Page 1

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

1 NEWS

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Dealing with cystinosis > STORY ON PG. 14

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SATURDAY, JULY 03, 2010

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First mayoral race in a decade

Centenarian Ernie Kendall passes away Elmira resident, 101, was a longtime teacher at EDSS and supporter of community events

Steve Kannon

T

odd Cowan has been watching the goings-on at Woolwich council with an increasingly skeptical eye, not always impressed with what he’s seen. In launching his candidacy for township mayor, he wants others to see changes are needed. “I’ve been thinking about doing this for a long time. As I watch the way township council operates, I see the need for a new vision,” said Cowan, a former Queen’s Park insider. “I’ve been around politics for a lot of years. We have a lot of potential here, but we need some new energy.” Watching council bounce around on contentious issues such as the development of Victoria Glen park, a proposed biogas facility in Elmira and

> SEE MAYOR ON PG. 07

Katie Edmonds

F

THE RACE IS ON Todd Cowan was joined by his wife Joanne and children Brittany, Cassie and

Luke as he filed his papers at township hall Wednesday, officially launching his campaign for Woolwich mayor.

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riends and family of Elmira’s Ernie Kendall are raising a glass this week and toasting a life well-lived. Kendall, a retired teacher, war veteran, athlete, volunteer, father, grandfather and friend passed away June 26 at his home in Chateau Gardens at the age of 101. “He is going to be very missed around here,” said Chateau Gardens adminisERNIE KENDALL trator Joan Norris. “Although it may seem as though losing a person at a nursing home is simply part of the job, it’s not. It is like losing a member of

> SEE KENDALL ON PG. 05

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NEWS 2

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

PHOTO

» PAT MERLIHAN

John Mahood Grade 2 Picnic

ALL FUN AND GAMES John Mahood's three Grade 2 classes celebrated the start of summer holidays with a picnic in Elmira's Gibson Park June 28. A picnic lunch and games made for a fun afternoon.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

3 NEWS

King of the

» KATIE EDMONDS

> Construction season continues

PHOTOS

The construction that has made a mess of Snyder Avenue in Elmira moves to the next phase Monday, closing Church Street West between Herbert Street and 75 metres east of Snyder Avenue North until approximately Aug. 6. The current work on Snyder Avenue, between First and South streets, is scheduled to continue until July 23. In the third stage, Snyder Avenue South between Church and South Streets will be closed late July 2010 until late October.

Kruise

FUN FIT FOR A KING A number of Elvis impersonators stopped by the Linwood community centre June 26 for the annual Kruisin' with the King event. At left, Dave Starr-Neitzel and Jamie Hoffman. Above, Cathy Carbone shows off her Elvis ink.

> Gwynne Dyer named to the OC Author and journalist Gwynne Dyer, who's column appears in the Observer, was one of 74 recipients of the Order of Canada announced Wednesday by Governor General Michaëlle Jean. Now based in London, UK, Dyer was born in Newfoundland in 1943.

> $300 million for rapid transit DOPPLEGANGERS At left, Wellesley Coun. Herb Neher joins Jamie Hoffman and Anthony Carbone between sets. Middle, local resident Orville Haskell gets serenaded by Loretta Lynn, perhaps better known as Amberley Beatty around these parts. At right, Fred Lange of Kitchener does his best Buddy Holly.

Woolwich Community Lions cap a fruitful year Katie Edmonds

I

ncoming Woolwich Community Lions Club president Diane Smith will be starting the year off with a clean slate, as this year’s group was able to make their final payment to the Woolwich Memorial Centre fund, fulfilling their commitment of $50,000 over three years. The all-female service organization had a very successful year, with a number of events bringing in money that was later distributed to community groups in need. Donations totaling more than $24,000 were approved for local community projects including the Family Violence Prevention Program run by Woolwich Community Services, Sunshine Therapeutic Riding program, Lissard House, Woolwich Counselling Centre and

EE RY FR IVE L DE

Community Care Concepts. The club also provided a donation to the relief mission in Haiti in memory of Yvonne Martin, provided Medic Alert bracelets for children at two local schools and sponsored a Lions Foundation service dog. “I am really happy with what we were able to accomplish this year,” said Smith. “Each year our club has grown and with more members, we are capable of raising more funds for both local and global causes.” In addition to the fundraising activities that allowed for donations, the club volunteered for community, district and international activities. Members provided vision screening for kindergarten age children in more than 15 schools in Waterloo and Woolwich and collected eye glasses for sight conservation proj-

ects in the Third World. Other activities include collecting toys and food for WCS, participating in both the Elmira and KW Santa Claus parades and gardening at the memorial gardens in Elmira and Breslau. The club sponsored a bursary award at Elmira District Secondary School for the fifth year and organized the local Purina Walk for Guide Dogs, which raised more than $8,000 locally this year. “The walk was such a success this year,” said Linda Palmer, past president of the group. “We got a great number of people out and everyone seemed to be in support of the project.” And the club has already gotten a start on events for next year: last week they held the early bird draw for the Shania Dance Draw Raffle, giving $200 to winner

W • O • O • L • W • I • C • H

Mike Bender. Another $500 draw will be held at their Christmas Extravaganza ‘An Affair to Remember’ and the final draws will take place on Feb. 12, 2011 at the Shania Twin Dinner and Dance. In the works, Smith added, are a team for the ‘Run for the Cure,’ a ‘diabetic breakfast’ to raise money for the Diabetes Association, the sponsorship of a dog for an autistic child and co-hosting the annual Lions Club convention alongside the Elmira Lions Club. “It’s important for the community to remember that we are a service organization,” said Palmer. “We want to help out groups in our community so please feel free to get in contact with us and see if we can work together.” The Woolwich Community Lions Club was chartered in 2003 and now has a membership of 66.

The province this week announced $300 million in funding for rapid transit in Waterloo Region. The money represents part of $790 million the region hopes to drop on the first stage of light rail transit (LRT) connecting Conestoga Mall and Fairview Park mall, with rapid buses connecting the system to Cambridge. The idea is to eventually link all three cities by LRT. Having expected Ontario to pick up two-thirds of the cost, the region now turns to Ottawa to provide considerable amounts of money in order to continue pursuing the train option. "[This week’s] announcement will hopefully lead to a further commitment from the federal government, which will allow us to begin the necessary planning to move ahead,” said regional Chair Ken Seiling in a statement.

> Zone change for church a go The way was cleared last week for construction of a new meetinghouse for the Martindale Church group, as Woolwich councillors approved an agreement with the owner of the land that will house the building. The deal addresses property standards issues at Marvin Weber’s farm at 1210 Durst Rd., allowing councillors to give the go-ahead to the zoning changes necessary for the church project.

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NEWS 4

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

LAW & ORDER

Lock up your cupcakes, especially during a full moon JUNE 23 > 4:20 PM | More than

$2,000 worth of Bridgestone and Michelin tire casings were stolen from Bast Tire in Heidelberg sometime overnight. There was no damage to the building itself. The investigation is ongoing.

JUNE 24 > 4:17 AM | A truck driver

coming from Elora called police after he found a number of hydro poles snapped in two and power lines down in the area of Northfield Drive and Tillman Road. The poles had come down in the strong windstorm. Police closed the road and hydro workers were able to fix the problem within a few hours.

> 10:40 PM | Police approached

a group of eight to 10 teens at the playground in Elmira’s Bolender Park who were drinking in public. One young man was arrested for public intoxication and was held until sober and a 16-year-old girl was taken home to her parents. Both were charged with ‘public

A

neighbour noticed two men standing outside a dark blue pickup truck with flashlights at the intersection of Noah and Seiling roads in Woolwich Township and called police about 11:30 p.m. last Saturday. The 56-yearold Waterloo man who owned the truck told the neighbour that they were just looking at the moon. When police arrived, the men were gone but they left behind a chocolate chip muffin with an incense stick and a piece of paper saying

intoxication.’

JUNE 25 > 9:50 AM | A 64-year-old

Wellesley Township man operating a boom forklift was driving on Herrgott Road in Wellesley Township when he crossed over a soft section of the shoulder and rolled into the ditch. The man was taken

shirt, entered the LCBO, where the employee recognized him from past thefts. As he was attempting to steal products, he was interrupted by the employee. He left in an oldermodel gold station wagon and took off in the direction of Waterloo.

‘dragon blood.’ Upon police investigation, it was discovered that it may have been related to a practice where some people worship the GrecoRoman goddess associated with magic and crossroads. The tradition is to leave an offering of sweets at a three way intersection. “We are not going to pursue this investigation any further,” said Sgt. Sig Peters with a chuckle. “But we do worry about the safety of local danishes, and even cheesecake.”

JUNE 27 > 12:30 AM | A 23-year-old man

was driving a Toyota Matrix on Benjamin Road near Martin Creek Road when he struck and killed a deer. There was extensive damage to the vehicle, but the man was unharmed. No charges were laid.

> 12:24 PM | Two grey

pickup trucks collided at the intersection of King Street and Farmers Market Road in St. Jacobs. Involved were an 18-year-old male and a 37-year-old male, the latter of whom was charged with ‘careless driving.’

to hospital with non-lifethreatening injuries; damage to the forklift was minimal. The Ministry of Labour was contacted.

> 2:50 PM | An attempted

JUNE 28 > 8:25 PM | Two 11-year-old

girls were near the Wellesley Community Centre and reported being followed by a male in a pickup truck. The girls describe the vehicle as a mid- to late90s dark green GMC extended cab with a matching cap and tinted windows. The lone occupant was a white male in his mid-40s, with dark hair and a large build. He was wearing an orange construction shirt with dark wrap-around sun or safety glasses. Anyone with information is asked to call Waterloo Regional Police at 519-653-7700, ext. 4499 or CrimeStoppers 1-800-222TIPS.

> 8:30 PM | A 19-year-old

Drayton man was charged with ‘possession of marijuana’ after Wellington County OPP officers, patrolling at the Drayton Fair Grounds, investigated two males seated

inside a 2007 Honda Civic parked behind the bleachers. Police spoke to the passenger of the auto and seized a small quantity of marijuana. The man is scheduled to appear in Guelph court on July 26.

JUNE 29 > 2:00 PM | A business on

Bonnie Crescent in Elmira was broken into. The locks were cut, but nothing appears to have been stolen. Police have not identified any suspects.

JUNE 30 > 7:23 AM | An 18-year-old

St. Jacobs woman was driving a 2007 Ford van westbound on Hawkesville Road at Three Bridges Road when she failed to negotiate a slight bend in the road. Her car rolled over into the ditch and was demolished. The woman was unharmed and no charges were laid.

Student shows her leadership potential

theft at the liquor store on Church Street in Elmira was thwarted by an alert employee. A white male in his thirties, wearing blue jeans and a plaid

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

5 NEWS

Kendall: A life well lived was full of notable accomplishments

PHOTO

our family. We all feel a great loss with Ernie gone.” Kendall was a man who wore many hats, but he is best known for his role as an educator. He began his studies at the Ontario Agricultural College Campus in Guelph, graduated in 1932 with a degree in entomology but then transferred to teaching shortly after. He taught sciences for 37 years at Elmira District Secondary School, followed by supply teaching for 14 more years, and retired at age 75. His tenure as an educator was only interrupted by his service with the army during the Second World War, where he rose to the rank of major. While at EDSS after the war, he formed and supervised Teen Town, a place for teens to socialize, and was leader of the cadet program for 23 years. “He was a patriarch not only for his family, but also for Elmira,” said Norris who has known Kendall for upwards of 20 years. “So many people know him or were taught by him at one point. Education in this town has been so greatly influenced by Ernie.” Jack Tabbert, a student of Kendall’s in

» SUBMITTED

> CONTINUED FROM COVER

A LIFE IN PHOTOS A familiar sight in the hallways of EDSS for more than 50 years, Ernie Kendall was also a soldier, instructor and community advocate during his 101 years. An extensive group of friends and family gathered in Elmira this week to celebrate the many lives he touched.

the early 1950s, spent considerable time this week thinking about the lessons learned from his former teacher, many of which went above and beyond the school curriculum. “One spring, he taught all of us how to graft apple trees while we were in the class,” said Tabbert. “Then,

he came out and visited each and every one of us students to check on how our apple trees were coming along. He made each of us feel like we were the only student.” Athletics were always a passion for Kendall. He excelled in sports at OAC, breaking records in aquatics

and long-distance running. In retirement, Ernie helped with the Moms and Tots program at the local swimming pool, sometimes swimming the length of the pool with kids on his back. He did back flips until he was 75 and swam until he was 97 years old. Canoeing was yet an-

other passion, and in 1981, at the age of 75, his greatest canoeing accomplishment was a two-week canoeing trip on the Yukon River. In the past few years he has established athletic scholarships and an academic scholarship at the University of Guelph and also at EDSS. For his many achievements, he was named Citizen of the Year in 1978 by Elmira and Woolwich Chamber of Commerce, has been inducted into the Waterloo County Hall of Fame and received the Governor General’s Award in 1992. “It is just astounding to me all of what he has done and accomplished,” said Tabbert. “If you live by Ernie’s morals, you really can’t go wrong.” As a resident of Chateau Gardens for the past eight years, Kendall continued to par-

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ticipate in and lend his support to community activities. He was the guest speaker at Remembrance Day services: last November, Kendall didn’t let the cold wind prevent him from participating in the Legion’s parade. He even attended the Kiwanis Club’s Lobsterfest earlier this summer. “He came to every possible event he could attend,” said Norris. “He had a true zest for life that was contagious.” He transferred from Chateau Gardens Assisted Living Centre to the long-term care facility in May 2006 where his wife Grace was also a resident. Grace passed away in 2007. Kendall is survived by three children – John, Jane and Amy Grace – eight grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren.

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The WCDSB is the eighth largest Catholic school board in our province and has more than 40,000 elementary, secondary and adult/ continuing education students within the system. But McCabe sees it not as a numbers game, but understands that each student deserves equal opportunities. “There is a whole number of things to think about,” she explained. “To make sure that we are promoting things like environmental sustainability, ensuring our kids have access to leading-edge technology, to ensure that we as a board are using our financial resources efficiently –

these types of things will make sure that all of our students are being considered.” But primarily, said McCabe, the role of trustee is to be the face and the voice for students and parents. “Ultimately it’s about the students, and they need someone who will listen to them and respond to their issues and concerns. Education is the best way for a society to grow and change, and I would just like to be a part of that.” For more information on Dorothy McCabe and her campaign, visit her website at www. dorothymccabe.com. Nominations for the fall election close Sept. 10.


» Saturday, July 03, 2010

7 NEWS

Mayor: Electoral hopeful sees need for proactive leadership in township numerous gravel pit applications, his frustration with the lack of public input finally prompted him to run. He’ll be taking on longtime incumbent Bill Strauss, who was acclaimed in the last two municipal elections and faced only a marginal challenge in 2000. Noting the challenges facing Woolwich have grown over the years, Cowan said this week the township can no longer make do with reactive leadership dealing with issues strictly on a piecemeal basis. “We need to be proactive. We should have policies in place rather than waiting for things to happen then reacting with a lack of leadership.” A policy that says the township will protect and enhance green spaces, for instance, would preclude putting the public through fights such as the one over Victoria Glen, he said. More pressingly, he argued, council needs to take charge of the agenda rather than relying on its staff to

set the pace. That has led to an explosion in costs, staffing numbers and taxes and fees, and less support for community groups. Taxpayers aren’t always getting good value for their money, he said, promising to bring a results-based spending approach to a review of every department’s budget. “I want to change the attitude at the township – the public comes first.” Also in his platform is a push for high-tech business in the township. Given its proximity to Waterloo and the number of professionals and knowledge workers who live here, Woolwich should be getting a piece of the pie. “We need to get out there and market Woolwich. If we can attract one high-tech company, others will see the advantage of Woolwich and they’ll come along too,” said Cowan. “It’s up to the mayor to be out there marketing the place.” As a member of executive on the Business Improvement Area committee in Elmira, Cowan said he has a

Joni Miltenburg

T

keen interest in the success of businesses in the township. Cowan, 46, and his wife Joanne have three children, ages 12, 10 and 6. Raised on the family farm near Tilbury, Ont., he’s called Elmira home for more than a decade. He’s a business owner and general manager of Martha’s Mixes Wild Bird Centre in Elmira. Prior to that, he spent 10 years working in senior roles for provincial politicians, specifically on policies concerning safe schools, crime prevention, government efficiencies and Small Business Ontario. Currently, Cowan is a board member of the Waterloo Region Crime Prevention Council, a member of the St. Teresa of Avila parish council and Knights of Columbus in Elmira. More information about Cowan’s platform can be found on his website at www. vision4woolwich.com. He’s seeking public input on a proposed fivepoint action plan. Woolwich voters join other Ontarians at the polls for the municipal election on Oct. 25.

he Woolwich Community Fund celebrated 10 years of presenting grants to groups in Woolwich Township this week and distributed grants to this year’s recipients. Approximately $4,500 was handed out this year to Woolwich Community Services’ Women of Courage program and the Elmira Boy Scouts. The Scouts are using the funds to move a storage shed and rebuild its hall. The Woolwich Community Fund was started in the late 1990s and began distributing funds 10 years ago. The fund’s mission is to enhance the quality of life in Woolwich. The money is managed and invested through the Kitchener Waterloo Community Foundation, and applications are reviewed by a committee of Woolwich

» JONI MILTENBURG

> CONTINUED FROM COVER

Community fund celebrates 10 years

PHOTO

THE OBSERVER

HERE TO HELP Ron Cressman, chair of the building committee for the 1st Elmira Scouts, was at a reception hosted by the Woolwich Community Foundation Tuesday evening to receive one of the foundation’s grants from chair Jim Schwindt. residents. “It continues to build,” said committee member Pat McLean. “We’ve provided grants to a number of groups in Woolwich Township over the years.” Over the past 10 years, approximately 35 grants totaling al-

most $50,000 have been handed out to local groups. The money has gone toward such projects as equipment for the library, playground equipment at local schools, a horticulture therapy program for seniors and support for a community band.

ABOUT FACE

A

dry spring gave way to a wet June, but we may soon be back on track for just the kind of summer most of us appreciate. “We have had our fair share of weather activity this month, what with the tornadoes, the heavy summer storms and high winds, but we don’t expect the upcoming months to be this wet,” Dave Phillips, senior climatologist for Environment Canada, said Tuesday. Typically our region gets about 81 millimetres of rain in the month of June. This year, we had 130 mm fall in just the first 17 days. The 60 per cent increase could have been much worse for

crops had April and May been wet as well, but Phillips notes that, after a dry May, the excess water might be just what the land needs. “Precipitation was lower than usual in the spring – had it been much higher we would be seeing puddles everywhere right about now.” That excess rainfall, capped by a terrific downpour last Sunday, led the Grand River Conservation Authority to issue a high-water safety bulletin. Recreational users were advised to take note of the changing river conditions. Rainfall and resultant runoff swelled the levels of rivers and creeks, causing the GRCA to increase dis-

charges from some of the dams it operates. Phillips expects the region, and much of southern Ontario, will experience warmer and drier conditions for the remainder of the summer, however. “I feel uneasy talking about precipitation 90 days down the road though,” he noted. “It can be hard to predict the next day sometimes! But if we can make it through the month of storms and soakers, patio season may be upon us in full force before we know it. “Our last two summers were wet and on the cool side. It looks like we might actually have a good season to get out the tent, or the beach towel and enjoy the outdoors.”

PHOTO

Katie Edmonds

» JONI MILTENBURG

Warmer, drier conditions to return after a wet June

Sheri Stover How long have you worked at Inspiring Accents? Eight weeks. I finished a maternity leave in May and I’m doing this until I transition back into teaching. Where do you teach? I was just hired by the Waterloo Region District School Board and I’m going to be doing some supply

Inspiring Accents, Elmira; Teacher

teaching in the fall. What do you teach? High school. I’m a phys-ed teacher. What do you do when you’re not working? I look after my kids – Trent is seven and Sydney is one. I like to do home improvement and home decorating

projects – which is why I like working at the store. What’s the biggest DIY project you’ve tackled? We redid our kitchener – my husband and I did it together. What’s your favourite summertime activity? Biking with my family; swimming; and canning fruit.


OPINION 8

THE OBSERVER

OPINION

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

I can assure the resident that Woolwich Bio-En was not the source of the odour since the facility does not yet exist. Chuck Martin

letter on pg. 10

VERBATIM y city feels like a crime scene and M the criminals are all melting into the night, fleeing the scene. No, I’m not talking about the kids in black who smashed windows and burned cop cars. I’m talking about the heads of state who smashed social safety nets and burned good jobs in the middle of a recession.

> Author Naomi Klein notes the public will bail out the bankers under measures approved by G8/G20 members

THE MONITOR costs for the G8/G20 boondoggle Ttootal could hit $3 billion. Direct costs alone host the three days of summits are projected to range from $1.2 to $1.4 billion. There are also indirect costs due to damaged property, legal expenses and the promises politicians made to spend even more taxpayer money.

> Canadian Taxpayers Federation

EDITORIAL

Train rolling out of region's financial reach W

aterloo Region would be well advised to scale back its plan for public transit, beginning with scrapping the light rail option, in light of this week’s provincial funding announcement. The $300 million pledged is a considerable amount of money, but the region was expecting far more. In fact, it was looking for Queen’s Park to cover two-thirds of the $790 million earmarked for rapid transit in Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge. The federal government, which has yet to commit to the plan, was expected to pay most of the remaining costs, leaving regional taxpayers to pick up the rest of the tab, optimistically some $50 million. Now, even if Ottawa matches the $300 million, we’re still facing a $190 million shortfall. And that doesn't included the tens of millions of

dollars for direct costs such as land acquisition, nor the multiples of that needed to alter the road network to deal with the installation of a new rail corridor. Most troubling, however, is the absolute certainty that the cost estimates bandied about today will undoubtedly be unrealistic should the rail project go ahead. As municipalities have discovered under infrastructure funding programs, the one-third shares picked up by upper tier governments only cover original budget estimates. When the actual costs come in much higher, often the case here in the townships, the municipality is left to make up the difference. In short, the $300 million that represents about 38 per cent of $790 million today will be a much smaller part of the total when the bill passes

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Joe Merlihan, Publisher | EXT 107 jmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Steve Kannon, Editor | EXT 103 skannon@woolwichobserver.com Joni Miltenburg, Reporter | EXT 101 jmiltenburg@woolwichobserver.com Katie Edmonds, Reporter | EXT 102 kedmonds@woolwichobserver.com

> LETTER POLICY

$1 billion or more. Of course, the feds could decline to get involved or provide less than $300 million. We are in a time of restraint, after all, despite the profligate spending by the Harper government just now. We’ve argued here before that investment in rail lines is worthwhile, but only on a larger scale. A highspeed rail link between Kitchener and Toronto, for instance, would do far more to get people out of their cars than a train taking the milk run between two shopping malls in K-W. A cheap and fast train to Toronto would take many commuters off the roads, particularly the 401. It would also encourage more people to use transit, which is often shunned because it’s slow, inconvenient and costly. And, of course, there’s a certain stigma associated with it. With

Donna Rudy, Sales Manager | EXT 104 drudy@woolwichobserver.com Pat Merlihan, Production Mgr | EXT 105 pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Matthew French, Production | EXT 108 mfrench@woolwichobserver.com Kyle Ledermann, Production | EXT 109 kledermann@woolwichobserver.com

The Observer welcomes letters to the editor on topics of interest to our readers. Letters may be edited for brevity, grammar, and legal considerations. All letters must be signed and contain the writer’s full name and telephone number for verification purposes. Unsigned or anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. If you have a legitimate concern and cannot sign your name to a letter, please contact the editor to discuss alternative means of resolving the issue. This newspaper declines announcements, poetry and thank-you letters in the opinion section. Maximum suggested length is 500 words.

the right incentive – we mentioned fast and inexpensive, right? – more people might be willing to become accustomed to public transit. At that point, they may even opt to use Grand River Transit to connect to the fast trains. A bit of a gamble, but far less so than the risk the region is prepared to take with piles of your money. Given the reduced funding, rapid buses – much less expensive and far more flexible to deploy – make more sense. The math is simple: of the $790 million proposed for rapid transit, $710 million would go toward the train linking Conestoga Mall and Fairview Park. Just $80 million of the total would cover rapid buses connecting Cambridge to the network. In that light, the decision is a simple one, too.

> CIRCULATION The Observer is an audited controlled circulation publication. Canadian Media Circulation Audit calculates and prepares The Observer circulation reports | 14,953.

> SUBSCRIPTIONS Annual subscriptions are available at a rate of $37.10 (includes GST) for delivery within Canada. Contact the office or email sales@woolwichobserver.com for further details. All issues from 2006 on are available online free of charge.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

9 OPINION

Russia's rewriting of history leans heavily on host of lies

T

he Georgians took down the last statue of Stalin last week. There used to be thousands of such statues all across the old Soviet Union, but the Communists themselves tore almost all of them down after the great dictator and mass murderer died in 1953. They left the one in Gori, in northern Georgia, because that’s where he was born and the locals were still proud of him. Even after Georgia got its independence in 1991, the six-metre (20-foothigh) statue of Stalin continued to stand in Gori. But now, just when you might think that the Georgians would be starting to approve of Stalin – after all, he was responsible for the deaths of more Russians than any other Georgian, or indeed anybody else – they go and tear his statue down. They’re planning to replace it with a monument to “victims of the Russian aggression” in the 2008 war, so the history they’re peddling in Gori will still be based on lies. (It was Georgia that started the war with Russia in 2008.) But the bigger lies will be told in Russia, and they will be told mainly about Stalin. Two weeks ago, a group of politicians and academics met in Moscow’s main library to discuss how to make Russians proud of their history. The answer? Get an upbeat history book into the schools. “(The book) should not be a dreary look at or apology for what was done,” explained Prof. Leonid Polyakov of the Higher School of Economics. The politicians were from Vladimir

International Affairs GWYNNE DYER Putin’s United Russia Party, and they wanted the academics to come up with a single history textbook for use in all Russian schools. It should downplay the crimes and failures of 74 years of Communist rule – the purges, the mass deportations, the famines, the gulags – and concentrate on the glorious epic of the Soviet victory in the Second World War. Which means they must rehabilitate Stalin. Rewriting the history books is not a Russian monopoly. The Texas Board of Education recently caused a great furore by deciding that its history textbooks should show that the founding fathers of the United States, and the authors of its constitution, intended America to be a Christian nation, not a country committed to the separation of church and state. Even that is an easier job than making Stalin look good, but it can be done. Start with the proposition that the Soviet Union played a key role in defeating Hitler (true), and that the war was a heroic victory against great odds (false). This is the first place where you wind up having to give Stalin some credit, because he was definitely the man in command throughout the war.

Then, to justify the terrible cost of the Bolshevik revolution of 1917 and the subsequent civil war, and to slide past the purges and famines of the 1930s, you have to argue that those horrors were what allowed the miracle of high-speed industrialization that laid the groundwork for a Soviet victory in the war. Once again, Comrade Stalin gets the credit, for the industrialization happened on his watch. It’s all lies and distortion. The Soviet Union’s population was twice that of Nazi Germany, and its industrial power and technology were not significantly inferior. If Stalin had not murdered most of the Red Army’s senior officers in the purges of the late ’30s, and if he had not stupidly let himself be surprised by the German invasion, the war would not have lasted so long and killed so many Russians. As for the alleged miracle of rapid industrialization, it was only needed because most existing Russian industry was destroyed by the revolution and the civil war: industrial output in 1922 was only 13 per cent of that in 1914. If there had been no revolution and no Stalin, and Russia had just started growing again after the First World War at the same rate as other capitalist countries, it would have been far too strong by 1941 for Hitler to dream of attacking it. Russia’s history in the 20th century was an unmitigated and unnecessary disaster: the first half tragic and

> SEE DYER ON PG. 12

THE VOICE

What are your plans for the summer break?

“I am going to hang out with my friends and then go to camp.” > Eric Bowman

“I work at No Frills so I will do that for the first part and then go to camp.” > Angus Mulroney

THE VIEW FROM HERE

“Swimming, sleeping in, and having my friends over.” > Jessie Herbison

As with every summer, parents won't be the only ones scrambling to find something for the kids to do for the next two months.

“I would like to sleep in, ride my horse and do summer sports and activities.” > Megan Bredenkamp


OPINION 10

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

Plenty of reasons to protest, but is it anarchy? S

pit out by Johnny Rotten – the man with the best sneer in rock ‘n’ roll – anarchy is a word that conjures up youthful fury. “Don’t know what I want, but I know how to get it. I wanna destroy passersby, cuz I, I wanna be aaanaaaarchy …” Officials of the temporary police state that was Toronto last weekend would have you believe anarchy is what occurred in the warzone around the G20 summit. Anarchy hasn’t been spoken about this much since the heyday of punk music. Or, more in line with the goings on during the G8/G20 summits, the early part of last century, when isms – fascism, Marxism, communism, anarchism, imperialism – were all the rage. Leading up to the summits, police were busy rounding up “anarchists.” After things got messy on the barricaded streets of Toronto, anarchists were to blame. It seems to me officials were being very liberal with that moniker. The word anarchist conjures up images of bomb-wielding zealots – nervous, furtive, bearded fellows dressed in black, chain-smoking their way through meetings in the back rooms of bookstores and print shops, something akin to the communists they’re often lumped in with. While anarchists come in a variety of flavours – from the socialist variety through to the libertarian offspring of Ayn Rand – the true believers see governments of any stripe as intrinsically evil. The goal is the overthrow of all coercive systems, allowing for individuals to live unencumbered by rules set by

From the Editor Steve Kannon others. Left to our own devices, they argue, we will all get along just fine, as it’s in our own best interests to live and behave rationally. I doubt any of those tossing Molotov cocktails last weekend had that outcome in mind. Those protesting the summits might be better described as those in favour of a change – perhaps a revolutionary change, in some cases – of the current form of government. Most were part of the growing anti-globalization (more correctly anti-neoliberalism) movement. A small minority, supporting those goals, is responsible for the violence. Like the vandalism that sometimes takes place in Montreal following the ups and downs of the Canadiens, a few of those involved in the violence were dedicated troublemakers and some were criminals using the situation to do some burning and looting. Undoubtedly there is a group of professional protesters who traipse around after these gathering of international elites. Some of them condone violence. It would have been nice, in the interest of showing how, well, nice Canadians are, to have seen a completely trouble-free protest here. That would have thrown the Harper government’s billion-dollar waste into sharper relief.

Dyer: Whitewashing Stalin's past > CONTINUED FROM PG. 11 very bloody, the second half merely impoverished and oppressive. Even today, Russia has not regained the rank among the developed countries that it held a century ago. What can one do with such a history but deny and rewrite it? One can tell the truth. Germany’s 20th-century history was also terrible, and Germans had to bear a burden of historical guilt for harming others far heavier than anything Russians should feel for the crimes of their own imperial past. If today’s Germans can see their past with clear eyes and still feel pride

in their present and hope for their future, why can’t the Russians? It’s not a lost cause. There have been some encouraging instances recently of Russians facing up to the less proud bits of their history, like Prime Minister Putin’s attendance at the ceremony commemorating the Soviet massacre of Polish prisoners in Katyn forest in 1940, and President Dmitry Medvedev’s condemnation of Stalin for “mass crimes against his own people.” But the omens are not good. If the Georgians no longer need that statue of Stalin, maybe there’s a market for it in Russia.

As it was, the security measures were overkill, and largely ineffectual as police hastily detained the innocent and peaceful while largely failing to intervene in the areas where violence broke out. It did not take long for the debate to shift from the violence of the few to the reaction of the police and, more tellingly, the decisions of the politicians. Hosting the summits was a bad idea from the get-go. The Harper government mishandled the whole affair: everyone knew holding the G20 portion in Toronto was a mistake. Spending well in excess of a billion dollars showed contempt for taxpayers. Shutting down the country’s largest city for something so frivolous and costly borders on punitive given that Toronto has consistently rejected the Conservatives. But that kind of heavy-handed treatment is just what brought people out into the street. The money wasted, the attack on civil liberties, the inconvenience to residents, the loss of income and damage to property all occurred at the expense of the many for the benefit of a few. Which is how more and more of us see the intertwined political and financial systems across the globe. Simply put, there is a growing dissatisfaction with that most pervasive ism: corporate capitalism. Perhaps the kind of “anarchy” gaining vogue these days has less to do with overthrowing governments than it does with exposing how the current system is failing the majority. That’s certainly the take of noted anthropologist and

anarchist David Graeber, for instance, who traces the roots of the current movement to the 1996 uprisings in Chiapas, Mexico. Globally influenced, the events the 1999 World Trade Organization protests in Seattle set the pattern, putting government officials worldwide into a security panic that predated 9/11. “However you choose to trace their origins, these new tactics are perfectly in accord with the general anarchistic inspiration of the movement, which is less about seizing state power than about exposing, delegitimizing and dismantling mechanisms of rule while winning ever-larger spaces of autonomy from it. The critical thing, though, is that all this is only possible in a general atmosphere of peace,” he wrote shortly after Sept. 11. “They’re attempting to invent what many call a ‘new language’ of civil disobedience, combining elements of street theatre, festival and what can only be called non-violent warfare – non-violent in the sense adopted by, say, Black Bloc anarchists, in that it eschews any direct physical harm to human beings,” Graeber adds of protesters. The goal, then, is essentially reinventing democracy. Well, really, restoring democracy to its original intent: widespread and decentralized decision-making in the public good rather than the top down, hierarchical structure prevalent today. That, and not the minor disruption we saw last weekend, is what officials fear, those labelled anarchists argue. Analyze what happened in Toronto, then you be the judge.

No odours from nonexistent biogas To the Editor,  On June 20 at approximately 9 p.m., I received a relatively polite but anonymous complaint from an Elmira resident about the “dreadful smell in the wind” from the biogas operations of Woolwich Bio-En. Since no name or contact information was left, I was unable to follow up on the odours from “swine fuel.” I can assure the resident that Woolwich Bio-En was not the source of the odour since the facility does not yet exist. Neither Woolwich Bio-En nor I have any production or processing facilities in or near Elmira. If the odours referred to were from ma-

nure or any other organic source, they are in fact odours that a biogas plant might substantially reduce or eliminate. For more information on bio-gas facilities and links to other useful sites visit www.bio-en.ca or call 519-669-5171 and ask for Chuck or Earl. The contact number at the Ministry of Environment in Guelph is 519-826-4789. Before the Woolwich Bio-En biogas facility is constructed, a public liaison committee will be established with members of the community invited to participate. Inquiries regarding biogas or the public liaison committee are welcome.

> Chuck Martin, Woolwich Bio-En Inc.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

11 BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Canada playing catch-up on plastic recycling S

ometime in the 1980s, the three Rs taught in schools changed from “reading, ‘riting and ‘rithmatic” to “reduce, reuse, recycle.” The environmentally conscious carefully sort their plastic, glass, cardboard and cans into blue bins and carry them to the curb every week. What happens next is sometimes less than environmentally friendly. Some items are recycled more successfully than others; the current recovery rate for paper-based packaging is 58 per cent and 56 per cent for steel packaging, compared to just 22 per cent for plastic packaging. Some municipalities, looking to save a few dollars, sell their plastic material to brokers who ship it overseas to countries like China and Vietnam where there are few environmental or labour regulations. Items are sorted by hand, and the material

that can’t be recycled is dumped. For Martin Vogt, it doesn’t make sense to ship plastic back and forth across the ocean. Vogt is president of EFS Plastics, an Elmira company that recycles mixed post-consumer plastic into pellets that are used to manufacture plastic bags, tool boxes, piping and other products. Vogt explained that recycling plastic requires less energy than making virgin plastic and prevents wasting both the raw material and the energy that went into making it when the item is thrown in a landfill. Vogt moved to Canada from Germany in 2006, and discovered that Canada was almost 20 years behind when it came to recycling post-consumer plastic. Post-industrial plastic, like waste from manufacturing cars, is much simpler to recycle; it’s clean and already sorted by type. Post-consumer plastic, on the other hand, is

PHOTO

Joni Miltenburg

» JONI MILTENBURG

Elmira firm looks to boost the amount of post-consumer material diverted from landfills

PELLET POWER Martin Vogt, president of EFS Plastics, displays

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new processing capacity for mixed plastics, and got a contract to produce pellets used in the new “Tote for Life” in Sobeys stores that is made from 100 per cent recycled materials. In June, Vogt received the ‘newcomer of the year’ award from the Canadian Plastics Industry Association. Currently EFS recycles more than 7,500 tonnes of plastic a year, and Vogt wants to double that number by the end of 2011. That will mean moving to a new location and adding another production line. As promising as the picture looks, there is still a ways to go. Some municipalities, like Waterloo Region, are willing to support local recyclers by offering long-term contracts that guarantee there will be the raw material available to start a business. In other cases, there needs to be more political pressure brought to bear in municipalities that are

> SEE PLASTIC ON PG. 13

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mixed and contaminated by colouring, labels, glue and residue. In Germany, Vogt’s father had an injection moulding and extrusion business and turned to recycled plastic as a new source of raw material. Vogt started as a tool and die maker and then went back to school and studied mechanical engineering, specializing in plastics engineering. Vogt settled on Elmira to start his business because of the number of manufacturing shops that could produce the equipment he designed. His timing was unlucky; just when things were up and running, the recession sent oil prices down, making his product less competitive and hurting the manufacturers who were his customers. Business finally rebounded in February of this year, and things are looking up. EFS received funding from Stewardship Ontario and Waste Diversion Ontario to develop

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BUSINESS 12

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, Julu 03, 2010

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

13 BUSINESS

There’s more to life than deficit reduction T

he deficit reduction measures that consumed discussions at the G20 summit in Toronto are no-brainers. Few can argue with globally agreed upon efforts to reduce the crushing debt that leaves borrowers with a chronic black cloud over their heads, and lenders wondering if they’ll ever get their money back. It would irresponsible for world leaders to avoid it, given the economy’s still-fragile comeback and experts’ warnings that we are far from out of the woods. But that said, there’s more to life than deficit reduction. It’s not what protesters or police put life and limb on the line for last weekend. I believe in their respective ways, they were stepping up for democracy and all it entails, although their definitions of it were appreciably different. For example, people rail against deficit reduction when it makes the vulnerable elements of society even more exposed than they already are. To me, that’s something to protest against. And by the same token, it’s something to defend. But in downtown Toronto, it’s easy to lose sight of the world beyond the city skyline. Ontario farmers live with that reality daily, and are constantly challenged to explain and justify their sector to the very people they feed. If farmers

Food For Thought Owen Roberts can’t make a living growing crops and raising livestock, it’s simple: we don’t eat. Or, we import what we eat…and take our chances that it will be there when we want it, at the price we want, grown under conditions that we deem acceptable. Good luck. However, even moving the public opinion meter on domestic versus imported food pales in comparison to the effort needed to move the world towards real support for some of the most vulnerable members of our global society – that is, the poverty-stricken souls in underdeveloped countries. You might be surprised to learn upwards of 80 per cent of them are farmers … not farmers as we know them in North America, but rather, subsistence farmers who grow food for their own family and a few others. These farmers are not a threat to our agricultural sector. They are not an enemy of Canada’s economy, or anyone else’s. Rather, they are people who would truly benefit from a global

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investment in agriculture. Visions of boatloads of technology from America and Europe come to mind when this kind of investment is mentioned. But that’s not the way it is. Rather, it’s an investment in the people themselves, in the farmers. This is one part that the G20 got absolutely right. Its commitment to maternal health directly supports farmers, given that many farmers in underdeveloped countries are women. I doubt if the leaders saw this commitment as support for agriculture. But it is, in so many ways. Ron Bonnett, president of the Canadian Federation of Agriculture, is adamant that deficit reduction be treated separately from global agricultural program development. He says creating programs that help farmers, such as road devel-

opment projects so they can get their harvests to markets, as well as improved food storage techniques, training and organizational measures, offer direct assistance without the need for expensive and trade-distorting subsides. How this all plays out will be determined in the summit in Seoul, South Korea, in November. A communiqué released by the European Union at the G20’s conclusion said the next meeting needs to “pave the way for the final deal,” with a special emphasis on trade. “Trade is the most tax friendly and consumer friendly tool to generate growth,” it said. Perhaps. But so is human resource development. There’ll be nothing to trade if there’s no one to grow it or raise it. Don’t lose sight of farmers’ role in food production, no matter where they are.

Plastic: Recycling efforts that aim to help more than the environment > CONTINUED FROM PG. 11 just looking for the highest price or are unwilling to change what they’ve always done. Vogt notes that it’s also important that people see the benefit of their recycling efforts.

“Plastics recycling makes a lot of sense,” he said. “It helps the environment on one side, but it also creates a lot of jobs and ensures manufacturing can stay in Canada. You have your raw material in front of your door.”


LIVING HERE 14

THE OBSERVER

LIVING HERE Just like all the other kids

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

T

wo and a half year old Gabbie Strauss is still too young to realize that she’s different from other little girls. As far as she knows, everyone drinks glasses and glasses of water and takes ‘vitamins’ every six hours. Some day Gabbie will understand that her vitamins are actually medicines that slow the effects of a rare genetic disease called cystinosis. The drugs help prevent the formation of crystals of cystine that would otherwise build up in her cells and destroy her organs. “I wonder how we’ll deal with things as she gets older and becomes more aware,” muses her mother Jody. “I guess we’ll have to take it one question at a time.” Cystinosis causes the amino acid cystine to build up in the kidneys, eyes, liver, muscles, blood cells and central nervous system. Kidney function is impaired, causing excessive thirst and urination and eventually kidney failure. Children often appear pale and thin and have trouble getting enough nourishment for proper growth. Trevor and Jody Strauss learned that their daughter had cystinosis in January 2009, when she was just over a year old. The diagnosis was the start of a turbulent year for the family. At the same time that they learned about the disease and started a rou-

tine of medications every six hours, they launched a fundraising effort and started a not-for-profit to work toward a cure. Family and friends pitched in to organize events and launch the Cystinosis Awareness and Research Effort. There was a dog walk, pig roast, car show, a fun day, bake sales, spaghetti dinners, a fashion show, smoothie day, a golf tournament. If that wasn’t enough, Trevor started a new job at NextEnergy in Elmira and Jody gave birth to their second daughter, Chloe. Between breast-feeding a newborn and getting up at midnight to give Gabbie her medication, it seemed that there were always lights on at the Strauss house. “We just somehow got

PHOTO

Joni Miltenburg

» JONI MILTENBURG

Parents strive for a normal life for Gabbie despite coping with cystinosis

KIDs WILL BE KIDs Gabbie Strauss suffers from cystinosis, a rare genetic disease that means she has to take medications every six hours. Her parents, Trevor and Jody, are raising funds to help find a cure.

Gesu Hospital and Research Institute in Rome. In April, Jody flew to California to sit in on a conference where researchers shared their ideas and findings. Driving back to the airport with a group of Belgian researchers, she asked

I wonder how we’ll deal with things as she gets older and becomes more aware. I guess we’ll have to take it one question at a time.” Jody Strauss through it,” Jody said. “If we got three hours of sleep, it was a miracle.” It was an exhausting year, but also a successful one. The new charity raised $106,000, which is going toward a study into stem cell therapy for cystinosis, led by Dr. Paul Goodyer from Montreal Children’s Hospital and Dr. Francesco Emma of Bambino

them what all the technical terms and findings they had discussed meant for children with cystinosis. “I can guarantee there will be a new therapy for your child in her lifetime,” they told her. Jody struggles to describe just how encouraging it was to hear those words. Belief that a cure will be found –

and not just a parent’s blind faith, but a medical researcher’s belief – keeps them positive. The other thing that keeps them going is that Gabbie herself is a happy, relatively healthy toddler. There have been a few trips to the emergency room, but they’ve managed to avoid any overnight stays in the hospital. Gabbie eats well and is the size she should be for her age and loves running and going to the park. In September, she starts preschool for half days twice a week. As she gets older, Gabbie will begin to realize that she’s different from other children, but for now, Trevor and Jody have tried to keep life as normal as possible. Having Chloe has helped; they’re grateful that Jody was pregnant before Gabbie was diagnosed, because they would have hesitated to have another child knowing there was a one-in-

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four chance that she could have cystinosis as well. “I don’t think we would want a child to go through what Gabbie has to go through,” Jody said. The Strausses are also hopeful that a new 12-hour delayed release drug – now in Phase III clinical trials – will be approved soon. The new drug would make it possible for Gabbie to lead a more normal life and would mean she and her parents could get an uninterrupted night’s sleep. Every step is another spark of light at the end of another tunnel, Jody said, on the road to a day when Gabbie doesn’t need to take medications anymore. The Strausses have made a conscious decision to focus on fewer, larger events – to avoid burning out themselves or their support group – but the fundraising will continue. “We’re going to be part of a cure,” Trevor said.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

15 LIVING HERE

Hopping aboard a new trend in the kitchen R

emember when pork became ‘the other white meat’ during a series of ad campaigns? Well, we’re starting a new one: Rabbit, the new chicken. Recently rabbit has been getting a lot of press, all of it good. New domestically raised rabbit is lean, offers white and dark meat and is mild in flavour – very similar to chicken, except that you can bet that where you get your rabbit, it has been naturally raised, without chemicals, and that definitely comes through in the flavour. Nutritionally, compare it to beef, lamb or pork. Rabbit has about half of the calories and about one-third of the fat, yet you are still rewarded with a rich-tasting meat. Recently, Dave Kabbes contacted us to question how much we actually do work with rabbit, and if any of our clients were interested in it. To be

From The Chef's Table Kirstie Herbstreit & Jody o'Malley honest, we don’t work with it much ... well, until now. Dave dropped off a couple of rabbits and the experimentation began. The results were amazing: juicy and extremely flavourful meat. I braised the rabbit Italian style, with red wine and lots of herbs, which was perfect for last weekend’s rain. At the end I had falling-off-the-bone meat and some very happy eaters. But what about the bunny factor when feeding kids? We’ve heard it referred to as the four-legged chicken, so let the campaign begin with a move

towards farm-raised and grain-fed meat with great flavour. For more information on how and where to get rabbit, contact kabbespatch@hotmail.com or call 519-6383349. Cut rabbit into six pieces, or, leave whole (depending on the size of your

Rabbit, Italian Style > 1 whole rabbit > 1-2 chopped tomatoes > Kosher salt and pepper, > 1/2 bunch chopped to taste

thyme

> Canola oil, as needed > 2 red onions, sliced > 2 cloves garlic, crushed > 1 cup red wine > 1 cup tomato purée

> 10 sage leaves, sliced > 1 lemon, quartered > 1/2 cup black olives > 1/2 cup freshly chopped parsley

dutch oven, and your confidence with a knife). Cutting around the bones, take off the two back legs, the two front legs, and then chop the loin in the center. Season pieces well with salt and pepper; Heat oil in a dutch oven or heavy pot with a lid and brown rabbit, in batches; When rabbit is all browned, set aside and add the red onions; caramelize over medium heat for about 10 minutes, add garlic, cook one minute, and then the rest of the ingredients along with the rabbit; cover and simmer for 1 hour and 30 minutes, or until meat is fork tender; Remove meat and keep warm on a platter; Reduce sauce over medium-high heat and then pour over rabbit; sprinkle with freshly chopped parsley; Great with a garlic spaghetti, creamy rice or polenta.

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LIVING HERE 16

THE OBSERVER

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> soLUTIoNs: Find the answers to all of the puzzles on pg. 27

Across 1. Beach shelter 7. Tracheae of insects 13. Italian brandy 19. Moon of Uranus 20. Spoiled 22. Means of support 23. Prejudice 25. Amorous intentions 26. Tokyo, formerly 27. One thousandth of an inch 28. Brother 30. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m ___ you!â&#x20AC;? 31. Reserved 34. Nonsensical language 38. Sue Graftonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ for Lawlessâ&#x20AC;? 39. Large amount of money 40. Bit 41. Tending to corrupt 42. Marked by the consumption of alcohol 46. 30-day mo. 48. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Men always hate most what they ___ mostâ&#x20AC;?: Mencken 49. Hoof sound 51. Edible mushroom with a brown cap 52. Appropriate 53. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ momentâ&#x20AC;? 54. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ a chanceâ&#x20AC;? 55. .0000001 joule 56. Churchillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;so fewâ&#x20AC;?: Abbr. 57. Mouth, in slang 59. Altdorf is its capital 60. Once occupied Britain and Spain and Gaul prior to Roman times 61. Goes quickly 63. Cloak-and-dagger org. 64. Small cases of dough with fillings 68. Rule 75. Actor Pitt 76. Product of inflammation 77. Amateur video subject, maybe 78. Work from home via phone 83. Programs 88. 18-wheeler 89. Golden Triangle country 90. Hairdo 91. Beanie Babies, e.g.



























 

 



 



















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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

SPORTS

» JONI MILTENBURG

UP AND OVER

Grab hold Local judo fighter headed to Lethbridge to participate in national championships

him,” Leeman said. “A guy might be better than you, but if he makes one mistake and you see that mistake, you can beat him.” Leeman is frequently one of the youngest competitors in his age category, being the victim of an unfortunate birthday. Judo Canada places him in the under-17 class, even though he won’t turn 14 until August. However, the age difference doesn’t faze him. “I normally fight guys older than me. Being 14 and fighting guys who are 15, 16 doesn’t really bug me,” he said.

Although he has no interest in stepping in the octagon, Leeman enjoys watching mixed martial arts, particularly Canadian welterweight champion Georges St-Pierre. Leeman would like to see the Quebec fighter confirm speculation that he will try for an Olympic medal as a member of Canada’s wrestling team in 2012. “Representing your country at an international level is an honour,” Leeman said. Competing in the Olympics is something Leeman would like to do himself someday, although that’s a few years away. Leeman got his first

taste of international competition in March at a tournament in Germany, which was followed by a week-long training camp. It was an opportunity to study different techniques and styles and try them out against opponents from a number of different countries. Not surprisingly, the Japanese judoka were head and shoulders above the competition; more surprising was that Kazakhstan dominated as well. Leeman trains at Kaizen judo club in Waterloo four times a week and does

> SEE JUDO ON PG. 18

Slo-pitch tournament honours Don Dietrich First annual event raises money for St. Clements play structure in name of lifelong resident, sports enthusiast

ON TARGET Kevin Shultz tosses a pitch at the Don Dietrich Memorial Slo-pitch Tournament June 25 in St. Clements. The event raised almost $5,000 to go towards new play equipment.

Katie Edmonds

T » KATIE EDMONDS

n the moments before he steps on the mat at a judo competition, Phil Leeman puts on his music and mentally goes over every move, grip and throw, right down to the bow at the start of the fight. Mental focus is just as important as technique in a competition; Phil describes judo as “physical chess.” He’ll need a strong focus this weekend when he fights in the under-17 national judo championships in Lethbridge, Alberta. Leeman is ranked third

in Ontario in the U17, 66-kilogram class. His toughest opponents will be the two Ontario judoka ranked above him – Luke Heatherington and former teammate Johnny Nagy. Leeman and Heatherington have traded points this season, while Nagy has beaten both of them. That doesn’t mean that he can’t be beat, however; the last time Nagy and Leeman squared off, they went the full three minutes and into golden score, where the first point wins. “If we go that far into a fight, I feel that I can beat

PHOTO

PHOTOS

Elmira’s Phil Leeman practices a judo throw with a fellow judoka at Kaizen Judo Club.

Joni Miltenburg

I

17 SPORTS

he sounds of clanking bats and the slap of the catcher’s mitt that echo from the ball diamond were joined by a chorus of voices singing ‘The more we get together’ and frequent laughter at the Don Dietrich Fun Slo-Pitch Tournament June 26-27 in St. Clements.

“‘The more we get together’ was Don’s favourite song,” said Brenda ‘Beanzie’ Brenner, a member of the St. Clements Recreation Service Board and friend of the Dietrich family. “The theme of the weekend was fun. When we were cleaning up, we noticed that there was no food left, and no beer left, so we

know people had a good time.” This was the first outing for what is planned to be an annual event in honour of St. Clements resident Don Dietrich who died of cancer this year at the age of 74. Dietrich lived his whole life in St. Clements and participated

> SEE SLO-PITCH ON PG. 19


SPORTS 18

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

Wooden it be nice to have some good advice? I

f your homeland were ever experiencing a severe drought, if the ground was parched and cracked, if crops failed, wells dried up, there wasn’t a cloud in sight and the rain dancers finally gave up because of sore feet, there’s only one thing to do – that’s right, build a wooden boat. I’m not talking about a sensible wooden boat either. No sir, the thing I am referring has no drainage plug – just like the one I built. Talk about a rain magnet. In fact, all I need to do to ensure that our garden gets the rain it so richly deserves is trailer my boat out into plain sight of the sky. What happens next is not even subtle. It starts with a gentle breeze that

Not-So-Great Outdoorsman Steve Galea carries just a hint of rain. Next, every dark cloud within 200 miles queues up just over its bow. And then clouds open up and it rains. And rains. The object, near as I can tell, is to turn my boat into a bathtub-like vessel so that the rain gods can gain great amusement at the sight of me either bailing or running the bilge pump. I’ve noticed several things can modify the amount of rain received

Judo: Young competitor continues to work on international experience > CONTINUED FROM PG. 17 weight training twice a week on top of that. He also helps out with his sister Olivia’s class, teaching or correcting technique where he can. Leeman just finished his first year of high school and discovered he had to step back from judo a bit to get his school work done, but keeping a balance was easier than he expected.

His coach, Bob Zettl, wants to see Leeman work on his technique, build strength, work on his mental focus and most importantly, get more experience in international events. Leeman has progressed with each tournament he’s participated in, and getting exposure to international competition was an important step. “He knows what he has to do now,” Zettl said.

too. If I have only a short amount of time to take the boat to a local lake, for instance, it’s possible to get several inches of precipitation in the space of minutes. Similarly, if the battery for my pump dies, the rain gods sense a weakness and then exploit it with something like a tsunami or monsoon season. Ideally, they prefer that I use a bailing can to remove the water in my boat before the next round of drenching. They are nothing, if not old school. But they also don’t mind watching me struggle with a siphon hose – in fact, I believe they get a good kick out of seeing me accidentally swallow that first pull, especially if a June bug is part and parcel of it. Such is the rain-gathering ability of my boat. In fact, it is so good that I am thinking of renting it out to places where severe droughts have altered the landscape. I believe that if it was airlifted into the middle of the Sahara, we could recover thousands of acres. Don’t get me wrong. My boat has other uses too. Fishing immediately comes to mind. The really good part is that, generally, I no longer need a live

well. I just release the fish onto the floor and let them enjoy a swim in the gentle rainwater. Lately, I have been thinking that all this aggravation could easily be remedied with the addition of a simple hole in the boat. And, in fact I was about to add this little modification, when my wife told me I couldn’t shoot my 30.06 in the driveway – her garden needed a gentle soaking this week. The thing is no one ever told me this about wooden boats before I built one. All they said was that a little rain was good for them as it tightens up the seams, which in this case, are already fibreglassed over. Now, when I mention this to others who have wooden boats, they just smile, pat me on the back, and nod knowingly. The funny thing is that each one of these people was a wellspring of good advice when I was building it. They provided me with the benefit of their many years of experience and guided me along the way so that my boat was completely waterproof – like a water trough. But since completion, no one has been able to offer me any good advice at all. Oh, except for one guy. He handed me a box of 30.06 cartridges ...

IN ACTION

Tobacco and Sports Don’t Mix…

Make your sport tobacco-free! For more information contact Region of Waterloo Public Health at 519-883-2279 or visit www.region.waterloo.on.ca/smoking, and click on “Second Hand Smoke”.

Aaron Wilson

W

ilson flips a large tire down the parking lot as a part of his cardio training, one aspect of his Mauy Thai regimen. Mauy Thai is a type of kick boxing, a class that he hopes

PINACLE FITNESS

to instruct at Pinacle this year. Tire flipping helps to boost overall body strength, says Wilson, but shouldn’t be attempted by beginners without proper instruction and supervision.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

19 SPORTS

Slo-pitch: Proceeds from tourney to fuel Don Dietrich Memorial Fund > CONTINUED FROM PG. 17 in and coached a variety of sports, including hockey and baseball. Laurine MacDermott played on a women’s softball team coached by Dietrich and returned this weekend to play three games at the age of 86. She was joined by Dietrich’s extended family and friends, young and old, who all took their turn up at bat. Each team played three one-hour games. The tournament attracted more than 120 players from across the region, with some members of the Dietrich family coming from as far away as Nova Scotia to join the celebration. When Dietrich passed away this year, dona-

PHOTO

Brad Voisin, director of recreation for the Township of Wellesley, swings at a pitch for his team, the Park St. Bandits.

» KATIE EDMONDS

MAKING CONTACT

tions were made to the Don Dietrich Memorial Fund. Those funds have since been donated to the St. Clements Recreation Service Board to go towards the purchase and installation of a play structure at the soccer facility. The structure will be set up, possibly as soon as this week, to give young children a place to play while their siblings are playing soccer. “We didn’t want the weekend to be about competition,” said Brenner. “The only people who will win are the kids when they get their new play equipment.” Before the tournament, the fund held about $4,200 and the service board pitched in the extra funds to cover

the $13,000 structure. Brenner estimates that the tournament brought in close to $5,000 from the teams’ $100 entry fee, funds to be turned over to the rec. board when the final tally is in. Although the project will likely be completed this calendar year, the committee plans to hold the tournament in Dietrich’s name for many years to come. “Donny was a vital member of our community,” said Brenner. “He knew everyone and everyone knew him. He was always there to help out, or simply to play. This is the kind of event he would have loved, and I know that he would have been proud of this.”

Linwood PS games day SUMMER FUN

PHOTOS

» JONI MILTENBURG

Students at Linwood Public School held their annual games day on Monday, marking the end of the school year by competing in events like the sack race, shoe toss, bean bag relay and tug of war.

WOOLWICH COMMUNITY’S COMPLEMENTARY HEALTH CARE FACILITY

SCORECARD ELMIRA AQUADUCKS SWIM MEET - JUNE 26

BOYS 8 AND UNDER Matthew McArdle – 5th, 25m freestyle BOYS 9 AND 10 Jacob Davis – 1st, 50m freestyle; 1st, 25m backstroke; 1st 25, breaststroke; 1st, 200m relay GIRLS 9 AND 10 Meghan Creelman – 4th, 100m IM; 14th, 25m breaststroke; 5th, 25m butterfly; 4th, 100m free relay Emma Crewe – 13th, 25m backstroke; 9th, 25m breaststroke; 9th, 25m butterfly; 4th, 100m free relay Caylee Gallant – 3rd, 100m IM; 20th, 25m breaststroke; 7th, 25m butterfly; 4th, 100m free relay Erin Nechanicky – 7 , 50m freestyle; 4th, 25m breaststroke; 4th, 25m butterfly; 4th, 100m free relay th

Carmen Read – 11th, 50m

freestyle; 8 , 25m breaststroke; 3rd, 25m butterfly; 2nd, 100m medley relay th

BOYS 11 AND 12 Alex Carbone – 3rd, 50m breaststroke; 3rd, 25m butterfly; 1st, 200m free relay Isaac Hogan – 2 , 50m freestyle; 1st, 50m breaststroke; 1st, 25m butterfly; 1st, 200m free relay nd

Matthew Teng – 4th, 50m freestlye; 4th, 50m breaststroke; 2nd, 25m butterfly; 1st, 200m free relay GIRLS 11 AND 12 Lindsay Glofcheskie – 8th, 50m backstroke; 8th, 50m breaststroke; 6th, 25m butterfly; 2nd, 100m medley relay Melanie McArdle – 13th, 50m freestyle; 16th, breaststroke; 10th, 25m butterfly; 2nd, 100m medley relay Sarah Norcott – 17th, 50m freestyle; 12th, 50m

breaststroke; 14 , 25m butterfly; 2nd, 100m medley relay th

BOYS 13 AND 14

St. Jacobs Naturopathic Clinic With Massage and Reflexology

Emma Teng – 6 , 50m breaststroke; 1st, 200m free relay th

INDIVIDUALIZED HEALTH CARE FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY

OPEN GIRLS

Jordan Lemp: 2 , 50m freestyle; 1st, 50m breaststroke; 2nd, 50m butterfly; 1st, 200m free relay nd

Kyle Stickney – 8th, 50m freestyle; 5th, 50m backstroke; 7th, 50m breaststroke GIRLS 13 AND 14 Katie Glofcheskie – 6th, 100m IM; 12th, 50m freestlye; 10th, 50m breaststroke; 3rd, 50m butterfly; 1st, 200m free relay Jamie MacDougall – 4th, 100m IM; 3rd, 50m freestyle; 3rd, 50m breaststroke; 1st, 200m free relay Madeleine Nelson – 3 , 100m IM; 7th, 50m freestyle; 1st, 50m butterfly; 1st, 200m free relay rd

Leslie Quinn – 1st, 100m IM; 1st, 50m freestyle; 1st, 50m breaststroke; 1st, 200m free relay

Our services are covered by

d Infrare most health insurance plans. Sauna

Alex Nicholson – 1 , 100m IM; 2 , st

nd

50m freestyle; 1st, 50m butterfly; 1st, 200m free relay Toby Root – 3rd, 50m freestyle; 1st, 100m freestyle; 2nd, 50m backstroke; 1st, 200m free relay WOOLWICH U15/16 L6 GIRLS BLACK

JUNE 23 Woolwich 3, Fergus 3 Goals: Ashley Palmer x2, Emma Leger WOOLWICH U11 GIRLS L6

JUNE 24 Woolwich 1, Fergus 1 Goal: Morgan Douglas WOOLWICH U14 BOYS

JUNE 22 Woolwich 1, Kitchener 0 Goal: Caleb Warren Shutout: Jordan Mitchell

1 - 9 PARKSIDE DRIVE, ST. JACOBS

(Beside the Ha Harvest Moon Restaurant)

519.664.1050 Tricia Brubacher R.M.T. & Reflexologist

Raza Shah

Naturopathic Doctor

Call for a 15 minute Free Consult.

INDIAN RIVER DIRECT f

ELMIRA

FREESTONE PEACHES WEDNESDAY

July 7

10:00am to 3:30pm at New Apostolic Church (First & Arthur Streets)


CLASSIFIEDS 20

THE OBSERVER

CLASSIFIEDS

HELP WANTED

FOR SALE

> Scroll Saw - hardly used. Call 519-669-4859, after 5 p.m. FARM EQUIPMENT

HELP WANTED AZ & DZ DRIVER

Local & Long distance. Livestock experience an asset but will train. Competitive wages & benefits.

Call 519-669-3991 or 519-577-2900 or Fax Resume to 519-669-5934 HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

> Tractors,

JD 4020 diesel late model syncro, JD 1630 145 loader, excellent, quick attach $13,500 each; JD 2130, 4500 hrs $12,000; Ebersol elevators $750; Cuningham 851 hay crimper $1,650. Dan Seifried, Harriston, 519-338-2688.

PETS

> MEGAMUTTS

dog training, Summer Session - group session or private, starting July 6, 6 weeks - $140.00. www. megamutts.com. or 519669-8167.

> Agricultural Parts Counter. Stoltz Sales and Service (Elmira) is looking for a self-motivated, positive thinking individual to join our expanding parts dept. We require someone who has a good understanding of the agricultural industry and equipment and possesses above average customer service skills. We offer competitive wages and benefit plan. If you wish to join our team please mail or email resume to: eparts@ stoltzsales.com, Stoltz Sales and Service, PO Box 235, Elmira, Ont., N3B 2Z6.

> Sales Position - Golden Triangle Printing is looking for area resident to develop clientele in Elmira area. Ideal for retired or semi retired person. To reply send resume to dave@goldentriangleprint ing.com

> Established Framing Company in KW area requires framers with a minimum of 2 year experience. Must have own transportation. Top wages offered to energetic and responsible applicants, 519575-3807.

> Intex Oval Framed pool. Above ground, 24’X12’x4’. Salt system pump, 5 filters for pump, ladder. Used one summer. Pool cover, ground cover, must sell. Make an offer, asking $500. Call 519-6692583, after 3 p.m.

Bedroom Semidetached Bungalow apartment in the village of Wellesley. Open concept, gas fireplace in living room, french doors to deck, fridge, stove, washer & dryer, all utilities included, including lawn mowing and snow removal. Perfect for elderly, no steps. $900 /mth inclusive. Available September 1 or possibly August 1. Call Jim 519-588-1045.

> John

> Elmira

The #1 Weekly in the Region.

CHILD CARE

> Child

Care - Spots available for one to two, full or part time. Snacks and lunch provided. Call 519669-5327.

FOR SALE

Deere Sabre, 9 years old, good running condition. Asking $800. Call 519-669-8325.

WANTED

> Wanted - used 4’x8’ pool table. Call 519-6692563, leave a message. RENTALS

>2

- 1 bedroom, downtown location, no pets, A.C., immediate. $495.00 + utilities. 519-669-8074.

RENTALS

Residential 20-Word Ad $7.50 (Extra Words 20¢/word) Commercial 20-Word Ad $12.00 (Extra Words 30¢/word)

GARAGE SALES

APARTMENTS

> Elmira - 2 bedroom town house. Please, no smoking, no pets. $875 plus utilities. Must provide own appliances. Suitable for quiet tenants. Call 519-743-7479. One Parking space included.

> HUGE Yard/Estate Sale. Fri. July 9, 2 p.m., Sat. July 10, 8 a.m. 15 Grosbeak Rd., Elmira.

> Moorefield large two bedroom apartment, furnished or unfurnished, laundry facilities, parking , electric heat, cable TV. No pets, adult building. References. $795.00 inclusive. First & Last. 519-638-3013.

> Yard Sale. 24 Killdeer Rd., Elmira. Sat Jul 3, 7 a.m. TONS of kids clothes - girls + boys, Elliptical machine - like new, household items + more

> MOOREFIELD

- One bedroom apartment, furnished, laundry facilities, parking, deck, electric heat, cable tv, no pets, adult building. References. $695 inclusive. First & last 519-638-3010.

> Multi Family Yard Sale - Expo Drive, St. Clements. Sat. July 3, 8 a.m. - 2 p.m.

APARTMENT FOR RENT

2 Bedroom Unit available immediately 14 Spring St., Drayton 1st Flr. Unit good 2007condition Call 519-669-1544

SALES & SERVICE

We get you

Mildred or Len Frey

Results.

> For

Lease - Retail/ light commercial up to 3200 sq ft available. Great location on busy main street of St. Clements. Approx. 10 mins. from Waterloo. Ample parking, many uses permitted. $1.15 per sq ft inclusive. Price may be adjusted based on needs. Call 519-404-8879.

> Office Space - 17 Church St., W., Elmira. Individual upstairs offices. 135 sq. ft $650 per month all inclusive and 90 sq. ft $400 per moth all inclusive. Call Mildred Frey 519-6691544.

PLACING A CLASSIFIED AD | Classified ads can be obtained in person, by phone, fax or email from Monday to Thursday 8:30am-5pm or Friday 8:30am-4pm. All classified ads are prepaid. Deadline is WEDNESDAYS by 4pm.

COMPUTERS

COMPUTERS - LAPTOPS

Sales and Service

CALL FOR DETAILS

Come see our showroom at:

112 Bonnie onnie Crescent, Elmira r ra

519-669-5551

AUCTIONS

AUTOMOTIVE

Police, Government, Repo, Bankruptcy, Fleets & Others

2010

Monthly PUBLIC Vehicle

AUCTION

to be held ONSITE at:

SALES & SERVICE

2008 PONTIAC WAVE

COMM/IND FOR RENT

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

81,000km

$9,995.00

2007 FORD F150 XLT Crew Cab 4X4

75,000km

$20,500.00

2006 PONTIAC TORRENT 2WD $13,500.00 2006 TOYOTA COROLLA Automatic

68,000km 54,000km

$10,500.00

2005 HONDA CIVIC 2DR Reverb 5 spd $7,995.00 2003 ACURA RSX S 2DR 5 spd

120,000km 106,000km

$9,995.00

2001 NISSAN ALTIMA

73,000km

$7,500.00 All prices subject to HST

47 Northside Dr., St. Jacobs, ON

519-664-2281

100% Local. Period.

BRESLAU AIRPORT ROAD AUCTION COMLEX 5100 FOUNTAIN ST. NORTH, BRESLAU (kitchener)

Sat July 10th 9:30am 2007 Crown Victoria 2007 Caravan Wgn 2005 Chev IMPala 4 - 02/05 Ford E450 Buses 2003 KIa RIoS 2001 Saturn Sl1 2 - 01/03 GMC Chev 1500 P/ups 2 - 00/01 Caravan Wgns 2002 Windstar Wgn 2000 Cavalier 4dr 2000 Cadillac DeVIllE 2000 Ranger Pickup

2006 PIoNEER 27’ Travel Trailer 2005 Palomino 29’ 5th Wheel Trailer 75 Bendix 25’ Motorhome Enclosed (6X12) Trailer 15’ Bowrider, 60hp Evinrude & Trailer www.mrjutzi.ca - website is updated daily as vehicles arrive Partial List ONLY!!!!!

No Buyer’s Premium!! VIEWING: Friday, July 9th, 2010 - 1pm to 5pm TERMS: $500 Cash Deposit on Each Vehicle or as announced

M.R. Jutzi & Co

PRoFESSIoNal IN ThE oRDERly lIquIDaTIoN aND aPPRaISalS oF CoMMERCIal, INDuSTRIal, CoNSTRuCTIoN, MuNICIPal EquIPMENT & VEhIClES

www.mrjutzi.ca

519-648-2111

47 Northside Dr., St. Jacobs, ON

519-664-2281

SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTION ON WATER STREET IN ST. JACOBS General Info The Township of Woolwich has contracted with Sousa Concrete Ltd. for the construction of sidewalk on the west side of Water Street in St. Jacobs (From Abners Lane to Hachborn Street East). Commencement of work is now anticipated to start on Monday, July 5 2010, weather permitting. If your driveway entrance is affected by this work, it will not be accessible to you while the work is being completed. Please ensure that your vehicle is out before any formwork is built, and use alternative parking until the concrete has had a few days to cure. The contractor will inform the residents who will be directly affected by the construction. Lines of Communication If you have any questions or concerns during the course of this project, please contact the people noted to the right. Timely responses will be provided in accordance with customer service guidelines that have been established by the municipality. We regret any inconvenience that this construction project may cause, and we thank you for your patience and co-operation.

Ross Sousa Sousa Concrete Ltd. Phone: 519.623.5572 Cell Phone: 519.223.1340 E-mail: ASousaI@aol.com

Mario Martinez Engineering Technician Township of Woolwich Phone: 519.669.6031 Cell Phone: 519.465.8121 E-mail: mmartinez@woolwich.ca


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

21 CLASSIFIEDS

SNYDER AVENUE SOUTH & CHURCH STREET WEST RECONSTRUCTION PROJECT NEWSLETTER No. 2 Project Description In partnership with the Federal and Provincial Governments through the Infrastructure Stimulus Fund, the Township of Woolwich has contracted J.G. Goetz Construction Limited for the Snyder Avenue South Reconstruction Project. In addition, in partnership with the Region of Waterloo, the Township of Woolwich has contracted J.G. Goetz Construction Limited for the Church Street West Reconstruction Project. This project consists of the reconstruction of the following roadways: • Snyder Avenue South from First Street West to Church Street West, • Church Street West from Herbert Street to 75m east of Snyder Avenue North. The scope of work is to include the complete replacement of the existing sanitary sewers, cellar drains, storm sewers, watermains and all other surface works to the municipal property line. Included will be the replacement of all pavement structures, the installation of curb and gutter, and new sidewalks.

Kevin Firmage Project Manager J.G. Goetz Construction Ltd. Phone: 519-836-2832 Cell Phone: 519-244-7453

Richard Sigurdson, C.E.T. Project Manager Township of Woolwich Phone: 519-669-6033 Cell Phone: 519-465-8182 E-mail: rsigurdson@woolwich.ca Zoltan Tako, C.E.T. Project Manager Gamsby & Mannerow Ltd. Phone: 519-291-9339 Cell Phone: 519-501-4161 E-mail: zoltan@gamsby.com

July 19, 2010 On Monday, July 19, 2010, at 5:30 p.m. the Committee will meet in the Council Chambers of the Municipal Offices, 24 Church Street West, Elmira to consider the following applications. All persons interested in the applications may attend and may contact Nancy Thompson at 519-669-6040 or 519-664-2613 (ext. 6040) regarding meeting details. Email: nthompson@ woolwich.ca. The Committee will also consider signed, written submissions for or against the applications if submitted to the Township of Woolwich no later than 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, July 13, 2010. Submissions can be forwarded by mail or hand delivery to: Township of Woolwich, Attn: Jeremy Vink, P.O. Box 158, 24 Church Street West, Elmira, ON N3B 2Z6 or Fax 519-669-4669 or Email jvink@woolwich.ca.

Communication If you have any questions or concerns during the course of this project, please contact the people noted below. Julie Morgan Site Representative Gamsby & Mannerow Ltd. Cell Phone: 519-242-7384 E-mail: jmorgan@gamsby.com

COMMITTEE OF ADJUSTMENT NOTICE OF HEARING

Malcolm Molloy Construction Manager J.G. Goetz Construction Ltd. Phone: 519-836-2832 Cell Phone: 519-244-7454 E-mail: molloy@goetzconstruction.com Rod Kruger, C.E.T., A.M.C.T. Manager of Engineering Operations Township of Woolwich Phone: 519-669-6029 Cell Phone: 519-465-8359 E-mail: rkruger@woolwich.ca

Stage 1 on Snyder Avenue South between First Street West to the south side of South Street West will be closed until approximately July 23, 2010. Please note that the limit of Stage 1 has been expanded to the south side of South Street West for scheduling purposes. Access to the Woolwich Memorial Centre, Lions Hall, and Community Care Concepts will be maintained through the South Street West intersection. Church Street West between Herbert Street and 75m east of Snyder Avenue North will be closed on or about July 5, 2010 until approximately August 6, 2010. Local traffic will be detoured via Barnswallow Drive to Whippoorwill Drive to Arthur Street South. Truck traffic will be detoured via Floradale Road to Listowel Road to Arthur Street South. For a map showing the detour routes noted above or for a full newsletter, please visit the Township website at www. woolwich.ca. Grand River Transit route on Snyder Avenue South will be detoured during this project. For details on this detour, please visit the Grand River Transit website at www.grt.ca. We regret any inconvenience that this construction project may cause, and we thank you for your patience and co-operation.

MINOR VARIANCE APPLICATION A14/2010 – John and Maria Botsford PROPERTY: 31 Woolwich Street South, Breslau, GCT Part 114, Plan 587 Lot 102) PROPOSAL: The applicant is requesting permission to recognize the existing reduced lot area of approximately 728 square metres, whereas 2,000 square metres is required, in order to establish a commercial use (sewing and alterations business) in the detached garage. The property is zoned Settlement Commercial (C-3) and contains a single family dwelling and detached garage. Further information about the applications may be obtained from Engineering and Planning Services at 519-669-6038 or 519-664-2613 (Ext. 6038). DATED this 3rd day of July, 2010 Jeremy Vink, RPP, MCIP Senior Planner Engineering & Planning Services

FINE OF $300 FOR PARKING IN A DESIGNATED ACCESSIBLE PARKING SPACE WITHOUT MTO PERMIT TAKE NOTICE that the Township of Woolwich monitors designated accessible parking spaces to ensure that they are used by vehicles displaying an Accessible Parking Permit (APP) issued by the Ministry of Transportation (MTO). The individual to whom the permit is

issued must be using the vehicle and the permit must be visibly displayed on the dashboard or sun visor when the vehicle is parked in the designated accessible parking space. The permit holder may use the permit in any vehicle in which they are travelling. There is no fee for

an APP. The fine for parking a vehicle in an accessible parking space without an MTO permit is $300. Information about Accessible Parking Permits can be found on-line at http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/dandv/ vehicle/app.shtml.


CLASSIFIEDS 22

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

REAL ESTATE

500

FEATURED LISTING

$

NEW PRICE

INLAW SET UP With seperate entrance. 5200 sq ft, 3 kitchens, 5 bedrooms, 6 bathrooms, 3 car garage and extra long driveway. MLS. Call Paul direct.

Is Donated To

KidsAbility With Every Home I Sell!

$875,000

GREAT STARTER HOME!

Paul Martin

Walk up attic to master bdrm & ensuite, fmly rm and lvng rm, seperate dining rm. Kitchen addition 2005. Walk out bsmnt and sngl detached grge. MLS. Call Paul direct.

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

$619,000

CALL DIRECT

2,800 SQFT HOME ON 42 ACRES

519-503-9533

Elmira is my home ... let’s make it yours!

6+1 bdrms, 4 bths, surrounded by 100ft trees, 2 springs, pond, and riding trails. Geo-thermal heating system. MLS. Call Paul direct.

$519,000

BEAUTIFUL HOME COMPLETELY FINISHED 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms. Extra large windows in basement. MLS. Call Paul direct.

$364,900

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

GEM IN THE COUNTRY

Located on 1 acre near Waterloo, backing onto farm land & over looking golf course. Recently updated kit w/custom cabinets. Stunning perennial gardens surround sttractive home. MLS. Call Paul direct.

$274,900

HOME 519-669-3074

EMAIL paul@remaxsolidgold.biz

OFFICE 519-888-7110

ONLINE www.homeswithpaul.ca

180 Weber St. S., Waterloo

QUALITY BUILT HOME BY VERDONE 4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, upgraded kitchen cupboards, pantry, upper laundry floor. MLS. Call Paul direct.

$431,900

REAL ESTATE BROKERAGE

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

ELMIRA REAL ESTATE Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage SERVICES

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD.

Independently Owned and Operated

4B Arthur St. S. Elmira • www.remaxsolidgold.biz

45 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

OFFICE: 519-669-5426

519-669-2772

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

519-669-3192 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

BRAD MARTIN Broker of Record MVA Residential

Res: 519-669-1068

JULIE HECKENDORN Broker Res: 519-669-8629

TRACEY WILLIAMS Sales Rep. Cell: 519-505-0627

BERT MARTIN, BROKER

COUNTRY PROPERTY!

BONNIE BRUBACHER Broker of Record

SHANNA ROZEMA Broker.

DARREN ROMKEY Sales Rep.

LAURIE LANGDON Sales Rep.

DALE KELLER Sales Rep.

MONIQUE BRUBACHER Sales Rep.

THIS WEEK'S FEATURE PROPERTIES

RED

UCE

D

CoUNtry ProPerty

GREAT STARTER!

$178,000 DRAYTON | Spacious home; open concept; large bedrooms. COME AND SEE. MLS

NE

WP

RIC

E

COUNTRY BUNGALOW!

LOTS OF HOUSE - 1883 sq. ft. 3+ bdrms, 3 bths.(5 pc. enuite). LR, DR PLUS main flr. family rm. Fenced yard w/shed. 4th bdrm. in lower level. Across from park. REDUCED TO $291,900 MLS

Nice back yard!. Cozy fam. rm addition w/woodstove. Updated windows, refaced cabinetry. Rec. rm. w/gas stove 4th bdrm. Great lot! MLS $279,900

Three bedroom, three bathroom, one-half acre lot, main floor laundry, open concept. MLS $317,900

$299,900 A BEAUTY! | 1635 sq. ft. finished top to bottom, 3 spacious bedrooms and 3 baths including luxurious ensuite. Fenced yard, deck shows AAA. MLS

COUNTRY SETTING RED

UCE

D

With streams, trees, large lawns, 5 bedrooms, tennis court, detached workshop, updates in 2003. MLS $459,000

Your referrals are appreciated!

oPeN CoNCePt SiDeSPlit

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

Oversized principal rooms. Lrg. dining area. W/O from fam. rm. to deck & partly fenced yard. Fin. rec. re. & 4th bdrm. Tastefully decorated REDUCED TO $319,000 MLS

COUNTRY TWO STOREY!

elmira 2 Storey

$349,900 ELMIRA | Wow, the space! Front sitting room or office, formal dining + eat-in kitchen with ample natural oak cabinetry. Mainfloor family and laundry. 3 Bedrooms, 3 Baths. Great location, close to schools and amenities. MLS

LOCaTION! - Large wooded lot. Lots of living space in this 2500 sq. ft. + finished w/o bsmt. Rear addition Potential for in-law suite. MLS $389,900

Country Property outside Elmira, 2 bedrm, finished basement. Enjoy sunsets and sunrises. NEW PRICE $249,900 MLS

Three bedroom open concept offers ensuite, main floor laundry, large double garage on one-half acre lot. MLS $319,900

$249,900 ELMIRA | Great 3+1 bedroom home on spacious mature lot, new berber carpeting, freshly painted, walk-up from basement w/large rec.room, 2nd kitchen & bdrm, detached garage/ shop w/heat, hydro & phone. NEW MLS

$299,000 | Nestled on mature lot overlooking farmland. 2+ Bedroom, welcoming character throughout, deep cherry window sills, open concept family dining room, mudroom/laundry/ den and double garage. MLS

RaRE OPPORTUNITY - near Elmira. Immaculate bungalow nestled in the trees on 7 acres. Updated from top to bottom! - bathrms, kitchen, hardwood flrs. windows, shingles. Huge fam, rm. w/ expansive windows. Fin. lower level. Prof. landscaped. MLS $699,000

COUNTRY PROTPERTY

SiDeSPlit & DetaCheD GaraGe/ShoP

fielD StoNe Charmer

ONLY 1 LEFT - 1900 sq.ft. condo backing to open parkland. Quality constructed. Finished rec. room. Precast concrete const. - r.i. for in-floor heat. Elevator. Oversized dble. garage. MLS $413,500

Property offers three bedrooms, eat-in kitchen with sliders to large deck, french doors separating dining & living rooms, sun room, main floor laundry. MLS $154,900.

Great family home

$275,900 GLEN ALLAN | This home features 3 Bedrooms, 2 Baths, updated kitchen, patio off family room, newer windows; large insulated shed/garage, all located on a large beautifully treed lot. MLS

Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, main floor family room, finished basement, double garage (28' x 22'), large principal rooms. New in 2009, roof, garage doors, paved drive. Most original windows replaced. All this on 1/2 acre 10 minutes from Waterloo and 5 minutes from Elmira. MLS. Reduced to $319,900.

www.

.com

IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH

Spacious home on a huge lot in LINWOOD. Oversized country kitchen w/island & b.i. appl. Sunken fam. rm. w/gas f.p. Main flr. office & laundry. Large master w/ensuite. Oak staircase. Lge. deck. Storage shed. Furnace and cac(2008). MLS $ 374,900 UNIQUE BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY! - Be your own boss. Flower shop on main street. Established for 25+ years. Own a piece of history! NEW MLS $25,000

www.thurrealestate.com


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

23 CLASSIFIEDS

STRANGE BUT TRUE

Engineering know-how puts art to the test Q.

How many engineering jobs let you take a van Gogh off the wall and hold it in your hands?

Strange But True

A.

If you’re both an electrical engineering professor and a research fellow at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam, like Cornell’s C. Richard Johnson Jr., you just might do this, says Susan Karlin of IEEE Spectrum magazine. A big concern of his is “fraud and how to detect it.” Is that alleged van Gogh in hand authentic? Answering this can be done with high-resolution imaging associated with signalprocessing algorithms that zero in at the brushstroke level. Currently, Johnson’s focus is on canvas thread counts -- the number of horizontal threads crossing a vertical line one centimetre long -- to

Bill & Rich Sones identify paintings from the same roll of canvas. This is telling for an artist who bought canvas in rolls, as van Gogh often did. Radio-opaque material in an X-ray helps reveal signature weave density. Johnson’s team is currently distributing the software free to museums. For me, he says, this kind of research is “like having a backstage pass. I go to conservation studios and can take a van Gogh out of its frame and examine it.”

Q.

“I was famous for the kites I made, and my sleds were the envy ... of all the boys in town.” What invention is this woman world famous for today, more than a century after a court battle for the patent and after she was awarded the “Decoration of the Royal Legion of Honour from Queen Victoria”? You probably don’t know her name but have doubtless used countless of this product when shopping ...

A.

She was Margaret Knight (18381914), one of the first American women to be awarded a patent, says Jack Challoner in 1001 Inventions That Changed the World. She was a prolific inventor from the age of 12, when an accident in a textile mill prompted her to design a

safety feature to protect workers from the loom. However, of her 27 patents, the flat-bottomed paper bag is her most widely remembered invention. Knight was working in a paper-bag factory after the American Civil War when she saw the need for a boxier shape to replace the envelope-slim bags unsuitable for bulky items. Since the flat-bottomed bag could be made only by hand, Knight designed a wooden prototype of a bag-maker that she sent to a machine shop, where an unscrupulous employee stole her design and got the patent. But the decision was overturned in court, with Knight bagging what was righfully hers from the beginning.

>

Send STRANGE questions to brothers Bill and Rich at strangetrue@cs.com

PHOTOS

» KATIE EDMONDS

Maryhill awash in well-polished chrome

THEY DON’T MAKE ‘EM LIKE THIS ANYMORE Maryhill resident Tyler Runstedler DRIVING IT’S A FEW YEARS OFF YET takes a close-up look at one of the antique cars on display at the car show in his hometown June 27.

Todd Groves holds up his daughter Addison to take a closer look while son Ethan peers in the front window of a ride that caught their eye.

REAL ESTATE

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

ALLI NORRIS

BILL NORRIS

OFFICE:

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CELL:

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CELL:

FAX:

HOME FAX:

HOME FAX:

180 Weber St. S., Waterloo, ON N2J 2B2 519-888-7110 519-888-6117

519-577-6248 519-669-9885

allinorris@rogers.com

519-588-1348 519-669-9885

billnorris@rogers.com

ELMIRA

Well kept three bedroom semi backing onto church property. Large eat in kitchen with walk out to deck. Bright eating area with lots of windows. Enjoy the privacy of a fenced back yard. Finished rec room with a two pc. bathroom. Mature trees and tool shed. Hook up for gas stove and BBQ. Ideal home for first time buyers close to schools and Lions Park ball diamonds and soccer fields.

$229,900.00 I

CE

N

EW

PR

LINWOOD Plenty of living space in this century home located in the downtown core of Linwood. Close to school, church, ball diamond and the new Community Centre. Presently a four plex. A very unique property with potential development possiblities or easily converted back to a single family dwelling. Rare find!

$249,900.00

519-669-1544 24hrs

REALTY LTD., BROKERAGE

Independently Owned and Operated

17 Church St. W., Elmira www.peakrealestate.com

Preparing Your Home For Sale Series Ask Wendy + Mary Lou

Q: OH! OH! What just fell on my head? Cleaning out Cabinets A: Buyers will want to check out your cupboards and closets for storage. If your storage areas are busting out at the seams, buyers will think your home is too small. Having your storage areas neat and tidy says you likely look after the rest of your home

For more selling tips call or email:

3.5 acre country property near Moorefield 1400 sq ft, 3+2 bedroom bungalow, 10yrs old, Natural gas heat, wood stove in finished rec room. $328,000 call 519-638-2439 or view @ www.bytheowner.com

Wendy Taylor

Everything that’s fit to print...

BROKER wendy.taylor1@rogers.blackberry.net

Plus a whole lot

Mary Lou Murray SALES REPRESENTATIVE

marylou@mmrealestate.ca “You dream...We’ll work.”

www.

.com

IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH


CLASSIFIEDS 24

THE OBSERVER

> PRINT

FAMILY ALBUM

| COPY | SCAN

THANK YOU

THANK YOU

MEMORIUM

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

THANK YOU (Bill & Joan Hahn)

Elizabeth Walter (Betty) July 1, 2002 Within our hearts, We always keep A special place for you. And try to do our best to live As you would want us to. As we loved you, so we miss you, In our memories you are near. Loved, Remembered, Longed for Always, With the passing of each year.

> Lanier 5227 Black and white Digital

Copier / Printer / Scanning System. Features include 3 paper trays up to 11x17, duplex, sheet feeder, collator with staple function. Ideal for midsize businesses, 600 dpi resolution, manufactured in 2001, only 117,000 actuations, 5 toner cartridges included, $600 Call 519-669-5790 ext. 107

Forever In Our Hearts Bill & Family ANNIVERSARY

BIRTHDAY & RETIREMENT

Happy 50th Anniversary!

Ivan and Agnes Kraemer Married June 29, 1960 To Celebrate the occasion, the family invites friends and relatives to an OPEN HOUSE on Sunday July 4, 2010 from 2:30-5:00, at Countryside Christian School in Hawkesville, On. Best Wishes only, please.

Marg & Bob Bowman’s 65th Birthdays and Retirement Celebration We invite our family and friends to an OPEN HOUSE on Saturday August 7th, 2010 from 2:00pm - ? at our home in Crosshill. Join us for a pork and beef bbq, under the BIG TENT. Please bring your lawn chairs and singing voices for Karaoke. Hope to see you all there! Best Wishes only

PLACES OF FAITH

HEARING ASSISTED

No God No Peace Know God Know Peace

St. Teresa Catholic Church Celebrate Eucharist with us

Welcome to

St. Jacobs

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

48 Hawkesville Rd. • 519-664-2311

Bloomingdale Mennonite Church

Trinity United Church ELMIRA

Minister: Summer Worship Rev. Dave Jagger June 27 - Sept. 5 10 a.m. at Trinity Sunday School During Worship

Sundays - 9:45 am Family Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday School for all ages

Visit our website at: www.wondercafe.ca 21 Arthur St., North • Church Office 519-669-5560 “Our mission is to love, learn and live by Christ’s teachings”

1151 Snyder’s Flat Rd., Bloomingdale • 519-745-2411 www.bloomingdalemennonite.com

MY FINANCES

Sunday, July 4, 2010-10:00AM July 4

As Long As You’re Happy Church

SUNDAYS @ 10:30AM 5 First St., Elmira • 519-669-1459 Services at John Mahood www.elmiracommunity.org Public School

11:00 AM - Ron Seabrooke A Tale of Misplaced Values Jonah’s Flight

10:00 am

Wheelchair accessible • Nursery Care provided • Hearing Assisted

“Seeking Heaven, Thinking Heaven, Living Heaven” Speaker: Gord Ahier 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 Check out our website www.woodsidechurch.ca

SUNDAY SCHOOL

Sun. July 4th

Upbeat Family

Worship & Calvary United Sunday School

Mass times are:

Sat. 5pm, Sun. 9am and 11:15am

NURSERY PROVIDED

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

Discovering God Together

519-669-2319 | www.wbconline.ca 4522 Herrgott Road, Wallenstein

“Making Faith Live” Sunday Worship 9:30 am - 10:30am

2 First St., Elmira • 519-669-5030

Gale

Summer Worship 10am Sunday School during service

Minister: Rev. Dr. Linda Bell

Presbyterian www.galepresbyterian.com Church 2 Cross St., Elmira • 519-669-2852

Office Hours: M-TH 9-Noon & 1-3 • E galepresbychurch@golden.net

www.

.com

IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

25 CLASSIFIEDS

SERVICE PROS AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

Body Maintenance

ARE A

at

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

THOMPSON’S

21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial • On-The-Farm Service

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519-669-3232

(Behind the old Trylon Building)

SERVICE PROS

Renovating? Let us do the clean up

SPRING CLEANING

RENOVATION CLEAN UPS! Call for Details

budurl.com/SAVE139

www.completecarpetcare.ca

ROB McNALL

519-669-7607

LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

FRAMING

519.669.8330

1-800-CARSTAR

AFTER HOURS

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

FAX: 519.669.3210

519.669.8917

CONCRETE FOUNDATIONS

IS FOR RENT

Concrete Foundations Limited

Ltd.

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

Find It Online At...

Call today to get your business listed!

Chem-Dry Acclaim ® 61 Arthur St., N Elmira

519.669.5790

519-669-3332

www.ObserverXtra.com

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Call for estimate

Willis Martin

DRAYTON, ON

CRANE

CONSTRUCTION

519-638-2699

YES... WE DO RESIDENTIAL WORK!

6982 Millbank Main St., Millbank 519-595-2053 • 519-664-2914 ELECTRICAL

DECORATING

ORTLIEB Read’s Decorating CRANE & Equipment Ltd.

SINCE 1961

CONSTRUCTION

-Framing -Roofing -Renovations -Repairs

Design/ Build Agricultural/ Residential 6672 Ruggles Rd. Floradale RR#2 Wallenstain, N0B 2S0

519-669-3082

• 14 ton BoomTruck • 35 ton Mobile Crane

Specializing in Paint & Wallcoverings For all your home decorating needs

519-664-9999

Yes we do RESIDENTIAL too! ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

New Construction Renovations Additions Repairs Knob & Tube Re-Wires Aluminum Re-Wires Service Upgrades

● ● ● ● ● ● ●

519-669-3658 27 Arthur St. S., Elmira

519-669-8776 ELMIRA

www.dentechelectric.com

HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING

SERVICE PROS

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

THIS SPACE

ST. JACOBS

GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

IS FOR RENT

• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

You name it, we frame it!

ER RS OVYEA 10

ALMA, ONTARIO

PHONE:

519.846.5427 FAX: 519.846.5134

www.ObserverXtra.com

► Aerating ► Dethatching & Verti-cutting ► Fertilizing - Granular & Liquid ► Weed & Crabgrass Preventer ► Chinchbug Preventer ► White Grub Control ► Sod Webworm Control ► Cranefly Control ► Tree & Shrub Fertilizing ► Horticulture Vinegar ► Granular Compost ► Soil Testing NE

W!

Environmentally Friendly

WEED CONTROL

MESSAGE THERAPY

MEDICAL TREATMENT

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada

LAWN CARE & LANDSCAPING LTD. ORGANIC LAWN CARE PRODUCTS

Murray & Daniel Shantz

519.669.5790

FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

LAWN MAINTENANCE

> Excavating > Trenching > Backfilling > Fine Grading > Overseeding & Top Dressing > Lawn Seeding

Call today to get your business listed!

TEL: 519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

76 Howard Ave., Elmira 519.669.3456

Established 2000

Call for your free estimate ELMIRA

519-669-1278

F. David Reimer

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

LANDSCAPING & OTHER SERVICES

► Landscape Design ► Landscape Build ► Hydro-seeding ► Slit-seeding ► Over-seeding ► Sodding ► Planting ► Interlocking Stone ► Retaining Walls & Steps ► Water Ponds ► Backhoe & Skid Steer Services

Panel Upgrades Generator Transfer Panels Pools, Hot Tubs, Saunas Landscape Lighting Central Vacuum Systems Realty & Insurance Inspection Reports Energy Saving LIghting Solutions

Call for your free estimate

ST. JACOBS

24 Hour Service 7 Days A Week

Dennis Brubacher, RME Owner/Operator ECRA ESA # 7001311

FREE ESTIMATES

LAWN MAINTENANCE

519-669-3373

WEICKERT& MEIROWSKI

FREE Gift Offer $139 Value

GLASS SERVICES

For All Your Framing Needs

CONCRETE

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE 24 Hour Accident Assistance

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

THIS SPACE

ONLY FROM CHEM-DRY

Worlds Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location • Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off and Pick up Service • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair • Janitorial • Grout Cleaning • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping

519-669-7652

21 HOWARD AVE., ELMIRA

CARPET CARE

CARPET CARE

Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400

AUTOMOTIVE

Complete Collision Service

AUTO CLINIC

Auto Tech Inc.

Call Us At

519-669-3373

AUTOMOTIVE

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications: ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

www.reimerhbot.com For more information call:

519-669-0220

63 Arthur Street S., Unit 3, Elmira, ON, N3B 2M6

REGISTERED

MASSAGE THERAPIST IN YOUR HOME Relaxation & Deep Tissue Massage CALL TODAY TO BOOK AN APPOINTMENT!

Lisa Stemmler, RMT 519-504-8004


CLASSIFIEDS 26

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

SERVICE PROFESSIONALS PLUMBING

PLUMBING

PAINTING

YOUR

20 years experience

PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIALISTS!

free estimates interior/exterior painting wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

C.J.

BRUBACHER LTD.

519-669-2251

19 First St. E., Elmira

519-669-3362

36 Hampton St., Elmira

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

Now Booking For:

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

• Spring Clean-up • Top Dressing/Overseeding • Lawn Maintenance/ Landscaping • Mowing Packages Available • Mulch Delivery & Installation Telephone

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs. 24 HOUR SERVICE

Jeff Basler

ELMIRA

519-669-3652

R O O F I N G

ever-green@sympatico.ca

SALT

Locally Owned & Operated Since 19 96

Steel Cedar Shingles Fully Insured Thousands of satisfied customers! Call or email Mike for your FREE estimate.

519.669.4484 benderroofing@gmail.com

SIGNAGE | VINYL & DIGITAL

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

FOR YOUR UNWANTED SCRAP VEHICLES CARS, TRUCKS OR VANS WE PAY CASH WITH FREE TOWING PLEASE CALL

519-568-8666

STUMP REMOVAL

SELF STORAGE

TREE STUMP REMOVAL

TOP QUALITY RESIDENTIAL ROOFING SYSTEMS

CALL SCOTT SEILING FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE. CALL NOW AND BOOK FOR SPRING!

SEPTIC

>Commercial Commercial & Residential >Booking for Spring Cleanup

27 Brookemead, St, Elmira kdetweiler@rogers.com

Serving Elmira and Surrounding Area for over 30 years!

In Business since 1971 • Fully Insured

>Complete Complete Lawn Maintenance >Flower bed maintenance

We call Elmira home but we service the surrounding area.

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches

519.698.2114

Mobile

CASH PAID

Phone: 519-669-1188 Fax: 519-669-9369

INC

AMOS

519-669-9081

TOWING AND RECOVERY

519-505-0985

Owner|Operator

ROOFING

ROOFING

RECOVERY & TOW

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES Your Source for year round property maintenance

Steve Co. Steve Jacobi

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

FREE BAG In troductor y Offer

> Superior Salt Products > Fast, Friendly Service > Convenient Delivery Times > Discounts for Seniors

Various sizes & rates

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE

Taking Salt to Peoples’ Basements Since 1988

519-669-4964

Call

519-747-2708 Waterloo www.riepersalt.com

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

SKATE SHARPENING

Call Kevin 519-846-2558

SOIL

BICYCLE SALES & REPAIRS

GET YOUR BICYCLES READY

graphfix ltd.

Septic Tank Cleaning

Signs & Banners

Inspections for Real Estate Septic System Repairs & Restoration Catch Basin Cleaning

Logos & Graphics

Waterloo Region • Woolwich Township

519-896-7700

or

519-648-3004

www.biobobs.com

www.remingtongraphfix.com

Vehicle Lettering Large format printing Decals & Safety Stickers

With an expert spring tune up

20

BILL SCHENKEL

$

519-664-1809

parts extra

1600 King St. N., Unit #18

ST.JACOBS

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

FAST, FRIENDLY SERVICE AT COMPETITIVE PRICES!

TREE SERVICE

STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

TREE SERVICE •Tree Trimming & Removal • Aerial Bucket Trucks • Stump Grinding • Arborist Evaluations • Fully Insured & Certified • Certified to Work Near Power Lines

FREE ESTIMATES

T R

E

E

LOCNEW ATI ON

•Removal of Trees or Branches of Any Shapes or Sizes in Almost Any location •Hedge trimming

Triple Mix • Top Dressing Screened Top Soil • Sands Gravels • Natural River Rock NEW N IO LOCAT

889 Bridge St. E. Waterloo (Corner of Bridge & McMurray)

Pick-up or Delivery

519-888-1007

Turn the stash into cash!

•Branch Chipping •Stump Grinding

519-669-1836 Thomas Martin TROPHY

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

WASTE MANAGEMENT

SERVICE PROS

Golden Disposal Waste & Recycling Services a division of 1678834 Ontario Inc.

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102

• Roll Off Containers • Curbside Garbage Removal • Registered Hauler for OTS Tire Program • Total Trash Removal of • Apartments, Estates, Insurance, Residential sites • Locally owned and operated since 2001 P.O. BOX 111 Breslau, On. N0B 1M0 goldendisposal@bellnet.ca

Ken Kolpean Julie Lavigne-Kolpean Tel: 519-744-5246 Fax: 519-744-5295

519-744-5246 www.goldendisposal.com Serving Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge/Elmira/Guelph areas

THIS SPACE

GARAGE SALE LISTINGS ONLY!

IS FOR RENT

Call today to get your business listed!

519.669.5790

www.ObserverXtra.com

Call 519-669-5790 ext. 104


THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, July 03, 2010

27 CLASSIFIEDS

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS CROSSWORD & 2 ' ( 6

$ % , ' (

$ 3 & / 7 $ 1 5 $ 8 5 + , 5 $ 7 ( 5 5 $

6 2 7 6

% ( 6 2 7

$ 1 $ 5 2 1 & 5 , 0 0 , $ 6 , ' / , 6 3 ( 6 7 , 5 2 3 . ( 2 7 ) , ( 6 9 , 2 / , % 5 $ ' ( / ( & 2 / 0 , $ 1 * ( , * 2 1 / 6 $ 6

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIMEâ&#x20AC;?

$ * , / (

, 5 6 $ & 2 1 ( % $ 1 $ 7 2 5 6 0 2 - $ % % : $ ' ) ( 5 2 8 6

0 $ 6 6

0 ( $ 3 0 8 7 2 6 7 ( $ + 8 7 6 3 (

' < 1 . ( 5 , 6

6 8 5 8 6 ( 6 & 2 0 5 2 2 8 7 1 ' 6

( 2 , /

* 5 $ 3 3 , / / 2 * / , 2 1 : 2 & . 2 7 $ 2 7 7 , ( 1 & 2 ( 5 7 5 & ( & 0 ( 1 7 8 ) 2 ) 7 : $ ) ) / ( 5 , ( 0 ( 5 5 8 3 (

3 $ 1 7 <

$ 5 * 2

6 9 ( 1 * $ / ,

+ < 3 (

5 $ 1 * (

( ' * ( 6

Kleensweep Carpet Care

West Montrose, ON

T. 519.669.2033

COLLEEN

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance

WORDSEARCH % , 2 ) 8 ( / % ( 3 4 8 % % *

1 1 8 & / ( $ 5 : $ 6 7 ( 8 $

8 : & ) 6 7 2 5 $ * ( & 5 7 6

& ; + 8 7 $ 9 , $ 7 , 2 1 $ 2

/ ; ( ( 7 + $ 1 2 / % * $ 1 +

( 6 5 / = ( , 6 , + , ( & ( 2

$ < 1 & 1 $ ; 8 / + 2 1 8 $ /

5 3 2 ( 0 7 ) / 3 < * ( 5 % 5

) 5 % / & , 8 $ 5 ' $ 5 $ , /

, 2 < / < 1 ( 7 , 5 6 $ 1 2 0

6 3 / 4 , * / , & 2 6 7 , 0 (

6 $ ' $ 0 6 7 2 ( * + , 8 $ 7

, 1 ) ' ( 0 $ 1 ' ( : 2 0 6 (

2 ( , * . 2 ; ) . 1 2 1 7 6 5

1 8 & / ( $ 5 5 ( $ & 7 2 5 ;

SUDOKU - EASY

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

SUDOKU - HARD

        

        

        

        

DEATH NOTICES

>BENDER-BETIK, Emilee Dawn â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Emilee Bender passed away early Sunday morning, June 27, 2010 at Lisaard House hospice, in Cambridge. Local relatives are her parents Linda and Ken Bender of Breslau. > COOPER, James Albert â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Peacefully at Groves Memorial Hospital, Fergus on Wednesday, June 23, 2010 in his 91st year. Local relatives are son Paul Cooper and his wife Margaret of Elmira and his sister Barbara Campbell and her husband Ken of Drayton. > DeBLOCK, Florence Marie (nee Kieswetter) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Passed away, peacefully, on Saturday, June 26, 2010 at Parkwood Mennonite Home, at the age of 101, formerly of St. Jacobs.

        

> HUMMELBERGER, Maria â&#x20AC;&#x201C; It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our mother and oma on Thursday, June 24, 2010 at Leisureworld Care Centre, Elmira in her 86th year. > KENDALL,

Ernest Wakefield (Ernie) 19082010 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ernie had a great run at life and ran the victory lap and passed away, peacefully, surrounded by family at Chateau Gardens, Elmira, on June 26, 2010 in his 102nd year.

> MOORE, Allan Joseph â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Passed away after a courageous battle with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, on Friday, June 25, 2010 at Leisureworld Care Giving Centre in Elmira, age 70 years. > SPIELMACHER, Julie â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Passed away peacefully, surrounded by her family on Wednesday, June 23, 2010 at Freeport Health Centre at the age of 62, formerly of Elmira.

Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS â&#x20AC;˘ Design â&#x20AC;˘ Installation â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

519.669.5105

P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

TOTAL HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

519.664.2008

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

NANCY KOEBEL

Bus: 519.895.2044 ext. 217 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Suite 800, 101 Frederick St., Kitchener

DENTURE Allen Morrison Insurance Inc. 25 Industrial Dr., Elmira, On.

FREE CONSULTATION Bus.:519.669.2632

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville

www.cooperators.ca

519-699-4641 www.freybc.com

JULY 6 > VBS 2010 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Spy Kids â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Mission 360 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; July 6-9, 9 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12 p.m. Koinonia Christian Fellowship, 850 Sawmill Rd., Bloomingdale. Enjoy four days of adventure with the Spy Kids as they go on a mission to love their world. For all kids ages 4 to Grade 6, with games, crafts, drama, singing and prizes. $12 per child for the week, $30 per family. For information call Koinoniaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main office 519744-7447 or online at www.kcf. org/events.

> A Rainforest Adventure At The

Region of Waterloo Library. Join us at St. Clements, Linwood, St. Jacobs, Bloomingdale and Wellesley branches for A Rainforest Adventure with the Destination Jungle TD Summer Reading Club! This free program includes stories, crafts and activities for children ages 6 to 12. For more information please contact your local branch; July 6-9.

JULY 10 > Bikefest in July at the

Wellesley Arena. Event features all forms of motorcycles, swap meet, poker run and show and shine. Doors open at 9 a.m. Admission is $10 per person. For more information contact cycleworks@rogers.com.

> History (In The Garden) Under

SANYO CANADIAN

Since 1987 - DentureTech Since 1995 - Denturist

Home Auto Business Farm Investments Life

Rugs and Upholstery

â&#x20AC;˘Mattress Cleaning â&#x20AC;˘Residential â&#x20AC;˘Commercial â&#x20AC;˘Personalized Service â&#x20AC;˘Free Estimates

3 7 $

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

the Trees. An afternoon full of seeds and roots, flowers and vegetables, weeds and stems. Horticulturalist Bob Wildfong will speak to WHS members and friends on the role of gardens in Waterloo County/Regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. Doon Heritage Village, 10 Huron Rd., Kitchener, (in the new Jubilee Park). Doors open at 1 p.m. Jointly sponsored by the Waterloo Historical Society and Doon Heritage Village. For more information call Rych Mills 519-742-4990.

JULY 13 > Wild Canada at the Region of

Waterloo Library. Join us at St. Clements, Linwood, St. Jacobs, Bloomingdale and Wellesley

branches for Wild Canada with the Destination Jungle TD Summer Reading Club! This free program includes stories, crafts and activities for children ages 6 to 12. For more information please contact your local branch; July 13-16.

> Awesome Animals

at St. Clements Library, 3 p.m. Become a zoologist and explore the animal kingdom! Take home your animal tack model. This event is for children ages 6 to 12. Tickets $3 per person or two for $5. For more information call St. Clements Branch Library 519-699-4341.

JULY 20 > Explore Africa at the Region of

Waterloo Library. Join us at St. Clements, Linwood, St. Jacobs, Bloomingdale and Wellesley branches for Explore Africa with the Destination Jungle TD Summer Reading Club! This free program includes stories, crafts and activities for children ages 6 to 12. For more information please contact your local branch; July 20-23.

â&#x20AC;˘ Total Denture Care â&#x20AC;&#x153;The RightDay Coverage â&#x20AC;˘ Same Service For Youâ&#x20AC;? on Repairs and Relines â&#x20AC;˘ Metal Partial - Soft Relines â&#x20AC;˘Since Implants 1987 - DentureTech â&#x20AC;˘Since DENTURE SPECIALIST 1995 - Denturist

Denture

DENTURE Vinolea Jahandari DD

â&#x20AC;˘ ELMIRA Total Denture Care â&#x20AC;˘ Same day service on and relines 15repairs Memorial Ave., Since 1987 - DentureTech â&#x20AC;˘ Elmira Metal Partial - Soft Relines 1995 - Denturist (Behind Bank of Montreal) â&#x20AC;˘ DENTURE SPECIALIST

519.669.1535 KITCHENER

FREE CONSULTATION 519.744.9770 ELMIRA â&#x20AC;˘ Total Denture Care KITCHENER 519-669-1535 â&#x20AC;˘ Same Day Service519-744-9770 15 Memorial Ave., Elmira (behind Bank of Montreal) on Repairs and Relines â&#x20AC;˘ Metal Partial - Soft Relines â&#x20AC;˘ Implants Great Wine â&#x20AC;˘ DENTURE SPECIALIST Made Simple Vinolea Jahandari DD

ELMIRA

519.669.1535

From $99

15 Memorial Ave., Elmira

(Behind Bank of Montreal) KITCHENER

519.744.9770 55 EARL MARTIN DR., ELMIRA

519.669.8807 Hours: Tue-Fri. 12-6; Sat 12-4

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess. Elmira & Surrounding Area

JULY 22 > The Reptile Show at Wellesley

Branch Library, 3 p.m. Join us for the Reptile Show from Hamilton Reptiles. Meet the reptiles and learn about where they are from, their eating habits and defenses. This show is recommended for children 5 and up. Tickets $3 per person or two for $5. For more information contact the Wellesley Branch Library 519-656-2001.

JULY 27 > Go

Bananas, Dress-up Contest at the Region of Waterloo Library. Join us at St. Clements, Linwood, St. Jacobs, Bloomingdale and Wellesley branches for A Rainforest Adventure with the Destination Jungle TD Summer Reading Club! This free program includes stories, crafts and activities for children ages 6 to 12. For more information please contact your local branch; July 27-30.

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763

elmirawelcomewagon@sympatico.ca

519.669.2884 Summer is Coming! 21 Industrial Dr., Elmira

CORPORATE WEAR PROMOTIONAL APPAREL WORK & SAFETY WEAR | BAGS T-SHIRTS | JACKETS | HATS

245 Labrador Drive | Waterloo

519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com


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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 03, 2010

PATIO FURNITURE SALE

CREATE THE PERFECT BACKYARD OASIS

Other Available Styles • Bar Set • Chat Group • Sling Set

Seaside Casual Furniture 100% recycled resin. Available in 18 colours.

Quality products to meet your needs and budget!

Custom order or up to 25% off in-stock*

CROSSOVER JUNCTION

Wicker to suit your style

Financing Available

*

7 to 9pm

Bring Your Lawnchairs

FREE

SEASON SPONSOR

Ask for detials.

JULY 4

* See store for details

396 Victoria St. N., Kitchener l tel: 519.578.9663

STORE HOURS; MON. - WED. 9-6; THURS, FRI., 9-8, SAT. 9-5; SUN. 11-4

.com www. IN PRINT. ONLINE. IN PICTURES. IN DEPTH.

July 3, 2010  

The July 3, 2010 issues of the Woolwich Observer.

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