Page 1

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

1 NEWS

Dance to local bands, beginning at 7:00pm Food and old friends on hand (Rain location is the Woolwich community arena on Snyder Avenue)

Back out on her bike after injury > STORY ON PG. 17

VOLUME.....15 ISSUE..........30

SATURDAY, JULY 31, 2010

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Former councillor running for mayor

Blaze destroys Elmira-area barn Many animals lost as firefighters could only stop flames from spreading he fire that leveled a barn southeast of Elmira Monday evening left $250,000 in damage and more than a hundred dead animals in its wake.

» JOE MERLIHAN

T

Columns of smoke were visible miles away from the farm on New Jerusalem Road, not far from the newly expanded parochial school

> SEE FIRE ON PG. 05

PHOTO

Katie Edmonds

RESCUE MISSION About a dozen cows were saved

from a barn fire Monday night that caused $250,000 damage at a farm on New Jerusalem Road near Elmira.

Pat McLean becomes second challenger looking to unseat incumbent Steve Kannon

A

former township councillor has thrown her hat into the ring, becoming the third candidate in Woolwich’s mayoral race. Pat McLean served on council for 18 years before losing her Ward 1 seat in the last election. She joins Todd Cowan in the bid to unseat incumbent Bill Strauss. “A lot of people are feeling the need to see a change,” she said of her motivation for running. “I had a lot of support from people who encouraged me.” Strauss, who’s been mayor since 1997, hasn’t faced voters in a decade, having been acclaimed to the position in the previous two elections. It’s time for a change of direction, said

> SEE ELECTION ON PG. 07

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NEWS 2

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

Former Elmira librarian succumbs to cancer Mary Anne Cressman had just retired last year after four decades at the job she loved Joni Miltenburg

PHOTO

ary Anne Cressman, longtime librarian and library supervisor at the Elmira branch, passed away July 25 after a brief battle with cancer. She was 67. Cressman worked at the Elmira library for 40 years before her retirement in 2009. She presided over a number of changes during her tenure, including its expansion in the 1970s, the switch to a computerized catalogue system and recent renovations to make the building wheelchair accessible. “The library was a big part of her life for 40 years,” said Cressman’s husband Ron. “I think of her smile and the kindness and dedication to her profession. She was always willing to help people.” “I think she embodied excellent and compassionate public service. She was welcoming, she always had a smile for people. She had a quiet determination to give everyone a positive experience,” said Katherine Seredynska, manager of public services for the Region of Waterloo

» FILE PHOTO

M

PASSINGS Mary Anne Cressman, who had a welcoming smile for Elmira library patrons for more than four decades, passed away July 25 after a brief bout with cancer.

Library. Cressman moved to Elmira in 1966 and started working at the library part time in 1968. The library board was looking for someone with a B.A. and a love of reading, and Cressman fit the bill. She oversaw two major renovations to the

library. In the 1970s, an addition was built onto the Carnegie building while the library operated out of a bookmobile. In 2008, the library operated out of the children’s area while an elevator was installed. “That was a dream of hers for many years,”

Seredynska said. “She was always very cheerful with a change like that. She did a great job of steering everybody through it.” Seredynska recalls that during the recent renovations, Cressman asked the construction crew to cut a window into the wall

so people could see the work progress and it became a huge draw for patrons visiting the library. Cressman also had a passion for local history and library history. For the library’s 100th anniversary in 1988, she researched and wrote a booklet tracing the history of the Elmira branch from its humble beginnings with eight books donated by the Germanius Society. Seredynska praised Cressman’s rapport with staff and patrons, noting she always made people feel better. “You could go in to pay a fine and you felt you were contributing to the library,” she said. Bette Cummings, children’s librarian at the Elmira branch, said Cressman continued to attend staff parties after her retirement and helped make dolls to raise funds for Haiti after the earthquake. Many library patrons came in this week with memories of Cressman, and added their signatures to a memory book. The Cressmans enjoyed travelling and

had been to Egypt, Europe and Russia. After Mary Anne retired, they travelled to the East Coast to visit family, went to Santa Barbara, California, and were planning to be in western Canada and the Yukon this summer. “I could look at the itinerary right now and tell you where we’re supposed to be sleeping tonight,” Ron said, noting that Mary Anne liked to have every detail of their trip planned out and organized. “She’s going to be missed by a lot of people, no one more than me.” Along with her husband Ron, Cressman is survived by sons Chris (Lisa Harrison) Kirkness of Connecticut, Jeff (Lauren Muir) Cressman of Whitehorse and Scott (Adrienne) Cressman of Burlington; her brother John (Sheila) Stackhouse of Truro, Nova Scotia; brothers and sisters-in-law Ross (Karen) Cressman and Wendy (Peter) Banting; and Peter Kirkness. The funeral was held Friday at St. James Lutheran Church in Elmira.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

3 NEWS

> Saturday marks annual Food Day

Steam engine’s restoration is on track

Today (Saturday) is Food Day in Canada, the eighth annual national celebration of Canada’s culinary excellence, from farm to fork, recognizing Canadian farmers’ hard work in providing food to people in this country and around the world. Agriculture is a vital part of Canada’s economy, providing eight per cent of the country’s gross domestic product. The industry is responsible for one in eight of jobs and last year its contribution to trade was more than $40 billion. "On Food Day and every day of the year, everyone is encouraged to cook, grill and savour Canada's safe, highquality food,” said federal Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz. "Our government will continue to maximize every opportunity to highlight Canadian agriculture because increased international trade delivers benefits to all Canadians."

A MOVING PIECE OF HISTORY Jordan (left) and Mitchell Lee got to hop up on steam engine No. 124 and ring the bell while the locomotive sat on the

> More money for hospital wait times

tracks in Elmira Wednesday morning.

Joni Miltenburg

G

etting the train back on the tracks was the objective Wednesday morning, as a steam locomotive arrived in Elmira on a truck and departed being pulled behind another locomotive. The Southern Ontario Locomotive Restoration Society, which operates the Waterloo Central Railway, has been working on steam engine No. 124 at its St.

Thomas yard for the past eight years. Now the train is moving to the society’s shop in St. Jacobs for the finishing touches. The small steam engine was built in Kingston in 1930 and used by a construction company that built railway track to move materials. After a stint in lumber country up north, it was bought by retired CN conductor Alex Brown in 1969. Brown kept the locomotive

on a short piece of track in his front yard and eventually bequeathed it to SOLRS. Loaded on a gooseneck flatbed so it was low enough to pass under overhead wires, the locomotive was trucked to Elmira. It isn’t possible to get a truck onto the tracks at St. Jacobs, so the engine was carried to the crossing adjacent to Chemtura. With the locomotive sitting on pieces of tempo-

rary track, the trailer was parked on a slight incline. The chains holding the engine in place were taken off, and with a gentle tug from a diesel locomotive, it came rolling off the flatbed and onto the tracks. Roy Broadbear, one of the restorers working on the train, estimated the work is 80 per cent complete, with another year or two to go before it's working the spur line.

Four hospitals in the Waterloo Wellington Local Health Integration Network (WWLHIN) will receive funding as part of the province’s $100-million investment through the Emergency Department Pay for Results (P4R) initiative. This is the third year the province is providing funding to hospitals to meet specific targets and reduce the time patients spend in the emergency department. Seventy-one hospitals across the province will receive funding. In this LHIN, Cambridge Memorial (CMH), Grand River (GRH), Guelph General (GGH) and St. Mary’s General (SMGH) hospitals will receive funding. CMH and GGH are receiving funding for the first time through this initiative and get $782,100 and $776,000 respectively. GRH, which has received funding in each of the three years of the program, has been allocated $935,400 for this year and SMGH, participating for the second year, receives $764,500.

PHOTOS

» JONI MILTENBURG

> St. Clements man up for awards

SPECIAL DELIVERY The steam engine was transported to Elmira on a special gooseneck flatbed truck and rolled onto the tracks before being pulled to the Southern Ontario Locomotive Restoration Society facility in St. Jacobs by another locomotive.

Country music producer Jason Barry of St. Clements has been nominated for a number of honours at the Canadian Country Music Awards, to be held Sept. 12 at Rexall Place in Edmonton. Barry is up for ‘Guitar Player of the Year,’ two nominations for ‘Producer of the Year,’ as well as ‘Recording Studio of the Year.’ He also got a nod for his work on the CMT program 4 Tracks.

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NEWS 4

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

LAW & ORDER

Birdnappers make off with pair of parakeets JULY 21 >>10:00 AM | A navy blue and

green quilt was stolen from a clothesline on Tanager Street in Elmira. On July 28, the quilt was returned to the clothesline, folded and hung up where it had been originally.

>>12:00 PM | An Elmira woman

called police to report her keys had gone missing while she was at the St. Jacobs Farmers’ Market. The keys are attached to a rectangular, blue keychain with ‘Indala’ written on it. If found, please return to Division 3A in Elmira.

>>11:40 PM | A 26-year-old

Waterloo man driving a Jeep Wrangler on Line 86, east of Northfield Drive called police after he struck a cyclist on the side of the road. The cyclist was a 19-year-old Wellesley man who was not wearing a helmet at the time of the accident. The man had possible head injuries and was taken to Grand River Hospital by ambulance. The driver of the Jeep was charged with ‘careless driving.’

P

olice are still on the lookout for a pair of suspects who flew the coop after apparently “birdnapping” two seven-week-old quaker parakeets from Exotic Wings & Pet Things on Lobsinger Line in St. Clements just after noon on July 21. Owner Mark Koenig said two women carrying large handbags came in, and left a short time later while the store was busy. With them, investigators believe, went the two birds, concealed in the bags. The quakers’ cage wasn’t locked. Koenig described the little greenand-grey birds with royal blue wings – native to South and Central

JULY 22

America – as intelligent, playful birds. The babies retailed for $350 each. The first suspect is a white woman in her thirties, four feet, 11 inches tall with a heavy build. She has short dark hair and a silver hoop nose ring, and was carrying a large white purse decorated with large gem stones. The second woman is white, in her sixties, five feet, 11 inches tall with a thin build. She has dark, shoulder-length hair and carried a large brown purse. Anyone with information is asked to call police at 519-650-8500, ext. 3310 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.

>>8:07 PM | A 20-year-old

JULY 23

Clifford man lost control of his

>>2:12 PM | A 59-year-old >>4:40 PM | The West Montrose blue Saturn sedan and struck Waterloo woman was driving on Farmers’ Market Road when she decided at the last minute to make a left turn onto Weber Street. She signaled, and then entered the left-turn lane quickly, striking the vehicle of a 40-year-old Millbank man. She has been charged with ‘making an unsafe lane change.’ There was moderate damage to both vehicles, but no injuries.

covered bridge suffered a bit of damage after a truck got lodged inside. A 35-year-old Guelph man misjudged the height of the bridge when was driving his company truck through and got stuck. In order to dislodge the vehicle, he let the air out of the tires. The Township of Woolwich was called and they assessed damage to the bridge to be minimal.

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a guardrail on Northfield Drive at Jigs Hollow Road. Several people called the incident in to police as rainy conditions were making the accident difficult to see and a number of cars nearly struck his vehicle as they were passing. Both the vehicle and guardrail suffered moderate damage. There were no charges laid.

JULY 24 >>3:06 AM | Two men were seen

fleeing a vehicle on Ament Line near Lavery Road in Wellesley Township during a party. When the owner of the vehicle checked the car, they noticed their iPod was missing. Police are continuing to investigate.

>>8:40

AM | Someone attempted to steal a vehicle that was parked on Katherine Street in West Montrose. The ignition was found to be punched, but it seems as though the person was unable to get the car started. The driver’s door was left open and tools were left in the back of the car. Police have not yet identified any suspects but the investigation is ongoing.

>>11:30 AM | A construction

vehicle was damaged in Linwood sometime overnight. Windows on the excavator were smashed to the tune of $2,000. Anybody with information is asked to call the Elmira police detachment.

>>8:19 PM | A Waterloo

Regional Police officer on patrol conducted a traffic stop on Hwy 7/8 near Nafziger Road in Wilmot Township to check on a driver’s well-being after the officer noticed unusual and unsafe maneuvers being made by a motorist. The investigation led to the driver being arrested for driving while impaired by drugs. The driver, a 27-yearold Stratford man, was found to be in possession of 86 grams of suspected crystal methamphetamine, with a street value of approximately $13,000. As well, a quantity of cash was seized. The male was taken into custody and charged with ‘possession for

the purpose of trafficking’ and two breaches of a court order. The male was held for a showcause hearing.

JULY 26 >>3:37 PM | A 20-year-old

Elmira woman was the victim of an in-car fight that led to a single-vehicle collision on Wellington Rd. 38, north of Guelph. County of Wellington OPP officers responding to the scene found that a 2003 Chevy Cavalier had been travelling northbound with a man and a woman in the vehicle. An altercation erupted in the vehicle and the auto left the roadway into the east ditch, striking some trees. The Elmira woman was unhurt and the man left the scene on a bicycle. Police closed the roadway while they reconstructed the collision scene. Traffic was re-routed in the area until about 9:15 p.m. The OPP have charged a 24-year-old Fergus man with ‘dangerous operation of a motor vehicle’ and two counts of ‘assault contrary to the Criminal Code of Canada.’

JULY 27 >>8:50 AM | A shed was broken

into sometime overnight on Brookmead Street in Elmira. Stolen was a Simonize pressure washer valued at $200.

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REMNANTS OF THE PAST Construction crews working on Snyder Avenue just outside

Chateau Gardens in Elmira on Wednesday came across a number of logs believed by bystanders to belong to historic corduroy roads. A corduroy or log road is made by placing sand-covered logs perpendicular to the direction of the road over a low or swampy area. This type of road is known to have been used as early as 4,000 BC.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

5 NEWS

Elmira Scouts seeking funds to help with future move

Liberal Express rolls into the region

Katie Edmonds

PHOTO

» KATIE EDMONDS

T

THE SUMMER CIRCUIT Federal Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff’s “Liberal Express” bus tour made a few stops in Waterloo Region this week. At left, Ignatieff’s wife Zsuzsanna Zsohar joins Liberal Candidate for Kitchener-Conestoga Teresa Huegle, Ignatieff and Woolwich Mayor Bill Strauss at the Waterloo Region Children’s Museum in Kitchener July 26.

Fire: Three stations respond to the scene

UP AND OVER Farmers use a loader tractor to hoist cattle over a retaining wall, away from the burning barn. Some 18 cows, 50 pigs, 100 chickens and 10 rabbits were believed to have perished. buildings.” Firefighters were on scene until midnight, while the tanker stayed for several more hours to make sure none of the smoldering parts flared up again. Many animals and dozens of hay bales were lost along with the barn. Neighbours and passersby stopped and helped with the rescue of animals; about a dozen cows were hauled out from the barn.

“Some of the cattle were able to come out through the gate,” said Frey. “Some of the guys knocked down a wooden wall so that several more could be brought out. But there was just a lot of heat and a lot of flames.” The owner of the property estimates that some 18 cows, 50 pigs, 100 chickens and 10 rabbits were killed. Cleanup was well underway at the site by the following day.

PHOTO

on Scotch Line, around 7 p.m. July 26. “I just happened to be driving by,” said Floradale fire chief Dennis Frey. “I was about two kilometres away when I noticed the smoke, and by the time I got there it was going pretty good – lots of flames and there was a lot of heat coming off of it.” A farmhand was loading hay bales onto an elevator when the machinery stopped. When the man checked the equipment, he noticed a small fire and called police. Firefighters believe the blaze began when an overheated electrical cord got too close to the nearby hay bales. Six trucks from the Conestogo and St. Jacobs fire stations responded, along with an extra tanker from Floradale. “We started applying water to the fire as soon as we got to the scene,” said Woolwich fire chief Rick Pedersen. “But when a blaze is that big, sometimes you have to let it burn down and just make sure that it doesn’t spread any farther or catch any other

» JOE MERLIHAN

> CONTINUED FROM COVER

he 1st Elmira Scout Group is making great progress on this year’s big project, but is putting a call out to past Scouts and friends of the organization to help them raise the last of the funds required to move their clubhouse. The organization is taking down the building from its current location on Martin’s Lane and setting up shop on township land at 75 Oriole Pkwy. That site is already home to the Rovers’ den used by older members of the Scouting group. “We have never put a call out to past Scouts before, so we are not sure how it will go,” said Scout leader Brian Soehner. “We have had tremendous support from the local service clubs but we just need that extra push to make sure that we can get the clubhouse up and running again.” The 1st Elmira Scout Group is made up of six sections: two Beaver colonies, one Cub pack, one Scout troop, one Venturer company, and one Rover crew. The storage shed was built in 1988 for use by all of the groups and sits on land rented from Martin Mills for $1 a year. That site, however, is proposed to house a biogas energy plant, prompting the search for a new location. The project is estimated to cost $25,000 to $30,000; to date, the

organization has raised more than $19,000. The group hopes to use materials from the existing 1,200-squarefoot structure to erect the new shed. It will be slightly smaller because the site falls within a floodplain, restricting the available space. Because the land is municipally owned, the township has agreed to file the necessary paperwork, negating fees for a building permit and development charges, saving a total of some $7,700. “The clubhouse is really a focal point for the organization,” explained Soehner. “All the kids meet there to prepare for their camp outings and trips. Most of the activities that the group does start at the Scout shed. I remember back when we didn’t have a central place like this, we kept our equipment in garages and barns around the area. We are very fortunate to have somewhere like this to call our own.” The group is asking for contributions of $100, but any amount will be gladly accepted. Tax receipts will be issued for all contributions of $20 or more. To make a donation, please contact Ron Cressman, chair of the moving committee, at 519-669-8610. Donations can be made payable to Scouts Canada – 1st Elmira Scout Group and sent to Box 31 Elmira ON N3B 2Z5.

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NEWS 6

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

Kids come out for a wild time at the library ANIMAL INSTINCTS

PHOTO

» KATIE EDMONDS

It was a jungle inside the Elmira Library at the ‘Go Bananas – Jungle Dress Up Day’ on July 29. Raven Fockler, Brianna Fleming, Brayden Boerner, Griffin Boerner, Brendan Grant, Riley King, Vanessa Weber, Hailey Gore and Joseph Wilcken put on their best animal acts.

Poetry under cover of the kissing bridge

ABOUT FACE

Canoeing poets plan stop in West Montrose Katie Edmonds

PHOTO

» JONI MILTENBURG

T

J.C. Bautista How long have you worked here? Aug. 17 will be four years. What do you like about working in Elmira? The people are nice; everybody is friendly and courteous. Also the Maple Syrup Festival. Too bad it’s only once a year.

Drug Store Pharmacy, No Frills

What do you do here? I’m a pharmacy technician. I place orders, dispense medications, some accounting. How did you get into this job? I always liked science and wanted to get into pharmacy school but I haven’t made it yet so I’m doing

the next best thing in the meantime. So you plan to go to pharmacy school? Hopefully. Otherwise become a registered pharmacy technician. What’s something people might not know about you? I speak Spanish fluently.

he West Montrose covered bridge has played host to a wide variety of events and goings-on over the years. Next month it will add to its repertoire in a fresh, new way. A group of modern-day poets from Montreal will be paddling down the Grand River from Elora to Brantford between Aug. 10 and 17, performing readings in cafés, arts centers and libraries along the way, with an additional stop at the historic kissing bridge. The group, the Fish Quill Poetry Boat, includes six accomplished Canadian poets whose mission is to bring the art form to small and mid-sized towns, which are often overlooked by up-andcoming artists in favor of major urban centres. “It was an idea that a few friends and I had together,” said Linda Besner, who along with poet Leigh Kotsilidis is coordinating the event

for the Fish Quill Poetry Boat. “People don’t typically think of contemporary poetry as part of their everyday lives, but we are hoping to change that if we can bring it right into their neighbourhoods.” Tony Dowling of the West Montrose group the BridgeKeepers expects the event to attract a substantial audience from local colleges, universities, poetry and book clubs, along with curious local residents. “This is a wonderful chance for people to enjoy a unique evening of poetry and a warm summer evening in the covered bridge,” said Dowling. “Anyone who has ever attended the Kiwanis Christmas carol sing in the bridge knows what a kind of magical setting it is. It will be an interesting contrast to go from 200 carolers singing on a cold winter’s night to a handful of poets reciting on a warm summer evening.” The canoes for the

tour have been lent free of charge by the Brantford-based outdoor adventure company Treks into the Wild. Reading will begin in the bridge on Aug. 11 at 7 p.m., ending at approximately 8:30 p.m. There is no charge for admission and no seating. Refreshments will be served, courtesy of the BridgeKeepers. “None of us are what you would call nature poets. It will be a challenge being outdoors for a long period of time,” said Besner. “This will be a first for many of us so we are really excited to see how the trip goes and to bring our poetry to new audiences.” BridgeKeepers, incorporated as the West Montrose Residents’ Association Inc., is an organization formed to preserve the “covered bridge experience.” For more information, or to support their efforts, contact Tony Dowling at info@bridgekeepers. ca, or visit www.bridgekeepers.ca.


7 NEWS

McLean, an Elmira resident. “There’s a sense that perhaps we’re moving ahead too quickly in terms of development. We need a growth strategy: how fast do we want to grow?” While she hasn’t staked a position on the growth issue, she wants to see the issue more thoroughly vetted than it has been – “It’s time for the discussion.” The pace of growth may be too quick, too slow or just right, but the township needs to consult with its residents, she said, adding Woolwich has a unique quality of life that needs to factor into discussions if it’s going to be protected. Having lived in Elmira for more than 35 years, she’s seen several changes in the area. Once largely industrial, it shifted to a bedroom community for some years before being something of a more free-standing, diversified town. There needs to be a balance between the township’s rural routes and enough development to provide jobs locally and housing for seniors and young families, McLean stressed. Her time in the com-

munity, along with almost two decades of council involvement, provides her with a combination of experience and the ability to bring a new approach to the mayor’s job, McLean said. A former executive director of Habitat for Humanity in Waterloo Region, she’s now semiretired. She’s also the long-serving chair of the Chemtura Public Advisory Committee. With a third person entering the fray, Strauss said he wants to hold onto the job because he’s got more to give, promising to represent the people. For his part, Cowan, 46, welcomed the additional challenger. “I believe it’s great that there’s more interest in local politics,” he said, noting the township needs more people to run for ward positions. “I would like to see more interest in the councillor side.” McLean expressed the same sentiment, saying more electoral battles might boost voter turnout numbers. In the last election, held in 2006, only 27 per cent of Woolwich’s eligible voters cast a ballot. The mayor’s position was filled by acclamation, as was Coun.

Mark Bauman’s Ward 2 seat. Incumbent Murray Martin faced a light challenge in Ward 3. The real battle was in Elmira’s Ward 1, where the vote essentially boiled down to a referendum on a twin-pad arena at what would become the Woolwich Memorial Centre. A three-way race for the two seats saw about 36 per cent of voters turn out. Newcomer Sandy Shantz, a supporter of the twin-pad arena, took 43.5 per cent of the vote, while incumbent Ruby Weber (28.53), an advocate for the arenas, just squeezed past McLean (27.93), who had spoken out against the plan. To date, the mayor’s position is the only one up for grabs during the Oct. 25 municipal elections. Bauman and Martin are the only candidates in their respective wards. In Elmira, Weber is running again, joined by newcomer Jim David. Shantz has yet to declare her intentions.

Dog days of summer at the library

» JONI MILTENBURG

> CONTINUED FROM COVER

PHOTO

Election: Mayor's seat is the only one being contested at this point

READING ARF-ICIONADO

Tina Cressman shares a story with Joker during the Elmira library’s Read to a Dog event Thursday.

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St

LEN’S

Store Made

Store Made

519-836-2412

Texas Jalapeno or Maple Smoked Sausages

Pepper, Apple Cinnamon or Montreal Smoked Bacon

WATERLOO

Yellow Cheese Curds

7.29

$

Ib. /$16.07kg.

Ib. /$8.80kg.

Get all your local produce with us including Sweet Corn on the Cob & Vine Ripened Beef Steak Tomatoes today!

3031 Lobsinger Line, Heidelberg 519-699-4590 Mon.-Wed. 8-6; Thurs. - Fri. 8-8; Saturday 7:30-5 Visit us online at www.stemmlermeats.ca

Union St

LEN’S

Weber St

Bright Brand

3.99

$

Moore Ave

3.29

$

Ib. /$7.25kg.

519-743-4672

Monday to Saturday 9:30-5:00 Closed Sundays

Hersgott Rd.

ne tli en

Hawkesville Rd.

Am

Hwy. 86

HAWKESVILLE (St. Jacobs)

s

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

King St

Rib

THE OBSERVER

Assorted Pieces

3 Titles

COMPANY’S INFLATABLES COMING COOKBOOKS

40 % OFF Original Price

• fool proof recipes • everyday recipes and ingredients • easy & delicious

5

$ 99 Compare at $16.99 Values In Effect to July 31st Hawkesville location only

ENTERTAINMENT

CENTRE

• swivel top • silver or black

29

$

99

Value $79.99


2010 SIDEWALK SALE 8

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

SPECIAL FEATURE

Sidewalk Sale

Downtown Elmira

August 5, 6, & 7

Don't miss this chance to find some great deals at your favourite Elmira Stores!

ANNUAL SIDEWALK SALE AUGUST 5, 6 & 7

Suit Clearance! 2-button & 3-button styled suits Clearance Grouping

50-60% OFF Shorts, Regulars and Talls

Summer Shorts

t ea on Gr lecti Se

Blazers, Sport-jackets & Dress Pants

Long-cargo’s, Short Cargo’s, Golf styles, Resort Cargo’s, Ruff & Tuff Cargo’s, Dress Shorts, Plaid Shorts, Plain Shorts

50-60% OFF

40-60% OFF

Golf Style Shirts By Bugatchi, Cutter & Buck, Modango, Klaus Bohler

Polo Shirts From Nautica

Fantastic Selection!

40-60% OFF

Shorts, Regulars and Talls

40-60% OFF

Select Grouping

Long-Sleeve Dress Shirts All the best brands!

50-70% OFF

Short-Sleeve Casual Shirts

T-Shirts and Swimwear

Sizes 32 to 42

Bugathci, Casa Moda, Nautica, Modango, Horst, Cutter & Buck and more

40-60% OFF Sizes Small to 3X

Golf Shirts With Pockets Select Grouping

NOW

Sizes 15 to 20

40-50% OFF By Nautica, Tommy Bahama, and Tommy Hilfiger

40% OFF

Sizes Medium to 2X

Kahki’s By Nautica, Haggar, Cutter & Buck

NOW

40% OFF Sizes 34 to 44

Tommy Bahama 100% Silk Shirts Select Grouping

40-50% OFF Sizes Medium to 2X

Pant Sale

e id ew or St

50-60% OFF

50% OFF

NOW

Sizes 32 to 44. Don’t miss out!

t ea on Gr lecti Se

Denim Jeans Clearance

Silk Tie Clearance

SIDEWALK SALES

¢ 15

4x6" Prints

EACH

From Digital Media Only

(In-store Only)

30

%

All in-stock Frames & Albums

OFF

9

$

Film Processing Included

Pentax H90 Digital Camera

.99 PER ROLL

5X

OPTICAL ZOOM

$129.99 While supplies last. All sales end Saturday, August 7, 2010.

Brian’s

Foto Source "Someday your prints will come"

All dress pants, business casual pants and cruise-wear pants

40-60% OFF Riviera, Gala, Tommy Bahama, Design II, Platinum

Terms of Sale: All sales final. Alteration Extra. Cash & Carry applies to some items.

W.C. BROWN & SONS

MENS CLOTHIER • TAILORS • DRY CLEANING & ALTERATION SERVICES • COMPANY UNIFORMS

LOCATED AT

57 Arthur St., South, Elmira UPTOWN ELMIRA - T. 519-669-1152

HOURS: Monday-Wednesday 9-6; Thursday-Friday 9-8; Saturday 9-5

WWW.BROWNSMENSWEAR.COM

PHONE

519-210-0608


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

9 2010 SIDEWALK SALE

SPECIAL FEATURE

Sidewalk Sale

Street dance rain location: The Woolwich Community Arena on Snyder Avenue

Sales galore, special vendors and a community shopping experience awaits!

Prices in effect August 5, 6 & 7 Stock

nce Event a r a le C r e Print Samsung r and

up on scho ol Of fice Pr o an s supplies a t d r ece ive: Crayola 24 P

Colour Lase ters e Laser Prin Black & Whit FROM

Thursday, August 5 to Saturday, August 7

.99

$79

EXTENDED HOURS:

FREE

With a p urchas of $5* e

mited Stock is li

Lang 2011 Wall Ca

50% OFF Hallmark and Lang

Dayspring Boxed Scr UP TO

ipture Cards

70% OFF

Napkins, Stationery,

Journals & Photo Alb

50-70% OFF

UP TO

We’ll pay the HST on Etonic and Cambrians!

ums

FREE

Kingston 4GB Fla sh Drive

FREE

With a p urchase of $60*

y! and Funk n u F l o cho ite 2011 Back to S Mom’s Favour lender ge Ca

Oversized Frid

.99

$12

$17.49 Hallmark Sound Cards

Sharp E Scientifi L 531 c Calcula tor

With a p urcha of $40* se

Crayola 24 P of Crayo ack ns

9

lenders

Many Styles At

FREE

.9 $119

Hallmark and Lang Pr oducts

ack Crayons

With a p urcha of $20* se

and Colour Laser s ulti Function M e it h W & Black FROM

Open Thursday till 7 pm And Saturday 9 am t0 2 pm

of Pencil

Hilroy Zwipe and Five Star ooks Binders, Noteb s and Accesorie

h Napsaks, Lunc ses Ca il nc Pe d Bags an FROM

9 $1.9

Office Chairs, FROM

s

Desks and File

.99

$29

FROM

99¢

*Some limits apply, see staff in store for details.While supplies last.

Custom Othotics • Orthopedic Footwear Custom Shoes • Shoe Repairs Printer/Copier & Courier Service

Office Machines & Furniture

Hallmark Cards & Stationery

Computer Supplies

School & Office Supplies

ELMIRA

10 Church St. West 519.669.2201

11 Church Street East, ELMIRA 519-669-3030 or 888-669-3030

FERGUS/ELORA 99 Geddes St. 519.846.5540

www.footfoundation.ca Regular Hours: Monday to Friday 9:00 am - 5:30 pm

PROUDLY CELEBRATING OUR 50TH YEAR IN BUSINESS


2010 SIDEWALK SALE 10

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

SPECIAL FEATURE

Sidewalk Sale

Don't miss this chance to find some great deals at your favourite Elmira Stores!

1P/R2ICE SALE!

3 days only

Aug 5,6,7 storewide sale (except for newer consignments)

QUALITY DISCOUNTS

26 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-4032

Sweetest Sidewalk Sale Deals SALE HOURS: Thursday and Friday 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. and Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. SKU#

August 5, 6 & 7 only on toys

on all clothing

August 5, 6, & 7

Elmira Home Hardware’s

DESCRIPTION

4520-511 MURPHY’S OIL OIL 4520-511 MURPHY’S OIL $2.79 4520-511 MURPHY’S 4540-839 MOP REFILL 4540-839 BEE MOPBEE REFILL $6.99 4540-839 BEE MOP REFILL 4521-609 BOWL BRITE 4521-609 BOWL BRITE $4.99 4521-609 BOWL BRITE at the 4522-788 MEAN GREEN 4522-788 MEAN GREEN $5.29 4522-788 MEAN GREEN ELMIRA BRANCH LIBRARY 4527-391 4527-391 ULTRA NATURANATURA ULTRA $8.99 4527-391 NATURA ULTRA 65 Arthur St. S., Elmira 4510-326 4510-326 BLEACHBLEACH $2.49 4510-326 BLEACH Thursday, August 5 4528-041 4528-041 FOLEX FOLEX $9.99 4528-041 FOLEX 9a.m. - 8:30p.m. 4520-035 CABINET MAGIC 4520-035 CABINET MAGIC $5.99 4520-035 CABINET MAGIC Friday, August 6 4520-036 COUNTERTOP `` 4520-036 COUNTERTOP `` $5.69 4520-036 COUNTERTOP `` 9a.m. - 6p.m. 4520-968 CLR CLR 4520-968 CLR $8.99 4520-968 Saturday, August 7 4522-724 PINE-SOL 4522-724 PINE-SOL $3.49 4522-724 PINE-SOL 9a.m. - 3:30p.m. 4522-332 4522-332 LESTOILLESTOIL $4.29 4522-332 LESTOIL Sale continues inside the library until August 27 4521-716 AMMONIA 4521-716 AMMONIA $2.19 4521-716 AMMONIA For more information call the Elmira Branch Library at 519-669-5477 4530-350 4530-350 WINDEXWINDEX $4.29 4530-350 WINDEX 4412-068 MOTH BALLS 4412-068 MOTH BALLS $6.09 4412-068 MOTH BALLS 4490-866 SARAN WRAP 4490-866 SARAN WRAP $3.79 4490-866 SARAN WRAP COMET COMET $1.09 4521-440 COMET Proceeds to Mennonite Central Committee 4521-4404521-440 4411-693 FLY SWATTERS 4411-693 FLY SWATTERS $0.99 4411-693 FLY SWATTERS 4521-770 STOVE CLEANER 4521-770 STOVE CLEANER $6.99 4521-770 STOVE CLEANER 4542-287 V. SCRUNGE PAD PAD 4542-287 V. SCRUNGE PAD $2.99 4542-287 V. SCRUNGE 4532-063 (SM) (SM) 4532-063 NATURANATURA (SM) $2.97 4532-063 NATURA 4533-179 (LG) (LG) 4533-179 NATURANATURA (LG) $3.97 4533-179 NATURA 4510-942 PALMOLIVE 4510-942 PALMOLIVE $2.29 4510-942 PALMOLIVE 1670-481 MASKING TAPETAPE 1670-481 MASKING TAPE $1.99 1670-481 MASKING 4515-485 MAG/MAG/ BROOM 4515-485 MAG/ BROOM $6.69 4515-485 BROOM 4543-658 SCOUR PADSPADS 4543-658 SCOUR PADS $3.29 4543-658 SCOUR Come in and cool down SOLID COLOUR WASH CLOTH RY313F RY313F WASH CLOTH Special RY313FSOLID COLOUR SOLID COLOUR WASH CLOTH with free lemonade! SOLID COLOUR HAND TOWEL RY63H RY63H HAND TOWEL Special RY63H SOLID COLOUR SOLID COLOUR HAND TOWEL SOLID COLOUR FLEECE THROW TH01H TH01H FLEECE THROW Special TH01H SOLID COLOUR SOLID COLOUR FLEECE THROW 4PC KITCHEN TOWEL SET SET Special KS4PCS KS4PCS TOWEL SET TOWEL KS4PCS4PC KITCHEN 4PC KITCHEN TEA TOWEL, KITCHEN PRINT HT53 HT53HT53 TEA TOWEL, KITCHEN PRINT Special TEA TOWEL, KITCHEN PRINT KITCHEN SINGLE PRINTED KT53 KT53KT53 TOWEL, TOWEL, KITCHEN SINGLE PRINTED Special TOWEL, KITCHEN SINGLE PRINTED 4560-058 N’ DONE 4560-058 ONCE N’ONCE DONE $28.99 4560-058 ONCE N’ DONE 4575-687 SHINEKEEPER 4575-687 SHINEKEEPER $16.99 4575-687 SHINEKEEPER 4560-336 NEWNEW BEGINNING 4560-336 NEW BEGINNING $18.99 4560-336 BEGINNING 5045-854 FLY COILS 5045-854 FLY COILS $3.29 5045-854 FLY COILS Still Open regular hours during construction! 5325-472 FLASHLIGHTS 5325-472 FLASHLIGHTS $4.49 5325-472 FLASHLIGHTS

USED BOOK SALE

Downtown Elmira

RETAIL

SALE

$2.79 $6.99 $4.99 $5.29 $8.99 $2.49 $9.99 $5.99 $5.69 $8.99 $3.49 $4.29 $2.19 $4.29 $6.09 $3.79 $1.09 $0.99 $6.99 $2.99 $2.97 $3.97 $2.29 $1.99 $6.69 $3.29 SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL $28.99 $16.99 $18.99 $3.29 $4.49

$2.39 $5.99 $3.79 $3.99 $7.99 $2.29 $8.49 $4.99 $4.99 $7.99 $2.97 $3.37 $.97 $3.97 $4.29 $3.49 $.99 $.69 $4.99 $2.49 $2.49 $3.49 $2.19 $1.19 $4.99 $2.59 $.90 $2.99 $4.99 $4.99 $.99 $.99 $21.97 $14.99 $16.99 $1.79 $3.29

Plus many other ends of lines, discontinued products, scratch and dents, etc.

NO TAX On Purchases

Lots of reasons to shop local. Personal shopping only please. Limited quantities. No rain checks.

Save even more at MCC!

59 CHURCH ST. W. | 519-669-8475 STORE HOURS: Monday to Wednesday: 9:30 to 5:00, Thursday: 9:30 to 8:00 Friday: 9:30 to 5:00, Saturday: 9:30 to 4:00

22 Church St. W., Elmira 519-669-5537 REGULAR STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6

Proud member of the Elmira Business Improvement Area

$2.39 $5.99 $3.79 $3.99 $7.99 $2.29 $8.49 $4.99 $4.99 $7.99 $2.97 $3.37 $.97 $3.97 $4.29 $3.49 $.99 $.69 $4.99 $2.49 $2.49 $3.49 $2.19 $1.19 $4.99 $2.59 $.90 $2.99 $4.99 $4.99 $.99 $.99 $21.97 $14.99 $16.99 $1.79 $3.29


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

11 2010 SIDEWALK SALE

SPECIAL FEATURE

SINCE 1961

Sidewalk Sale Local bands will be performing beginning at 7:00 p.m.

Visit us during the Sidewalk Sale for all your painting and decorating needs

27 Arthur St. S., Elmira • 519-669-3658

GREAT S H GREAT OES ... PR I C ES at Brubacher Shoes Ltd. Athletic Shoes

August 5th -7th Thursday - Friday | 9am - 6pm Saturday | 9am - 4pm

• All Household Items •Nic Nacs •Soccer Cleats All proceeds support

BIRKENSTOCK

$15 | $25

00

Woolwich Community Services “Together We Make a Difference”

(End of Line Sandals)

20-40% OFF Athletic Shoes

48 Arthur St. S., Elmira 519-669-1129

Men’s & Women’s

30-60% OFF

Women’s

Casual & Dress Shoes

Men’s

Casual & Dress Shoes 1/2 PRICE

$2000 | $2995

| $2995

SALE HOURS MONDAY - WEDNESDAY...................9am - 6pm THURSDAY & FRIDAY.........................9am - 9pm SATURDAY..........................................9am - 5pm

Est. 1940

WCS THRIFT SHOP

AUGUST 5,6,7

Kid’s

00

WCS

Woolwich Community Services

BRUBACHER SHOES Ltd. 519-669-3349

Our biggest clearance sale of the year! Inspired by community spirit, we're clearing out garden, giftware, food and more. Look for our door crasher specials.

Save up to

% OFF

Where the Sidewalk Sale starts... 3 Arthur Street,

Elmira’s downtown corner

519-669-9356 www.inspiringaccents.com

7 Arthur St. S., ELMIRA

ACCENT FURNITURE • ARTWORK & PRINTS • JEWELRY & PURSES • POTTERY LAMPE BERGER • ENTERTAINMENT ESSENTIALS • GIFTS FROM THE HEART


OPINION 12

THE OBSERVER

OPINION

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

In declining to keep the raceway in Elmira, Woolwich has certainly let a lot of money slip away from the township and the taxpayers. D.M. Langdon letter on pg. 14

VERBATIM

T

aking such a casual, permissive approach to sodium reduction is reckless and could silently kill 15,000 Canadians and squander $2 billion annually. The health of Canadians and provincial health care coffers ... depend on the federal government taking to heart the Sodium Reduction Strategy.

> Bill Jeffery of the Centre for Science in the Public Interest on a new report calling for lowered sodium levels in prepared foods

THE MONITOR combined global land and ocean averTtheheagewarmest surface temperature for June 2010 was on record at 16.2°C (61.1°F). The

previous record for June was set in 2005. June was the fourth consecutive warmest month on record (March, April, and May 2010 were also the warmest on record).

> National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

EDITORIAL

More candidates needed to make a race of it I

n Woolwich, there’s now a threeway race for mayor, the first time the top job has been contested in a decade. However, that’s the sole contest among the 10 council spots in Woolwich and Wellesley townships. At least so far. Woolwich Mayor Bill Strauss faces two challengers, but councillors Ruby Weber, Mark Bauman and Murray Martin are looking at acclamation at this point, six weeks ahead of the nomination deadline for the Oct. 25 municipal election. Elmira resident Jim David is seeking the other Ward 1 seat – incumbent Sandy Shantz has yet to declare what she intends to do. All five current Wellesley council members – Mayor Ross Kelterborn, Shelley Wagner, Herb Neher, Jim Olender and Paul Hergott – are the only ones to have filed papers.

Clearly this situation is not the stuff of epic political battles. Whether or not you agree the incumbents are doing a good job, putting them through the trial of a widely-contested election is a good thing: good for voters, good for debate and, most of all, good for democracy. For that reason, we’re calling on public-minded citizens in both townships to come forward and stand for election – the pay’s not too great (mayors’ aside), the hours erratic, the public ungrateful and the media coverage scathing, but aside from that, it’s a great job and a way to both shape and serve the community where you live. Municipal councils do have a great deal of influence over the quality of life in their communities. That’s especially true in the townships, where even small decisions can have

PUBLICATIONS MAIL AGREEMENT NO

1004840 ISSN 1203 9578

WOOLWICH OBSERVER 20-B Arthur Street North, Elmira, Ontario, Canada N3B 1Z9

> COPYRIGHT

Phone: 519.669.5790 Toll Free: 1.888.966.5942 Fax: 519.669.5753

The entire contents of The Observer and online edition are protected by copyright. No portion thereof is to be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means without the specific permission of the publisher. Reproduction rights can be obtained from ACCESS Copyright located at 1 Yonge St., 1900, Toronto, ON M5E 1E5 FAX: 416.868.1621

Joe Merlihan, Publisher | EXT 107 jmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Steve Kannon, Editor | EXT 103 skannon@woolwichobserver.com Joni Miltenburg, Reporter | EXT 101 jmiltenburg@woolwichobserver.com Katie Edmonds, Reporter | EXT 102 kedmonds@woolwichobserver.com

> LETTER POLICY

a noticeable impact. Because that’s the case, it’s even more important to have community-minded people at the helm, those with the drive to enhance the quality of life here. A contested election generates ideas, perhaps dragging residents out of their typical apathy. With any luck, we’d see voter turnout exceed the measly 30 per cent that’s the norm these days. Of course, there would be greater interest if controversy were the order of the day; just look at the public reaction to the gravel pit applications and issues such as development in Victoria Glen park to see just how galvanized people can get. Most of the time, however, council meetings are dry affairs. That is both cause and effect in a system that essentially sees staff drive the agenda. Councillors often simply review

Donna Rudy, Sales Manager | EXT 104 drudy@woolwichobserver.com Pat Merlihan, Production Mgr | EXT 105 pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Matthew French, Production | EXT 108 mfrench@woolwichobserver.com Lindsay Lehman, Production | EXT 109 llehman@woolwichobserver.com

The Observer welcomes letters to the editor on topics of interest to our readers. Letters may be edited for brevity, grammar, and legal considerations. All letters must be signed and contain the writer’s full name and telephone number for verification purposes. Unsigned or anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. If you have a legitimate concern and cannot sign your name to a letter, please contact the editor to discuss alternative means of resolving the issue. This newspaper declines announcements, poetry and thank-you letters in the opinion section. Maximum suggested length is 500 words.

reports and vote on the recommendations. Discussion is typically muted, with little dissent around the table, a situation made worse by the ill-considered Harris-era decision to reduce the size of municipal councils. A few more bodies around the table would provide more eyes to study reports, more voices to air opinions and more chances to vet ideas. There’s no need for a free-for-all in council chambers, but dissent and debate are essential parts of the democratic process. Those qualities are precisely why we need more people to get involved in local politics. The more proactive the participants, the better the outcome will be for residents of the townships. For voters, municipal elections typically mean a low turnout – the same should not be true of candidates.

> CIRCULATION The Observer is an audited controlled circulation publication. Canadian Media Circulation Audit calculates and prepares The Observer circulation reports | 14,812.

> SUBSCRIPTIONS Annual subscriptions are available at a rate of $37.10 (includes GST) for delivery within Canada. Contact the office or email sales@woolwichobserver.com for further details. All issues from 2006 on are available online free of charge.

> PRESS COMPLAINTS

The Observer is a member of the Ontario Press Council which considers complaints against member newspapers. For more information about the Press Council contact www.ontpress.com.

> ASSOCIATIONS

The Observer is a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association [OCNA], Canadian Community Newspaper Association [CCNA], Ontario Press Council, and The Greater KW Chamber of Commerce.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

13 OPINION

We're nearing the point of no return It

may seem premature to talk about lastditch measures to deal with runaway climate change, but Ben Lieberman has it right. Lieberman, an energy expert at the Heritage Foundation, a Washington think-tank, responded to the news that the U.S. Senate will not pass any climate legislation this year by saying: “It’s pretty clear that no post-Kyoto treaty is in the making – certainly not in Cancun, and maybe not ever.” The Cancun meeting next December is where the optimists hoped to untangle the mess left by last December’s abortive climate summit in Copenhagen and create a new treaty to replace the Kyoto accord, which expires in 2012. It was always a slim hope, but the U.S. Senate has decisively crushed it. Big Coal and Big Oil win again. The U.S. Senate is one of the more corrupt legislative bodies in the Western world, so this comes as little surprise. Few senators take direct bribes for personal use, but very many believe that they will not win re-election unless they accept cash donations from special interests like the fossil fuel industries. Taking the cash obliges them to vote in defence of those interests. Pity about the public interest. As Senate majority leader Harry Reid put it: “We know that we don’t have the votes.” The Democrats control 59 out of a hundred seats in the Senate, but some of their more vulnerable members have been picked off by the fossil fuel lobby, so there will be no serious climate legislation in the United States before the mid-term Congressional elections in November. And it’s not going to get better after November, on current forecasts. The likelihood that the Democrats will emerge from the November Congres-

International Affairs GWYNNE DYER sional elections with a bigger majority in the Senate is approximately zero. The probability is that the balance will tilt the other way, perhaps a little, perhaps a lot. Either way, that means that there will be no climate legislation in the United States until after the next Congressional election in November 2012. Maybe President Barack Obama will be back in office in early 2013 with a bigger majority in the Senate, but that’s the earliest that we can hope for any legal U.S. commitment to cut its emissions – and it’s far from sure even then. Until the United States makes that commitment, you may be sure that none of the rapidly growing economies like China, India and Brazil will make it either. So the climate goes runaway. Not right away, of course. We won’t actually reach the point of no return (+2 degrees C higher average global temperature) until the late 2020s or the early 2030s. But we will be committed to that outcome much sooner, because with every year that passes, the cuts that we would need to make to hold the temperature below that level become deeper. Eventually, in practice, they become impossible to achieve. Before the current recession, global emissions of greenhouse gases were growing at almost three per cent per year, and they will certainly return to that level when the recession ends. To come in under +2 degrees C of warming,

we needed to be reducing global emissions by at least two per cent by 2012: a total cut of around five per cent each year, assuming that economies grow at the same rate as before. That would have been hard to do, but not impossible. However, as the years pass and the emissions continue to grow, it gets harder and harder to turn the juggernaut around in time. On the most optimistic timetable, there might be U.S. climate legislation in 2013, and a global climate deal in 2014, and we really start reducing emissions by 2015. By then, we would need to be cutting emissions by five or six per cent a year, instead of growing them at three per cent a year, if we still want to come in under +2 degrees C. That’s impossible. No economy can change the sources of its energy at the rate of eight or nine per cent a year. So we are going to blow right through the point of no return. Plus-2 degrees C is the point of no return (and every government has recognized it as such) because after that the additional warmth triggers natural processes that speed the warming. The permafrost melts and emits enormous amounts of greenhouse gases. The warming oceans lose their ability to absorb carbon dioxide. After that, just cutting human emissions won’t stop the warming. Runaway. The only way to avert that disaster that currently offers any hope is geo-engineering: direct intervention to hold the actual global temperature increase below 2 degrees C, no matter what happens in the short term to the concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

> SEE DYER ON PG. 14

THE VOICE

What are you doing for the long weekend?

“I am working at Lazer Video in Elmira.” > Jenna Bauman

“I plan to hang out with my husband and kids at home.” > Kelly Nelson

THE VIEW FROM HERE

“Probably not much. Maybe I will hang out with my friends and go swimming.” > Zach Goetz

With an electoral race underway only for the mayor's position, the rest of Woolwich's candidates are having an easy time of it at this point.

“Going swimming in the pool!” > Jamie Ferretti


OPINION 14

THE OBSERVER

More to food than a label A

trip to the market these days will provide you with an abundance of produce, much of it local. Stop by the farm gate, and you can be surer still the fruits and vegetables were grown close to home. Increasingly, that proximity is of interest to consumers. We’re concerned about where are food comes from, and the environmental impact of shipping it in from long distances. We want to support local farmers. And we’re worried about just how healthy the stuff is, especially processed food. That’s increasingly the case as food industry companies tap overseas sources for cheaper inputs. As with many of the goods we buy, often that means China. The quality and treatment of the foodstuffs immediately becomes suspect, and federal laws aren’t overly helpful in protecting consumer interests, let alone our safety. According to the Canadian Federation of Agriculture, the connection to China isn’t always obvious to the average consumer. Much of what’s what we buy is sold as “Product of Canada,” but is processed in China or contains ingredients from China. Under Canadian law, the ingredients can come from anywhere in the world and still get a “Product of Canada” label. That’s because “Product of Canada” only means that at least 51 per cent of manufacturing costs were incurred in Canada. Apple juice concentrate from China, for instance, can be mixed here, packaged and declared Canadian made, and you and I are none the wiser. In such cases, the product flies in the face of a growing desire to buy food as locally as possible. The practice also hides from consumers information that might lead them to choose another product because of safety concerns about goods from suspect parts of the globe. And when it comes to Chinese food products, we have every reason to be cautious, as food safety standards there are not consistent and enforcement spotty at best. Consumers are at risk both in China and in countries where Chinese food products end up, including Canada. Beyond poor handling practices, the threat extends to environmental pollutants and the use of chemicals deemed unsafe here. Farmed fish, for instance, has been found to contain malachite green, used to prevent infections in crowded ponds. Canada has banned that practice, and seafood so treated can’t be sold here, yet there have been cases where such products have slipped by the Canadian Food

From the Editor Steve Kannon Inspection Agency. In fact, the CFIA, as with consumer agencies monitoring for such things as lead in toys, relies on the manufacturers and importers to follow the rules: there just aren’t enough inspectors to cover all of the goods shipped to Canada. In 2006, more than 368 million kilograms (812 million lbs) of food from China made its way to this country. The trend is upwards, as many companies opt for cheaper, even as Canadians say they’re concerned with quality and with buying local food from local farmers. Food labeling is a highly politicized topic. Even farmers have conflicting positions. Livestock producers, for instance, oppose U.S. country of origin labeling, which they see as a protectionist measure. They would prefer greater integration of the North American livestock industry. On the other hand, organizations such as the Canadian Federation of Agriculture want more explicit labeling of processed goods so that consumers know whether or not the food they’re buying was actually grown in this country. Beyond origins, there’s a wider battle over labeling as it pertains to health impacts: amounts of salt, fats and food additives, among a host of other concerns. Then there’s the debate over labeling products containing genetically modified foodstuffs. Current labeling is inadequate and often ambiguous – how many people are snowed by the absurdly low serving sizes used to measure calories or sodium levels? Ultimately, however, it’s we as consumers who are to blame for the situation – we’re voting with our dollars, and we’re getting what we pay for. Salt, sugar, fat and grease are cheap to produce and add flavour to foods of even the lowest quality. The solution involves watching what we eat. With fresh food, supermarkets usually indicate the country of origin. With prepared and mixed foods, the situation rapidly gets cloudy. The key there is to pressure government to force proper labelling requirements on the industry: only full disclosure of ingredients and their origins will allow consumers to make the right choice when it comes to protecting their health.

Dyer: Time for the last-ditch effort > CONTINUED FROM PG. 13 There are various suggestions on the table. Maybe we could create a kind of sunscreen in the stratosphere by putting some sulphur dioxide gas up there. Maybe we could thicken

up the clouds over the ocean so they reflect more sunlight. Maybe, maybe, maybe. But nobody has done serious field trials of these techniques, and it’s high time that they started. We are probably going to need them. Welcome to the last ditch.

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Buggy drivers care about their horses To the Editor,  The letter from Elze Bredenkamp (Observer, July 17/10) displays an all-too-common human tendency: judging other persons and situations without really having an understanding of the circumstances. For one, I do not believe the driver of the horse was “plain and simply ignorant and cruel.” Much more likely, he was taken by surprise when his horse suddenly stopped and lay down. Then remorse and concern for his horse set in. Whether there had been signs of exhaustion that went unnoticed, I do not know. But that wasn’t necessarily the case. The weather was exceptionally warm and humid that week. This did affect humans and animals alike. One man related how he had driven an open tractor a few miles to a neighbour’s place one sunny afternoon. On the way home, he suddenly felt ill and queasy and pulled of the road and lay down for a while. A woman close by drove him home, while her husband drove the tractor back. He said he had no warning, but suddenly knew he was not fit to be driving. Heat exhaustion can be a sudden thing, be it for humans or horses, and isn’t necessarily related

to overexertion. Certainly the writer’s hobby horse would not have been in shape to pull a buggy in that kind of weather. But remember, these are seasoned horses that are used to pulling rigs in all kinds of weather. This is much more akin to a sports player collapsing from the heat. As for horses dying in harness, yes it can happen. But I have been driving horses for over 55 years and have never had it happen. I have heard older men relate stories of workhorses that would suddenly lie down and die on a very warm, humid day. I know of a team of horses that were driving on the road when one suddenly neighed and keeled over dead of an apparent heart attack. I would respectfully submit that most horse drivers are just as concerned for the well-being of our animals as Elze is for hers. But just as it is for us humans, so can horses suddenly and without warning have problems. So, please, if you happen onto such a situation, instead of being instantly judgmental and harshly critical of an already chastened driver, see if you can be of assistance.

> Aden Horst, Elmira

Economic opportunity was squandered To the Editor,  How ironic. In last week’s edition of the Observer, the page one headline reads, “Woolwich plans to investigate ways to boost local economy.” On page three, the headline reads, “Another jackpot for Centre Wellington.” The latest slots revenue payment, representing April through June, amounts to more than half a million dollars. The total revenue to

date for Centre Wellington is reported to be over $12.3 million. In declining to keep the raceway in Elmira, Woolwich has certainly let a lot of money slip away from the township and the taxpayers. Let’s not forget that many jobs were created at the Centre Wellington raceway and that the boost to their economy could have been ours.

> D.M. Langdon, Elmira

We’ll pay for guaranteed food quality To the Editor,  Owen Roberts’ column “Retail battle will keep food prices low” (Observer, July 17/10) states, “If consumers won’t pay farmers what it costs to produce food, governments need to kick in more” and “Farmers are fed up with platitudes about the importance of their sector while many are struggling to make ends meet.” It is true Ontario farmers work hard to feed the nation. They have to battle the weather, fuel, fertilizer, insurance costs and the high price of equipment, seeds, etc. However, one has to wonder if farmers are doing enough to protect their markets. Consumers are totally confused when they see cucumbers from India, canned fruit from China, fish from Taiwan, apples from Mexico,

canned pork and beans from South America, beef from Argentina, etc. in our grocery stores. They know these foods are also grown here. When the label says 'produced' for (name of company) or 'imported' for (name of company) or merely gives the address of the food company consumers have no idea where their food is coming from. In the U.S., farmers lobbied their government to force food companies to clearly mark the country of origin on the label. Not all people want to buy the cheapest brand. If consumers knew bakeries bought their flour from Peru or China they may not want to buy that bread and would prefer to pay more for Canadian wheat flour. After all, we have no

> SEE LETTER ON PG. 16


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

15 BUSINESS

PHOTO

» JONI MILTENBURG

BUSINESS

HELP FOR HARD-HIT INDUSTRY Agriculture Minister Carol Mitchell (second from right) was in Breslau Tuesday morning to announce $350,000 for Conestoga Meat Packers. On hand for the announcement were Kitchener-Conestoga MPP Leeanna Pendergast, company president Arnold Drung and Bob Hunsberger, chair of the Progressive Pork Producers Co-operative.

Provincial money boosts Breslau pork plant Agriculture Minister brings $350,000 cheque to aid expansion at Conestoga Meat Packers Joni Miltenburg

C

onestoga Meat Packers is getting $350,000 from the provincial government for improvements to its Breslau plant, which will result in the creation of 40 new jobs. Ontario Agriculture Minister Carol Mitchell was in Breslau Tuesday morning to make the funding announcement. “We know the world is hungry for Ontario products,” Mitchell said. “This investment means Conestoga Meat Packers was able to buy new equipment to expand their production capacity.”

Conestoga Meat Packers will be expanding its loin deboning line and selling more boneless loins. Boneless loins command a higher price and expanding the line will mean the creation of 40 new jobs. The plant has also purchased a ham tumbler, which loosens the skin and softens the muscles, allowing for higher yield on each ham. The oneper-cent improvement in yield doesn’t seem like a lot, said Bob Hunsberger, but it amounts to a significant increase over a year. Hunsberger is chair of the board for the Progressive Pork Produc-

ers Cooperative, which owns Conestoga Meat Packers. The 150-member co-op bought the processor in 2001. Conestoga Meat Packers processes 14,000 hogs

ness, we’ve gone from 35 jobs to 350 jobs and now we’re adding another 40,” Hunsberger said. “All of our members are committed pork producers, so they’re proud of

Hog farms are now profitable at current prices, but they have gone through a long period of unprofitability. Bob Hunsberger per week and exports to 35 countries, including Japan, United States, South Korea, Philippines, Mexico and Russia. “In the time the co-op has owned this busi-

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this business.” The investment is another piece of muchneeded good news for the pork industry, which has been struggling for the past few years. Around Easter, the price of pork

rose significantly, allowing producers to finally break even after months of negative receipts. Since 2007, pork producers have been hammered by the high Canadian dollar, which makes Canadian pork less competitive on world markets. Many producers built and invested in their operations counting on the Canadian dollar being at 70 or 80 cents U.S., Hunsberger explained in an interview, which hurt them when the loonie soared past the greenback. The Canadian dollar is still hovering close to parity but pork prices have risen, thanks to a

drop in pork inventories in the U.S. The price jump comes too late for a number of Canadian producers who have left the industry, some of them through the federal government’s hog farm transition program. “Hog farms are now profitable at current prices, but they have gone through a long period of unprofitability.” Hunsberger estimates the Ontario hog industry has downsized around 25 per cent over the past few years. In 2009, Ontario’s pork industry contributed $4 billion to the Canadian economy.

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BUSINESS 16

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

New events hasten a national food strategy W

hy don’t we have a national strategy for food? We have one for a lot of other important matters, such as HIV/AIDs and defense, so why not a national approach to food? The federal Liberal party rolled through Guelph and other communities last year, getting the ball rolling with a drive towards a national food policy. Liberal leader Michael Ignatieff is on a cross-Canada tour right now, keeping the momentum alive. And farmers, too, are taking up the cause. Wisely, they’re trying to make sure any policy that advances regarding food includes them. Traditionally, a chasm has divided farming and food. And honestly, farmers weren’t all that concerned about closing in. They didn’t really need

Food For Thought Owen Roberts to, given that many people, including decision makers, had at least a vague idea of what farming was all about. Now, farmers realize the public – particularly urbanites who know little about agriculture – has a new interest in what they do, considering farming influences health, the environment, energy and to an increasing extent, the economy. Farmers also realize the public has a growing influence over how they

Letter: Health linked to the food we eat > CONTINUED FROM PG. 14 idea what kind of pesticides or herbicides are used in foreign countries or if foreign chemicals are detrimental to our health. Because we know the U.S. has passed a law that allows people to choose whether they buy foreign or domestic foods we feel safer picking “Product of USA” off the shelf than the orange juice that is labelled “Product of Canada.” Perhaps it is time for farm groups such as the Ontario Federation of Agriculture to start working for the

farmers and the consumers. Many people would gladly pay more for Ontario-grown food if they knew that all farmers were required to take courses on the handling and application of chemical sprays, and that certification must be displayed. Canadian farmers should not have to compete with foreign producers or sell their products at the same low price if the chemicals and the fertilizers they use are Canadian government approved. Our health depends on the food we eat.

> Marion Israel, West Montrose

produce food, given the dwindling strength of the rural vote. So groups such as the Guelph-based Ontario Federation of Agriculture and the Canadian Federation of Agriculture are pushing for a national strategy to guide and define food production’s role in Canada. The timing is crucial on many levels, including the fact that Ottawa is instituting a new agriculture and agri-food framework for farm program funding. Farmers would like funding programs to match the national strategy, so efforts in one arena complement those in the other. For example, if energy self-sufficiency is a domestic policy, programs that support biofuel production will be put in place. But at the same time, efforts are needed to preserve soil, especially if biofuels are produced from the biomass that would normally be returned to the soil. Mark Wales, vice-president of the provincial federation, says those involved in food production domestically are finding their returns are shrinking, while their input costs (fuel, fertilizer, insurance, etc.) are growing. “This is putting farmers increasingly at the mercy of the consuming world, and their success as business people is diminishing,” he says. “We want to give farmers a stronger role within the food chain.” At the same time, others are working in their own way to help guide a national policy. At the George Morris

Centre, a new think piece highlights the need for precise and transparent performance measures in the agrifood policy framework. Bob Seguin, author of "Where to Next? Thoughts on National AgriFood Policy Developments and Directions," says following the federal, territorial and provincial agricultural ministers’ meeting in Saskatoon in June, governments and sector stakeholders should get on with discussions now on key topics, such as how to create programs that both feed Canada and feed the world – not one or the other. There’s no question more people are influencing the food system. On Monday, the Vineland Research and Innovation Centre announced an $88,000 grant from the Greenbelt Foundation to help develop five fruits and vegetables that have traditionally been imported, but can be successfully grown in southern Ontario: callaloo, fuzzy melon, okra, eggplant and yard long beans. Produce grown as part of the project will be distributed through Toronto-based community food programs and markets. That’s about as close as agriculture can get to urban Canada. But in terms of what’s being grown, it’s worlds away. Indeed, a national strategy is underway, but people are getting on with their lives and adopting consumption patterns no matter what. The strategy needs to be developed now.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

17 LIVING HERE

LIVING HERE

Back in the saddle

Putting foundation principles in perspective

Seriously injured in collision, West Montrose woman trains to ride with Lance Armstrong

Get healthy Stay healthy Barney Kuntze

Katie Edmonds

H

> SEE FITNESS ON PG. 19

» KATIE EDMONDS

O

PHOTO

ard to believe that July is almost over. Actually by the time you’re reading this, it most likely will be. This time of year is considered in the business arena to be the end of the first month of Q3 or the third quarter of the fiscal year. I find in my coaching practice with clients that it’s always good to get back to the basics, to remember what it is that yields exceptional results. In holistic lifestyle coaching, we teach the six foundation principles in order to become successful in achieving optimal health and wellbeing. They are: 1) Thinking – most people think on average around 68,000 thoughts per day – most of which are negative and don’t serve them in a beneficial way. 2) Breathing – upwards of 20,000 breaths per day is average, however a lower number is ideal since it places less stress on your body and improves healthy posture and digestion. Breathe in through your nose and exhale through your mouth. Remember this acronym: S.L.E.D.S, Slow Long Even Deep Smooth. 3) Movement – for the most part, on average only about three to eight per cent of us exercise on a regular basis, including walking the dog or riding a bike. Join a health club, go for a walk, get out for a bike ride, join an organized sports league or just start dancing in your house right now … like no one is watching. Just get moving! 4) Nutrition – three square meals per day equals 21 meals per week on average for most people. Each time you eat, that’s either bringing you closer or further away from your goals. Think about what you put on your fork next time. 5) Hydration – water. It’s

A rEAsoN To rIDE Suffering multiple injuries after being hit by a pickup truck while cycling, Shannon McTaggart is back in training as she prepares to ride with seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong.

n October 6, 2008 West Montrose’s Shannon McTaggart was merely weeks away from crossing a major life goal off her list. A marathon runner who was training for an ironman triathlon in Florida that fall, McTaggart had spent the past seven months conditioning her body; cycling more than 30 hours per week, passing up time spent with her family in order to prepare for the big race. That afternoon she was cycling one of her usual routes, on Hwy. 6 just outside of Arthur. One minute she was riding along the shoulder of the highway, the next she awoke and was looking up at the sky above her. McTaggart was struck from behind by a pickup truck travelling at 100 km/h: the driver was not watching where he was going. The cyclist was dragged for 500 metres before her bike snapped in half and she was thrown onto a nearby lawn. “I woke up and felt as though I had been sleeping in my bed; I was warm and cozy,” said McTaggart, a mother of three. “Then I felt the grass beneath me, and saw the people crowded around me. I tried to sit up to shift my leg but I couldn’t move.” She was taken by ambulance to Fergus, where they discovered a host of injuries that ran the gamut from a broken tibia to a dislocated left knee, a pelvis fractured in three spots, seven fractures in her back and neck, a shattered elbow, a crushed radial nerve, a broken collarbone and punctured lung. The athlete spent the next seven weeks at Grand River Hospital and was told by doctors that she would

certainly never compete again; she would be lucky if she was able to regain full mobility and walk properly. Because of severe nerve damage in her arm, steering a bicycle was out of the question. After several long weeks spent lying in her hospital bed, McTaggart was allowed to return home to West Montrose, where she began her long journey of rehabilitation and physical therapy. Her recovery has been relatively quick, thanks to her impressive physical condition prior to the accident, say her doctors. She has set her sights on a new goal. Last year, after realizing that her healing was not far enough along to return to competition, McTaggart went to watch a friend participate in the Ride with Lance event in Kitchener. The event is a rare opportunity for cyclists to ride with, and spend a day in the company of cancer survivor and seven-time Tour de France winner Lance Armstrong, while raising some money for the Grand River Cancer Centre at the same time. “After being around the group, feeling all that positive energy and briefly meeting Lance, I made up my mind that if he decided to come back to KitchenerWaterloo a third time, there wasn’t anything that was going to stop me from riding with him.” Currently, she has limited movement in her left arm and limited function in her left hand, making it difficult to balance her bike. Her pelvis was fused, so sitting on a bicycle seat for long periods of time is challenging. She has spent the past year attending frequent appointments at Waterloo Sports Medicine, visiting with

> SEE BIKING ON PG. 18


LIVING HERE 18

THE OBSERVER

MY sPAcE WHo? Sylvia Paurys

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

>>WANT TO HAVE YOUR HOME OR WORKSPACE FEATURED? pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com 3

2

4

Photographer

WHErE?

7

Ariss SAP Photography Studio 6

1) LIGHTING

>>Understanding the way light

8

1

works with photography is the key to great photographs. A standard butterfly setup as shown here, will take care of the shadows in the background, highlighting the subject. This Opus H250 lighting kit Sylvia uses works great in the studio, and is small enough to pack up and take on the road.

e

9

5

2) BAcKDroP

>>You won’t find any princess

themes or fake brick walls to pose up against at SAP. She prefers to work in her subject’s natural element, but for studio work she uses canvas and paper backdrops.

3) cLIFForD THE DoG

>>Kid and toddler photography is a busy segment of her business. The toys and props are used mainly as distractions for toddlers. Clifford the Big Red Dog was a 25-foot dog portrayed in the stories written by Norman Bridwell. First published in 1963, the series established Scholastic Books as a premier publishing company. Sylvia says that coloured balls in a basket is a

10

popular shot with parents but the ‘less is more’ approach to pictures of their kids is most common.

4) BIrD oF PrEY

>>This photo of a bird of prey was

taken at African Lion Safari on a visit with her mother one month before her mother passed away. The picture usually hangs above her desk; she finds inspiration when she looks at it.

5) DoGs

German shepherds are used to getting their picture snapped. Cujo on the left is 9 and got his name from Maple Leaf goalie Curtis Joseph rather than the 1981 Stephen King thriller. Five-year-old Bear is a cuddler. Pet photography is a large part of her business. Snakes and hairless rats round out her portfolio of dogs and horses.

6) cAMErA GEAr

>>Sylvia credits her husband

Paul for his support of her new career. Paul bought her first Canon

>>These super-friendly mixed

xTi as well as this Canon 50D she just acquired at Christmas. She has five different lenses to accommodate different situations, but her go-to portrait lens is her 17-85mm.

7) PHoTos oN DIsPLAY

>>Examples of her work help Sylvia

secure future gigs. Weddings, engagements, kids, babies, family and pets all make great subjects. The image of petals was shot at the Toronto Zoo and printed on canvas making a nice art piece for the wall.

8) KIssING BrIDGE

>>Sylvia has taken photos of

various landmarks in Woolwich and turned them into greeting cards which she’ll customize and print. Constructed in 1881 West Montrose’s Kissing Bridge is Woolwich’s most visible tourist landmark. Last year Sylvia landed herself on the Kissing Bridge Studio Tour and sold three of her framed prints of Old Order Mennonnites to overseas tourists. She’ll open up her studio again at the end of October when the tour resumes.

9) PHoTo BooKs

>>Customized coffee table books

are all the rage in the photo business. Sylvia likes keeping control of her designs by doing all the layout work herself rather than using various online photo book services. She prints the pages and has them bound locally.

10) WEBsITE

>>She uses her website to promote her services and to give her clients access to their photos to save or print at www.sapphotography.ca.

Busy? It’s time for some “not really” cooking S

o, we have a confession to make. Even we, as chefs, have our nights where we do not want to cook. Summers are busy with soccer games, a golf game or meeting a friend on a patio leaving very little time to spend in the kitchen. But we still want to eat great tasting food; there is absolutely no compromise there. Lucky for all of us, it is very easy to ‘not really’ cook with all the great food, produce especially, that is available at this time of year. The key to ‘not really’ cooking a good meal lies in the quality of ingredients that you use. Buy the best ingredients that you can, turn on the barbeque and enjoy the sunshine. So for a quick dinner for two we bring you the simple grilled pork chop. We were given fresh herbs from a friend’s garden – rosemary, sage and parsley – and purchased extra thick bone-in local pork chops from the Bauer Butcher, located in Vincenzo’s. Fresh lemon juice and a good olive oil are an instant marinade and sauce. And, of course, kosher salt and freshly ground pepper. Be generous with the salt: a good four-finger sprinkle on both sides, because meat loves salt. This recipe will work well with bone-in, skin-on chicken breasts as well. Enjoy this meal with whatever market vegetables you have on hand, and perhaps some leftover potato salad (from last week’s column). We actual-

From The Chef's Table Kirstie Herbstreit & Jody o'Malley

Barbecued pork chops >>2 8-oz pork chops >>Juice of 1 lemon >>2 tbsp chopped fresh herbs, whatever you have on hand

>>1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil, plus more for drizzling

>>Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper ly sautéed some kale, from the same friend’s garden: wash kale and take leaves off of thick stem. Heat olive oil in pan with one clove of crushed garlic. Add kale (we used three large stems). Season with salt and pepper, and cook for 4-5 minutes. Add a splash of water, a squeeze of lemon and cook for another couple minutes. Done! Place pork chops in a shallow dish; Drizzle with lemon juice, herbs, olive oil and salt and pepper; Allow flavours to absorb for 30 minutes, at room temperature, turn-

ing once; Pre-heat grill to medium-high; Place pork chops on grill at “10 o’clock;” Cook for 3 minutes, and then turn to “2 o’clock” for 3 more minutes. This will give you great looking grill marks; Flip pork chops over and continue cooking for 5 minutes, or until firm to the touch. It is okay if pork chops are slightly pink in the center;

Remove from grill and allow to rest, uncovered, on a plate for 5 minutes before serving; serve with collected juices and drizzle with olive oil.

>>Chefs

Kirstie Herbstreit and Jody O’Malley are both Red Seal certified chefs. Together they run the company YouCanCook2, specializing in interactive dinner parties. You can also find them cooking at Entertaining Elements in St. Jacobs, where they hold private dinners for eight people. To contact the chefs, visit their website www.youcancook2.com.

Biking: On the comeback trail > CONTINUED FROM PG. 17 physiotherapists, trainers and an osteopath who have been able to not only get her back on her bicycle seat, but encouraged her to continue training. She rides three or four times per week, on routes ranging from 35 to 140 kilometres in length. She has added a rear-view mirror to her helmet, but she is not afraid of the roads. “With everybody’s help, I have gotten back into good enough physical condition to ride again and I have learned to ignore parts that still hurt.” On Aug. 28, when Armstrong takes to area roads with an exclusive group of cyclists to ride 120 kilometres in the fight against cancer, Shannon McTaggart will be along for the ride. All riders who wish to participate

must commit to raising $20,000 and the local cyclist is just $4,000 short of that goal. She has been reaching out to friends and family and her daughters have run a number of lemonade stands out in front of their home, raising almost $200. To sponsor McTaggart, donors can visit www.ridewithlance.org and click on ‘Sponsor a Rider.’ “It will be very exciting to meet and chat with Lance, but the best part about all of this is that I have been able to have that joy that I used to have when I rode my bike,” she said. “I would have liked to have taken the easier path but a lot of good things have come out of the situation and I try to just think about the positives. Getting back on my bike is an amazing feeling.”


THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, July 31, 2010

19 LIVING HERE

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> soLUTIoNs: Find the answers to all of the puzzles on pg. 31

Across 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coolâ&#x20AC;? amount 4. Actors 8. Refusing to comply 14. Picket line crossers 19. Not permanent 21. California county 22. Loud utterance 23. Confiscate by distress 24. Unwilling to cooperate 26. Any Time 27. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ a chanceâ&#x20AC;? 29. Breviloquent 30. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I, Claudiusâ&#x20AC;? role 31. Dance creator 35. Cokeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s partner 37. ___ lab 38. Denials 39. Collapsible canopy 44. Inside shot? 47. Texas state highway patrol 48. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tarzanâ&#x20AC;? extra 49. Nymph of lakes 50. Ring bearer, maybe 51. Dalai ___ 52. Not yet final, at law 54. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Losing My Religionâ&#x20AC;? rock group 55. Father of Balder 57. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Check this out!â&#x20AC;? 58. ___ Minor 61. Extinguish 62. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ momentâ&#x20AC;? 65. Leap 66. A person 68. Bubkes 69. About to explode 71. Barley bristle 73. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zip your lip!â&#x20AC;? 77. Old German duchy name 78. Fossil shells 80. Honoreeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spot 81. Morgue, for one 83. Driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lic. and others 84. 25th anniversary 90. Particular, for short 93. Speech defect 96. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go team!â&#x20AC;? 97. Relating to the dura mater 98. Prison 102. Rocket feature





























 

 





 













 

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12. Biology lab supply 13. Contact, e.g. 14. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Criedâ&#x20AC;? (1962 hit) 15. Coarsely ground corn 16. African flower 17. Cloud 18. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ehâ&#x20AC;? 20. Well-built 25. An edge between a sidewalk and a roadway 28. Bite 32. Propel, in a way 33. â&#x20AC;&#x153;MS. Found in a Bottleâ&#x20AC;? writer 34. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Town Tooâ&#x20AC;? (1981 hit) 36. Ashes holder 39. To a higher intensity 40. Objective form of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;? 41. Pinocchio, at times 42. Flimsy, as an excuse 43. Cartilage of the larynx

 









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44. Fear of foreigners 45. Busts 46. The elevation of the hand 53. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gotten ___ you?â&#x20AC;? 56. Muslim pilgrimage 59. Hot spot 60. Commingle 63. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cheersâ&#x20AC;? regular 64. ___ cheese 67. An indifference to pleasure or pain 70. Armageddon 71. Expressing a rate 72. Plural of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;? 73. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do the Right Thingâ&#x20AC;? pizzeria owner 74. Human immunodeficiency virus 75. ___-friendly 76. Grand ___ (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Evangelineâ&#x20AC;? setting)



77. Win over 79. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cast Awayâ&#x20AC;? setting 80. Render harmless 82. Mammary gland of bovids 84. Curled 85. Russian alternative 86. Like some milk 87. O. Henry device 88. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eraserheadâ&#x20AC;? star Jack 89. Great merriment 90. Fitness centers 91. French father 92. Carbon compound 94. Creep 95. Ancient colonnade 99. Oolong, for one 100. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flying Down to ___â&#x20AC;? 101. Churchyard tree in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Romeo and Julietâ&#x20AC;? 103. Adage

Fitness: Start by putting these principles into action > CONTINUED FROM PG. 17 too bland. It has no taste. It makes me pee. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what I hear all the time. Try using a small pinch of good sea salt, which will add very healthy and beneficial trace minerals. Also it will reduce the chance youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have to visit the washroom every hour. 6) Sleep â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just get some! Sleeping from 10-11 p.m. until 5-6 a.m. is ideal. If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to cut yourself short due to being â&#x20AC;&#x153;busy,â&#x20AC;? go to bed earlier and get up earlier. Yes, there is another 4 and 5 on the clock that exists during the same 24 hours. These are just some short tips â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and a reality check â&#x20AC;&#x201C; about the

kind of simple things that you can do today. To take notice of the impact that the first three can have on your health, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s essential to start with 1), taking inventory of the thoughts that youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re thinking. Do they serve you or not? 2) How conscious are you of your breathing during the day? Set a timer on your phone, watch or computer to remind you to check it each hour during the day! 3) Get up and move each day. Walk the stairs, take your bike, join the gym or an organized sports league. 4) Take written inventory of what you eat for a week. Just the act of writing it down will encourage more conscious eating

decisions! 5) Carry a water bottle with you where ever you go. Put some freshly squeezed lemon or lime juice, add a small pinch of sea salt, on the rocks or straight up! 6) Make a conscious effort this week to have quiet time before bed (Facebook doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t count!) and try counting backwards from 100 very slowly to help you fall into a meditative state just before you drift off to a good nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sleep. Enjoy and continue the process. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have more on each principle for the next few weeks. Stay tuned.

>>Barney Kuntze, a holistic lifestyle coach, is the owner

of Pinacle Health & Fitness, which operates clubs in Elmira and Milverton.


SPORTS 20

THE OBSERVER

SPORTS

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

Horseshoes Kings’ newest fly over recruit comes Linwood with an Elmira

connection

TAKING AIM

Richard Shantz lines up a shot at the Bernice Basler horseshoe tournament last Saturday.

Relationship with Graham and LuAnn Snyder made the choice easier for Brady Campbell Joni Miltenburg

WCS continues its drive against family violence Jeanne Renault Golf Classic is a fundraiser for educational program Joni Miltenburg

T

he 16th annual Jeanne Renault Golf Classic is set to tee off at Conestoga Country Club Aug. 12. The tournament is a fundraiser for Woolwich Community Services’ family violence prevention program. Last year WCS supported 114 survivors of domestic violence, both women and men, and educated more than 10,500 students on

reducing violence in their own lives. The tournament is named for Jeanne Renault, the woman who founded the family violence prevention program and passed away shortly after its inception. A daycare supervisor in Elmira, Renault saw the need for a program based in and tailored to the townships. The program has three components: individual support for victims of relationship

violence, group support, and a public education program for students. WCS executive director Don Harloff said a large percentage of the funds raised go to the public education program, which operates without the help of government funding. The education program, which has been in place for a decade, has been run for the

> SEE RENAULT ON pg. 22

pHOTOS

IN MEMORy OF BERNICE The Basler family saw a good turnout for the sixth annual Bernice Basler horseshoe tournament in Linwood July 24. Winners Adam Snider and Jeremy Meissner took home the coveted trophy and the group raised $1,150, the highest amount to date. This marks the final year for the event organized by the Basler family, which has yet to determine which charity will receive the proceeds.

» KATIE EDMONDS

W

hen the Elmira Sugar Kings offered Brady Campbell a spot on the roster, they told him he should come to Elmira to check out the arena the Kings call home. The beautiful new Dan Snyder Memorial Arena is a selling point for the team, but Campbell didn’t need the pitch; he was already sold on the arena, the team and the town. The connection between Campbell and Elmira goes back to 2004, the year Brady lost his friend and teammate Weston deBrouwer in an ATV accident. That December, the annual minor hockey tournament in Blenheim was dedicated to his memory. Knowing none of them would be able to speak about the loss, Brady’s father Brad invited Graham and LuAnn Snyder to the tournament. Graham and LuAnn didn’t know Weston, but they knew what it was like to grieve for a son, having lost their own son Dan in a car accident the year before. In front of 2,000 players and parents that filled the rink to capacity, Graham talked about life and loss and how the two young hockey players, Dan and Weston, were alike. Graham and Brad Campbell kept in touch over the years with occasional emails, and Graham issued a standing invitation: “If

BRADy CAMPBELL you’re ever in Elmira …” The Campbells finally took him up on the offer when Brady was invited to the Sugar Kings’ prospect camp in May. “I got the invitation in the mail and decided that would be a place I wanted to play,” Brady said. A week before the prospect camp, Brady and his father spent the morning with the Snyders, who took them on a tour of Elmira and the new arena and told them about the team. “We were barely on the road home and Brady told me that’s where he wanted to play,” Brad said. The visit happened unbeknownst to the Kings, who had scouted him without realizing there was a connection between the families. When they asked him to sign and told him the Snyders had agreed to billet him, it only made the decision that much easier for Brady. It’s been seven years

> SEE CAMPBELL ON pg. 21


» Saturday, July 31, 2010

21 SPORTS

A tawdry little affair put down the phone and looked up and all those memories came flooding back. “It was her again wasn’t it?” my wife said, somewhat distressed and even a bit angry. Not knowing what to say, I gathered my car keys and wallet and walked towards the door. “Look, I’m sorry,” I said. “I’m so sorry.” “Why?” she pleaded. “Why must you go to her? What does she have?” “She has something that you can never give me.” I muttered. “And it’s something exciting that completes me.” Carol looked at me in disappointment and wept openly as I stepped out the door to rendezvous with Mary, the most important woman in the world to me at that moment. For Mary, the postmaster in town, had just called to tell me that the 2010 Migratory Bird Permits were in. How can you resist a woman like that? My wife calls her a home wrecker. Yes, Mary – that fowl seductress – had once again put out the siren call of the duck licence, knowing full well that I was powerless to resist. Ten minutes later, I was at the wicket, my palms all sweaty and my heart racing. “It took you long enough,” she laughed wickedly, as she waved the envelope that held the permits. “I got here as soon as I could,” I said nervously, trying to suppress my shame and longing. “I ... I ... need what you have.” Mary just smiled and gave in. And, in seconds, we were locked in a long and passionate embrace – that duck permit and I. “Not here,” Mary said. “People will talk.” But we both knew that it was no use. I had waited since the end of last waterfowl season for this moment. I could no longer control those raw emotions. “Let them talk,” I said. “This duck

Not-So-Great Outdoorsman

A great day for hitting the trail

Steve Galea permit and I were meant for each other.” “That will be nineteen dollars and twenty one cents,” Mary said, cutting in. “Must we make this so tawdry?” I replied. “You’re the one who is kissing a duck license,” she mumbled. She had a point. So I pulled out my wallet and paid her in full. I’m not proud of it, but Mary and I have had this on-again, off-again relationship for several years now. Life will be going along just fine; Carol and I will have gone for days without speaking of mallards and great crossing shots that I have made, when suddenly, Mary will once again enter into my life with the news that the duck permits are in. Carol, like most wives, will be heartbroken. For she knows that this means that I will be up early and home late, with the seductive smell of marsh gas on my cloths. When the transaction was complete, I looked at Mary and said, “I should go now, before I lose all control and buy another one.” “Well,” she said, “it was fun while it lasted.” I looked over and thought that Mary is a fine woman, despite the fact that she doesn’t sell deer, bear or moose tags. But I knew, deep in my heart, that I had to go home to my decoys and dogs, now that this was out of my system. “Yes, it was fun,” I conceded. “Same time next year?” she winked. “Sure,” I muttered. “Unless they open a spring snow goose season.”

Campbell: Bringing families together > CONTINUED FROM pg. 20 now since Dan Snyder died, but he continues to have an impact on his community; last year with the opening of the new arena named in his honour and now by bringing three

families together. “In connecting these events together; it’s as if Brady has the opportunity to thank Elmira and the Snyders for helping Blenheim and the DeBrouwers in 2004,” Brad Campbell said.

IMPORTANT NOTICE CHANGE OF VENUE Township of Wellesley Council Meeting The August 3rd, 2010 Township of Wellesley Council Meeting will be held at the: TOWNSHIP ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 4639 Lobsinger Line, Crosshill Meeting will start at 6:45pm Sorry for any inconvenience this may cause.

» KATIE EDMONDS

I

pHOTOS

THE OBSERVER

STRuTTING THEIR STuFF Riders from around the region came together for friendly competition at the Waterloo County Trail Riders show July 25 at the group's showgrounds near St. Jacobs. A newcomer to the scene, MacKenzie Elridge (top) takes a ride on Toki, a horse waiting his turn to compete.

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SPORTS 22

THE OBSERVER

Renault: Tourney still open to golfers, sponsors

Aquaducks play host for the first time

pHOTOS

» KATIE EDMONDS

> CONTINUED FROM pg. 20

THERE'S NO PLACE LIKE HOME Some 150 swimmers from Elmira, Kincardine and Fergus dove into the new pool at the Woolwich Memorial Centre July 24 as the Elmira Aquaducks hosted the semi-finals of the South Western Ontario Regional Swimming Association. Right, Elmira swimmer Melanie McArdle celebrates a fast lap.

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JuLy 24 SWORSA semi-finals

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rant a group for men at this time, Harloff said. Organizers are hoping the tournament raises around $15,000. Harloff noted that they aim to make it a fun event, and don’t take the golf overly seriously. The tournament is a four person scramble, with a shotgun start at 12:55 p.m. There is still space for more golfers; the $125 registration fee includes 18 holes of golf with carts, dinner and prizes. There is also a silent auction with items available to bid on. WCS is also looking for more sponsors for holes and golf carts. For more information, to register or become a sponsor, contact WCS at 519-6695139 or email Leigh-Anne Quinn at leighanne_ wcs@yahoo.ca.

SCORECARD ELMIRA AQUADUCKS

2008 Grand Caravan

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

Matthew McArdle: 25m freestyle – 5th; 25m breaststroke – 4th; 25m butterfly – 1st BOYS 9 AND 10

Jacob Davis: 100m IM – 1st; 50m freestyle – 1st; 25m backstroke 1st; 100m free relay – 1st BOYS 11 AND 12

Alex Carbone: 50m freestyle – 2nd; 50m breaststroke – 4th; 25m butterfly – 2nd; 100m medley relay – 2nd Isaac Hogan: 100m IM – 1st; 50m breaststroke – 2nd; 25m butterfly - 1st; 200m free relay – 3rd BOYS 13 AND 14

Jordan Lemp: 100m IM – 1st; 50m freestyle – 3rd; 50m breaststroke 1st; 200m free relay – 2nd Kyle Stickney: 50m freestyle – 8th; 50m backstroke – 4th; 50m breaststroke – 5th; 200m free relay – 3rd GIRLS 9 AND 10

Meghan Creelman: 100m IM - 5th; 25m butterfly – 8th; 100m free relay - 1st; 100m medley relay – 2nd Erin Nechanicky: 50m freestyle – 5th; 25m breaststroke – 4th; 25m butterfly – 4th; 100m free relay – 1st Carmen Read: 100m IM – 4th;

25m breaststroke – 5th; 25m butterfly - 6th; 100m free relay – 1st GIRLS 11 AND 12

Melanie McArdle: 100m IM – 7th; 25m butterfly – 4th; 200m free relay - 3rd; 100m medley relay – 2nd Sarah Norcott: 50m breaststroke – 5th; 25m butterfly – 11th; 100m medley relay – 2nd; 200m free relay – 3rd GIRLS 13 AND 14

Jamie MacDougall: 100m IM – 1st; 50m freestyle – 3rd; 50m butterfly - 2nd; 200m free relay – 2nd Madeleine Nelson: 100m IM – 3rd; 50m freestyle – 7th; 50m butterfly - 3rd; 200m free relay – 2nd Leslie Quinn: 50m freestyle – 1st; 50m breaststroke – 1st; 100m breaststroke – 1st; 200m free relay – 2nd GIRLS OPEN

Brittany Martin: 200m IM – 1st; 100m freestyle – 2nd; 100m backstroke - 2nd Alex Nicholson: 100m IM – 1st; 50m freestyle – 1st; 50m butterfly - 1st ELMIRA U11 SELECt BOYS

JuLy 22

Elmira 8, Fergus 5 goals: Adam Weber x3, Owen Read, Cameron Rose, Mathew Uhrig, Earl Schwartz x2

> Nationals provide Green with another gold medal Norm Green of St. Clements claimed the gold medal at the Canadian Blind Lawn Bowling Championships in Winnipeg this past week.

His record was five wins and only one loss. The Ontario team came home with two gold medals, two silvers and one bronze.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

23 CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS

HelP WaNteD

HelP WaNteD

Then you should be working for us. WE’RE LOOKING FOR:

Construction Millwrights (apprenticeship available) Assets: • Arc Welding • Blueprint Reading • Agricultural background • Leadership Ability

Fitter Welder

(minimum 3 years experience) (must be able to pass CWB welding test, G.M.A.W. F.C.A.W.)

Mig Welder

(must be able to pass CWB welding test, G.M.A.W. F.C.A.W.) Are you capable of: • Layout of plate and sheet metal from blueprints • Able to work with minimum supervision • High quality workmanship • Regular and punctual attendance

Requires

Daytime Shifts Mon-Fri. You will be responsible for providing courteous and efficient service to our customers. You will process payments using debit, credit card and cash with G-Site. You will perform general housekeeping duties of facility along with stocking of merchandise. Some light lifting and unloading of shipments will be required. You must have good communication skills and a friendly, helpful attitude towards customers. We offer a competitive salary and a fast paced, fun environment. If you are interested in joining our team, please forward your resume or drop off in person to:

Dub-L-E Esso

390 Arthur St. S., Elmira, ON, N2B 2P6 Attn: Trent HelP WaNteD

> Ground

Force environmental Inc. requires qualified labourers and heavy equipment operators to start immediately. Professional, team players with a great attitude are needed for progressive environmental contractor. Flexible hours and own vehicle required. Wages dependent on experience. Please send resume by fax or email: 519-664-0772 or careers@gfei.ca

HelP WaNteD

WOrK WaNteD

Apply in person between 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. OR fax or e-mail resume to:

M&G MILLWRIGHTS LIMITED R.R.#1 Reg. Rd. 19

(1540 Floradale Rd.) Elmira, ON

519-669-5105

fax: 519-669-1450 email: bob@mgmill.com HelP WaNteD

Sip & Bite

FOr sale

> Need help to clean your house? Call 519-669-3323.

Drivers & Helpers

COMING eVeNts

aUtOMOtIVe

You are welcome to

Countryside Mennonite Fellowship (Hawkesville, ON)

Commemorating 50 years of God`s faithfulness, 1960-2010.

August 15, 2010

> Mattress/Boxspring,

50th anniversary books will be available.

> Passport Photos, Gun licences etc. $10. Brian’s Photo, 57 Arthur St. S., Elmira. 519-210-0608. table with 6 chairs and one leaf. $150 o.b.o. 519-638-3945.

> Window

air Conditioner, 5,000 btu. Good working order w/ accordion sides, $65, Please call 519-669-4356.

14 Spring St., Drayton

Washer/Dryer in unit

Special service at 2:30 p.m. followed by a time of fellowship, refreshments, and reflections from the past (photos).

new, never used, still in sealed bag. Sacrifice $195. Delivery available. 519-635-8737.

2 Bedroom Unit

available immediately

Must be physically fit, neat appearance. Full-time with benefits. License required. Apply in person with resume to Dan at: 66 Schaefer St., Waterloo or fax 519-747-5810

Window air Conditioners and a kitchen stove. Good working, for sale. For more information please call 519-669-3323.

>2

> elmira based furniture > Wooden

company now hiring for mature general labourers. Please call 519-669-3143 or fax resume to 519-669-8820.

WE OFFER: • Competitive wages • Company uniforms • Pension plan • Company benefits

COMPUters

reNtals APARTMENT FOR RENT

Store/Fuel Sales Attendant

PLACING A CLASSIFIED AD | Classified ads can be obtained in person, by phone, fax or email from Monday to Thursday 8:30am-5pm or Friday 8:30am-4pm. All classified ads are prepaid. Deadline is WEDNESDAYS by 4pm.

Commercial 20-Word Ad $12.00 (Extra Words 30¢/word)

HelP WaNteD

DO YOU WANT? A wide range of jobs? Welding? Millwrighting? Assembly? Blueprint reading? Inside work? Outside work? Responsibility?

Residential 20-Word Ad $7.50 (Extra Words 20¢/word)

FarM eQUIPMeNt

> ebersol elevators, 40

ft $750, 24ft $650. NH 55 rake $575; International hay crimper, hydraulic lift $750; JD 30 bale thrower $850; sickle mower $575. Harriston, 519-338-2688.

WaNteD

> Wanted

to Buy Bungalow in Elmira in good condition. 519-669-5534.

1st Flr. Unit

COMPUTERS - LAPTOPS

Sales and Service

CALL FOR DETAILS

Great Cond.

Come see our showroom at:

$650+

112 Bonnie onnie Crescent, Elmira r ra

519-669-5551

519-741-6368 reNtals

COMING eVeNts

> 2000 Chrysler Neon LE > elmira - 1 Bedroom. New, > reunion - 4 door sedan. Automatic, sunroof, safetied, 108,000 kms. 519-807-8189.

reNtals

> elmira - One Bedroom,

basement apartment. For Sept. 1. $650 inclusive. Non smoker, no pets, quiet tenant. 519-669-5372, after 6 p.m.

> For rent - Back split semi. 3 bedrooms, fenced in yard. Newly renovated, no pets,non smoking. $950 + utilities, Elmira. 519-669-9059. > Industrial Bay for rent. 64 Howard Ave., Elmira. 2000 sq ft., open space. 14’ high bay door. 16’ ceiling height, good for mezzanine. separate hydro, gas and water meters. Inquiries please call 519-465-8421 or 519-669-1461 ext. 22.

unique and attractive. Non smokers, no pets preferred. Available Sept. 1. $678 + utilities. 519-669-2212.

> MOOreFIelD

- One bedroom apartment, furnished, laundry facilities, parking, deck, electric heat, cable tv, no pets, adult building. References. $695 inclusive. First & last 519-638-3013.

> One Bedroom apartment - second floor of house. Available August 1. Close to downtown, parking. Call 519-669-1263. > Wanted to rent. Christian family looking to rent house in St. Jacobs area. 3-4 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms. Call 519-664-1508.

Watch your business

GROW

GaraGe sales

> estate sale - 5812 Wellington Rd. 86, near Ariss. Sat. July 31, 8:30a.m. 3:30p.m. Wood cookstove, 24” gas stove, electric bed, lift chair, bath seat, collectibles, knick knacks, old books, bottles, must see to believe everything we have. > Moving/Garage sale - Sat. July 31, 8 a.m. - noon, 19 Dalebrook St., Elmira. Baby items, double stroller, toddler clothes, books, household items, and more.

traDes & serVICes

> elmira - 2 bedroom town > CrD house. Please, no smoking, no pets. $875 plus utilities. Must provide own appliances. Suitable for quiet tenants. Call 519-743-7479. One Parking space included.

- Christian/ Veronica steinman(n) Reunion. Sunday, October 17, 2010 at Shakespeare Optimist Hall. Potluck 1 p.m. (Refreshments provided. Bring plates, cutlery and cups). Memorabilia welcome.

accounting services - Income Tax (E-File) Services. Small business accounting, payroll & gov/t filings. Chuck Downs, 95 Aspen Cr., Elmira. 519669-1498, cell 519-569-1744.

The #1 Weekly in the Region.

Printed Promotional Materials Door Hangers Business Cards Brochures

Flyers Postcards And More

Home Cooking

Line cooks and servers needed

Experience preferred

Apply in person with resumé to 39 Arthur St. S., Elmira

We get you

Results.

Designed. Printed. Delivered.

519-669-5790


CLASSIFIEDS 24

THE OBSERVER

u think. Approx 1500sqft this home is equipped w/3 R, lg bdrms, FR & RR! 4car drive. Many updates. Put your l Paul direct.

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

real estate

500

FEATURED LISTING

$

ATTENTION SENIORS!

Close to downtown, original main floor master or walk up to attic. Sep DR, kit addition '05 w/garden door to deck. Single detached garage. Many updates. MLS. Call Paul direct.

Is Donated To

KidsAbility With Every Home I Sell!

LARGER THAN YOU THINK!!

ATTRACTIVE SEMI

Only mins to Waterloo. 1393sqft well kept home. 3 bdrms, 2 baths, lg eat-in kit, LR walk out to deck, roomy master w-walk in closet, very lg RR, garage, double drive. Partly finished bsmt w/3 pc bath rough-in. MLS. Call Paul direct.

NEW LISTING

CALL DIRECT

519-503-9533

$875,000

Elmira is my home ... let’s make it yours!

6+1 BEDROOMS AND 4 BATHROOMS

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

This 2800sqft home is located on 42 acres. House is surrounded by 100ft trees, 2 springs, pond, and riding trails. Geo-thermal heating system. MLS. Call Paul direct.

Independently Owned and Operated 180 Weber St. S., Waterloo

HOME HOME 519-669-3074 OFFICE OFFICE 519-888-7110

EMAIL paul@remaxsolidgold.biz ONLINE www.homeswithpaul.ca

SMALL TOWN LIVING!

Only mins to Waterloo. Located on a deep lot, this home is a perfect family home. Recent kit upgrades. MF lndy/office, lg Sep DR, hot tub. Lg detached garage/ workshop fits 2 cars, 4 car drive. MLS. Call Paul direct.

$235,000

Only steps to golf course. Separate entrance to inlaw set up. 5200sqft, 3 kit, 5 bdrms,6 baths, 3 car garage, extra long driveway. MLS. Call Paul direct.

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

This semi is approx 1500sqft. Equipped with 3 bdrms, 2baths, big kit, sep DR, lg bdrms, FR & RR! 4car drive. Many updates. Put your TLC into this home. MLS. Call Paul direct

$199,900

STUNNING HOME

Paul Martin

$195,000

NEW LISTING

$274,900

$619,000

5 BEDROOMS, 3 BATHROOMS!

In this 1,900sqft home. Located on attractive fenced corner lot, mature trees. Eat-in kit open to family rm w/FP, slider. Bright dining rm w/2nd slider. Lg living rm. Finished bsmt. MLS. Call Paul direct.

$387,000

QUALITY BUILT HOME BY VERDONE

$431,900

4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, upgraded kitchen cupboards, pantry, upper laundry floor. MLS. Call Paul direct.

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

4B Arthur St. S. Elmira • www.remaxsolidgold.biz

BROKERAGE

OFFICE: 519-669-5426

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. 45 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

519-669-2772

BRAD MARTIN Broker of Record MVA Residential

Res: 519-669-1068

JULIE HECKENDORN Broker Res: 519-669-8629

LEON MARTIN

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

TRACEY WILLIAMS Sales Rep. Cell: 519-505-0627

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage | Independently Owned and Operated

COUNTRY LOTS .5 acre don’t miss this chance to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. Within 40 minutes KW, or Guelph. High speed internet is available with fibre optic. Starting at $66,000 MLS

BERT MARTIN, BROKER

COUNTRY PROPERTY!

iMMaCUlatE- Custom built home backing to farmland! Custom maple kitchen w/island. Open concept to huge fam. rm. w/gas f/p and oversized windows. 3 bths. Rec. Room. 4th bdrm. Walk-up bsmt. Triple drive. You won’t be disappointed! NEW MlS $439,900

RED

UCE

Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, main floor family room, finished basement, double garage (28' x 22'), large principal rooms. New in 2009, roof, garage doors, paved drive. Most original windows replaced. All this on 1/2 acre 10 minutes from Waterloo and 5 minutes from Elmira. MLS. Reduced to $319,900.

D

3 bedroom country bungalow with high speed internet available open concept. Master ensuite, main floor laundry, large 2 car garage, new ready to move in. Hobby shop allowed. $319,900 MLS

GREAT STARTER!

RED

OPPORtUNitY KNOCKS!!- Business opportunity or storage. 2 bldgs w/ approx. 4680 sq. ft. Partial 2 flr hoists incl. Overhead doors 10x10 and 14x12 Partial bsmt. A/C, gas heat. Drilled well. NEW MlS $249,900

attRaCtiVE older home - Newer maple kitchen. Hardwood flrs in LR/ DR. Update furnace, a/c, electrical. Extra insulation. Main floor laundry. 2 full bthrms. Lovely backyard w/2-tier deck. NEW MlS $254,900

165 KillDEER ROaD

20 lORRaiNE DR., liNWOOD $ 374,900

$319,000

UCE

Property offers three bedrooms, eat-in kitchen with sliders to large deck, french doors separating dining & living rooms, sun room, main floor laundry. MLS $149,900.

D

Great property on the edge of town, approx. 21 acres workable, the rest is wooded with a large portion of maple trees, 1.9 acres is inside an industrial designated area. $599,900 MLS

Your referrals are appreciated! ELMIRA REAL ESTATE Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage SERVICES

Two storey 3 bed and 3 bath room home on a half acre lot, open concept, high speed fibre optic internet available. $317, 900 MLS

519-669-3192 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

Country Property outside Elmira, 2 bedrm, finished basement. Enjoy sunsets and sunrises. $224,900 MLS BONNIE BRUBACHER Broker of Record

SNOW GOOSE CRES.

$413,500

COUNtRY - ElMiRa

$699,000

SHANNA ROZEMA Broker.

DARREN ROMKEY Sales Rep.

LAURIE LANGDON Sales Rep.

DALE KELLER Sales Rep.

MONIQUE BRUBACHER Sales Rep.

4.3 acre country property with 5 bedroom, 2 bath home. Kitchen and dining room, family room, rec room, two car garage. Lots of area to entertain both inside and out. Camp fire site in the woods. Large garden and much more $459,900 MLS

THIS WEEK'S FEATURE PROPERTIES DRAYTON STARTER

$224,000 | Excellent price for this well maintained home. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, lovely fenced yard and huge deck off kitchen. 55' lot. NEW MLS.

91 acre farm, 81 acres systematically tile drained. House was built in 2006. 2170 sq. ft. home with Chervin kitchen, hardwood floors, 9 and 10 foot ceilings, geothermal ground source heating and air conditioning. Shed 45’ x 60’ and bank barn. Quiet country retreat set back from road. $1,500,000 MLS

40 NiGhtiNGalE CRES. $389,900 34 CEDaR WaXiNG DR. $279,900

ELMIRA

$344,900 | Open concept plan with walkouts from family room and dinette. Awesome kitchen with plenty of natural oak cabinets and breakfast bar. Front room den/office. 3 Bedroom, 3 Baths. MLS

www.thurrealestate.com

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

ADDRESS: 4-B

Arthur St. S., ELMIRA • EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net • OFFICE: 519-669-5426

DIRECT: 519-503-2753


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

25 CLASSIFIEDS

real estate

Let Team McNeil break it down for you!

519-669-1544 24hrs

17 Church St. W., Elmira www.peakrealestate.com

REALTY LTD., BROKERAGE

Independently Owned and Operated

Wendy Taylor

Mary Lou Murray

Call us Today!

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

BROKER

marylou@mmrealestate.ca

00 ,9 48 $4

3 bdrms, 3 bath, huge lot! Large kitchen with granite, and great room. Finished bsmt with large rec-room. Central Air, Vac, Natural Gas, fenced yard! Call Mel today! MLS 00

HUGE LOT! UPDATED BUNGALOW

$3

In exclusive Whispering Woods backing onto Nith River just under 1/2 acre wooded lot. Hardwood, ceramics, private park-like backyard with extensive gardens. A must see! MLS Call Mary Lou,

Eat-in kit open to FR w/fireplace, 3+ bdrms, rec room. Deck, workshop & shed. Dbl garage & new driveway. MLS

$374,900 - Ayr 00 ,9 69

3 bdrms, updated kitchen & windows, hrdwd & ceramic flrs. C/A, re-insulated. Fenced yard backs onto park & river. MLS

DOWNTOWN LIVING AT ITS FINEST!

1 bdrm + den, hrdwd flrs, upgraded kit, in-suite laundry, all appliances, w/out to private patio. A must see! MLS

69

,9

00

UPDATED CENTURY HOME

$3

825 sq ft and 1250 sq ft available immediately in well maintained building with elevator and free parking. Recently renovated with ensuite 2 pc. bath. High traffic location. MLS Call Wendy or Mary Lou,

$2

26

,5

00

For Lease - Kitchener

BACKS ONTO RIVER! RENOVATED

$2

Well kept home on .31 acre in Village of Ayr. Entertaining will be a pleasure in the parklike, fully fenced backyard with stamped concrete patio and hot tub. Hardwood, ceramics, master ensuite and more!!! MLS Call Mary Lou,

Steps to Victoria Park & amenities. F.R. addition, updated baths, finished attic. Wrap around porch & large yard. Deal of the Century! MLS

Thinking of Buying or Selling call or email today! “You dream...We’ll work.”

You’ve come to the right place to find a home.

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

BILL NORRIS

OFFICE:

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CELL:

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CELL:

FAX:

HOME FAX:

HOME FAX:

519-888-7110 519-888-6117

519-577-6248 519-669-9885

allinorris@rogers.com

$3 F 04RO ,9 M 00

NEW CONSTRUCTION IN DRAYTON Mapleton model to be built by quality builder. Impressive standard features. Limited lots left, Call Team McNeil today! MLS

DREAM HOME CONESTOGA MODEL

NEW CONSTRUCTION IN DRAYTON Quality Builder. 10 plans to choose from! Only 2 lots left! Build your dream home today! MLS

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

ALLI NORRIS

180 Weber St. S., Waterloo, ON N2J 2B2

CUSTOM BUNGALOW TO BE BUILT

$3 F 04RO ,9 M 00

BUYING OR SELLING?

519-588-1348 519-669-9885

billnorris@rogers.com

519-579-4110

Warren McNeil* Melanie McNeil*

Colleen Mader*

McNEIL *Sales Representatives

$229,900

LINWOOD Plenty of living space in this century home located in the downtown core of Linwood. Close to school, church, ball diamond and the new Community Centre. Presently a four plex. A very unique property with potential development possiblities or easily converted back to a single family dwelling. Rare find!

Wishing everyone a safe and happy summer. Please feel free to call us for all your Real Estate needs!

TWIN CITY REALTY INC., BROKERAGE

Sherry Waite Sales Representative

$310,000 Beautiful brick bungalow located in desirable "Birdland" neighbourhood. Walking distance to all schools and new Rec Centre. This well maintained home is on a large lot, has beautiful mature maples,and a parklike backyard setting, with a lovely stone patio. Numerous updates including bathrooms, some windows, and roof . Come out and see this neat and tidy house, you'll want to move to beautiful small town Elmira. "A Great Buy"

www.clickthathouse.com www.elmirarealestate.ca

Team

www.facebook.com/TeamMcNeilRemax

OPEN HOUSE • 32 ROBIN DR. ELMIRA• SUN. AUGUST 1 • 2-4PM

Turn to pets for stress relief Strange But True

CUSTOM BUNGALOW WITH UPGRADES

,5

Now supporting Habitat For Humanity. $579,900 - New Hamburg

26

wendy.taylor1@rogers.blackberry.net

straNGe BUt trUe

RCR Realty, Brokerage

Independently Owned and Operated

519-846-0660

519-501-0306 (cell) jswaite@hsfx.ca

Your local Mapleton Country Realtor

OPEN HOUSE

Saturday July 31st | 1-2:30 pm 122 Porchlight, Elmira $295,000 - Almost New! Built in '09 - get it new with stunning landscaping all complete! The kitchen sets this home far beyond the rest - stunning maple custom design cupboards with concrete countertop. 3 bedrooms, extra wide paved drive to park 2 vehicles and a 12 x 25 deck.

Bill & rich sones

Q.

You and the rest of the staff at “Math for Women” are tackling some tough problems and have been encouraged to bring along a companion to the sessions for stress control. Should you take a) your spouse b) your best friend c) your dog?

A.

Your dog would likely be the best choice to help handle any stress you might feel, says researcher Karen Allen in Psychology by David G. Myers. Many people liken a loyal dog or cat to a close family member, helping them feel calm, valued, happy. A pet can be a best friend that will love you just as you are (whether you can do the math or not), that is nonjudgmental and is always there for you. Thus pets even have healing power. Also Allen reports that pets have been found to increase the odds of survival after a heart attack, to relieve depression among AIDS patients and to lower levels of blood lipids that increase cardiovascular risk. As nurse pioneer Florence Nightingale foresaw, “A small pet animal is often an excellent companion for the sick.” Allen notes a similar de-stressing effect among harried stockbrokers who had few social contacts but had a pet at home: They exhibited only half the blood pressure rise as non-petowners. “For lowering blood pressure, pets are no substitute for effective drugs and exercise. But for those who enjoy animals, and especially for those who live alone, they are a healthy pleasure.”

Q.

You don’t need to take a physics class to minimize your likelihood of injury from a long parachutist’s leap or from a throw down in judo or aikido or onto the mat of a wrestling ring. But it wouldn’t hurt ...

A.

You should try to land so as to maximize the region of contact, thus reducing the all-important force per unit area on the colliding body part, says Jearl Walker in The Flying Circus of Physics. This lessens the chance of bending or twisting a bone to the point of breakage or of rupturing an internal organ. For the judo or aikido throw, slap the mat as the trunk of your body hits, adding to the contact area. The slap also helps lift the body and reduces the collision force on the rib cage. Professional wrestlers are usually in superb shape and can withstand falls, as when they jump from the top of the ropes onto an opponent lying on the mat. Plus, the wrestling floor is highly flexible for collision-cushioning. A parachutist is trained to collapse and roll by first making contact with the balls of the feet and then bending the knees and turning so as to come down on the side of the leg and finally the back side of the chest. This prolongs the collision time, reducing the force and spreading it out over a larger area. “If the parachutist were to land standing up, the compression on the bones in the ankles would likely rupture the bones.”

>

Send STRANGE questions to brothers Bill and Rich at strangetrue@cs.com


CLASSIFIEDS 26

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

NOTICE OF COMPLETE APPLICATION AND PUBLIC MEETING Tuesday August 24, 2010 7:00 p.m. Township Council Chambers 24 Church Street West, Elmira Regarding Thomasfield Homes Limited - Zone Change 6/2010 and an Modification to Draft Approval of Subdivision 30T-05701 Take Notice that in accordance with the Planning Act, R.S.O., 1990, as amended, the Township of Woolwich has received a complete application for the above noted proposed Zoning By-law amendment as detailed below. Please be advised that Notice of a Complete Application does not indicate whether the municipality is in support of, or in opposition to the proposals. That determination will be made at a later date.

a) the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, to the Ontario Municipal Board; and

The Township of Woolwich will hold a Public Meeting, under Sections 34 and 51 of the Planning Act, to consider the following zone change application and a modification to the conditions of draft plan approval for a subdivision plan. No decision will be made at this meeting; its purpose is to provide additional information to the public and agencies and to receive comments and information from them.

Individuals are requested to submit a written outline of any oral submissions made at the Public Meeting to the Township Clerk.

Any persons may attend the public meeting and make written and / or verbal representation either in support of or in opposition to the proposed applications. Details of the Zone Change and Modification The Township of Woolwich received a Zone Change application (6/2010) and a request to modify the conditions of draft plan approval for Subdivision Application 30T-05701 (Thomasfield Homes Limited) from Thomasfield Homes Limited concerning a 4.84 hectare parcel located between Victoria Street North (Provincial Highway 7) and the future extension of Townsend Drive within Thomasfield Home’s other adjacent development (Subdivision Plan 30T-98701) in the Breslau Settlement (see Map 1 below). The lands are designated Residential and Ancillary Use in the Township’s Official Plan and are zoned Residential – One Unit Medium Density (R2A) with site-specific provisions and are draft approved for 49 single detached lots on full municipal services extended from the City of Kitchener. The proposed lots are between 15.2 to 18.3 metres wide and would front onto a new crescent off of Townsend Drive.

b) the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to do so.

The applicant is proposing to rezone the lands from R-2A to Residential Mixed Medium Density with Design Guidelines (R-5A) for the purpose of developing a total of 69 single detached lots on the same proposed crescent off of Townsend Drive. The proposed modification to the draft approved subdivision plan will provide for the new lot layout, as the lots to be created will be between 11.5 to 13.7 metres wide. Map 1 (above) identifies the lands subject to the proposed zone change and modification to the draft approved subdivision plan. For further mapping details please view the Notice of Public Meeting particular to these applications on the Township webpage at the following link www.woolwich. ca/en/newsevents/public_notices.asp or visit the Township offices to obtain a copy of the circulation notice. For further details or should you have any concerns or comments regarding the proposed development please contact our office. Please Note: APPEALS: Draft Plan of Subdivision If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at the public meeting or make written submissions to the Regional Municipality of Waterloo in respect of the proposed plan of subdivision before the approval authority gives or refuses to give approval to the draft plan of subdivision:

Notification: If you wish to be notified of the decision of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo in respect of the proposed plan of subdivision you must make a written request to the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, Attn: Laurel Gibson, Planner, Planning, Housing and Community Services, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener, Ontario N2G 4J3 Zoning Amendment If a person or public body that files an appeal of a decision of the Council of the Township of Woolwich in respect of the proposed zoning by-laws does not make oral submissions at a public meeting or make written submissions to the Council of the Township of Woolwich before the proposed zoning by-law amendments are passed: a) the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of the Township of Woolwich to the Ontario Municipal Board; and b) the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to add the person or public body as a party. Notification: If you wish to be notified of additional Township public meetings or Township staff reports regarding these applications you must make a written request to Engineering and Planning Services at

the Township of Woolwich at the address shown below. If you cannot attend the meeting, you can express your concerns/comments about the proposed change in writing to the Township of Woolwich. Any comments received on or before August 17, 2010 (Note that this date is before the public meeting) will be included in a report prepared by Engineering and Planning Services and presented at the Public Meeting. Any comments received after the Public Meeting, but prior to Council making a decision on the applications, will also be considered. The personal information accompanying your submission is being collected under the authority of the Planning Act and may form part of the public record which may be released to the public. Questions about this collection should be directed to the Records and Freedom of Information Officer at 519-669-6005 or 519-6642613 ext. 6005. MORE INFORMATION: The public may view planning documents and background material relating to these applications at the Township of Woolwich, Engineering and Planning Services Department between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, or on the Township website at www.woolwich.ca. Questions or written submissions may be directed to: Township of Woolwich John Scarfone, Manager of Planning Engineering and Planning Services Department Box 158, 24 Church Street West Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6 Telephone: 519-669-1647 / 519-664-2613 extension 6037 or email: jscarfone@woolwich.ca Dated at the Township of Woolwich this 31st day of July, 2010.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

27 CLASSIFIEDS

ANIMAL CONTROL BY-LAW 75-2006

ACCESSIBILITY IN THE TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH

The Council of the Township of Woolwich passed an Animal Control By-law on November 14, 2006. The following are key points for dog owners:

Do you have comments, questions or suggestions about how services, programs or facilities of the Township of Woolwich are accessed by persons with disabilities? The first step is to e-mail your ideas and requests for improved accessibility to the Township's Accessibility Co-ordinator for consideration. The e-mail address is vhummel@woolwich.ca or call (519) 669-6005 Monday to Friday between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. All incoming requests will be investigated and responded to. Help us improve accessibility!

• Every owner of a dog must license and register such dog with the Township of Woolwich by April 15th or within 21 days of becoming the owner of a dog. • The tag must be attached to the dog any time that it is off the property of the owner.

WOOLWICH MEMORIAL CENTRE

• All dogs must have a current rabies vaccination and the appropriate documentation showing proof of vaccination.

PreSeason Ice Times Available! August 23 – September 11 Contact Gloria at: 519.669.6025 or gspencer@woolwich.ca

• At any time that a dog is off the owners property it must be leashed and under the control of a responsible person. • The owner of a dog or person in control of a dog except a Guide Dog must remove and dispose of in sanitary manner excrement left by the dog anywhere in the Township. • No person may keep more then three (3) dogs on one property without a kennel license. •The owner of a dog shall not permit such dog to make any clearly audible noise which is likely to disturb the inhabitants of the Township. The by-law also includes regulations for kennel operations and fines for all offences. Some of the fines and fine amounts are: Allowing a dog to run at large $195.00 Failure to procure a dog license $195.00 Failure to remove dog waste $345.00 Failure to provide evidence of a rabies inoculation $345.00 Please contact Lorna VanderPloeg at (519) 669-6007 or lvanderploeg@woolwich.ca for a copy of the by-law or a complete fine schedule.

TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH

WOOLWICH SUMMER PLAYGROUND

TENDER 2010-19 For the Supply and Delivery of Two 4x4 Pick-up Trucks

Single Day Registrations Available

Sealed Tenders clearly marked as to contents, will be received by the undersigned until: Friday August 13, 2010 at 2pm Further details and specifications with respect to areas of application, Form of Tender and Information to Bidders, may be obtained as noted below: Finance Department Township of Woolwich 24 Church Street West Elmira, ON N3B 2Z6 Fax: (519) 669-9348 Email: dennisk@woolwich.ca Lowest or any tender not necessarily accepted.

ALL UPDATES & BREAKING NEWS DELIVERED TO YOUR INBOX.

» Go online for archives, xtra photos & more!

IN PRINT. ONLINE. IN PICTURES. IN DEPTH.

»

Become a Fan on Facebook to join contests.

Cost: $140 a week or $35 a day Week of August 3rd to 6th Theme - Christmas In August Clay and Glass Museum Trip 8:00am-9:00am Drop Off 9:00am-3:30 pm Program 3:30pm-4:30pm Swimming Registration –In person at Woolwich Memorial Centre 519.669.1647 ext 7001 Or On Line www.woolwich.ca/register For More Information contact: Summer Playground Supervisor Stephanie Brignolio 519.669.1647 ext 7008


CLASSIFIEDS 28

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

FaMIlY alBUM aNNIVersarY

BIrtHDaY

BIrtHDaY

Happy 86th Birthday

Happy 1st Birthday Evan!

Papa

staG & DOe

BUCK 'N DOE

for

Amanda Lynn Mayhew & Craig Thomas Hare Saturday, August 7, 2010 7:00PM

The Lions Hall, Elmira, ON One GRAND door prize, Pig Roast, Flashpoint Entertainment...and more

Les and Sharon Frey

You have filled all of our lives, with so much joy...

Invite you to celebrate Their 40th Anniversary

August 7th from 2-4pm Wallenstein Bible Chapel Best wishes only please!

staG & DOe

Love Your Pals Pepper, Rylie & Ruby Tuesday

Angela Brubacher & Noe Ishaka Sunday August 8th at 4pm

Love Mommy, Daddy, Grandma and Grandpa Martin & your four legged buddies, Tyson & Cooper!

tHaNK YOU

staG & DOe

STAG and DOE for

We love you so much!!!

VIVA LAS VEGAS STAG and DOE for

Laura Robinson & Wes Errey

Floradale Mennonite Church

FaMIlY alBUM

Thanks to Frank’s Girls Who love to party!

Kids Games • BBQ • Auction $10/pp or $25/family for more information contact Gena Hiller - 519-648-9809

FaMIlY alBUM

Celebrate your family & friends With a Family Album Ad!

Call and place your ad today!

519.669.5790

~Mother

With a Family Album Ad in the Observer

Saturday, August 7th, 2010 8:00pm - 1:00am St. Jacobs Community Centre DJ * Games * Raffle * Lunch

$10 per person | $12 at the door

Contact the wedding party via facebook or Call 519-664-3615 for tickets

Call

They made my big one the BEST!

PLACES OF FAITH

HEARING ASSISTED

St. Teresa

Welcome to

Upbeat Family

Celebrate Eucharist with us Mass times are: Saturday 5pm and Sunday 10am

St. Jacobs

10:00 am

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

Wheelchair accessible • Nursery Care provided • Hearing Assisted

48 Hawkesville Rd. • 519-664-2311

Bloomingdale Mennonite Church

Trinity United Church ELMIRA

Minister: Summer Worship Rev. Dave Jagger June 27 - Sept. 5 10 a.m. at Trinity Sunday School During Worship

Sundays - 9:45 am Family Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday School for all ages

Visit our website at: www.wondercafe.ca 21 Arthur St., North • Church Office 519-669-5560 “Our mission is to love, learn and live by Christ’s teachings”

1151 Snyder’s Flat Rd., Bloomingdale • 519-745-2411 www.bloomingdalemennonite.com

MY FINANCES

10:00 AM

The Power of Words Church

SUNDAYS @ 10:30AM 5 First St., Elmira • 519-669-1459 Services at John Mahood www.elmiracommunity.org Public School

IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH NURSERY PROVIDED

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

“Choosing Gratitude” 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 Check out our website www.woodsidechurch.ca

SUNDAY SCHOOL

Sunday August 1st 11:00 AM Richard Haverkamp Discovering God Together

519-669-2319 | www.wbconline.ca 4522 Herrgott Road, Wallenstein

“Making Faith Live” Sunday Worship 9:30 am - 10:30am

2 First St., Elmira • 519-669-5030

Gale

Sunday, August 1, 2010

August 1

+GST

519.669.5790 ext 104

Worship & Calvary United Sunday School

Catholic Church

For as little as.. .

23

$

In memory of

Forever and always in our hearts

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IN MeMOrIaM

Heidi Taunya Shoemaker

$15.00 - advance - call 519.669.9812

Summer Worship 10am Sunday School during service

Minister: Rev. Dr. Linda Bell

Presbyterian www.galepresbyterian.com Church 2 Cross St., Elmira • 519-669-2852

Office Hours: M-TH 9-Noon & 1-3 • E galepresbychurch@golden.net

St. Paul`s 10am Worship Service Lutheran Pastor: Richard A. Frey Church www.stpaulselmira.com 27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

29 CLASSIFIEDS

serVICe PrOs aUtOMOtIVe

aUtOMOtIVe

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

Body Maintenance

at

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

ARE A

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.

aUtOMOtIVe

THOMPSON’S

Auto Tech Inc. accuracy and confidence.

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial • On-The-Farm Service

21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

519-669-3232

serVICe PrOs

ONLY FROM CHEM-DRY

Worlds Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

Renovating? Let us do the clean up

SPRING CLEANING

RENOVATION CLEAN UPS! Call for Details

budurl.com/SAVE139

www.completecarpetcare.ca

ROB McNALL

519-669-7607

LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

CONCrete

24 Hour Accident Assistance

519.669.8330

1-800-CARSTAR

AFTER HOURS

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519-669-3373

FAX: 519.669.3210

519.669.8917

CONCrete FOUNDatIONs

WEICKERT& MEIROWSKI

IS FOR RENT

Concrete Foundations Limited

Ltd.

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

Find It Online At...

Call today to get your business listed!

Chem-Dry Acclaim ® 61 Arthur St., N Elmira

519-669-3332

519.669.5790

www.ObserverXtra.com

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Call for estimate

Willis Martin

DRAYTON, ON

CraNe

CONstrUCtION

519-638-2699

DeCOratING

CONSTRUCTION

Design/ Build Agricultural/ Residential

-Framing -Roofing -Renovations -Repairs

ORTLIEB Read’s Decorating CRANE & Equipment Ltd.

519-669-3082

• 14 ton BoomTruck • 35 ton Mobile Crane

6982 Millbank Main St., Millbank 519-595-2053 • 519-664-2914

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS

GLASS SYSTEMS INC.

Specializing in Paint & Wallcoverings

1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

FREE ESTIMATES

For all your home decorating needs

519-664-9999

• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

ST. JACOBS

24 Hour Service 7 Days A Week

519-669-3658

TEL: 519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

27 Arthur St. S., Elmira

laWN MaINteNaNCe

HeatING aND aIr CONDItIONING

YES... WE DO RESIDENTIAL WORK!

Glass serVICes SINCE 1961

6672 Ruggles Rd. Floradale RR#2 Wallenstain, N0B 2S0

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

THIS SPACE

FREE Gift Offer $139 Value

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location • Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off and Pick up Service • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair • Janitorial • Grout Cleaning • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping

519-669-7652

31 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA

CarPet Care

CarPet Care

Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400

aUtOMOtIVe

Complete Collision Service

AUTO CLINIC

to repair your vehicle with

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

eleCtrICal

aUtOMOtIVe

Providing the latest technology

Call Us At

519-669-3373

aUtOMOtIVe

FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

MeDICal treatMeNt ER RS OVYEA 10

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada F. David Reimer

Established 2000

Dennis Brubacher, RME Owner/Operator ECRA ESA # 7001311

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

RESIDENTIAL Commercial Industrial

> Excavating > Trenching > Backfilling > Fine Grading > Overseeding & Top Dressing > Lawn Seeding

Call for your free estimate

Murray & Daniel Shantz

ELMIRA

ALMA, ONTARIO

519-669-8776 www.dentechelectric.com

eNtertaINMeNt

PHONE:

MessaGe tHeraPY

REGISTERED

MASSAGE THERAPIST Live music for wedding ceremonies & receptions Ashlinn O`Marra

519-210-0401 petacus@ rogers.com

IN YOUR HOME Relaxation & Deep Tissue Massage CALL TODAY TO BOOK AN APPOINTMENT!

Lisa Stemmler, RMT 519-504-8004

PaINtING 20 years experience

free estimates interior/exterior painting wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

519-669-2251 36 Hampton St., Elmira

YOUR

PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIALISTS!

C.J.

BRUBACHER LTD. 19 First St. E., Elmira

519-669-3362

● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

www.reimerhbot.com For more information call:

519.846.5427 FAX: 519.846.5134

PlUMBING

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications:

519-669-0220

63 Arthur Street S., Unit 3, Elmira, ON, N3B 2M6

PrOPertY MaINteNaNCe

PlUMBING

Steve Co.

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES Your Source for year round property maintenance

Now Booking For:

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

• Spring Clean-up • Top Dressing/Overseeding • Lawn Maintenance/ Landscaping • Mowing Packages Available • Mulch Delivery & Installation Telephone

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs. 24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

ELMIRA

519-669-3652

Jeff Basler Owner|Operator

519-669-9081 Mobile

519-505-0985 ever-green@sympatico.ca

We call Elmira home but we service the surrounding area.


CLASSIFIEDS 30

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

serVICe PrOFessIONals reCOVerY & tOW

rOOFING

TOWING AND RECOVERY

AMOS R O O F I N G

CASH PAID

>Complete Complete Lawn Maintenance >Flower bed maintenance

>Commercial Commercial & Residential >Booking for Spring Cleanup

Phone: 519-669-1188 Fax: 519-669-9369

519-568-8666

selF stOraGe

sePtIC

salt

TOP QUALITY RESIDENTIAL ROOFING SYSTEMS Locally Owned & Operated

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

Since 19 96

Serving Elmira and Surrounding Area for over 30 years!

Steel Cedar Shingles Fully Insured

CALL SCOTT SEILING FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE. CALL NOW AND BOOK FOR SUMMER!

Thousands of satisfied customers!

519-747-2708 Waterloo www.riepersalt.com

519.669.4484 benderroofing@gmail.com

In Business since 1971 • Fully Insured

sIGNaGe | VINYl & DIGItal

troductor y Offer

Taking Salt to Peoples’ Basements Since 1988

Call or email Mike for your FREE estimate.

519.698.2114

FREE BAG In

> Superior Salt Products > Fast, Friendly Service > Convenient Delivery Times > Discounts for Seniors

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches

FOR YOUR UNWANTED SCRAP VEHICLES CARS, TRUCKS OR VANS WE PAY CASH WITH FREE TOWING PLEASE CALL

27 Brookemead, St, Elmira kdetweiler@rogers.com

rOOFING

INC

PrOPertY MaINteNaNCe

sKate sHarPeNING

BICYCLE SALES & REPAIRS

GET YOUR BICYCLES READY

graphfix ltd. Various sizes & rates

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE

Call

519-669-4964

Signs & Banners

Inspections for Real Estate Septic System Repairs & Restoration Catch Basin Cleaning

Vehicle Lettering Logos & Graphics

Waterloo Region • Woolwich Township

Decals & Safety Stickers

519-896-7700

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

serVICe PrOs

www.remingtongraphfix.com

Septic Tank Cleaning

or

519-648-3004

www.biobobs.com

tree serVICe •Tree Trimming & Removal • Aerial Bucket Trucks • Stump Grinding • Arborist Evaluations • Fully Insured & Certified • Certified to Work Near Power Lines

THIS SPACE IS FOR RENT

Large format printing

With an expert spring tune up

20

BILL SCHENKEL

$

519-664-1809

parts extra

1600 King St. N., Unit #18

ST.JACOBS

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

FAST, FRIENDLY SERVICE AT COMPETITIVE PRICES!

STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

Peewees place second

FREE ESTIMATES

Call today to get your business listed!

519.669.5790

www.ObserverXtra.com

sOIl

tree serVICe LOCNEW ATI ON

Triple Mix • Top Dressing Screened Top Soil • Sands Gravels • Natural River Rock NEW N IO LOCAT

889 Bridge St. E. Waterloo (Corner of Bridge & McMurray)

Pick-up or Delivery

519-888-1007

trOPHY

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

•Removal of Trees or Branches of Any Shapes or Sizes in Almost Any location

T R

•Hedge trimming

E

•Branch Chipping

E

•Stump Grinding

519-669-1836 Thomas Martin Waste MaNaGeMeNt

Golden Disposal Waste & Recycling Services a division of 1678834 Ontario Inc.

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102

sOFtBall sIlVer The Elmira Peewee Boys softball team won silver at a tournament in Mount Forest recently. Back row: coach Jamie Inglis, Jordan Shantz, Quade Hunter-Rhodes, Noah Taylor, Nathan Dowdall, Kai Wotton and coach Paul Wilson. Front: Jeremy Hanley, Jared Wilson, Jake Bruder, Spencer Inglis, Ryan Shinkar and Eddie Huber.

• Roll Off Containers • Curbside Garbage Removal • Registered Hauler for OTS Tire Program • Total Trash Removal of • Apartments, Estates, Insurance, Residential sites • Locally owned and operated since 2001 P.O. BOX 111 Breslau, On. N0B 1M0 goldendisposal@bellnet.ca

Get Pro results. We connect you with customers looking for professionals.

Have them read all about it in the Observer! Contact the Observer at 519.669.5790 ext 104 for more information.

Ken Kolpean Julie Lavigne-Kolpean Tel: 519-744-5246 Fax: 519-744-5295

519-744-5246 www.goldendisposal.com Serving Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge/Elmira/Guelph areas

IN PRINT. ONLINE. IN PICTURES. IN DEPTH. www.

.com


Âť Saturday, July 31, 2010

THE OBSERVER

31 CLASSIFIEDS

COMMUNItY eVeNts CaleNDar

OBItUarY

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIMEâ&#x20AC;?

PUZZle sOlUtIONs

Kleensweep Carpet Care

CrOssWOrD 0 ( ' , &

, 5 , 6 +

; ( 1 2 3 + 2 % , $

1 2 5 0

6 3 $ 6

3 ( 5 (

/ $ 6 6 2

& $ 5 ( ( 1

6 7 8 5 ' $ < 5 6 , , 1 6 7 2 ( ' 6 $ 7 0 2 , ( & 1 , 2 6 / 0

5 $ , ' 6

$ 6 7 % / ( $ , 1 1 2 2 * 5 $ 5 $ 1

7 $ 1 *

' ( 1 , 2 5 $ 1 & $ 1 7 7 ( 3 + ( 5 2 ( 6 ( 5 $

$ : 1 ' 7 ( 6 , , 6 3 6 1 7 , $ & 2 5 5 + $ < 0

( 1 , ' 6 / 7 ( ( $

$ * $ 5

/ ( 1 . 6 ( 5 8 0 % 3 (

6 + 8 7 $ , 6 / 9 ( 5 5 $ 1 5 < , ( & 2 : +

8 3 5 : ( + 2 6 / $ ( :

6 & $ % + 2 / / ( 5 2 8 1 ( 5 8 0 5 ( / / 1 $ , $ / $ 0 5 ( + $ 6 , ' $ 0 - 8 0 1 , 6 $ ; 8 ( ' ' , 1 ' 8 5 $ ( & 2 1 5 ( 1 & 6 < (

$ ' $ 0 6 $ 3 3 / (

, : 2 1 $ $ * $ 5 / , & $ , /

0 / 8 5 0 % ( $ 1 % * ) , 7 &

( , 5 $ $ % 9 3 % ( ( 7 = & +

1 2 ' ' 5 $ 7 8 5 1 , 3 ( + ,

7 + / , 5 * 5 2 1 2 . 5 $ . 9

2 % 9 6 2 ( 6 ( / ( 7 7 8 & (

) ( 0 + : ; / 3 / ( ( . 2 2 <

* 6 & $ 5 / ( 7 5 8 1 1 ( 5 6

sUDOKU - easY         

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

5 & $ 3 6 , & 8 0 2 : 7 7 1 3

( + 0 * ; ' & < $ 0 8 2 , 8 ,

( $ 8 % ( 5 * , 1 ( 0 7 / / 1

1 / ' 3 ( . $ / ( $ & 6 6 & $

6 2 ' 6 ( 1 ( 7 7 / ( . 2 &

: 7 6 & + $ 3 2 7 $ 7 2 ( < +

sUDOKU - HarD         

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

>C R E S S M A N , Dolly Olive Charlotte (1922-2010) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Passed away at Heritage House, St. Jacobs on July 25, 2010, at the age of 88 year.

> CRESSMAN,

Mary Anne (Stackhouse) â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Peacefully at the KW Health Centre on July 25, 2010, in her 67th year. Dear wife of Ron Cressman of Elmira. Mother of Chris (Lisa Harrison) Kirkness of Connecticut, Jeff (Lauren Muir) Cressman of Whiteorse, and Scott (Adrienne) Cressman of Burlington. Sister of John (Sheila) Stackhouse of Truro, Nova Scotia. Loving grandmother of Lindsay and Zoe Kirkness, bailey and Nathan Muir-Cressman, and Owen and Gavin Cressman. Loving aunt to Ryan and Jamie Stackhouse and her many nieces and nephews. Sadly missed by brothers and sister-in-law Ross (Karen)

COLLEEN

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS â&#x20AC;˘ Design â&#x20AC;˘ Installation â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

519.669.5105

P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

TOTAL HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

DeatH NOtICes

> BOWMAN, Iona â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Passed away on Wednesday, July 21, 2010 at Stratford General Hospital in her 89th year. Local relatives are her daughters Mary Bowman and Kathleen Martin and her husband John all of Wellesley.

T. 519.669.2033

* / ( ( 6

WOrDsearCH 3 = * & 8 & 8 0 % ( 5 = 0 ) :

West Montrose, ON

Cressman and Wendy (Peter) Banting. Also remembered by Peter Kirkness. Predeceased by her parents John Elwood (Steve) and Etta (nee Bell) Stackhouse. Mary Anne was widely known and respected as Elmiraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Librarian for 40 years before her 2009 retirement. During her career she oversaw a major expansion in the 1970s and more recently, the installation of an elevator to make the library fully accessible She was a board member and avid supporter of the Wellington Winds and Elmira Little Theatre. Mary Anne leaves behind many long time friends and family who will miss her positive energy and giving nature. Thanks to the wonderful staff at St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s General Hospital and the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre. Services were held Friday, July 30 at St. James Lutheran Church, Elmira.

> LANTZ, David Edwin â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The family sadly announces the sudden death of David at his residence as the result of a heart attack on Tuesday, July 27, 2010. Born in Elmira, David was in his 68th year.

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

519.664.2008

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

NANCY KOEBEL

Bus: 519.895.2044 ext. 217 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Suite 800, 101 Frederick St., Kitchener

DENTURE Allen Morrison Insurance Inc. 25 Industrial Dr., Elmira, On.

FREE CONSULTATION Bus.:519.669.2632

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville

www.cooperators.ca

519-699-4641 www.freybc.com

aUGUst 3 > Endangered Animals at the

Region of Waterloo Library. Join us at St. Clements, Linwood, St. Jacobs, Bloomingdale and Wellesley branches for Endangered Animals with the Destination Jungle TD Summer Reading Club! This free program includes stories, crafts and activities for children ages 6 to 12. For more information please contact your local branch; Aug. 3-6.

> Kids Hop â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Musicians,

11 a.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays; free; Kitchener Market, 300 King St. E., Kitchener, to Aug. 31. 519-7412287.

> Dinosaurs, Rocks, Minerals and

More. Free admission. Earth Sciences Museum, 200 University Ave. W., Waterloo. 519-888-4657, ext. 32469.

august 4 > Creepy Crawly Critters at Elmira

Branch Library. Join us for the Creepy Crawler Critters show from Wings of Paradise at 2 p.m. Meet the critters and spin the wheel of doom to guess a critter by their sound or touch. This show is recommended for children 5 and up. Tickets $3 per person or two for $5. For more information contact the Elmira Branch Library 519-6695477.

aUGUst 7 > Underground Railroad Music

SANYO CANADIAN

Since 1987 - DentureTech Since 1995 - Denturist

Home Auto Business Farm Investments Life

Rugs and Upholstery

â&#x20AC;˘Mattress Cleaning â&#x20AC;˘Residential â&#x20AC;˘Commercial â&#x20AC;˘Personalized Service â&#x20AC;˘Free Estimates

6 2 6 2

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

Festival, 1-4 p.m., Glen Allan Park. The second annual festival launched in honour of the Underground Railroad and early black pioneers of the Queenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bush settlement is a project headed up by Diana Braithwaite, singer/songwriter, who started the festival last year as a tribute to the lives of those men and women that first settled in the area. Please bring lawn chairs, all are invited and welcome to attend. For more information: Diana Braithwaite, 416-857-4351.

aUGUst 10 > Go Wild, Jungle Party at the

Region of Waterloo Library. Join us at St. Clements, Linwood, St. Jacobs, Bloomingdale and Wellesley branches for A Rainforest Adventure with the Destination Jungle TD Summer Reading Club! This free program includes stories, crafts and

activities for children ages 6 to 12. For more information please contact your local branch; Aug. 10-13.

aUGUst 11 > The Reptile Show at St. Jacobs

Branch Library; 3 p.m. Join us for the Reptile Show from Hamilton Reptiles. Meet the reptiles and learn about where they are from, their eating habits and defenses. This show is recommended for children 5 and up. Tickets $3 per person or two for $5. For more information contact the St. Jacobs Branch Library 519-6643443.

aUGUst 12 > Awesome Animals at Wellesley

Branch Library, 3 p.m. Become a zoologist and explore the animal kingdom! Take home your own animal tack model. This event is for children ages 6 to 12. Tickets $3 per person or two for $5. For more information call Wellesley Branch Library 519-656-2001.

â&#x20AC;˘ Total Denture Care â&#x20AC;&#x153;The RightDay Coverage â&#x20AC;˘ Same Service For Youâ&#x20AC;? on Repairs and Relines â&#x20AC;˘ Metal Partial - Soft Relines â&#x20AC;˘Since Implants 1987 - DentureTech â&#x20AC;˘Since DENTURE SPECIALIST 1995 - Denturist

Denture

DENTURE Vinolea Jahandari DD

â&#x20AC;˘ ELMIRA Total Denture Care â&#x20AC;˘ Same day service on and relines 15repairs Memorial Ave., Since 1987 - DentureTech â&#x20AC;˘ Elmira Metal Partial - Soft Relines 1995 - Denturist (Behind Bank of Montreal) â&#x20AC;˘ DENTURE SPECIALIST

519.669.1535 KITCHENER

FREE CONSULTATION 519.744.9770 ELMIRA â&#x20AC;˘ Total Denture Care KITCHENER 519-669-1535 â&#x20AC;˘ Same Day Service519-744-9770 15 Memorial Ave., Elmira (behind Bank of Montreal) on Repairs and Relines â&#x20AC;˘ Metal Partial - Soft Relines â&#x20AC;˘ Implants Great Wine â&#x20AC;˘ DENTURE SPECIALIST Made Simple Vinolea Jahandari DD

ELMIRA

519.669.1535

From $99

15 Memorial Ave., Elmira

(Behind Bank of Montreal) KITCHENER

519.744.9770 55 EARL MARTIN DR., ELMIRA

519.669.8807 Hours: Tue-Fri. 12-6; Sat 12-4

> Music and Movies in the Park. Screening Diary of a Wimpy Kid, music with Hot Kitty and the Hellstrings, 7:30 p.m., free; donations to the Food Bank appreciated; Waterloo Park bandshell, Waterloo; 519-579-8243.

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess. Elmira & Surrounding Area

aUGUst 15 > Lynn Russwurm anniversary jam;

7 p.m., free, Gore Park bandstand, Elmira.

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763

elmirawelcomewagon@sympatico.ca

> Kidspark! Hands on activities,

games, music, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; free admission; Victoria Park Kitchener. 519-741-3330.

aUGUst 17 > Creature Feature from GRCA at

3 p.m. Learn about species that are local to Waterloo Region, the Grand River and more! This show is recommended for children 5 and up. Tickets $3 per person or two for $5. For more information contact the St. Clements Branch Library 519-6994341.

aUGUst 22 > Family Fest 2010. Food, face

painting, rides, 3-6 p.m., free admission. Koinonia Christian Fellowship, 850 Sawmill Rd., Bloomingdale. 519-744-7447.

519.669.2884 Summer is Here! 21 Industrial Dr., Elmira

CORPORATE WEAR PROMOTIONAL APPAREL WORK & SAFETY WEAR | BAGS T-SHIRTS | JACKETS | HATS

245 Labrador Drive | Waterloo

519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com


BACK PAGE 32

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 31, 2010

SUMMER PATIO Are you CLEARANCE missing out? ENDS AUGUST 8TH

If you don’t already get the Observer, you can have it delivered right to your mailbox.

UP TO

70% OFF

*

In-stock only Floor Models and Discontinueds

Umbrellas

149

$

From

Choose from: Resin • Teak • Wicker • Sling Cast • And More

For Just

396 Victoria St. N., Kitchener

/YEAR

Call for details

519-669-5790

tel: 519.578.9663

Or visit us at 20B Arthur St., North, Elmira

* See store for details

STORE HOURS; MON. - WED. 9-6; THURS, FRI., 9-8, SAT. 9-5; SUN. 11-4

A Sale Worth Waiting For!

$35

Yes, the Observer is free. But if you live outside of our distribution area and it’s not convenient to pick up the paper every week, you can have it delivered right to your mailbox. The subscription fee of $35.00 (plus tax) covers the cost of postage for the year.

HUGE FACTORY AUTHORIZED

Located In The Home Hardware

Parking Lot

Bring Your Truck & Trailer

Saturday, August 7th 8:00am to 12:00pm ONLY! No high pressure sales, just quality products at competitive prices.

No early birds please • May not be exactly as shown • Limited stock only

Visit our ce applian dept. HOURS Mon.-Thurs. 8-6 | Fridays 8-9 | Saturdays 8-5 | Sundays 12-5 1421 King St. N, Downtown St. Jacobs | 519-664-3301 | www.homefurniture.ca

NOW EARN AEROPLAN® MILES ®Aeroplan is a registered trademark of Aeroplan Limited Partnership.

July 31, 2010  

The July 31, 2010 issue of the Woolwich Observer.

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