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THE OBSERVER

Saturday, July 30, 2011 LARGEST » Canada’s

All Mopar Car Show

1 NEWS

August 20 & 21, 2011 New Hamburg, Ontario

Home, suite home > STORY ON PG. 11

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demolition next step at mac’s site in Elmira core Steve Kannon

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TIME FOR A TREAT Cole MacGregor (left), Diego Dyck, Matt MacDonald and Alex Devore take a moment to enjoy an ice cream cone outside of Lazer Video in Elmira during the Woolwich Summer Playground on Wednesday morning.

It’s an ice cream world in the summer I

James Jackson

s there anything better than a cold ice cream on a hot summer day? Whether it comes on a cone, in a cup or on a stick, Canadians love the frozen treat. According to the Canadian Dairy Information Centre, in 2007 we were

ON NOW!

WEEkENd WEaTHER

tied with Denmark for eighth in global ice cream consumption at 8.7 litres per capita, a drop of about a third from the 12.7 litres Canadians consumed in 1980 but well below the top spot held by New Zealand with a per capita consumption of nearly 23 litres. We make a lot of ice cream in this

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Living Here.........16 Sports...............19

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> SEE DEMOLITION ON PG. 04

> SEE ICE CREAM ON PG. 06

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AUGUST 1st - 5th

THE TAX ON * ACCESSORIES

country, too. In 2005 alone, Canada produced more than 300 million litres of hard ice cream, an increase of about nine per cent over the year before, according to Statistics Canada. Tack on the other 117 million li-

temporary home for the Mac’s convenience store in downtown Elmira is taking form, clearing the way for demolition crews to teardown the existing building and gas bar. Following removal of contaminants from the site, construction will begin on a new facility, making use of the now-vacant lot that used to house the Steddick Hotel. Property owner Becker Milk Company Ltd. has plans for a 3,500-squarefoot building on the site of the old hotel, providing far more space than the current 1,400 sq. ft. Mac’s building. The Subway restaurant will have more room, and the current gas bar will be moved slightly to the north. The move eases flooding concerns about Weigel Drain, a 2.5-kilometre stretch of open and closed channels that flow into the Canagagigue Creek. Elmira is built over the lower section of the drain. The buildings would be farther away from the floodway that essentially channels along Wyatt Street. The township is in the process of fi-

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NEWS 2

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

Thunder ready to roll into Breslau Air show a chance to get an up-close look at a variety of planes, military and civilian he skies over Breslau will be full of thunder from the roar of fighter jets during the third annual Waterloo Air Show at the Region of Waterloo International Airport Aug. 20 and 21. For the first time since the air show returned to the region in 2009, all three Canadian Forces demonstration teams will be present this year, including the SkyHawks Parachute Team, the CF-18 Hornets and Snowbirds. These acts will be joined by other new acts such as the U.S. Air Force’s F-16 Fighting Falcon as well as vintage airplanes like the P-40N a WWII fighter, from Vintage Wings of Canada in Gatineau, Que. and a T-33 Thunderbird, a longtime Canadian military aircraft now retired and

lots who fly them, take photos, and in some cases climb aboard. “We want people to come to the air show, but the public should know there is a lot more to do than just watch the skies,” said Spremo. “The event makes for a great day’s outing it is very family friendly. We have a show in the air and on the ground.” There will be an educational component, with displays and a kid’s amusement area and some interactive activities for families to partake in, including the Kitchener Rangers shootout as well as performer autographs, food, and a beer garden. “We are creating a festival atmosphere at this year’s event,” said Spremo. Last year’s attendance of 40,000 was a big jump from inaugural 25,000.

JUMP! Members of the Canadian Forces SkyHawks Parachute Team perform a stunt during last year’s Waterloo Air Show. “We are planning a grand fabulous show and if the weather is good we should see the

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housed at the Breslau airport. Mike Wiskus, the 2002 U.S. National Aerobatic champion, will also be attending the show for the first time, performing aerobatics during the show. Returning performers include Kitchener native Wayne Hadath, who will show off his racing F1-Rocket airplane, and Kent Pietsch and his three-act-in-one aerial comedy routine, which includes landing his plane on an RV. “We have a great lineup slated for this year and it will be better than other years,” said Diana Spremo, a spokesperson for the Waterloo Air Show. This year’s ground display will also be the largest to date with additional aircraft parked on the tarmac all weekend long, allowing people to see them up close, speak to the pi-

PHOTO

Colin Dewar

attendance numbers go up again.” Organizers of the show want to remind

people rainy weather shouldn’t be a deterrent, as performers have low shows and high shows. “If it is cloudy or a little bit of rain, performers still perform their low shows. Don’t let a little bit of rain scare you away,” said Spremo. With thousands of visitors passing through the gates over the two days it is the fascination people have with aviation that brings them to show, she posited. “I think it comes down to accessibility: people don’t have a lot of opportunities to see aircraft, especially military jets up close. These are big machines with a lot of power that people are fascinated with.” Gates open at 10 a.m. until 5 p.m., with the air show running from 1-4 p.m. For more information, visit www.waterlooairshow.com.

Sales galore and a community shopping experience await you on the sidewalks of Downtown Elmira. Join us Friday for Family Night at the movies and the Saturday Night Street Dance. Presented by the downtown businesses and local service clubs, the Aug. 4th - 6th weekend is fun for the whole family. Friday - Kidstrak and Charity BBQ followed by an outdoor movie (old Foodland parking lot) Saturday - 7:00 pm Arthur Street comes alive with local bands.

(Rain location is the Woolwich community arena on Snyder Avenue)


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

Time for pack-to-school James Jackson

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he calendar is only just about to flip over to August but already it’s time to start planning for those three little words that will bring a smile to almost any parent’s face: back to school. Of course, paying for those supplies is another matter, as back-to-school shopping has become a multi-million dollar industry that can seem like an impossible financial burden for some families. That is why Woolwich Community Services has announced its eigth annual backpack program to collect school supplies for lowincome families, which will be distributed between Aug. 22 and the Labour Day weekend in preparation for the first day of school on Sept. 6. “We were finding a lot of families were struggling with income, or lack thereof, and we understood that going back to school can be a very costly period of time for families,” said WCS executive director Don Harloff of the program’s roots. Statistics Canada reports that this year school supplies could cost the average family about $60 for a Grade 2 student and more than $200

PACKING ‘EM UP WCS executive director Don Harloff with the types of items that have already been donated for the organization’s annual backpack program for low-income families in the area.

for a Grade 7 or 8 student. WCS aims to reduce that burden through their backpack program which started back in 2003 and has grown from 79 backpacks distributed in the first year to 206 backpacks in 2010. “We get an outstanding response from the public. All of the items that we put together for the program are donated, so we certainly rely on the public to make those donations for us,” said Harloff, adding that community members can also make cash donations to allow WCS to go out and purchase the supplies themselves.

The success of the program also relies on making back-to-school shopping fun for kids, who might otherwise be upset about the prospect of having to head back to class in the fall. WCS sets up a “store” according to the different grade levels, and children and their parents can come and “shop” for a backpack and supplies to fit their own personality. “For the little ones going into kindergarten or Grade 1, sometimes the backpack is as big as they are by the time they leave with all their supplies in it,” laughed Harloff.

“There are lots of smiling faces and they are very happy and eager to show off their new backpack.” Donations have already started coming in for the program, and to qualify families must be considered lowincome and live within Woolwich Township or northern Wellesley. Anyone interested in donating to the program can contact Kelly Christie, director of community supports for WCS at (519) 6695139, or drop off new school supplies at the Woolwich Community Services office at 73 Arthur St. in Elmira.

Poets pick up paddles again Fish Quill Poetry Boat to make a stop at West Montrose covered bridge Colin Dewar

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group of poets will be giving up their pens for paddles as they embark on another tour down the Grand River starting Aug. 5. Known as the Fish Quill Poetry Boat, the eight poets from Montreal and Toronto will spend nine days on the river, making their way from Elora to Chiefswood National Historic Site near Middle-

port, Ont. and stopping for public poetry readings along the way. This is the second year the troupe has made its way down the river bringing poetry to smaller venues, which are often over looked by artists in favour of major cities, by performing readings in cafes, museums and ice cream parlours as they go along. The West Montrose covered

bridge will once again play host to the travelling poets. “It was an idea that a few friends and I had,” said coorganizer Linda Besner, of how the annual trips began. “People don’t typically think of poetry as part of their everyday lives, but we are hoping to change by bringing it right into their neighbourhoods.” The group has doubled in size since their first voyage,

she noted. Besner, who just released her first book of poetry, The Id Kid, had to drop out of the last year’s trip after she fell ill. “It was really disappointing for me but hopefully this year I will be in good health and will be joining everyone on the trip,” she said. Besner is looking forward to the stop at the Kissing

> SEE POETRY ON PG. 05

3 NEWS

> Youth centre to hold BBQ The Woolwich Youth Centre will host its annual fundraiser barbecue Aug. 4 and 5 in the parking lot beside Woolwich Community Services, located at 73 Arthur St. S. in Elmira. Meal options include a hot dog, pop and chips for $3, or substitute the ‘dog for a burger for just $1 more. It is an opportunity for the local youth to get out and help raise money for their youth centre, located inside the Woolwich Memorial Centre, and a way for the community to help support them as well. The barbecue will run from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. both days, and youth will be on-site assisting with the BBQ.

> airport looks at service to Windsor With an airline showing interest in a service between Waterloo Region and the Windsor area, the Region of Waterloo International Airport is looking for input from companies that have offices, plants, or facilities in both Kitchener-Waterloo and Windsor-Essex. The airport has launched an air service survey, collecting data on travel patterns between the two communities that will be shared with prospective airlines in support of the recruitment of air service on the route. The data collected by the airport will help ensure that airline has the best possible picture of the potential market strength. The survey, open to anyone with an interest in the potential service, can be accessed from the RWIA website, www.waterlooairport.ca.

> Saturday is Food day Canada Today (Saturday) is Food Day Canada, on which Canadians are encouraged to recognize the hard work of Canadian farmers and food producers by taking part in celebrations and eating Canadian food. Food Day began in 2003 as “The World’s Longest Barbeque,” a nationwide response to sanctions of Canadian beef exports and the hardships it imposed on our agricultural community. Today, it has evolved into an annual mid-summer celebration where farmers, food producers and restaurants join together to promote home-grown agricultural treasures with citizens. The industry accounts for about two million jobs and contributes some eight per cent to Canada’s GDP.

O U R S T R AT E G Y H A S A N N U A L I Z E D R ET U R N S O F 1 6 . 1 % † A Y E A R S I N C E 1 9 8 4 Paul Lauer | Investment Advisor & Financial Planner 519-747-6927 | paul.lauer@rbc.com | www.rbcds.com/paul.lauer Professional Wealth Management Since 1901 † The Strategy Focus List is a list of recommended securities that may form the basis for an investment portfolio strategy. The Strategy Focus List is not a mutual fund. The indicated rate of return is the historical annual compounded total return since Dec 31, 1984, as of Feb28, 2011 but does not reflect applicable taxes, account and transaction fees, which would lower actual returns. The indicated rate of return assumes additions and deletions from the list are priced using previous day closing values. As a result, the beginning and ending prices used in the Strategy Focus List model are not subject to actual market fluctuations and your portfolio return may vary from our results. Past performance may not be repeated. RBC Dominion Securities Inc.* and Royal Bank of Canada are separate corporate entities which are affiliated. *Member-Canadian Investor Protection Fund. ®Registered Trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. RBC Dominion Securities is a registered trademark of Royal Bank of Canada. Used under licence. ©Copyright 2011. All rights reserved.


NEWS 4

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

LAW & ORDER

Three horses perish in multi-vehicle collision July 21 > 4:10 PM | A 26-year-old man

from Vanessa, Ont. had to swerve to miss a Honda Civic travelling on King Street North in St. Jacobs. The Civic was passing cars and forced the on coming vehicle into a ditch, where it hit landscaping rocks and a culvert, causing serious damages to the vehicle. Police are looking for a bright green Honda Civic driven by a male in his 30s to 50s, bald with glasses and a beard.

July 22 > 9:00 AM | Police responded to an industrial accident at the new Region of Waterloo International Airport fire station on New Germany Lane. An electrician testing electrical wires suffered burns to his arms and chest and was transported to hospital in Cambridge. The Ministry of Labour is investigating.

> 12:40 PM | A 47-year-old male from Kitchener man in a blue 2002 Volkswagen was travelling westbound on Line 86 and attempted to pass

A

n early-morning, multi-vehicle collision east of Breslau July 26 sent a woman to hospital and saw three horses killed at the scene. Police responding to the collision on Shantz Station road near the railway tracks found a 21-year-old Cambridge woman driving a 2000 Chevy Malibu had swerved to avoid three horses

that were running free, subsequently hitting an oncoming vehicle, a 2006 Subaru. The force of the collision sent the Malibu back, striking a 2004 freight truck. A forth vehicle was then struck by one of the horses. The driver of the Malibu sustained minor injuries. She was taken to the Guelph General Hospital.

three vehicles including a tractor trailer that was turning left. The car struck the tractor trailer causing minor damages to both vehicles. The driver of the Volkswagen was charged with improper passing.

> 11:20 PM | A police officer

> 3:00 PM | Police received

a call about a teenage boy hiding in the bushes looking into a home on Henry Street. Witnesses describe the boy as tall with sandy blonde hair wearing plaid shorts and a black T-shirt with a stick man on it. This is the second time witnesses have seen the young man looking into the home.

a motorcycle that had been in a single-vehicle collision. The 46-year-old Kitchener resident was transported from the scene to Grand River Hospital and transferred to Hamilton General with lifethreatening injuries. An investigation found the driver lost control of the motorcycle on Bloomingdale Road just before the road name changes to Sawmill Rd, crossed Ebycrest Road and came to rest in the ditch on the east side of Sawmill Road. Alcohol and speed are suspected to be contributing factors.

on patrol heard breaking sounds coming from Gibson Park in Elmira. The officer found two young adults and one teenager breaking picnic tables. The suspects are making retributions and will be dealt with by way of a diversion program.

> 7:20 AM | Police received a

call about a broken window on a parked vehicle on Riverside Drive East in Elmira. A giant thermometer had been used to smash the window. The investigation continues.

> 7:40 AM | A beer bottle had

been used to smash the window of Elmira Auto Supply on Mill Street. The investigation remains ongoing.

July 23 > 4:30 AM | Police responded to

Ebycrest and Sawmill roads in Woolwich Township for a report of a man calling out for help. Upon arrival, officers located a man in the ditch along with

> 9:50 AM | Windows were

smashed in at the main entranceway to EDSS. Police found a lock that was used to break the glass at the scene and continue to investigate.

TVs will no longer be collected curbside

> 9:30 PM | An iPod is reported

stolen by a teenage boy who had it with him while he was riding his bike behind in a forested area behind an Elmira cemetery. He left his bike and the iPod for a few minutes and

TVs are now part of the Region’s electronic waste (e-waste) ban from landfill.

when he returned the device was gone.

July 24 > 6:00 AM | Police and

Woolwich firefighters responded to a fire on Steffler Road, where a small hobby barn caught fire on a rural residential property. The blaze was quickly extinguished by the fire crew. It was not deemed suspicious and was determined to be caused by a heat lamp. Damages were estimated to be at least $5,000.

July 26 > 11:00 AM | A 20-year-old woman from Barrie driving a brown SUV hit a minivan driven by a 39-year-old Waterloo man

who had stopped at a red light on Northfield Drive and New Jerusalem Road. Both vehicles were towed from the scene. The Cambridge woman was charged with ‘careless driving.’

> 1:15 PM | Police received

a call about a stolen boat from behind the Waterloo County Antique Store. The 16’ 6” maroon Princecraft with a 60-horsepower motor and 9.9-horsepower motor has an estimated value of $20,000. Police are still investigating.

July 27 > 12 PM | Police received a

complaint about spray paint graffiti behind the plaza along Industrial Drive. The investigation continues.

> Police warn of “grandparent scam” Waterloo Regional Police are warning the public to be wary following an upswing in the number of fraud cases known as the “the grandparent scam.” In the typical scenario, a grandparent receives a phone call from a con-artist claiming to be one of his or her grandchildren. The caller goes on to say that they are in some kind of trouble and need money immediately. Typically they claim to have been in a car accident, to be having trouble returning from a foreign country or in need of bail money. The caller asks the victim to keep the aid

secret, not to “tell mom or dad.” Wanting to help their grandchild, the victim sends money by a money transfer company. Noting that this “emergency scam” has been around for years, the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre also issued public warnings after tracking a marked increase in the number of complaints in the last two months. Police suggest you do not rush to send money but rather take the time to confirm with other family members the whereabouts of the grandchild who claims to be in jail or in trouble.

The large item pickup dates in August will be the last chance to dispose of TVs with garbage: Wellesley Township: August 8th - 9th Woolwich Township: August 15th - 19th

PHOTO

www.recycleyourelectronics.ca

» JAMES JACKSON

Following these dates, TVs will no longer be accepted curbside with garbage. TVs and all electronic waste (computers, stereos, etc.) can be recycled for FREE. Find a drop-off location near you at:

SLATED TO GO The original building, including gas bar, will be demolished, allowing for the clearing of contaminants before a new facility is built slightly to the north side of the property.

demolition: Site to be remediated > CONTINUED FROM COVER E-waste brought to the Waterloo or Cambridge landfill waste management facilities for residential recycling will be subject to the regular tipping fee of $72/tonne, with no charge for the first 50 kg. The commercial e-waste recycling fee remains unchanged at $2,000/tonne.

For more information call 519-883-5100 or visit www.regionofwaterloo.ca/waste

nalizing the site plan for the project with the company, said Woolwich senior planner Jeremy Vink. The owner has applied for and received a demolition permit for the site, which will

have to be remediated before any new construction can begin, said Peter vanderBeek, the township’s chief building official. “We’re prepared to issue a building permit for the new Mac’s building once we’ve received confirmation

the site has been decontaminated.” He expects to see that work carried out over the next three or four weeks. The timing of construction will hinge on clearances from the Ministry of the Environment, which would free up the necessary permits.


» Saturday, July 30, 2011

5 NEWS

Kin Club already making plans to expand event next year

Poetry: A chance to showcase the bridge P > CONTINUED FROM PG. 03 Bridge as it will make a picturesque backdrop for the readings. “We had great turnouts and we are hoping, because of the connections we made last year in the communities. And the fact some people will remember us from last year, we will see more people come out.” Tony Dowling, cochair of the West Montrose residents’ group the BridgeKeepers, expects the event to attract a good-size audience this year. “This is a very unique event and appeals to a specific kind of audience, but we are hoping for a good turnout,” said Dowling. “We have had carol singers at the bridge and public presentations and I think it is pretty cool to have something as unusual as a poetry recital held there too.” This year the poets will not be in the bridge but will be holding

their readings on the lawn northeast of the bridge, a decision that was made to keep the event fresh and different from last year. “In terms of the venue the setting we have this year for the evening will be in the shadows of the bridge by the trees near the end of the bridge. It should be really neat for a background,” he said. The readings will begin next to the bridge on Aug. 6 at 7 p.m. There is no charge for admission and no seating. Refreshments and snacks will be provided, courtesy of the BridgeKeepers. The trip will also feature a special Paddle with the Poets Day family activity on Aug. 8, where the public can rent a canoe or bring their own and join the poets at 10 a.m. at Bingemans campground in Kitchener for lunch and a reading before the group heads to Cambridge.

Seniors Building

Colin Dewar

articipants crossed the finish line of the Grand River Amazing Race sweaty and exhausted, but exuberant last Saturday. The race was part of the family fun weekend organized by the Woolwich Kin Club. Based on the popular television show, the Grand River Amazing Race included teams of two or three who set out from West Montrose down the Grand River and surrounding area where teams would work through different challenges along the route. “Pardon the pun but it was amazing,” joked organizer Bill McBay. “The weather was great and we had most people we have ever seen come out and partake in the weekend events including the race, movies and the carnival.” Funds raised during the pledge drive for the race and the family fun weekend came to more than $42,000, with proceeds going to the Women’s Crisis Services of Waterloo Region.

» COLIN DEWAR

SCENIC The covered bridge will serve as a backdrop Aug. 7

amazing Race contest pulls in more than $42,000

PHOTO

PHOTO

» COLIN DEWAR

THE OBSERVER

CHALLENGE ACCEPTED Heather Asmussen and Tyson Collins of Elmira compete in a challenge during the Grand River Amazing Race held on July 23. The winning team, Winmar Restoration Girls Gone Wild, not only raised the most pledges, $3,601.50, but also clocked in the best time of one hour and 29 minutes. For raising the most funds, team mates Kendra Ainlay, Rachel McCorriston and Michelle Schomphe shared a luxury camper, including a hot tub, for the weekend and will be defending champions for next year’s race.

“I thought it was a lot of fun. It was a lot more challenging than I thought it was going to be,” said Ainlay. “A lot of teams gave us a run for our money but it was all in fun.” Ainlay admits that the real challenge were the weeks prior to the race where her team had to go head-to-head with other teams to win top fundraiser. “It was really competitive for weeks and weeks before the race

even started. I was constantly checking the website to see how many pledges we had compared to other teams and finally on race day we were able to put a face to the team names that we were competing against raising pledges,” she said. “We all did such a great job raising money for Women’s Crisis Services.” Contestants of the

> SEE RACE ON PG. 07

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NEWS 6

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

tres of soft ice cream made that year, and that makes nearly half a billion litres of the cool dessert. While the industry notoriously safeguards its seasonal sales figures, it is a business unquestionably reliant on the weather, and with the hot temperatures we’ve been enjoying in the Waterloo Region and across southern Ontario the past few weeks, ice cream sales have been steadily climbing along with the mercury, according to several ice cream shops in the area.

“May and June weren’t good months, we were still busy but it wasn’t what it’s been like for the month of July,” said Harold Taylor, manager of Lazer Video in Elmira. “It’s been extremely busy this month.” He estimates that during the peak summer months, 50 per cent of the traffic through his store will pick up an ice cream, be it one of his 16 flavours of hard scoop, soft-serve, or the 26 types of ice cream or novelty bars such as Drumsticks or Fudgesicles that he stocks as well. The shop has been

selling ice cream for about 14 years now, and typically the ice cream season runs from April through to October or November, when he stops ordering fresh tubs. “We always start it up for the Elmira Maple Syrup Festival, regardless of the weather,” said Taylor with a smile. “We can sell about eight tubs on a nice day.” In nearby St. Jacobs, much of the same was true at Moser’s Ice Cream Caboose. Alex Kerstens, who is in her fifth summer of work there, said that during the summer months

Once-per-week lawn watering is in effect May 31- September 30

PHOTO

> CONTINUED FROM COVER

» JAMES JACKSON

Ice cream: Canadians love to beat the heat with frozen favourite

COOLING TIME Julia and Matthew Nicolaisen from Waterloo took advantage of the cooler temperatures to take a bike trip from Waterloo to Moser’s Ice Cream Caboose in St. Jacobs on Wednesday. she can scoop up to 100 flavours makes hard cones of hard ice cream scoop ice cream the superior choice over softduring a shift. The store also sells serve or frozen yogurt. “I like hard ice cream. vanilla soft-serve, frozen yogurt, smoothies, Personally, I love chocfloats and their own olate peanut butter and version of the McFlur- you can only get that ry called the Arctic with hard ice cream,” Swirl, but she says the she smiled. Of course, recordhard scoop has always temperabeen number one with breaking tures like last week’s customers. “It doesn’t melt as 40-degree scorchers fast,” she said with don’t guarantee recorda laugh, adding that breaking ice cream the wider variety of sales, either.

“When it was really, really hot it was really quiet,” Kersten’s said. “My theory is that I would rather be at home in front of the air conditioner instead of walking around outside, so I don’t really blame anyone for not wanting to go out. “It really is weatherdependent.” When it comes down to it, though, grocery chains and corner stores have made it easier than ever to get that ubiquitous summer treat whenever we want from the comfort of our own homes – So what is the appeal of taking a bike or a walk down to the local ice cream shop anymore? “It’s a bonding experience,” mused Kerstens. “It’s a family thing and something you can do with friends. You can come in here, pick up a cone, and then head out mini-golfing or something. “It’s not expensive and it’s easy to do.”

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every other day watering for shrubs, trees and gardens. (Odd dates for odd addresses, even dates for even addresses.)

Remember that lawn watering days are based on the last digit in your house number. If your address ends in: 0 or 1 your watering day is: Monday 2 or 3 Tuesday 4 or 5 Wednesday 6 or 7 Thursday 8 or 9 Friday

5:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. AND 7 p.m. to 11 p.m.

EmEka agada In drought conditions, we thank everyone for doing their part. For more information: 519-575-4495 • www.regionofwaterloo.ca/water

What are you doing here at the running track at WmC? I am training and practicing basically just trying to keep fit. What are you training for? The Olympic trials are coming up soon so I am focusing

Elmira resident and student

on training for that. What are you doing after this summer? I am returning to EDSS for my fifth year. What are your plans for school this year?

I am going to try out for a few plays and do some acting this year. What is something people don’t know about you? I like to cook, I’ll try anything once.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

7 NEWS

BEAT THE HEAT

TEENS/LADIES

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Values in effect till Closing Sun, August 7th, 2011

Fun-tastic weekend

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CAN’T BEAT FUN FOR A GOOD TIME Tyler Vieneau-Hill, 5, (top) runs through a group of inflatable clowns while William Burry,

14, (bottom left) enjoys a twirl on the swings and Jacquie Porhtuis, 10, jams with her band Redline at the entertainment pavilion during Family Fun Weekend held at the West Montrose Family Camp.

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» COLIN DEWAR

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Race: Amazing results for Kin Club event > CONTINUED FROM PG. 05 race gathered more than $22,000 in pledges. Ainlay said having three team members worked out to an advantage when it came to finding sponsors and working to raise money but when it came to race day they found that they had to fight harder to keep up, especially in the canoe portion of the race. “There were three of us and other teams only had two and were able to canoe a lot faster down the river than we were because we had more weight in our canoe. And at each challenge only one member was allowed to participate so it did not matter if we had two members or three.” McBay, president of the Kin Club of Woolwich, said feedback from contestants was 100 per cent positive, and many of them plan to come back again and participate. “We think that we

could double the number of teams next year, if not more, which would double the amount of money that we raised through pledges,” he said. One of the challenges organizers faced was trying to draw people out because it is a destination event. “It’s not like you are driving by downtown Elmira and you see a fair in one of the major parking lots – you have to know ahead of time that we are holding the event,” said McBay. Next year he hopes to approach charities and have those organizations look after the route challenges, which will take away some of the stress of the organizers finding for volunteers and will give the racers an option as to what charity their pledges will help. “We hope that will increase the number of teams we will get next year because if somebody wants to race for

MS because they know someone with the disease or heart and stroke or breast cancer, they can do that. Assuming that their choice

of charity have signed on to look after one of our challenges, then we will give the money directly to them,” said McBay.

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OPINION 8

THE OBSERVER

OPINION

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

[T]he trucking of manure and these other odoriferous materials should not be allowed on our two main streets. Mike Hicknell

letter on page 10

VERBATIM

I

n the United States, right-wing fanatics in Congress may block a necessary rise in the debt ceiling, potentially wreaking havoc in world financial markets.

> Nobel Prize-winning economist Paul Krugman takes aim at the Republican games threatening the economy

THE MONITOR

F

rom April to May, average weekly earnings of non-farm payroll employees increased 0.5% to $875.64. On a year-over-year basis, average weekly earnings were 3.3% higher compared with May 2010.

> Statistics Canada

EDITORIAL

We can learn from U.S. debt-ceiling debate

T

here are many lessons to be learned from the debt-ceiling debate going on in the U.S. And many warnings that Canadians can heed. There is, of course, the issue of extremism in politics, as it’s primarily the fringe elements of the Tea Party that are pushing the already out-of-touch Republicans to the brink. Even as Democrats, not blameless in all of this, make concessions, those on the right continue to accuse President Barack Obama and his supporters as socialist partisans. It takes a certain amount of gall to continue pressing for the same things – massive military spending, tax cuts to the rich and tax freezes elsewhere – that created the financial mess as a cure for the country’s massive deficits. Yet that’s exactly what’s happening right now. Most rational people realize it

will take a combination of strategic cuts – i.e. not those harmful to an already high unemployment rate – and tax increases to tackle the deficit. But rational does not seem to be on the agenda in U.S. politics. Surely the fact that the country has one of the OECD’s lowest tax-todebt ratios indicates there’s a need for tax increases: after living on borrowed money for years, the bill has come due. Of course, the debate is all about money. Specifically, about who will pay for the excesses of the past and the future tax breaks for the wealthy. For those who control the political system, there’s money to be made in the financial wranglings – which is why we saw no real action to curb the industry that caused the economic meltdown. If a price must be paid, it should fall

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Joe Merlihan, Publisher | EXT 107 jmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Steve Kannon, Editor | EXT 103 skannon@woolwichobserver.com James Jackson, Reporter | EXT 101 jjackson@woolwichobserver.com Colin Dewar, Reporter | EXT 102 cdewar@woolwichobserver.com

> LETTER POLICY

to the average citizen, those who gained little and suffered much from decisions made on Wall Street and in Washington. Many pundits recognize the U.S. political system has become dysfunctional, partly because of the way it was structured in the first place, but largely because it’s fuelled by money and lobbyists. For Canadians, what’s going on in the U.S. is a clear indication of what not to do. Yet we’ve got a federal government that’s ramping up spending on the military and security, favours deregulation, supports tax cuts to the wealthiest corporations and individuals, encourages privatization of public assets, and hides behind a wall of secrecy. It’s a scenario that we saw played out in the U.S. on route from turning a budgetary surplus into the largest deficits in history. Come to think of

Donna Rudy, Sales Manager | EXT 104 drudy@woolwichobserver.com Pat Merlihan, Production Mgr | EXT 105 pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Jon Sarachman, Production | EXT 108 jsarachman@woolwichobserver.com Lindsay Lehman, Production | EXT 109 llehman@woolwichobserver.com

The Observer welcomes letters to the editor on topics of interest to our readers. Letters may be edited for brevity, grammar, and legal considerations. All letters must be signed and contain the writer’s full name and telephone number for verification purposes. Unsigned or anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. If you have a legitimate concern and cannot sign your name to a letter, please contact the editor to discuss alternative means of resolving the issue. This newspaper declines announcements, poetry and thank-you letters in the opinion section. Maximum suggested length is 500 words.

it, that’s already happened here, too. Changes to financing rules for political parties and the influence of lobbyists will have an effect on who has the ear of government. In the U.S., members of Congress are beholden to those who hold the purse strings. That’s less the case here, but the changes instituted by the Conservatives push the country along that road. There’s much to envy about the United States. Its political system is not one of them. Nor is its current economic system, though there’s a similar crisis in Europe just now, too. The much bigger picture shows the free rein given to corporations, especially the financial services sector, is to blame for the economic crises. We’re tied into that, so Ottawa should be doing what it can to mitigate our exposure, not worsen it, as is the case.

> CIRCULATION The Observer is an audited controlled circulation publication. Canadian Media Circulation Audit calculates and prepares The Observer circulation reports | 14,812.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

Watch for the usual overreaction to Norwegian terrorist attack

Y

ou could almost hear the enormous sigh of relief as journalists around the world welcomed the news that there had been a big explosion in Oslo and many shooting deaths on a nearby island. There’s been practically no foreign news for them to write about – it’s summer in the northern hemisphere, and all the major villains of international politics are on holiday – but this is terrorism, and terrorism always sells. “Even if one is well prepared, it is always rather dramatic when something like this happens,” said Prime Minister Jens Stolteneberg with admirably Norwegian restraint. But restraint is not the dominant mode in journalism, and plenty of people were willing to hypothesize on who caused the explosion and why. The leading theories were: 1. It was Islamist terrorists taking belated revenge for the cartoons published by Jyllands-Posten six years ago that mocked the Prophet Muhammad. They would have had to be very ignorant terrorists, since Jyllands-Posten is a Danish newspaper and Oslo is in Norway, but the distinction may not be clear if you live far away and you didn’t pay attention in geography class. 2. It was Libyan dictator Muammar Gadhafi carrying out his threat earlier this month to attack European targets in retaliation for European help to Libyan rebels: “Hundreds of Libyans will martyr in Europe. I told you it is eye for an eye and tooth for a tooth.” There are six Norwegian fighter planes operating over Libya, after all.

THE VIEW FROM HERE

International Affairs GWYNNE DYER 3. It was an extreme right-wing conspiracy with its roots in Norwegian politics, taking aim at the ruling Labour Party. It’s starting to look as if the last theory was correct, with Anders Behring Breivik, the sole suspect who has been arrested, cast as a Norwegian Timothy McVeigh. The point is that if you are not Norwegian, it doesn’t matter much. Indeed, even if you are Norwegian, it shouldn’t matter much. This is a big media event and a tragedy for those directly involved, but it is not actually a big event. A hundred people killed in a train wreck or an airline disaster is a twoday story in the country where it happened, and a one-day story that does not lead the television news (unless there are particularly dramatic pictures) in the rest of the world. Whereas a hundred Norwegians killed in a bomb attack and a shooting spree once in a half-century makes headlines around the world. This is quite understandable in some ways: we know that we all have to die eventually, but we feel entitled not to be murdered by strangers. Besides, news is really news precisely because of its scarcity value. If there were bomb attacks and shooting incidents in Oslo every day, most foreign me-

dia would soon stop reporting it on a daily basis. There would be a piece of reportage or analysis every month or so, and that would be it. The problem is that terrorism gets people’s attention, just as it is intended to. It then becomes the basis for making policy. And often that policy is very expensive, very intrusive and very foolish. There will now be thousands of new metal detectors, and thousands of new “security” personnel to run those machines and carry out body searches, at the entrances to public buildings across Europe and probably beyond. There may even be armed guards at youth camps run by political parties. It will create some employment at a time when it is needed, but that will presumably not be the aim of the exercise. The goal, or so we will be told, is to reduce the likelihood of such a terrible event happening again. But you can’t do that. All you can do is to move the terrible events around. If you make all government buildings everywhere totally impenetrable, with overlapping layers of tight and time-consuming security, then the next bomber with a grievance will just blow himself up in a bus. Or in a supermarket, or at a major sports event, or just in a crowded city street. Unless you are willing to legislate against more than a dozen people being together anywhere, terrorists will continue to enjoy a “target-rich environment.” Fortunately, these terrible events are very rare. They are rare partly

9 OPINION

THE VOICE

What are your plans for the long weekend?

“I’m working, actually. At the new Staples store in Kitchener.” > James Kryski

“I don’t have any. I don’t make any plans that far ahead.” > Alson Martin

> SEE DYER ON PG. 10 BY SCOTT ARNOLD

“I’m going to my cousin’s cottage up on Five Mile Lake.” > Luke Schering

Given the prolonged dry spell, those in search of a lush lawn find creative ways to get around the region’s lawn-watering ban.

“We will be playing with our four children in the garden and at the Wellesley splash park.” > Katie Byrd


OPINION 10

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

Norwegian tragedy can’t be viewed in isolation It would be easy to categorize what happened in Norway last week as the actions of a lunatic, but that would miss the point. Anders Behring Breivik, who confessed to the crimes, may have had some ideas that stray far from the norm, but the amount of planning that went into his horrendous acts says this was not just some mad notion. That concept applies, for instance, to the teenager declared insane by a court in Glasgow earlier this month for stabbing to death a man he thought was a zombie. No, the man who planted a bomb in Oslo then shot teens at a camp appears to be someone who knew full well what he was doing. And we can expect more instances like this given growing social alienation and the pace of change in society. As Gwynne Dyer notes in his column this week, journalists are having a field day with this story, coming during a major lull in the news, unless you count the debt-ceiling crisis that’s shining a light on the perhaps irreconcilably dysfunctional U.S. political system. The story is also fodder for all kinds of blogs and message boards. Reading through those comments – far more numerous even than the Breivik’s musings in his 1,500-page compendium – you quickly realize the so-called madman has struck a chord. As always, conspiracy theories abound. Those on the right of the spectrum inclined to think a certain

From the Editor Steve Kannon way see the tragedy as a leftist plot to discredit conservative viewpoints. Their counterparts on the right see the incident as a chance for hawks to swoop in during a time of crisis to do away with democratic processes and civil rights, employing strategies itemized in Naomi Klein’s Shock Doctrine. We don’t know what the longerterm implications will be for Norwegian society – let alone Europe and beyond – but so far the country’s prime minister, Jens Stoltenberg, is saying all the right things, avoiding the kind of kneejerk reaction we saw in the U.S. and, to a lesser extend, in the UK following terrorist attacks there. Instead of talking about military and police-state options, he’s talking about enhancing an already enviable democratic and socially-aware society. Still, there’s a bigger issue here, one already at play in much of Western Europe where shifting demographics and immigration have led to simmering tensions for years. Much of what Breivik wrote about in his manifesto has fuelled the growth of right-wing and nationalist political parties in

England, France, Germany and even traditional neutral Switzerland and liberal Holland, among others. While those on the fringes often make the news, the arguments Breivik makes are not restricted to the extremes. That’s especially true of anti-Islamic sentiments. As noted in a report from Bloomberg’s Scandinavian bureau, even traditionally liberal Nordic countries have been grappling with the issue, and the revulsion from Breivik’s terrorist acts won’t stop that. “The rise of globalization and open borders has seen a surge in support for nationalistic movements across the Nordic region, as uncertainty and fear of the unknown grip sections of society in some of the richest countries in Europe. Parties that press for restrictions on immigration or over Islam’s influence have won seats in parliament in Denmark, Norway, Finland and, since September, Sweden,” reads the report. The growing shift in attitudes, and political activity, comes as more and more foreigners seek access to the Nordic countries’ strong, stable economies and tradition of equality. Of 44 countries surveyed by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees last year, Sweden received the most applications from asylum seekers per head of population. Norway was fourth, Denmark 10th and Finland 13th.

LETTER

Odours don’t belong on our main streets To the Editor,  As some residents of Elmira know, we have until Aug. 21 to post our comments on the Ontario Environmental Registry regarding the Bio-En proposal to construct and operate a large-scale anaerobic bio-digester in the north part of Elmira. Many residents have commented in the past about the potential odour and traffic problems that might ensue from this proposal. However, I would like to bring to the attention of your readers the additional point that nothing in the proposal (as it stands today) would disallow the trucking of liquid or solid beef/chicken/hog manure,

animal blood, decaying animal parts, dead stock, grease, etc. along either Church or Arthur streets. In my opinion the trucking of manure and these other odoriferous materials should not be allowed on our two main streets. If others agree I would suggest they either post their objections on the Ontario Environmental Registry website or call the MOE project supervisor Kristina Rudzki, senior project evaluator, Ministry of the Environment, at 1-800-461-6290 and directly voice their objections. Alternately if she is unavailable you could then leave a voicemail message. I would also suggest residents call or email members of the Woolwich Township council and voice their concern that Church and Arthur streets are for shopping, bank-

ing, going to the library or post office, etc. Our two main streets are not for hauling 100,000-pound loads of manure. Or to pose my concern another way: where else in Ontario do they routinely allow the annual transportation of up to 20,000 tons of manure and up to 50,000 tons of other equally odoriferous materials on their main streets? Finally, your readers should note in the Bio-En proposal the trucking of these materials will be by “third party contract” haulers. As Mr. Chuck Martin at a public meeting indicated, Bio-En Inc. would therefore have or take no legal responsibility in the event of a major or minor spill of these materials on our roadways or main streets.

> Mike Hicknell, Elmira

Even though Norway boasts Europe’s lowest jobless rate and biggest budget surplus, it must now acknowledge a threat of violence more usually associated with less stable societies, Stoltenberg told reporters who prepared the Bloomberg piece. The bombing and shooting spree could heighten concerns about immigrants, says an expert contacted for the report. Initially, people may move away from the conservative movements, but that’s likely temporary. “National traumas tend to breed cultural fears, which project onto immigrants or the unknown,” Fredrik Erixon, director of the European Centre for International Political Economy in Brussels is quoted as saying. “The fantastic show of support for open society and the values of democracy will inevitably fade away and be overshadowed by suspicion of the unknown.” Even now, however, there are those using the anonymity of Internet forums to praise Breivik’s philosophies, though condemnation of his methods is almost universal. What he did was heinous, but he’s not alone in his thinking, which means someone else may go down a similar road. There may be a rush to simply consider this the act of a lone psychopath, but politicians ignore the underlying issues at their peril, and that of their constituents.

Dyer: No need for more security > CONTINUED FROM PG. 09 because governments keep track of individuals and groups that show some interest in terrorism, but mainly they are rare because there really are not that many such individuals and groups. The ordinary citizen’s safety lies in statistics, not in ever more elaborate “security” measures. You are still more likely to die from falling off a ladder or drowning in the bath than you are to die in a terrorist attack. When they tell you to reshape your life or your foreign policy in response to the “terrorist threat,” tell them to go jump in the lake.

Share your comments in print or online. Write a letter to the Editor. Post a comment online. Join the conversation.

is cheap. editor@woolwichobserver.com


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

11 BUSINESS

BUSINESS

There’s no place like home(made) PHOTO

» COLIN DEWAR

New burger restaurant in Elmira puts health and fresh into fast food fare

THE PERSONAL TOUCH Candace Roehr is opening a new restaurant in Elmira called Candies Burger Suite. All the dishes will be homemade by Roehr. Colin Dewar

T

he homemade burgers will soon be sizzling on the grill of Candies Burger Suite, a new restaurant in Elmira. Owner Candace Roehr decided to open a burger joint after identifying a need in town. “I didn’t want to compete with other restaurants in the town. I wanted to do something different and offer something that you can’t get in Elmira,” said Roehr. “There are no burger joints anymore in Elmira, and I feel the town needs a place like this.” This is the second restaurant the 25-year-old Roehr has owned, the first one was a successful all-day breakfast restaurant in Arthur. After three years serving up meals at Candies Diner, Roehr decided to move back to her hometown to be closer to her family. “I bought my first restau-

rant when I was 21 years old ourselves.” and worked with my aunt,” Roehr’s motto is good food she said. “I was young, I was fast. away from my family and I All the dishes available at just wanted to be back with the burger joint are home them.” cooked, including homeRoehr was no stranger made hamburger, fresh-cut even when getting into her fries, fresh-battered fish and first venture. She began chips, homemade pulled working as a bus girl at the pork and ground pork burgage of seven and by the age ers and a homemade panof eight was zerotti, with cooking meals soups and salfor herself and ads. “I am here her family. “I am cookeveryday. I wanted “I started ing fast food, to make it feel like cooking when but I am usI was quite ing fresh inhome, with my style young out gredients so and lots of colours. of necessity there are no I think its fun.” because my preservatives parents had in the food like Candace Roehr MSG. What a split up and I needed to eat; I lot of people found a love for cooking be- don’t know is that food availcause of that,” she said. “It’s able in restaurants contains in my blood, my grandfather MSG, so as a restaurant you was a cook, both my parents can have egg salad in the reare great cooks, and my fam- frigerator that can last up ily is made up of food snobs to 60 days. The customers – we would never serve any- think they are eating something that we would not eat thing healthier by ordering

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the egg, but it is full of preservatives because it is not freshly made.” Customers will be able to order burger suites, much like combos at other restaurant. Burgers will come either as specialty orders or customers can choose their own toppings. Roehr wants everyone to feel welcome at the restaurant but looks forward to serving high school students in the fall. “I grew up in Elmira and I know there isn’t really any place for them to go and hang out and enjoy each other’s company. A lot of people don’t want teenagers hanging out around their businesses but I want them to feel free to do that here.” Roehr plans to set up a television and free wi-fi for her customers. “I want people to feel comfortable and at home. This is my home and I want them to feel at ease and not rushed and feel they have to eat and

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run.” Located on Arthur Street, the restaurant’s décor is designed with an eclectic style but at the same time has a few very personal touches of Roehr found throughout, from the leopard skin print on the chairs to the paint colour she created for the walls. “I am here everyday. I wanted to make it feel like home, with my style and lots of colours. I think its fun.” The original structure of the new restaurant was built in the 1850s and still has the original windows and fixtures throughout the little white house located on Arthur Street next to WCS. Roehr has some big plans for the space, including using the upstairs as her future apartment. “I just figured that I need to be close to my work. This industry is never ending: you always have stuff to do

> SEE BURGERS ON PG. 12

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BUSINESS 12

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

Quality Canadian grain could lose out in post-wheat board era I

’m delayed at one of America’s most unpredictable airports (Chicago O’Hare) thanks to America’s most unreliable airline (United), watching fellow travellers gape at dire financial news blasting out of the airport’s television monitors. Americans are trying to figure out what’s happening to their country’s threatened credit rating, fragile stock market and loan default. Politicians who oppose President Obama say he has an “addiction” and a “spending disease.” They say he isn’t serious about trying to balance the government’s books, so they have a “moral obligation” to refuse to strike a debt deal. How sad for everyday Americans, who are literally quaking in their boots, watching what some are calling a financial civil war unfold at their peril. Predictions call for higher interest rates, which

Food For Thought Owen Roberts will be devastating for recovery. If and when that happens, watch out. As America’s fortunes fall, Canadians are bound to feel a ripple effect, at the very least. We’re a major exporting nation, and the U.S. takes the lion’s share of everything we ship beyond our borders. This is putting Western Canadian grain farmers in a pickle. One of the biggest changes in Canadian agricultural history is pending, as the federal government prepares to dismantle the Canadian Wheat Board by next summer. Wheat is our biggest agricultural

export, and for the past 75 years, every grain of wheat grown on the prairies and headed for markets abroad has been sold by the wheat board. It’s the law. But the federal government thinks prairie farmers shouldn’t be bound by a single selling agent, such as the wheat board. They should have options, according to Ottawa. So, it’s charging ahead with its plan, and in a relatively short time prairie farmers will have to fend for themselves when it comes to selling grain. Who’s standing in the shadows? Private companies, some of which are Canadian, but moreover some that are American or international, and huge. Candidly and honestly answering a reporter’s question recently, a spokesperson for a U.S. grain company, Bunge, said his firm was anxious to get access to world-class Canadian wheat, which is renowned for quality. Critics of the board’s dismantling called him something akin to a predator, but from a business sense, it’s a strategic move … provided, of course, there’s a buyer. You’d think there would be. The media is brimming with stories about world hunger, and we can help address it with Canadian grain. But consider this scenario: if the American economy tanks

again like it did four years ago, and the American dollar continues to slide, American wheat will be a bargain. Will international grain companies work hard to find markets for Canadian wheat when they can much more easily sell buyers cheap U.S. wheat? They need to move volume, and despite the vastness of the prairies, quantity is not a word anyone associates with Canadian wheat when comparing it to global competitors such as Europe and the U.S. The drive for volume is also being driven by the expansion of the Panama Canal and higher energy prices. All the way up the chain, the agri-food sector is being challenged by delivery systems, as slow, outdated, dilapidated crowded highways and rails cut into farmers’ profits. In the U.S., plans are underway for major developments in ports in the Mississippi Gulf, based on more cheaply moving soybeans, corn and wheat by cargo vessels, barge and even by container for specialized crops. Proponents are convinced water transportation is the way to go. This scenario will unfold further in the next year as Ottawa chisels away at the wheat board. Its supporters are being accused of hyperbole and seeing ghosts. But until plans are unveiled to address situations like the one described here, you can’t blame them.

We’re in your

Community.

A TOUCH OF HOME

Candies Burger Suite’s décor is designed with an eclectic style reflecting its owner and which feels like home to Candace Roehr.

Burgers: Free to do things her way

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to keep things fresh, there is always a floor or wall to clean. For me, the best thing I can do is stay close,” she said. “This is my life; I know that I will be working crazy hours to get this off the ground. I always say I am married to my restaurant.” Eventually Roehr would like to add a patio space for customers to use in the summer. “I plan to be here for a long time.” Roehr hopes to open this Saturday (today) or the following Monday with the grand opening planned for September when the students return to school. “I enjoy working with the public and meeting new people, knowing who my customers are and their families which is really important to me to have a family atmosphere,” she said. Right now the 30-seat restaurant

» COLIN DEWAR

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 11

is a family business through and through, with Roehr’s sister, Janel Beatty, working as a server and her mother and aunts lending a hand while she works in the kitchen. “It helps me to get back in the groove of things again having my family around to help out and support. I have a few bugs to work out, I know that, so I have a few weeks before the grand opening to fix everything.” Candies Burger Suite will be closed Sundays so Roehr can spend time with her friends and family.

Ask us about membership!

www.mscu.com | 519.669.1529

A Mennonite financial cooperative serving communities of faith across Ontario


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

13 2011 SIDEWALK SALE

special feature

Sidewalk Sale

Downtown Elmira

August 4, 5, & 6

Don't miss this chance to find some great deals at your favourite Elmira Stores!

GREAT S H GREAT P OES... rice at s Brubacher Shoes Ltd. August

Kid’s

Athletic Shoes $1500 | $2500

Men’s

1/2 PRICE OR LESS

| $2000

(End of Line Sandals)

Men’s & Women’s

(Except for New or Consignments)

QUALITY DISCOUNTS

26 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-4032

SINCE 1961

27 Arthur St. S., Elmira • 519-669-3658

Proceeds to Mennonite Central Committee

Women’s

Casual & Dress Shoes $20 | $29 00

95

SALE HOURS

MONDAY - WEDNESDAY...................9am - 6pm THURSDAY & FRIDAY.........................9am - 8pm SATURDAY..........................................9am - 5pm

Est. 1940

SALE! storewide sale

BIRKENSTOCK

20-40% OFF Athletic Shoes 30-60%

Casual & Dress Shoes

Aug 4,5,6

Visit us during the Sidewalk Sale for all your painting and decorating needs

4th, 5th & 6th

OFF

1P/R2ICE

3 days only

BRUBACHER SHOES Ltd. 519-669-3349 7 Arthur St. S., ELMIRA

thursday

friday

saturday

On all clothing

On all books, toys, puzzles, games

On all furniture, lamps, pictures, bedding, curtains

/2 /2 1/2 1 1PRICE PRICE PRICE Check our website at: thrift.mcc.org

NO TAX On Purchases Save even more at MCC!

59 CHURCH ST. W. | 519-669-8475 STORE HOURS: Monday to Wednesday: 9:30 to 5:00, Thursday: 9:30 to 8:00

Friday: 9:30 to 5:00, Saturday: 9:30 to 4:00


Love to vacuum? Then you’ll really love2011 to SIDEWALK Zuum! SALE

14

THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, July 30, 2011

special feature

Sidewalk Sale

a. European style. res. Easy, powerful, ning.

g, high-performance and smart-designed, chnology by Electrolux is at the heart of products nt on today and into the future.

wer units are powered with the HE Technology motors.

Quick Lock Bucket

Bucket Lens

Internal Triumph HEPA Filter

ARM & HAMMERÂŽ Vacuum Bags

Don't miss this chance to find some great deals at your favourite Elmira Stores!

75

Street dance rain location: The Woolwich Community Arena on Snyder Avenue

Available on Zuum Central Vacuum Systems*

Come on in for great savings!

FVSFLBDPNtXXXMPWFUPWBDVVNDPN

Vacuum Cleaners

Parts & Repairs

(All makes and models)

Electrical Supplies

and Eureka attachment kit to qualify. See in store for details. ER logo are trademarks of Church & Dwight Co., Inc.

E •L •M •I •R •A

HOURS: Tues., Wed., & Fri. 9-5:30 | Thurs. 9-8 | Sat. 9-3

www.elmiravacuumelectrical.ca

USED BOOK SALE at the ELMIRA BRANCH LIBRARY 65 Arthur St. S., Elmira

Thursday, August 4 9a.m. - 8:00p.m. Friday, August 5 9a.m. - 6p.m. Saturday, August 6 9a.m. - 3:30p.m. Sale continues inside the library until August 13 For more information call the Elmira Branch Library at 519-669-5477

ANNUAL SIDEWALK SALE AUGUST 4, 5 & 6

ORANGE-YELLOW TAG Clearance Specials

Amazing Selection up to

75% OFF

Dress Pants, Jeans, Casual Shirts, Casual Pants, Golf Shirts, Name Brand Designer Mens Apparel

1st Group $39.50 each or 2 Items for $69 2nd Group $31.50 each or 2 Items for $59 All Sales Final | Cash & Carry Only.

Our Biggest clearance sale of the year!

75

Save up to

%

OFF

Select Instock Items

We Carry Sizes Small to 4x plus TALL

RED-WHITE TAG

Sidewalk Sale Specials

This Season’s Newest Storewide Spring/Summer Mens Apparel

HUGE SAVINGS START AUGUST 4TH

Summer Shorts, Golf Shirts, Swimwear, Cruise & Resort Wear, Polo-Style Shirts, Casual Shirts, Dress Pants, Casual Pants, Denims, Blazers-Sport-Jackets, Suits, Dress Shirts, Socks, Ties and Much More! Terms of Sale: All sales final. Alterations Extra. Cash & Carry applies to some items.

12 Arthur Street, S., Elmira Between the Window Box and Raphael’s Pizza 519-669-9356 www.inspiringaccents.com

ACCENT FURNITURE • ARTWORK & PRINTS • JEWELRY & PURSES • POTTERY LAMPE BERGER • ENTERTAINMENT ESSENTIALS • GIFTS FROM THE HEART

W.C. BROWN & SONS

MEN’S CLOTHIER • TAILORS • DRY CLEANING & ALTERATION SERVICES • COMPANY UNIFORMS 18-24 ARTHUR ST., DOWNTOWN ELMIRA | T. 519-669-1152 | WWW.BROWNSMENSWEAR.COM

SIDEWALK SALE HOURS:

Thursday, Aug. 4th - 9a.m. to 8:30p.m. | Friday, Aug. 5th - 9a.m. to 8:30p.m. | Saturday, Aug. 6th - 9a.m. to 5p.m.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

15 2011 SIDEWALK SALE

special feature

Sidewalk Sale Don't miss this chance to find some great deals at your favourite Elmira Stores!

WCS

Woolwich Community Services

THRIFT SHOP

Sidewalk Sale BLOWOUT! August 4th, 5th and 6th

Open Until 8pm on Thursday, August 4th! Purchases Go Towards Our Community Programs “Together We Make a Difference”

48 Arthur St. South, Elmira, ON | 519-669-1129 Hours: Mon-Fri 9-6 & Sat 9-4

Harvest the Savings!

Massive Sidewalk & Garage Sale

Thurs. August 4 & Fri. August 5

SANDALS & SHOES!!!

SALE HOURS: Thursday and Friday 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. and Saturday 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. SKU#

DESCRIPTION

4520-511 MURPHY’S OIL OIL 4520-511 MURPHY’S OIL $2.79 4520-511 MURPHY’S 4540-839 MOP REFILL 4540-839 BEE MOPBEE REFILL $6.99 4540-839 BEE MOP REFILL 4521-609 BOWL BRITE 4521-609 BOWL BRITE $4.99 4521-609 BOWL BRITE 4522-788 MEAN GREEN 4522-788 MEAN GREEN $5.29 4522-788 MEAN GREEN 4527-391 ULTRA 4527-391 NATURANATURA ULTRA $8.99 4527-391 NATURA ULTRA 4510-326 4510-326 BLEACHBLEACH $2.49 4510-326 BLEACH 4528-041 4528-041 FOLEX FOLEX $9.99 4528-041 FOLEX 4520-035 CABINET MAGIC 4520-035 CABINET MAGIC $5.99 4520-035 CABINET MAGIC 4520-036 COUNTERTOP `` 4520-036 COUNTERTOP `` $5.69 4520-036 COUNTERTOP `` 4520-968 CLR CLR 4520-968 CLR $8.99 4520-968 4522-724 PINE-SOL 4522-724 PINE-SOL $3.49 4522-724 PINE-SOL 4522-332 4522-332 LESTOILLESTOIL $4.29 4522-332 LESTOIL 4521-716 AMMONIA 4521-716 AMMONIA $2.19 4521-716 AMMONIA 4530-350 4530-350 WINDEXWINDEX $4.29 4530-350 WINDEX 4412-068 MOTH BALLS 4412-068 MOTH BALLS $6.09 4412-068 MOTH BALLS 4490-866 SARAN WRAP 4490-866 SARAN WRAP $3.79 4490-866 SARAN WRAP 4521-440 4521-440 COMET COMET $1.09 4521-440 COMET 4411-693 FLY SWATTERS 4411-693 FLY SWATTERS $0.99 4411-693 FLY SWATTERS 4521-770 STOVE CLEANER 4521-770 STOVE CLEANER $6.99 4521-770 STOVE CLEANER 4542-287 V. SCRUNGE PAD PAD 4542-287 V. SCRUNGE PAD $2.99 4542-287 V. SCRUNGE 4532-063 (SM) (SM) 4532-063 NATURANATURA (SM) $2.97 4532-063 NATURA 4533-179 (LG) (LG) 4533-179 NATURANATURA (LG) $3.97 4533-179 NATURA 4510-942 PALMOLIVE 4510-942 PALMOLIVE $2.29 4510-942 PALMOLIVE 1670-481 MASKING TAPETAPE 1670-481 MASKING TAPE $1.99 1670-481 MASKING 4515-485 MAG/MAG/ BROOM 4515-485 MAG/ BROOM $6.69 4515-485 BROOM 4543-658 SCOUR PADSPADS 4543-658 SCOUR PADS $3.29 4543-658 SCOUR SOLID COLOUR WASH CLOTH RY313F RY313F WASH CLOTH Special RY313FSOLID COLOUR SOLID COLOUR WASH CLOTH SOLID COLOUR HAND TOWEL RY63H RY63H HAND TOWEL Special RY63H SOLID COLOUR SOLID COLOUR HAND TOWEL SOLID COLOUR FLEECE THROW TH01H TH01H FLEECE THROW Special TH01H SOLID COLOUR SOLID COLOUR FLEECE THROW 4PC KITCHEN TOWEL SET SET Special KS4PCS KS4PCS TOWEL SET TOWEL KS4PCS4PC KITCHEN 4PC KITCHEN TEA TOWEL, KITCHEN PRINT HT53 HT53HT53 TEA TOWEL, KITCHEN PRINT Special TEA TOWEL, KITCHEN PRINT KITCHEN SINGLE PRINTED KT53 KT53KT53 TOWEL, TOWEL, KITCHEN SINGLE PRINTED Special TOWEL, KITCHEN SINGLE PRINTED 4560-058 N’ DONE 4560-058 ONCE N’ONCE DONE $28.99 4560-058 ONCE N’ DONE 4575-687 SHINEKEEPER 4575-687 SHINEKEEPER $16.99 4575-687 SHINEKEEPER 4560-336 NEWNEW BEGINNING 4560-336 NEW BEGINNING $18.99 4560-336 BEGINNING 5045-854 FLY COILS 5045-854 FLY COILS $3.29 5045-854 FLY COILS 5325-472 FLASHLIGHTS 5325-472 FLASHLIGHTS $4.49 5325-472 FLASHLIGHTS

RETAIL

SALE

$2.79 $6.99 $4.99 $5.29 $8.99 $2.49 $9.99 $5.99 $5.69 $8.99 $3.69 $4.29 $2.19 $4.29 $6.09 $3.79 $1.09 $0.99 $6.99 $3.49 $2.97 $3.97 $2.29 $2.19 $6.69 $3.29 SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL SPECIAL $28.99 $16.99 $18.99 $3.29 $4.49

$2.39 $5.99 $3.79 $3.99 $7.99 $2.29 $8.49 $4.99 $4.99 $7.99 $2.99 $3.69 $1.79 $3.97 $3.99 $3.49 $0.99 $0.69 $4.79 $2.49 $2.49 $3.49 $2.19 $1.19 $4.99 $2.59 $0.99 $2.99 $4.99 $4.99 $0.99 $0.99 $21.97 $13.99 $15.99 $1.79 $2.99

$2.39 $5.99 $3.79 $3.99 $7.99 $2.29 $8.49 $4.99 $4.99 $7.99 $2.97 $3.37 $.97 $3.97 $4.29 $3.49 $.99 $.69 $4.99 $2.49 $2.49 $3.49 $2.19 $1.19 $4.99 $2.59 $.90 $2.99 $4.99 $4.99 $.99 $.99 $21.97 $14.99 $16.99 $1.79 $3.29

Don’t ! t i s s i m 11 Church Street East, ELMIRA 519-669-3030 or 888-669-3030 www.footfoundation.ca Regular Hours: Monday to Friday 9:00 am - 5:30 pm

20-50%

OFF

almost everything in the store

Small Appliances - Power Tools - Hand Tools - Electronics Pet Supplies - Gift Ware - Plus More Close Outs - Discontinued items - Seconds from almost all departments. Personal shopping only please. Limited quantities. No rain checks.

5 Church St. E., Elmira, Ontario

519.669.0918

22 Church St. W., Elmira 519-669-5537 REGULAR STORE HOURS: M-F: 8-8, SAT 8-6

www.coreclothing.ca Proud member of the Elmira Business Improvement Area

Hours: Thurs 10-8pm; Fri 10-8pm and Sat 10-5pm


LIVING HERE 16

THE OBSERVER

LIVING HERE

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

PHOTO

» JAMES JACKSON

Soccer a gateway to the wider world Members of Woolwich U16 team took in the sights and history of Europe during Women’s World Cup

F

James Jackson

or two weeks in July, three Woolwich girls were involved in a cultural, historical and sporting exchange unlike anything they had ever experienced in their lives. Krista Wiens and Emma Leger of Elmira and Melanie Schwartzentruber from St. Jacobs – along with the rest of their Woolwich Wolfpack U16 teammates – travelled to Germany and several other European nations in a bid to not only watch Canada compete at the Women’s World Cup of soccer, but to learn a little more about the world. Head coach and Germannative Markus Philipp saw it as a prospect he couldn’t pass up. “I felt it was a tremendous opportunity for a youth team, many of whom had never been out of the country or some even not out of the province or on a plane, to go on a trip like that and to see the 16 best teams in the world compete for the crown of our sport,” said Philipp, who immigrated to Canada about eight years ago. “I was in Germany during the men’s World Cup in 2006 and it was an amazing atmosphere.” The girls left Canada on

July 2, and returned last Tuesday. While away, they not only had the chance to see the best women in the world compete but they were able to explore Germany and absorb its rich culture and history. The team stayed at a youth hostel near Philipp’s hometown of Wiesbaden, close to Frankfurt, the main site for the World Cup. The Wolfpack played three friendly matches while in Germany, two against German clubs (4-0 and 3-1 wins) and they tied a team from British Columbia. They also got to watch five World Cup matches, including the Canadian’s 1-0 loss to Nigeria, the semi-final match between Sweden and Japan and Japan’s thrilling 3-1 shootout victory over the United States in the finals. The team sat in the first few rows directly behind the goal during the finals, and all three local girls said the match was one of the highlights of the trip. The girls also met with Team Canada and exchanged shirts with some of the players and chatted with many of their idols. “It was neat to see that they made it and one day we can eventually do the same,” said Wiens, who had never

TEAM TRAVEL The 15 players on the Woolwich Wolfpack U16 girls’ soccer club – including Woolwich residents Melanie Schwartzentruber (left), Emma Leger and Krista Wiens – had the opportunity of a lifetime to travel to Germany during the Women’s World Cup of soccer from July 2-19. travelled on a plane prior to this trip. During the two weeks they were there, the team visited the city of Dresden, which was famously carpetbombed during the Second World War then rebuilt, and they also saw the Cologne cathedral and visited the Dachau concentration camp, near Munich.

“It was really interesting because we just finished Grade 10 history and we had talked a lot about World War II and World War I,” said Leger, the team’s captain. “We visited the concentration camp and although our time there was brief it was very powerful and meaningful to be in a space where millions of others have

walked before.” The head coach said it was important to not only make the exchange about soccer, but about the larger cultural experience as well. “Playing soccer was not really that important for us, we wanted to stay fit and play a few games, but we can

> SEE EUROPE ON PG. 17

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

17 LIVING HERE

Preparation is key in getting Europe: A chance to see the best this potato salad just right From The Chef's Table

New Potato Salad Serves 8

>>3 green onions, finely chopped >>1/2 lightly packed cup of dill, finely chopped

>>2 tbsp whole grain mustard (we like Kozlik’s Triple Crunch Mustard)

>>3 tbsp vinegar (we like Ponti’s Pinot

Grigio white wine vinegar, or another goodquality white wine vinegar – it makes a big difference!)

>>9-10 tbsp of canola oil >>1/2 tsp sugar >>Salt and pepper to taste

O

ver the last couple of weeks we’ve had several fantastic cooking classes: Fish and Seafood Night, Knife Skills, barbecuing our Big Green Egg and more. With every class we really want to ensure that you learn a lot, have some fun, but most of all, do not go away hungry. Whatever the theme of our classes at this time of year, this New Potato Salad has been a staple side dish. The potatoes at the market have this newness to them: they are small, very waxy (that means that their sugar content is high, while their starch content is low, making them perfect for potato salad, as they will not fall apart to mush when you slice them), and taste delicious, even on their own. Here are a few tried and true, ex-

pert (meaning, this is what I learned from my oma) tips for great potato salad: 1. Keep potatoes whole and unpeeled when you cook them. 2. Do not boil them at a rapid pace, rather, simmer them slowly so that they do not break apart and absorb too much water. 3. Simmer them in very salty water 4. Drain when fork tender, and then peel and slice while still warm. Toss with remaining ingredients when still warm. This will help the potatoes to absorb all of the flavours. 5. Always serve at room temperature, not freezing cold out of the fridge. Simmer potatoes whole, until just fork tender; peel and slice in half while still warm, and then slice each half into ‘half-moon’ slices; Toss with green onion and dill in a large bowl; In a small bowl make vinaigrette by mixing mustard and vinegar together and slowly drizzling in oil; Season with sugar, salt and pepper; mix dressing with vegetables; serve at room temperature. Taste for salt before serving. Remember, potatoes love salt.

>>Chefs Kirstie Herbstreit and Jody O’Malley are both Red Seal certified chefs. Together they run The Culinary Studio, which offers classes, demonstrations and private dinners. To contact the chefs, visit their website www.theculinarystudio.ca.

PHOTO

diameter is nice

» SUBMITTED

Kirstie Herbstreit & Jody O'Malley

>>3 lbs of new potatoes, 1-1/2 inches in

TEAM BUILDING The team had the opportunity to not only watch five world cup matches and meet team Canada, but they played three exhibition matches and saw numerous historical sights during their trip as well, including the Dachau concentration camp near Munich.

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 16 play in Canada every weekend and we didn’t need to go to Germany to play soccer,” said Philipps. “We wanted the girls to see the toplevel of soccer and how they train and compose themselves, and on the other hand we wanted to take the opportunity, being in Germany and Europe, to expose the girls to the culture and to the history.” The team also visited historical sites in Amsterdam, such as Anne Frank House, and Paris, including the Eiffel Tower and the Louvre. The players say that the visit played a big role in helping the team come together as one unit and to become closer friends and teammates than they already were. The head coach strongly believes that to build a successful team the players must know and respect each other, which the trip has certainly helped to accomplish. “It would have been impossible not

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2 Finch Place, Elmira, ON | 519-500-6928 St. Jacobs Place would like to extend a huge thank you to all volunteers, as well as those who made donations to the Woolwich Fire Department and participated in St. Jacobs Summer Fest July 20th. Special thanks go to Goods Garage, Fairway Lumber/Home Hardware, Mercedes Corp. and Stone Crock for their generous contributions as well as “The Back Street Boys” for providing outstanding entertainment.

10 Water St., St. Jacobs, Ont. N0B 2N0 519-664-6637 ext. 405

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to bond the team further. The girls really need to know each other and they really need to have each other’s back and they need to respect each other.” The team was promoted this season to Level Three of the Western Ontario Youth Soccer League and sports an impressive 9-5-3 record, including a 2-1 victory over the Sarnia Spirit on Monday night – a team that had not lost in nine matches to start the season after four wins and five draws. The players agreed the trip played a big role in bringing them all together, although they did admit that being with the same people for two weeks straight wasn’t always fun and games. “We had some rough days here and there, but we were spending 24-hours a day with the same people, so we got to know the things that bother us about each other and I guess that’s always good,” laughed Leger. “We were like siblings.”


LIVING HERE 18

THE OBSERVER

SUDOKU

THE CROSSWORD

HOW TO PLAY: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. You already have a few numbers to get you started.



                

     

       

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Boat

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Brig

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Buss

Gig

Punt

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Canadian Canoe

Howker

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Hoy

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Âť Saturday, July 30, 2011

Otaheite Dhow > SOLUTIONS: Find the answers to all of the puzzles on pg. 26

ACROSS 1. Back talk 4. Acadia National Park locale 9. Crude group? 13. Elliptical 17. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ momentâ&#x20AC;? 18. A member of one of four linguistic divisions of the prehistoric Greeks 19. Chart anew 21. Auxiliary 22. A transmission that changes gears according to the speed of the car 26. Gallivant 27. Old small silver Spanish coins 28. Subject of this puzzle 29. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You there?â&#x20AC;? 30. An edge between a sidewalk and a roadway 31. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Sound of Musicâ&#x20AC;? backdrop 32. â&#x20AC;&#x153;mehâ&#x20AC;? 35. Fit for farming 38. Live wire, so to speak 42. The theory that it is impossible to accurately measure both energy and time at the same time 48. ___ Minor 49. Mild, as weather 50. Fishing, perhaps 51. Swelling 52. To be at the head of the route 54. Catch 55. Caribbean, e.g. 56. A fictitious name used when the person performs a particular social role 57. Touched lightly in passing 59. ___-eyed 61. Delicate 63. A method of psychotherapy that reinforces you for stating negative and positive feelings directly 71. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ and the King of Siamâ&#x20AC;? 72. Do-it-yourselferâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s purchase 73. Neighbor of Georgia 74. Indian turnover 78. Atlanta-based station 81. Numero uno 83. Javelin, e.g. 84. Beauty pageant wear 85. Ticket info, maybe 86. Abominable Snowman 88. Coastal raptor 89. Intangible property that is the result of creativity (such as patents or trademarks or copyrights) 93. Regrets 94. Bloviates 95. Black stone 96. â&#x20AC;&#x153;September ___â&#x20AC;? (Neil Diamond hit) 97. Astrological transition point 100. Frigid 105. An Indian dish made with highly seasoned rice and meat or fish or vegetables 109. Lifeless, old-style 111. Egg-shaped with the narrower end at the base 113. A group of persons including one suspected of having committed a crime 116. Brio





















 























 



 











 











  

















 

 



















 

 















 





















































 























117. Downy duck 118. Measure 119. On, as a lamp 120. Gym set 121. Having or fostering a warm or friendly and informal atmosphere 122. The hole that an anchor rope passes through 123. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Star Trekâ&#x20AC;? rank: Abbr.

DOWN 1. Disinclined 2. Accustom 3. Corolla part 4. Extinct flightless bird of New Zealand 5. A chip, maybe 6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rocky ___â&#x20AC;? 7. Bead material 8. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Come in!â&#x20AC;? 9. Face-to-face exam 10. Composes 11. Dash lengths 12. Any of several shrubs or small evergreen trees having solitary white or pink or reddish flowers 13. Brewerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s equipment 14. Henry ___ 15. Bothers 16. Advanced 18. Levy 20. Nickname given to someone that is filthy or untidy 23. Black gold 24. African capital 25. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Help!â&#x20AC;?





 







30. Aussie â&#x20AC;&#x153;bearâ&#x20AC;? 31. Au courant 33. Sun, e.g. 34. Double 36. Traditional Scandinavian wool rugs made using a form of the Ghiordes knot to make the double-sided pile fabric. 37. ___ line (major axis of an elliptical orbit) 38. Lover of Aeneas 39. Airy 40. Abounding with elms 41. Enlarge, as a hole 42. ___ manual 43. A nest in which spiders deposit their eggs 44. A justification for something existing 45. Ammonia derivative 46. Hose material 47. A coin worth one-hundredth of the value of the basic unit 48. Goyaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Duchess of ___â&#x20AC;? 53. A type of verb that exists in combination with verb /preposition, verb/adverb, or verb/adverb/preposition, any of which are part of the syntax of the sentence. 56. Way, way off 58. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Empedocles on ___â&#x20AC;? (Matthew Arnold poem) 60. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A rat!â&#x20AC;? 62. Address 64. The residence of the Catholic Pope in the Vatican City 65. A woman who tells fortunes 66. Prepare, as tea 67. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well, I ___!â&#x20AC;? 68. Dead to the world

69. Fool 70. Box office take 74. Ado 75. Hokkaido native 76. Buddy 77. Assayersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; stuff 79. Remaining after all deductions 80. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How ___!â&#x20AC;? 82. Razor sharpener 85. Extraordinarily good or great 87. 007, for one 90. canadian dollar 91. English race place 92. Kind of duty 96. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Welcomeâ&#x20AC;? site 98. Dickensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ___ Heep 99. Leaf opening 101. Egg cells 102. Big dipper 103. Saved on supper, perhaps 104. Breaks 105. A coffin along with its stand 106. Doing nothing 107. Acquire 108. Getaway spots 109. Air force heroes 110. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Poppinsâ&#x20AC;? 111. Sonata, e.g. 112. BĂŞte noire 114. Altar avowal 115. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ what?â&#x20AC;?

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

19 SPORTS

SPORTS

Metzger relishes chance at international competition Canada falls just short of medals at the Women’s U25 World Wheelchair Basketball Championships James Jackson

PHOTO

orin Metzger has returned home to Elmira after participating in the inaugural Women’s U25 World Wheelchair Basketball Championships held last week at Brock University. Canada finished fourth in the tournament, losing out to Great Britain 62-42 in the bronze medal match July 21. She said that although Canada couldn’t claim a medal, it was an honour just to represent her country in the historical event. “It was a disappointment for sure, I’m not going to say that it wasn’t, but we played our best and it was just unfortunate that we ended up losing,” she said. “We were the first athletes for Canada to ever play in that tournament, and although we did lose, we will always have that in our hearts.” Canada actually opened the tournament by rattling off four straight wins to claim first-place in Pool B, including a 62-15 win over Russia in the opener on July 15, a close 65-52 win over Japan on July 16, a 60-47 win over Germany on July 17, and a 63-48 win over Mexico in the quarterfinals on July 19 to advance to the semi-finals against Australia on the 20th. Unfortunately, Canada fell short in that game, 6047, and wound up losing to Great Britain the following day in the bronze medal match and for Metzger, the level of competition at the tournament was a whole

» SUBMITTED

C

MAKING HER MOVE Elmira’s Corin Metzger takes a shot past Australia’s Katherine Reed during Team Canada’s 60-47 semi-final loss to the Aussie’s during the inaugural Women’s U25 World Wheelchair Basketball Championships held last week at Brock University.

new experience. “It was very high-paced, especially since this is my first time playing at a higher level,” she said. “I was expecting it to be high paced, but it was certainly higher than I’ve ever been really used to.” As the fourth-youngest player on the 12-player team, the 19-year-old didn’t see the floor as much as she probably would have liked. After logging 12:22 and sinking two baskets in the opening game against Russia, Metzger had zero minutes against Japan, a little over five minutes in the win over Germany, zero minutes against Mexico, and only 1:57 in the semi-final loss to the Australians, before closing out the tournament with 4:28 against Great Britain in the bronze medal game. Metzger didn’t let the lack of playing time get her down, though, and took full advantage of the minimal time she was given. “Even though I only got a few shifts here and there, I just had to go out there and give it my all and I felt that I achieved that,” she said, adding that the four points she registered in the opener was the highlight of the tournament for her. “I went out and I just played basketball, and I was very happy with myself.” Metzger, a versatile athlete who also plays on the provincial sledge hockey team in the winter, said it was a tremendous honour

> SEE METZGER ON PG. 20

Woolwich Wild select logo to mark 10th anniversary 11-year-old Elmira girl’s entry chosen from among 10 submitted for contest James Jackson

T

he 2011/2012 season marks the Woolwich Girls Minor Hockey Association 10th anniversary, and to celebrate the occasion the association held a logo contest, with 11-year-old Elmira-resident Megan Chapman named the winner last week. “Girls hockey has come

a long way in 10 years, especially in Woolwich, so we decided to have a contest but we wanted the girls that are part of the association to participate in it,” said WGMHA vice-president Tammy Willms, who has been on the executive for four years and whose daughter has played for the Wild for the past nine.

“We just had our first bunch of girls actually leave the association since it first started, so that was a big milestone for us this year as well,” she added. The contest was open the entire month of June, and the executive committee received 10 different entries. It was only open to players within the association, and

Willms said they had a fairly simple time choosing Chapman’s design as the winner. “It matched our colours and said everything we wanted to say,” she said, adding that it was a simple yet effective design. The logo features two blue hockey sticks crossed in the middle with the words ‘girls’ and ‘hockey’ written on the blades,

and the association’s ‘Wild’ logo emblazoned across both sticks as well. There is also a large number 10 above the sticks. Chapman’s design will be used in marketing material for upcoming Woolwich Wild events this season such as their annual tournament,

> SEE LOGO ON PG. 21


SPORTS 20

THE OBSERVER

An expert with smaller fish to fry

T

he other day, I discovered precisely what’s wrong with fishing. This might not seem important now, but I suspect, in a hundred or so years it will be the kind of thing that teachers are forced to explain to bored students, right alongside the story of Newton getting clocked by a falling apple. Even then, it will still not be important but at least it will be far more interesting than apple-induced head injuries – of which I am a bit of an expert, by the way. Like Newton’s great discovery, mine also happened accidentally and while I was practically asleep. I was sitting in my boat contemplating life, slowly retrieving a fly that imitates a leech. That’s when a large, smallmouth bass ascended out of the depths right beside it. Not to belabour the point, but it was a really good fish. But just as that bass was about to strike, a tiny one, no larger

Not-So-Great Outdoorsman Steve Galea than my index finger, rushed in, took the fly and hooked itself. No surprise there. This, and countless other experiences just like it, have led me to compile and pen my first law of fishing: If two fish are looking at your lure, the small one will always get there first. I know, brilliant. OK, right now this is just a very solid theory based on my extensive expertise at catching the smaller of two fish – but in time, I suspect, science will recognize the pure genius and uselessness of this observation. And, as we all know, these are the very two qualities required to proclaim a theory a scientific law.

I only mention this to explain all the small fish I have caught since the opening of bass season. It has nothing to do with the fact that I am a lousy angler – as some people claim. No, it has more to do with the serious scientific research that I am conducting. Thus, far, I’m proud to say I have caught and released several hundred bass – and not one was even close to being a lunker. Impossible you say? Well, I’ve got plenty of incredulous witnesses. If all goes well, I’ll probably publish a scientific paper about this phenomenon within a year or two. This will place me in an extremely good position for when the angling public finally gets bored of catching big fish. And when that day comes, I’ll be ready with my theories, research, photos and video. I might even get sponsorship from com-

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

panies who sell very fine fishing line and tiny lures. I will be known as the small fish expert. And not just among those people who have fished with me All I really need to do is make it trendy. And, if owling and planking are any indication, this shouldn’t be too difficult. I’ll start by letting the general public in on the fact that small fish taste better and are less of a strain on your expensive equipment. You also spend less time cooking them. And, if you are short as I am, a photo of you with a small fish makes you look bigger. In some, I actually look like a giant, which makes me feel a whole lot better about myself. And isn’t that what fishing is supposed to do? Yup, one day people will want to learn how to catch small fish. And that’s the day I’ll probably catch a lunker.

Metzger: Happy to have a chance to represent Canada

PHOTO

to play for team Canada in front of a home crowd in St. Catharines. “The fans and everybody were incredible, as we were going down the hallways of Brock and people were asking ‘How did you do? How did you play?’ that brought up our spirits and really pushed us to work harder when we had so many people behind you all the time. It was fantastic.”

» SUBMITTED

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 19

FOR CANADA Metzger was the fourth-youngest player on the 12-player squad, which was assembled following a grueling training camp held in Winnipeg back in January. Canada eventually lost 62-42 in the bronze medal game to Great Britain on July 21.

PHOTOS

» COLIN DEWAR

Elmira golf tournament a fundraiser for Kate's Kause

ON COURSE FOR THE KAUSE

Mark MacSporran (left) putts onto the green, Bing Hong (middle) tries to sink his putt, and Gerry Oue tees off from the ninth hole during the Kate’s Kause golf tournament held July 18 at the Elmira Golf Club.

> Rank wins golf tourney In one of the most exciting finishes in tournament history, Elmira’s Garrett Rank beat out 123 other golfers to win the Toronto Star Men’s Amateur Tournament in Burlington July 22. In the four-day event played under blistering conditions, Rank shot a combined score of 282, just one stroke better than second-place finishers Adrian Cord, Alex Carrigan and Simon McInnins, and two-strokes over Dean Henry. The Elmira-native and member of the University of Waterloo golf team secured the title by draining a 20-foot putt on the 18th hole. He shot rounds of 75, 65, 70 and 72. “I let out a pretty good fistpump there,” said Rank after accepting the John Honderich trophy at the Islington Golf Club.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

21 SPORTS

WINNING ENTRY Eleven-year-old Megan Chapman holds up her first-place winning design for the 10th anniversary

PHOTOS

» JAMES JACKSON

PHOTO

» JAMES JACKSON

Autorama rolls into St. Clements

logo contest held throughout the month of June, while club vice-president Tammy Willms displays the digital copy that will appear on all 10th anniversary clothing and apparel.

Logo: What Wild hockey is all about > CONTINUED FROM PG. 19 and will also appear on all 10th anniversary commemorative clothing apparel items such as exercise jackets and pants, hoodies, t-shirts and even headbands. These items will be ready for purchase by the beginning of the season in September. “[I] tried to come up with ideas that would sort of commemorate the Woolwich

girls’ 10th anniversary,” said Chapman of her inspiration for the logo. She said it felt good knowing that her design was chosen as the winner and that she is proud that will be on the clothing and worn throughout the season. “It’s going to feel nice seeing it around and people wearing it and knowing I made that,” she said. As the winner of the de-

sign contest, Chapman is entitled to $100 worth of free anniversary apparel, but perhaps more importantly it gives her bragging rights over her 15-year-old sister Emily, also a member of the Woolwich Wild. “It feels good because I beat my sister and she entered too,” smiled Chapman, who will suit up as a winger for the peewee squad this upcoming season.

Aquaducks host SWORSA event at WMC

DUCKS

From the top left, Melyssa Macdonald, 8, Jamie MacDougall, 15, Thomas Norcott, 9, and Madeleine Nelson, 15, from the Elmira Aquaduck swim team compete during the Aquaduck SWORSA semifinals July 23 at the WMC. PHOTOS

» COLIN DEWAR

SHOWTIME Hundreds of classic cars and motorcycles rolled into the St. Clements Community Centre on July 16 for their sixth-annual Autorama show. Top, John Orrell (left) and Ken Locasale from Bamberg wowed the crowd with their 1932 MG J2 Roadster – originally owned by the grandson of Charles Dickens. Above, they don’t make ‘em like they used to, emphasized by the oversized fins on this 1958 Desoto Firesweep. Below, the chrome on this black 1954 Chev was blinding in the hot sunshine. Meanwhile, Ben and Sam Atkinson from Kitchener were more interested in sitting in the front seat of Wellesley’s new aerial fire truck and trying out the siren.


SPORTS 22

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

Woolwich U13 boys play to a second-place finish at Kingston tournament

PHOTO

» SUBMITTED

SILVER LINING On July 23 and 24th the Woolwich U13 boys’ team travelled to Kingston to compete in the Ambassador Cup. The boys opened the tournament with a 2-1 win over the host team followed by a convincing 2-0 shutout over Peterborough, led by goaltender Colby Bond and the rest of the defence. They then fell 1-0 to Scarborough but still advanced to the semifinals, where they beat a physical Montreal squad 2-1. The boys fell in the finals, again to Scarborough, by a 3-1 margin to finish up the tournament in second place.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

23 ENTERTAINMENT

ENTERTAINMENT

A good case of the blues

Now in its 11th year, Kitchener Blues Festival has an international reputation Steve Kannon

T

» SUBMITTED

LEGENDARY SOUNDS The Kitchener Blues Festival runs Aug. 4-7 at various venues in downtown Kitchener. This year's lineup includes Howlin' Wolf guitarist Hubert Sumlin and Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame member Gregg Allman.

PHOTOS

he summertime blues, troubling to Eddie Cochran, are something music fans really start to anticipate at this time of year, courtesy of next weekend’s Kitchener Blues Festival. Now in its 11th year, the festival is an August mainstay, helping to cement the city’s place on the international blues map. Kitchener already had a reputation for the blues, thanks to the early efforts of Glen Smith, who booked blues shows in town and later opened the Hoodoo Lounge and Pop the Gator and brought Mel Brown to town. The legendary bluesman, who passed away in 2009, made the city his home for 20 years. Brown was one of the performers at the first festival in 2001, attended by some 3,000 people. Today, the event runs over four days, with 40 bands and 60 shows. From a small affair in front of city hall, the festival now boasts seven stages, and more than a dozen bars playing host to blues music. Rob Deyman, one of the co-founders who still serves as president of the volunteer board of directors, has seen continued growth year over year. In 2010, the organization spilled over into Victoria Park, adding a huge tent-covered venue to accommodate crowds that now exceed 100,000. This year’s addition of two small workshop stages is likely to be the footprint for the next couple of years, he said. The idea is to split up the crowds, spreading them out across the downtown area by scheduling artists at different stages. That helps avoid congestion in any one place, Deyman explained, noting the new tent in the park proved very useful last year. “We have the capacity for the audiences at that location,” he said

A MIX OF STYLES Jimmie Vaughan, founder of the Fabulous Thunderbirds and one of the defining artists of the Austin guitar sound of the late ’70s and ’80s, is this year's recipient of the Mel Brown Award. Also on tap for the weekend is the the great soul singer Bettye Lavette.

of the ability to handle growing crowds. “We want the crowds, and we prepare for it,” added artistic director Claude Cloutier. With the lineup for next weekend’s festival, organizers are preparing for large crowds indeed, especially if the weather stays hot and dry. On tap at headliners this time out are Gregg Allman, John Mayall, Jimmie Vaughan and both Jonny and Edgar Winter. As is normally the case, organiz-

ers try to put together a good mix of legends, up-and-coming artist and local performers, though the number of legends continues to dwindle over time. This year, for instance, Pinetop Perkins was booked to play, but he passed away in March at the age of 97. However, we will get to see longtime collaborator Willie (Big Eyes) Smith, who performed with the legendary Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy and Howlin’ Wolf, as well as Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones and Eric

Clapton. He’ll be joined in a tribute to Pinetop Perkins by Huber Sumlin, Howlin’ Wolf ’s guitarist. “Along with the great international artists, we want to have great representation as far as local, regional and national performers,” said Cloutier. Given the area’s reputation for the blues and the growing size of the festival – it draws fans from the U.S. and Europe – organizers have an easier time these days booking performers. “All of the bands know about our festival – they really want to play here,” Cloutier noted. “We’re absolutely on the international blues radar,” added Deyman. Still, there are many variables to juggle, including programming a variety of blues sounds. When it comes to booking performers, there’s a matter of who’s available at the time, who’s touring, travel plans and tour schedules for those acts who are on the road … and a host of other considerations. “The second the playing ends, the planning begins for the next one,” said Deyman of the process, noting more than 4,000 volunteer hours are needed to make the festival happen. “The number of volunteers continues to grow. There are many hours donated to the festival – the amount of work is significant.” All that hard work pays off, as the crowds grow along with the number of performances and activities. “Last year was a banner year for us – it was our best year ever in terms of attendance, and revenues were up,” said Cloutier. “We’re still 100 per cent volunteer-driven.” The fruits of all their labours can be seen and heard for free Aug. 4-7 in downtown Kitchener. For more information, including a complete schedule of performances, checkout www.kitchenerbluesfestival.com.

Sunday July 31

Paul Weber Variety Night WHAT’S UP NEXT: August 7 Doug DeBoer & Hard Ryde

SUNDAY NIGHTS | 7-9PM | BRING A LAWNCHAIR | FREE (From Niagara Falls)


CLASSIFIEDS 24

THE OBSERVER

CLASSIFIEDS

HELP WANTED

A wide range of jobs? Welding? Millwrighting? Assembly? Blueprint reading? Inside work? Outside work? Responsibility?

Then you should be working for us. WE’RE LOOKING FOR:

Fitter Welder

(minimum 3 years experience) (must be able to pass CWB welding test, G.M.A.W. F.C.A.W.)

Mig Welder

(must be able to pass CWB welding test, G.M.A.W. F.C.A.W.) Are you capable of: • Layout of plate and sheet metal from blueprints • Able to work with minimum supervision • High quality workmanship • Regular and punctual attendance

AUCTION for

Various Municipalities & Others Breslau Airport Road Auction Complex

5100 Fountain St, North, Breslau (Kitchener)

Sat

Aug 6th

Woodworking/Construction => Makita Thickness Planer & Jointer Scroll Saw * Radial Arm Saws * Dust Collector * 2-6” Jointers * Router Hilti TE10 * 12” Planer * Wood Lathes * 6+ Honda Generators Honda 5hp Air Compressor * 8 - Paslode/Hitachi Air Staplers & Nailers 3 Paslode Impulse Nailers * 2 - Mitre Saws * Power Saws * Harnesses I-R 175 CFM Diesel Air Compressor * 15 + 12/14” Carbide Blades 2-Stihl Concrete Saws * Wacker Trench Tamper * 4” Port Diesel Pump 16’ Cedar Canoe * 14’ Alum Boat * Outboards * Gas Ice Auger Troy-Bilt PONY R/T Tiller * Weedtrimmers * Blower * Chainsaw

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fax: 519-669-1450 email: bob@mgmill.com

HELP WANTED

>>Elmira Based Furniture Company now hiring for mature full time general labourer position. Day shift. Fax resume to 519-669-8820 or call 519669-3143. >>Required - Handyman

to occasionally do some painting and maintenance on Home Hardware Building in Elmira. 1-416-244-3451.

WORK WANTED

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The #1 Weekly in the Region.

HEALTH CARE

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>>Mobile

Home 14’x60’, 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Open concept, kitchen and living room. Attached screen area 12’x 16’. Very clean, asking $12K. 519570-0539.

>>Oil Furnace and tank in good condition. $500 o.b.o. Please call 519-7436880. >>Used

Orange Steel in very good condition. 32 in wide x 20ft long and 32”in wide x 7 ft long. Approximately 80 sheets of each length. Please call Bert 519-638-5033 or 519-5027309.

Trained by Brad Pattison

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» Saturday, July 30, 2011

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>>Industrial Bay for rent. 64 Howard Ave., Elmira. 2000 sq ft., open space. 14’ high bay door. 16’ ceiling height, good for mezzanine. Separate hydro, gas and water meters. Inquiries please call 519-465-8421 or 519-669-1461 ext. 22.

>>For

Rent - spacious, up to date, second level, two bedroom adult, non smoking apartment in a quiet setting. All appliances including washer & dryer and air conditioning included. Contact Bill 519-669-2797 or Don 519-669-2716.

Worship 10:00a.m.

COMM/INDUSTRIAL FOR RENT

>>Elmira - One Bedroom apartment, heat & hydro incl. No pets. 519-669-0623.

>>Apartment Wanted - in Elmira. 3 bedroom, no pets, non smoker. References available. Call 519-669-2144, ask for Ed or leave message.

Gale

>>2 Bedroom Condo available September 1, Elmira. Laundry, balcony, pet friendly. $960 + hydro. Please call 519-210-0094 or email ehc@hotmail.ca

Brookmead St. Elmira - large moving sale. Aug. 5th 8 a.m.- 7 p.m; Aug. 6th 7 a.m. noon. Microwave, 23 place setting china, Tupperware, bedding, towels, home decor, misc household items, travel crib, photocopier, GPS, quilt frames, garden tools, kerosene heater and much more!

RENTALS

PLACES OF FAITH

10:00am Worship Service Pastor: Richard A. Frey www.stpaulselmira.ca

27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593

July 31 - The Secret To Greatness

Sunday, July 31, 2011

Sale - 1599 Three Bridges Rd., RR1, St. Jacobs. Sat. July 30, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m.

casual dress | contemporary music | christian church

>>Moving Sale - July 30. Furniture and other household items for sale. 63 Brookmead St. 7 a.m.

5 First St., Elmira • 519-669-1459

SUNDAYS AYS @ 10:30AM Services at John Mahood Public School A www.elmiracommunity.org

10:00 AM

Guest Speaker: Alistair Noble 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 Check out our website www.woodsidechurch.ca


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

25 CLASSIFIEDS

TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH

COMMITTEE OF ADJUSTMENT NOTICE OF HEARING

Advertising Opportunities - 2012

August 15, 2011 On Monday, August 15, 2011 at 5:30 p.m. the Committee will meet in the Council Chambers of the Municipal Offices, 24 Church Street West, Elmira to consider the following applications. All persons interested in the applications may attend and may contact Nancy Thompson at 519-669-6040 or 519-664-2613 (ext. 6040) regarding meeting details. Email: nthompson@ woolwich.ca. The Committee will also consider signed, written submissions for or against the applications if submitted to the Township of Woolwich no later than 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, August 9, 2011. Submissions can be forwarded by mail or hand delivery to: Township of Woolwich, Attn: Jeremy Vink, P.O. Box 158, 24 Church Street West, Elmira, ON N3B 2Z6 or Fax 519-669-4669 or Email jvink@woolwich.ca. MINOR VARIANCE APPLICATION A15/2011 – Barry Bauman PROPERTY: 7536 Reid Woods Drive, GCT Part lot 91 PROPOSAL: The applicant is requesting permission to reduce the building line setback to the property line adjacent to a road (Reid Woods Drive) from 7.5 metres to 0 metres to permit the construction of a second storey addition on a portion of the single family dwelling. The property is zoned Agricultural (A) and contains a single family dwelling, detached garage and a hoop house. MINOR VARIANCE APPLICATION A17/2011 – Terence and Gayle Tyner PROPERTY: 1858 Sawmill Road, Conestogo, Plan 601 Musselman Survey Lot 1 PROPOSAL: The applicant is requesting permission to: • recognize the existing reduced lot width of approximately 22 metres where 30 metres is required; and • recognize the existing reduced lot area of approximately 1030 square metres where 2,000 square metres is required. The applicant is proposing a change of use for the property from retail to a chiropractic office on the main floor. The second floor is proposed to remain as an apartment unit. The property currently enjoys legal non-conforming status for eight parking spaces which will meet the necessary parking requirements for the proposed chiropractic office / apartment uses. The property is zoned Settlement Commercial (C-3) and contains a two storey commercial building and detached garage.

WOOLWICH MEMORIAL CENTRE Dan Snyder Arena 200’ x 85’ NHL sized ice pad 1325 seat bowl design Walking track 40, 000 sq. ft. total Home to the Elmira Sugar Kings Junior “B” team – winners of the 2011 Cherrey and Sutherland Cups

ARENA BOARDS One Year Term Snyder Arena (WMC) $1,300.00 / year Only 3 locations McLeod Arena (WMC) $700.00 / year remaining! WTA (St. Jacobs) $700.00 / year SCORECLOCK NEW 1 Year Term Snyder Arena 4 LOCATIONS $2,600.00 / year ONLY! 1 BACKLIT McLeod Arena LOCATION ONLY! $1,400.00 / year PLEASE NOTE: Prices do not include HST

Two Year Term $1,150 / year $650 / year $650 / year 2 Year Term $2,300.00 / year $1,300.00 / year

Three Year Term $1,000 / year $600 / year $600 / year 3 Year Term $2,000.00 / year $1,200.00 / year

For more information please contact Jennifer at 519.669.6048 or jhorndl@woolwich.ca

DATED this 30th day of July, 2011 Jeremy Vink, RPP, MCIP Senior Planner Engineering & Planning Services

THE TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH HAS THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS AVAILABLE IN RECREATION & FACILITIES SERVICES Part Time Recreation Customer Service Staff to provide excellent customer service in the operation of the Woolwich Memorial Centre. Must be willing to work evenings, weekends and statutory holidays. Job description can be viewed on the Township web site www.woolwich.ca under Employment Opportunities. Send resume to: Township of Woolwich 24 Church St. W, Box 158 Elmira, ON N3B 2Z6 Attn: Human Resources

ALL 2011 FINAL TAX BILLS WERE MAILED JULY 22, 2011.

Deadline: August 19, 2011

First Installment is due August 12, 2011 Second Installment is due October 14, 2011

We thank all who apply however only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

If you are a new owner or have not received your tax bill by the first week in August, please contact the Finance Department. 519-669-6000.

275

WOOLWICH TOWNSHIP ARENA 185’ x 75’ 250 – 300 viewing capacity

ADVERTISING RATES

Further information about the applications may be obtained from Engineering and Planning Services at 519-669-6038 or 519-664-2613 (Ext. 6038).

5,000 FLYERS $ 8.5x11” Paper, Black & White, One Side

Jim McLeod Arena 200’ x 85’ NHL sized ice pad 100 – 150 viewer capacity 3 bleachers

PLUS HST

OR

449

10,000 FLYERS $ 8.5x11” Paper, Black & White, One Side

Promote your business with a professionally designed flyer Call today to find out how our award-winning design team can help your business.

PLUS HST

519-669-5790


CLASSIFIEDS 26

THE OBSERVER

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

FAMILY ALBUM STAG & DOE

THANK YOU

Louise Bauman

Thank you to all who joined us in celebrating our 40th Wedding Anniversary by attending our Open House. Many thanks for the cards, flowers and best wishes from our relatives and friends.

Saturday August 6th - 8pm to 1am

A special thanks to our children who worked so hard to make this a great day for everyone.

DJ, BAR, DRAWS, FOOD!!! $10 COVER

Robert & Debbie Musselman

Elmira Lions Hall 40 South St. W., Elmira

CROSSWORD

IN MEMORIAM

Thank You

Stag & Doe for Jamie Klammer & Ryan Rozema

Âť Saturday, July 30, 2011

In loving memory of a special friend who passed away one year ago, July 31, 2010. What I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give to take one more walk or just quietly sit and have one more talk with you. I will never forget how dear you were to me. Miss you lots. Love Sheri & Family IN MEMORIAM

Bringing in the wheat

In Memory of

Heidi Taunya Shoemaker There is not a day that I do not think of you. Always loved â&#x2C6;&#x2019; forever.

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A SIGN OF THE SEASON Farmers across the region â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including this one in a field on Herrgott Road between Wallenstein and Hawkesville â&#x20AC;&#x201C; have been busy this week harvesting their winter wheat crop.The region produces upwards of 25,000 tonnes of winter wheat annually. M&T Business Card Ad:Layout 1 04/03/09 10:22 AM Page 1

Âť JAMES JACKSON

Bob & Audrey Gaede TRAVEL WITH THE Take your Observer on all your travels, take a picture with it and then send it in to us. info@woolwichobserver.com

SUDUKO - EASY SUDUKO - HARD

Thank you to all for phone calls, cards, and best wishes received on the occasion of our 60th Anniversary.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

27 CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE FEATURE PROPERTY

3bdrm, 2bath home features MF Cathedral ceilings. Loc’d on lg beautiful treed corner lot full of perennials. Potential for pool or double garage. Bright, open kit w/breakfast bar. X-lg slider in DR to 17ftx19ft deck. Airy LR w/hrdwd flrs. Whirlpool bath, RR gas FP, lndy rm walk out, Lg 19x24ft storage rm. MLS Call Paul direct.

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated | 180 Weber St. S., Waterloo

OFFICE 519-888-7110

Paul Martin

$289,000

$166,900

FEATURE PROPERTY IN LOVELY SOUTHFIELD Fantastic well kept semi located in sought after Southfield subdivision directly across from park, first time buyers its what you have been waiting for! Come and be impressed. Completely finished featuring open concept main floor plus eatin kitchen with patio door leading to deck and extensive yard. finished basement with 3 pc. bath, tastefully finished throughout. Side entrance off driveway. MLS Call Paul direct.

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-503-9533 www.homeswithpaul.ca

Paul will donate $250.00 with every home he buys or sells in Woolwich to both Park Manor PS & WCS Family Violence Prevention Program.

MOVE TO THE SMALL TOWN OF DRAYTON!

UNIQUE SIDESPLIT!

$252,500

SPACIOUS RAISED BUNGALOW

$369,900

Fantastic opportunity for car buff or hobbyist, 3 car garage & detached 4 car garage/workshop. Inlaw suite w/2 bdrms, full kit, bath, & lndry. lg 87x250ft lot steps to golf course. 5200 sq. ft. of fin’d living space. Grand yrd over looking farm land. MLS Call Paul direct.

$293,900

Unbelievable value to own your own piece of countryside in a small peaceful village with a beautiful panoramic view of the Conestoga River Valley, right from your front porch. Large 24ft X 40ft detached insulated and heated workshop (220amp service) situated on a .74 acre lot. 3 Bedroom and 2 Bathroom. Enjoy the cottage feel right at home! MLS Call Alli or Bill direct.

$277,500

Don’t miss this handsome open concept home in Sought after Southfield. Loc’d right beside park backing onto farmland. MF consists of LR, bright kit w/fabulous skylight & dinette w/slider. Upstairs has 3 nice sized bdrms & master walk in & main bath w/tub surround. Downstairs is the lg FR w/gas FP, open to dinette. Fin’d RR w/closet wall perfect for storage. MLS Call Paul direct.

OPEN CONCEPT

FABULOUS BUNGALOW

Alli Bauman

On 150ft x 150ft treed lot. Only 30min to Waterloo. Captivating custom built home equip’d w/attractive sunken LR featuring wood burning FP, eat-in kit & sep DR both with walk-outs to wrap around deck. MF lndry & ens. Huge fin’d bsmnt incl RR, FR. MLS Call Paul direct.

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-577-6248

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

$429,000

LARGER THAN IT LOOKS

BEAUTIFUL HOME 3 bdrm, 3bath exceptional home is carpet free w/ceramic & hdwd throughout. Convenience at its best w/ upper flr laundry, 2 walk-in closets, many kit cupboard upgrades. Lovely garden door off dinette leading to lg deck in fenced yrd w/shed. MLS Call Paul direct.

$379,900

1853sqft luxurious Verdone home. Carpet free MF, Hrdwd & ceramic, mudrm, MF lndy. Bright LR equip’d w/gas fp. Lg kit abundant w/cupboards, under cabinet lights, breakfast bar. Lg master your own private oasis, spacious walk in closet, 2nd closet, fabulous ensuite: lg vanity, 2 sinks, stunning glass dr shower, soaker tubs in both baths. French door walk-out to covered 16x15ft patio. MLS Call Paul direct.

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-588-1348

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

$393,500

BRIGHT AND SPACIOUS

$309,900

Raised bungalow in immaculate condition and extremely well maintained. This is a solid brick home with three plus bedrooms located in desirable “Birdland” and is perfect for all ages and ready for immediate occupancy. MLS Call Alli or Bill direct.

$375,000

FOUND IT, YOUR NEW HOME!

Bill Norris

3 plus bedrooms. Large sunken family room addition features gas fireplace, skylight and walk-out to a huge deck with hot tub and gazebo. Lots of updates through-out including furnace, a/c, windows, flooring and much more. Finished basement with workshop. MLS Call Alli or Bill direct.

CHARMING COUNTRY SETTING

EXCEPTIONAL HOME W/INLAW!

$849,000

First time home buyers, this is a great starter home with a huge lot backing onto park. The large living room with patio door opens to a spacious deck & very private yard. Features a large country eat in kitchen. Some updates include furnace (2008), laminate flooring, deck, and some newer windows. Lots of potential and very affordable. MLS Please call Bill or Alli direct.

DOWNTOWN GLEN ALLAN Build your dream home on this 0.48 acre lot. MLS Call Paul direct.

$59,000

INDUSTRIAL LOT

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME ON THIS

Exceptional corner lot. Great exposure. Industrial 0.95 acre lot on the corner of Union and Donway. MLS Call Paul direct.

$199,500

Spectacular home larger than it looks. 4bdrms, 2 full baths, updated eat-in kit w/cupboards to spare, den, lg cold room. Hrdwd flr in LR & DR, gas heating stove in FR. Fantastic home for any hobbyist w/craft rm & workshops. Balcony overlooking stunning perennial gardens, vegetable gardens & fruit trees surrounding this tranquil home loc’d on lg .69 acre lot. MLS Call Paul direct.

0.78 acre lot in the quaint little village of Glen Allan. MLS Call Paul direct.

$79,000

ELMIRA REAL ESTATE SERVICES

5 SCENIC ACRES $449,900. Minutes

Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage 519-669-3192 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

BONNIE BRUBACHER Broker of Record

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

HOT NEW LISTING

$284,900 DRAYTON.

This gorgeous home situated in an ideal family neighbourhood with a park, features a fenced back yard and deck, main floor den, an almost totally finished basement, central air, hot tub and second floor laundry. MLS

FIRST TIME BUYERS $264,000 ELMIRA. Oversized

garage with walkout to backyard. Neutral décor, walkout to deck and fenced yard. Great family location with appliances included. MLS

SHANNA ROZEMA Broker.

LAURIE LANGDON Sales Representative

STRIKING FAMILY HOME

from Drayton, new home, 3 Bedrooms, 3 Baths, walk out basement. Includes your choice of flooring. MLS

MONIQUE ROES Sales Representative esentative

$329,900 ELMIRA.

Carpet free. 3 Bedrooms offers cheater bath including ceramic/glass shower and whirlpool bath. Ceramics and dark Armstrong flooring. Dark Maple cabinetry, upgraded sinks and faucets. Walkout to deck and fenced yard. A pleasure to show. MLS

CLASSIC CENTURY HOME

$394,000 ELMIRA.

2400 SQ FT + walk up attic for future development. Love and appreciate the character this amazing home has to offer. Hardwood flooring, natural woodwork, transom windows, wooden banisters and stairs, walkouts to private covered verandahs, the list is endless. Private backyard patio bordered with mature trees and gardens plus a fenced yard for gardening and play area. MLS


CLASSIFIEDS 28

THE OBSERVER

REAL ESTATE

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

Sunlight Homes Scott Grainger

Barrister and Solicitor Phone: 519-669-1736 Fax: 519-210-1736 scott@propertyshop.ca CALL A PARTICIPATING LAWYER TO FIND OUT HOW PROPERTYSHOP.CA CAN WORK FOR YOU IN THE SALE OF YOUR MOST IMPORTANT ASSET.

Drayton Heights

Independently Owned and Operated

4B Arthur St. S. Elmira • www.remaxsolidgold.biz OFFICE: 519-669-5426

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

BERT MARTIN, BROKER

THIS WEEK’S LISTINGS WITH PROPERTYSHOP.CA

DRAYTON BUNGALOW!

63 Sugar King Drive, Elmira - Property ID# 2525

This home located in a private setting offers four bedrooms, three bathrooms, one & one half garage and a heated pool on a large lot. MLS. Call Bert to View.

PRICE: $328,800

LOCATION EqUALS CONvENIENCE! This 3 Bedroom Ivystone Home is only 5 years old and could not be more conveniently located to recreational and school amenities in the desirable town of Elmira. 63 Sugar King Drive, originally intended as a builder’s model, features premium finishes, “character” maple hardwood in the livingroom and solid maple cabinetry in the well appointed kitchen. The “Lilac”, includes a master with walk-in closet and ensuite bath, in addition to the main bath on the second floor and a powder room on the main level. Approaching the home you will note a full two car garage and lovely landscaping as you ascend the porch to the front entry. Entering the foyer, your eyes lead you into the kitchen where you will discover beautiful maple cabinetry, flowing towards a spacious dinette. The adjacent livingroom room is blessed with maple hardwood and provides enough room for separate dining space! Upstairs, this home includes a generous master bedroom with a vaulted ceiling, palladium window and a 3 piece ensuite. The second and third bedrooms are also located on this level and are large enough in size for your children to share. Closet space is excellent in all three bedrooms. This home has been professionally painted and is well decorated throughout. You will find that the yard is fully enclosed and ready for the kids with a substantial deck and an impressive play house. The basement is unfinished but insulated and ready for drywall, including rough-ins for a downstairs bath. When you do bring the drywall in, you’ll be pleased to discover that the basement windows are oversized and will accommodate a full 4x8 sheet! Central air, a high efficiency furnace and rough-in for central vac complete the technical picture. Call Carson or Joanne at (519) 503-1355 to arrange a viewing or watch for open house announcements on this site!

$264,900 Charming older home with lots of character located on a quiet tree lined street offers 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, many recent renovations including kitchen, bathrooms, windows, doors, trim, flooring, lighting, drywall, paint, soffits & eaves. MLS. Call Bert to view.

$319,900

COUNTRY ACREAGE!

Great property on the edge of town backing to river offers century home with 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, large family room addition, attached single garage, 5 acres of manicured orchard with a mix of fruit trees, 12 acres workable. Three one storey out buildings totaling 10,000 s/f. MLS. Call Bert to View.

735 Reid Crescent, Listowel - Property ID# 2511

74 Porchlight Drive, Elmira - Property ID# 2518

PRICE: $333,000

KEEP THE PORCHLIGHT ON! This 3 PLUS 1 BEDROOM HOME, backing to beautiful greenspace features open OP concept and convenient living, minutes YSH T from schools and the new Woolwich R PE Memorial Centre. Kitchener-Waterloo PRO is less than 15 minutes away. Nicely H T I decorated throughout,you will find a caDW thedral entry with a clear view through SOL the dining area to patio slider, looking over the two-tier deck, backyard and community walking path. This 7 year old Finoro Home, the “Merchant” is situated on a premium 42’ x 114’ lot. The kitchen provides lots of workspace, inclusive of a moveable kitchen island, breakfast bar, included gas range, over the range microwave (2010) and dishwasher. In this open concept home, cheerful, natural light prevails and the chef is never excluded from family events. Your living room features hardwood flooring installed in 2010. Upstairs, three spacious bedrooms and two bathrooms are provided, including the master with ensuite and luxurious corner soaker tub! The basement is fully finished with cinnamon maple veneer floors and includes a fourth bedroom, with a cedar closet and an ensuite of it’s own. Natural lighting is excellent in this beautifully finished space with oversized, above grade windows. The basement bedroom ensuite is presently a two piece but is roughed in for a shower which can be finished to your taste (materials included). This would be a great spot for your teenager! The finished basement brings finished square footage in this home to well over 2150 square feet. Mechanically, you have central air, an included water softener (2010), gas dryer, reverse osmosis water treatment (2010) and a gas line for your barbecue. The home is roughed in for central vacuum. The garage is large for homes of this class, with high ceilings. Contact Scott Grainger at (519) 669-1736 to arrange a private viewing or attend an Open House, Saturday or Sunday between 2pm and 4pm.

$414,900

LEON MARTIN

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage | Independently Owned and Operated

Y2 ONL

! LEFT

COUNTRY LOTS .5 acre don’t miss this chance to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. Within 40 minutes KW, or Guelph. High speed internet is available with fibre optic. Starting at $68,000 MLS

Two storey 3 bed and 3 bath room home on a half acre lot, open concept, high speed fibre optic internet available. $319,900 MLS. Financing available O.A.C. Space for lease. 4000 square feet. Available immediately. Industrial in Waterloo. $2700 per month. MLS ADDRESS: 4-B Arthur St. S., ELMIRA • EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net DIRECT: 519-503-2753 • OFFICE: 519-669-5426

HOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER | 15 HERBERT ST., ELMIRA

from

$239,990 Many models to choose from Learn More About Sunlight Heritage Homes and Our fine communities by Visiting us Today! Alyssa Henry Lisa Hansen Tribble Sales Representative

Sales Representative

519.787.0203

www.sunlighthomes.ca

Have a question? Email us at: info@sunlighthomes.ca

BROKERAGE

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. 45 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

BRAD MARTIN

519-669-2772

MVA Residential

Broker of Record,

JULIE HECKENDORN

TRACEY WILLIAMS

Res: 519.669.1068

Res: 519.669.8629

Cell: 519.505.0627

Broker

Sales Rep.

BUNGALOW - close to downtown, on a large lot. Newer carpet and hardwood on the main level. Freshly painted. Granite countertop & newer sink. New shingles in 2009. 24x12’ deck. Dble. driveway. 4th bdrm. & office in lower level. MLS $262,900.

OPEN CONCEPT - bungalow backs to greenspace & close to downtown. 3 sided fireplace in L.R./D.R. W/O to deck from kitch. Ensuite priv. Lovely fin. bsmt. w/lge. windows - huge rec. rm. and games area, 4th bdrm. 3pc. bath. Single + garage, dble. drive. MLS $309,900.

FLORADALE - affordable country setting on the edge of the village. 2 bdrm. bungalow w/many updates - oak kitchen (lots of cupboards), windows, hdwd. in L.R. shingles, decorating & flooring. Lge. rec. room. Gas heat. 346' deep lot. MLS $299,900.

HEIDELBERG - Well maintained family home! Hardwood fooring in D.R. & all bedrooms. Main flr. family room addition w/walkout to deck & patio. Updated windows, shingles and furnace. Extralong concrete driveway. MLS $319,900.

www.thurrealestate.com

FARMLAND FOR SALE 6782 Third Line W. Pilkington, ON, N0S 1S0

For Sale by Silent Auction Offers due by Sept 9, 2011

or visit us online at:

You’ve come to the right place to find a home.

Choose from one of our plans or let us custom build your home fully detached. Homes starting

Your referrals are appreciated!

CALL THE 24 HOUR INFO LINE FOR MORE DETAILS: 519-742-5700 | 1-866-432-6884 + Property ID# is extension

BUYING OR SELLING?

$189,990

BUNGALOW!

Mature trees surround this home featuring 3+1 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, finished basement with fireplace & walk-up, large attached 2 car garage, great deck & patio, backs to green space. Only 10 minutes to Guelph and K-W. MLS. Call Bert to View.

PROPERTY ID#’s 2511, 2518 & 2525

for photos & full descriptions • www.propertyshop.ca

The Edge Semi-detached homes from

$389,900

PRICE: $259,900

COME HOME TO 735 REID CRESCENT! This 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom gem in LisP towel is everything you need. Set at the SHO margin of the Listowel Golf & Country Y T Club, this home provides all the quiet PER of small town life, with all the convePRO H nience of a modern family home which WIT is defined by natural light and accomOLD S modates the flow of family living. Enter through the foyer, past the powder room to discover an open concept mainfloor. The kitchen, featuring an island/breakfast bar, solid oak cabinetry and stainless appliances, opens to a spacious dining area. A little further along, you will find an expansive sunken living room, graced with oak hardwood and glorious windows opening to the fully fenced backyard, mature trees and the local golf course. Your next stop will be the second floor family room, where natural light also presides. You’ll find the perfect window here for your Christmas tree; this family room may become your favourite room in the house....a place where family naturally gathers. Just a few more steps take you to the bedroom level, featuring a master bedroom with walk-in closet and windows tucked under mature trees. This master gives you that sense of quiet and rest you’re looking for. The four piece cheater ensuite includes a luxurious corner soaker tub with jets...You’re going to love being here because 735 Reid Crescent is home. Priced far below 2008 assessed value, this home is not going to last...Call Sue today to arrange a private showing or attend an open house Sundays between 1 pm and 3pm.

VISIT US SATURDAY AND SUNDAY!

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

$269,900 Here is a well-kept, small three bedroom bungalow, great as a starter home or the right-sized house for someone wishing to down-size. It has a beautiful lot 72ft. x 123ft., located on a quiet street. Call AL GRAFF at 519-669-5227 to arrange an appointment for a private showing.

• 95 acres cleared farmland • 55 acres systematically tiled balance random tiled as needed Contact: Arnold Frey, 519-577-2342 Carroll Brook Farms Ltd.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

29 CLASSIFIEDS

Though we’re made of water, tidal effect is not at play Q.

If  the moon can pull the  mighty oceans, and if  your  body is mostly water, then why  shouldn’t the moon create tides  within you as well?

A.

In our educated society, not one person in a thousand could explain this if their lives depended on it, says Bob Berman in Secrets of the Night Sky. The problem is the confusion between gravitational and tidal effects: Our planet orbits the sun, not the moon, so the sun has the stronger pull on us. Yet the ocean tides primarily follow the movements of the moon; this is because gravity falls off rapidly with increasing distance, meaning the moon’s pull on the side of the Earth facing it is stronger than its pull on the other side, 8,000 miles farther away. This difference is not what produces the tidal effect: it IS the tidal effect. The sun’s much greater distance means the difference between its pull on the two sides of Earth is less extreme. The oceans, being interconnected and fluid, respond to the moon’s differential pull with a daily rise and fall of about three feet world-

Held, Jr., in Quirks in Human Anatomy. A few such people were displayed as curiosities at carnivals in the 1800s under stage names such as Bill & Rich Sones the Dog-faced Boy and the Lionfaced Man. In 1868, Charles Darwin described a famous family with this wide, with many local variations. trait: “At the Burmese Court was People, on the other hand, average a man 30 years old with his whole only five to six feet in length, so the body except hands and feet covered moon’s pull on anyone’s entire body with straight silky hair, which on the is even and identical. You’d have to shoulders and spine was five inches grow thousands of miles tall before in length. He had a daughter born tides would resonate within you. with hair in her ears, soon extending “At your present stature, your over her body. Of her two children, bodily fluids are no more inclined to one, a boy 14 months old, had hair migrate from their customary posigrowing out of his ears, with a beard tions than tea in a cup tries to climb and moustache.” up the sides when the moon passes Hair growth has also occurred on overhead.” the neck, the elbows or the palms At the top of  the classification  and soles. Though Ambras Synscheme are the Dinosauria,  drome appears an evolutionary which immediately break down  throwback, it cannot be since apes Only about 50 cases of  Ambras  don’t have furry noses nor do any into those with lizardlike hips like  Syndrome have been reported  Tyrannosaurus rex vs. those with  primates have fur on the palms or since the Middle Ages. How  birdlike pelvises like Stegosaurus.   soles. “Because there is no rhyme or does this dramatic hereditary  And on and on it goes. Just how  reason to these assorted spots, it’s condition manifest itself? hard to know what to make of many species of  dinosaurs were  them.” there? Men or women grow luxuriant >>Send STRANGE questions to brothers Bill and Rich at hair all over their face, including Pinning down an exact number is strangetrue@cs.com the forehead and nose, says Lewis elusive, partly because mistakes

Strange But True

Q.

have been made during classification, says paleontologist Peter Dodson of the University of Pennsylvania in “ScienceIllustrated.Com” magazine. For example, scientists recently concluded that a dino they had called “torosaurus” is actually the adult form of triceratops. To date, researchers have identified approximately 650 extinct species, with about 140 discovered in China, now surpassing the U.S. Using previous rates of discovery, Dodson and Swarthmore College paleo-statistician Steve Wang have estimated that nearly 1,850 species of dinosaurs roamed the Earth at some point. They believe that this number will continue to rise for another century but that “by the start of the 22nd century, 90% of all discoverable species will have been unearthed and new finds will plateau.”

Q.

A.

A.

SERVICE PROS AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

Body Maintenance

Complete Collision Service

ARE A

at

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.

Call Us At

519-669-3373

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial • On-The-Farm Service

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519-669-3232

BIKE REPAIRS

24 Hour Accident Assistance

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

519.669.8330

1-800-CARSTAR 519-669-3373

FAX: 519.669.3210 AFTER HOURS

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519.669.8917

CARPET CARE

CRANE

BICYCLE SALES & REPAIRS

GET YOUR BICYCLES READY With an expert spring tune up

ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd. • 14 ton BoomTruck • 40 ton Mobile Crane

519-664-9999 ST. JACOBS

DECORATING

Learn More Online At...

budurl.com/SAVE139

7 Days A Week

669-3332

(Emergencies only)

AUTOMOTIVE

THOMPSON’S

Auto Tech Inc. Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

21 Industrial Dr. Elmira Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400

519-669-7652

31 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

CONCRETE

CONSTRUCTION

CONSTRUCTION

Design/ Build Agricultural/ Residential 6672 Ruggles Rd. Floradale RR#2 Wallenstain, N0B 2S0

-Framing -Roofing -Renovations -Repairs

519-669-3082

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

GLASS SERVICES

AUTO CLINIC

Ltd.

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Decorative/Stamped and coloured concrete CALL NOW TO BOOK YOUR SUMMER PROJECTS

519-638-2699

EAVESTROUGH

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS • Residential • Commercial • Industrial

Randy Weber ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

27 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

$139 FREE Gift Offer

STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

READ’S

FOR ALL YOUR HOME DECORATING NEEDS.

NEW CLIENTS

Chem-Dry Acclaim® 61 Arthur St., N. Elmira

DECORATING Specializing in Paint & Wall coverings

NOW ACCEPTING

24 Hour Service

ELECTRICAL

SINCE 1961

World’s Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

519.669.3658

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

AUTOMOTIVE

519.669.1462 Fax: 519.669.9970 Tel:

18 Kingfisher Dr., Elmira

GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

FREE ESTIMATES • Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

TEL: 519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104 FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

Home Improvements

WINDOWS & DOORS

ROOFING | SIDING | SOFFIT & FACIA DRYWALL INSTALLATION

MURRAY MARTIN | 519.669.9308 1722 Floradale Rd., Elmira, ON, N3B 2Z1

AGRICULTURAL • COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL • High Quality Installation of Steel & Aluminum Eavestrough • Rugged Steel Eavestrough for Today’s Metal Roofing Systems

JEREMY MARTIN

PH 519-502-4679 | Fax 519-291-6624

xcountryeaves@live.ca

8632 Concession 3, RR#3 Listowel, ON, N4W 3G8


CLASSIFIEDS 30

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

SERVICE PROS PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

PAINTING

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

Renovating? Let us do the clean up

RENOVATION CLEAN UPS! Call for Details

www.completecarpetcare.ca

ROB McNALL

519-669-7607

LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

MEDICAL TREATMENT

Established 2000

F. David Reimer

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications: ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102 PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

www.reimerhbot.com

ALMA, ONTARIO

PHONE:

519.846.5427 FAX: 519.846.5134 PLUMBING

519-669-0220

ROOFING

519-669-2251

27 Brookemead, St, Elmira

36 Hampton St., Elmira

kdetweiler@rogers.com

C.J.

For all your Plumbing Needs.

BRUBACHER LTD.

24 HOUR SERVICE

19 First St. E., Elmira

ELMIRA

KEVIN DETWEILER

P: 519-669-1188 | F: 519-669-9369

OWNER-OPERATOR

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

YOUR SOURCE FOR YEAR-ROUND PROPERTY MAINTENANCE • Lawn Mowing Packages • Lawn Maintenance & Landscaping • Top Dressing/Overseeding • Mulch Delivery & Installation • Commercial & Residential Snow Plowing & Ice Control

Call Jeff Basler, Owner/Operator, today 519.669.9081 mobile: 519.505.0985 fax: 519.669.9819 | ever-green@sympatico.ca

SELF STORAGE

519-669-3362

SEPTIC SERVICES

NOW BOOKING OFFERING A QUICK AND EASY WAY TO RECLAIM UNUSED LAND

Brush Mowing/Long Grass | Capable of mowing up to 3 inch diameter brush Tracked Skid Steer equipped with Brush Mower

- Trail Maintenance and Development - Wooded Lot Thinning - Pasture Reclaimation All other - Orchard Maintenance tracked skid - Industrial Lots steer services are available - Real Estate Lots

ROOFING

AMOS

SPECIALISTS!

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

519-669-3652

56 Howard Ave. Unit 2, Elmira, ON, N3B 2E1

Lawn Maint Maintenance Main tenance Programs | Spring Clean-up Flower Bed Maintenance Programs Leaf Clean-up and Removal | Soil & Mulch Delivery & Installation | Snow Clearing & Removal | Ice Control

YOUR Steve PLUMBING Co. & HEATING Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

Services

> Commercial & Residential > Fully Insured > WSIB Clearance > Senior Discount

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

Murray & Daniel Shantz

Steve Jacobi

For more information call:

free estimates interior/exterior painting wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

> Excavating > Trenching > Backfilling > Fine Grading > Overseeding & Top Dressing > Lawn Seeding

PLUMBING

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada

20 years experience

Outdoor

ER RS OVYEA 10

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location • Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off and Pick up Service • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair • Janitorial • Grout Cleaning • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping

LAWN MAINTENANCE

Various sizes & rates

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE

Call

519-669-4964

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

SALT

R O O F I N G

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches Serving Elmira and Surrounding Area for over 30 years!

BOOK NOW FOR SPRING INSTALLATION. CALL SCOTT SEILING FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE.

519.698.2114 In Business since 1971 • Fully Insured

TREE SERVICE

TOP QUALITY ROOFING SYSTEMS Locally Owned & Operated

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

Since 19 96

Septic Tank Cleaning Roof Replacement Specialists Cedar Shakes Composite Tiles All Flat Roofing Systems

Inspections for Real Estate Septic System Repairs & Restoration Catch Basin Cleaning

Call or email Mike for your FREE estimate.

Waterloo Region • Woolwich Township

Office: 519.206.4484 | Cell: 519.575.0311

or

mbender@rogers.blackberry.net

TREE SERVICE

T R

E

E

519-896-7700

519-648-3004

www.biobobs.com

•Removal of Trees or Branches of Any Shapes or Sizes in Almost Any location

now available

FREE BAG In troductor y Offer

> Superior Salt Products > Fast, Friendly Service > Convenient Delivery Times > Discounts for Seniors

FREE ESTIMATES

Taking Salt to Peoples’ Basements Since 1988

519-747-2708 Waterloo www.riepersalt.com

BACKHOE SERVICES

Country CraftsmanShip

David Sherk Woodworking CUSTOM SOLID WOOD RAISED PANEL DOORS

EDGE GLUED PANELS, TREADS, TURNING SQUARES ETC.

•Hedge trimming •Branch Chipping

Specializing in solid wood components

•Stump Grinding

519-669-1836 Thomas Martin

•Tree Trimming & Removal • Aerial Bucket Trucks • Stump Grinding • Arborist Evaluations • Fully Insured & Certified • Certified to Work Near Power Lines

WOODWORKING

WINDOW COVERINGS

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

INC

CARPET CARE

TEL: 519-699-9315 | St. Clements, ON sales@davidsherk.com | www.davidsherk.com

CFB

BACKHOE SERVICES Specializing in ag. drainage, repair, installation

• REPAIR DRAINAGE SYSTEMS WRECKED BY EXCAVATING, ETC.

SERVICE DIRECTORY

THIS SPACE IS FOR RENT

• LAWN, GARDEN DRAINAGE • STUMP REMOVAL • TILE SYSTEM LOCATES

Call Clare at

519.669.1752

Call today to get your business listed!

519.669.5790

www.ObserverXtra.com


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

31 CLASSIFIEDS

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

OBITUARY

Grube, Candice

“A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

June 30, 1991 to July 17, 2011 Candice Grube, tragically as a result of an accident, on Sunday July 17, 2011 at the age of 20. Candi resided in Atwood, was a member of Atwood United Church and a Girl Guide Canada Ranger. Candi loved her job working at Livingstone Manor, enjoyed drama classes and spending time with her family and friends. Beloved daughter of George Grube of Atwood and Loretta Wright of Winterbourne. Dear sister of Mercedes of Elmira, Beverly of Atwood and Hope of New Hamburg and Travis and Kaitlyn of Winterbourne. Special granddaughter of Barb and Wayne Grube of Atwood, Jim and Doris Herbison of Elmira, Jim and Rosemary of Winterbourne and great granddaughter of Priscilla Bray of Wingham. Sadly missed by Venus and Turbo. Remembered by her aunts and uncles Deborah and Joe Cabral of Coldstream, Theresa Herbison and fiancé Guy Landry of Elmira, stepmother Amberley Lamka of New Hamburg, stepfather William Wright and many great aunts, uncles and cousins. DEATH NOTICES

>>BAUMAN, Eva (Mrs. Mevin W.) – Peacefully, at KW

Health Centre on Thursday, July 21, 2011. Eva (Martin) Bauman, age 66 years, of RR1 St. Clements.

Kleensweep Carpet Care

Rugs and Upholstery

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates West Montrose, ON COLLEEN

Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS • Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

519.669.5105

P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

>>COWAN, Eleanor (Koebel) (nee Siopiolosz) – Eleanor passed away peacefully and suddenly, surrounded by her children at KW Health Centre on Tuesday, July 26, 2011, in her 78th year.

24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

Village Care Center. Born in St. Clements on August 17, 1922.

>>ERB, Marjorie M. (nee Cook)- Peacefully at her home

in Wellesley with her beloved husband Milton by her side, on Sunday, July 24, 2011, in her 80th year.

>>MARTIN, Lizzie (Mrs. Isaiah B.)- Peacefully at her home on Monday, July 25, 2011. Lizzie (Weber) Martin age 90 years, of RR1, Waterloo.

TOTAL HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

519.664.2008

>>METZGER, Luida (Mrs. Urias B.) – Peacefully on Tuesday, July 26, 2011 at Countryview Residence, age 83 years, of RR2, Wallenstein.

.com

www.

Any photo that appears in the Observer and was taken by our staff is available for reprints. Visit us online for details.

SANYO CANADIAN

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

REPRINT PRICING

4x6...............$9 5x7................$11

8x10.............$15 11x17.............$35

Order a 2nd reprint of the same image for half price. Pick-up is free | Shipping charge is additional $2.00

NANCY KOEBEL

Bus: 519.895.2044 ext. 217 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. 519-669-5790 IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH.

info@woolwichobserver.com

Aug. 5th - Elmira Home

Suite 800, 101 Frederick St., Kitchener

Hardware Parking Lot

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance

KIN KORNER

Family Fun Day

T. 519.669.2033

>>BRENNER, Roman – On Friday, July 22, 2011, at Trinity

>>DOERR, Lola Ethel – Passed away on Monday, July 25, 2011 at her residence, Heritage House, St. Jacobs at the age of 79 years.

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

519-699-4641

Carnival & movie night fun for the whole family

www.freybc.com

woolwichkin.com

JULY 30

>>WTHHS Historical Room at the Old School, 1137 Henry Street, Wellesley, between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., featuring old pictures of people and events in Wellesley Township. Come and see if you can help us identify people in the photos. We open every last Saturday of each month, except December. Free admission. AUGUST 2

>>Splish, Splish, Splash! Have fun and be safe in the Water at the Region of Waterloo Library. Join us at the St. Clements, Linwood, St. Jacobs, Elmira, Bloomingdale and Wellesley branches for Splish, Splish, Splash! Have fun and be safe in the water with the Splash! Celebrate Summer TD Summer Reading Club! This free program includes stories, crafts, and activities for children ages 6 to 12. Together we will learn some easy water safety tips, read Scaredy Squirrel at the Beach and make a fish from and old CD! For more information, please email libhq@regionofwaterloo. ca, visit www.rwl4kids.wordpress.com or contact your local branch. AUGUST 5

>>Youth

Centre BBQ! Come out for a hamburger or hot dog between 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. on Thursday, August 5, or Friday, August 6. The BBQ will take place in the parking lot beside Woolwich Community Services at 73 Arthur St. South. All proceeds to support our local Woolwich Youth Centre.

AUGUST 6

>>BBQ & Carwash Fundraiser 8 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. at Elmira Foodland Parking Lot. Support the Elmira Midget Boys Softball team as they represent Ontario in the Eastern Canadian Softball Championships in Truro, Nova Scotia. Come out and get your car washed, enjoy our peameal bacon on a bun breakfast with coffee or one of our OUTstanding hamburgers or sausage on a bun and pop. >>Morningstar Presents: Kids’ Hope Garden Tour Adventure; 1-5 p.m. Garden passport $10. 3 Fabulous Gardens for your adventure. Garden 1 – Ross & Kathy Little, Bloomingdale, Garden 2 – Dave & Beatriz Gosling, New Hamburg; Garden 3 – Mac & Judy Crummer, St. Agatha. Each garden features different activities and events. Passports can be purchased at Artistic Landscape, Waterloo 519-746-2848; Heritage Pet & Garden, New Hamburg 519662-3684; Meadow Acres, Petersburg 519634-5479; Morning Star Acres, Baden 519634-5550 ext. 224. For more information call Katherine Smart 519-634-5550, ext. 224 or email katsmart@morningstarfm. com. AUGUST 8

>>Free Summer Camp – Aug. 8-12, for children ages K to Grade 6. Campers will enjoy such activities as crafts, music, stories, snacks, outdoor games, and fun times with their small group leaders. All activities will follow the colour theme of the day. Drop off time from 8:30-9 a.m. – Pick up time 11:30-noon. Check out details at www.breslaumennnonitechurch.ca/ node/945.

AUGUST 9

>>Wild Wet Weather at the Region of Waterloo Library Tuesday. Join us at the St. Clements, Linwood, St. Jacobs, Bloomingdale, and Wellesley branches for Wild Wet Weather with the Splash! Celebrate Summer TD Summer Reading Club! This free program includes stories, crafts, and activities for children ages 6 to 12. Come in and learn about hurricanes, tsunamis and floods. We will make a windsock craft and play Drip, Drip, Splash! For more information, please email libhq@ regionofwaterloo.ca, visit www.rwl4kids. wordpress.com or contact your local branch.

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess. Elmira & Surrounding Area

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763 psgingrich@hotmail.ca

AUGUST 11

>>GRCA Creature Feature: Recommended for ages 5 and up; 10-11 a.m. at St.Clements Branch. A Summer Reading Club special event at Region of Waterloo Libraries. For more information call 519699-4341. >>Magic Splash Show with Owen Anderson: Fun for all ages. 4-5 p.m. at St. Jaocbs Branch. A Summer Reading Club special event at Region of Waterloo Libraries. For more information call 519-664-3443. AUGUST 12

21 INDUSTRIAL DR. ELMIRA

519-669-2884

>>H.U.G.S. Program – note special time 10 a.m. – Come meet with other parents to discuss parenting and child health issues. Topic: Bolender Park Day – Meet at Bolender Park, 38 Church St. E. Elmira. Return to Woolwich Community Health Centre in case of rain. Bring your own snack. No childcare today. AUGUST 16

>>Shipwrecked! at the Region of Waterloo Library Tuesday. Join us at the St. Clements, Linwood, St. Jacobs, Bloomingdale, Elmira and Wellesley branches for Shipwrecked with the Splash! Celebrate Summer TD Summer Reading Club! This free program includes stories, crafts, and activities for children ages 6 to 12. Come in to learn about a few of the most famous shipwrecks, like the Titanic! Today, we will award our contest winners. For more information, please email libhq@regionofwaterloo. ca, visit www.rwl4kids.wordpress.com or contact your local branch. >>Fish in a Fish Bowl at Elmira Branch Library. 10 – 10:30 a.m. and 7-8 p.m. A demonstration on how to create an aquarium with Sherry for The Fish Bowl. Free demo for kids ages 7 and up from 1010:30 a.m. and free demo for adults and teens from 7-8 p.m. For more information contact the Elmira Branch at 519-6695477 or elmlib@regionofwaterloo.ca AUGUST 18

>>Captain Cam: Recommended for ages 4 to 8. 2:30 – 3:30 p.m. at Wellelsey Branch. A Summer Reading Club special event at Region of Waterloo Libraries. For more information call 519-656-2001. AUGUST 23

>>Stamp Camp – 2:30-3:30 p.m. at Elmira Branch Library. Join us for stamp collecting for beginners. Free for ages 5-15. Spaces are limited. Event will take place at the library, 65 Arthur St. S., Elmira. For more information call the Elmira Branch at 519-669-5477 or email: elmlib@ regionofwaterloo.ca.

CORPORATE WEAR PROMOTIONAL APPAREL WORK & SAFETY WEAR | BAGS T-SHIRTS | JACKETS | HATS

245 Labrador Drive | Waterloo

519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com

PRINTING & COPYING SERVICES Black and white, 8 1/2 X 11 flyers designed and printed for as low as 6¢. Professionally designed, quick turnaround, local service. Delivery, folding and colour work also available. Call 519.669.5790 ext 107 for details.


More Power. Less Fuel. Great Value is a comparison between the entire current Chrysler Canada lineup and the entire 2010 Chrysler Canada lineup. Wise customers read the fine print: •, *, ††, § The Summer Drive One Home Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating retailers on or after July 6, 2011. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. See participating retailers for complete details and conditions. •$18,995 Purchase Price applies to the 2011 Jeep Wrangler 2-door Sport 4x4 (23B) only and includes $3,250 Consumer Cash Discount. $16,995 Purchase Price applies to the 2011 Jeep Compass Sport 4x2 (25D) and includes $2,500 Consumer Cash Discount. $15,995 Purchase Price applies to the 2011 Jeep Patriot Sport 4x2 (25D) only and includes $2,500 Consumer Cash Discount. See participating retailers for complete details. Pricing includes freight ($1,400), air tax (if applicable), tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailers may sell for less. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on most new 2010 and select 2011 vehicles and are manufacturer-to-retailer incentives, which are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. Amounts vary by vehicle. See your retailer for complete details. ††Customer Choice Financing for 36-, 48- and 60-month terms on approved credit through TD Financing Services and Ally Credit Canada is available at participating dealerships to qualified retail customers on select new 2011 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge and Ram models. Taxes on the full negotiated purchase price are payable at the beginning of the contract term resulting in higher payments than payments taxed on a periodic basis and are not reflected in advertised payments. The following terms apply to TD Financing Services contracts. (Different contract terms apply to Ally Credit Canada offers. See your retailer for complete details.) Vehicles are financed over a 36-, 48- or 60-month term with payments amortized over a term of up to 96 months and the pre-determined residual balance payable at the end of the contract. At contract’s end, customers have the choice of returning their vehicle through a Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram dealership with no further obligations (except payment of a $199 return fee and excess wear and tear, mileage and similar charges), financing the remaining balance for the rest of the amortization period at then-current standard rates or paying the residual balance in full. Some conditions apply. Customer Choice Financing offered by TD in Quebec is subject to different terms and conditions. All advertised Customer Choice Financing offers are TD offers. Example: 2011 Jeep Wrangler 2-door Sport 4x4 (23B) with a Purchase Price of $18,995 financed at 6.49% APR over 36 months with $3,099 down and payment amortized over 95 months equals 78 bi-weekly payments of $99 and one final payment of $10,830 for a cost of borrowing of $2,631 and a total obligation of $21,626.41. Taxes, licence, insurance, registration, excess mileage and wear and tear charges, any retailer administration fees and other applicable fees and charges not included. Retailers may sell for less. See participating retailers for complete details. §2011 Jeep Patriot Limited shown. Price including applicable Consumer Cash Discount: $23,330. Pricing includes freight ($1,400), air tax (if applicable), tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. See bottom of the ad for range of potential retailer fees. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailers may sell for less. ¤Based on 2011 EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide ratings published by Natural Resources Canada. Transport Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. ΔBased on Ward’s 2011 Middle Cross Utility Segmentation. Excludes other Chrysler Group LLC designed and/or manufactured vehicles. ®SIRIUS and the dog logo are registered trademarks of SIRIUS Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC. Customer Choice Financing is a trademark of Chrysler Group LLC.

BACK PAGE 32

DON_111132_KB_JEEP.indd 1

THE OBSERVER

$

18,995

$

$ PURCHASE FOR

16,995 PURCHASE FOR

15,995 PURCHASE FOR

2011 Jeep Patriot Limited shown.§

• INCLUDES $3,250 CONSUMER CASH,* FREIGHT, TIRE LEVY AND OMVIC FEE. TAXES EXCLUDED. OTHER RETAILER CHARGES MAY APPLY.+

INCLUDES $2,500 CONSUMER CASH,* FREIGHT, TIRE LEVY AND OMVIC FEE. TAXES EXCLUDED. OTHER RETAILER CHARGES MAY APPLY.+

2011 Jeep Compass Sport 4x2 shown.

INCLUDES $2,500 CONSUMER CASH,* FREIGHT, TIRE LEVY AND OMVIC FEE. TAXES EXCLUDED. OTHER RETAILER CHARGES MAY APPLY.+ OR CHOOSE

CUSTOMER

ALL-NEW 2011 JEEP COMPASS SPORT 4X2

ALL-NEW 2011 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT 4X2

Date: JULY 15, 2011

$

CHOICE FINANCING

99 BI-WEEKLY

@

» Saturday, July 30, 2011

NOW BOTH YOU AND YOUR MONEY CAN GO FURTHER.

2011 JEEP WRANGLER 2-DOOR SPORT 4X4

%††

FOR 36 MONTHS AND $3,099 DOWN

6.49

WITH THE OPTION TO RETURN AFTER 36 MONTHS

2011 Jeep Wrangler 2-door Sport 4x4 shown.

6.8L/100 KM HWY¤

42 MPG

HWY

• Hwy: 6.8L/100 km and City: 9.1L/100 0 km¤ • One of the most affordable SUVs in Canada anada Δ • All-new exterior appearance: Completely tely new from the A-pillar forward, enhanced ced soft interior touch points, and improved ed ride and handling

6.9L/100 KM HWY¤

42 MPG

HWY

• Canada’s most affordable SUV∆ • IIHS Top Safety Pick (with side seat air bags) • Best-in-Class rear seat legroom ∆ • Hwy: 6.9L/100 km and City: 8.9L/100 00 km¤ • Electronic Stability Control

(with side seat air bags)

+Your local retailer may charge additional fees for administration/pre-delivery that can range from $00 to $1 $1,098 098 and anti-theft/safety products that can range from $0 to $1,298. Charges may vary by retailer.

Jeep.ca/Offers

SCAN HERE FOR MORE

GREAT OFFERS

7/20/11 2:43 PM

July 30  

Local news in Elmira, Ontario

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