs site. Although the city claims it’s opposed to big box retail – apparently in deference to its downtown core – the evidence to the contrary is quite clear to anyone passing by that intersec-

Donna Rudy, Sales Manager | EXT 104 drudy@woolwichobserver.com Pat Merlihan, Production Mgr | EXT 105 pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Jon Sarachman, Production | EXT 108 jsarachman@woolwichobserver.com Lindsay Lehman, Production | EXT 109 llehman@woolwichobserver.com

The Observer welcomes letters to the editor on topics of interest to our readers. Letters may be edited for brevity, grammar, and legal considerations. All letters must be signed and contain the writer’s full name and telephone number for verification purposes. Unsigned or anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. If you have a legitimate concern and cannot sign your name to a letter, please contact the editor to discuss alternative means of resolving the issue. This newspaper declines announcements, poetry and thank-you letters in the opinion section. Maximum suggested length is 500 words.

tion. Waterloo, and any of the other players, already knows the impact of big box stores: they can see it today. There’s really nothing to object to anymore, nor any credible argument from those opposed to changes in the past, mostly other developers and large retailers looking after their own interests. The stockyards area is prime space for development. There are no longer any valid external reasons to place restrictions on the site – the only yardstick is good planning. As for the absence from the meeting of residents who packed gatherings in past years, perhaps they’ve resigned themselves to the inevitable. Or they’ve realized there’s no real issue with the new-style retail that has become so prevalent since King/86 first appeared on the agenda all those years ago.

> CIRCULATION The Observer is an audited controlled circulation publication. Canadian Media Circulation Audit calculates and prepares The Observer circulation reports | 14,812.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

Predicting into 2050 could be all wrong

T

he economists, the statisticians and the investment bankers have done their work, and everybody in the financial world now has more or less the same picture of the future in their minds. The predictions are so consistent that even the general public thinks it knows where the trends are leading us: Asia and Latin America up, Europe and North America in a holding pattern, Africa and the Middle East down. But maybe the predictions are wrong. Goldman Sachs started the game almost a decade ago with its study predicting that the BRICs, the four largest emerging economies (Brazil, Russia, India and China), would overtake the rich countries of the G7 (the United States, Japan, Germany, Britain, France, Italy and Canada) some time in the 2030s. The world’s economic centre of gravity, the study implied, was shifting from the West to Asia. Hardly anybody disputes this model anymore; the pundits just differ on the details, like when China’s economy will pass that of the United States. As soon as 2020, said PricewaterhouseCooper; 2027, says the latest Goldman Sachs prediction; 2035, says the Carnegie Institute. As late as the mid-2040s, according to Karen Ward’s recent study for HSBC. But they all agree it’s going to happen. Ward’s study, “The World in 2050,” is particularly interesting for two reasons. One, because it is more realistic about China, whose economy is currently the biggest bubble in world history. And two, because it offers predictions for the world’s 30 biggest economies, not just the top 10. China’s economy, at $25 trillion annually, is only a couple of trillion

THE VIEW FROM HERE

International Affairs GWYNNE DYER ahead of the United States in 2050. (All calculations are in constant dollars of the year 2000.) Then there is a long drop to India at $8 trillion and Japan at $6 trillion – and no other country reaches $5 trillion. Places five to 11 are mostly filled by the rest of the G7 countries, with only Brazil and Mexico breaking into the magic circle. The rest of the top 20, however, are almost all developing countries (Turkey, South Korea, Russia, Indonesia, Argentina, Egypt and Malaysia), with only Spain and Australia from the developed world. So in this model, Asia and Latin America really are taking over, with 11 out of the top 20 slots. Now, you can quibble with bits of this, like categorizing Russia as an emerging economy. In terms of infrastructure, average education level and birth rate, Russia is clearly a developed country. But if these predictions are roughly correct, then it is definitely Asia and Latin America up, and Europe and North America (plus Japan) in a holding pattern. And are Africa and the Middle East really down? Up and down are purely relative, of course, and there are certainly some large African countries with quite respectable projected growth rates, like Nigeria and South Africa. But despite the world’s highest population growth rates, no African country’s economy makes it into the

top 20 by 2050. Of the Middle Eastern countries only Egypt scrapes in at No. 19, just ahead of Malaysia (which has only a third of Egypt’s population). Most of the non-oil economies face virtual stagnation, and there are big question marks over the claimed oil reserves of a number of the oil states. Africa and the Middle East down. It’s only a game: only the very brave or the very foolish would base major investment decisions on such a longterm extrapolation of current trends. But it’s the sort of thing that the strategists and the geopolitics experts love – and it could be wrong. Not just wrong in detail, but utterly, spectacularly wrong. All of these predictions assume that global conditions will remain essentially unchanged for the next 40 years. That is highly unlikely. The predictions are not simpleminded straight-line extrapolations. They all assume, for example, that China’s economy, which has grown at 10 per cent for the past 20 years (and therefore doubled in size every seven years), will drop to about half that growth rate (doubling only every 14 years) well before 2050. But they do assume that energy – especially oil – will remain plentiful and relatively affordable for the next four decades. Even more implausibly, they also assume that global warming will not cause serious disruptions in the world’s economies over the next two generations. Yet there is already enough warming locked into the system by past, present and near-future emissions that severe disruption is

11 OPINION

THE VOICE

What impact has the spring's rainy weather had on you?

"We have had a lot of indoor practices for sports at our school." > Matt Horst

"I don’t get to ride my bike enough because of all the rain." > Gareth Martin

> SEE DYER ON PG. 12 BY SCOTT ARNOLD

"I haven’t been able to enjoy the nice warm springs that I am used to." > Seth DeBoer

Under fire for the impact on scenic vistas, tourist attractions and productive farmland, would-be gravel pit operators try to put a visitor-friendly spin on their plans.

"With all the rain the sports fields have been really wet and during the first lacrosse game of the season I ended up slipping and hurting my knee." > Jocelyn Lubert


OPINION 12

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

If booze is involved, we're rarely treated like adults I

t must be an election year: the province is talking about modernizing its liquor laws, treating Ontarians like adults. Attorney General Chris Bentley this week said the government plans to loosen restrictions on how alcohol is sold and consumed at festival and other special occasions. Specifically, the goal is to remove the need for beer tents at events and festivals so people can walk around freely with drinks; extend the hours that alcohol can be served at special events, such as weddings or charity fundraisers, to 2 a.m. from 1 a.m., to be consistent with licensed establishments; and allow people to circulate in retail booth areas of festivals with beverages. Can that other election favourite – the sale of beer and wine in convenience stores – be far behind? Certainly there are those who would like to see power wrested from The Beer Store, which holds a virtual monopoly on the sale of beer. Proponents of corner store sales say greater convenience and lower prices would flow from competition. Currently the distribution and retail systems are owned by the three largest brewers, Labatt, Molson and Sleeman. Once Canadian companies, the three are now foreign-owned: InBevSA of Belgium, U.S.-based Molson Coors Brewing and Japan’s Sapporo respectively. If beer was sold in grocery and convenience stores, it would benefit smaller breweries, which are now dependent on a retail channel owned and controlled by their much larger competitors. The sale of beer and wine in corner stores is a political hot potato. Under previous Conservative governments, the Liberals suggested the change, with the Tories opposed. In power,

From the Editor Steve Kannon the Liberals shunned the idea. We now have a situation where Conservative leader Tim Hudak – who’s mused about the return of the buck-a-beer option – has suggested changing the rules, while Premier Dalton McGuinty maintains it’s steady as she goes. Supporters of the status quo usually point to the prospects of minors buying beer, believing it’s easier to police The Beer Store than thousands of smaller outlets. While monitoring is easier with some 450 beer stores versus an estimated 10,000 convenience stores, we don’t know that the changes would lead to rampant abuse. Having grown up in Montreal, where beer and wine are available in every dépanneur, I certainly saw no evidence of that; underage drinking goes on everywhere. In Quebec, convenience is certainly a factor. You can nip down to the corner and grab some wine for dinner, albeit not the selection you’d find at the liquor store, the friendlysounding Société des alcools du Québec (SAQ), as opposed to the Liquor Control Board of Ontario. Critics take aim at the convenience factor, claiming it would increase the amount of drinking. Again, the numbers don’t bear out that argument. It certainly doesn’t take much extra planning to stop by a beer or liquor store, and hours have been extended due to public demand; the convenience angle is overplayed. From an environmental standpoint,

however, there is an upside to being able to walk to the corner store to pick something up rather than having to climb in your car to do so. Especially advantageous for all concerned if you’re going for a refill. The best arguments in favour of beer and wine in supermarkets and convenience stores are economic. Unlike the LCBO, which is owned by the province and looks after socalled hard liquor, The Beer Store is a near-monopoly in private hands. And, due to mergers and buyouts, control is now offshore. Allowing craft breweries and wineries direct access to a new retail channel that excludes the big players who control Brewers Retail Inc (BRI). Originally a co-operative formed in 1927 to warehouse and distribute the beer produced by hundreds of brewers, BRI now represents two major shareholders – Labatt and Molson – and a minor one, Sleeman. In 2005, a provincial study showed the company had become “essentially a private monopoly for the retailing of beer in Ontario.” The year prior, BRI had gross sales of $2.6 billion, accounting for 83.4 per cent

Dyer: Disruptions are coming > CONTINUED FROM PG. 11 virtually guaranteed, especially in the tropical and sub-tropical parts of the planet. The old-rich countries of the G7 are all in the temperate zone, which may get away with relatively minor damage from global warming in the period to 2050. All the big “emerging” economies except Russia and Argentina are located wholly or largely in the tropics and/or the sub-tropics. That means they will

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almost certainly suffer very serious disruption, including huge losses in food production. This is monstrously unfair. Just when the poorer countries finally start to catch up economically with their former imperial masters, the warming caused by two centuries of greenhouse gas emissions by the rich countries knocks them back yet again. Which may also knock all those predictions that the emerging economies will soon overtake the developed ones into a cocked hat.

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of Ontario’s beer sales by volume. Small breweries have argued for years they don’t get a fair shake at retail stores owned by the big players. Perhaps changing the rules to allow the craft brewers access to corner stores would increase their profile, and their profits. Such sales would also be a boon to the retailers, especially the mom-and-pop shops that struggle with retaining business – even more so with new restrictions on tobacco sales. Such changes seem like a nobrainer. For the government, however, there is risk in change, especially when it has anything to do with anything resembling moral implications – even after all these years, the ghost of prohibition still haunts us. The government sees little upside to making the sale of beer and wine an issue. Under the current system, we can indeed get our hands on our beverage of choice, albeit at the high prices mandated by the province and the near-monopoly it has allowed to develop. Perhaps this summer we can console ourselves with a beverage free from the confines of a festival beer tent.

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To the Editor, „ Congratulations to Mayor Todd Cowan and councillors Julie-Anne Herteis and Bonnie Bryant for sticking with their decision to request a peer review of the visual impact of the Jigs Hollow gravel pit in the Winterbourne Valley. The view over the valley is valued by residents whose homes overlook the valley, and by hikers who walk the scenic route along Peel Street. The view is also an asset to the township, as it draws tourists to the area to drive the heritage tour, which goes right past the proposed pit site. If this gravel pit is approved, the scenic view of the Winterbourne Valley will be dominated by a 20-foot berm and 65-foot high stockpiles. Our concerns should be the concerns of all Woolwich residents who are able to foresee the negative impacts of the proposed gravel pit.

> Rose and Peter Bettiol, West Montrose

Send letters to editor@woolwichobserver.com


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

13 BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Festival season a boon to local economies

In addition to cultural and recreational opportunities, events generate revenues and jobs, says new study Colin Dewar

FESTIVE MOOD Caitlin (left) and Reegan Jantzi of Wellesley enjoy a spin in the Scrambler at the midway, and William Stewart enjoys a bite of his pancake during the Elmira Maple Syrup Festival last month.

» OBSERVER FILES

» OBSERVER FILES

PHOTO

PHOTO

PHOTO

» JAMES JACKSON

P

opular events such as the Elmira Maple Syrup Festival and next week’s Robin in the Hood Festival aren’t just good fun, they’re major contributors to the provincial economy. A recent study by Festival and Events Ontario (FEO) found such events provide significant cultural, sporting and recreational opportunities for Ontarians and attracts many visitors to all regions of the province. Festivals also provided significant economic benefits for the province through spending by the organizations themselves and by their visitors. The overall impact of the roughly 2,000 culture, sports, recreation and community festivals and events in Ontario amounts to nearly $2.3 billion in economic return to the province’s gross domestic product (GDP). The study, conducted by FEO in partnership with the Ontario Trillium Foundation and Toronto-based Enigma Research, found that the festivals and events across the province generated more than $1.1 billion in taxes for all levels of government and helped create 52,700 jobs. “Whether it is a festival engaging the local population or a world-leading bestin-class event, this research verifies that investing in festivals and events is a smart business decision,” said Gary Masters, FEO’s executive director. “Festivals can

FOR FUN AND PROFIT A recent study by Festival and Events Ontario shows that festival season, such as next weekend’s Robin in the Hood Festival, are a boon for the local and provincial economy alike.

play a key role in attracting visitors, some create jobs, and enhance the qualqual ity of life in communicommuni ties across Ontario.” Of all the festivals, 90 per cent, are considered small, local festivals with budgets under $250,000 but contribute $1 bilbil lion to the province’s GDP. The small festivals and events also generated $577 million in taxes for all three levels of government and helped create 19,200 jobs. “Festivals can act as attractors to an area,” said Masters. “Not everyone can afford a cottage in Muskoka or a trip to Las Vegas but they can attend a local festival and these events enhance the value of a community, not only to visitors but to the residents as well.” The study found that smaller festivals and events have significant GDP impacts on various sectors of the local economy, especially the recreation, accommodation and restaurant sectors. “During the maple syrup festival we are run off our feet,” said Allie Vignault, an employee at the Sip ‘n Bite Restaurant in Elmira. “It is a very busy day; we see a lot of transactions come through.” Other local venues decide to close or see a drop in revenue during the maple syrup festival, finding the event impedes any business they would have seen. “We close for the day,” said Freda Walker of Pampered

> SEE FESTIVALS ON PG. 14

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BUSINESS 14

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

Farming’s future is in consumers’ hands

F

armers spend a lot of money on feed for their cattle, pigs and other livestock – about two-thirds of the cost of raising an animal now is feed. They enhance basic feed with additional nutritional ingredients for better animal health (“programmed nutrition,” as some say), and one of the global leaders in ingredient production is Alltech. The company, whose Canadian office is in Guelph, holds an annual outlook symposium for the ag sector at its world headquarters in Lexington, Kentucky, which this year was themed “The Game Changers” and showed how consumers are really the driving force behind so many farming decisions. The program, which concluded Wednesday, drew a record 2,200 participants from 72 countries. It was populated by farmers and researchers who are breaking new ground at the farm level. For example, a huge Alberta farm’s approach to sustainability was introduced to participants as a “game changer” because it pushes so many buttons with agriculture and the public. It begins with a feedlot capable of handling 36,000 cattle. But farmers Bernie and Mike Kotelko don’t just feed them and send them off for processing. They’ve developed their own premium brand line of beef called Spring Creek, which is now available nationwide. Consumers make that enterprise viable,

Food For Thought Owen Roberts especially those who have a generous interpretation of local food and are willing to pay more for quality. But that’s just the start of what the Kotelkos call their integrated biorefinery. The manure from the custom-fed animals is put through a biodigester, producing power for the feedlot, rather than being relegated to waste. In fact, hardly anything is wasted on this farm – the cattle are fed wet distillers grains, gleaned from onsite ethanol production. The Kotelkos even plan to create biodiesel from algae production in an aerobic digester. Bernie Kotelko says integrating food production with alternative energy production can give farmers a buffer against low commodity prices, and consumers’ endless appetite for cheap groceries. He thinks the farm will be self-sufficient in energy in five years, and that its revenue from energy production will equal revenue from food production in 10 years. But outside the confines of this farm or any farm, forces are at work that can heavily influence what happens inside. In the industry,

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it’s called the license to operate or the right to farm, and it’s centered around farmers’ ability to produce safe, affordable food under increasingly challenging conditions. For example, in livestock production, increasingly stringent animal welfare standards for matters such as housing and processing are being demanded by consumers and special interest groups. Some specific and popular demands, particularly for the amount of space an animal needs to live a fulfilled life, have enormous cost implications for everyone involved. They’re helping drive research efforts such as the recently announced poultry welfare chair at the University of Guelph. Animal welfare, renewable energy production, waste reduction – these are all honourable pursuits. But society speaks out both sides of its

mouth when it comes to farming and food. People piously demand farmers and food production adhere to up to the highest standards … then they take that food and turn it into nutrition-void garbage. Case in point: at the same time the Alltech symposium was delivering hopeful solutions, the food industry was reporting sales at New York Fries ballooned last month thanks to its diversified poutine offerings and marketing campaign. An industry publication reports the chain saw a 20-30 per cent increase in sales in April. Think about it. We’re dealing with an obesity crisis, soaring health care costs and numerous diseases related to poor eating, and New York Fries is counting its money. Tightening the screws on agriculture is not the solution to our biggest social problems.

Festivals: Impacts beyond financial > CONTINUED FROM PG. 13 and Polished Tanning Aesthetics Nails Spa. “We don’t book any of our regular business that day because there is no parking for my clients during the festival.” Christine Aberle owner of The Window Box also keeps her shop closed due to the lack of interest she sees in local shopping during the annual event.

Festivals and events do have impacts that go well beyond what can be measured in economic terms. “They contribute to the quality of life across Ontario by strengthening communities, providing unique activities and events,” said Masters. “Festivals can help build awareness of the diverse cultures and identities around us and acting as a source of community pride.”

Be a better online investor with BMO InvestorLine Come in for a free, personalized consultation and learn how you can manage your investments online with confidence. Tuesday, May 31, 2011, 10:00a.m. – 6:00 p.m. BMO Bank of Montreal Elmira Branch, 53 Arthur Street RSVP to russell.butler@bmo.com or 519-669-2724.

www.mscu.com | 519.669.1529

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Registered trade-marks of Bank of Montreal, used under licence. ®BMO InvestorLine Inc. is a wholly owned subsidiary of Bank of Montreal Holding Inc. Member – Canadian Investor Protection Fund and IIROC.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

15 LIVING HERE

LIVING HERE

PHOTO

» JAMES JACKSON

Drawn back to animation St. Clements woman takes a winding route to her dream job with Pixar Studios James Jackson

J

ust this past April, Jamie Metzger graduated from the animation program at Sheridan College, and on June 6 she starts her first day at Pixar Animation Studios in California. Not a bad first job for the 29-yearold St. Clements native who, as a student in Grade 6, wrote to Disney asking how she could get a job with them. “They wrote back and said ‘Go to Sheridan,’” laughed Metzger as she sat in the backyard of her parents’ Waterloo home. In retrospect, Metzger said that her entire life up to this point was geared towards becoming an animator, starting back in Grade 6 with that fateful letter and culminating with her graduation from Sheridan College last month. But it wasn’t a direct path for the artist. Her trek from talented student to gifted animator contained a couple of detours along the way. She enrolled at Elmira District Secondary School and was an active participant in the visual and dramatic arts program of the school. Her parents, Jim and Susan, helped her research the art programs that local high schools had to offer, and Metzger attended EDSS from Grades’ 9 to 12 before transferring to St. David Catholic Secondary School for OAC. After high school, Metzger was part of an exchange program to France and while away from home she got her first international exposure to theatre, musicals, and some of the world’s most famous works of art.

She professes she caught the “fame and fortune bug that teenage girls seem to get swept in to.” After returning to Canada, she landed in Toronto at the Randolph Academy for the Performing Arts, where she studied for three years to become an actress in film and television. But she quickly learned it wasn’t the life for her. “After going to hundreds of auditions with hundreds of other girls who looked just like me, I realized that it wasn’t really based that much on skill – at least in film – and that it was more based on what you looked like,” she said. “I thought it seemed like a waste of energy and time and money if it only matters if I’m blonde, or tall.” So she returned to her true passion of drawing, and enrolled in the one-year art fundamentals course at Sheridan to hone her drawing skills after so many years away from it. She said she “busted her butt,” hired a tutor and read every book she could on the subject of animation before ultimately applying to the four-year B.A. program at Sheridan in animation. Yet her time as an actress was not wasted – quite the opposite, actually – as her acting training continues to aid her development as an animator and she believes it is one of the primary reasons for her success. “The longer I was animating, the more I realized that the character isn’t going to emote on its own,” she said. “It can’t feel sad on its own, you have to infuse that. It’s just lines on a page until you do something with

> SEE ANIMATION ON PG. 16

ON HER WAY Jamie Metzger has landed her dream job working at Pixar Studios in California for three months. She also had her thesis film project, Paso Doble, chosen as one of six animated films to be screened at the Toronto International Film Festival Student Showcase this week.

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LIVING HERE 16

THE OBSERVER

It’s time to bring a salad, but not just any salad

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

Animation: Mentors play a role

From The Chef's Table

Inspired Pasta Salad >>1 450g box of Orzo pasta, cooked until

Kirstie Herbstreit & Jody O'Malley

al dente

>>Salt >>1 cup sliced black olives >>1 pint cherry tomatoes, sliced in half >>1 bunch of green onions, chopped >>1 green or red pepper, diced >>1 bunch of cilantro, chopped >>2 cups grated old cheddar cheese >>Juice of 4 limes (or more, to taste) >>1/3 cup olive or canola oil >>1 tsp ground turmeric >>1/2 tsp smoked paprika >>Salt and pepper, to taste

J

ust bring a salad” is what we hear all summer long, isn’t it? Going to this barbecue or that, we’re constantly challenged to show up with something interesting to share with family and friends. This salad has some classic South-

west inspirations, but uses Orzo pasta, a Greek-style, rice-shaped pasta. Ground turmeric is that bright yellow spice, often an ingredient in mustard. Smoke paprika is essential. La Dalia brand can be found at Vincenzo’s (or also now in our ‘Studio Sampler’ basics basket at The Culinary Studio!) And as per request, we’re giving this recipe out again to start the season off right. Cook pasta until al dente in salted water; Drain and let cool on a baking tray; In a large bowl combine olives, green onions, tomatoes, peppers, cilantro and cheese; In a small bowl whisk together lime juice, oil, turmeric, smoked paprika and a good pinch of salt and pepper; Combine gently the pasta with the vegetables and the dressing; enjoy at room temperature or cold.

>>Chefs Kirstie Herbstreit and Jody O’Malley are both Red Seal certified chefs. Together they run The Culinary Studio, which offers classes, demonstrations and private dinners. To contact the chefs, visit their website www.theculinarystudio.ca.

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SHORT SHOTS Stills from Metzger’s animated short film, Paso Doble, in which a woman rejects the advances of her dancing partner, who becomes filled with rage and transforms into a bull.

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 15 it.” And landing her dream-job at Pixar isn’t the only reason to celebrate for Metzger. Her thesis film project, Paso Doble, was chosen as one of six animation finalists at the Toronto International Film Festival Student Film Showcase held on Tuesday. The film, a brisk minute and fifty seconds in length, is based on the Spanish dance of the same name in which a matador dances with his cape, symbolizing a woman. Only for Metzger, she uses the dance as an analogy for domestic abuse. “The woman is white, her dress is red and the man is symbolized by black and he becomes enraged when he doesn’t want to do more than just dance. In his rage he becomes a bull and she is the cape, and so a bull fight ensues, and then someone gets it…” she said, trailing off at the end, trying not to reveal the film’s climax. The film took two years to finish and she had some of the best help in the industry to complete it. She interned with Hans Bacher for three months in the Philippines last summer. Bacher is known for animating some of Disney’s greatest films, including The Lion King, Aladdin and

Beauty and the Beast. “He helped me find a style,” Metzger said of Bacher. “I would bring him work and he would say ‘No, push it further’ and then I’d come out with other ideas and he would say ‘No, push it further’ and finally after experimenting on my own, I brought my work back to Hans and he said ‘OK! Now, that is exciting. Run with that.’” While working with Bacher, Metzger was also interning with Canadian animator Charlie Bonifacio in his Oakville office via Skype. Bonifacio is perhaps best known for his work in the films Mulan and The Hunchback of Notre Dame. “The combination of both of their help made my film that much stronger,” she said. Now, after years of hard work she stands on the cusp of doing what many of us only think about – working at her dream job and getting paid to do what she loves most. The job with Pixar is only a threemonth training contract where she will be taught how to use the company’s patented animation technology with a mentor, but she hopes the fact that Pixar is working on releasing two animated films in

> SEE FILM ON PG. 17

How is lending at MSCU different? t0OFNFNCFSTEFQPTJUCFDPNFT another member’s loan t8FFODPVSBHFSFTQPOTJCMFVTF of credit and apply faith-based stewardship principles t8FMJWFPVUPVSWBMVFTPGJOUFHSJUZ  compassion, and responsible stewardship every day Call Heidi Harris at our Elmira Branch to discuss your options! 519.669.1529 | www.mscu.com

A Mennonite financial cooperative serving communities of faith across Ontario.

Notice ofROAD PublicCLOSING Information Centre PROPOSED REGION OF WATERLOO

TAKE NOTICE THAT the Council of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo intends to pass a SIGN BY-LAW by-law to close a part of a road allowance located on Northfield Drive East (Regional Road 22), Part Lotwill 32, German Company PIN 22705-0401(LT), in the Township The described Region of as Waterloo be holding a publicTract, information centre to introduce a draft of Woolwich, Regional Municipality of Regional Waterloo.roads. The Regional Municipality of Waterloo will Regional By-law respecting signs on The proposed Sign By-law addresses also declare its interest in theonlands surplus to the Region’selection needs and offer the lands for all types of unoffi cial signs Regional roads including signs, business accessory sale tofarm the abutting property owners. accessory signs, open house signs and poster signs. signs, accessory signs, mailbox

The proposed Sign By-law establishes requirements for unofficial signs including: The proposed by-law and plan showing the land affected may be viewed at the office of Location and placement; the•Regional Clerk, 2nd Floor, Administration building, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener during • Size, shape, construction content; normal business hours (8:30 a.m. to and 4:30 p.m.) up to and including June 15, 2011. • Impacts to the function of the road; • Number of signs and timing of placement; and At a meeting to be held on June 15, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber, 150 Frederick • Sign removal. Street, Kitchener, the Council of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo will hear in person or by counsel, anyproposing person whoanclaims that their will be prejudicially affected by the said Staff are also amendment tolands the Region’s Tourism and Essential Services by-law whotoapplied to be heard. Those be heard may make arrangements Signingand Policy allow tourism signage ondesiring Regionaltoroads for agri-toursim activities. by phoning 519-575-4420. When: Tuesday, June 17, 2008, drop in 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. Place: Regional Administration Headquarters (lobby) For further information please contact Joan Moore, Property Agent, Region of Waterloo at 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener 519-575-4724. This public information centre is being held for the purpose of providing information and receiving comments from the public. A copy of the draft By-law is available for review in


THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, May 28, 2011

17 LIVING HERE

SUDOKU

THE CROSSWORD

HOW TO PLAY: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. You already have a few numbers to get you started.





                           

     

EASY

                        



HARD

WORD SEARCH / 2 , / 3 $ / 0 = 1 < 6 6 $ -

< ( : $ ( ( ' $ / , 8 3 $ 6 8

Acacia Agave Akee Alder Arum Asa Ash Aspen Atap Balm Bark Bass Bead Bo Dali Dari

6 8 0 $ & $ 6 % $ / 0 / 3 '

5 % 2 2 $ $ ( & 6 6 ) ( 6 ( $

2 $ : & 1 4 & 1 + + $ , ; 1 6

$ 6 $ 7 8 1 ) , ( ) / $ 5 & +

Elder Elm Fig Fir Glade Hip Holm Hop Ilex Ivy Jaca Judas Kauri Larch Leaf Lemon

1 6 ( 2 $ 8 7 / $ 9 & 3 ( $ 5

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/ $ % 7 $ 0 $ 5 , 6 . + , 3 *

/ $ 6 + ( 2 : ( / ' ( 5 2 / (

Lime Locust May Mowa Nut Nyssa Oak Oil palm Peach Pear Pecan Pipe Red gum Roan Rubber Sap

2 7 2 ' + $ / ' ( 5 + 6 $ 3 .

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Seedling Sequoia Shea Shittah Silver-wattle Sorb Sumac Tamarisk Tea Teil Tod Ulmus Upas Yew

> SOLUTIONS: Find the answers to all of the puzzles on pg. 28



ACROSS 1. Land tenure by agricultural service or payment of rent 7. Second part 14. Ancient 18. Frank acknowledgment 19. A picture representing a continuous scene 20. ___ donna 21. A republic in northwestern Africa that achieved independence in 1960 23. eliminate military organization 25. â&#x20AC;&#x153;48___â&#x20AC;? 26. Flight data, briefly 28. A hardy wheat grown mostly in Europe 29. Touch, lift, or hold with the hands 30. Resentments 32. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Empedocles on ___â&#x20AC;? (Matthew Arnold poem) 34. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Ngâ&#x20AC;? (They Might Be Giants song) 35. A nerve fibre or impulse passing toward the central nervous system 36. Newswoman Shriver 38. English artist noted for engravings that satirized the affectations of 1697-1764 40. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Raiders of the Lost ___â&#x20AC;? 41. Conduct an inquiry 42. Amazing adventure 46. Before noon 47. Any thing 49. Absorbed, as a cost 50. 100 centavos 51. Curb, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;inâ&#x20AC;? 52. Density symbol 53. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aeneidâ&#x20AC;? figure 54. Cuckoos 55. Coal container 56. Surfing need 57. Can of worms? 59. ___ grecque (cooked in olive oil, lemon juice, wine, and herbs, and served cold) 60. â&#x20AC;&#x153;... or ___!â&#x20AC;? 61. Branch of engineering that uses computers and telecommunications 62. Shake up 66. Metric unit of volume (one thousandth of a litre) 74. Altdorf is its capital 75. A Semitic language originally of ancient Arameans 77. Anglerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gear 78. Pastoral poem 82. Back-to-work time: Abbr. 83. Crude group? 85. Bell the cat 86. Harbour ill feelings 87. Yogiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s language 89. Ride the waves



























  

 







 











 



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1. Very thinly sliced raw fish 2. Exceeded 3. Someone who works to protect the environment 4. Cow, maybe 5. Plum variety 6. Carry away, in a way 7. Make sense, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;upâ&#x20AC;? 8. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hogwash!â&#x20AC;? 9. Examine similarities or differences 10. Familiarize 11. (Judaism) A loaf of braided white bread glazed with egg, containing eggs and leavened with yeast 12. Bypass



13. Back muscle, familiarly 14. Seed coverings 15. Thingamajig 16. Arab leader 17. Papa 20. An act done for amusement 22. Club consisting of a heavy stick bound with iron; used by police in India 24. Silly trick 27. Touch with the lips as an expression of love/greeting 31. A unit of conductance equal to the reciprocal of an ohm 33. ___ Khan 35. Blue 37. very poisonous metallic element that has three allotropic forms 39. Expresses position, direction or location 43. Bit of a draft 44. An album by trumpeters Hubbard and Shaw recorded in June 1987 and released on the Blue Note label 45. An academy for the advanced study of Jewish texts 48. Bullwinkle, e.g. 49. An electrical device that sends or receives radio or television signals 51. Jewish teacher 54. Expected hopefully

 



DOWN



 



91. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ any drop to drinkâ&#x20AC;?: Coleridge 92. Someone who dresses/acts like a member of the opposite sex 95. A canoe made by hollowing out a log 97. Barely beat 98. Small circular area such as the inflamed area around a pimple or insect bite 99. A rapid in some rivers 100. Live wire, so to speak 101. In walking position with right foreleg raised 102. Food processed in a blender











58. Oolong, for one 63. Tough 64. Consistent with fact or reality 65. Deception 66. Nelson ______ 67. I am 68. ___-tzu 69. Romeoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;two blushing pilgrimsâ&#x20AC;? 70. Freeze 71. Have the quality of being 72. Coming 73. A prophetess 75. Compound derived from ammonia 76. Musical form that is often the last movement of a sonata 78. Encouraged, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;onâ&#x20AC;? 79. Belief 80. Fencing action 81. More eccentric 84. To the point 87. Bickerer in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iliadâ&#x20AC;? 88. Persia, now 90. A German courtesy title for an adult woman 93. Protestant denom. 94. Undertake, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;outâ&#x20AC;? 96. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Gangâ&#x20AC;?

Film: Artists can make a living at what they love > CONTINUED FROM PG. 16 the next year instead of one will mean there are a few extra seats around the animation table for her to fill. If she canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t land a job at Pixar, she hopes to stay in California and find a position at Dreamworks, Disney or another studio, but her long-term plans involve an eventual return to Canada to make a home in Vancouver where her fiancĂŠ, Mitchell McLean, lives and works as a

carpenter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even just having the few months of training [at Pixar] on a rĂŠsumĂŠ, that could help the rest of my career when I come back to Canada. So really, this is setting up my whole career in a short amount of time.â&#x20AC;? Metzger also added that she would encourage anyone thinking of pursuing a career in drawing or the arts in general to just go for it, even if they are from a small town and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t see it as a viable option. She said if she

ever makes a name for herself in the industry, she will return to her small town roots and help students realize they can make a living in the arts, like she has. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was lucky that when my parents found out I wanted to do animation they researched the career and found out that you can actually make a living,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want kids to give up because no one else around them is doing it. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to go to an arts school to have an arts career.â&#x20AC;?


SPORTS 18

SPORTS

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

L

oud cheers were heard as the top athletic awards were handed out Wednesday at the Elmira District Secondary School athletic banquet, held at Lions Hall in Elmira. “It’s all about celebrating the excellence in sports for both the athletes and the coaches,” said Dale Roberts, head of the physical education department at EDSS. The night saw team coaches praising and celebrating their student athletes as they presented the most valuable player awards as well as the major athletic awards which included manager of the year, both the sportsmanship and sportswoman awards, most improved male and female athlete and outstand-

ing male and female athlete awards for both junior and senior students. Top honours went to Lydia Frey and Brandon Seip who both took home the outstanding senior athlete awards and also acted as the masters of ceremony for the night. Seip would also share the Colin Hood OFSAA School sport Award with Laura Jane Weber. The award is presented to one graduating male and one graduating female, who throughout their high school career have been committed to the success of sports at their school and their teams. Frey was the recipient of the Ernest Kendall Award for Outstanding Athletics and Academics for both her commitment to sports and academia.

PHOTO

Colin Dewar

» COLIN DEWAR

EDSS honours its athletes at awards banquet FOR A JOB WELL DONE Brandon Seip and Lydia Frey were honoured with the senior athlete awards at the EDSS athletic banquet held Wednesday night at Lions Hall. “[Frey] is an amazing popular as they are. success and how to never young woman and it has “I am very impressed with give up on your dreams. been great to watch someone the number of athletes we “Don’t rely on anyone to with her leadership abilities have at our school, we have do anything for you in sport. through out the years,” said 356 students who actively You have to go out and get it Roberts. “She truly deserves participate in sports and I for yourself. No matter how the success she has had and am very happy to see more good or bad your training earned everything she got kids finding interest in not has been, every match starts tonight.” just one sport but multiple at 0-0,” said Redman. Roberts also had praise for sports,” said Roberts. The last presentation of her coaching team saying, if During the course of the the night was delivered by it were not for them volun- night guest speaker Cana- both Frey and Seip honteering their time, the ath- dian beach volleyball player, ouring Roberts for her letic programs at the school Christian Redman, told the would not be as successful or young athletes his story of > SEE AWARDS ON PG. 21

EDSS boys pound St. Mary’s More medals for in slo-pitch match in Elmira synchro swim team James Jackson

Like so many sports this spring, season has been squeezed by wet weather; playoffs up in the air James Jackson

T

he EDSS boys’ slo-pitch team shook off an errorprone first inning to beat the visiting team from St. Mary’s 16-11 at Lions Park Tuesday afternoon. The win evens the Lancers’ record at 2-2, but early-season

rain and soggy conditions has meant that three of their games have been scrapped, with no guarantee of them being rescheduled in time for the end of the season. “Hopefully they're rescheduled, they’re supposed to be rescheduled, but it hasn’t come through yet,”

ELMIRA SUGAR KINGS ANNUAL MEETING Tuesday, June 7th, 7p.m. at the Elmira Fire Hall, 20 Howard Ave.

said coach Troy Shantz. A season-ending tournament is used to determine the league champions and has been earmarked for June 2, but the coach said there are talks of pushing it back one week to try and squeeze in some

> SEE SLO-PITCH ON PG. 19

he Waterloo Regional Synchronized Swimming Club continued its parade to the podium last weekend in Etobicoke. The club captured the provincial title to go along with 14 other podium finishes at the largest competition of the season, the Ontario Open Age Synchronized Swimming Championships. Heidelberg-resident Grace Adams came home with a sil-

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> SEE SYNCHRO ON PG. 19

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T

ver medal as part of the 16-20 Combo team, while the 11-12 year team captured the gold medal in a field of 22 teams from across the province. The team is coached by Jenna Kressler and includes: Amy Knechtel, Robin-Le, LopezNugyen, Alison Payne, Kate Steinbach, Zoe Kreze, Kelly Thurlow, and Jenna Schell. Sarah Bainwohl (13-15 solo) and Marina Triebe-Gravel (16-20 solo) also took home the

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

19 SPORTS

Slo-pitch: Lost games to be played? Synchro: Another strong outing

WATER CONSERVATION BY-LAW STARTS MAY 31 Once-per-week lawn watering is in effect May 31- September 30. Remember that lawn watering days are based on the last digit in your house number. If your address ends in: 0 or 1 your watering day is: Monday 2 or 3 Tuesday 4 or 5 Wednesday 6 or 7 Thursday 8 or 9 Friday 5:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. The following activities are permitted during the above watering hours for even-numbered addresses on even days of the month and for odd-numbered addresses on odd days of the month: • Watering of shrubs, trees and gardens • Washing of vehicles • Pool top-ups

Thanks for doing your part! For newly planted sod/seed lawns and nematode applications contact the Region for a permit. For more information: 519-575-4495 • www.region.waterloo.on.ca/water

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 18 silver in their events. Bronze medals went to both the 10U team, as well as Triebe-Gravel in the 16-20 figures event. The team rounded out the competi-

» SUBMITTED

more league games. The top half of the league will compete in the A tournament, while the bottom half of the league will compete in the B tournament. The lack of playing time for the team was evident for the Lancers in their match on Tuesday as the team committed two errors in the first inning, leading to an early five-run cushion for the visiting St. Mary’s squad. Elmira responded in the bottom of the inning, however. Pitcher Nevin Wilson – who gave up a home run to the first batter he saw in the game – helped his own cause by hitting a double to right field and was cashed in two batters later by Andrew Brubacher’s two-run double to centerfield. Ted Sebben then followed Brubacher with an inside-the-park homerun to cut the lead to 5-4. The team would tack on three more in the second inning thanks to a tworun homer from Brubacher and Sebben’s second homerun of the game for a 7-5 lead. Shantz said that it’s been hard for the team to gel together given their limited playing time together. They’ve only had one batting practice all year, and the coaches have been re-

lying on the player’s natural skills to get them through. “They do play in their own leagues, for the most part, so the fielding has been fine, but none of them really play slo-pitch so their timing has been a little off at the plate,” said Shantz. The sport has challenged hitters as pitchers lob the ball into the strike zone rather than zipping it in with full-force. “They’re used to fastball or windmill or hardball, so with lob-ball it’s hard to be patient enough to wait for it to come down to you,” Shantz laughed. But if Tuesday’s game is any indication, the Lancers’ bats appear to be heating up at the right time. Shantz said he hopes the team, playing in only its second season after slo-pitch was introduced to the league last year, can finish with a record above .500 and make the A tournament. “We pretty much have to win whatever games are left to make the A tournament,” said Shantz. “We’re in about the middle of the pack right now.” Their next game is slated for this Tuesday at Lions Park in Elmira, and the team must await notice of how officials plan to either squeeze in the cancelled games, or make other arrangements for the year-end tournament.

PHOTO

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

tion with three fourth-place finishes, one fifth-place finish, and four sixthplace finishes, including Lindwood’s Brooklyn Bowman, a member of the 11-12 year team coached by Kate McDonnell and Erin Noll.

SILVER FORMATION Heidelberg’s Grace Adams and the 16-20 combo team took home a silver medal at the OOAGSS competition last weekend in Etobicoke.

Notice ofSTUDY Public Information Centre NOTICE OF COMMENCEMENT PROPOSED REGION OF WATERLOO WEST MONTROSE WATER SUPPLY SIGN BY-LAW CLASS ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

The Region of Waterloo will be holding a public information centre to introduce a draft Background Regional By-law respecting signs on Regional roads. The proposed Sign By-law addresses Water incial thesigns community of West all typesservices of unoffi on Regional roads including election signs, business accessory Montrose (see figure) are provided to its signs, open house signs and poster signs. signs, farm accessory signs, mailbox accessory citizens through coordination between the The proposed Sign By-law establishes requirements for unofficial signs including: Township of Woolwich (Township) and the • Location and placement; Region of Waterloo (Region). In 1997, the • Size, shape, construction and content; Region completed a Class Environmental • Impacts to EA) thetofunction of the road; Assessment (Class address water supply • Number of signs andWest timing of placement; and issues associated with the Montrose • Sign removal. Water Supply System. Construction of the recommended upgrades was completed to in the Region’s Tourism and Essential Services Staff are also proposing an amendment May 1999. Signing Policy to allow tourism signage on Regional roads for agri-toursim activities.

When: Tuesday, 17, groundwater 2008, drop supply in 4:00system - 8:00has p.m. Since 2005, the West June Montrose faced operational challenges Place: Administration (lobby) that have Regional impacted the optimum use of Headquarters the existing sources. The Region is conducting this 150 Frederick Street, study to identify potential new waterKitchener supply sources for the community of West Montrose. This public Class EA information centre is being held for the purpose of providing information and receiving fromthis thestudy public. copy ofand therecommend draft By-lawtheis preferred available water for review in The Regioncomments has initiated to A evaluate supply the Clerk’s Offi ce, Region of Waterloo, 2nd fl oor, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener or on the alternative solution for the West Montrose Water Supply System with consideration for Region’s website at: social, natural, technical and economic factors. This study is being environmental, cultural, developed as awww.region.waterloo.on.ca Schedule “C” Municipal Class Environmental Assessment (Class EA) under - tab Newsroom, tab Public Notices Ontario’s Environmental Assessment Act. If you have questions concerning the By-law, please contact Nancy Button, Invitation Participate Engineering at 519-575-4520 or by email at Manager, toTransportation Public involvement is an important part of the Class EA process. Residents and community bnancy@region.waterloo.on.ca organizations are encouraged to participate by attending Public Information Centres (PIC) If you require accessible services to participate in this meeting, please contact the above and providing input for study consideration. This notification and any future documentation noted June for the person project by willTuesday, be posted on 10, the 2008. Region’s website at www.region.waterloo.on.ca/water. All comments and information received from individuals, stakeholder groups and agencies regarding this

project contact are beingeither collected to assist the Region of Waterloo in making decision. Municipal Please of the following study team members if youawould likeUnder more the information Act, personal information such as name, address, telephone number, and property location that may be at this early stage in the process or to be added to the study mailing list to receive direct notice included in a submission becomes part of the public record. Questions regarding the collection of this of future study events: information should be referred to the person indicated above.

Ms. PamButton Law, P.Eng. Ms. Oya Koc, P.Eng. Nancy Project Manager, Water ServicesEngineeringProject Manager Manager, Transportation Region Waterloo AECOM Regionofof Waterloo 150 Frederick Street, 7th Floor 5600 Cancross Court, Suite A 150 Frederick Street, 7th Floor Kitchener, ON N2G 4J3 Mississauga, ON L5R 3E9 Kitchener, ON N2G 4J3 Tel: 519-575-4095 Tel: 905-712-6998 Fax: 519-575-4452 Fax: 905-501-0181 Email: plaw@regionofwaterloo.ca Email: oya.koc@aecom.com All comments and information received from individuals, stakeholder groups and agencies regarding this project are being collected to assist the Region of Waterloo in making a decision. Under the Municipal Act, personal information such as name, address, telephone number, and property location that may be included in a submission becomes part of the public record. Questions regarding the collection of this information should be referred to Pam Law.


SPORTS 20

Never look a gift walleye in the mouth T

hrough no fault of my own, my family and I dined on walleye this week. It was, without doubt, the most memorable fish in recent seasons – a wonderful four-pounder that was literally effortless to acquire. My neighbour gave it to me. Admittedly, this is not exactly a proud moment – for him. Nor is it easy for me to confess. But, yes, I have a neighbour who thought nothing of giving me the only fish that he caught – and a beauty of a walleye at that. It happened unexpectedly. There I was, fishing off of my dock, having had no great luck on distant shoals. Suddenly, he and his wife puttered by. Until then, he was doing what any angler would do – raising his stringer and showing his fish to anyone who possessed enough eyesight to see it. “Nice fish,” I said, in that obligatory and insincere way.

Not-So-Great Outdoorsman Steve Galea But did he answer with a lengthy dissertation on how he caught it? Did he describe a life-and-death battle that pitted man against nature? Did he speak of the skill required to catch or land such a beast? Did he tell me, in an oblique way, that he was a far better angler? No, he did none of the normal things. Instead, he asked, “Should I release it or would you like to have it for dinner?” Up ‘til then, he seemed perfectly normal. I looked at him in disbelief. “Don’t toy with me,” I said, al-

though, between you and me, that would have been brilliant. It turned out that he was serious. He didn’t want to clean or eat the fish and thought that I might like it. Perhaps it was the manner in which I was salivating that clued him in. “Come get it when you feel like it,” he said, as he turned his back to tie off at his dock some 50 yards away. When he turned back to face me, I was already there. Smoke, in fact, was still rising from the treads of my shoes. After the obligatory photo shoot, I thanked him in the accepted ways, by offering to hand over my first-born child on the next full moon. Then, I walked back home, content that I had caught dinner. It was the nicest gesture that anyone had demonstrated to me in a long time. And he was only too glad to do it. Naturally, I wondered what was wrong with him. I mean who gives away a four-

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

pound walleye? Though I had no answer, I thought it would be prudent to lock all the doors that night and sleep with one eye open. He had, after all, clearly showed the first signs of a rudimentary mental illness. In all my years of angling, I have never heard of anyone giving away a prime eating walleye. And though that simple act raised property values on the lake substantially, the thought of it still haunted me. What if, for instance, he did have some sort of horrible mental illness that caused him to be humble about the fish he caught and happy to give them away? What then was my moral obligation? Well, after much thought and soul searching, I realized that my poor neighbour isn’t quite right. And, yes, he probably needs serious professional help. Perhaps, after the fishing season, I’ll get him some.

10

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ELECTION to the BOARD of DIRECTORS of the WATERLOO REGIONAL HERITAGE FOUNDATION

W PAY TE HE

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The WATERLOO REGIONAL HERITAGE FOUNDATION is a non-profit Corporation funded by Regional Council for the purpose of assisting organizations and individuals in the preservation of the heritage and culture of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo. The Board of Directors meets at 6:30 p.m. on the 4th Tuesday of each month, except July, August and December, in the Conference Centre, Regional Administration Building, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener, Ontario. The By-laws of the Foundation provide for the election of ten members-at-large to its Board of Directors. As of the Annual Meeting, there will be five (5) vacancies to be filled.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

21 SPORTS

Seven EDSS track and field athletes advance to OFSAA regionals hile none of the nine Elmira track and field athletes managed to bring home a gold medal at last week’s CWOSSA championships at Resurrection Catholic Secondary School, the Lancers did have seven athletes qualify for the OFSAA West Regional competition in London, Ontario this weekend. The team captured eleven top-five positions – including five second-place finishes – after the two-day meet was complete, and with so many athletes moving on to the OFSAA regionals, coach Lisa Douglas was pleasantly surprised. “We’re very, very happy with the results,” she said. “We knew all of them were

Awards: Athletes feted > CONTINUED FROM PG. 18 outstanding commitment to the schools athletic program. Roberts will be retiring from EDSS after working at the school for 20 years.

MAJOR ATHLETIC AWARDS Manager of the Year – Mackenzie Denison and Jillian Askes Sportswoman Award – Vanessa Lachance Sportsmanship Award – Yo Wang Most Improved Female Athlete – Tracy Weber Most Improved Male Athlete – Jon Milanovich Outstanding Jr. Female Athlete – Krista Weins Outstanding Jr. Male Athlete – Matt Bannon Outstanding Sr. Female Athlete – Lydia Frey Outstanding Sr. Male Athlete – Brandon Seip Colin Hood OFSAA School Sport Award – Laura Jane Weber and Brandon Seip Ernest Kendall Award for Outstanding Athletics and Academics – Lydia Frey

MVP AWARDS Sr. Girls Basketball – Kaitie Martin Badminton – Connor Goodwin and Nevin Wilson Jr. Girls Basketball – Krista Weins Jr. Boys Basketball – Lucas Nosal

“The success of the program would not have happened if it were not for (Roberts),” said Frey. “Every student who was a part of sports at EDSS over the years has been blessed to know her.”

Cross Country – Matt Bannon Sr. Boys Basketball – Brandon Seip Field Hockey – Yi Wang Curling – Bailey DeRose Jr. Football – Sam Maier Girls Hockey – Yi Wang Sr. Football – Matt Horst Boys Hockey – Christian Calenda Sr. Tennis – Connor Goodwin and Yo Wang Ski Team – Justin Hackman Jr. Boys Volleyball – Robbie Mazzocca Swim Team – Katherine Hoffman Sr. Boys Volleyball – Brandon Uhrig Jr. Girls Volleyball – Krista Weins Sr. Girls Volleyball – Tracy Weber Girls Rugby – Tracy Weber Girls Soccer – Yi Wang Boys Soccer – Yo Wang Track and Field – Matt Bannon Girls Slo Pitch – TBA Boys Slo Pitch – Nevin Wilson Jr. Tennis – TBA

fully he can close the gap and make it through.” Agada also finished 13th in the men’s high jump with a jump of 1.65 metres. Douglas was very pleased with the fact that four of the Lancer athletes – Aaron Lebold, Sab Huber, Matt Bannon and Jasmine Wilson – qualified in two events apiece. Bannon led the charge with a pair of second-place finishes, one in the men’s junior 1500-metre run where he finished in a time of 4:19.05, and the other was in the men’s 3000-metre run which he finished in 9:21.70. Lebold ended up in second in the midget men’s 800-metre run in a time of 2:06.86 and finished third in the 1500-metre run in 4:27.57. Jasmine Wilson came sec-

ond in the senior women’s javelin and fifth in the senior women’s discus, while Sab Huber came third in the 400-metre run, fourth in the junior men 200-metre dash, and 16th in the triple jump. Chad Bauman (third in junior men shot put) and Alex Hildebrand (fourth in midget women’s 3000-metre) also qualified for West Regional OFSAA, while Scott Shea (sixth in senior men’s long jump) and Julia Hildebrand (ninth in women’s 400-metre dash) failed to advance.

TOUGH COMPETITION Julia Hildebrand competes in the women’s 400-metre dash at last week’s CWOSSA track and field meet at Resurrection High School in Kitchener. She finished ninth.

» JAMES JACKSON

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close to qualifying, that they all had a good shot at it, but to have the seven of the nine qualify, it’s great.” The top five athletes in each event last week qualified for the this weekends competition at the University of Western Ontario campus. Of the five second-place finishes for Elmira, none were closer than Emeka Agada’s in the senior men’s 100-metre dash. Agada qualified for the finals tied for the fastest time of the day at 11.54, and despite shaving nearly a quarter of a second off his time in the finals, he came second by 1/100th of a second to Mitch O’Donnell from Forest Heights with a time of 11.29. “He’s hoping to get them next week,” Douglas said of Agada’s close finish. “Hope-

PHOTO

James Jackson

Men’s baseball season gets underway Breslau Badgers defeat Linwood Junior Chiefs in SPMFL opener

T

Colin Dewar

he boys of summer returned to Breslau Memorial Park on Tuesday night as the Breslau Badgers of South Perth Men’s Fastball League opened their season against the Linwood Junior Chiefs, fighting for both a victory and to stay warm. “We have to work out the kinks tonight, in the cold weather, underneath the lights in a new ball park,” said Badgers coach Jamie Simpson. Bad weather has canceled both practices and games for most teams in the league. “With the rain and the cold weather we have had, we haven’t had a lot of time to get together – we have

been out once so far this season to practice,” said Simpson. “We are fortunate that a bunch of the guys play on different teams in different leagues, so they have managed to get out a play a couple of times already. But this will be the first time a lot of the guys will be getting their spikes out.” Simpson, who became the Badger coach just last week, has some high expectations for his team. “We had a pretty good season last year, one of the best Breslau has ever had, so we have some high goals. We have a really good bunch of guys and we all want to make it to the final Sunday and be a part of the final three teams in September.”

Simpson, who does double duty as a pitcher for the team, said he is really impressed with his teammates. “They are all a great bunch of guys, we have Andrew Phibbs pitching for us this season, Brandon Horne who is a part of the British national team and a great first baseman in Jamie Sutton,” said Simpson. The Badgers defeated the Junior Chiefs 4-0, scoring all their runs in the bottom of the fifth inning. Team captain Sutton hit a three-run homerun. On the mound, Phibbs had a near perfect night, giving up one hit and striking out 13 batters.

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ENTERTAINMENT 22

ENTERTAINMENT

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

You don’t have to go far to enjoy a world of music Kitchener's civic square set to host the Our World Festival of Music next weekend Steve Kannon

PHOTOS

he weather hasn’t been overly cooperative, but Victoria Day weekend heralded the arrival of the summer season. Another sure sign? Outdoor music festivals such as the one next weekend that brings a world of sounds to downtown Kitchener. The Our World Festival of Music marks its sixth year June 3-4 in the civic square in front of city hall, officially launching Tapestry: Celebrations of Diversity. In that vein, this year’s festival features performances by artists whose roots reflect Canada’s rich musical and cultural diversity: a trip around the world from Cuba to Zambia, the Middle East to the American Southwest. “I’ve attempted to line up some very upbeat stuff, the kind of performances that create a real outdoor festival

» SUBMITTED

T

A VARIETY OF SOUNDS Western Swing Authority (left) headlines the Our World Festival of Music June 4, playing

their brand of classic Southwest tunes. On opening night June 3, Zambian-born Chasaya Sichilima is the featured performer. atmosphere,” explained pro- is Chasaya Sichilima, a Zambi- contemporary, pop and roots ducer Lawrence McNaught. an singer and songwriter who songs. The festival opens at 7 p.m. now calls Kitchener home. At 8 p.m., things take on a June 3 with a performance by He’s developed a sound that in- decidedly Latin flavour with The Bellydonnas, a troupe of corporates rhythm and blues Septeto, a collaboration of the dancers that is the area’s lead- with traditional Zambian folk top Cuban/Latin musicians ing exponents of this Middle music and has become known in Toronto performing classic Eastern dance form. They’ll be for his smooth silky vocals and son montuno, the root of confollowed at 8 by The Bosswich, unique dance moves. temporary salsa. a Waterloo-based octet of On Saturday night, things Switching gears to wrap up young performers who play an get rolling at 7 p.m. with The the evening, Western Swing upbeat mix of Jamaican-style Water Boys, a University of Authority will bring their acska and punk-influenced riffs. Waterloo-based all male a claimed southwest sound to The headliner for the night cappella group that offers up the stage. Featuring local mu-

sicians that include Shane Gusé (2010 CCMA fiddle player of the year) and bassist Matt Lima, the group is a collection of seasoned professionals with individual bios that span from Gordon Lightfoot and Ian Tyson to Kellylee Evans and George Canyon, as well as a who’s who of Canadian country music. The Western Swing Authority’s much-lauded debut CD recreates the sounds from the dancehalls of Texas and the Southwest in the 1930s and ‘40s. “It’s a sound in the classic style of Bob Wills and the Texas Playboys – very authentic,” said McNaught. “It’s really very beautiful music.” The Our World Festival of Music runs June 3 and 4, 7-10 p.m. Performances take place in the civic square in front of Kitchener city hall, which will also be home to food and craft vendors. Admission is free.

30 hours to mark 30 years

ETC celebrates its anniversary tonight with a theatre-thon event that will produce five one-act plays Steve Kannon

C

all it reality theatre. Fueled by adrenaline and caffeine, a group of Elmira Theatre Company performers take to the stage tonight (Saturday) to cap a 30-hour marathon of writing, casting and rehearsing a series of one-act plays. Think of the theatre-thon that marks ETC’s 30th anniversary as a trapeze act without a net. Or, jokes the group’s first president who’ll be emceeing the night, think of it as going to a car race to see if there’ll be a wreck. “It’s reality theatre. It will certainly be real, as opposed to reality TV,” said Quentin

Martin. “It’s a neat concept. It should be an interesting evening.” The theatre-thon will see five plays written, directed, rehearsed and performed within 30 hours. Five writers gathered at the theatre company’s Howard Avenue facility at 6 p.m. Friday, each charged with creating a one-act play. From 6 to 7 a.m. this morning, directors and stage managers read through the scripts. By 6:45, actors begin auditioning. Stage managers select their crews. Rehearsals begin at 8:45 a.m., running until 5:30 p.m. At 6:30, company members will be prepping the theatre for audiences, with the doors opening at 7:30.

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Everything has to be ready by show-time, notes producer Chris Grose. It’s a fair bit of ground to cover, especially as the whole process starts from scratch. And pretty much everything is an unknown factor. The only real preparation for the actual productions was the selection of a writer, director and stage manager for each of the five plays, the jist of which was still in the writers’ heads up until they sat down in front of the blank screens of the laptop computers provided for them. “We’re looking forward to this. The place will be abuzz with excitement,” she said in advance of a hectic weekend, the planning of which has

been underway since before Christmas. “We thought it would be a cool way to celebrate our 30th anniversary. For Martin, one of those who staged ETC’s first-ever show (The Mousetrap) back in 1981, the evening will be a chance to review the group’s many performances over the past three decades. “The sheer volume of stuff produced over that time is mindboggling.” As emcee, he plans to keep things moving along for the audience between each of the five performances through video clips of shows past, and by relating some ETC history. Fellow group members will be brought up to the stage and

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put on the spot, he joked. He’s looking forward to the finished products that will emerge from the marathon theatrical session. “The material will be raw. The performances will be fairly raw. The spontaneous nature of the productions makes for greater uncertainties … and risks,” said Martin. “This is going to be a lot of fun.” The culmination of the full day of fun starts on stage at 8 p.m. Saturday (May 28) with the first of five plays on tap for the evening. Tickets, limited to 100, are $10, available by calling 519-669-3230. The Elmira Theatre Company is located at 76 Howard Ave., Elmira.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

23 CLASSIFIEDS

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>>Garage Sale - Sat. May 28, 8 a.m. - 3 p.m., 166 Water St., St. Jacobs. Crafts, games, linens, clothing, jewellery, sewing, decor, household items, tv’s and lawnmower.

VIEWING: Friday June 3rd 2011, 1 pm to 4 pm TERMS: $500 Cash Deposit Required on Each Major Item, Balance in 48 Hours-Cash, Debit Card or Bank draft, or as announced.

M.R. Jutzi & Co

PROFESSIONALS IN THE ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AND APPRAISALS OF COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, CONSTRUCTION, MUNICIPAL EQUIPMENT & VEHICLES 5100 FOUNTAIN ST. NORTH, BRESLAU, ONTARIO, N0B 1M0

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519-648-2111

GARAGE SALES

GARAGE SALES

>>Garage Sale - 18 Duke St., Elmira. Sat. May 28, 8 a.m. - 2 p.m., rain date June 11. >>Garage Sale - Sat. May 28, 8 a.m. 20 Oriole Pkwy Elmira. Household items, sewing supplies and material, sporting goods, small electronics. Don’t miss it. >>Multi - Family Garage Sale. Sat. June 4th, 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. 16 Kingfisher Dr. Elmira. Snowblower, tiller, some furniture. Items big and small.

>>Moving Sale - Sat. May 28, 8 a.m. 8 Goldfinch St. Elmira. Glasstop table, desk, cedar chest, window treatments, i-pod, wedding items, bedding, antique chandelier and more. >>Vendors and Shoppers WANTED for MOM to MOM SALE Sat. July 16th from 9-12 inside the Fergus CW Sportsplex. Tables $25 to rent. Contact Kathleen 226-384-5678.

.

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PLACES OF FAITH

HEARING ASSISTED

NURSERY PROVIDED

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

SUNDAY SCHOOL

St. Teresa

Zion Mennonite Fellowship

Sun May 29th

No God, No Hope; Know God, Know Hope! Celebrate Eucharist with us

Worship Service - 10:30am

Ron Seabrooke Our Vision for WBC

Catholic Church Mass times are:

Sat. 5pm, Sun. 9am and 11:15am

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

Trinity United Church, Elmira “Our mission is to love, learn & live by Christ’s teachings” Sunday Worship: 10:30 am Sunday School during Worship Minister: Rev. Dave Jagger

rm A Wlcaome We all! to

www.execulink.com/~unitedchurch/index.html Visit us at: www.wondercafe.ca 21 Arthur St. N., Church office 519-669-5560

- The Junction -

Finding The Way Together 47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 www.thejunctionelmira.com

Bloomingdale Mennonite Church Sundays - 9:45 am Family Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday School for all ages

1151 Snyder’s Flat Rd., Bloomingdale • 519-745-2411 www.bloomingdalemennonite.com

Refocusing Your Priorities casual dress | contemporary music | christian church

SUNDAYS AYS @ 10:30AM Services at John Mahood Public School A

5 First St., Elmira • 519-669-1459 www.elmiracommunity.org

Discovering God Together

519-669-2319 | www.wbconline.ca 4522 Herrgott Road, Wallenstein

Gale

Worship 10:30am Sunday School during service

Minister: Rev. Dr. Linda Bell

Presbyterian www.galepresbyterian.com Church 2 Cross St., Elmira • 519-669-2852

Office Hours: M-TH 9-Noon & 1-3 • E galepresbychurch@golden.net

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

Reenergizing Your Life May 29, 2011

@ 11:00 am

Sunday, May 29, 2011 9:15 & 11:00 AM

“Gifted to Make a Difference” 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 Check out our website www.woodsidechurch.ca

10:30am Worship Service 9:15am Sunday School Pastor: Richard A. Frey www.stpaulselmira.ca

27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593

Check the Observer for your local faith listings!


CLASSIFIEDS 24

THE OBSERVER

NOTICE OF COMPLETE APPLICATION AND PUBLIC MEETING Tuesday June 21, 2011 7:00 p.m. Township Council Chambers 24 Church Street West, Elmira Regarding the following Applications • Joan Kron– Zone Change 9/2011 • Cultural Heritage Landscape in the Vicinity of West Montrose - Official Plan Amendment 3/2011 Take Notice that in accordance with the Planning Act, R.S.O., 1990, as amended, the Township of Woolwich has received complete applications for the above noted Zone Change and Official Plan amendment applications for proposed Zoning By-law and Official Plan Amendments as detailed below. Please be advised that Notice of a Complete Application does not indicate whether the municipality is in support of, or in opposition to the proposals. That determination will be made at a later date. The Township of Woolwich will hold a Public Meeting, under Sections 17 and 34 of the Planning Act, to consider the following Official Plan Amendment and Zone Change applications. No decisions will be made at this meeting; its purpose is to provide additional information to the public and agencies and to receive comments and information from them. Joan Kron– Zone Change 9/2011 The Township has received a Zone Change application from Joan Kron who owns the property located at 299 St. Charles Street East (see Map 1). The property is designated Rural Land Use and Restricted Land Use in the Township Official Plan and is zoned Agricultural (A). The 9.7 hectare property contains a single family dwelling, barn, drive shed and greenhouse. The purpose of the application is to amend the Agricultural zoning with a site-specific amendment through a Temporary Use By-law, to allow a mobile home to be located on the property for a 10 year period, to accommodate Joan Kron. The mobile home is proposed to be situated on a portion of the property along Pine Creek Road in order that it is in close proximity to her son and daughter-in-law who live at 6933 Pine Creek Road. Joan Kron’s grandson will reside in the main farm house.

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

reconstruction of character defining elements and designated buildings and structures on original building footprints and in the original building form; • Policies aimed at encouraging the awareness, appreciation and enjoyment of the CHL; • Policies concerning the continued investigation of the CHL to identify additional attributes, including additional views and view sheds that may exist in the CHL; and • Policies concerning the development of a Conservation Plan which will contain a more detailed description of the character defining elements and the methods for conserving these character defining elements. Please Note: APPEALS: Zoning Amendments If a person or public body that files a notice of appeal of a decision of the Council of the Township of Woolwich in respect of the proposed zoning by-laws does not make oral submissions at a public meeting or make written submissions to the Council of the Township of Woolwich before the proposed zoning by-law amendments are passed: a) b)

the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of the Township of Woolwich to the Ontario Municipal Board; and the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to add the person or public body as a party.

Official Plan Amendment If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at a public meeting or make written submissions to the Township of Woolwich before the proposed official plan amendment is adopted: a) the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo to the Ontario Municipal Board; and b) the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to add the person or public body as a party. NOTIFICATION: If you wish to be notified of the proposed official plan amendment, or of the refusal of a request to amend the official plan, additional Township public meetings or Township staff reports regarding these applications you must make a written request to Engineering and Planning Services at the Township of Woolwich at the address shown at the top of this page.

Cultural Heritage Landscape in the Vicinity of West Montrose - Official Plan Amendment 3/2011 Purpose and Effect The purpose and effect of draft Official Plan Amendment Application 3/2011 is to designate a Cultural Heritage Landscape in the vicinity of West Montrose (see Map 2) and add policies to the Township of Woolwich Official Plan that will conserve this Cultural Heritage Landscape in such a way that its heritage values, attributes and integrity are retained. Policies that will promote the awareness, appreciation and enjoyment of the West Montrose Cultural Heritage Landscape are also included in the draft Official Plan Amendment. More specifically the proposed policies for the conservation of the West Montrose Cultural Heritage Landscape (“CHL”) include the following: • Policies concerning the review of development applications within and in the vicinity of the CHL; • Policies concerning lot creation within and in the vicinity of the CHL; • Policies concerning the listing and designation of buildings and structures that constitute character defining elements of the CHL; • Policies concerning reduction of setbacks and similar regulations in order to allow

! W E N

If you cannot attend the meeting, you can express your concerns/comments about the proposed change in writing to the Township of Woolwich. Any comments received on or before June 14, 2011 (Note that this date is before the public meeting) will be included in a report prepared by Engineering and Planning Services and presented at the Public Meeting. Any comments received after the Public Meeting, but prior to Council making a decision on the applications, will also be considered. The personal information accompanying your submission is being collected under the authority of the Planning Act and may form part of the public record which may be released to the public. Questions about this collection should be directed to the Records and Freedom of Information Officer at 519-669-6005 or 519-664-2613 ext. 6005. MORE INFORMATION: The public may view planning documents and background material relating to this application at the Township of Woolwich, Engineering and Planning Services Department between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, or on the Township website at www.woolwich.ca. Questions or written submissions may be directed to: Township of Woolwich Engineering and Planning Services Department Box 158 24 Church Street West, Elmira, Ontario, N3B 2Z6 Telephone: 519-669-1647 / 519-664-2613 Dated at the Township of Woolwich this 28th day of May, 2011

ONLINE FORMS AVAILABLE ON THE TOWNSHIP WEBSITE.

If you are looking to register as a delegation, book a marriage ceremony or a request a commemorative certificate from the Mayor, visit our website at www.woolwich.ca and complete the new online form. It’s fast and easy!

NEW!


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

25 CLASSIFIEDS

Humans adopted by animals might do better left with them Q.

What are a few of the truly remarkable adoption stories on record?

Strange But True

A.

Those involving animals “adopting” humans, usually wolves or wild dogs rearing children, says Deirdre Barrett in Supernormal Stimuli. There have also been cases of bears, monkeys, chimpanzees and panthers doing likewise. In 1996, Bello, a two-year-old Nigerian boy, was found after being abandoned at age six months and spending a year and a half with chimpanzees. “He walked by bending his legs and dragging his arms on the ground and leaped about throwing objects. So far, he has learned some human language and social behavior but still makes chimpanzee noises amid his speech.” John Ssebunya, abandoned as a two-year-old in the jungle of Uganda, was adopted by a colony of African green ververt monkeys for three years. In 1991, when a tribe took the naked boy to an orphanage, he was more adept at climbing trees than walking and chattered like the monkeys; more recently, he has picked

Bill & Rich Sones

up some human language and now enjoys singing in a church choir. One of the best documented early cases was in 1920 when Kamala, age eight, and Amala, 18 months, were discovered in a wolves’ den in India. Both walked on all fours, ate only raw meat and kept nocturnal hours. Amala died after a year without learning any human language or gait; Kamala lived eight years, picked up a few words and learned to walk upright, though she reverted to all fours when in a hurry. When human children are found living among animals, their “foster parents” invariably try to prevent their removal. The monkeys harboring John Ssebunya bombarded villagers with sticks and stones; the wolf pack defended Kamala and Amala so fiercely that the adoptive mother had to be shot. “Reading these cases,” says Barrett, “it’s not

at all clear that people have done these children a favor by returning them to human society to which they never adjust completely.”

instrument). Despite their origins in Welsh, they are accepted English words (from the Writing Center of Central Washington University).

Q.

Q.

We all tend to like ourselves so much that we also like people who think and act as we do. What’s one surprising way this intangible is turned into cool cash by knowing practitioners?

Can you think of two threeletter words pronounced exactly the same though without any letters in common?

A.

“You” can if you also call to mind the word “ewe,” which pairs with your pronoun as prescribed, says Anu Garg in The Dord, the Diglot, and an Avocado or Two. Another duo even closer to your self is “I” and “eye,” though obviously with different letter counts. Are you savvy enough about vowels to say what “cwm” and “cwrth” have in common?

A.

Have you noticed that when others nod their heads as you do, you feel a certain rapport and liking. Such mimicry fosters fondness, a common experience, say Rick van Baaren and colleagues, as reported in Social Psychology by David G. Myers. One concrete result is higher tips for Dutch restaurant servers who mirror their customers by merely repeating their orders. Note Jessica Lakin and Tanya Chartrand, natural mimicry increases rapport, and the desire for rapport increases mimicry, tightening the bonds of contentment even as we diners open our wallets wider.

Q.

A.

Did we fool you on this one? There are no a’s, e’s, i’s, o’s, u’s or y’s in these words. “Cwm” (pronounced “koom” and defined as a steep-walled hollow on a hillside) is a rare case of an English word in which “w” is the nucleus vowel. The same is true of “cwrth” (pronounced “krooth,” a type of stringed

>>Send STRANGE questions to brothers Bill and Rich at strangetrue@cs.com

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CLASSIFIEDS 26

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

REAL ESTATE NEW LISTING

AFFORDABLE HOME

$259,000

Fantastic for first time buyers don’t miss out come and see it now. Open concept main living area, large kitchen to work in. finished rec room with fireplace. Dinette french doors to multi level deck and huge treed back yard. Some updates include: newer furnace, air conditioner, roof, most windows replaced. MLS Call Paul direct.

$399,000

Huge drive in shed/workshop 24ft x 36ft 2 storey metal shed. Lovely bungalow on .46 acre lot just outside Elmira. 3 bdrms, lg LR & RR. Inspiring kit complete w/pantry. Stariway to bsmnt from sngle garage. 2nd kit in bsmnt. Lg deck overlooking farmland. MLS Call Paul direct.

$379,900

3 bdrm, 3bath exceptional home is carpet free w/ceramic & hdwd throughout. Convenience at its best w/ upper flr laundry, 2 walk-in closets, many kit cupboard upgrades. Lovely garden door off dinette leading to lg deck in fenced yrd w/shed. MLS Call Paul direct.

$449,349

W/picturesque view on 100ft x 237ft lot in Hesson. 2900sqft. 4 bdrms, 3 baths, fabulous LR w/2story windows & vaulted ceiling. Huge kit w/breakfast bar. Lg bright MF lndry & walk-out to clothesline. Huge master w/walk-in closet, ens. Lg MB. MLS Call Paul direct.

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

Independently Owned and Operated | 180 Weber St. S., Waterloo

OFFICE 519-888-7110 SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-503-9533 www.homeswithpaul.ca

Alli Bauman

$43,500

$398,500

$307,000

519-577-6248

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

Don’t miss this great starter home! Very well kept home w/original charm & character. 3 bdrms, sep DR, mudroom, lg 28x12ft detached garage/workshop & many updates incl: flooring, furnace, all wiring. Carpet free, nice lg windows provide lots of natural light. Big bath w/linen closet. Partly fenced yard. Close to downtown. MLS Call Paul direct.

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-588-1348

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

$259,900

ELMIRA REAL ESTATE SERVICES

OPEN HOUSE - 11 Eagle Drive, Elmira Sunday May 29, 2-4pm FAMILY HOME $329,000.

Family home location, full 4 level open concept backsplit offers double garage, fenced yard, sunroom addition and 3+ bedrooms, 3 baths. Formal dining and livingrooms. Visit this Sunday for further details. MLS

ELMIRA INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY

$249,900.

Building lot available 52.8’ zoned R-5 plus renovated bungalow with full basement residential home on 66’ x 132’ lot, sold together or possible individually, subject to restrictions. MLS

Move in and enjoy! "Lilac" by Ivystone Homes. 1560sqft w/3big bdrms, 4baths, sep DR, Lg RR, double garage, & stunning foyer. Spacious master w/lg window and vaulted ceiling. Hrdwd and ceramic throughout main flr. MLS Call Paul direct.

COUNTRY PROPERTY!

$479,000

Perfect inlaw set up on 1 acre w/beautiful view of rolling countryside! Spacious 2440 sqft home 5 bdrms, 3-5pc baths, huge kit & dining area. Mf laundry w/clothes line door to backyard. Lg mudroom just off garage. Mf master. Den walk-out to deck. Rec room w/french door walk-out to patio. Inlaw set up. MLS call Paul direct.

GORGEOUS PROPERTY!

$429,900 Drayton.

Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage 519-669-3192 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

$329,000

ATTENTION FIRST TIME BUYERS

Bill Norris

Family home w/3 bdrms, eat-in kit, sep DR. Basement is fin’d w/rec room, den & bath. LR w/gas FP & lg bay window. Huge 75x165ft treed lot, above ground pool, shed. Deck is equip’d w/sunken hot tub. Many updates. MLS call Paul direct.

COMPLETELY FINISHED!

ELEGANT HOME

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

Beautifully maintained backsplit with a gorgeous yard and in-ground pool perfect for family fun and entertaining. This 4 level backsplit is fully finished with updates from top to bottom. MLS Call Alli or Bill direct.

BUNGALOW W/ BEAUTIFUL YARD

BEAUTIFUL HOME

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

ATTENTION ’SNOWBIRDS’

A wonderful park at the edge of Waterloo. This little getaway located in Green Acre Park is quiet, secure and has loads of activities. Open concept 2 Bedroom, 1 Bathroom Glendale 1989, 40 ft. Park Model Trailer (12ft x 40ft) with two additions. Mostly renovated and in excellent condition. MLS. Call Alli or Bill direct.

PREPARE TO BE IMPRESSED!!

COUNTRY PROPERTY!

Paul Martin Paul will donate $250.00 with every home he buys or sells in Woolwich to both Park Manor PS & WCS Family Violence Prevention Program.

NEW LISTING

BONNIE BRUBACHER Broker of Record

SHANNA ROZEMA Broker.

LAURIE LANGDON Sales Representative

MONIQUE ROES Sales Representative

OPEN HOUSE - 47 Ottawa Avenue, St. Clements Sunday May 29, 2-4pm PRIDE IN OWNERSHIP $409,900.

Beautifully maintained raised bungalow on private 100x150 property. Welcoming ceramic foyer, maple hardwood in hallway and bedrooms, large kitchen w/stainless steel appliances open to the dining area and family rm. addition, walkout to deck, spacious main floor living room, huge recreation room on the lower level with large windows plus games rm/den. MLS

Backs onto the Conestogo River and countryside! Enjoy the view from your cozy breakfast nook in this lovely cape cod style home. Main floor offers hardwood & ceramic floors, bright kitchen with island open to the dining area, living room w/gas fireplace, den and laundry/mudroom, 3 upper floor bdrms, finished walkout basement w/3 pc bathroom. Professionally landscaped grounds. MLS

LARGE LOT

$379,900 Linwood.

Lovely cap cod style on nearly ½ acre. Welcoming foyer, large eat in kitchen, family room, hardwood & ceramic flooring, separate dining room, large country kitchen, partially finished basement with workshop for the hobbyist, 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms including ensuite, backing on to farmland, within walking distance to school. NEW MLS.

DRAYTON BUNGALOW

$329,000.

Great Value! 5 year open concept, vaulted ceilings. Walkout to spacious deck, fenced yard and above ground pool. 3 Bedrooms, 2+ baths. Oversized double garage and triple+ concrete driveway. MLS

MAPLETON TOWNSHIP

$449,900.

5 ACRES of mature mixed bush, creek and clearing. New 2100 sq ft home with full walkout basement. Make your choice of flooring and cabinets offered through builders selection. MLS

No matter what your style...we’ve got what you’re looking for every week in the Real Estate section of the Observer.

IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

27 CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE

Sunlight Homes

Jake Benjamins Broker

519-575-9092

Drayton Heights

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

VISIT US SATURDAY AND SUNDAY!

Independently Owned and Operated

4B Arthur St. S. Elmira • www.remaxsolidgold.biz OFFICE: 519-669-5426

$324,900

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

BERT MARTIN, BROKER

EXQUISITE DECORATING!

View the countryside from the loft in this beautifully decorated home offering hardwood & ceramic flooring, open concept dining area & kitchen with island, three bedrooms, two bathrooms plus ensuite with corner tub, walkouts from dining area and basement, one & one half garage, backs to green space. To view this property call Bert. MLS.

$359,900

Located in the picturesque village of Hawkesville, this lovely 4 bedroom home is the perfect setting for a family. Large country kitchen and great room with woodstove and maple hardwood flooring. Most windows newer, 6 appliances included, main floor office, heated workshop attached to house, 12’ X 8’, plus small barn, 16’ X 10’. Call Benjamins Realty Inc., 519-575-9092, Broker of Record. MLS

W NE

ING T S LI

DAIRY FARM!

110 acres with large 12 year old bank barn, 3 silos with unloaders, inside & outside grain storage, equipment shed 5 years old, 5 bedroom house with recent addition, new drilled well, new septic tank and weeping bed. MLS. Call Bert to view.

The Edge Semi-detached homes from Choose from one of our plans or let us custom build your home fully detached. Homes starting from

$239,990 Many models to choose from Learn More About Sunlight Heritage Homes and Our fine communities by Visiting us Today! Alyssa Henry Lisa Hansen Tribble Sales Representative

Sales Representative

Your referrals are appreciated!

$189,990

www.sunlighthomes.ca

519.787.0203

Have a question? Email us at: info@sunlighthomes.ca

Scott Grainger

Barrister and Solicitor Phone: 519-669-1736 Fax: 519-210-1736 scott@propertyshop.ca CALL A PARTICIPATING LAWYER TO FIND OUT HOW PROPERTYSHOP.CA CAN WORK FOR YOU IN THE SALE OF YOUR MOST IMPORTANT ASSET.

THIS WEEK’S LISTINGS WITH PROPERTYSHOP.CA

735 Reid Crescent, Listowel - Property ID# 2511

BROKERAGE

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. 45 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

BRAD MARTIN

519-669-2772

MVA Residential

Broker of Record,

JULIE HECKENDORN

TRACEY WILLIAMS

Res: 519.669.1068

Res: 519.669.8629

Cell: 519.505.0627

Broker

Sales Rep.

PRICE: $269,500

COME HOME TO 735 REID CRESCENT! This 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom gem in Listowel is everything you need. Set at the margin of the Listowel Golf & Country Club, this home provides all the quiet of small town life, with all the convenience of a modern family home which is defined by natural light and accommodates the flow of family living. Enter through the foyer, past the powder room to discover an open concept mainfloor. OPEN HOUSE SATURDAYS The kitchen, featuring an island/breakfast bar, solid oak cabinetry and stainless FROM 1-3P.M. appliances, opens to a spacious dining area. A little further along, you will find an expansive sunken living room, graced with oak hardwood and glorious windows opening to the fully fenced backyard, mature trees and the local golf course. Your next stop will be the second floor family room, where natural light also presides. You’ll find the perfect window here for your Christmas tree; this family room may become your favourite room in the house....a place where family naturally gathers. Just a few more steps take you to the bedroom level, featuring a master bedroom with walk-in closet and windows tucked under mature trees. This master gives you that sense of quiet and rest you’re looking for. The four piece cheater ensuite includes a luxurious corner soaker tub with jets...You’re going to love being here because 735 Reid Crescent is home. Priced far below 2008 assessed value, this home is not going to last...Call Sue today to arrange a private showing or attend an open house Saturdays between 1 pm and 3pm.

74 Porchlight Drive, Elmira - Property ID# 2518

PRICE: $342,900

KEEP THE PORCHLIGHT ON! This 3 plus 1 bedroom home, backing to greenspace features open concept and convenient living, minutes from schools and the new Woolwich Memorial Centre recreation complex. Nicely decorated throughout,you will find a cathedral entry with a clear view through the dining area to patio slider, looking over the deck, backyard and community walking path. The kitchen provides ample space for meal preparation, inclusive of OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY a kitchen island, breakfast bar, included FROM 2-4P.M. gas range, over the range microwave (2010) and dishwasher. In this open concept home, the chef is never excluded from family events. Your living room features hardwood flooring installed in 2010. Upstairs, three ample bedrooms and two bathrooms are provided, including the master with ensuite and luxurious corner soaker tub. The basement is fully finished and includes a fourth bedroom, with a cedar closet and an ensuite of it’s own, to be finished to your taste! In fact, this home includes 4 bathrooms! Mechanically, you have central air, an included water softener, gas dryer and a gas line for your barbecue and reverse osmosis water treatment system (both installed in 2010). The home is roughed in for central vacuum. Garage is large for homes of this class, with high ceilings. Please contact Scott Grainger at (519) 669-1736 to arrange a private viewing or attend an Open House, Saturdays between 2pm and 4pm.

PROPERTY ID#’s 2511 & 2518

CALL THE 24 HOUR INFO LINE FOR MORE DETAILS: 519-742-5700 | 1-866-432-6884 + Property ID# is extension or visit us online at:

for photos & full descriptions • www.propertyshop.ca

LEON MARTIN

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage | Independently Owned and Operated

BUNGALOW on a quiet street close to downtown. Lge. master bdrm. Main flr. laundry. Large L.R./D.R. area. Eat-in kitchen. Fin. rec. room, office area, bdrm. & 4pc. bath in lower level. New furnace (2011). MLS $244,900.

COUNTRY LOTS .5 acre don’t miss this chance to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. Within 40 minutes KW, or Guelph. High speed internet is available with fibre optic. Starting at $68,000 MLS

LOCATION! Lovely wooded lot. Newer kitchen. Walkout to partly covered deck. Carpet free home. Updated bathroom, windows & doors. Walkout bsmt - Rec. room w/ gas f.p. Games rm. & 2pc. in lower level. MLS $399,900.

Two storey 3 bed and 3 bath room home on a half acre lot, open concept, high speed fibre optic internet available. $319,900 MLS. Financing available O.A.C. REDUCED

GLEN ALLAN - great view of the countryside! Custom built 4+ bdrm. with fin. walkout basement. Large country kitchen w/walkout. Open concept to fam. rm. Main flr. master bdrm. & ensuite. Dble. garage + detached garage 24’ x 30’. A MUST SEE. MLS Reduced $499,900.

CONESTOGO - secluded bungalow on 1 acre, backing to a wooded ravine. Almost 2900 sq.ft. of luxury! Major renovations in 2008. 2 master suites on the main flr. Finished walkout bsmt. w/separate entrance leads to an inground salt water pool. MLS $949,900.

www.thurrealestate.com

Industrial For Lease. Local heated shop is available. Total square feet is 4400. Lots of parking. $1800.00 per month. MLS Space for lease. 4000 square feet. Available immediately. Industrial in Waterloo. $2700 per month. MLS ADDRESS: 4-B Arthur St. S., ELMIRA • EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net DIRECT: 519-503-2753 • OFFICE: 519-669-5426

TRAVEL WITH THE

Take your Observer on all your travels, take a picture with it and then send it into us.

info@woolwichobserver.com

Gorgeous home, 3 bedroom back split, on a large landscaped lot, with the greatest family room, eat in kitchen, 2 bath, central air, gas fireplace. 234,900 MLS


CLASSIFIEDS 28

THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, May 28, 2011

SERVICE PROS AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

THOMPSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

TIRE Complete Collision Service

WHERE TIRES

Body Maintenance

RUDOWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

ARE A

at

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.

RUDOWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

519.669.8330

Call Us At

519-669-3373

Farm â&#x20AC;˘ Auto â&#x20AC;˘ Truck Industrial â&#x20AC;˘ On-The-Farm Service

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

CRANE

CARPET CARE

RENOVATION CLEAN UPS! Call for Details

Learn More Online At...

budurl.com/SAVE139

24 Hour Service

Chem-Dry AcclaimÂŽ 61 Arthur St., N. Elmira

7 Days A Week

669-3332

DECORATING

6672 Ruggles Rd. Floradale RR#2 Wallenstain, N0B 2S0

READâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

CALL NOW TO BOOK YOUR SUMMER PROJECTS

519-638-2699

519-669-3082

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

ST. JACOBS

GLASS SYSTEMS INC.

â&#x20AC;˘ Residential â&#x20AC;˘ Commercial â&#x20AC;˘ Industrial

Specializing in Paint & Wall coverings

FREE ESTIMATES â&#x20AC;˘ Store Fronts â&#x20AC;˘ Thermopanes â&#x20AC;˘ Mirrors â&#x20AC;˘ Screen Repair â&#x20AC;˘ Replacement Windows â&#x20AC;˘ Shower Enclosures â&#x20AC;˘ Sash Repair

ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

519.669.1462 Fax: 519.669.9970 Tel:

FOR ALL YOUR HOME DECORATING NEEDS. 27 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

519.669.3658

Home Improvements

1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

Randy Weber

www.completecarpetcare.ca

WINDOWS & DOORS

ROOFING | SIDING | SOFFIT & FACIA DRYWALL INSTALLATION

MURRAY MARTIN | 519.669.9308

TEL: 519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

1722 Floradale Rd., Elmira, ON, N3B 2Z1

FAX: 519 664-2759 â&#x20AC;˘ 24 Hour Emergency Service

18 KingďŹ sher Dr., Elmira

EAVESTROUGH

TROPHY

Driveways â&#x20AC;˘ Sidewalks â&#x20AC;˘ Curbs â&#x20AC;˘ Barn Renovations Finished Floors â&#x20AC;˘ Retaining Walls â&#x20AC;˘ Short Walls Decorative/Stamped and coloured concrete

COMMERCIAL â&#x20AC;˘ RESIDENTIAL

SINCE 1961

LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

Ltd.

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

GLASS SERVICES

ELECTRICAL

DECORATING

519-669-7607

-Framing -Roofing -Renovations -Repairs

Design/ Build Agricultural/ Residential

$139 FREE Gift Offer

(Emergencies only)

â&#x20AC;˘ Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location â&#x20AC;˘ Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off and Pick up Service â&#x20AC;˘ Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair â&#x20AC;˘ Janitorial â&#x20AC;˘ Grout Cleaning â&#x20AC;˘ Carpet Repair & Re-Installation â&#x20AC;˘ Pet deodorization â&#x20AC;˘ Floor Stripping

ROB McNALL

CONSTRUCTION

NEW CLIENTS

ST. JACOBS

CONCRETE

CONSTRUCTION

NOW ACCEPTING

519-664-9999

519-669-7652

30 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA

Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

â&#x20AC;˘ 14 ton BoomTruck â&#x20AC;˘ 40 ton Mobile Crane

Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400

CARPET CARE

ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd. Renovating? Let us do the clean up

accuracy and confidence.

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519.669.8917

21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

to repair your vehicle with

519-669-3373

AFTER HOURS

519-669-3232

Providing the latest technology

1-800-CARSTAR

FAX: 519.669.3210

AUTO CLINIC

Auto Tech Inc.

24 Hour Accident Assistance

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

AUTOMOTIVE

BIKE REPAIRS

SERVICE DIRECTORY

BICYCLE SALES & REPAIRS

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

THIS SPACE

GET YOUR BICYCLES READY

IS FOR RENT

With an expert spring tune up AGRICULTURAL â&#x20AC;˘ COMMERCIAL â&#x20AC;˘ RESIDENTIAL

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING

â&#x20AC;˘ High Quality Installation of Steel & Aluminum Eavestrough â&#x20AC;˘ Rugged Steel Eavestrough for Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Metal Roofing Systems

Call today to get your business listed!

JEREMY MARTIN

PH 519-502-4679 | Fax 519-291-6624

QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

xcountryeaves@live.ca

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102

22 Church St. W., Elmira

519.669.5790 | www.ObserverXtra.com

Tel: 519-669-5537

8632 Concession 3, RR#3 Listowel, ON, N4W 3G8

STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

6 $ 6 + , 0 ,

2 9 ( 5 5 $ 1

5 ( % % (

$ ( 5 , $ / 6

& 2 1 6 ( 5 9 $ 7 , 2 1 , 6 7

& 5 ( ' 2

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CROSSWORD

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS / 2 , / 3 $ / 0 = 1 < 6 6 $ -

< ( : $ ( ( ' $ / , 8 3 $ 6 8

6 8 0 $ & $ 6 % $ / 0 / 3 '

5 % 2 2 $ $ ( & 6 6 ) ( 6 ( $

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SUDUKO - EASY

        

        

        

        

        

SUDUKO - HARD

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

29 CLASSIFIEDS

SERVICE PROS MEDICAL TREATMENT

LAWN MAINTENANCE

Services

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada

> Commercial & Residential > Fully Insured > WSIB Clearance > Senior Discount

Established 2000

kdetweiler@rogers.com

● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

519-669-0220

ER RS OVYEA 10

PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIALISTS!

ALMA, ONTARIO

SERVICE DIRECTORY

RENOVATIONS

Steve THIS Ben White SPACE Co. IS FOR RENT

Renovations and Home Improvements SAVE Basements or Baths

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

THE

HST

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs.

Call today to get your business listed!

24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

ELMIRA

519.669.5790

519-669-3652

www.ObserverXtra.com

SEPTIC SERVICES

Book a basement or bath reno by May 31st 2011 and WE PAY THE HST on your labour

- THAT'S A 13% SAVINGS!!! All work is guaranteed and insured. Estimates are free. Bloomingdale, ON

19 First St. E., Elmira

519-669-3362

519-896-7700

or

519-648-3004

www.biobobs.com

TREE SERVICE

T R

E

E

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE

Call

519-669-4964

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

WINDOW COVERINGS

•Removal of Trees or Branches of Any Shapes or Sizes in Almost Any location

Serving Elmira and Surrounding Area for over 30 years!

BOOK NOW FOR SPRING INSTALLATION. CALL SCOTT SEILING FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE.

519.698.2114 In Business since 1971 • Fully Insured

now available

TOP QUALITY ROOFING SYSTEMS Locally Owned & Operated Since 19 96

Roof Replacement Specialists Cedar Shakes Composite Tiles All Flat Roofing Systems Call or email Mike for your FREE estimate. Office: 519.206.4484 | Cell: 519.575.0311

mbender@rogers.blackberry.net

TREE SERVICE •Tree Trimming & Removal • Aerial Bucket Trucks • Stump Grinding • Arborist Evaluations • Fully Insured & Certified • Certified to Work Near Power Lines

FREE BAG In troductor y Offer

> Superior Salt Products > Fast, Friendly Service > Convenient Delivery Times > Discounts for Seniors

FREE ESTIMATES

Taking Salt to Peoples’ Basements Since 1988

519-747-2708 Waterloo www.riepersalt.com

WOODWORKING

SERVICE DIRECTORY

Country CraftsmanShip

David Sherk Woodworking CUSTOM SOLID WOOD RAISED PANEL DOORS

THIS SPACE IS FOR RENT

EDGE GLUED PANELS, TREADS, TURNING SQUARES ETC.

•Hedge trimming •Branch Chipping

Specializing in solid wood components

•Stump Grinding

519-669-1836 Thomas Martin

today 519.669.9081 mobile: 519.505.0985 | fax: 519.669.9819 ever-green@sympatico.ca

ROOFING

SALT

Various sizes & rates

Basler, Owner/Operator,

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches

519-404-0514

Septic Tank Cleaning

Waterloo Region • Woolwich Township

Call Jeff

R O O F I N G

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

Inspections for Real Estate Septic System Repairs & Restoration Catch Basin Cleaning

• Lawn Mowing Packages • Lawn Maintenance & Landscaping • Top Dressing/Overseeding • Mulch Delivery & Installation • Commercial & Residential Snow Plowing & Ice Control

AMOS

benwhiterenovations@bell.net

SELF STORAGE

519.669.5643

Cell | 519.504.5934

YOUR SOURCE FOR YEAR-ROUND PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

ROOFING “Your Old Home Specialist”

rozell_soehner@yahoo.ca

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

BRUBACHER LTD.

519.846.5427 FAX: 519.846.5134

PLUMBING

519-669-2251

C.J.

www.groprolawncare.com

Planting | Garden Design Lawn Maintenance All Your Gardening Needs

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

PLUMBING

YOUR

519-669-1278

Anita Soehner Clean Up | Mulch

free estimates interior/exterior painting wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

36 Hampton St., Elmira

56 Howard Ave. Unit 2, Elmira, ON, N3B 2E1

> Excavating > Trenching > Backfilling > Fine Grading > Overseeding & Top Dressing > Lawn Seeding

PHONE:

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

www.reimerhbot.com

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

Murray & Daniel Shantz

Complete Garden and Lawn Maintenance

For more information call:

OWNER-OPERATOR

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

F. David Reimer

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications:

KEVIN DETWEILER

P: 519-669-1188 | F: 519-669-9369

Just Gardens

20 years experience

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

Lawn Maint Maintenance Main tenance Programs | Spring Clean-up Flower Bed Maintenance Programs Leaf Clean-up and Removal | Soil & Mulch Delivery & Installation | Snow Clearing & Removal | Ice Control 27 Brookemead, St, Elmira

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

INC

Outdoor

PAINTING

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

TEL: 519-699-9315 | St. Clements, ON sales@davidsherk.com | www.davidsherk.com

Call today to get your business listed!

519.669.5790 | www.ObserverXtra.com


CLASSIFIEDS 30

THE OBSERVER

OBITUARY

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR “A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Kleensweep Carpet Care

West Montrose, ON

T. 519.669.2033

COLLEEN

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

KIN KORNER

Rugs and Upholstery

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS • Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

519.669.5105

P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

TOTAL HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

519.664.2008

SANYO CANADIAN

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

NANCY KOEBEL

Bus: 519.895.2044 ext. 217 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Suite 800, 101 Frederick St., Kitchener

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville

July 23rd

519-699-4641

Register Your Team Today!

www.freybc.com

woolwichkin.com

MAY 27

>>Elmira Horticultural Bus trip to the Royal Botanical Gardens. Departing from Pentecostal Church parking lot at 8:30 a.m. returning approximately 5:30 p.m. Call Diane at 519-669-8217 for further details. >>H.U.G.S.

Program – 9:15-11:15 a.m. Come meet with parents to discuss parenting and child health issues. Topic: Basic Photography Skills – Stephanie Marshall will describe techniques to taking effective pictures of our children. Held at the Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr. St. Jacobs. Call Heidi at 519664-3794 ext. 237 for more information.

>>A Tribute To Patsy Cline the Legend featuring Marie Bottrell, Canadian Country Music Hall of Fame inductee, seven-time Juno nominee and two-time CCMA winner; 7 p.m., doors open at 6 p.m. Concert and large silent auction takes place at Floradale Mennonite Church, 22 Florapine Rd., Floradale. Dessert and refreshments provided. Tickets $25 each. Please call Woolwich Counselling Centre at 519669-8651, ext. 100 for tickets. Avoid disappointment – get your tickets early! MAY 28

>>Fireworks – the Fireworks that the Conestogo-Winterbourne Optimist had planned for May 23rd was cancelled due to rain. The fireworks will now take place on Saturday, May 28 starting at 6 p.m. with kiddy rides and hot dogs. Admission is $5 per family. >>Grandparents Play Day – 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free at Kinds & I, Birdland Plaza, Oriole Parkway, Elmira. All grandparents must be accompanied by a grandchild 4 & under. >>Purina Dog Walk 9:30 a.m. at Waterloo Park at the Hospitality area. Hosted by St. Jacobs Lions Club in support of Canine Vision. >>WTHHS

Historical Room at the Old School, 1137 Henry St., Wellesley between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. featuring new displays and interesting historical facts about Wellesley Township. Come and share interesting heritage and history of Wellesley Township every last Saturday of each month, except December. Free admission.

MAY 29

>>Lions Foundation of Canada Purina Walk for Dog Guides hosted by Woolwich Community Lions Club, Kissing Bridge Trail, Arthur St. entrance, Elmira. 9 a.m. (you may wish to register and start walking at 8 a.m.). All proceeds will help fund Dog Guide programs – Canine Vision, Hearing Ear, Special Skills, Seizure Response and Autism Assistance Dog Guides. Prizes,refreshments. All ages, fitness levels with or without a dog are welcome to participate. For more information please call 519-669-5084 or long on to www. purinawalkfordogguides.com >>Laurindo and Friends In Concert. Guitar sensation Laurindo and his quartet perform a concert at The Schoolhouse Theatre, 11 Albert St. St. Jacobs at 7:30 p.m. Tickets $18 can be purchased at The Stone Crock in St. Jacobs, or by email at Laurindo53@live.ca or at the door. Music styles presented are Latin, Pop, Gypsy, Jazz, Celtic and Smooth Jazz.

MAY 30

>>Cholesterol Solutions class will be held from 1:30-3:30 p.m. Find easy ways to improve your cholesterol level. Join our Registered Dietitian at Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr. St. Jacobs. For more information call 519664-3794.

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess. Elmira & Surrounding Area

JUNE 3

>>Maryhill K. of C. and C.W.L Fish Fry – Maryhill Heritage Community Centre. Two sittings, 5:30 & 7 p.m. Adults (12+) $14; children (6-11) $7; preschool (5 & under) free. Tickets: Doug 519-648-2939; Mike 519-648-3394; Mary 519-822-9287.

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763 psgingrich@hotmail.com

>>K2K Year End Dance held at the Woolwich Community Centre, 29 Parkside Dr. in St. Jacobs; 7-10 p.m. Students from grades 5-8. Parents must accompany their student to the door for registration. JUNE 4

>>Grand River Motorcycle Ride For Dad. Pre-registration June 3 at Stampede Corral, Kitchener, noon – 8p.m. Ride Day June 4, Sportsworld Crossing, Kitchener. Parade leaves 9 a.m. sharp! For more information visit www.MotorcycleRideForDad.org

21 INDUSTRIAL DR. ELMIRA

519-669-2884

>>Crosshill’s

3rd Annual Rhubarb and Rhummage Sale; 8-2 p.m. Massive Rhumble Seat Rummage Sale, local vendors market, bake sale, fresh Rhubarb sale, Rhuby Café with “All Things Rhubarb,” free children’s activities and free snacks. Or join us with your vehicle full of Rhummage items to sell. We provide the venue and marketing, you provide the Rhummage Sale and keep the profits. Join us at Crosshill Mennonite Church.

JUNE 5

>>Decision – Southern Gospel, 7 p.m. Come and welcome this local group as they minister to us in song. Waterloo North Presbyterian Church, 400 Northfield Dr. W., at Northfield Dr and Westmount. 519888-7870. Free-will offering, wheelchair accessible. JUNE 7

>>Caregiver Coffee Hour – this coffee hour is offered to those caregivers of a family member with Alzheimer’s disease. Sessions are held on the first Tuesday morning of each month, 10-11 a.m. at Chateau Gardens in Elmira. For more information about the monthly topic, call Lorraine at the Woolwich Community Health Centre, 519-664-3794 ext. 229. JUNE 10

>>H.U.G.S. Program – 9:15-11-15 a.m. Come meet with other parents to discuss parenting and child health issues. Topic: ADD/ADHD – Paula Brunkard from Kidslink will explain the difference and how to recognize the symptoms. Held at Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr. St. Jacobs. Call Heidi at 519-664-3794 ext. 37 for more information.

CORPORATE WEAR PROMOTIONAL APPAREL WORK & SAFETY WEAR | BAGS T-SHIRTS | JACKETS | HATS

245 Labrador Drive | Waterloo

519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com

PRINTING & COPYING SERVICES Black and white, 8 1/2 X 11 flyers designed and printed for as low as 6¢. Professionally designed, quick turnaround, local service. Delivery, folding and colour work also available. Call 519.669.5790 ext 107 for details.

Musselman, Elma Laura (neé Shoemaker)

Peacefully went home to be with the Lord on Friday, May 20, 2011 at KW Health Centre of Grand River Hospital. Elma, in her 91st year, was of Elmira and formerly of RR 2, Ariss. Loving wife of the late Ervin G. Musselman (2005). Devoted mother of Murray and Sally Musselman of Gowanstown and their children Margaret and Steve Raycraft, Connie and Randy Mayburry, Janet and Henry Verner, Becki and Jamie Bell; Ruth Ann and George Bauman of Hanover and their son Stacey and Ronna Bauman; Robert and Debbie Musselman of Elmira and their children Laura Musselman, Caroline and Dave Shaw, Ashton Musselman; Kenneth and Elizabeth Musselman of Elora and their children Dorlisa Loney, Matthew and Charlotte Musselman, Andrew and Courtney Musselman, Mary Lee Musselman, Katrina Musselman; Douglas and Pauline Musselman of Kitchener and their children Eric and Maria Musselman, Ingrid and Tim Musselman Bell, Heidi Musselman, Peter and Heather Musselman; Morris and Gail Musselman of Ariss and their children Chad Musselman, Sean Musselman, Lori Mussleman; Marlene and Phares Martin of Elora and their children Lindsay Martin, Joshua Martin; and Richard and Barb Musselman of Elora and their children Renae and Robert Van Zyle, Danielle and Brad Walker. Fondly remembered by her 20 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Wilfred and Ella Shoemaker of Elmira, Herb and Wilma Shoemaker of Fergus, Milt and Naomi Shoemaker of Elmira, sisterin-law of Lorne and Esther Musselman of Kitchener, and Arnold Meyers of Waterloo. She was predeceased by her parents Wesley and Edith (Hasenpflug) Shoemaker and a grandson-in-law Rob Loney. Elma enjoyed reading to her friends at Chateau Gardens and she loved gardening, knitting and crocheting. The family received their friends and relatives at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira on Sunday, May 22, 2011 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. and on Monday, May 23, 2011 at Bethel Mennonite Church, RR 1, Elora from 1-2 p.m. A family interment service took place in the adjoining cemetery followed by a memorial service in the church at 2:30 p.m. with Pastor Linda Brnjas officiating. In her memory, donations to Chateau Gardens Auxiliary or MCC would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

Everything that’s fit to print...

Plus a whole lot www.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

31 CLASSIFIEDS

FAMILY ALBUM

OBITUARY

STAG & DOE

STAG & DOE

Stag & Doe

Sarah Braid & Ian Dunbar

Sutherland, Linda Joy (nee Thomson)

ANNIVERSARY

Stag & Doe for Lindsay Timleck & Ryan Foell

50th Wedding Anniversary Melvin and Irene Frey

Let’s Get Rockin’!

January 11, 1980-May 24, 2011

After a ten year battle with cancer went home to be with her Lord on Tuesday, May 24, 2011, at the age of 31. Linda, beloved wife and best friend of Ian. Loving momma of Jordan. Will be dearly missed by her parents Val and John Thomson, brother Matthew and his wife Rosalia, sister Laura and her husband Terry, her in laws Linda and Brett, and brother in law Brian and his fiance Melanie. Linda will be fondly remembered by her grandmother’s Jean Norris and Leona Thomson, many aunts, uncles, cousins, friends and colleagues. Friends may call at the STECKLEY-GOODERHAM FUNERAL HOME, 201 Minet’s Point Rd., (at Yonge St.), Barrie, on Friday, May 27, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at Emmanuel Baptist Church, 4120 Salem Rd., Barrie, on Saturday, May 28, at 2 p.m. with visitation one hour prior to the service. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers remembrances to the L.J. Thomson Sutherland Hope and Strength Award to benefit students who have been affected by cancer would be appreciated by the family. Cheques payable to SCDSB will be accepted at the funeral home. On line condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.steckleygooderham.com

Help us celebrate with Ian and Sarah on May 28th, 8-1 a.m. at the Waterloo Rod & Gun Club, 1075 Bo-De Lane, St. Jacobs.

Saturday, June 4th 2011 8:00pm-1:00am Lion's Hall, Elmira $10/person

Games/food/prizes and lots more!!

Tickets $10 at the door.

STAG & DOE

Stag & Doe for Tania Metzger & Patrick Anderl

ANNIVERSARY

We invite you to share in the celebration of our parents with your presence at an Open House on Sunday, May 29th from 2:30-5pm at the Wallenstein Bible Chapel Best wishes only please.

ANNIVERSARY

50th Wedding Anniversary Roy and Marlene Gilles June 3, 1961

Celebrating 50 years of marriage Pearl & Leonard Heintz

Saturday, June 4, 2011 7pm to 11pm Towne Bowl, Kitchener, ON. Tickets $15/adults, $5/kids 3-12, free/kids under 3. Tickets available at the door.

All our love and best wishes from Michelle and Carey, Mike and Carolyn, Stephen and grandchildren, Mitchell, Marisha, Mackenzie, Adrian and Brendan

BIRTHDAY

DEATH NOTICES

Join us for an Open House June 5th, 2011, 2-4pm at Listowel Missionary Church Best wishes only.

Riverside students raise $11,000

>>BEGGS, Ralph Elgin – June 4, 1944 – May 24, 2011.

The Sunshine of our family passed away peacefully at St. Mary’s Hosptial, in his 67th year.

>>BOCK, Doris – Went peacefully to be with her Saviour, on Sunday, May 22, 2011, at Chateau Gardens, Elmira, in her 87th year. >>BRUDER, Mabel Ellen- A generation has ended. On Thursday, May 19, 2011, Mabel Ellen Bruder (nee Brown), in her 97th year, died at Hospice Wellington. >>DUNCAN, Kevin – Passed away suddenly, at home, after a brief illness, on Friday, May 20, 2011, at the age of 47. >>MUSSELMAN, Elma Laura (nee Shoemaker)Peacefully went home to be with the Lord on Friday, May 20, 2011 at KW Health Centre, in her 91st year. She was from Elmira formerly of RR2 Ariss.

Please join us for an Open House 2-4pm, June 5th, 2011 in the Great Hall Luther Village on the Park 139 Father David Bauer Drive, Waterloo

Whatever the occasion?

Celebrate it by placing it in the Observer’s Family Album. IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH

SINGLE $23 2.475”x3.75”

DOUBLE $38 2.475”x3.75”

TRIPLE $48 3.7687”x3.75”

info@woolwichobserver.com

519-669-5790

» JAMES JACKSON

Best wishes only please

TEL: 519.669.5790 EMAIL: info@observerxtra.com

PHOTO

IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH

Happy 95th Birthday Jan Bos

LOADS OF HEART Students at Riverside Public School in Elmira raised more than $11,000 for Jump Rope for Heart on May 18 and 19. Students involved included (left) Lucas Carson, Cole Sonnenberg, Seth Morrison, Darren Farwell, Nathan Taylor, Olivia Aitken, Avery Klooster, Mariah Martin, Ben Hall, Ethan Warren and Lucas Harrison. Front, Mariah Martin and Ethan Warren demonstrate some of their rope skills.


Wise customers read the fine print: •, *, ††, § The Jeep 70th Anniversary Event offers apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating retailers between May 3 and May 31, 2011. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. See participating retailers for complete details and conditions. •$18,995 Purchase Price applies to 2011 Jeep Wrangler 2-door Sport 4x4 (23B) only and includes $3,250 Consumer Cash Discount. See participating retailers for complete details. Pricing includes freight ($1,400), air tax, tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailers may sell for less. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on most new 2010 and select 2011 vehicles and are manufacturer-to-retailer incentives, which are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. Amounts vary by vehicle. See your retailer for complete details. ††Customer Choice Financing for 36-, 48- and 60-month terms on approved credit through TD Financing Services and Ally Credit Canada is available at participating dealerships to qualified retail customers on select new 2011 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge and Ram models. The following terms apply to TD Financing Services contracts. (Different contract terms apply to Ally Credit Canada offers. See your retailer for complete details.) Vehicles are financed over a 36-, 48- or 60-month term with payments amortized over a term of up to 96 months and the pre-determined residual balance payable at the end of the contract. At contract’s end, customers have the choice of returning their vehicle through a Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram dealership with no further obligations (except payment of a $199 return fee and excess wear and tear, mileage and similar charges), financing the remaining balance for the rest of the amortization period at then-current standard rates or paying the residual balance in full. Some conditions apply. Customer Choice Financing offered by TD in Quebec is subject to different terms and conditions. All advertised Customer Choice Financing offers are TD offers. Examples: 2011 Jeep Wrangler 2-door Sport 4x4 (23B)/2011 Jeep Compass North Edition 4x2 (26E)/2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo (26E) with a Purchase Price of $18,995/$21,995/$37,995 financed at 6.49%/3.99%/0% APR over 36/36/36 months with $3,099/$2,849/$5,999 down and payments amortized over 95/71/74 months equals 78 bi-weekly payments of $99/$139/$199 and one final payment of $10,830/$10,070/$16,483 for a cost of borrowing of $2,631/$1,774/$0 and a total obligation of $21,626.41/$23,769.47/$37,995.01. Taxes, licence, insurance, registration, excess mileage and wear and tear charges, any retailer administration fees and other applicable fees and charges not included. Retailers may sell for less. See participating retailers for complete details. §2011 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon shown. Price including applicable Consumer Cash Discount: $29,780. Pricing includes freight ($1,400), air tax, tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. See bottom of the ad for range of potential retailer fees. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailers may sell for less. ▼Based on Ward’s 2010 Middle SUV classification. The Best Buy Seal is a registered trademark of Consumer Digest Communications LLC, used under licence. ¤Based on 2011 EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide ratings published by Natural Resources Canada. Transport Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. 2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo V6 – Hwy: 8.9L/100 km and City: 13.0L/100 km. 2011 Jeep Compass 4x2 2.4L 5-speed manual – Hwy: 7.0L/100 km and City: 9.0L/100 km. ®SIRIUS and the dog logo are registered trademarks of SIRIUS Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC. Customer Choice Financing is a trademark of Chrysler Group LLC.

BACK PAGE 32

DON_111098_KB_JEEP.indd 1

THE OBSERVER

2011 JEEP WRANGLER 2-DOOR SPORT 4X4 PURCHASE FOR

$

18,995 •

32 MPG HWY

8.9L/100 KM HWY ¤

INCLUDES $3,250 CONSUMER CASH,* FREIGHT, AIR TAX, TIRE LEVY AND OMVIC FEE. TAXES EXCLUDED. OTHER RETAILER CHARGES MAY APPLY.+

• Hwy: 7.0L/100 km and City: 9.0L/100 km¤ • One of the most affordable SUVs in Canada • All-new exterior appearance: Completely new from the A-pillar forward, enhanced soft interior touch points, and improved ride and handling

CUSTOMER

CHOICE FINANCING

290 hp and Hwy: 8.9L/100 km¤ • Delivering De and City: 13.0L/100 km an New premium interior & 4-wheel • Ne independent suspension in Quadra-Trac I® 4-wheel drive system • Qu More than 45 safety & security features •M OR CHOOSE

$

139

BI-WEEKLY

CUSTOMER

2011 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon 4x4 shown.§

ALL-NEW 2011 JEEP COMPASS 4X2 NORTH EDITION

@

CUSTOMER

CHOICE FINANCING

$

CHOICE FINANCING BI-WEEKLY

$

199 0

BI-WEEKLY

» Saturday, May 28, 2011

LIKE NO OTHER VEHICLE ON ROCK, ON ICE, ON SAND, ON SNOW, ON EARTH. 99 6.49 @

%††

WITH THE OPTION TO RETURN AFTER 36 MONTHS

FOR 36 MONTHS AND $3,099 DOWN

39 MPG HWY

7.0L/100 KM HWY¤

FOR 36 6 MONTHS AND $2,849 ,849 DOWN

3.99 99 %††

WITH THE OPTION TO RETURN AFTER 36 MONTHS HS

2011 Jeep Compass Sport 4x2 shown.

ALL-NEW 2011 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE LAREDO

UNSURPASSED 4X4 FUEL ECONOMY▼ UNSURPASSE

@

%††

FOR 36 MONTHS AND $5,999 DOWN

WITH THE OPTION TO RETURN AFTER 36 MONTHS

2011 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland shown. 201

+Your local retailer may charge additional fees for administration/pre-delivery that can range from $0 to $1,098 and anti-theft/safety products that can range from $0 to $1,298. Charges may vary by retailer.

Jeep.ca/Offers

SCAN HERE FOR MORE

GREAT OFFERS

16 ALL-NEW OR COMPLETELY REDESIGNED VEHICLES.

5/16/11 8:30 PM


May 28, 2011