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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

1 NEWS

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A bee story > STORY ON PG. 14

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SATURDAY, JULY 10, 2010

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Flyer campaign launched in biogas debate

Candidates ramping up for Woolwich mayoral race

Citizen’s group looks to rally public opposition

Steve Kannon

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A ROYAL VISIT

Having been met my local politicians upon landing at the Region of Waterloo International Airport in Breslau Monday, Her Majesty The Queen was whisked to Waterloo for a tour of Reasearch in Motion. More photos of the Queen's stop in the region available online at www.ObserverXtra.com.

SATURDAY

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> SEE ELECTION ON PG. 06

Steve Kannon glossy flyer that showed up in every Elmira mailbox this week is the latest salvo from a group fighting plans to build a biogas plant in the north part of town. Under the banner of “stop the stink,” the Elmira Bio Fuel Citizen’s Committee (BFCC) is calling for residents to get vocal with concerns about the facility, which would convert organic waste into electricity. Flyers were delivered to all 4,100 homes in Elmira. With the flyer, the group hopes to get a direct message out to every Elmira resident, ensuring the issue stays top of mind, said High Street resident Ed Speers, an organizer behind BFCC, launched last year by neighbours of the proposed plant on Martin’s Lane. “We’re urging people to contact their elected officials to let them know where they stand.” Because the Ontario Green Energy Act removes authority for energy-producing projects from local hands, the decision

PHOTO

acing his first electoral race since 2000, Woolwich Mayor Bill Strauss says he’s happy to run on his record. He dismissed his challenger’s claims the township needs new ideas and leadership at the head of council. “I think we are proactive. Look at that new building (Woolwich Memorial Centre): we listened to the people. We listen to everyone. “I think we have a pretty good record to go on,” he said in an interview this week, reacting to remarks made by Elmira businessman Todd Cowan in announcing his candidacy. While prepared for an election, Strauss said he was surprised Cowan was making a bid for his job instead of running for a council seat. “I would like to see him run for council first and get some training, then run [for mayor] when I’m ready to step down.” In response, Cowan said he de-

SUNDAY

Cloudy Periods

27°

Opinion...............08 Business.............14

> SEE BIO-GAS ON PG. 05 Living Here..........18 Sports.................22

Classifieds.........25

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NEWS 2

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

T

he woman who launched social services for seniors in the townships succumbed to cancer July 1, leaving behind a legacy and some big shoes to fill. The founder of what would become Community Care Concepts, Veronica MacDonald was 54. “She was it when it came to developing services for older adults when there were none in the townships. These are services that wouldn’t exist without her,” said Irene O’Toole, a longtime colleague and friend, who was working in a similar capacity in Waterloo when MacDonald started what was then known as Woolwich Home Support Services more than a quartercentury ago “This is a huge loss to the community support service sector.” O’Toole, who retired

last year, has been acting executive director of the agency since MacDonald took a leave to deal with her illness. “The agency has been working in a holding pattern for a few months, hoping Veronica would be back,” she said. Now, its board will have to decide what comes next in absence of the only leader the agency has known. O’Toole said MacDonald has created a strong organization with 15 employees and a host of volunteers – others will pick up where she left off. “Her work will continue. We will continue to do the work Veronica left for us.” Community Care Concepts of Woolwich, Wellesley and Wilmot runs a wide variety of programs geared toward seniors and disabled adults with the goal of keeping them in their homes for as long

as possible. Unlike other larger communities where there are separate agencies that handle different aspects of care, Community Care Concepts has it all under one roof. It offers everything from assisted transportation that provides volunteer drivers to seniors for things such as medical and health appointments, to homemaking services where assistance may be provided for laundry, cooking, and general cleaning. A friendly visiting program ensures that those in need have contact with a regular guest to socialize and the inside and outside maintenance service helps fix small household problems. As well, there is a seniors day program, an Alzheimer’s program and Meals on Wheels. The wide array of services exists because MacDonald saw a need,

and worked tirelessly to make sure individuals didn’t go without help in the community, said O’Toole. “She wasn’t afraid to try things that hadn’t been done before. In fact, if it hadn’t been done, that was a reason for it to be done. “She wanted to make sure the very best services were available here.” Those efforts paid off for local seniors, with policies MacDonald pushed for resonating at the regional, provincial and federal levels, said Don Harloff, who, as executive director of Woolwich Community Services, worked closely with her for years. “Veronica was really passionate about services for seniors. She spent a lot of time advocating for the rights of seniors and the programs that seniors deserve.” Facing many of the same funding issues at his own agency, Harloff

ALWAYS AN ADVOCATE Veronica MacDonald was credited with bringing seniors' services to the townships.

recognized the tireless way MacDonald fought for her clients. “It’s a constant struggle to meet the needs of the people and to get the money to fund those programs. As dynamic as Veronica was, she just stayed at it … always with a pleasant personality.” MacDonald is sur-

vived by her husband Glenn Toner of St. Clements; her daughter Michelle Relic (Tom) of Waterloo; stepdaughters Lisa Toner (Brian Voisin) of Breslau, Erin Toner (Mark Jones) of England; sister Sandra Beisel (Ross) of Arthur; and brother Neil MacDonald of Drayton.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

3 NEWS

> Johnson named Govenor General

New digs for airport Katie Edmonds

O

n Monday, an assortment of politicians gathered at the airport in Breslau to greet Queen Elizabeth. They were back again the following day, this time for a ceremony with much less pomp and circumstance: the ground-breaking of a new $10.8 million building. The 28,000-square-foot facility will centralize fleet maintenance and the new in-house firefighting equipment at the Region of Waterloo International Airport.

The project brings the services under one roof. Among those taking part were regional Chair Ken Seiling, Kitchener-Conestoga MP Harold Albrecht, his provincial counterpart Leeanna Pendergast and Woolwich Mayor Bill Strauss. “This is going to allow us to be more efficient,” said Pendergast. “With the growth that we have seen recently at the airport and the increasing numbers of flights in and out of there, it’s important to make sure that quality emergency re-

sponse is accessible.” Replacing the fire hall allows the airport to meet Transport Canada’s criteria for precision approach landings. The current fire hall projects three inches into the airspace needed for precision approaches. The new building will also have the space needed to house the new fire truck that arrived in February. “We weren’t equipped to handle a major emergency at the airport,” said Strauss.

SOMETHING TO BUILD ON MP Harold Albrecht, MPP Leeanna Pendergast, Mike Malloy of Gateman-Malloy, regional Coun. Tom Galloway, regional Chair Ken Seiling, Woolwich Mayor Bill Strauss and MP Peter Braid break ground Tuesday morning for the new Region of Waterloo International Airport fleet maintenance and firehall services facility.

> SEE AIRPORT ON PG. 06

Renovations planned for Wellesley council chambers Joni Miltenburg

R

enovations to the Wellesley council chambers, budgeted to cost $79,000, started this week in Crosshill. Built in 1854, the former township hall is the oldest continually-used municipal building in the Region of Waterloo. The exterior of the building is the original stone, while the interior, with its brown paneling and green tile floor, is vintage 1970s. The flooring and paneling

will be replaced, the front door widened and new windows installed. Eventually the porch will be rebuilt to bring it level with the front door. Meeting Monday night, councillors considered two options for new audience chairs. The renovations are necessary to make the building accessible and address health and safety issues, said chief administrative officer Susan Duke. The tiles in the audience gallery are buckling

and likely have asbestos in them, while the paneling is not fire rated. Renovations to the front entrance and washrooms are necessary to make the building wheelchair accessible. The 2010 budget includes $50,000 for interior renovations, $20,000 for work on the exterior, $4,000 for new chairs and $5,000 for making the washrooms wheelchair accessible. Another $7,000 was set aside for replacing the oil furnace.

Wellesley councillors had discussed the renovations a number of times over the past three years and agreed something had to be done but were unable to agree how much. The deteriorating condition of the building and the need to comply with provincial accessibility standards finally forced the issue. “There are health and safety and accessibility issues that must be addressed,” Duke said.

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> Wellesley to enforce parking Wellesley council passed a motion Monday to enforce handicap parking spaces on private property. The bylaw, proposed by Coun. Jim Olender, would allow the police or township staff to ticket people who park in designated handicap spots in private lots such as those at schools. The new bylaw was proposed in response to complaints that people were parking in spots where they shouldn’t. The police declined to ticket offenders unless the township implemented the bylaw. Olender requested that the bylaw be in place by September.

> Safety first Home Hardware recently received top honours from the Private Motor Truck Council of Canada when it was presented the Safest Large Fleet Award at the council’s annual conference. With more than 75 per cent of the miles it covers considered long-haul, the Home Hardware fleet runs approximately 17 million kilometres a year while serving stores coast-to-coast from the company’s four distribution centres. The 132 power unit and almost 500 trailer fleet was previously deemed the Safest Large Fleet in 2005 and 2008.

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NEWS 4

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

LAW & ORDER

Police looking for information about fatal motorcycle collision Guelph man faces two counts of ‘computer child luring’ and one count of ‘trafficking in a controlled substance’ after County of Wellington OPP officers received information about some explicit emails sent to a young teen in Mapleton Township. The adult had been conversing with a teen through Facebook, and some of the messages had a sexual overtone. It was reported the suspect wanted to meet the 15-year-old girl at the Drayton fairgrounds, where he would supply her with marijuana.

JUNE 30 > 7:20 AM | A guardrail on

Hawkesville Road at Three Bridges Road was knocked out of place when it was struck by a Ford van. The driver, an 18-year-old St. Jacobs woman, went off the roadway and rolled the van, striking the pole. She was not injured, but the van was destroyed.

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tached manure spreader as it was turning left into a private laneway. The driver of the motorcycle, Casey Phillip Martin of Waterloo, was pronounced dead at the scene. There were no other injuries in this collision. Police continue to investigate. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Traffic Services Branch at 519-650-8500, ext. 8856 or email: traffic@wrps.on.ca.

eastbound on Crowsfoot Road in Maryhill when he fell asleep and drifted across the roadway. His vehicle then hit a large tree stump, became airborne and landed on the driver’s side in a cornfield. Witnesses assisted by tipping the car back upright so the driver could escape. He was not injured but the car was demolished.

northbound on Arthur Street near Sideroad 5 when he struck and killed a deer that had come out onto the road. The man was not injured, but there was moderate damage to the front bumper of his car.

JULY 1 > 12:27 AM | A 52-year-old Mapleton man was driving

> 6:45 AM | A 43-year-old

Elmira man pulling his 2009 red Dodge truck into the St. Jacobs Home Hardware parking lot struck a pole. The man was unharmed but there was significant damage to his truck.

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TIME FOR A REST A group of passersby stopped to help a Mennonite family whose horse had collapsed from the heat on Arthur Street North near Reid Woods Drive Monday afternoon. The horse was able to stand up and nobody was harmed in the incident.

> 7:50 AM | Employees of

a construction company on First Street in Elmira called police when they noticed that the storage units behind the building had been broken into sometime overnight. A number of tools were stolen. No suspects have been identified.

JULY 2 > 4:00 PM | Employees of

the construction company on First Street in Elmira who called police the previous day called again to report another theft. This time, the locks on the storage unit were broken and stolen were a gas power washer valued at $300 and a

Kodiak gas generator valued at $400.

JULY 3 > 3:00 AM | Two young males, described as Caucasian, around 5’7” and 20 years of age, stole a number of magazines from the Mac's convenience store on Arthur Street in Elmira. Police have identified suspects and will be charging them with shoplifting.

JULY 4 > 3:00 PM | Several youths

were in the vehicle when an 18-year-old Wallenstein man

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aterloo Regional Police continue to investigate a collision involving a motorcycle driven by a 23-year-old male from Waterloo and a farm tractor. Just before noon on July 3, a 1999 Kawasaki motorcycle was travelling northbound on Arthur Street near Scotch Line Road, just south of Elmira. As the rider attempted to overtake a line of traffic, he struck a farm tractor with an at-

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> 1:00 PM | Police pulled over

a vehicle on Line 86 in West Montrose recorded travelling at a speed of 130 km/h in a zone that has an 80 km/h posted maximum. The driver was a 33-year-old West Montrose woman who had five children (aged four and five years old) in the vehicle with her. She was charged with ‘stunt driving’ and her driver’s license and vehicle were seized for the next seven days.

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lost control of the 2005 Hyundai Santa Fe he was driving on Reid Woods Drive. The vehicle flipped into the ditch and rolled several times before stopping. Nobody was injured in the crash, but the driver of the vehicle was charged with ‘careless driving.’

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

5 NEWS

First heat wave rolls into the region K

eeping cool was the name of the game this week as our region – and most of Central Canada and northeastern U.S. – roasted in a nearly weeklong heat wave. A southern flow of hot air from the south blanketed the area and acted like a heat pump, moving warm, southerly air from the Gulf of Mexico northward over the eastern United States and through Ontario, explained Peter Kimbell, warning preparedness meteorologist with Environment Canada. Temperatures for our area were in the 30s this past week but with the humidity, it felt more like 40 degrees Celsius or hotter. “It’s not the heat that

is making being outside uncomfortable, it’s the heavy, muggy air,” said Kimbell. “That humidity is what is causing the current temperatures to feel as hot as they do.” As temperatures soared, health officials at the Region of Waterloo encouraged residents to get creative when it comes to keeping cool this summer. “People with heart or respiratory problems, seniors and children are especially at risk of serious complications from high heat and smog levels,” said David Young, manager of health protection and investigation at the public health department. “But when it’s this hot out, everyone needs to be careful. This includes people

playing sports, or people who work outside, someone going for a jog in the afternoon after work, and even pets.” There are a number of things that people can do to avoid heatrelated illness, including drinking plenty of water or natural fruit juices, wearing light, loose-fitting clothes and eating light, cool foods. “It may sound like a lot, but if you’re spending significant time outdoors you should be drinking about a cup of water every 20 minutes.” Also, avoid using the oven or other hot appliances and stay in airconditioned rooms, either at home, a friend’s place or public spaces such as malls, libraries or community facilities. Heat exhaustion can manifest in a number

of different ways including symptoms of fatigue, muscle cramps, dizziness, nausea, headaches, even anxiety and confusion. Symptoms of heat stroke, a more serious condition, can include headache, dizziness, confusion and fainting. This is a medical emergency that can be fatal if not treated. “Heat exhaustion is something that we all need to be looking out for,” said Young. “Parents, and coaches of kids’ teams should be aware of the symptoms and allow kids to take lots of water breaks and encourage them to stay in the shade if possible.” For more tips on how to beat the heat, visit the Region of Waterloo’s website, chd.region.waterloo.on.ca.

PHOTO

Katie Edmonds

» PAT MERLIHAN

With hotter-than-usual weather expected this summer, residents advised to be prepared

COOL RUNNINGS

Seeking a break from the heat Wednesday, Reid, 6, and Abigail, 8, Burkholder of Elmira take advantage of a backyard sprinkler. This activity eventually turned into sprinkle-soccer with other neighbourhood kids.

Biogas: Flyer contains errors, misleading numbers, says Bio-En president > CONTINUED FROM COVER about Bio-En Power Inc.’s proposal will be made at Queen’s Park, which is why the flyer provides contact information for provincial representatives. The lack of local accountability is disappointing, said Speers, lamenting the loss of a chance to sway township councillors in the same way opponents to development at Victoria Glen park in Elmira were successful in halting those plans. “That makes it quite a bit different – it’s challenging.” Among those who received the flyer in their mailboxes this week was Chuck Martin, president of BioEn, who described the piece as misleading,

even if well done. Saying that some of the information was wrong, he noted the overall effect was to paint a damning image of the proposed facility using “scare tactics” rather than facts. Many of the numbers cited, for instance, are upper limits included in the paperwork, not the number that will be reflected in the operation. Opponents say there will be 80 trucks a day – the number in the application – rather than the seven to 15 forecast, said Martin. “‘Bio-En wants to try something that has never been done before,’” he said, reading from the flyer. “Not true. This technology has been used widely. “‘Thousands of

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trucks will pass through Elmira.’ Not true.” Some of the claims in the flyer are literally true, but are presented out of context, Martin added. “Yes, there will be organics and, quite frankly, some of it will be rotting. We will have some materials that give off odours – but it’s our job to capture those odours,” he said, explaining that the odour-causing materials are precisely the ones used to create biogas, which in turn fuels a generator to create electricity. For Speers, however, the goal is simply to foster awareness and debate. The neighbours aren’t opposed to the

principle of diverting waste to electricity generation, only to the location of the plant. To that end, action is necessary, he said. Along with having residents contact local and provincial politicians, BFCC is also raising money to pay for scientific experts to review and challenge technical reports prepared by Bio-En. “We haven’t given up yet. We’re going to fight this.” Mayor Bill Strauss said Woolwich council would be happy to hear from residents, but has no jurisdiction over the proposal. The township did submit comments to the MOE, but hasn’t received a response.

“ I know the feelings of the residents,” he said. “Until we hear more from the ministry, there’s not much we can do.” Bio-En submitted its final paperwork to the province two weeks ago. The Ministry of the Environment has up to six months to review the proposal, but a decision is likely to come within a month or two. The Austrian tech-

nology proposed for the Bio-En facility uses an anaerobic digester to convert organic material into biogas and fertilizer. It will be fed by waste material, including livestock manure, food waste, used cooking oils and other fats and the like. A diesel generator converted to work with methane will generate electricity to be sold back into the grid, while steam heat produced could be sold to neighbours such as the pet food mill. The $12-million facility would generate 2.8 megawatts of renewable electricity – enough to power 2,200 homes – and 3.4 mW of heat.

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1970, revealing the rusting steel, sagging trim and cramped quarters. Lillico explained that the existing truck bays are too small to wash vehicles inside the building and it’s difficult for the firefighters to don their gear when responding to an emergency call. The successful bid, from contractor Eli Sherk, estimated the

cost of constructing the new bay at $46,250, adding a new peaked roof over the entire building at $7,500 and replacing the siding at $5,250. Phase three, including electrical and heating upgrades, painting, replacing the doors and renovating the radio room is estimated to cost $33,099, bringing the total cost of the renovations to $92,099.

position because “we have to have change at the top – that’s where we need it most.” In the face of growing challenges, Cowan said the township can no longer make do with reactive leadership dealing with issues strictly on a piecemeal basis. “We need to be proactive. We should have policies in place rather than waiting for things to happen then reacting with a lack of leadership.”

fied property taxes as a priority. Noting Woolwich taxes are second lowest in Waterloo Region, he said he hopes to keep them that way. “Dollars mean an awful lot to me – I was trained that way in business.” He also points to a new Hwy. 7 corridor between Kitchener and Guelph as longstanding issue in need of resolution. Strauss expects to run a low-key cam-

tion and again in 2000. He was acclaimed in 2003 and 2006. “I’m out there. I want to be mayor for one more term anyway,” he said. “The only promise I make is that I’ll continue to be here for the people.” For his part, Cowan is making use of the internet – a website (www. vision4woolwich.com), Facebook and Twitter – to roll out a platform and invite public input.

back on the rails,” said Cowan, stressing the need for a vision for the future. The online presence has allowed Cowan to get an immediate response from the public. He’s getting 10 or 15 messages per day in response to his campaign. “I’m getting lots of support, plenty of good feedback and lots of volunteers who want to help out.”

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he Linwood fire station will be getting some upgrades after Wellesley council this week approved spending up to $100,000 for an addition and renovations. The first phase of the project is the construction of a 20-by-55foot truck bay on the east side of the building. The second stage

will see a new peaked roof put on the station and the exterior siding, steel and trim replaced. The third phase involves replacing the truck bay doors and upgrading the heating and electrical systems. At the township council meeting Monday evening, fire chief Andrew Lillico showed council photos of the fire station, built in

Patio Election: Campaigns off to differing starts Dishes the campaign paign, highlighting his “My strategy is to > CONTINUED FROM COVER forWith the Oct. 25 munici- experience. He’s been come to the people with to run for mayor pal election in the early mayor since 1997, con- a proactive plan, to lead ¢ cided rather than a council stages, Strauss identi- testing that year’s elec- this township, to get it

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» Saturday, July 10, 2010

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to get an emergency crew to the scene of a fire here will be much quicker after this building is operational,” said John Hammer, director of transportation for the Region of Waterloo. “The equipment will be right here in the centre of the airport and full-time firefighters will be on stand-by when the planes land.” The project is ex-

pected to be completed by next March. Some $4.7 million of the budget will be covered by the federal and provincial Infrastructure Stimulus Fund. The remaining balance is to be financed by the Region of Waterloo. Last year the airport saw a total of 106,052 aircraft movements, up from 104,242 in 2007 and 100,149 in 2006.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

7 NEWS

Food drive part of youth centre’s summer D

uring the season of barbecues, corn on the cob and cold drinks on the patio, it is easy to forget about those people in our community who don’t have as much to eat, a phenomenon illustrated by rows of empty shelves at the Food Bank of Waterloo Region this summer. In response, the township’s young people are rallying together to remind people that donations are still needed; members of the Youth Centre of Woolwich are organizing a ‘Fill Our Pool With Food’ contest in support of the local food bank. “The youth in the group are often looking to give back to the community,” said Kelly Christie, director of community support at Woolwich Community Services. “This is just one of the things that we have planned for the summer but because people don’t always think about food banks at this time of year, we thought it was a good place to start.” About 18,000 pounds

of food are dispensed each week, according to Ruth FriendshipKeller of the Food Bank of Waterloo Region, the distributing agency which provides food to a number of local organizations throughout the region. “The amount of food that we distribute throughout the year is fairly constant,” she explained. “But the amount of food donated is much more variable.” Food donation peaks around Thanksgiving and Christmas, when many schools, charitable organizations and community groups tend to organize their annual food drive. “But people are busy with other things throughout the summer,” said Friendship-Keller. “They don’t always think of the food bank at this time of year.” Essential items such as rice, stews, chili, canned fruit, beans in sauce and peanut butter are those that typically get depleted most quickly and are in the highest demand at this time of the year. “We are continuing

to send out the normal amount and we are okay for the next few weeks, but towards the end of the summer, our shelves will start to get empty.” The food drive is just one of a variety of activities planned this summer for youth centre participants. Other options include a trip to Bingemans in Kitchener where local youth can enjoy the water park, mini golf or go for a lap around the track in the go-carts. Since last September, 190 memberships have been purchased at the centre. An annual membership costs $20 and for that price, youth can come out and enjoy access to the internet, a pool table, movies, books, gaming systems and a chance to participate in offsite activities. Offsite activities come with an additional fee. “They’re worthwhile,” said Christie. “It gets our youth out and allows them to go places with their peers.” A new initiative this year will be the introduction of age-specific

PHOTO

Katie Edmonds

» KATIE EDMONDS

New programs lined up for facility organized by WCS

SUMMER DRIVE The youth centre’s Karyn Kennedy checks out the progress on the ‘Fill Our Pool with Food’ project for bank Wednesday afternoon at the Woolwich Memorial Centre. evenings. On Tuesday evenings from 6-10 p.m., kids in Grades 6, 7 and 8 are invited to come out and enjoy the centre. On Thursday evenings, it’s time for the Grade 9 kids. Despite the many

off-site activities happening this summer, the centre will remain open to the public Tuesday to Friday from 2 to 10 p.m. The drop-in centres is geared for young people from Grade 6

to 19 years of age. For more information, stop by the Woolwich Memorial Centre or WCS to get a calendar of events or visit www. woolwichyouthcentre. blogspot.com.

ABOUT FACE

PHOTO

» KATIE EDMONDS

Celebrating Canada's Day

What is your job here? I was hired on as a summer student. I will be the event planner between the months of June and August. Most of my job is getting sponsorship for our events like the Jeanne Renault Golf Classic and the youth BBQs. I also work part-time at No Frills.

PHOTOS

» JONI MILTENBURG

PARTY TIME

Woolwich Township hosted its annual party in Elmira's Gore Park to celebrate Canada Day. Above, Coun. Murray Martin, Coun. Mark Bauman, MP Harold Albrecht, Mayor Bill Strauss and Coun. Ruby Weber serve up cake. Right, Nathan Martin digs in. Far right, Rayna Zhou wears her Canadian pride right on her face.

Brynna Wasylycia

Where are you a student? I just graduated from Elmira District Secondary School in January and I am heading to Wilfrid Laurier University in

Woolwich Community Services

the fall for Sociology. Why sociology? In high school I liked all the social sciences. I like psychology and counseling and all that jazz. Recently I have been leaning towards teaching though. After university I would like to work for the school board somehow. What is your favourite thing about your job here? I like working with people. I get to answer phones and

talk to all kinds of people. It’s very much a helpingout atmosphere and we will bend and twist to get someone the help they need which I think is cool. So when you’re not working here or at No Frills, what is your guilty pleasure? Honestly, it’s probably my phone. It’s basically an extension of my arm. I constantly feel the need to check it. I freak out if I leave it behind somewhere.


OPINION 8

THE OBSERVER

OPINION

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

Some sort of deal will be done in the end, because the spoils of power are just too tempting. Gwynne Dyer

column on pg. 09

VERBATIM

I

t is a colossal disappointment. It's up to Parliament now to scrap the legislation to begin anew. This is clearly not worth the paper it is written on.

> Liberal consumer affairs critic Dan McTeague on the deficiencies of the National Do Not Call List

THE MONITOR Majesty Queen Elizabeth's most reHcialercentvisit tour in Canada was her 22nd offito the country. The longest was for 45 days in 1959, which included stops in every province and territory.

> Canadian Heritage Department

EDITORIAL

Do-not-call registry firing blanks, as predicted L

ong-delayed and watered-down, federal legislation to prevent unwanted telemarketing calls is proving to be worth as much as the paper it’s printed on. Not much also applies to the number of fines levied for rampant violation of the the National Do Not Call List. Since the list was introduced in September 2008, only 11 fines have been imposed, a total of $73,000. Of that, only $250 had been collected by last March, a report revealed this week. The numbers are miniscule even compared to the low fine limits – $1,500 for individuals and $15,000 for telemarketing companies – for those who call someone registered on the do-not-call list. Apparently the Conservative’s law-and-order agenda doesn’t extend to its own weakly-worded legislation, despite the fact mil-

lions of Canadians have joined the battle against telemarketers by signing up. Either that or the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission, which runs the program, is being extremely lax. Or both, which does seem to be the case. To those of us facing those calls that usually come as we’re sitting down to dinner – Do you want your carpets cleaned? New windows? Trash hauled away? – the solution is simple: ban such calls outright, impose crippling fines and enforce them vigorously. That would represent a major shift in government policy: doing something that Canadians actually want, instead of finding new ways to waste money and inconvenience us. Critics, largely those in the telemarketing field, naturally oppose

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WOOLWICH OBSERVER 20-B Arthur Street North, Elmira, Ontario, Canada N3B 1Z9

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Joe Merlihan, Publisher | EXT 107 jmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Steve Kannon, Editor | EXT 103 skannon@woolwichobserver.com Joni Miltenburg, Reporter | EXT 101 jmiltenburg@woolwichobserver.com Katie Edmonds, Reporter | EXT 102 kedmonds@woolwichobserver.com

> LETTER POLICY

such a move, claiming it would put some companies out of business – the industry is worth some $18 billion, employing almost 300,000 people. That may be a concern, but it is irrelevant to the argument: like so-called spam e-mail, unwanted calls clog up a resource the consumer pays for himself and interferes in receiving valued information. The phone is an essential tool: people shouldn’t have to deal with unwanted calls if that is their desire, nor should they have to resort to technical screening tools to do so. The government’s own studies show 80 per cent of us find telemarketing calls annoying, with more than 60 per cent in favour of the registry. When the current legislation was introduced, it was immedi-

Donna Rudy, Sales Manager | EXT 104 drudy@woolwichobserver.com Pat Merlihan, Production Mgr | EXT 105 pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Matthew French, Production | EXT 108 mfrench@woolwichobserver.com Kyle Ledermann, Production | EXT 109 kledermann@woolwichobserver.com

The Observer welcomes letters to the editor on topics of interest to our readers. Letters may be edited for brevity, grammar, and legal considerations. All letters must be signed and contain the writer’s full name and telephone number for verification purposes. Unsigned or anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. If you have a legitimate concern and cannot sign your name to a letter, please contact the editor to discuss alternative means of resolving the issue. This newspaper declines announcements, poetry and thank-you letters in the opinion section. Maximum suggested length is 500 words.

ately lambasted for its looseness and loopholes, critiques that have proven to have been well founded. The list was essentially neutered from the start. A better idea? Make the practice of telemarketing illegal – that includes any and all groups, no exceptions – and allow the industry to create a “do-call” list: anybody who wants such calls can sign an agreement explicitly allowing the annoyance. In that way, the costs are borne directly by the industry, and everyone is automatically covered, with no need to opt out. Sweeping changes and severe penalties offered up at no cost to taxpayers is the only useful course of action in what would otherwise be a public relations stunt doomed to backfire.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

9 OPINION

Oil riches means some kind of order will come to Iraq A

s the American withdrawal gains speed, there are fewer American troops in Iraq than in Afghanistan for the first time since 2003. By the end of August there will be no U.S. combat troops left in Iraq, though some tens of thousands of support troops will remain until next year. And still there is no new Iraqi government, although it is now four months since the election on Mar. 7. U.S. Vice-President Joe Biden was in Baghdad last weekend urging Iraqi politicians to end the political deadlock, but America’s influence over events in Iraq has been falling as fast as its troop numbers. In the end, the same broad coalition of Shia Arabs and Kurds that ran the country before will probably rule again, excluding the Sunni Arabs, but it’s unclear who will lead the new coalition. The last election made Iraq’s sectarian and ethnic rivalries even sharper, if that is possible. The corruption is universal and shameless. Dozens of people are still being killed by suicide bombers every week. But the country cannot really fail, because there is just so much oil. After three decades of foreign wars, UN sanctions and American occupation, Iraq’s oil exports bottomed out at 1.8 million barrels per day in 2008, but they are already back up to 2.5 million b/d – and Baghdad plans to be producing 9.9 million b/d only 10 years from now. That would make it the world’s first, second or third-largest exporter (depending on what happens to Saudi

International Affairs GWYNNE DYER Arabian and Russian production), and drown it in a tidal wave of cash. The target is plausible, because this is not speculation about production from new oilfields; it is just enhanced production from existing fields. Contracts to build the infrastructure to pump that extra oil have already been signed with two dozen foreign oil companies. Since the foreigners are only paid a fee per barrel, Iraq gets most of the profits. On the reasonable assumption that the price of oil will not drop below $50 per barrel in the next decade, that means that the Iraqi government will have an oil income of at least $150 billion a year by 2020. Two-thirds of the current government’s income is stolen by the political elite and there is no reason to think that this will change, but that would still allow some $50 billion a year to trickle through and serve the needs of ordinary Iraqis. That is probably enough to buy the grudging loyalty of most Shia Arabs to the Iraqi state. The Kurds are a different case, but the hostility of all their neighbours to full Kurdish independence will probably persuade them to maintain their current semi-detached relationship with Baghdad. And the Sunni Arab minority can be either

bought off or repressed. In the old days, there might have been a popular revolution to sweep away the emigre elite that came back from the U.S., Europe and Iran to feed off the long-suffering Iraqi people, but those days are gone. After Abdulkarim Qasim, the Baathists, Saddam Hussein, and the Americans – 50 years of disappointment – the Iraqis don’t believe in saviours any more. “Won’t Get Fooled Again” could be the national anthem. All the Iraqis can reasonably hope for, in the aftermath of the U.S. occupation, is corrupt governments riven by sectarian and ethnic divisions, but that is probably a stable outcome provided there is enough money. And to be fair to the Americans, no other post-Saddam, post-occupation outcome was ever likely. So what happens in the next few months? The union last month between outgoing prime minister Nouri al-Maliki’s secular but overwhelmingly Shia State of Law Party and the two religious Shia parties in the Iraqi National Alliance creates a bloc that is within striking distance of a parliamentary majority. Recreate the alliance with the Kurds that Maliki had in the last coalition, and the deal is done. That coalition has not yet happened because Maliki would almost certainly not be the prime minister in it: one of the Shia religious parties, led by Mo-

> SEE DYER ON PG. 10

THE VOICE

What’s your strategy to beat the heat?

“I don’t exercise and I drink plenty of fluids.” > Bev Miller

“Public libraries. They have air conditioning and it’s a good place to hang out.” > Emma Bartel

THE VIEW FROM HERE

“Drink lots of fluids.”

> Nick Boychuk

The Queen's arrival in Breslau gives Mayor Bill Strauss an opportunity to seek out a little advice prior to the first contested election in a decade.

“I just stay in the basement – relax in the basement as much as I can.” > Patricia Bagley


Rib

s

OPINION 10

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

Stay hydrated ... with the right kind of water T

his week’s heat wave has public health officials reminding us all to drink plenty of water to replenish what we lose through sweating, particularly if we’re being active outdoors. Just don’t rely on bottled water, which would run counter to municipal efforts to get us to trust tap water, and to reduce the waste generated by single-use plastic bottles. There’s also the environmental impact of shipping bottled water all over a country where safe, clean water is abundant. Increasingly, municipalities have turned to tap-water campaigns while introducing controls on bottled water, particularly in facilities such as arenas and stadiums. Reaction has run the gamut, from those calling the move fascist (dictatorial) or communist (the nanny state) to those deeming it a godsend. People using facilities such as arenas will still be free to bring their own bottled water. As some have pointed out, visitors may simply opt for other beverages, consuming something less healthy such as pop and still generating a not-really-recyclable plastic bottle or aluminum

From the Editor Steve Kannon can. Such moves are more useful, however, for their symbolism. Why is that we now feel compelled to have a beverage, water or otherwise, within reach at all times? Argue about the quality of tap water versus bottled water, or about the convenience factor, but there’s got to be a reason why we’re drinking the stuff in the amounts we do, all the while creating growing piles of discarded single-use plastic bottles. The environmental impact is compounded by the health risks associated with Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical that mimics the natural female sex hormone, estradiol. BPA is commonly used in food and beverage containers. Experts tell us our drinking water is safe, tested far more often and rigourously than the bottled variety. In fact, much of what we buy is sim-

ply municipal tap water that’s been filtered, bottled and sold for thousands of times what the company paid the municipality. Does bottled water taste better than what comes out of the tap? Usually. The stuff coming out of the taps in Waterloo Region varies in taste, typically less-than-stellar. My solution is to filter the stuff used for drinking. A reusable bottle is handy if I need to take it with me, which, really, isn’t as often as many people seem to think it is. There was a time when nobody carted water around with them, much like we were able to leave the house without a phone on our hip. As a kid, I would spend all day outside in the summertime with only the occasional visit to a drinking fountain. I was never at risk of dehydration, playing in the neighbourhood park, not the middle of a remote desert. I lived to tell the tale. A decade or so ago, we would have laughed if someone said we’d spending a dollar or two or three or more for a little bottle of water … and that we’d be buying them by the ton. Today, the North American bottled

Dyer: Americans attempting to withdraw quietly support from secular Shias in and around Baghdad. But the Kurds would probably not join such a coalition, because Iraqiyyah ran on an anti-Kurdish platform across northern Iraq – and besides, Allawi and Maliki cannot stand each other. Some sort of deal will be done in the end, because the spoils of power are just too tempting – and meanwhile, the Americans are leaving

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 09 qtada al-Sadr, hates him too much. The coalition talks may continue at a stately pace down to September as Maliki seeks to stay in power, but he will probably fail. His only hope is to make a deal instead with Iyad Allawi’s Iraqiyya party, which got most Sunni Arabs’ votes across the west and north of the country, but also significant

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water industry is a $15-billion business. Here in Waterloo Region, we’re especially attached to the bottled stuff: a Statistics Canada report found 46 per cent of us drink mostly bottled water, compared to 27 per cent as the national average. Much of that has to do with the inconsistent taste, and the public’s perception about the quality of the tap water, but regional officials stress the water is fine, and it would rather not deal with all the empty bottles. The latest health news may help their cause. Concern about the environmental and health impacts of so many plastic bottles has spurred something of a resurgence for containers made of glass – especially for such things as baby food – and metal in items such as portable water bottles. Municipal moves against bottled water are another step in changing the public’s perception, perhaps giving us pause to think about the consequences. It would be nice if we looked at the bigger picture, reassessing our impact as consumers: everything we buy comes at a cost beyond what we take out of our pockets.

Write a letter to the Editor. editor@woolwichobserver.com > LETTER POLICY The Observer welcomes letters to the editor on topics of interest to our readers. Letters may be edited for brevity, grammar, and legal considerations. All letters must be signed and contain the writer’s full name and telephone number for verification purposes. Unsigned or anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. If you have a legitimate concern and cannot sign your name to a letter, please contact the editor to discuss alternative means of resolving the issue. This newspaper declines announcements, poetry and thank-you letters in the opinion section. Maximum suggested length is 500 words.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

11 FARM SAFETY

SPECIAL FEATURE

Farm Safety Handling big bales safely

T

hose big round bales weigh 1,000 to 2,000 pounds. Developing safety awareness begins with the operator’s manual. Take time to read through it when the machine is new, and make sure each operator reads or re-acquaints himself with the manual at the beginning of each season. Make sure that all employees are trained and know how to operate the equipment. • Before starting, inspect the tractorbaler combination. Make sure all shields are in place, especially the Power Take-Off (PTO) shields. Pull hard on the PTO shaft to ensure it is properly locked on the splined shafts. Check the PTO speed range to be certain 1,000-RPM isn’t used where 540 may be specified. • Lubricate all parts according to manufacturer’s recommendations. Proper lubrication can reduce unnecessary wear on parts and prevent overheating that could cause a fire.

• Check the maintenance records of the baler prior to starting a new baling season. Excessive grease or grass buildup on moving parts may cause a fire hazard that should be removed periodically. • A 5 lb. A: B: C fire extinguisher is recommended as part of your tractor equipment. • When working on this equipment, chock the baler wheels, lock the tractor brakes, and remove the ignition key. Removing the key may prevent a hasty helper from starting something he shouldn’t have. • Thoroughly clean the baler to remove any accumulated field trash or other debris. • Carefully check for loose or missing nuts, bolts, screws, guards or bent teeth. • Replace missing guards to prevent accidental contact with the components they guard. • Replace bent or missing pickup teeth to ensure effective feeding of material into the feed rolls.

• Inspect all belts or chains for evidence of wear or breakage. • Maintain belt tension according to the manufacturer’s recommendations. • Belt lengths should be matched to prevent slippage that can cause plugging and heat build-up. • Belts that must be spliced should be trimmed and laced squarely. • New belts should be checked periodically until they are broken in and length has stabilized. • Before replacing a belt or chain, consult the operator’s manual for instructions on securing the upper chain or moving load from the belt tension springs. • Make sure the hydraulic hoses are clean and in good repair and hooked up correctly. • Check the twine feeding and cutting mechanisms to see that they are working properly and that your twine is in good condition.

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FARM SAFETY 12

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

SPECIAL FEATURE

Farm Safety Agricultural mower safety

A

n accident with a rotary mower can cost you your life! Following safety practices, using proper protective equipment correctly and keeping the mower in good repair will all help keep the operator safe. The main source of danger with any mower is the blade, which does the actual work of cutting. This sharp, high-speed blade can cause serious injury if a hand or foot is allowed to get under

the mower deck while the engine is running. Push mowers should always be operated across the slope so your feet will not get under the mower if you slip, nor will the mower roll down the slope and run over you. Pulling a push type mower is also dangerous, as your foot might slip under the mower. Riding mowers are generally more stable when operated up and down the slope.

There is also the danger of objects being thrown from under the mower by the blade, whose tip may be moving as fast as 200 miles per hour. A person struck by a rock or piece of wire thrown with such force could experience severe injury or even death. Fuelling hot engines and smoking while refuelling can result in serious burns, often to large portions of the body.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

13 FARM SAFETY

SPECIAL FEATURE

Farm Safety Safety of children in agriculture

C

hildren living and growing up in the farm workplace continue to be exposed to hazards that can lead to serious injury or death. Approximately 20% of fatalities on Ontario farms involving farm work are children under the age of fifteen. Parents need to create “hazard-free” play areas to protect their children. A farm cannot be considered a giant playground. Boundaries and limits need to be set for such play areas. View your farm from your child’s perspective. Get down on their level and look up, down and all around. In many cases children will be performing various work related tasks when they reach an appropriate age. In these cases stick adult supervision is required. Farm parents can take these precautions to prevent children from getting hurt on the farm: • Find out what the developmental characteristics of children are at specific ages. Child development guidelines are available that

give abilities of children at different ages. These characteristics help to identify typical risks. • Identify the dangerous areas on your farm. Determine where kids are most likely to get hurt on the farm. Determine what draws children to dangerous situations. An example: Toddlers are especially at risk to pesticide poisoning because of their curiosity, tendency to put things into their mouths, inability to read labels, and budding independence. • Set up appropriate rules for children to follow. Remember that very young children cannot understand the concept of rules but as children grow they begin to understand the reasons for guidelines and the consequences for not following them. Be consistent in enforcement of rules. • Supervise children according to their age. Very young children need constant supervision. Children must prove they

Ensure outdoor outlets have a Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI)

HAZARD-FREE PLAY AREA

• Children should have a place to play where they are protected from the daily hazards of farm life. This area should be away from the driveway and buildings. Everyone on the farm should know where this area is and make sure the children use it. The area should be free of broken and unsafe equipment. Make it a place children will enjoy and use. Areas could include a sand box, swing set, backyard or porch. Know where your kids are at all times!

ANIMAL BEHAVIOR

• Children love animals, but animals don’t always love children. Children need to be taught how to handle and work around animals to lessen potential hazards. • Household pets can be as dangerous as farm animals. Respect for all animals should be one of the first things taught

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BUSINESS 14

THE OBSERVER

BUSINESS Bee health is all the buzz

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

f you’ve never given much thought to bees beyond waving them away from your drink, consider this: every third mouthful of food you eat comes from crops pollinated by bees. That’s why it was so alarming when in 2006, bees began dying off in large numbers. In the United States, the culprit was Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), believed to be a combination of factors, including parasites, viruses, bacteria, poor nutrition and pesticides. In Canada, winter mortality rates that were three

times higher than normal were caused by the parasitic varroa mite, harsh winter conditions and insufficient food reserves for winter. At the same time that beekeepers have been battling honeybee dieoffs, they’ve faced poor honey yields. Last year honey production in Ontario was the lowest it’s been since 1982, when the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs began collecting data. Jerry Dietrich of BeeHaven Apiaries in Alma said his honey crop was down to one-third of its normal volume for the past two years due to the

PHOTO

I

Joni Miltenburg

» JONI MILTENBURG

Insects’ role in pollination has honey producers and experts fretting about population

GOOD FOR BEES-NESS Beekeeper Jerry Dietrich holds a frame partially filled with honey in one of his bee yards outside Alma. This year’s warm weather has been a boon to beekeepers, boosting bee populations and providing them with ample sources of nectar and pollen. cool, wet weather. “There were a lot of discouraged commercial beekeepers,” he said. Dietrich has about 100 hives in five bee yards around Alma, and produces between three and seven tonnes of honey per year. At 100 hives he’s considered a small commercial producer, but Dietrich sees himself as a hobbyist. He started keeping bees 15 years ago and has gradually built up the number

Watch your business

GROW

of hives since he retired in 2005. So far this year is off to a better start. The warm weather early in spring meant bee populations built quickly. Honey production started strong with the dandelion blossoms everywhere, paused during a late snowfall, then resumed with the flowering of silver maples, poplars and willow trees. Dietrich welcomed the hot weather this week, explaining that it dries

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out blossoms enough for bees to access the nectar and pollen. Dietrich’s backyard is considered a bee yard, but most of his hives are located on surrounding farms, with the permission of the farmer. One is in an old apple orchard; another is located in a small stand of trees near fields of canola and red clover. Most farmers are willing to cooperate with beekeepers, he said, because more pollinators means better

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yields. While honey production is important, it’s their status as pollinators that has researchers so concerned about the welfare of the honeybee. The value of honeybees to pollination of crops in Canada is estimated at $1.3 to $1.7 billion annually. In the United States, migratory beekeeping – where beekeepers load their hives on flatbed

> SEE BUZZ ON PG. 15

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519-669-5790


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

15 BUSINESS

Research responds when the heat takes its toll E

ver wonder what keeps plants going in staggering heat and drought as they wait for a new home, outside grocery stores, hardware stores and other big box stores? It can be a tough grind. When plants come from the comfort of a nursery into a store’s garden centre (such as it is), which is often perched atop part of the establishment’s blistering hot parking lot, it’s a shock to their systems. And considering most of the ornamentals consumers purchase in Ontario now come from megastores such as Walmart, Zehr’s and Canadian Tire, losses can be huge. The same goes for highway horticulture. The province plants significant numbers of roadside trees every year, but you’d never know it. Most of these trees come from the west coast, where the conditions are much milder

Food For Thought Owen Roberts than they are here. The newly arrived trees have seldom seen drought and severe weather spikes like we have in Ontario. So when the trees get transplanted – and then get walloped by the weather – they can’t handle it. As a result, a vast majority of roadside trees die. Vineland Research and Innovation Centre CEO Jim Brandle, whose Niagara region establishment is involved in drought tolerance research, puts the figure as high as 95 per cent. Two choices exist. First, either

Buzz: Protecting the health of bees > CONTINUED FROM PG. 14 trucks and rent them out for pollination, following the blossoming season north – is critical to agriculture. It is also part of the problem; the practice of transporting bees over long distances is believed to have weakened hives and contributed to spreading disease. With the causes of honeybee die-

offs pinpointed – at least in Ontario – research has shifted to finding solutions. Organizations like the Ontario Beekeepers Association make recommendations on best practices and conduct inspections to monitor hive health. Globally, the hunt continues for ways to protect these tiny but valuable insects – and protect our food supply in the process.

forget all this ornamental stuff, and let nature take its course. But that’s not likely to happen, given the players involved and their investment in this field. The other, better choice is to beef up plants’ and trees’ abilities to withstand drought and harsh conditions, get retailers to help sponsor research, and serve consumers needs. This may seem like a self-indulgent North American pursuit, designed for little more than aesthetics. But the truth is ornamentals have all kinds of value, environmentally and economically. And in the even bigger picture, what researchers learn about drought tolerance in ornamentals can be applied to food crops, too. With climate change (apparently) upon us, new knowledge that sheds light on how to cope with temperature extremes and extraordinary growing conditions could potentially help in areas where drought is already prevalent and getting worse, such as certain underdeveloped countries. To this end, world leaders issued a declaration as the G20 summit concluded in Toronto. Item 34 of their manifesto said, “Looking ahead, [G20 countries] commit to exploring innovative, results-based mechanisms to harness the private sector for agricultural innovation.” This is a vital point. The G20 leaders are recognizing the way forward

for global sustainability is through partnerships. The private sector has a role that can’t be ignored. And now, it’s part of officialdom. The agri-food sector is already ahead of the game. There are scores of cooperation examples at the University of Guelph with the private sector, mostly based on research supported by the multi-million-dollar agreement between the university and the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs. When it comes to food, partnerships just make sense – the private sector supplies the agri-food industry with most of the goods it needs to produce food. Food is essential, everywhere. Research is needed to address the many challenges that exist in producing food and feeding a hungry world, and universities are fertile ground for ideas that can turn into strategies and products. The Vineland model, which also involves the ministry and the university, is new. Vineland’s mandate is focused on research and innovation; specifically, “to create industry-driven innovation pipelines,” particularly in horticulture. And as the drought tolerance research shows, results are often transferable to even bigger problems. The key now is for G20 countries to actually commit resources to their declaration. When they do, they will find credible, proven and progressive institutions ready to help and already engaged.

OPEN HOUSE In honour of Wayne Martin’s retirement from

Fun e for th e r i t En y Famil

Please join us in congratulating Wayne on over 37 years of service

Thursday, July 22 1:00-4:00pm To be held at Way-Mar Inc.

3585 Ament Line, Hawkesville

Saturday, July 17

9am to 3pm St. Clements Arena Rain or Shine!

10

Tr to b ophies e aw arde d

200 First tered egis Cars r a dash e receiv ue plaq

Silent Auction, 50/50 Draw, Food & Refreshments,

Show Vendors call or E-mail for details Contact:

Mark Hergott......... 519-699-4989 Brad Bowman......... 519-699-9496 Brenda Brenner...... 519-699-5746

Email: stclemautorama@yahoo.ca

St. Clements

Recreation Services Board


ENERGY CONSERVATION

16

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

SPECIAL FEATURE

Energy Conservation

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

17 ENERGY CONSERVATION

mo movement JOIN THE

2° at a time.

If your home or small business has central air conditioning, Waterloo North Hydro will provide and install a peaksaver thermostat at no cost — a package valued at $400. To learn more and to register for the program, please visit www.wnhydro.com

Take

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*Reward miles offer is limited to the first 150,000 pledges or until August 31, 2010, whichever comes first. Limit of one reward miles offer per AIR MILES Collector Account. Collector can choose from 1 of 3 participating charities for the OPA donation component: WWF-Canada, Special Olympics Canada or Kids Help Phone. No cash value. For further information visit powerpledge.ca or call 1-877-PWR-PLDG (877-797-7534) Toll Free. Funded by the Ontario Power Authority and offered by Waterloo North Hydro Inc. For more information contact your participating electric utility or call The Power Pledge line as indicated above. OMOfficial Marks of the Ontario Power Authority. †Trademark of Waterloo North Hydro Inc. ®™ Trademarks of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne, Inc. and Ontario Power Authority. © 1986 Panda symbol WWF-World Wide Fund For Nature (also known as World Wildlife Fund). ® “WWF” is a WWF Registered Trademark.

The Power PledgeOM is presented jointly by the Ontario Power AuthorityOM and WWF-Canada.


LIVING HERE 18

LIVING HERE Organizing the past

THE OBSERVER

Cataloguing Wellesley’s historical archives is just the right fit for Nancy Maitland PUTTING HISTORY IN ORDER Nancy Maitland brings an interest in family history and many years experience as a corporate archivist to the Wellesley historical society room, where she is working part-time.

Joni Miltenburg

I

t’s taken a few decades, but Nancy Maitland is doing the job she always wanted to do. Maitland is the new parttime archivist at the Wellesley Township Heritage and Historical Society room. She studied archaeology at Wilfrid Laurier University before completing a master’s degree in museology and a certificate course at the National Archives. Maitland’s aim was to work in local history, but she wound up working at the University of Waterloo archives for a short time before taking a job as a corporate archivist at Mutual Life Insurance, which later became Clarica and then Sun Life. Maitland retired from Sun Life at the end of 2008, and a few months ago she came across the Wellesley posting. “It was just the right job at the right time,” she said. Her work in corporate

archives has proven excellent training for her current post, as the responsibilities are largely the same: acquiring and preserving materials, arranging and displaying them, and making the material available to the public. A good deal of the legwork has been done already; in 2008, Derek Cooke and Lian Goodall catalogued the 1,200 items in the historical society’s collection, scanned about 400 photos and ensured all the materials were stored properly. Maitland will pick up where their work left off, by continuing to catalogue items as they come in, rearranging the room, changing displays and helping anyone who wants to do research in the archives. Despite being a native of Kitchener-Waterloo, Maitland didn’t know a lot about the history of Wellesley Township before she started the job, but she’s intrigued.

There are several things in the collection that have piqued her interest, including materials on Dr. Deborah Glaister Hannay. A relative donated a number of items relating to the township’s first female doctor, who also served in the Second World War. The other thing that has caught Maitland’s eye is school attendance records from SS#16 in Wellesley. The school kept daily attendance records for almost every year from 1890 to 1970, including reasons for absences. The records are a valuable resource for anyone doing genealogical research, as well as offering insights into the rural school – Maitland noted that it appears students did go to school in the summer at one time. That, however, is for someone else to investigate; Maitland explains that she can’t be an archivist and a historian at the same time. Her

job is to make the materials available to other researchers. Maitland’s other goal, in conjunction with the historical society, is to generate interest in the collection. Maitland will be making herself available to speak to interested groups and offer tours of the archives, and the historical society is discussing using the room for meetings and perhaps bringing in people to speak on topics of local interest. Another goal is to build a website to showcase the society’s collection. Maitland noted with some amusement that she is probably better qualified to do the job now, after years of experience in corporate archives, than she was when she first graduated and dreamed of working in local history. “It’s very exciting for me, and I have many ideas. With my experience in the corporate world, I’m able to put them into practice.”

Five rules for better results Get healthy Stay healthy Samuel & Stacy Lancaster

R

ules are not meant to be broken. Rules provide structure and certainty of expectation. Just as sure as the law of gravity where everything falls downward, is the truth to these next few rules to exercise. And if applied, you will see better results. Pay attention!

> RULE 1 – INTENSITY Remember this formula: calories burned = fat burned = weight loss. To see results you need to do high intensity training. A high intensity workout is defined as exercise that pushes your heart rate up to 75 per cent or more of its maximum. When you exercise at a higher heart rate, you not only burn more calories during the workout, but you boost your metabolism for up to 24 hours afterward. This is referred to as the “after-burn effect.” Tip: if you work out alone and find it hard to push yourself, sign up for a class where those around you will encourage you to work harder. Turn off the TV and pump up the music. The beats will get you moving faster.

> RULE 2 – MIX IT UP Change your routine from time to time. The body’s natural tendency is to adapt to the demand to find stability. The problem with this is that eventually you

> SEE FITNESS ON PG. 21

Auto Care Tip of the Week If you notice any squealing of your brakes, have them checked as soon as possible. It’s much cheaper to replace worn pads than it is to have to replace expensive rotors if they become worn. — Gavin Shantz

AUTO CARE 20 Oriole Parkway E., Elmira, ON N3B 0A5 Tel: (519) 669-1082 Fax: (519) 669-3084 info@leroysautocare.net

www.leroysautocare.net

Complete Automotive Maintenance & Repair

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

NEW LOCATION!


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

19 LIVING HERE

Local bounty makes for options in the kitchen S

autéed green beans tossed with toasted almonds and butter, roasted candy cane beets, crispy cucumbers in a dill and buttermilk dressing, baby greens, baby carrots, creamy goats’ cheese tossed with a green onion vinaigrette, the first new potatoes of the season. Ontario cherries, strawberries or raspberries for dessert. These are just a few in the long list of delicious local produce items that will be available to us this month. As chefs, it is hard to pass up all of the fantastic foods the region has to offer. Kirstie’s vacation this year was her honeymoon to Italy where she was able to enjoy some of the world’s finest olive oils and cheese. I have taken my kids to visit their cousins in Whitehorse, Yukon for our vacation. The landscape is breathtaking, the 24 hours of sunlight is something to experience but I am really missing Waterloo Region and all of our local produce. The local food movement that we have in Waterloo Region does not exist in the Yukon. I was able to locate Canadian mushrooms at the Whitehorse super store; everything else is shipped in from the United States. I am proud to say that we are spoiled with our farmers’ markets, produce auctions and grocery stores like Central Fresh Market and Vincenzo’s, both big supporters of Foodlink Waterloo Region. As I listen to the cousins enjoy their time together, I am daydreaming about what I am going to eat when I get home … ohhhhh … grilled onions, Charles Quality Meat’s ribeye steak, roasted new potatoes and garlic butter .. or a bowl of fresh berries and ice cream … so many choices, I am a lucky girl. You can check out Foodlink’s website (www.foodlink.ca) to find out what is available and upcoming at our local markets. And to get you started right now, here’s a fantastic dessert recipe that is oh-so-impressive.

From The Chef's Table Kirstie Herbstreit & Jody O'Malley

Fresh Fruit Clafoutis Serves 8 >>1/3 cup sugar >>1

lb fruit such as blueberries, raspberries or pitted cherries (our favourite is the cherries, and if you warn people, don’t bother pitting them)

>>Zest of half a lemon

Chantilly Cream:

>>3 eggs, separated

>>1 cup 35% cream >>1 tbsp icing sugar >>1/2 tsp vanilla

>>3 tbsp sugar (second amount) >>3 tbsp flour >>2 tbsp ground almonds

In a cold bowl, whip cream with a whisk until soft peaks form; add icing sugar and vanilla and whip until just combined.

>>Chefs Kirstie Herbstreit and Jody O’Malley are both Red Seal certified

>>1 tsp vanilla extract

chefs. Together they run the company YouCanCook2, specializing in interactive dinner parties. You can also find them cooking at Entertaining Elements in St. Jacobs, where they hold private dinners for eight people. To contact the chefs, visit their website www.youcancook2.com.

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Pre-heat oven to 375°F; Toss the fruit with the sugar and lemon zest; arrange in the bottom of 6-8 well-buttered ramekins; Beat the egg yolks with the second amount of sugar until light and creamy; Beat in flour, almonds, vanilla and cream; In a second bowl, beat the egg whites together with the pinch of salt until soft peaks form; Fold whites gently into the yolks until just blended, and then pour batter over the fruit; Bake in the upper third of the oven for about 15-20 minutes, until the batter is puffed and well browned; Let cool slightly and then serve with a dollop of Chantilly cream.

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LIVING HERE 20

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

MY SPACE WHO? Ernie Lyons Wildlife Recording Engineer

6

WHERE?

2

Bitternut Place., Elmira

10

5

Recording Studio

ernielyons@execulink.com

3

1) GUITAR

4

>>This 1954 J50 Gibson guitar

7

is dear to Ernie’s heart. He loves the true, full sound it produces. One of Gibson’s most successful and best-selling guitars, the J50 was introduced in 1945. The 1954 version Ernie holds is considered vintage and worth anywhere from $4,100-$5,300. Ernie has four guitars, but prefers his 12-string when performing gigs. Ernie’s repertoire is wide-ranging, but his fans prefer a good mix of Tom Petty and Irish drinking songs. Ernie will be playing at Waterloo’s Duke of Wellington Saturday night.

2) PICTURE

>>The framed artwork was used as album cover art for a CD created by Ernie called the Spirit of Muskoka for the Grandview Inn. Ernie spent eight days in 1992 recording sounds of the wild and put those sounds to song. The hotel gave these CDs to guests as a memento of their stay.

3) MICROPHONE

>>This is a parabolic microphone

that allows Ernie to target specific sounds in nature for recording. This

e

8

9

1

microphone is essential for that task: hooked up to headphones and digital audio tape recorder, Ernie can get clean recordings of specific creatures. Instructions to make your own can be found at www. solorb.com/elect/misc/bige.

4) RECORDER

>>This D.A.T. recorder is a solid

machine built for the great outdoors. Ernie needs rugged equipment to withstand nature’s elements. This Tascam is ideal because it’s light and has a

long battery life – that’s really important when the closest outlet is miles away.

5) SOFTWARE

>>In Ernie’s business ProTools

is the standard. He runs it on his Mac. Be it music or audio in film, the sounds you hear were more than likely filtered through ProTools. ProTools launched in 1991 and first album recorded, edited and mixed was Summer in Paradise by The Beach Boys.

6) FRAMED CD

>>Ernie recorded, mixed and

produced a series of seven CDs titled Sanctuary working with former Glass Tiger keyboardist Sam Reid. The first in the series, called Sanctuary: A Day Remembered, went gold in Canada, selling more than 50,000 albums. The series sold in excess of 500,000 copies.

7) MICROPHONE 2 >>This Shure VP88 stereo microphone doesn’t look like

a $1,500 piece of equipment. Ernie relies heavily on it to record ambient sounds which creates the atmosphere for main melodies and nature sounds to find voice.

8) MIXER >>This Yamaha ORM800 Mixer is used to record bands and Ernie’s own music. 9) CDS

>>Ernie’s been involved or credited on 35-40 different albums over the years. Ernie is a pioneer in the

nature music genre, working with Dan Gibson who went on to create Solitudes. Ernie’s been credited on Into the Quiet Stream, a recording of W.B. Yeats poems read to a background of Ernie’s nature sounds in Ireland.

10) OUTDOOR GEAR

>>Full body bug protection is

required in the wild. A wind screen for his microphone also hangs here. >>WANT TO HAVE YOUR HOME OR WORKSPACE FEATURED? pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com


THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, July 10, 2010

21 LIVING HERE

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Nurse Pilot Plumber Printer Quality engineer Teacher Technician Turner Tutor Typist

> SOLUTIONS: Find the answers to all of the puzzles on pg. 35

ACROSS 1. Song and dance, e.g. 5. Bartender on TVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pacific Princess 10. F.B.I. operative 14. Elaine ___ (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seinfeldâ&#x20AC;? role) 19. Granitelike rock 20. Downhill racer 21. Pink, as a steak 22. Certain Arab 23. Canadian 9-digit number 27. Material thrown out 28. Spanish city on the Tagus river 29. â&#x20AC;&#x153;... ___ he drove out of sightâ&#x20AC;? 30. A cotton fabric with a satiny finish 32. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re entered in court 33. Kind of sandwich 37. Allied 39. Lizard, old-style 40. 1973 Supreme Court decision name 41. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seinfeldâ&#x20AC;? uncle 42. Any â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seinfeld,â&#x20AC;? now 45. Humour that is down-toearth 46. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;? problem 47. Bucket of bolts 48. Bunch 49. .0000001 joule 50. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ be a cold day in hell ...â&#x20AC;? 51. (in India) a native nursemaid 53. At liberty 54. One thousandth of an ampere 55. In the direction of 56. Flightless flock 58. Catch 61. Delicate 62. Anger 63. ___ noir 64. Maple genus 65. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gimme ___!â&#x20AC;? (start of an Iowa State cheer) 66. Three players out at once 74. Indian state 75. Ballpoint, e.g. 76. Disdainful grimace 77. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much ___ About Nothingâ&#x20AC;? 78. Cast off hair 80. ___ Preston Caldwell



























 

 



 





 













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315 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5403 315 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5403















 

















(American author) 82. Moving along swiftly 84. Forget 88. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ we having fun yet?â&#x20AC;? 89. Plasters 91. Where dead bodies are kept 92. Distributing things into classes 97. All thumbs 98. ___ Bowl 99. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rabbit foodâ&#x20AC;? 100. Agitated state 101. Bristles 102. Flight data, briefly 103. Figure of speech 104. Some male dolls



















 











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4. Cut into sections 5. Cuba, e.g. 6. Schuss, e.g. 7. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ it the truth!â&#x20AC;? 8. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Belling the Catâ&#x20AC;? author 9. Bakery treat 10. Pass imperceptibly from one degree 11. Grinding stone 12. Parentheses, e.g. 13. Born 14. The stock exchange in Paris 15. Ant, in dialect 16. Apprehend 17. Charlotte-to-Raleigh dir. 18. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dearâ&#x20AC;? one 24. Saved on supper, perhaps 25. Coral 26. Demands 31. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hold on a ___!â&#x20AC;? 33. Functioned as



34. Gadget devices 35. Wine and dine 36. Noggin 38. Engage in 40. Plural of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;? 42. Perlman of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cheersâ&#x20AC;? 43. Mysterious: Var. 44. Shabbily clothed urchin 48. Examines closely 52. Dispatch 56. Break 57. A person given to excessive complaints 59. Length x width, for a rectangle 60. Disease cause 64. * 66. Contents of some cartridges 67. Morgue, for one 68. The thing named 69. Missing part

70. By analysis 71. Multimedia for playback on a mobile device 72. Before noon 73. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ rang?â&#x20AC;? 74. Apportion 76. Plagiarist 79. Like some beds 81. Certain sorority woman 82. Grave marker 83. Kind of battery 85. Gone by 86. Altercation 87. Crowsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; homes 89. Blue books? 90. Fodder holder 92. Alliance that includes Ukr. 93. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ momentâ&#x20AC;? 94. Big Apple attraction, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;theâ&#x20AC;? 95. Not just â&#x20AC;&#x153;aâ&#x20AC;? 96. Blast

Fitness: Have a plan, and make plans to stick to it > CONTINUED FROM PG. 18 plateau in your results and exercise becomes boring. Keep your body guessing, try new exercises, and keep challenging yourself by going faster, harder or longer.

> RULE 3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; CONSISTENCY If you want your program to work for you, you need to work the program. Do your part and stick with it. Get your day planners out each week and schedule time for exercise. Like any other appointment or meeting you go to these workouts need to be viewed just as important. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t allow family, friends, co-workers or yourself to compromise these appointments.

Plan ahead and build a strategy for staying on track.

> RULE 4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; QUALITY OVER QUANTITY Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just go through the motions. You must move with purpose and with good form. How well you perform an exercise is way more important than how much you lift or how many you do. Sloppy form can lead to injury but also greatly decrease the effectiveness of your workout.

> RULE 5 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; STOP SPOT TRAINING Doing a thousand crunches a day WILL NOT get rid of abdominal fat! In fact, if you do tons of

crunches in attempt to shrink your midsection, you can actually build muscle mass underneath the fat, making your problem area look bigger. The only way to burn fat from your belly is to reduce overall body fat by creating a calorie deficit. A healthy diet, challenging exercise and proper rest is the key to reducing fat. Fat is burned systematically across the body, according to genetics. What I have noticed in my practice is that the first place you gain weight, will be the last place you lose it. So donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get discouraged if those problem areas are stubborn to budge. Consistently follow your program and it will eventually come around for you.


SPORTS 22

THE OBSERVER

SPORTS

BRIEFS

Wellesley gauging interest in permanent skate park A

> SEE SKATE ON PG. 24

Elmira judo practitioner Philip Leeman came second at the under-17 Canadian Judo Championships in Lethbridge, Alberta last weekend. Fighting in the 66-kilogram weight class, Leeman beat Aaron Beatch of British Columbia and Eric Ayasse of Alberta before losing to former teammate Johnny Nagy. Leeman spent this week in Alberta taking part in a national judo camp. Upon returning to Elmira, he’ll have a week off before training starts again.

> Basketball women arrive in England

A PLACE TO HANG TIME Joshua MacKinnon catches air on the new fun box that is part of the temporary skate park set up in the Wellesley arena this summer.

PHOTO

t the Wellesley skate park, there are two rules: wear a helmet and be respectful. About a dozen skateboarders braved the heat to check out the new skate park when it opened in the Wellesley arena Tuesday afternoon, trying out their flips, ollies and grinds. Equipment was set up in the arena last year for a few weeks before the ice went in, but now kids in Wellesley will have the whole summer to work on their tricks. The skate park has three new pieces of equipment this year: two quarter pipes and a fun box. The fun box was built by a handful of kids with help from their parents and materials purchased with donations from the Lions Club and the Apple Butter and Cheese Festival.

The arena will be open to skateboards and bikes on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons from 1:30 to 5 p.m. On those days, the skate park is supervised by students employed by the Wilmot Family Resource Centre. The park is operating in partnership with the resource centre; in the winter, when the ice is in the Wellesley arena, the equipment is set up in the old New Hamburg arena. Melanie Jahn and Megan Fisher, the students supervising the skate park, will be keeping track of numbers this summer to gauge interest in the park. They’re hoping that attendance will build once word spreads that the facility is open. On Tuesday, the boarders ranged in age from eight to 19. Wellesley Coun. Jim Olender, one of the advo-

> Second place finish for Elmira’s Leeman

» JONI MILTENBURG

Joni Miltenburg

Camp touts the benefits of the great outdoors Katie Edmonds

I

n 2004, Linwood residents Ron and Cindy Weber took a chance and bought 200 acres of property in the Muskoka area. Their dream was to create a place for kids to visit, get back to nature, learn from each other and have some fun – goals which they have now achieved with their Christian faith-based charitable organization, Crane Lake Discovery Camp, which has just started its busiest season yet. The camp offers two-week sessions for boys between the ages of 12 and 17. Each

of the three available sessions focuses on a different theme, but all end the same way: with a three-day canoe trip on Crane Lake. “Ultimately, we believe that kids experience God through nature,” said Ron Weber. “When you bring a kid from a city or an urban environment into the wilderness and really expose them to the outdoors, the change in them is amazing.” This year, the camp has seen higher registration numbers than in any previous year, their lot is bustling and they have almost reached capacity.

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

“We have kids come from all walks of life – kids from upper class families who typically have things handed to them, to kids who have lost a parent and need to work through some of their issues, to refugees who are new to Canada; this is a camp for kids who need camp.” Ron worked as a builder for a number of years and then spent some time working at a kids’ camp in the U.S. before deciding that his passion was for the outdoors and for what the camp experience could provide for kids from very diverse backgrounds.

“After a number of years of working at camp I began to realize that it was group work which allowed them to grow and develop their social skills. They aren’t going to have everything handed to them here. Group work teaches the kids to depend on each other and trust each other.” The DIY-style camp allows campers the chance to learn to work together to construct living quarters, prepare meals, out-trip, portage, and catch fish. When Weber first began

> SEE CAMP ON PG. 24

The Canadian women’s wheelchair basketball team, which includes Elmira’s Katie Harnock, is in Birmingham, England to compete in the world championships. The Canadian women are currently ranked fifth in the world and are looking to reestablish themselves at the top with a fifth world championship in a row. Team Canada played its first match against Great Britain on Thursday, before taking on the Netherlands, Mexico and Australia. Playoffs start July 14, and the women will be gunning to be in the championship match July 17.

> Optimists support the Woolwich Wild The new Woolwich Wild Rookie program received a welcome $500 donation from the Optimist Club of Elmira to offset costs of the program. Donations are allowing the Woolwich Girls Minor Hockey Association to offer the program for $180, compared to regular registration fees over $400. The rookie program is open to girls aged four to six who want to try the sport. The association is accepting registrations up to September.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

23 SPORTS

The error of my weighs T

he other day I was fishing for bass when a big fish struck my fly, broke the surface, broke my tippet, and broke my heart. Like most great acts of love, the whole thing happened in less than five seconds. And then it was gone. Honestly, that smallmouth weighed at least four pounds – which means for the purposes of this column, it will now be referred to as “that eight pounder.” This, of course, follows the standard angling rule that was put in place in approximately 1603 – that being “Ye shall double the weight of any fish that got away without being observed by credible witnesses or members of the clergy.” It is standard stuff that most of us already know. In a sense, losing a fish like this is actually better than landing it. That’s because, at the end of the day, there is no tangible proof that you are exaggerating – only a very, very strong suspicion. This means that you, as an angler, have a certain creative licence which would be lost if that fish were sitting on the fillet board giving you a dirty look as you overstated its weight. That, more than anything, explains why you can only add about 50 per cent to a fish in hand. After that, someone is going to bring over an accurate scale over and ruin everything. In fact, I once knew a fellow who actually made a point of carrying such a scale in his tackle box. Worse still, he’d use it at the drop of a hat and then say something like, “See I told you it wasn’t five pounds.” On our later trips, he’d say it from the middle of the lake while treading water towards shore, but that didn’t make it any less hurtful. At issue was the honesty he was attempting to introduce into a sport that has got along just fine without it for thousands of years. He really had

IN ACTION

Not-So-Great Outdoorsman Steve Galea no business doing that. Fortunately, that’s not the norm. Just last week, I met an angler at a boat launch who told me about the 12-pound smallmouth that he had caught and released in the puddle of a lake I was about to fish. We both knew that two things were very wrong with this story. First, this exceeds the measured smallmouth world record – which was caught in 1955 – by an ounce. Secondly, that lake doesn’t hold smallmouth bass at all. I couldn’t help admire the man and the straight face he was able to keep. The good thing about an angler like that lies in the generous spirit of unencumbered freedom that his statement fostered. For example, almost immediately after hearing his story, I regaled him of how I caught a 75-pound muskie within those very same waters – on a three-weight fly rod, no less. Again, no muskies have ever been known to live in those waters – which is something I might have taken into account had I not already been exposed to his story. Though also completely unbelievable, he was bound by the sacred angler’s code to nod his head and listen politely, just as I had done, even as I was describing in excruciating detail how I was unsure about how much more my three-pound tippet would take. It was marvellous. In fact, between us, this turned out to be the highlight of my angling week. That is, if you exclude that eight-pounder that I caught and released …

Adam Letson

I

n his fourth year playing baseball, Adam enjoys pitching for the Elmira Red Sox, one of two junior teams in a league dominated by South Woolwich and Wellesley teams. Adam has also proven himself to be quite a slugger. Coming to bat with the bases loaded in the fourth inning of the July 6 match against St.

WOOLWICH MINOR HOCKEY With great sadness the Board of Directors and Staff of

Community Care Concepts of Woolwich, Wellesley and Wilmot announce the passing of

VERONICA MACDONALD on Thursday, July 1, 2010 As the Executive Director of the agency for 25 years.

Veronica was a dedicated and passionate advocate of enhanced support services for older adults in our community. Her work has helped thousands of older adults live with independence, grace and dignity in their own homes. We are extremely grateful for her contribution to our community and will miss her courage, her kindness, compassion and generosity.

ELMIRA RED SOX

Clements, he found the sweet spot, making good on the opportunity for a grand slam homerun. As the season winds down this Saturday, Adam has a whole summer to look forward to: playing video games, visiting Canada’s Wonderland and helping out dad with the family business.

Proceeds to Mennonite Central Committee

REQUIREMENTS FOR QUOTATION FOR 2010 3 sets of rep hockey jerseys = 3 away, 3 home 17 jerseys per set Size for all sets could be adult sizes with 2 goalie sizes per set Jerseys medium weight pro knit/mesh (Kobe label) Cresting • 2 colour print on front aprox. 11x11 • Canadian flag patch (embroidered) 2-3/8 x 1-1/4 approx. • Sleeve 2 colour satin twill 4” • Back 2 colour satin twill 10” • Numbers are 1thru 16 and 31 • Sponsor bars will be required for these plus other sets as changes result • Stop sign patch embroidered cloth (Woolwich minor hockey may supply) • Samples of past jerseys are available as this is the look minor hockey is looking for. Socks • Approximately 700 pairs will be required of which 500 would be home and 200 away • Anything I have overlooked or you have questions about please contact Myself Paul Wilson 669-8006 or via email cpairbrush@cyg.net

HALF PRICE On All

Christmas Items July 12-17

We’re bursting at the seams with Christmas!

The Proposals The tenders can be presented towards all items or break it down i.e. only the jerseys and socks

NO TAX

Delivery Would be looking for delivery of order around Sept. 4, 2010 Thanks for your interest in tendering a quote for supplies Deadline is July 31, 2010 Paul Wilson Assistant Equipment Manager V.P. Rep Hockey Woolwich Minor Hockey 20 Queen St. Elmira, Ont. N3B 2S8 519-669-8006 cpairbrush@cyg.net

On Purchases Save even more at MCC!

59 CHURCH ST. W. | 519-669-8475 STORE HOURS: Monday to Wednesday: 9:30 to 5:00, Thursday: 9:30 to 8:00

Friday: 9:30 to 5:00, Saturday: 9:30 to 4:00


SPORTS 24

THE OBSERVER

Camp: Getting out to discover inner selves

Skate: Providing recreational options for Wellesley's older kids

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

» JONI MILTENBURG

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 22 cates of the skate park, said they’re hoping to have it open in the evening as well if they can find volunteers to supervise. The summer skateboarding spot is the first step on the way to the eventual goal of a permanent outdoor skate park, something that has been on the wish list for Wellesley teens for several years. The next step is a band night fundraiser on July 16 with five different bands.

A permanent skate park is still some ways off; Olender has studied a number of different setups and said they can cost anywhere from $50,000 to $250,000. “It depends on what you want to end up with,” he said. He’s hoping that when the new splash park is installed in the Wellesley recreation area, the fundraising focus will shift to the skate park and giving older kids something to do in Wellesley.

PHOTO

working at camp, he would see kids arrive and then depart swiftly for home when they experienced a bout of homesickness, but he says it’s not quite so straightforward at Crane Lake. “We had a kid once who had some behavior issues and didn’t want to participate,” he explained. “He thought we were going to send him home if he acted up but we worked with him and got through his fits. We stuck with him. We are not going to send someone home – we work through things together, as a group.” Registration for the first two sessions of camp are now closed, but a few spots remain for the third session. The final session of camp, entitled ‘Discovering the World of Nature’ runs from August 3-15 and will give campers the opportunity to study the plant and wildlife native to the Muskoka area. Every day, kids will get the opportunity to spot deer, moose, and other animals that roam the woods surrounding Crane Lake. They can also take part in a construction project using materials from the woods or go fishing, swimming, and canoeing. To make sure they are inclusive to many different kids, bursaries are available for families who require financial assistance and the organization’s application and interview process helps to ensure each session is filled with campers who could benefit from two weeks where their needs and issues are given priority attention. “I want kids to be able to come up here and just have fun in the outdoors,” said Weber. “This camp is the best thing that’s ever happened to me.”

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

THE SKATE ESCAPE Joshua MacKinnon tries a 50-50 grind at the Wellesley arena Tuesday afternoon. The skate park will be open Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1:30 to 5 p.m., and more often if volunteers can be found to supervise.

Playing ball in the hot, hot heat

SCORECARD WOOLWICH BLACK U15/U16 GIRLS

JUNE 30 Mount Forest 1, Woolwich 0

There's nothing like seeing your name in print. Submit your team's scores online at

www.ObserverXtra.com by Wednesday at noon.

THE BOYS OF SUMMER Tykes aged 6-7 braved the heat Wednesday night to play a game of Rookieball at the Riverside Public School diamond. At far left, Ethan Birmingham makes a run for second base after a clean hit. At left, Wyatt Diefenbacher gets a helping hand when up to bat. Above, avid baseball fans Jordan MacLachlan and Reid Deyell take in the game from the bench.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

25 CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS

helP waNteD

helP waNteD

> Full time sales clerk required. Must be able to work Saturdays and one evening a week. Apply in person with resume to Stemmler Meats & Cheese, 3031 Lobsinger Line, Heidelberg.

Our St. Jacobs Distribution Centre currently has the following opportunities...

Temporary Material Handlers #967 14 Term Positions ~ August - October 2010 Day Shift

> sales Position - Golden Triangle Printing is looking for area resident to develop clientele in Elmira area. Ideal for retired or semi retired person. To reply send resume to dave@goldentriangleprint ing.com

Responsible to the Shift Foreman for helping to maintain service levels to Home Hardware Dealers, you will contribute to the smooth flow of merchandise through the Distribution Centre by picking, packing, and other functions as directed. Compliance with all health and safety regulations is essential.

Rate of pay: $13.87 per hour Hours: Monday to Friday 7 a.m. - 3 p.m. We offer a competitive salary and great working conditions. If you are interested in becoming part of the Home Hardware Team, please forward your resume, quoting Material Handlers #967 by Monday, July 20th, 2010 to: Human Resources Department, Home Hardware Stores Limited, 34 Henry St. W., St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0 Fax: 519-664-4711 E-mail: hr@homehardware.ca (Microsoft Products Only)

helP waNteD

helP waNteD

reNtals APARTMENT FOR RENT

2 Bedroom Unit

Requires

Drivers & Helpers

available immediately 14 Spring St., Drayton

Must be physically fit, neat appearance. Full-time with benefits. License required. Apply in person with resume to Dan at: 66 Schaefer St., Waterloo or fax 519-747-5810

1st Flr. Unit Great Cond. Washer/Dryer in unit $650+ 519-741-6368

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> agricultural Parts Counter. Stoltz Sales and Service (Elmira) is looking for a self-motivated, positive thinking individual to join our expanding parts dept. We require someone who has a good understanding of the agricultural industry and equipment and possesses above average customer service skills. We offer competitive wages and benefit plan. If you wish to join our team please mail or email resume to: eparts@ stoltzsales.com, Stoltz Sales and Service, PO Box 235, Elmira, Ont., N3B 2Z6. > Cleaning

PUZZle sOlUtIONs

/ & ' 5 . 5 5 ( 7 ( 5 5 5 (

7 0 < < . / , % 5 $ 5 , $ 1 5

Person required for light cleaning duties. Mon. - Fri., 2-3 hours, morning. Apply in person with resume to: Stemmler Meats & Cheese, 3031 Lobsinger Line, Heidelberg.

> established

Commercial 20-Word Ad $12.00 (Extra Words 30¢/word)

Framing Company in KW area requires framers with a minimum of 2 year experience. Must have own transportation. Top wages offered to energetic and responsible applicants, 519-575-3807.

>e x p e r i e n c e d Babysitter in Elmira starting September, 2010. Within walking distance to 2 schools, parks and Kids & I. Please call Ellen at 519-6698188, between 6 and 9 p.m.

Plow Trucks & Snow Equipment

Annual Snow Equipment

AUCTION

to be held ONSITE at:

County of Wellington Central Yard Works

Country Rd #7, Elora

The Elora Road, West of Hwy 6, North of Guelph

Sat July 17 10:30am th

> huge Yard sale clearing out mattresses, sofas, recliners, laminate, hardwood, carpet and vinyl. 3 Days Only July 9, 10, 11 at Country Carpet and Furniture on Hwy 6 downtown, Mount Forest. 519-323-1331. > rose sofa $125; oval dining room table, 3 leaves, 4 chairs, $250. Please call 519-669-3535. reNtals

>2

Bedroom semidetached Bungalow apartment in the village of Wellesley. Open concept, gas fireplace in living room, french doors to deck, fridge, stove, washer & dryer, all utilities included, including lawn mowing and snow removal. Perfect for elderly, no steps. $900 /mth inclusive. Available September 1 or possibly August 1. Call Jim 519588-1045.

COMPUTERS - LAPTOPS

Sales and Service

CALL FOR DETAILS

2 - 2004 IhC 7600 Ta Dump, Plow, Wing & Sander 2 - 2004 IhC 7600 Ta Dump, Plow, Wing & Sander 99 IhC S2654 Ta Dump, Plow & Wings 94 IhC S2574 Sa Dump, Sander, Plow & Wing 3 - 99/03 Chev 1500 Pickups 2003 Dodge 1500 Cargo Van 99 CaT D3C-LX Dozer 200 Champion 720 Grader Ford 4630 Diesel Tractor/Sweepster J D 5200 Diesel Tractor Chainsaws, Concrete Saws, Sewer Camera, Etc. AUCTIONEER`S NOTE Ther are only a few Small Items, come fairly early or be Disappointed

Come see our showroom at:

112 Bonnie onnie Crescent, Elmira r ra

519-669-5551

traDes & serVICes

Partial List ONLY!!!!!

No Buyer’s Premium!! VIEWING: Friday, July 16th, 2010 - 1pm to 3pm TERMS: $1000 Cash Deposit on Each Vehicle or as announced

M.R. Jutzi & Co

FOr sale

> antiques - 42” round oak table, 3 leaves, 4 chairs $750; washstand/ dresser with oval mirror & harp $325, (suitable for a bathroom vanity), oval parlour table $95. 519-6693535.

PLACING A CLASSIFIED AD | Classified ads can be obtained in person, by phone, fax or email from Monday to Thursday 8:30am-5pm or Friday 8:30am-4pm. All classified ads are prepaid. Deadline is WEDNESDAYS by 4pm.

COMPUters

aUCtION

ChIlD Care hr@homehardware.ca

You have the ability to perform strenuous physical activities including walking, standing, bending, and heavy lifting. Excellent attentionto-detail, and good reading, writing, and number skills are required. High school or equivalent preferred.

Residential 20-Word Ad $7.50 (Extra Words 20¢/word)

PRoFESSIoNal IN ThE oRDERly lIquIDaTIoN aND aPPRaISalS oF CoMMERCIal, INDuSTRIal, CoNSTRuCTIoN, MuNICIPal EquIPMENT & VEhIClES

www.mrjutzi.ca reNtals

> elmira - 1 bedroom, downtown location, no pets, A.C., immediate. $495.00 + utilities. 519669-8074. > elmira - 2 bedroom town house. Please, no smoking, no pets. $875 plus utilities. Must provide own appliances. Suitable for quiet tenants. Call 519-743-7479. One Parking space included. > Industrial Bay for rent. 64 Howard Ave., Elmira. 2000 sq ft., open space. 14’ high bay door. 16’ ceiling height, good for mezzanine. separate hydro, gas and water meters. Inquiries please call 519-465-8421 or 519-669-1461 ext. 22. > Moorefield large two bedroom apartment, furnished or unfurnished, laundry facilities, parking , electric heat, cable TV. No pets, adult building. References. $795.00 inclusive. First & Last. 519-638-3013.

519-648-2111

reNtals

> MOOreFIelD

- One bedroom apartment, furnished, laundry facilities, parking, deck, electric heat, cable tv, no pets, adult building. References. $695 inclusive. First & last 519-638-3010.

> One Bedroom apartment - second floor of house. Available August 1. Close to downtown, parking. Call 519-669-1263. COMM/IND FOr reNt

> Office space for rent above Peak Realty at 17 Church St. in Elmira. 135 sq. ft $650 per month all inclusive and 90 sq. ft $400 per month all inclusive and 90 sq ft. $400 per month all inclusive. Call Mildred Frey 519-669-1544.

The #1 Weekly in the Region.

• Manufacturing of Landscape & Snow Removal Equipment • Custom Manufacturing and Machining • Agricultural, Industrial, Transportation & Construction Equipment Repairs

519.669.1501

100 Union St., Elmira, ON Toll Free 1.877.467.3478 www.reistindustries.com traDes & serVICes

> CrD accounting services - Income Tax (E-File) Services. Small business accounting, payroll & gov/t filings. Chuck Downs, 95 Aspen Cr., Elmira. 519-669-1498, cell 519569-1744. GaraGe sales

> Garage sale - 123 Sugar King Dr., Elmira. Sat. July 10, 7 a.m. Household items, books, games and more. > Garage sale - 6 Meadowlark rd., Elmira. Sat. July 10, 8 - 2. Household items, furniture and goodies. > hUGe Yard/estate sale. Fri. July 9, 2 p.m., Sat. July 10, 8 a.m. 15 Grosbeak Rd., Elmira.

Design & Print Services > Black and white, 8 1/2 X 11 flyers designed and printed for as low as 6¢. Professionally designed, quick turnaround, local service. Delivery, folding and colour work also available. Call 519.669.5790 ext 107 for details.

100% Local. Period.


CLASSIFIEDS 26

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING Tuesday, August 3, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. Township Council Chambers • 24 Church Street West, Elmira Regarding Modifications to: Zone Change Application 8/2007 Official Plan Amendment Application 3/2007 Draft Plan of Subdivision Applications 30T-07701, 30T-07702, 30-T07703 Lunor Group Inc. – 90 Church Street West, Elmira (Current Lands) 229249 Ontario Limited - 122 Church Street West, Elmira (Current Lands) Oak Leaf Farms Limited - 128 Church Street West, Elmira (Current Lands) Elmira & District Association for Community Living – 158 Church Street West, Elmira (New Lands) 2079993 Ontario Inc. – 88 Church Street West, Elmira (New Lands) The Township of Woolwich will hold a Public Meeting, under Sections 17, 34 and 51 of the Planning Act, to consider modifications to the above-noted zone change, official plan and draft plan of subdivision applications. No decision will be made at this meeting; its purpose is to provide additional information to the public and agencies and to receive comments and information from them. Any persons may attend the public meeting and make written and / or verbal representation either in support of or in opposition to the proposed applications. Individuals are requested to submit a written outline of any oral submissions made at the Public Meeting to the Township Clerk. The Township of Woolwich received and circulated Official Plan Amendment application 3/2007 and Zone Change application 8/2007, and the Region of Waterloo received and circulated Subdivision applications 30T-07701, 30T-07702 and 30T-07703 for the three parcels identified as 90 Church Street West (owned by Lunor Group Inc.), 122 Church Street West (owned by 229249 Ontario Limited) and 128 Church Street West (owned by Oak Leaf Farms Limited), in Elmira (hereinafter called the “Lunor Development”). The above-noted applications proceeded to a Public Meeting on November 4, 2008. The Official Plan Amendment application is proposing to increase the gross and net residential density and designate certain lands within the Lunor Development as Service Commercial. The Zone Change application is proposing a number of residential zoning categories, as well as Service Commercial (C-7), Institutional (P) and Open Space (O-1/O-2) zoning for the development of the lands. Lunor Development comprises of three separate subdivision applications and applies specifically to the lands as follows: 122 Church Street West (Application 30T-07701 – Green Acres) This parcel of land is approximately 1.675 hectares (4.1 acres) in area and is proposed to be developed with approximately 30 to 40 residential units. 90 Church Street West (Application 30T-07702 - Riverbend) This parcel of land is approximately 37.710 hectares (93.2 acres) in area and is proposed to be developed with approximately with 425 to 620 residential units, as well as service commercial, school, neighbourhood park, stormwater management, passive open space/trail blocks. 128 Church Street West (Application 30T-07703 - Northview) This parcel of land is approximately 33.498 hectares (82.7 acres) in area and is proposed to be developed with approximately 165 to 235 residential units, as well as two service commercial blocks,

school, neighbourhood park, stormwater management, passive open space/trail blocks. (Note: the Northview Plan school and park blocks will merge with the school and park blocks in the Riverbend Plan.)

Church Street West and owned by 2079993 Ontario Inc. within the Lunor Development Plan (i.e. Riverbend Draft Plan). The lands would be rezoned from A to R-5A* and would facilitate stormwater works and to develop 2 to 4 single family lots.

Through the course of circulating and reviewing the above-noted applications the applicant is proposing a number of changes to the Official Plan Amendment, Zone Change and Subdivision applications to address a number of issues that have been identified. As result, the applicant is proposing the following changes/modifications to Lunor Development’s applications and the applicable blocks of land as noted below.

Map 1 (above) identifies the lands subject to these applications. For further mapping details please view the Notice of Public Meeting particular to these applications on the Township webpage at the following link www.woolwich.ca/en/newsevents/public_notices.asp or visit the Township offices to obtain a copy of the circulation notice. For further details or should you have any concerns or comments regarding the proposed development please contact our office.

Block 1 (Northview) – to include an approximate 0.263 hectare rear portion of a property at 158 Church Street West in Elmira and owned by Elmira & District Association for Community Living within the Lunor Development’s Plan (i.e. Northview Draft Plan). The lands would be rezoned from Agriculture (A)/Settlement Residential (R-1) to Residential Mixed High Density with Design Guidelines and a site-specific provision to also allow townhouses (R-5A*). The proposed changes would facilitate the extension of Barnswallow Drive into the Lunor Development and create 3 to 5 single family or semi detached lots. Block 2 (Northview)– to modify the proposed zoning and subdivision applications for a 0.174 hectare parcel of land, a portion of which is within the Lunor Development (i.e. Northview Draft Plan) and a portion of which is owned by Elmira & District Association for Community Living, from A to R-5A* to facilitate the extension of Barnswallow Drive into the Lunor Development and to develop 4 to 6 single family or semi detached lots. The original application proposed Multiple Residential zoning on a portion of this Block. Block 33 (Northview) – to modify the proposed zoning and subdivision applications for a 0.57 hectare portion of land currently within the Lunor Development (i.e. Northview Draft Plan) from A to Residential Multiple with Design Guidelines and site specific provisions to also allow single family, semi detached and duplex housing (R-7A*), and to reduce the lot width/frontage to 9 metres. The proposed changes could accommodate 22 to 34 residential units within a condominium type development. The original application proposed R-5A zoning. Block 38 (Northview) - to modify the proposed Official Plan designation, zoning and subdivision applications for a 1.036 hectare block of land currently within the Lunor Development (i.e. Northview Draft Plan) from A to Convenience Commercial (C-4A) to develop a commercial type uses that would directly serve the abutting residential area. The original application proposed Service Commercial C-7 designation and zoning. Block 31 (Riverbend) – to include a 0.238 hectare property at 88

Please Note: APPEALS: Draft Plan of Subdivision If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at the public meeting or make written submissions to the Regional Municipality of Waterloo in respect of the proposed plan of subdivision before the approval authority gives or refuses to give approval to the draft plan of subdivision: a) the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, to the Ontario Municipal Board; and b) the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to do so. Notification: If you wish to be notified of the decision of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo in respect of the proposed plan of subdivision you must make a written request to the Regional Municipality of Waterloo, Attn: Laurel Gibson, Planner, Planning, Housing and Community Services, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener, Ontario N2G 4J3 Zoning Amendment If a person or public body that files an appeal of a decision of the Council of the Township of Woolwich in respect of the proposed zoning by-laws does not make oral submissions at a public meeting or make written submissions to the Council of the Township of Woolwich before the proposed zoning by-law amendments are passed: a) the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of the Township of Woolwich to the Ontario Municipal Board; and

> SEE PUBLIC MEETING ON NEXT PAGE


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

27 CLASSIFIEDS

PUBLIC MEETING > CONTINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE b) the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to add the person or public body as a party. Official Plan Amendment If a person or public body that files a notice of appeal of a decision of the Council of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo in respect of the proposed Official Plan Amendment, does not make oral submissions at a public meeting or make written submissions to the Council of the Township of Woolwich before the proposed Official Plan Amendment is adopted: a) the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of the Regional Municipality of Waterloo to the Ontario Municipal Board; and b) the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to add the person or public body as a party.

THE TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH SEEKS AN INDIVIDUAL TO FILL THE POSITION OF:

TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH TENDER 2010-09

Administrative Assistant (Casual)

Sealed Tenders clearly marked as to contents, will be received by the undersigned until:

This position will provide administrative assistance to various departments in a general office capacity. Duties and responsibilities for this position include administrative support including, but not limited to, communication and assistance to the general public via telephone and walkin inquiries, preparation of department correspondence, scheduling of meetings and maintaining department supplies, files and records.

Notification: If you wish to be notified of additional Township public meetings or Township staff reports regarding these applications you must make a written request to Engineering and Planning Services at the Township of Woolwich at the address shown below.

The successful applicant will operate from the Township office.

If you cannot attend the meeting, you can express your concerns/ comments about the proposed change in writing to the Township of Woolwich. Any comments received on or before July 27, 2010 (Note that this date is before the public meeting) will be included in a report prepared by Engineering and Planning Services and presented at the Public Meeting. Any comments received after the Public Meeting, but prior to Council making a decision on the applications, will also be considered.

Rate of Pay: $16.04/hr

The personal information accompanying your submission is being collected under the authority of the Planning Act and may form part of the public record which may be released to the public. Questions about this collection should be directed to the Records and Freedom of Information Officer at 519-669-6005 or 519-664-2613 ext. 6005. MORE INFORMATION: The public may view planning documents and background material relating to these applications at the Township of Woolwich, Engineering and Planning Services Department between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, or on the Township website at www.woolwich.ca.

KNOWLEDGE AND SKILLS Education and Experience The position requires a minimum Grade 12 education. A college education with majors in office procedures as well as previous office experience is an asset but not a prerequisite. Knowledge of computer programs including Microsoft Office. The Work Requires: Accurate computer skills Good knowledge of office practices and workflow methods Ability to multi-task and set priorities Good communication and public relation skills. Able to work with minimal supervision Working Conditions Usual public office conditions; expected to work with frequent interruptions from telephone inquiries and visitors to office.

Questions or written submissions may be directed to: Township of Woolwich John Scarfone, Manager of Planning Engineering and Planning Services Department Box 158, 24 Church Street West Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6

A high degree of self-initiated cooperation is required.

Telephone: 519-669-1647 / 519-664-2613, extension 6037 or email: jscarfone@woolwich.ca Dated at the Township of Woolwich this 10th day of July, 2010.

Hours will be on an “as needed basis”.

We thank all applicants for their interest, however, only those selected for further screening will be contacted. The Township of Woolwich is an equal opportunity employer. In accordance with the Municipal Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, personal information collected will only be used for candidate selection.

Supply and Delivery of Breathing Apparatus for the Woolwich Fire Department

Tuesday July 27, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. (local time) Further details and specifications with respect to quantity and Form of Tender, and Information to Bidders, may be obtained as noted below: Finance Department Township of Woolwich 24 Church Street West Elmira, ON N3B 2Z6 Fax (519) 669-9348 Email rpetherick@woolwich.ca Lowest or any tender may not necessarily be accepted.

TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH TENDER 2010-14 Trans Canada Trail Construction along Farmers’ Market Road Sealed Tenders clearly marked as to contents, will be received by the undersigned until: Friday July 23, 2010 at 12:00 P.M. Further details and specifications with respect to locations and measurements, Form of Tender, Plan Drawings and Information to Bidders, may be obtained as noted below: Finance Department Township of Woolwich 24 Church Street West Elmira, ON N3B 2Z6 Fax: (519) 669-9348 Email: rpetherick@woolwich.ca Lowest or any tender may not necessarily be accepted.

CONESTOGO PARK AND RECREATION ASSOCIATION Future Plans for Park and Recreation Association

Wednesday July 14 @ 5:00 pm

Hosted by the Conestogo Recreation Association RSVP to aconrad@realex.org


CLASSIFIEDS 28

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

real estate

500

FEATURED LISTING

$

INLAW SET UP

Is Donated To

KidsAbility With Every Home I Sell!

$875,000

2,800 SQFT HOME ON 42 ACRES

Paul Martin SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL DIRECT

519-503-9533

$274,900

GREAT STARTER HOME! Walk up attic to master bdrm & ensuite, fmly rm and lvng rm, seperate dining rm. Kitchen addition 2005. Walk out bsmnt and sngl detached grge. MLS. Call Paul direct.

159 William St., Palmerston (Across from Home Hardware)

PA

LM

$3

LI

PA

ER

34

S

,5

TO

LM

S

EMAIL paul@remaxsolidgold.biz

OFFICE 519-888-7110

ONLINE www.homeswithpaul.ca

180 Weber St. S., Waterloo

W

ER

*SALES REPRESENTATIVES:

Immaculate & tastefully decorated open concept all Brick Bungalow on nicely landscaped lot facing onto green space. 2 bdrms, 2 baths, cozy rec room. Shows AAA++ Call Kathy/Edith MLS 1027919 $264,500

ALLI NORRIS

BILL NORRIS

OFFICE:

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CELL:

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CELL:

FAX:

HOME FAX:

HOME FAX:

180 Weber St. S., Waterloo, ON N2J 2B2

519-577-6248

519-888-7110

519-669-9885

519-888-6117

ST

O

N

Magnificent & Stunning 5 bedrooms and 3.5 baths Victorian home w/grand porch & entrance nicely landscaped corner lot with circular drive. Call Edith for your private viewing. MLS 1024884 $369,000

$431,900

Independently Owned and Operated

4B Arthur St. S. Elmira • www.remaxsolidgold.biz OFFICE: 519-669-5426

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

519-669-9885

billnorris@rogers.com

BERT MARTIN, BROKER

25 KINGFISHER, ELMIRA

Well kept three bedroom semi backing onto church property. Large eat in kitchen with walk out to deck. Bright eating area with lots of windows. Enjoy the privacy of a fenced back yard. Finished rec room with a two pc. bathroom. Mature trees and tool shed. Hook up for gas stove and BBQ. Ideal home for first time buyers close to schools and Lions Park ball diamonds and soccer fields.

$229,900.00 E

IC

W NE

PR

4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, upgraded kitchen cupboards, pantry, upper laundry floor. MLS. Call Paul direct.

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

OPEN HOUSE • SUN. JULY 11 • 2-4PM

OPEN HOUSE | SAT, JULY 10 • 10:30-12 PM 394 CLAYTON ST., LISTOWEL

BRICK BUNG. Great location close to schools, ample sized rooms, 3 bdrms, w/part fin. bsmnt, hardwood floors, newer windows, well cared for. Call Kathy MLS 1021658 $229,900

QUALITY BUILT HOME BY VERDONE

519-588-1348

allinorris@rogers.com

3.36 Acres that has it all. Raised bungalow w/fin basement, 4 bdrms, 2 baths, 32X48 detached shop plus hobby barn & fenced paddocks. Call Kathy MLS 1024365 $334,500 EL

3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms. Extra large windows in basement. MLS. Call Paul direct.

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

Edith McArthur * 519.638.2509 Kathy Robinson * 519.292.0362

OPEN HOUSE | SAT, JULY 10 • 1-3 PM 5947 WELL. RD. 2, RR#3, CLIFFORD

00

$364,900

HOME 519-669-3074

OFFICE PHONE: 519.343.2124

N

BEAUTIFUL HOME COMPLETELY FINISHED

SPACIOUS FAMILY HOME 1,900sqft home, 5 bdrms, 3 baths, on fenced corner lot, mature trees. Eat-in kit open to family rm w/FP, slider. Bright dining rm w/2nd slider. Lg living rm. Finished bsmt w/storage rm.. MLS. Call Paul Direct.

Coach House Realty Inc. Brokerage

TO

6+1 bdrms, 4 bths, surrounded by 100ft trees, 2 springs, pond, and riding trails. Geo-thermal heating system. MLS. Call Paul direct.

Independently Owned and Operated

NEW LISTING

$395,000

$619,000

Elmira is my home ... let’s make it yours! Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

With seperate entrance. 5200 sq ft, 3 kitchens, 5 bedrooms, 6 bathrooms, 3 car garage and extra long driveway. MLS. Call Paul direct.

LINWOOD Plenty of living space in this century home located in the downtown core of Linwood. Close to school, church, ball diamond and the new Community Centre. Presently a four plex. A very unique property with potential development possiblities or easily converted back to a single family dwelling. Rare find!

$249,900.00

The latest news

delivered right to your inbox » It’s 100% FREE to sign up » Receive updates right to your email

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COUNTRY PROPERTY!

RED

UCE

D

Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, main floor family room, finished basement, double garage (28' x 22'), large principal rooms. New in 2009, roof, garage doors, paved drive. Most original windows replaced. All this on 1/2 acre 10 minutes from Waterloo and 5 minutes from Elmira. MLS. Reduced to $319,900.

GREAT STARTER!

Property offers three bedrooms, eat-in kitchen with sliders to large deck, french doors separating dining & living rooms, sun room, main floor laundry. MLS $154,900.

Your referrals are appreciated!


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

29 CLASSIFIEDS

real estate ELMIRA REAL ESTATE Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage SERVICES

Independently Owned and Operated

519-669-3192 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

LEON MARTIN

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage | Independently Owned and Operated

BONNIE BRUBACHER Broker of Record

SHANNA ROZEMA Broker.

DARREN ROMKEY Sales Rep.

LAURIE LANGDON Sales Rep.

DALE KELLER Sales Rep.

THIS WEEK'S FEATURE PROPERTIES

3 bedroom country bungalow with high speed internet available open concept. Master ensuite, main floor laundry, large 2 car garage, new not built. Hobby shop allowed. $319,900 MLS

oPeN HouSe SAT JULY 10, 2-4PM 114 BROOKMEAD, ELMIRA

$344,900 ELMIRA | Open Concept split-level. Offers main floor room, office/den & laundry/ mudroom. Spacious kitchen/dinette with walkout, Formal dining room. 3 Bedrooms, 3 Baths, bright future rec room and loads of storage all on a 50' lot MLS

Great property on the edge of town, approx. 21 acres workable, the rest is wooded with a large portion of maple trees, 1.9 acres is inside an industrial designated area. $599,900 MLS

oPeN HouSe SAT JULY 10, 2-4PM 1 CHAPEL ST., HAWKESVILLE

$495,000 HAWKESVILLE | This charming

3,200 square foot home on a half acre lot. Features 4 bedrooms, 2 garages, fully finished walk-out basement, large bright family room with a wood-burning stove, deck, main floor laundry and master bedroom, barn/workshop, and green space galore! MLS

Two storey 3 bed and 3 bath room home on a half acre lot, open concept, high speed fibre optic internet available. $317, 900 MLS

Great Value

$178,000 DRAYTON | Located in the village of Drayton, this home features large bedrooms, 2 large walk-in closets on 3rd level; open concept and loads of space; MLS

Country Property outside Elmira, 2 bedrm, finished basement. Enjoy sunsets and sunrises. $234,900 MLS

Beautifully treed lot

extra's are already completed! Fenced yard with deck, finished basement and central air to name a few. Inviting décor, generous sized rooms throughout will please any buyer. Full ensuite w/whirlpool bath, main floor laundry. MLS

draytoN retreat or HoMe

$329,000 | Converted century school house to an intriguing 2 bedroom home. Multi-level retreat areas, yet main floor conveniences. Character abounds with original wooden floors, restored windows, provate mature lot. MLS

www.thefreyteam.com

Len Frey

Mildred Frey

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

BROKER MANAGER

mildred@thefreyteam.com

PRICE REDUCED $390,000

MOOREFIELD | Almost 5 acres warehouses, lumber yard with retail store. Approx. 1/2 of yard is paved. Loading dock, repair shop w/ air lines. Great for retail + large storage area required for business. Selling land and building only. MLS Call Len Frey.

PRICE REDUCED $315,000

30 QUEEN ST., ELMIRA | Well kept, older 2 storey home with huge double garage. Knotty pine eat-in kitchen, all new windows and railings. Wood floors throughout, close to downtown. MLS. Call Mildred Frey.

DRAYTON $179,000 Great commercial lot 135’X225’ with services on site LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION | allowing for many uses, located across from Grocery Store, Medical Centre and Library. MLS Call Len Frey 519-669-1544

MACTON $259,000 Ideal for country store w/ home or gas bar. Hightraffic corner. MLS. Call Mildred Frey

FOR SALE By Owner

27 Pintail Drive, Elmira - $364,000

OPEN HOUSE Sun July 11, 2-4PM

Country at its best, trees, stream, camp area, lawns all on 4.3 acre estate lot with 18ft x 45ft outbuilding, 5 bedroom approx. 2350 sq ft with a large deck, walkout basement, tennis court with lights. $459,000 MLS

$275,000 GLEN ALLAN | This home has had many updates including the kitchen, windows and wiring. Patio off family room. Insulated shed 20 X 30. MLS

$299,900 A BEAUTY! | Just like new, but all the

THE FREY TEAM

COUNTRY LOTS .5 acre don’t miss this chance to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. Within 40 minutes KW, or Guelph. High speed internet is available with fibre optic. Starting at $66,000 MLS

MONIQUE BRUBACHER Sales Rep.

elMira

519-669-1544 24hrs

17 Church St. W., Elmira

ADDRESS: 4-B

Arthur St. S., ELMIRA • EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net

DIRECT: 519-503-2753

TWIN CITY REALTY INC. BROKER AGE Independently Owned & Operated 901 Victoria St. N., Kitchener

519.579.4110

• OFFICE: 519-669-5426

Doreen Martin Sales Rep.

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME

caPtiVatiNG Beauty

On this 3 acre building lot in Hawkesville. Enjoy the space of the country, room to work and play. Zoning allows residence, group home plus accessory building which includes hobby shop, storage building such as car/vehicle collection. Room for swimming pool and your own personal cabana. Lots of room for gardens. Property is easily accessible and 15 minutes to Kitchener/Waterloo. $224,900 MLS

$789,000 | 2.52 Acres in a mature private setting in Glen Allan. The charm, warmth and atmosphere are breathtaking in this 3+bedroom, 4 bath home. Exposed post & beam interior construction. Natural wood throughout, Chef's Dream Kitchen! A barn and pool complete this magnificent property

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

Get Pro results. We connect you with customers looking for professionals.

1730 sq ft (on main fl) bungalow, 3+1 beds, 2 updated baths, four season sunroom w/gas fireplace, large rec room with gas fireplace & bar, his & hers closets in master, eat-in kit + dining room, fenced yard, shed, furnace & a/c (06), roof (07). 519-669-3121

BROKERAGE

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. 45 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

519-669-2772

BRAD MARTIN Broker of Record MVA Residential

Res: 519-669-1068

JULIE HECKENDORN Broker Res: 519-669-8629

TRACEY WILLIAMS Sales Rep. Cell: 519-505-0627

M.L.S. LISTINGS SNOW GOOSE CRES.

$413,500 COUNTRY - ELMIRA

$699,000

40 NIGHTINGALE CRES. $389,900

165 KILLDEER ROAD

10 SPRING WAGON DR. $291,900

34 CEDAR WAXING DR. $279,900

20 LORRAINE DR., LINWOOD $ 374,900

GALE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH $479,000

$319,000

Have them read all about it in the Observer! Contact the Observer at 519.669.5790 ext 104 for more information.

IN PRINT. ONLINE. IN PICTURES. IN DEPTH. www.

.com

www.thurrealestate.com


CLASSIFIEDS 30

THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, July 10, 2010

straNGe BUt trUe

Credit Homer for naming the sardonic smile Q.

Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in a romantically darkened room when your girlfriend, who is studying to be a dentist, pulls out a pack of wintergreen LifeSavers and reaches to pop one into her mouth. But first she teases, â&#x20AC;&#x153;a sweet light show for you.â&#x20AC;? Pulling a pair of pliers out of her bag, she proceeds to crush the LifeSaver, which to your amazement emits a faint flash of blue light. Can you shed light on this?

A.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a form of â&#x20AC;&#x153;sparking,â&#x20AC;? stemming from the graininess of electricity, say David Halliday et al in Fundamentals of Physics. When the sugar crystals in the candy rupture, one part has excess electrons while the other has excess positive ions. Almost immediately,

Strange But True Bill & rich sones electrons jump across the rupture gap, with the electrons and the positive ions colliding with nitrogen molecules in the air. Oil of wintergreen in the crystals emits enough blue light to light up a mouth or a pair of pliers, in a show of fluorescence. However, if the candy is wet with saliva, the demo will fail because the moisture neutralizes the two parts. But, your girlfriend cautions, please donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t sit around chomping on these candies with your teeth, or

you may need to pay me a different sort of ... dental visit!

Q.

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the origin of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;sardonicâ&#x20AC;? grin, that slightly crooked or wry expression that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite the smile it might have been?

A.

The word goes back to the Greek bard Homer, who first used it to describe the hero Odysseus as he â&#x20AC;&#x153;smiled sardonically,â&#x20AC;? dodging an ox jaw thrown by one of his wifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s former suitors, says Discovery News. According to some scholars, Homer coined the word after learning that the Sardinians gave a smile-inducing potion to condemned people or to those who could no longer care for themselves. Then in ritual killings, they were dropped from a high

rock or beaten to death, says Charles Choi in Scientific American magazine. Scientists at the University of the Eastern Piedmont in Italy believe they have now identified a natural toxin that forces a person to smile-the herb â&#x20AC;&#x153;hemlock water dropwort,â&#x20AC;? popularly known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;water celery.â&#x20AC;? Highly toxic chemicals in the plant can make facial muscles contract into a grimace (as reported in The Journal of Natural Products). Yet, added the researchers, the plant molecules may one day be modified to have the opposite effect, causing muscles to relax and helping patients recover from facial paralysis.

>

Send STRANGE questions to brothers Bill and Rich at strangetrue@cs.com

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for summer fun in Woolwich PUZZle sOlUtIONs sUDOkU - easY         

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

sUDOkU - harD

GettING CreatIVe wIth theIr tIMe Participants in the Woolwich Summer Playground program stayed indoors at the Woolwich Memorial Centre to beat the heat Wednesday afternoon. Making masks was the activity of choice. At left, Nick Lee and Ryan Elliott add a splash of colour. At right, Summer Playground staff member Amanda McInnis

M&T 1 04/03/09 AM Page 1 helpsBusiness out AllieCard Slade,Ad:Layout who is hard at work on10:22 her creation.

        

        

        

        

        


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

31 CLASSIFIEDS

FaMIlY alBUM aNNIVersarY

Happy 40th Anniversary Honey July 25, 1970

OBItUarY

staG & DOe

BIrthDaY

Time’s a Tickin’

STAG N’ DOE FOR ALBERT STEFFLER & CRYSTAL CAMPBELL Saturday, July 24th, 2010 8:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.

Happy 8th Birthday Colin! Love Always! Mom, Dad, Cassandra & Nicole GraDUatION

Lions Hall 40 South Street West Tickets $10/person Raffles, games, lunch, D.J. Call 519-669-8010 for tickets

Micheal Deckert of Linwood

On July 3rd, in his 60th year, surrounded by his family. Finally at peace. Beloved companion of Judy Cole and loving father of Eric and Danielle, and their mother Debbie Deckert. Precious son of Marion and the late Stan Deckert, will be missed by his seven sisters and numerous neices and nephews. Donations to the Cancer Centre at Grand River Hospital

GraDUatION

Congratulations! Ryan Robert Elias Lawrence

Congratulations! Marcy Lemon-Lawrence

June 18, 2010

We are very proud!

June 18, 2010

Dr. Bryan Lawrence, Marcy Lemon-Lawrence and sister Lindsay of Waterloo are extremely proud to announce the graduation of their son/brother Ryan Robert Elias Lawrence, from the University of Western Ontario.

Dr. Bryan Lawrence, Lindsay (Teacher) and Ryan (Teacher) of Waterloo are extremely proud to announce the graduation of their wife/mother, Marcy Gayle Lemon-Lawrence from the University of Western Ontario.

Ryan earned a Bachelor of Education degree with Distinction (Junior/Intermediate Health and Physical Education). Ryan is a graduate of Wilfrid Laurier University where he earned an Honours Bachelor of Science degree in Kinesiology (2009). He is also an Ontario Scholar graduate of St. Johns Kilmarnock School, where he was presented with the Todd Shannon Memorial Scholarship for Athletics and Academics.

Marcy earned a Bachelor of Education degree with Distinction (Primary/Junior Division). Marcy is a graduate of the University of Waterloo where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree and the University of Toronto where she earned a Masters of Social Work degree. She is an Ontario approved Adoption Practitioner and operates her own adoption practice within the Region of Waterloo.

Ryan would like to sincerely thank his Western Associate Teachers, (John Foss, Rob Buston, Warren Bullock) and a special thank you to teacher mentor Clark Day, as well as his faculty advisors, (Les Asseltine, Don Schafer, Frank Haines). He is also proud to be teaching with the Waterloo Region District School Board.

Marcy would like to warmly thank her family, friends, colleagues and clients for the incredible support she received while she was completing her education degree. Special Acknowledgement to her Western Associate Teachers (Joanne Ziegler, Chrisoula Xintavelonis, Landry Smith, Secretary Trish Dietz) as well her faculty advisors (Les, Frank and Don).

Follow your dream. We are very proud!

PLACES OF FAITH

HEARING ASSISTED

No God No Peace Know God Know Peace

St. Teresa Catholic Church Celebrate Eucharist with us

Welcome to

St. Jacobs

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

48 Hawkesville Rd. • 519-664-2311

Bloomingdale Mennonite Church

Trinity United Church ELMIRA

Minister: Summer Worship Rev. Dave Jagger June 27 - Sept. 5 10 a.m. at Trinity Sunday School During Worship

Sundays - 9:45 am Family Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday School for all ages

Visit our website at: www.wondercafe.ca 21 Arthur St., North • Church Office 519-669-5560 “Our mission is to love, learn and live by Christ’s teachings”

1151 Snyder’s Flat Rd., Bloomingdale • 519-745-2411 www.bloomingdalemennonite.com

MY FINANCES

Sunday, July 11, 2010 July 11

As Long As You’re Sincere Church

SUNDAYS @ 10:30AM 5 First St., Elmira • 519-669-1459 Services at John Mahood www.elmiracommunity.org Public School

10:00 AM Church Picnic at Conestoga Bible Camp

10:00 am

Wheelchair accessible • Nursery Care provided • Hearing Assisted

10:00 AM Speaker: Richard Haverkamp “Disappointed in God” 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 Check out our website www.woodsidechurch.ca

SUNDAY SCHOOL

Sun. July 11th

Upbeat Family

Worship & Calvary United Sunday School

Mass times are:

Sat. 5pm, Sun. 9am and 11:15am

NURSERY PROVIDED

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

Discovering God Together

519-669-2319 | www.wbconline.ca 4522 Herrgott Road, Wallenstein

“Making Faith Live” Sunday Worship 9:30 am - 10:30am

2 First St., Elmira • 519-669-5030

Gale

Summer Worship 10am Sunday School during service

Minister: Rev. Dr. Linda Bell

Presbyterian www.galepresbyterian.com Church 2 Cross St., Elmira • 519-669-2852

Office Hours: M-TH 9-Noon & 1-3 • E galepresbychurch@golden.net

St. Paul`s 10am Worship Service Lutheran Pastor: Richard A. Frey Church www.stpaulselmira.com 27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593


CLASSIFIEDS 32

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

THE OBSERVER

serVICe PrOs aUtOMOtIVe

aUtOMOtIVe

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

Body Maintenance

at

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

ARE A

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.

aUtOMOtIVe

THOMPSON’S

Auto Tech Inc.

21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

519-669-3232

(Behind the old Trylon Building)

serVICe PrOs

ONLY FROM CHEM-DRY

Worlds Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

Renovating? Let us do the clean up

SPRING CLEANING

RENOVATION CLEAN UPS! Call for Details

budurl.com/SAVE139

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location • Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off and Pick up Service • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair • Janitorial • Grout Cleaning • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping www.completecarpetcare.ca

ROB McNALL

519-669-7607

LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

519-669-7652

21 HOWARD AVE., ELMIRA

CarPet Care

CarPet Care

Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400 CONCrete

24 Hour Accident Assistance

519.669.8330

1-800-CARSTAR

AFTER HOURS

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519-669-3373

FAX: 519.669.3210

519.669.8917

CONCrete FOUNDatIONs

WEICKERT& MEIROWSKI

IS FOR RENT

Concrete Foundations Limited

Ltd.

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

Find It Online At...

Call today to get your business listed!

Chem-Dry Acclaim ® 61 Arthur St., N Elmira

519-669-3332

519.669.5790

www.ObserverXtra.com

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Call for estimate

Willis Martin

DRAYTON, ON

CraNe

CONstrUCtION

519-638-2699

DeCOratING

CONSTRUCTION

Design/ Build Agricultural/ Residential

-Framing -Roofing -Renovations -Repairs

ORTLIEB Read’s Decorating CRANE & Equipment Ltd.

519-669-3082

• 14 ton BoomTruck • 35 ton Mobile Crane

6982 Millbank Main St., Millbank 519-595-2053 • 519-664-2914

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS

GLASS SYSTEMS INC.

Specializing in Paint & Wallcoverings

1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

FREE ESTIMATES

For all your home decorating needs

519-664-9999

• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

ST. JACOBS

24 Hour Service 7 Days A Week

519-669-3658

TEL: 519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

27 Arthur St. S., Elmira

lawN MaINteNaNCe

heatING aND aIr CONDItIONING

YES... WE DO RESIDENTIAL WORK!

Glass serVICes SINCE 1961

6672 Ruggles Rd. Floradale RR#2 Wallenstain, N0B 2S0

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

THIS SPACE

FREE Gift Offer $139 Value

aUtOMOtIVe

Complete Collision Service

AUTO CLINIC

Providing the latest technology accuracy and confidence.

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial • On-The-Farm Service

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

eleCtrICal

aUtOMOtIVe

to repair your vehicle with

Call Us At

519-669-3373

aUtOMOtIVe

FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

MeDICal treatMeNt ER RS OVYEA 10

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada Established 2000

Dennis Brubacher, RME Owner/Operator ECRA ESA # 7001311

RESIDENTIAL Commercial Industrial

> Excavating > Trenching > Backfilling > Fine Grading > Overseeding & Top Dressing > Lawn Seeding

Call for your free estimate

Murray & Daniel Shantz

ELMIRA

ALMA, ONTARIO

519-669-8776 www.dentechelectric.com

MessaGe theraPY

REGISTERED

MASSAGE THERAPIST IN YOUR HOME Relaxation & Deep Tissue Massage CALL TODAY TO BOOK AN APPOINTMENT!

Lisa Stemmler, RMT 519-504-8004

F. David Reimer

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

PHONE:

PaINtING 20 years experience

free estimates interior/exterior painting wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

519-669-2251 36 Hampton St., Elmira

PlUMBING

YOUR

PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIALISTS!

C.J.

BRUBACHER LTD. 19 First St. E., Elmira

519-669-3362

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications: ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

www.reimerhbot.com For more information call:

519-669-0220

519.846.5427 FAX: 519.846.5134

63 Arthur Street S., Unit 3, Elmira, ON, N3B 2M6

PrOPertY MaINteNaNCe

PlUMBING

Steve Co.

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES Your Source for year round property maintenance

Now Booking For:

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

• Spring Clean-up • Top Dressing/Overseeding • Lawn Maintenance/ Landscaping • Mowing Packages Available • Mulch Delivery & Installation Telephone

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs. 24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

ELMIRA

519-669-3652

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

Jeff Basler Owner|Operator

519-669-9081 Mobile

519-505-0985 ever-green@sympatico.ca

We call Elmira home but we service the surrounding area.

serVICe PrOs

THIS SPACE IS FOR RENT

Call today to get your business listed!

519.669.5790

www.ObserverXtra.com


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

33 CLASSIFIEDS

SOX IT TO ’EM

JUNIOr Ball The Elmira Red Sox were defeated in narrow 11-10 loss Tues July 6 in Floradale against St. Clements. (From left) Kyle Deyell turns this ball into a triple base hit in the third inning. Nolan Tracey winds up to get a piece and Hailey Maine dons the catcher equipment to guard home plate. Junior ball winds down Saturday with a league tournament and pizza party. PHOTOS

serVICe PrOFessIONals reCOVerY & tOw

rOOFING

TOWING AND RECOVERY

AMOS R O O F I N G

CASH PAID

>Complete Complete Lawn Maintenance >Flower bed maintenance

>Commercial Commercial & Residential >Booking for Spring Cleanup

Phone: 519-669-1188 Fax: 519-669-9369

519-568-8666

selF stOraGe

sePtIC

salt

TOP QUALITY RESIDENTIAL ROOFING SYSTEMS Locally Owned & Operated

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

Since 19 96

Serving Elmira and Surrounding Area for over 30 years!

Steel Cedar Shingles Fully Insured

CALL SCOTT SEILING FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE. CALL NOW AND BOOK FOR SUMMER!

Thousands of satisfied customers!

519-747-2708 Waterloo www.riepersalt.com

519.669.4484 benderroofing@gmail.com

In Business since 1971 • Fully Insured

sIGNaGe | VINYl & DIGItal

troductor y Offer

Taking Salt to Peoples’ Basements Since 1988

Call or email Mike for your FREE estimate.

519.698.2114

FREE BAG In

> Superior Salt Products > Fast, Friendly Service > Convenient Delivery Times > Discounts for Seniors

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches

FOR YOUR UNWANTED SCRAP VEHICLES CARS, TRUCKS OR VANS WE PAY CASH WITH FREE TOWING PLEASE CALL

27 Brookemead, St, Elmira kdetweiler@rogers.com

rOOFING

INC

PrOPertY MaINteNaNCe

» PAT MERLIHAN

skate sharPeNING

BICYCLE SALES & REPAIRS

GET YOUR BICYCLES READY

graphfix ltd. Various sizes & rates

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE

Call

519-669-4964

Signs & Banners

Inspections for Real Estate Septic System Repairs & Restoration Catch Basin Cleaning

Vehicle Lettering Logos & Graphics

Waterloo Region • Woolwich Township

Decals & Safety Stickers

519-896-7700

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

sOIl

519-648-3004

www.biobobs.com

LOCNEW ATI ON

NEW N IO LOCAT

or

889 Bridge St. E. Waterloo (Corner of Bridge & McMurray)

Pick-up or Delivery

519-888-1007

trOPhY

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102

FAST, FRIENDLY SERVICE AT COMPETITIVE PRICES!

STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

serVICe PrOs •Tree Trimming & Removal • Aerial Bucket Trucks • Stump Grinding • Arborist Evaluations • Fully Insured & Certified • Certified to Work Near Power Lines

FREE ESTIMATES

IS FOR RENT

Call today to get your business listed!

www.ObserverXtra.com

PhOtO rePrINts

waste MaNaGeMeNt

Golden Disposal • Roll Off Containers • Curbside Garbage Removal • Registered Hauler for OTS Tire Program • Total Trash Removal of • Apartments, Estates, Insurance, Residential sites • Locally owned and operated since 2001 P.O. BOX 111 Breslau, On. N0B 1M0 goldendisposal@bellnet.ca

THIS SPACE

519.669.5790

519-669-1836 Thomas Martin

a division of 1678834 Ontario Inc.

QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

•Stump Grinding

Waste & Recycling Services

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING

ST.JACOBS

•Branch Chipping

E

parts extra

Ken Kolpean Julie Lavigne-Kolpean Tel: 519-744-5246 Fax: 519-744-5295

519-744-5246 www.goldendisposal.com Serving Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge/Elmira/Guelph areas

Order a reprint today! 4x6..............$9 5x7...............$11 8x10............ $15

Additional Prints Are

HALF PRICE

e in nl rO de Or

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

Large format printing

1600 King St. N., Unit #18

•Hedge trimming

E

20

$

519-664-1809

•Removal of Trees or Branches of Any Shapes or Sizes in Almost Any location

T R

With an expert spring tune up

BILL SCHENKEL

tree serVICe

tree serVICe

Triple Mix • Top Dressing Screened Top Soil • Sands Gravels • Natural River Rock

www.remingtongraphfix.com

Septic Tank Cleaning

Purchase a reprint of any staff photo that appears in print or online.

IN PRINT. ONLINE. IN PICTURES. IN DEPTH. www.

.com


CLASSIFIEDS 34

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

        



                                                           

                

                                    

                            

                          

                                                                      

        

              

                  

                                                                                        

               

     

     

                    

                                  

     

     

                                                       

                                    

            

                       

                                                                                                                           

                       


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, July 10, 2010

35 CLASSIFIEDS

COMMUNItY eVeNts CaleNDar

OBItUarIes

Scott, Grace (Mrs. Harry) Peacefully on Wednesday, July 7, 2010 at Freeport Health Centre of Grand River Hospital. Grace (Stickney) Scott age 91 years of Elmira. Beloved wife of the late Harry Scott (2005). Loving mother of Donald and Myrna Scott of Wiarton, Gavin and Vallerie Scott of Kitchener, Roderick and Jude Scott of Port Colborne. Cherished grandmother of Sherida (Sean), Genevieve, Rebecca (Sean), Graham and Conor. Also lovingly remembered by the Gregory Family, Carol, Ken, Kathy, Karen and their families. Grace was the last surviving member of her family having been predeceased by her parents William and Mary Stickney, George in infancy, Mervin, Muriel and Clare. Grace was a retired teacher and principal in Waterloo County, was a faithful member of Trinity United Church and a past president of the Legion Ladies Auxiliary Branch 469. She was a life member of the Woolwich Ever Faithful Women’s Institute and an editor of the History of Peel Township. The family will receive their friends and relatives at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira, on Sunday from 1-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at Trinity United Church, Elmira, on Monday, July 12, 2010 at 1 p.m. A Legion Service will be held at the funeral home on Sunday. In her memory, donations to Trinity United Church, Sleeping Children Around the World or a charity of one’s choice would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

“A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Kleensweep Carpet Care

West Montrose, ON

T. 519.669.2033

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR

Schaefer, Douglas H. MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS • Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD. Went to be with the Lord on Saturday, July 3, 2010 at the K-W Health Centre of Grand River Hospital at the age of 76 years. Doug Schaefer of Elmira is the beloved husband of Elaine (nee Jarvis). Loved father of John and his wife Kathy of Elmira, Yvonne deBoer and her husband Allen of Hanover, and Bob and his wife Louisa of Baden. Loving grandfather of Michael (Samantha) deBoer, Jacob deBoer, Madison Schaefer, Seth deBoer, Karley Schaefer and Kai Schaefer. Also lovingly remembered by his sister-in-law Shirley Witten. He was predeceased by his parents Harold and Delphine Schaefer and one brother Murray. Douglas was a faithful member of the Alma Bible Church. The family received friends and relatives at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira, on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service was conducted at Woodside Bible Fellowship, Elmira, on Tuesday, July 6, 2010 at 2 p.m. followed by cremation. In Doug’s memory, donations may be made to the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre. The family wishes to thank all the doctors and nurses for the care they gave Doug. It was much appreciated. www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

Death NOtICes

> DeCkert,

Michael – On Saturday, July 3, 2010 at Freeport Hospital, Kitchener, Michael of Linwood in his 60th year, reluctantly, but lovingly released to Heaven surrounded by his family.

> DeNNY,

kevin Patrick – Passed away peacefully, following a brief battle with cancer at the KW Heath Centre, on Sunday, July 4, 2010 at the age of 58. Local relatives are his children Krista and Derek of St. Clements.

> Gee, Jack – At Leisureworld,

Elmira on Monday, July 5, 2010, Mr. John Sherwood Gee of Listowel, in his 98th year. Local relatives are his son Robert Gee and his wife Cathy of Elmira.

> GerBer,

Mildred kathleen (nee erb) – Peacefully with family by her side, at Knollcrest Lodge, Milverton, on Tuesday, July 6, 2010, Mildred of Wellesley in her 86th year.

> GerBer,

shawn william – Passed away at his home in New Hamburg on Saturday, July 3, 2010 in his 37th year. Shawn was the assistant coach for the Wellesley Applejacks.

> MUsselMaN, lloyd C. –

Peacefully on Wednesday, July 7, 2010, at his home, Leisureworld Care Centre, Elmira, in his 100th year.

> sChIeDel,

richard – Passed away suddenly after complications from a motor vehicle accident on Saturday, July 3, 2010 at the Hamilton General Hospital in his 79th year.Local relatives are his daughter Diane Burkhart and her husband Dan of Breslau.

> sNell,

Norman Douglas “Doug”- With profound sadness the Family announces the passing of Doug Snell at Twin Oaks Home, Maryhill on Saturday, July 3, 2010 in his 80th year.

519.669.5105

P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

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YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

519.664.2008

SANYO CANADIAN

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

NANCY KOEBEL

Bus: 519.895.2044 ext. 217 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Suite 800, 101 Frederick St., Kitchener

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Allen Morrison Insurance Inc. 25 Industrial Dr., Elmira, On.

FREE CONSULTATION Bus.:519.669.2632

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville

www.cooperators.ca

519-699-4641 www.freybc.com

JUlY 10

JUlY 17

> Bikefest in July at the Wellesley > St. Clements Autorama – rain Arena. Event features all forms of motorcycles, swap meet, poker run and show and shine. Doors open at 9 a.m. Admission is $10 per person. For more information contact cycleworks@rogers.com.

> History (In The Garden) Under

the Trees. An afternoon full of seeds and roots, flowers and vegetables, weeds and stems. Horticulturalist Bob Wildfong will speak to WHS members and friends on the role of gardens in Waterloo County/ Region’s history. Doon Heritage Village, 10 Huron Rd., Kitchener, (in the new Jubilee Park). Doors open at 1 p.m. Jointly sponsored by The Waterloo Historical Society and Doon Heritage Village. For more information call Rych Mills 519-742-4990.

> Elmira Horticultural Society

Garden Tour. 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Tickets $10, available at Brian’s Foto Source, Floristerra or call Barb 519-669-8239.

JUlY 11 > Elmira Legion Hungry Man’s

Breakfast, Christmas In July. Service from 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.; $6 all you can eat, along with a silent auction, bake table and, of course, Santa.

or shine, free admission, fun for the whole family. Vintage, classic, custom and muscle car show sponsored by JD Graphics. 10 trophies to be awarded, silent auction, 50/50 draw, BBQ refreshments. Show vendors welcome. KFun 99.5 FM will be on site. All proceeds will go towards the enhancement of recreation facilities within St. Clements. Dash plaques awarded upon registration of vehicle. Call 519-699-5792 for more information.

JUlY 20 > Explore Africa at the Region of

Waterloo Library. Join us at St. Clements, Linwood, St. Jacobs, Bloomingdale and Wellesley branches for Explore Africa with the Destination Jungle TD Summer Reading Club! This free program includes stories, crafts and activities for children ages 6 to 12. For more information please contact your local branch; July 2023.

JUlY 22

• Total Denture Care “The RightDay Coverage • Same Service For You” on Repairs and Relines • Metal Partial - Soft Relines •Since Implants 1987 - DentureTech •Since DENTURE SPECIALIST 1995 - Denturist

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519.669.1535 KITCHENER

FREE CONSULTATION 519.744.9770 ELMIRA • Total Denture Care KITCHENER 519-669-1535 • Same Day Service519-744-9770 15 Memorial Ave., Elmira (behind Bank of Montreal) on Repairs and Relines • Metal Partial - Soft Relines • Implants Great Wine • DENTURE SPECIALIST Made Simple Vinolea Jahandari DD

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519.669.8807 Hours: Tue-Fri. 12-6; Sat 12-4

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess. Elmira & Surrounding Area

> The Reptile Show at Wellesley

Branch Library, 3 p.m. Join us for the reptile show from Hamilton Reptiles. Meet the reptiles and learn about where they are from, their eating habits and defenses. JUlY 13 This show is recommended for children 5 and up. Tickets $3 per > Wild Canada at the Region of person or two for $5. For more Waterloo Library. Join us at St. information, contact the Wellesley Clements, Linwood, St. Jacobs, Branch Library 519-656-2001. Bloomingdale and Wellesley branches for Wild Canada with JUlY 27 the Destination Jungle TD Summer Reading Club! This free program > Go Bananas, Dress-up Contest includes stories, crafts and at the Region of Waterloo Library. activities for children ages 6 to Join us at St. Clements, Linwood, 12. For more information please St. Jacobs, Bloomingdale and contact your local branch; July 13- Wellesley branches for A Rainforest 16. Adventure with the Destination Jungle TD Summer Reading Club! > Awesome Animals at St. This free program includes stories, Clements Library, 3 p.m. Become crafts and activities for children a zoologist and explore the animal ages 6 to 12. For more information kingdom! Take home your animal please contact your local branch; tack model. This event is for July 27-30. children ages 6 to 12. Tickets $3 per person or two for $5. For more information, call St. Clements Branch Library 519-699-4341.

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763

elmirawelcomewagon@sympatico.ca

519.669.2884 Summer is Coming! 21 Industrial Dr., Elmira

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245 Labrador Drive | Waterloo

519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com


Wise customers read the fine print: •, *, **, †, ±, § Canada’s Hottest Model Event offers apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased between July 6, 2010 and August 3, 2010 from participating retailers. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Offers subject to change without notice. See participating retailer for complete details and conditions. •$25,999 Purchase Price applies to 2010 Ram 1500 Quad Cab SXT 4x4 (24A+AGR) only and includes $8,250 Consumer Cash Discount and $500 Dealer Performance Cash. See participating retailer for complete details. Pricing includes freight ($1,400), air tax, tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailers may sell for less. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on most new 2009/2010 vehicles and are manufacturer-to-retailer incentives, which are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. Amounts vary by vehicle. See your retailer for complete details. **Dealer Performance Cash Discounts are offered on 2010 Ram 1500 Quad Cab SXT 4x4 and are manufacturer-to-retailer incentives, which are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. See your retailer for complete details. †0% purchase financing for 36 months available to qualified customers on approved credit through Royal Bank of Canada, Scotiabank, TD Financing Services and GMAC on most 2010 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge and Ram models, except Challenger, Caliber Canada Value Package and SE Plus, Grand Caravan Canada Value Package and Cargo Van, Sprinter and Ram Chassis Cab. Example: 2010 Ram 1500 Quad Cab SXT 4x4 (24A+AGR) with a Purchase Price of $25,999 financed at 0% for 36 months equals monthly payments of $722.19; cost of borrowing of $0 and a total obligation of $25,999. Pricing includes freight ($1,400), air tax, tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailers may sell for less. ±Variable Prime Rate financing up to 84 months is offered on approved credit on most new 2010 vehicles to qualified retail customers through TD Financing Services and Royal Bank of Canada. Bi-weekly payments shown are based on 84 month terms. Variable rate shown is based on TD and RBC Prime Rate and fluctuates accordingly. Payments and financing term may increase or decrease with rate fluctuations. RBC offer not open to residents of Quebec. TD offer is not open to residents of New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Yukon, Nunavut and Northwest Territories. Some conditions apply. See participating retailer for trademark of Chrysler Group LLC. complete details. °Based on calendar year to date market share gain. §2010 Dodge Ram 1500 Crew Cab Laramie 4x4 shown has a higher price than the 2010 Ram 1500 Quad Cab SXT 4x4 advertised. See your retailer or go to www.dodge.ca for complete details. ®SIRIUS and the dog logo are registered trademarks of SIRIUS Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademar

BACK PAGE 36 THE OBSERVER

2010 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB SXT 4X4

CANADA’S FASTEST GROWING CHOICE OF LIGHT DUTY PICKUPº

PURCHASE FOR

$

25,999

STEP UP FOR ONLY $

34 MORE BI-WEEKLY

• INCLUDES $8,250 CONSUMER CASH,* $500 DEALER

PERFORMANCE CASH,** FREIGHT, AIR TAX, TIRE LEVY AND OMVIC FEE. TAXES EXCLUDED. OTHER RETAILER CHARGES MAY APPLY.+

2010 Ram 3500 3 Crew Cab Laramie 4x2 shown.

VISIT YOUR NEIGHBOURHOOD CHRYSLER, JEEP , DODGE, RAM RETAILER.

®

PLUS GET

%†

0 $

156

OR CHOOSE

PURCHASE FINANCING

for 36 months

2010 RAM 1500 SLT

• 5.7L HEMI® V8 with MDS and VVT, and 390 hp • Tire Pressure

er/ Monitoring display • Vehicle Information Centre with trip computer/

temperature/compass • Remote Keyless Entry

• 350 hp @ 3,000 rpm • Up to 650 lb-ft @ 1,500 rpm • Ram is the only Heavy Duty Diesel pickup in the market that does not require a diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) system to meet stringent 2010 emissions requirements • Best-In-Class low-end torque • Class-Exclusive standard integrated exhaust brake • Nobody offers a better diesel engine warranty: 5 years/160,000 km

MOTOR M TREND’S 2010

TTRUCK OF THE YEAR

CASH DISCOUNTS OF UP TO $8,750

+Your local retailer may charge additional fees for administration/pre-delivery that can range from $0 to $1,098 and anti-theft/safety products that can range from $0 to $1,298. Charges may vary by retailer.

» Saturday, July10, 2010

IF YOU WANT A HOT MODEL, IT’S TIME TO STEP UP.

2010 Dodge Ram 1500 Crew Cab Laramie shown.§

BI-WEEKLY

A VARIABLE PRIME RATE OF

@

FOR 84 MONTHS

2.50

NO CHARGE HEMI® ENGINE

• Uconnect phone with voice command • 20" Aluminum chrome-clad wheels • Class IV receiver hitch

2010 RAM HEAVY DUTY

%†

0

for 36 months

PURCHASE FINANCING


July 10, 2010