Page 1

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

1 NEWS THE SHOPS AT ROXTON

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He’s Wellesley’s Citizen of the Year > STORY ON PG. 15

VOLUME.....17 ISSUE.........06

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2012

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New hires add to staffing costs up 26% over last five years

All keyed up for US piano competition Colin Dewar

E

Steve Kannon

> SEE STAFFING ON PG. 05

WEEKEND WEATHER

PHOTO

lans to hike taxes by 5.25 per cent and hire two more staff members won’t be challenged when Woolwich moves to make official the 2012 budget, suggests Mayor Todd Cowan. A vote is expected Feb. 21, but no further review seems likely, council having completed its budget deliberations. While the document was given more scrutiny than in past years, with particular focus on cost overruns at the Woolwich Memorial Centre, the bulk of staff recommendations remain in place. That includes two of three proposed new hires, but no scrutiny of current full-time staffing numbers. The budget does, however, include cuts to some causal and part-time staff members, including lifeguards and front desk personnel, to help tame expenses at the WMC. Chief administrative officer David Brenneman said full-time managerial staff was not spared at the expense of part-timers such as students working at the pool.

»COLIN DEWAR

P

HITTING ALL THE RIGHT NOTES Bloomingdale’s Marko Pejanovic has won a spot at the Gina Bachauer Jr. International Piano Competition to be held in Utah. He will be one of 35 contestants at the worldwide competition.

SATURDAY

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Opinion...............08 Business.............13

ntering the Pejanovic home in Bloomingdale you are greeted with music playing from the Ritmuller baby grand piano sitting the family room. At the piano, tickling the ivory keys is 11-yearold Marko Pejanovic. He is playing the first movement from a Mozart sonata. It was playing that composition along with Chopin’s Nocturnes that won Pejanovic a spot at the Gina Bachauer Jr. International Piano Competition to be held in Utah in June. The competition has been known to foster excellent performances and help develop opportunities for pianists. Last December Pejanovic flew to New York City with his father, Miso, to audition for the worldwide competition. He won a spot among 35

> SEE PIANO ON PG. 07

Living Here.........15 Sports...............18

Entertainment....24 Classifieds.........25


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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

3 NEWS

Quarter century of Zion Mennonite »JAMES JACKSON

James Jackson

PHOTO

P

arishioners past and present gathered to reflect on a quarter century of memories Feb. 5 as they celebrated the 25th anniversary of Zion Mennonite Church in Elmira. “It was a real celebration of being able to fulfill a dream,” said Marilyn Brubacher, one of the original members of the congregation that began back in January 1987. “When we started the new congregation it was with the intent that we’d have an alternative to some of the traditional churches.” Known by many as simply The Junction, the church has flourished despite its humble roots. Zion Mennonite Fellowship began meeting at Elmira Branch 469 of the Royal Canadian Legion, and enjoyed the warm hospitality for almost 10 years. Yet the congregation wanted more – the space at the Legion worked well for Sunday worship, but limited their vision of outreach and service the other six days of the week. So a delegation went to council and proposed making used of a property downtown, formerly Shopeasy. The council of the day, led by mayor David Leis, granted a five-year lease at 47 Arthur St. S., signed April 1, 1996, and work began almost immediately on the renovations. On June 16, 1996 the

>> Robin Hood seeks township deal

HOW IT DEVELOPED Dawne and Ken Driedger, the husband-and-wife pastor duo at Zion Mennonite Church, with a visual timeline outlining major events in the church’s 25 year history.

church held its first official service in the building, and hasn’t looked back in the nearly 16 years since. Beyond its Sunday service, the church also offers a youth group on Friday nights, a coffee and games night dropin known as “Java Junction” on Thursday, as well as an evening to praise God through music one Saturday night per month. The church also opens its doors during the Elmira Maple Syrup Festival, moonlight madness sale, and the Elmira street dance. At the service last Sunday, Dale Bauman – a member of the steering committee that helped establish the church – encouraged the congregation to continue to take risks like they did 25 years ago. “That can fade over time,” said pastor Dawne Driedger, who along with her husband

Ken, has been giving Sunday service at Zion Mennonite since 2005. “Things get a little more comfortable and you might not feel like you need to take risks anymore, (but) I’d like to take the lead into some risky change.” As attendance numbers at churches continue to dwindle – such as at the recentlyclosed Chalmers Presbyterian church in Winterbourne – the Driedgers believe that the church cannot be afraid of taking risks in order to continue to serve the people of Elmira, just as the original members of the congregation took a risk starting their own church. “Times are changing and when we change it feels like a risk. Sometimes it is more of a risk than it feels like, and sometimes it feels like more of a risk than it really

is,” said Ken. The church sees about 60 parishioners on an average Sunday, but that number more than doubled for the 25th anniversary last week as former members made the trip back to Elmira to relive some old memories and enjoy a potluck meal. And what of the next 25 years? The Driedgers don’t see themselves staying at Zion for that long, but know it will be in good hands when they do decide to move on. “It will be exciting to see what the next 25 years brings for this congregation,” said Dawne. “There is so much potential here, people are so willing to serve this community and we really have a heart for Elmira. “I think we can work with Elmira to make this a better place for everybody.”

MCC teen night big on bargains, social mindedness T

James Jackson

he joint will be hoppin’ and the teens will be shoppin’ when the Elmira Mennonite Central Committee Thrift Shop holds its upcoming teen night on the evening of Feb. 21. After raising about $2,000 during their first teen night held last February, and doubling that amount to $4,000 this past August, the decision to have a third one was

a no-brainer. “It’s a real boost for MCC this time of year, because February is kind of a low time for donations,” said store manager Betty Marshall. “Christmas has past, and our sales are usually slow in February, so it helps all around.” Since their sale in August, staff at MCC has been setting aside popular teen brands like Bench and

American Eagle, and the sale has been a big hit with local teens as they line up “out the door and into the back parking lot” waiting for the doors to open, the manager said. And with prices up to ten times lower than teens can expect to pay for brand new clothes, the evening’s popularity is understandable. “T-shirt ranges from $3 to $5, a hoodie or a sweatshirt probably would go from any-

where from $6 to $10, and jeans are $4 to $6,” said Marshall. “So they’re at least a quarter and maybe a tenth of what they would be new, depending on the brand.” It’s not just the low prices and quality merchandise that brings the students and teens back, said Marshall, but the knowledge that the money they help raise goes back to MCC to support

> SEE MCC ON PG. 08

Having outgrown its roots as an EDSS project, Elmira’s Robin in the Hood Festival is looking for a new rehearsal space. To the end, the organization is hoping Woolwich Township agrees to a deal that would see the community rooms at the Woolwich Memorial Centre put to that use. Founder and EDSS drama teacher DJ Carroll addressed councillors Tuesday night, suggesting event volunteers would be happy to do cleanup duty at Gibson Park, the site of the annual festival, for instance, in exchange for free use of space at the WMC. Started in 2001 as an undertaking at the high school, the festival has grown to become a community-based non-profit event, necessitating a move from EDSS, he said. From 50 performers and 20 volunteers a decade ago, it last year boasted 157 performers and 60 volunteers. Receptive to the idea, councillors asked staff to prepare a report on the arrangement, to be discussed at the next meeting.

>> Building activity down in 2011 Indicative perhaps of the general economic slowdown, with a dip in 2011, building activity in Woolwich was down 18.8 per cent last year over 2010. A report tabled this week shows the township issued 687 building permits last year for projects with a total construction value of $88,630,648. That compares to 737 and $109,093,081 respectively in 2010. While residential construction was down just slightly ($60.7 million from $62.2 million), the largest drop was on the industrial side, where just $16.2 million worth of construction was undertaken in 2011, as opposed to $34.9 million the year before.

>> Wellesley history goes digital Anyone looking to learn a little more about the history of Wellesley Township can now purchase a digital copy of The Maple Leaf Journal: A Settlement History of Wellesley Township. Originally published in 1983, the book has been out of print for several years, but thanks to digital scanning technology, it is now available for purchase in a fully searchable digital DVD format. Cost is $20, with proceeds to the historical society. For information call the township administration office, (519) 699-4611 or email wthhs.info@gmail.com.

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NEWS 4

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

LAW & ORDER

Suspicious pair a reason not to take candies from strangers February 4 >>4:40 PM | A collision

involving a Ford pickup truck and a Hyundai occurred in the parking lot of the Walmart in St. Jacobs. The pickup was reversing from a parking spot when it hit the Hyundai, damaging the driver’s side door. No injuries were reported and no charges were laid.

>>4:45 PM | Police received a

call about a snowmobile trailer stolen from the parking lot of a commercial shop on Broadway Street in Hawkesville. The unit is described as a black, two-bed enclosed Triton trailer. Police are

P

olice were notified of a suspicious vehicle – grey with four doors – driven by a 30-year-old man with a 14-year-old girl in the passenger seat on Line 76 and Ament Line about 8:25 p.m. on Monday. The girl left a box of candies at a bus stop for Mennonite children. The candies were factory sealed and were eaten by the children that were walking home from school earlier in the day. Police caution children not to accept candy from strangers.

continuing to investigate.

>>5:00 PM | Police were notified

of a theft of a knapsack from a truck parked at the farmers’ market in St. Jacobs. The owner of the truck left the vehicle unlocked and when he returned the knapsack that had

been sitting on the passenger seat was missing. Police were told the bag contained a significant amount of cash. The investigation continues.

February 5 >>11:15 AM | Police were

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called to dispatch a distressed raccoon wandering along Mockingbird Drive in Elmira. The responding officer quickly put down the animal.

>>12:30 PM | The manager of

the MCC Thrift Shop on Church Street in Elmira contacted police about a broken window at the store. When police arrived they discovered broken beer bottles and believe they were thrown at the window by an unknown suspect. No entry was made into the store and nothing was stolen.

February 6 >>11:40 AM | A commercial truck was broken into in the parking lot of Signs Galore on Woolwich Street in Breslau. Suspects took tools and sign components for installation. The investigation is ongoing.

>>2:30 PM | Police were notified

of

a

break-and-

enter at the Home Hardware on Church Street in Elmira. Suspects stole lawn statues and salt for water softener from a fenced area. The investigation continues.

>>4:00 PM | A fence and

garbage bin were damaged at a commercial property on Bast Place in St. Jacobs. Police are still investigating what caused the damage.

>>9:30 PM | A 37-year-old

Baden woman driving a black 2002 Pontiac Grand Prix swerved to miss an animal on Weimer Line near Maplewood Road in Wellesley Township. The driver lost control of the vehicle and slid into a ditch. Minor damage occurred to the vehicle. No injuries were reported.

February 7 >>11:15 AM | The principal of Park Manor Public School

in Elmira contacted police after two students walking along Mockingbird Drive were followed by a man driving a white cub vane with barnstyle doors at the back. He was described at white, in his late 40s, with a black beard, short hair and wearing a black toque. Police are looking into the incident.

>>6:00 PM | Five vehicles in the parking lot of an apartment on Dunke Street North in Elmira were damaged when a suspect ran their keys along the side of the vehicles. Police are continuing to investigate.

>>11:30 PM | A suspicious vehicle parked on the side of the road on Avery Court in Breslau was reported to police. The vehicle was described as a black pickup truck with a tarp over the bed and a blue interior light. When police arrived the vehicle was gone.

Council told Wellesley’s unique features are attractive to tourists GM of Waterloo Regional Tourism Marketing Corp preaches merits of the township to council James Jackson

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ellesley Township should continue to embrace its rural roots and market them to tourists in order to gain a bigger slice of area tourism dollars, suggests the general manager of the region’s tourism agency. “Tourism is one of the fastest growing industries in the world, and as we see manufacturing declining and the creative sector becoming more important, tourism is tied more strongly,” Tracey Desjardins of the Waterloo Regional Tourism Marketing Corporation told councillors Monday night. She said that the absence of big box stores in the township, coupled with the emphasis on health and wellness, make Wellesley an ideal destination spot. “You are a living example of that, and where food comes from and the natural heritage of food is very

trendy and a very important story to tell.” Since starting her position about 18 months ago, Desjardins has revamped the way Waterloo Region markets itself, putting a renewed emphasis on public relations and making connections with the people who want to visit the region. She said she has introduced social media and internet banner ads into the equation, and made a push to connect with foreign media to attract tourism dollars from abroad. “We entertained some Chinese journalists during Oktoberfest and they talked about this whole area as being an interest for them in rural tourism. They really want to see the land and where the food comes from and the culture. “They’re not so interested in the real urban tourism, because they can get that where they’re from.” She said that Welles-

ley’s position within driving distance of the major urban core of Kitchener, Waterloo and Cambridge is also a big advantage over other possible tourist destinations such as Toronto, London, or Hamilton. Tourism is big business in this province; across Ontario it accounts for more than $22 billion and creates more than 200,000 jobs, Desjardins said, and in Waterloo Region it continues to grow. In 2007 about 3.5 million visitors came to the area, a number that grew to more than four million in 2009 and accounted for more than $370 million. At the same time, however, the people of Wellesley want to retain their small-town charm that brought them there in the first place, making it a challenge to encourage more tourists to come but not overwhelm the

> SEE TOURISM ON PG. 08


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

5 NEWS

Staffing: Woolwich officials say growth is justified, though spending reviews leave management untouched ... at least for the time being > CONTINUED FROM COVER “It just so happens that – when we were doing a review – that’s where we were staffed to a point where we could make reductions,” he said this week in discussing efficiencies review that was part of this year’s budget process. Although there are fewer part-time employees, the township has no plans to reduce middle-management positions, he added, noting managers tend to be hands-on workers as well, able to cover for those positions to be eliminated. Having talked of a review of staff levels, particularly newer positions such as economic development, business development and building maintenance, prior to the 2010 election, Cowan said he’s satisfied with continuing the positions, even though there are no measurements in place to evaluate their effectiveness. “They do a heck of a lot more than I expected coming in,” he said, adding he has been demanding more accountability, including a cost-benefit analysis of each position. He also has no prob-

DRAFT

BUDGET

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

ACTUAL

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

Payroll costs

$6,051,783

$5,716,647

$5,770,749

$5,232,792

$4,787,857

Operating

$12,324,438

$11,834,040

$11,262,001

$10,241,429

$8,909,436

Expenditure Budget % of payroll costs on operating expenditure budget

49%

Staff #’s

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

Full-time

63

61

59

59

56

Part-time

304

304

287

281

272

TOTAL STAFF

367

365

346

340

328

lem with two new hires. One, an engineering technician, will essentially be funded by revenues from development. The other, another administrative assistant/communications person, is justified due to the current workload assisting the CAO and council, as well as the perceived need for more communication with the public. The additions would bring to 63 the number of full-time staff members, up from 56 five years ago. In that time, total staff costs, including part-timers such as firefighters (304 people, up from 272 in 2008) has increased 26.4 per cent, to $6.05 million from $4.8 million. Cowan denied there’s been no political pushback against spending increases on staff. Just because there have

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been no cuts to date doesn’t mean that will remain the case, he said. It’s not easy to make changes, though he pledges to do that, starting with attitudes within the staff. “This is round 1 – it takes a while to turn the ship,” he said of this year’s budget review. “Are there going to be other changes? Definitely.” For this year, however, he expects the budget to remain as is, with no last-minute challenges – “where it’s at, it’s at.” For his part, Brenneman says the search for efficiencies started in 2012 is not a one-off review. “We’re going to continue down that path. There’s still work to be done.” One part of the

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have boosted costs for everything from water testing to fire services, where there are now three full-time staff members when a few years ago there was only a part-time chief. Between those requirements and the service expectations of both the public and council, there’s a much larger demand on staff time, said Brenneman, acknowledging that

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work to be done involves negotiating a new contract with the township’s unionized workers. The provincial government has called for a public sector wage freeze, but without legislation Brenneman isn’t optimistic municipalities will be able to keep wages, which account for half the township’s operating costs, under wraps. As with most contracts, the township will be subject to what’s going on in other municipalities, as well as the results of the provincial arbitration process, which typically has not been friendly to taxpayers. As with other municipalities, Woolwich is also constrained by excessive provincial legislation when it tries to curb staff spending. Unnecessary measures

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some of the functions appear to have little direct benefit to the public. “We do make a concerted effort to provide value for the tax dollar,” he stressed. Larger changes are going to take political will, with direction from council. For now at least, Cowan said he’s in favour of increased spending based on what he heard from people while going door-to-door during the election campaign and in subsequent consultations. “That’s what I have to take my lead from,” he said, arguing the extra spending and tax hikes are “the cost of doing business” if the township wants to be a player in the region’s development picture. “I’m going to do what I feel is the right thing.”

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NEWS 6

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

A

s Canada Post continues to install community mailboxes in Heidelberg, the operator who ran the post office until last month said the agency wasn’t really interested in maintaining service in the village. “For 10 cents an hour Canada Post would not save this post office,” said Steve McCathie, owner of Forwell Super Variety, which hosted the franchised postal outlet since 2000. Canada Post closed the outlet on Jan. 23. Since then, residents have been forced to pick up their mail in St. Clements until the Crown corporation finishes installing community boxes later this month. McCathie feels Canada Post is purposely trying to mislead the public, relaying false information about the process they undertook in Heidelberg. He said it would have only taken an extra 10 cents an hour for them to make a deal to keep the outlet open in his store, as that is how much he believes would be used in hydro for the new equipment Canada Post wanted to install.

“It seems to me that they don’t have a plan to keep post offices open, they only have a plan to close them because if you could keep one open for 10 cents an hour would that not be a plan? That plan was never looked at – all they wanted to do was have things their way. They were not interested in working things out. They only have plans on what to do when storeowners don’t want to be controlled by their rigid strict outlines.” At a committee meeting held last week in the Township of Wellesley, Canada Post representatives told council they had spoken to numerous businesses in the area about hosting the postal outlet but were unable to find a new location. The agency said it had no option but to install community boxes in Heidelberg, hiring someone to maintain the post boxes. McCathie said there was another option: allow him to keep the postal outlet open. That way they would not have to hire someone to maintain the boxes, which he believes will not happen as he has a

community box for his own personal mail in Kitchener and said the boxes are never maintained and in the winter it can be quite hard to access with all the snow build-up. “There has never been anyone in charge of clearing the snow or maintaining the boxes that I have seen, and I suspect the same will happen in Heidelberg.” Another point of contention for McCathie was the fact that Canada Post wanted to have access to his business bank accounts, something he strongly opposed. He insisted on paying by cheque or through online banking. Canada Post told him that was unacceptable. This week, however, McCathie received an invoice from Canada Post clearly stating they wanted to be paid by cheque or money order. “They printed that on their own invoice and yet they told me they no longer accepted cheques, they just wanted access into my bank account. They seem to be an organization that does not tell the truth.” Canada Post did not respond to inquiries prior to press time.

PHOTO

Colin Dewar

» SUBMITTED

Canada Post not interested in saving Heidelberg outlet, says former operator

FLIGHT CHECK The 1st Maryhill Scouting troop visited the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum in Hamilton last weekend to learn the science behind flight and the history of air raids in London during the Second World War.

Maryhill Scout troop takes in a slice of WWII history at warplane museum

H

Colin Dewar

istory was front and center for the 1st Maryhill Scouting troop last weekend as they learned about aircraft used by Canadians or Canada’s military from the beginning of World War II up to the present. The troop, made up of Beaver and Cub scouts from Maryhill and Breslau, spent the entire night at the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum in Hamilton. Along with over 120 other Scouts from the area, the troop learned all about science of flight and was given the chance to sleep under an authentic Second World War airplane.

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During their stay they built styrofoam jets and learned how to build hot air balloons; they were taught the physics behind flight, including lift, weight, thrust and drag. It was not all science for the Scouts as they learned about the history of the Second World War with an emphasis on the London air raids. They were given a Blitz “Night Ops” tour with a lesson on how London dealt with air raids and then experienced what it was like to be in London during the war. “They learned that during the war when the air sirens sounded no one was able to use any kind of light so the Ger-

mans would not know where the city was that they were bombing. A real air raid recording was used during the demonstration and the Scouts were led into a room with no lights and told to shine their flash lights on the ceiling to mimic the search lights the English used,” said Suzanne Wilson, leader (Akela) of the Cub pack. After the air raid demonstration they were treated to a tour of the museum including viewing a replica of the Silver Dart, the first aircraft built in Canada. The troop slept under the wing of a Hawker Hurricane which is

> SEE HISTORY ON PG. 07

Township of Wellesley

PUBLIC NOTICE

The Council of the Township of Wellesley has declared the following lands to be surplus to their needs and therefore pursuant to Township policy hereby declares that the following lands are to be sold: Block 106, 58M-380, located on the west side of Molesworth Street, in the settlement area of Wellesley. The lands are comprised of 6.0 m of frontage and an area of approximately 688.74 sq. m. The purchase price is to be established by Appraisal of the fair market value to be completed prior to the sale of the lands. Interested parties are requested to contact: Susan Duke EDC/Clerk Township of Wellesley 519-699-4611 sduke@wellesley.ca


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

7 NEWS

Piano: 11-year-old has quickly advanced to ranks of world-class students > CONTINUED FROM COVER

about the Kiwanis competitions is that they have judicators that write things down on paper that they think you can improve on and the tell you what you need to do to be better instead of just getting a score and not knowing how to improve,” said Marko.

Following the Toronto competition he will be participating in the Kitchener Kiwanis Music Festival in April and then he is off to the Canadian Music Competition in Toronto in May. “I am very busy but I enjoy playing the piano. It is my passion.”

History: A real learning experience »COLIN DEWAR

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

PHOTO

other finalists, one of only three Canadians at the contest. More than 300 pianists were heard in live auditions in Beijing, Shanghai, Seoul, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Moscow, Hamburg, Venice, New York City and Salt Lake City. Pejanovic had 15 minutes to impress the judges with his preparation and dedication to the music. “There were quite a lot of children at the audition and it was quite nerve-wracking in the morning,” said Marko. “But I am use to playing in front of larger groups and in competitions so I just channeled that into my music and did the best I could.” He started taking piano lessons at the age of eight and has progressed quite quickly in the world of music, joining the Young Artist Performance Academy at the Royal Conservatory in Toronto last summer.

tory and will be playing on Apr. 28 at the conservatory with a chamber orchestra. It will be the first time he has played with a full orchestra. At the end of February he will be participating in the Kiwanis competition in Toronto. “The good thing

IT NEVER STOPS Marko Pejanovic has a very busy schedule

over the next three months, participating in numerous competitions in Canada and the U.S. He travels to Toronto twice a week for theory and private lessons and practices close to three hours a day. The home-schooled student will be quite busy over the next few months leading up to the competition. “He has a lot on his plate this year and we spoke with some families with students at

the Royal Conservatory and discovered a lot of them were home schooled and we decided to teach Marko at home, giving him more chances to practice and play for pleasure,” said Bo Pejanovic, Marko’s mother. Last month he won a concerto competition for junior piano players at the Royal Conserva-

very similar to the Spitfire and was responsible for 80 per cent of the enemy aircraft destroyed by fighter command during the Battle of Britain. Other troops had a chance to sleep under a bomber aircraft that flew during the Second World War. “It was a really cool experience for both the kids and the adults that attended,” said Wilson. The overnight trip to the museum is only one of the many trips and outings the troop partakes in over the year.

This September the group will be participating in the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812 at Fort George in Niagara-on-the-Lake. “We went to the fort last year and all the kids had a blast and they keep asking when we are going back, it was really entertaining for them,” said Wilson.

Currently there are 20 members in the 1st Maryhill scout group and they meet every Monday night at Breslau PS at 6:30 p.m. Anyone interested in joining the group are invited to drop in at the school or can contact the group’s administrator Robin Managh at (519) 648-3109.

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NEWS 8

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

Gibson Park seen as ideal home for accessible playground Work could get underway in spring; Kate’s Kause looks at splash pad option Steve Kannon

A

playground for kids of all abilities is likely to make its home at Gibson Park in Elmira. If all goes well, construction should begin this spring on the facility, the goal of the charitable organization known as Kate’s Kause. Originally shooting to raise $250,000 over five years, the group found considerable public support, collecting $265,000 in just 15 months. Given the response, the goal

is now $500,000, which would allow for a larger facility, including a splash pad. Woolwich Township, which will provide the space for the play park, launched a community consultation process to get the ball rolling immediately after discussing the plan at a council meeting Tuesday night. While the township had it in mind to build the playground and splash pad adjacent to Lions Hall, near the Woolwich Memorial

Centre, that site was deemed unsuitable due to space constraints and the lack of tree cover for shade, director of recreation and facilities Karen Makela told councillors. Gibson Park, however, provides the needed room, tree cover and some natural elements that make it ideal. The WMC location remains on option for a skateboard park to be discussed in next year’s budget. The mother of Kate, a

three-year-old girl with Angelman Syndrome, a rare neurogenetic disorder, Kelly Meissner said she hopes to see work on the playground begin in the spring now that funding is in place. Two of the grants Kate’s Kause received had time limits attached to them: the recently receive $60,000 grant from Aviva Insurance has to be put to use by year’s end, while $25,000 from The Keg has a June deadline. With the current budget, work can proceed on the playground, she said, adding fundraising will continue for the splash pad. “We’re really excited about all of the possibilities coming out of here,” she said of the process, noting the project would be staged.

Tourism: Wellesley told to balance the charm but not overwhelm

ogy Triangle, and academic partners like the University of Waterloo, Wilfrid Laurier University, Conestoga College and local high schools to better understand those connections and to develop strategic plans. For more information, visit www.wrtmc.org.

» JAMES JACKSON

area – a challenge Desjardins is up for. “I’m very much from the school of sustainable tourism; you don’t want a horde of tourists coming into this idyllic setting, which is why people move here in the first place.”

The tourism corporation is constantly improving their ability to track where visitors come from, where they spend their money, and the types of experiences that they are looking for, and has aligned with municipal and regional groups, the Canada Technol-

– of all abilities – integrated into one place,” said Coun. Julie-Anne Herteis. As well, Coun. Allan Poffenroth suggested the township look at integrating accessibility elements into all future plans for playgrounds in the township. Kate was diagnosed with Angelman Syndrome, a neurological disease affecting some one in 15,000 people, characterized by a severe global developmental delay. People with AS can have little or no verbal skills, poor gross and fine motor skills, and possible seizure and sleep disorders. However, Angels do have a unique characteristic: they have a happy, pleasant demeanor with a wonderful smile and contagious laughter.

PHOTO

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 04

The local group is working with California-based non-profit Shane’s Inspiration, which has helped build a series of universally accessible playgrounds. The goal is to provide a common area for kids of all abilities to do what kids do best: play. Her presentation Feb. 7 included a short video about Shane’s Inspiration and the work it does. The organization will be providing some $50,000 of in-kind support, including the services of a landscape architect and outreach support to bring the message to the public such as talking with students at area schools. Plans for the park received a hearty welcome from councillors. “I love the idea that we can get all the kids

WHAT’S IN STORE MCC’s Cheryl Swartz holds just some of the clothes that will be available for sale at the organization’s teen night sale on the evening of Feb. 21.

MCC: Teens set to get thrifty > CONTINUED FROM PG. 03 their initiatives in Ontario, and around the world. “I think teens are very globally-minded and they want their money to go to others too, even though they’re getting something for themselves,” she said. “I think they are much more conscious of things like that than we ever were when I was a teenager.” In the past year, MCC has delivered funds and materials to relief efforts in Somalia and

Ethiopia as Somali refugees have fled their country because of famine and civil strife, and MCC aid workers are stationed in more than 50 countries around the world. Closer to home, MCC recently sent blankets, hygiene kits and relief supplies to the Aboriginal community of Attawapiskat after news of that community’s poor living conditions surfaced, and for two weeks in February MCC Ontario will send certified trades people to the community to

help build modular homes. The 14 thrift shops that MCC operates in Ontario form the backbone of the organizations ability to provide such aid, with those shops bringing in about $2 million in net revenue – $500,000 of that from Elmira alone. The MCC teen night is Feb. 21 from 6-10 p.m. with the shop closed an hour beforehand to set up for the night. For more information call 519-669-8475 or visit http://thrift.mcc.org.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

Flood risk low as winter remains at bay

9 NEWS

GRCA not idle, however, as it rolls out new terminology for warning systems James Jackson

I

n an effort to clear up possible confusion surrounding their flood alert terminology, the Grand River Conservation Authority and other conservation authorities across the province has updated those terms, effective Feb. 15. The GRCA issues three levels of flood messages, and the change applies to the first two levels. The first was previously known as a High Water Safety Bulletin but it is now called a Watershed Condition Statement and it is further sub-divided into two categories: water safety statements about possible danger from melting ice or unsafe banks, and flood outlook statements which provide early notice about the potential for flooding. The second level of warning was previously called a Flood Advisory but is now a Flood

Watch. This is issued if flooding is a possibility in specific watercourses or municipalities, and emergency services and individual landowners in those floodprone areas should be prepared. The third level, Flood Warning, remains unchanged. This is the most serious type of message and is issued when flooding is imminent or already occurring. “In everyday language a bulletin seems more important than an advisory, but in our flood message language it was reversed,” said GRCA communications manager Dave Schultz of why the changes were made. Schultz was also a member of the committee that spearheaded the changes, which have been in the works for about a year. The new terminology falls in line with that used by other weather agencies, such as En-

NO RISK HERE A lack of snow and ice this winter means the flood risk remains low along the Grand River watershed, including the West Montrose Covered Bridge. The GRCA has also updated its flood terminology, effective Feb. 15. vironment Canada and the Weather Network, which use “watches” and “warnings” for severe weather such as tornadoes or winter storm warnings. Monitoring weather and flood conditions is a shared responsibility of conservation authorities and Ministry of Natural Resources, but prior to the changes, some conservation authorities used different terms for the same types

of messages, which led to some confusion. “We want to clarify the whole system by going to the language that people are accustomed to seeing,” said Schultz. In 2011 the GRCA issued eight watershed condition statements (formerly known as bulletins); five flood watches (formerly known as advisories); and seven flood warnings, the majority of

which were related to the snow melt periods from January to March, but two warnings were the result of the heavy rainfall in November and December. So far in 2012 the agency has issued two flood watches along the Lake Erie shoreline, and Schultz said that if the warmer-than-usual winter continues, flood activity could be fairly tame for the duration of the spring – but that

outlook can change rather quickly. “We have to remind people that there is still a lot of winter left and there have been times in the past where we’ve had a major melt in January and we accumulate more through February and March, so there is still that potential that we could get a lot of snow. “We never make forecasts about the future.” The new terminology comes into effect on Feb. 15, the same day that the GRCA will gather all of the flood coordinators from the varying municipalities to discuss the new language. Flood messages are posted in the newsroom section of the GRCA website, www. grandriver.ca. The public can also receive flood messages directly through e-mail or Twitter. Information on how to sign up for the services is also available on the GRCA website.

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OPINION 10

THE OBSERVER

OPINION

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

Wouldn’t it be a pleasant surprise if next year our taxes stayed the same or even went down? Gordon Haywood letter on page

12

VERBATIM

T

he problem with the Canadian economy is not too much government debt or too big a deficit, but weak consumer demand and low productivity resulting from a growing gap in income distribution and too many people prevented from contributing to the economy to their full potential because of poverty and unemployment.

>>Dennis Howlett of Canadians for Tax Fairness points out debt needs to be tackled not only with austerity but with recovery of massive revenue loss due to corporate tax cuts

THE MONITOR

M

ore than half (53 per cent) of Canadian families have changed the timing of major purchases - such as a car, household appliances or vacation spending - due to current economic conditions. Almost half (47 per cent) expect that their family will spend less on such purchases in the upcoming year.

>>RBC Canadian Consumer Outlook

EDITORIAL

Consumer debt a symptom of much larger issue

T

he good news is some of us are starting to tackle our record levels of personal debt. The bad news is that debt has been fueling our economy – two-thirds of it based on consumer spending. The good news is we’re saving more. The bad news is we’re not really optimistic about the future. And we have no idea what that will mean as the economy continues to struggle. Canadians have lost confidence that the national economy or their personal financial situation will improve any time soon, according to a report released this week by RBC. Just under one-third (32 per cent) of Canadians indicate they feel positive about the outlook for the domestic economy over the next year, down from 43 per cent in January 2011 and nearly half the number who said so in January 2010 (56

per cent). Only 36 per cent say they believe their own financial situation will improve, compared to 38 per cent in 2011 and 45 per cent in 2010. The RBC report finds that while Canadians, on average, have reduced their personal (non-mortgage) debt, more than half (57 per cent) don’t have any savings set aside for an emergency/rainy day, unchanged since the last quarter. Personal debt is now down to $11,729 compared to $13,020 last quarter. In addition, when it comes to their personal finances, 46 per cent feel they are “standing still” rather than getting ahead, compared to last year. Consumers are, however, taking action about the state of their personal finances. Over the next year, almost one-third (31 per cent) intend to focus on reducing debt and spending less, 22 per cent plan to

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Joe Merlihan, Publisher | EXT 107 jmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Steve Kannon, Editor | EXT 103 skannon@woolwichobserver.com James Jackson, Reporter | EXT 101 jjackson@woolwichobserver.com Colin Dewar, Reporter | EXT 102 cdewar@woolwichobserver.com

> LETTER POLICY

save or invest more, and 23 per cent intend to take all of those actions. Easy credit and low interest rates have fueled the borrowing, which last year reached an all-time high of $1.5 trillion, but it’s our spending habits that have got the better of us: bigger homes, new cars, electronic toys and so on. Our wants are limitless, while our ability to pay for them is not. Worse still, our real incomes and net worth are in decline, meaning we’re borrowing just to maintain the status quo. So, even as household debt climbed by 13 percentage points relative to our incomes, we had less than we did last year. Although residential real-estate assets increased, this was more than offset by the decline in the value of our investment in stocks (including mutual funds) and our pensions: the Standard and Poor’s/Toronto

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Stock Exchange composite index fell by more than 12 per cent during the last quarter of 2011. Per capita household net worth declined to $180,100 in the third quarter from $184,700, the sharpest quarterly reduction in stock prices and per capita household net worth since the fourth quarter of 2008, reports Statistics Canada. Caught between falling incomes and growing household debt, we’re using borrowed money to finance day-to-day expenses rather than consumer goodies. Clearly debt is a problem at the individual level, just as it is with governments. The key to changing the situation rests not only with cuts and austerity – we should, however, be saving for the future – but with seeing actual economic growth that moves us away from a dependence on consumerism as its fuel.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

New form of meat production would help with population growth, warming

F

our decades ago Norman Borlaug, accepting the Nobel Peace Prize for his work on raising crop yields worldwide (the “green revolution”), said: “I have only bought you a forty-year breathing space to stabilize your population.” In 1970, when Borlaug got his prize for postponing the onset of famine for 40 years, the world’s population was 3.7 billion. Today, it is 7 billion. The U.S. Census Bureau expects only two billion more in the next 34 years, and we might actually stabilize the population by the end of the century – but we will have to feed almost three times as many people as there were in 1970. How on earth can we do that? Actually, you don’t need to panic right away. The UN’s Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO) recently estimated that the extra people can be fed, at least until we hit 9 billion, if crop yields rise by one per cent a year and the world’s farmland expands by 13 per cent. There is enough potentially arable land for that, although it would involve cutting down the forests over an area the size of South Africa. Grain yields probably can go on rising at one per cent a year if we manage irrigation and fertilizer use much better than we do now. And if the grain production expands, so does the meat production. This takes no account of the ecological damage done by removing even more land from the natural cycles, and it omits details like the looming collapse of most of the world’s big fisheries. Given the frequent forecasts of doom by overpopulation, however, it is a surprisingly reassuring assessment.

THE VIEW FROM HERE

International Affairs GWYNNE DYER But this is a forecast that ignores the probable impacts of global warming on food production, and those will be dire. In some places a hotter climate will actually increases food production, but in far more places crop yields will fall. The rule of thumb is that we will lose 10 per cent of global food production with every rise in average global temperature of 1 degree C (1.8 degrees F). Since we are virtually bound to see an increase of 2 degrees C before global average temperature stops rising (if it does), that’s one-fifth of world food production gone. It will be considerably worse in some places. In India, for example, a rise of 2 degrees C means a 25 per cent loss of food production. In China, it will probably be worse than that. And a crash in food production doesn’t just bring hunger. It brings chaos: collapsing governments, waves of starving climate refugees crossing borders, even wars between countries that depend on the same river for irrigation water. Military planners in many countries think that this may be the dominant factor in world politics in 25 years’ time. That will make it even harder to get global agreement on measures to stop further warming, so they are

making contingency plans for really ugly outcomes. But what if you could make food production independent of climate? Specifically, what if you could make meat production independent of climate? Don’t use 70 per cent of the world’s agricultural land to grow grain that feeds the animals we then kill and eat. Just grow the meat itself, taking stem cells from a cow, a sheep or a chicken and encouraging them to grow in a nutrient solution. It’s already being done in labs, but the quantities are small and the meat is still a long way from having the taste and texture that would make it a real candidate to replace meat from live animals. But those are details that can be sorted out with more research and more money. The point is that this could allow people to go on eating meat without trashing the climate in the process. People are not going to stop eating meat: demand is going up, not down. But if “cultured” meat can be made identical in taste and texture to “real” meat from animals, and if it can be grown in large quantities at a competitive cost, the ecological benefits would be immense. The political benefits might be even greater. If half of the meat people eat was “cultured,” greenhouse gas emissions would drop sharply (about one-fifth of global emissions from human sources come from meat production). About half the land that has been converted to grain-growing in the past century could be returned to natural forest cover. The > SEE DYER ON PG. 12

11 OPINION

THE VOICE

What is the worst Valentine’s Day gift you ever received?

One year I didn’t get a Valentine’s Day present. >>Meg Hovey

I got a break up poem one year, that was the worst. >>Justin Greenland

BY SCOTT ARNOLD

I have never received anything bad. I have liked all the gifts I have received.

>>Hollie Lair

Looking for a don’t-worry-be-happy-message, Woolwich officials come up with the ideal candidate for the job. After all, who doesn’t love Kool-Aid?

I have never received a bad gift. >>Thomas Coyle


OPINION 12

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

No sustainable future in a Fort McMurray economy B

lame it on corporate greed. Or maybe on out-of-touch unions. Either way, 450 workers at the ElectroMotive Diesel plant in London have joined the growing ranks of the unemployed. In isolation, what happened there is a shame. Looked at in perspective, it’s a microcosm of what’s plaguing our economy. The company, owned by U.S. giant Caterpillar through its subsidiary Progress Rail Services, says it needed wage concessions of 50 per cent to keep the plant going. Shortly after locking out the workers, it announced plans to shutter the building, moving production to its new facility in Indiana, which just happens to have adopted right-to-work (i.e. anti-union) legislation. Reaction to the news essentially falls into two camps: one says the company’s only goal was to drive down costs despite making huge profits last year, the other says unions got greedy, opting for no jobs instead of those paying half of the $35 an hour previously paid to workers. Leaving aside arguments that the owners never had any intention of continuing to run the operation long-term after acquiring EMD in August 2010, the real issues at play are free trade and globalization. Caterpillar argues it can produce the locomotives at the U.S. plant for less than half the $35 an hour it pays to workers in London. Though the parent company made record profits last year ($4.9 billion), there’s more money to be made by slashing costs. Nothing new there: shareholder returns – and large management bonuses – are the priority. Having gained concessions from Indiana, the company can simply ramp up production at the new facility and ship product north as needed. With facilities in Mexico, China and India, low wages are clearly an issue for EMD.

From the Editor Steve Kannon The closure is the latest in a long line of hits taken by Ontario’s manufacturing sector, which was already suffering from the high value of the dollar and, especially, free trade agreements that had hollowed out industry here even before the Wall Street-created financial collapse. While some facets of the economy improved last year, for instance, manufacturing wound up 2011 with a string of job losses, including in the plastics and rubber, computer and electronics sectors. In fact, across the country employment in factories fell to its lowest level since Statistics Canada began collecting data in 1976. Summing up the manufacturing sector, Avery Shenfeld, chief economist at CIBC World Markets, paints a bleak picture. “Productivity gains are a positive story, but the sadder story is that Canada has been pricing itself out of manufacturing as resource industries’ success drives up our currency. The world is beating down our door for our resources at a greater rate than for our manufactured goods. “Unfortunately, the combination of sluggish growth beyond our borders and a still-elevated Canadian dollar doesn’t give much promise to manufacturing as a source of employment growth.” As new Census data released this week by StatsCan show, there’s a correlation between the declining in manufacturing in Ontario and growth out west, where the resource-extraction industry is booming. Similar gains, though less notable, have been seen on the East

To the Editor, „„ I am writing to you to express my alarm and dismay over the 5.25 per cent tax increase that Woolwich Township council has just passed. This increase is just for the township and does not include anything for the Region of Waterloo, which will be in addition. Inflation in Canada as of December 2011 was 2.3 per cent, so how the members of council can justify an increase that is almost twice inflation is incredulous to me. I am retired, and my company pension has not increased for 10

of 25 per cent in earnings, implying a loss of about $10,000 a year for a typical manufacturing worker. As a result of the recession, even the growth in poorly-paid service jobs has been unable to keep up with manufacturing losses, at time driving up the overall unemployment rate. The remedy? More of the same failed policies that are in part responsible for the mess we’re in: trade agreements, corporate tax cuts and a focus on resource exports, as evidenced by the likes of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce and Canadian Manufacturers & Exporters. That focus may help sell unprocessed bitumen from the tar sands in Alberta – shipped off to be processed elsewhere, and sold back to us a finished products – but it’s not a sustainable arrangement, especially as Alberta holds on to little in the way of royalties, a common problem with resource extraction across the country. In the rush to blame the workers for EMD’s decision to shut the plant – there’s been a fair bit of CAWbashing in the blogosphere – it’s important to remember the lack of sustainability before simply recommending the unemployed move to Fort McMurray.

Dyer: Deep pockets needed > CONTINUED FROM PG. 11 famines and wars that would come with global food shortages could be postponed for decades, and even the warming itself might be stopped. “Cultured” food may be commercially available in only a few years if the research is pushed hard. Indeed, the animal welfare group PETA has offered a million-dollar prize for anybody who can demon-

strate lab-made meat in commercial quantities by June 30 this year, and they think that one of the research teams now working on the problem may claim the award. But it isn’t being pushed fast enough. “There is very little funding,” Professor Julie Gold, a biological physicist at Chalmers Technological University in Gothenburg, Sweden, said in a recent newspaper interview. “What it needs is a crazy rich person.”

TRAVEL AROUND THE WORLD

LETTERS

Tax increase is unacceptable

Coast where oil and gas are in play. With the decline of value-added manufacturing, we are in danger of regressing to our age-old role of hewers of wood and drawers of water. Well, that and the purveyors of service jobs, as that is where much of what passes for employment growth has been. Low-paying, parttime jobs with few if any benefits are increasingly the norm. Manufacturers in this country have shed some 300,000 jobs in the past decade or so. Everything from higher labour costs to red tape and a strong loonie have been blamed for the crisis. It’s cheaper to make goods in China or Mexico, so that’s where those intent on short-term gains go to do business. The workers displaced by plant closures – offshore transplants or recession-invoked bankruptcy, it doesn’t matter – find themselves looking for work in a tough environment. Those lucky enough to find another job typically take a pay cut, reducing buying power and ultimately contributing to the overall economic malaise. Another Statistics Canada study shows that those Canadians thrown out of work by closures and mass layoffs who find other jobs suffer an average decline

years, and will likely never increase, yet politicians at all levels of government seem to think that there is an endless supply of money in the public arena that they can access. Well, I say enough is enough. Rather than simply raising taxes to cover increased expenditures, perhaps our elected officials should instead direct township staff to cut their planned expenditures and also to make some improvements in the efficiencies of their operations. Wouldn’t it be a pleasant surprise if next year our taxes stayed the same or even went down? I live in hope that something will change for the better.

>>Gordon Haywood, Conestogo

How do you really feel? Send a letter to the Editor.

SOUTH AMERICA Dusan and Maureen Cizman of Bamberg are working on their bucketlist which included a trip to South America this past Christmas. It’s a big place with lots to do but they managed to snap a few moments to enjoy the news back home and share with the locals.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

13 BUSINESS

BUSINESS

Cut out for her own business With Generations Salon in Elmira, Krystal Strauss felt the time was right for a new venture

Colin Dewar

H

PHOTOS

» COLIN DEWAR

airstylists are the new bartenders. People open up sitting in the chair, telling all kinds of stories about themselves and their neighbours while they are pampered and getting their hair cut. For Krystal Strauss, owner of Generations Salon in Elmira, the gossip and small talk are just part of the job. Strauss opened her new salon, located at 63 Arthur St. S., Unit 3, on Feb.1 after working for over eight years in the industry at different salons. With help from her family she renovated and redesigned the space to make it a more w e l -

EYES ON THE PRIZE Opting to head out on her own, Krystal Strauss opened a new hair salon downtown Elmira on Feb.1, with an open house scheduled for today (Saturday).

coming atmosphere. Strauss attended the Voila Institute for hairstylists and after graduation started working at Voila until she realized she was better suited in a small-town rather than as a big city stylist. Four years ago she moved into Elmira and began working at a local salon. “I just decided it was time for me to get out and do it on my own. It is really the only way a hairstylist can make money,” said Strauss. In this current economic climate it would seem a difficult task to open a business in a town with so many salons already established, but Strauss knows the key to a successful venture: people seek beauty, and are constantly looking to improve what they have or give themselves a whole new look. People enjoy being pampered by stylists as they cut their hair or shape their eyebrows, all for a few bucks. An hour in a chair in a salon and one emerges confident and ready to take on the world. “Everyone needs their hair done. Everyone feels good about themselves after their hair is done. A lot of people get their hair cuts before vacations so they look nice and of course there are a lot of wedding parties that need their hair done as well,” said Strauss, adding hairstylists have an advantage over estheticians because esthetics are a want whereas a haircut is something that you need. Strauss admits she can’t just depend on the vanity of people and believes being a young entrepreneur is an advantage as she is willing to go that extra mile for her clients. “I open early and stay late and work around their schedules. I have a big clientele base already from my previous work at a salon, and I am willing to grow. I also offer modern looks and use up-to-date technology in colouring hair.” She frequently attends seminars

to keep on different styles and techniques used in the industry. “Long hair is coming back again, but instead of it being long and straight it is long with the Hollywood curl that is fashionable for women in the area. A year or two ago the bob was very popular and I see that coming back around again. It really never goes away, it just gets tweaked a little for every generation,” said Strauss. “For men I find that they are growing their hair a little bit longer and I am seeing a lot more side parts even with styles like the faux hawk, everything is off to the side.” At her salon Strauss uses MoroccanOil products and she is pleased to be a vendor of the product. The company has decided to only select a few salons to sell their products, which will be known as Elite salons. “It is quite the honour. I do have to follow their price structure, but it is a great seller for me,” she said. “They thought I would be beneficial as I am a new salon.” Currently the business has a mixture of clients’ young and old, men and women, hence the name of the salon: Generations. With haircuts starting at $29 for women and $18 for men – with children’s prices ranging from $5 to $15 depending on their age – Strauss said she is staying very competitive in the market. Although she works alone she is looking to hire another stylist very soon to keep up with the demand of her current customer base and new walk-in clients The salon also sells accessories as well, including scarves and feather hair extensions. “You have to be able to offer whatever new trends are in fashion to stay on top.” Today (Saturday) the salon is holding an open house for anyone wishing to drop in. Wine and cheese and cake are being served and tours of the salon being offered. Each client will also receive a 10 per cent discount coupon and their names will be put into a draw to win MoroccanOil gift.


BUSINESS 14

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

Big food producers get the spotlight in global trade W

e’ve been told China is a hungry country looking for partners to help feed it. Canada, a country heavily dependent on exports, is emerging as an important player in this quest. China has the ways and means to pay its bills, and represents a superb opportunity for North American farmers. It’s becoming increasingly aggressive in wanting to sign food-related deals with the western world. Although it claims to be about 95 per cent self-sufficient in grains, its agricultural trade deficit grew by almost 50 per cent last year, as its population grows interested in an increasingly varied and healthy menu. Among its new interests are pulses – peas and lentils among them, which despite having been around forever are becoming renowned for their exceptional nutritional benefits. Canadian farmers grow the world’s best pulses, and last year Pulse Canada, the progressively minded commodity group representing these crops, began collaborating with the Chinese Cereals and Oils Association to pursue new product development using pulses.

Food For Thought Owen Roberts Pulse Canada says Canadian and Chinese researchers are now working together to introduce pulses into Chinese staple foods such as noodles, steamed breads and dumplings, as well as snack foods and meat products. Last week, Canada and China signed a new memorandum of agreement – in which education, agriculture, science and technology were specifically mentioned – to increase the connection between the two countries, opening even more doors for development as the two countries drive towards a potential free trade agreement. At the signing of the memorandum, Prime Minister Stephen Harper said the rapidly increasing commercial, cultural and scholastic ties between our two countries are creating new jobs and economic growth. Indeed, this is a hot market and a growth area that

Canada does not want to miss. China is also investing in its own agricultural research and development initiatives. Last week, China Daily newspaper reported that the country, in its first major policy announcement of the New Year, revealed plans to boost spending on agricultural science and technology. One way or another, China will meet its needs. Canada is wise to be there as a partner in helping it do so. But what will it take beyond memorandums of agreement? First, Canadian farmers need to be able to operate in an environment that supports farming and food production. Researchers need funding to come up with new approaches to turn commodities into food products. And companies need to be able to pursue product development on a scale that they might not be familiar with. Pulse Canada’s Peter Watts talks about a growing interest in health and nutrition among China’s burgeoning middle class, and says pulses offer an ideal solution for food manufacturers looking to offer healthy foods. However, Canada may not be up

to the challenge when it comes to food manufacturing. At the same time Canada was signing the deal with China, Guelph’s George Morris Centre and a group called the Institute for Competitiveness and Prosperity released a study saying Canada’s food processing industry must grow larger, rather than stay segmented in small operations and niches. According to the report, “with greater scale of operations, [Canadian] food processors would be able to improve their cost performance and invest in areas like technology and [research and development] necessary for greater innovation.” It says Canada’s food processing industry represents the single largest market for Canadian agricultural products, yet Canada has a “propensity” for smaller facilities and firms which limits growth, investment and innovation, particularly compared to our biggest competitor, the U.S. Small food producers who serve local markets provide a lot of jobs and products, and need support as well. Their market is much different than China … but this week, all eyes were certainly focused overseas.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

LIVING HERE The bluebird of happiness alights on his shoulder

15 LIVING HERE

Murray Schlueter surprised, honoured to be named Wellesley’s Citizen of the Year James Jackson

G

AT HOME OUTDOORS Schlueter has a passion for the outdoors, one that started on his family

PHOTOS

» JAMES JACKSON

rowing up on a dairy farm just outside of Linwood, Murray Schlueter walked to school every day. It was the early 1950s – long before parents had any qualms about their kids walking on their own – and for Schlueter it was quicker to cut across the fields than to go along the road. One spring morning he happened to see a pair of bluebirds feeding their babies in an old apple tree, and a day or two later, he saw another pair of the bright birds also feeding their young. That chance encounter sparked an interest in bluebirds and a passion for the environment, a passion that continues to this day and is a major reason why Schlueter has been named as Wellesley Citizen of the Year by the Board and Trade.

back in 1974, and is presented annually to a Wellesley resident in recognition of outstanding achievements and unselfish contributions to their fellow citizens, and for nearly 50 years the Wellesley and District Board of Trade has provided a forum for community minded individuals and businesses to combine ideas and talents to enhance the quality of life in the village. Schlueter, 73, takes over from last year’s recipient, Ron Futher. The organization opens the nomination period for two weeks and solicits nominations from the community at large – though the exact number is kept under wraps, along with the names of the other nominees and the people who nominated them. According to the president of the Wellesley Board of Trade, this year’s

dairy farm and was stoked by his father, Pembrooke, and his care for the woodlot. He’s been tending to bluebirds for decades. “I’m flattered and honoured,” said Schlueter of the award while sitting on the couch in his Wellesley home earlier this week. “It was an absolute surprise when I got the call two weeks ago. I had no idea.” The award was first handed out

choice was a difficult one – as it is almost every year. “Their years of service, their accomplishments, and what the nominators say are all key to the award,” said Jeff Quint. “Murray was the most deserving

IT’S HIS YEAR Linwood native Murray Schlueter has called the Village of Wellesley home for the past 40 years and his involvement in the community has culminated in being named the Wellesley Citizen of the Year by the Board of Trade. this year. It’s like a people’s choice award: it’s for the community and chosen by the community.” Schlueter and his wife Beth have called the Village of Wellesley home since 1972. Schlueter was the first employee at Tughan Express, which handled the air freight moving to and from Waterloo Region, Fergus, Elora, Stratford and Guelph, and he worked there for 15 years before moving on to Erb Transport, where he worked until 2002. He has taken a deep interest in the wellbeing of Wellesley since moving back to the community, and has been actively involved in all aspects of the village, including the Wellesley and District Horticultural Society; the Wellesley Board of Trade for 22 years, serving as president in 1984 and 1985; he worked with his wife as coordinator of the Wellesley Home and Garden Show from 2007-2010; he remains an active member of the Wellesley-North Easthope Fall Fair, where he served as president and is now first vice-chair; he is a member of the board of directors for the Huron-Perth Woodlot Association, as well as the Stratford field naturalists, and a former member of the Wellesley Community Centre board. In 2009, Schlueter’s life-long dedication to returning the bluebird from the brink of extinction was recognized when he was the recipient of a Grand River Conservation Authority Watershed Award.

He still maintains 50 bluebird boxes throughout the region and estimates that he helped 42 baby birds take flight last year. “Why would a person get involved in everything I have? It just feels good if you can make a contribution, and be a part of the community,” he said. His passion for stewardship and the environment likely goes back to his days as a farm boy, where his father Pembrooke took great care of their 14-acre woodlot. “That’s what I miss about the farm the most – the woodlot. And I’m outdoorsy; I like to fish, I enjoy walking in the woods,” said Schlueter. “The outdoors is important to me, and it’s all in here,” he added, pointing to his heart. In the past 40 years he says he has seen many changes in the village, “a lot of growth,” and he hopes that the people moving to the community can do more than simply turn it into another bedroom community – instead, he hopes they become as involved as he and other Wellesley residents have been to continue to make it a better place to live. Schlueter was recognized as citizen of the year at the annual Board of Trade Valentine’s Day ball Friday night and he was joined by his wife, his two daughters Krista and Karen, and his granddaughter Julia. For more information, visit www. wellesleyboardoftrade.com.


LIVING HERE 16

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

A baked spud makes a great side dish, but also shines on its own

S

ometimes it’s not about the ‘main’ course or the meat in the center of the plate, but rather the side dishes and accompaniments that go along with the meal that one can get excited about. The baked potato is just that side dish. So simple and easy, but prepared perfectly we could have a baked potato (or two!) just on its own for dinner.

The important thing is to use the correct type of potato. Potatoes fall under two categories: waxy and starchy. Waxy potatoes are higher in sugar and lower in starch. They are perfect for when you want a potato to keep its shape, such as for potato salad or home fries. Examples of waxy potatoes include thin-skinned red or white potatoes, new potatoes and even new crop Yukon Gold potatoes. Starchy potatoes contain a higher starch content and much lower sugar content. They are used for french fries, baked and roasted potatoes and even mashed potatoes. Types of starchy potatoes include the russet potato, sometimes referred to as a baker’s potato or an Idaho potato. Again, depending on the age, the Yukon Gold potato can fall under the starchy category. For the perfect baked potato, keep it simple … to start. Then the possibilities are endless.

From The Chef's Table Kirstie Herbstreit & Jody O'Malley Start with a Russet potato. Scrub it well and then bake it. Avoid wrapping the potato in foil – this never makes sense to us, as all this does is steam the potato in the foil and you don’t get any crispy outer skin, which is some of the best part of the baked potato. If you’re in a rush, an initial 6-8 minutes ‘steam’ in the microwave can speed up your final baking time in the oven or on the BBQ.

with salt. This will give the crust a fantastic taste and texture; Bake for 45 minutes to 1 hour, or until fork tender; Enjoy your favourite way (i.e. with butter, salt, pepper and sour cream) or see below for some inspiration. Avocado and Tomato Potato Top hot baked potatoes with a mixture of diced avocado, chopped tomato, salt, pepper and cheddar cheese. Classic Bacon Top hot baked potatoes with cooked bacon, but try finding a

piece of ‘double smoked bacon’ at the farmers’ market, dice it up yourself and fry it. Veggie Potato Try using up leftover steamed vegetables, such as broccoli, asparagus or green beans. Chop them up and sauté in a little butter; top potato with veggies and a little feta cheese.

>>Chefs Kirstie Herbstreit and Jody O’Malley are both

Red Seal certified chefs. Together they run The Culinary Studio, which offers classes, demonstrations and private dinners. To contact the chefs, visit their website www.theculinarystudio.ca.

Perfect Baked Potatoes (for 4) >>4 medium to large size russet potatoes >>1 tbsp Olive Oil or soft butter >>1 tsp Kosher salt Pre-heat oven to 325; Scrub potatoes well, and then prick them all over with a fork; Rub potatoes with oil or butter and then rub the skins all over

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OUT AT NIGHT The 1st Elmira Cubs travelled to Laurel Creek Conservation Area Feb. 7 to learn about owl calls. The mating season of the barn and screech owls is in full swing and evening conditions were right to catch a glimpse of these local nocturnal birds. Cubs left the area without spotting owls, but did learn more about their habitat. Cubs broke into groups to pick through owl droppings with tweezers to find bones from former meals.


THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, February 11, 2012

17 LIVING HERE

SUDOKU

THE CROSSWORD

HOW TO PLAY: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. You already have a few numbers to get you started.

  

 





  

 

  



 

   

 

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ACROSS 1. Sagan of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cosmosâ&#x20AC;? 5. French novelist Pierre 9. French: white is ___ (in the masculine form) 14. Dog with a blue-black tongue 18. Bank 19. Beehive, e.g. 20. A participant in a rave dancing party 21. (in India) a native nursemaid who looks after children 22. That is, in Latin 23. Cleave 24. Biscotti flavoring 25. 100 centavos 26. Official document giving details of a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s birth 29. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gotten ___ you?â&#x20AC;? 30. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Get ___!â&#x20AC;? 31. ___ wrench 32. ___ bread 34. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ehâ&#x20AC;? 37. In or relating to the retina of the eye 40. ___ Verde National Park 42. Greatly exceeding bounds of reason or moderation 43. A rural area where farming is practised 46. Pudding fruit 47. Departed 48. Bolivian export 49. Kuwaiti, e.g. 51. The thing named or in question 52. Far from ruddy 54. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Turtleâ&#x20AC;? poet 56. An associate degree in nursing 57. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Little ___â&#x20AC;? 59. The basic unit of money in Romania 61. abbreviation for: reduced instruction set computing, 62. Smooch 63. Reddish-brown 67. The feeling when something burdensome is removed 74. Airport pickup 75. A planet seen just before sunrise in the eastern sky 76. Calendar span 78. Cartoon bear 79. Beautify 81. Bank claim 83. E.P.A. concern 85. Sclerosis of the arterial walls 92. Calf-length skirt 93. It holds water 94. Welfare, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;theâ&#x20AC;? 95. Ancient city NW of Carthage 96. Frosts, as a cake









































































 







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15. Howler 16. Brewerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s equipment 17. Shout, as if with joy or enthusiasm 18. Ballot abbr. 27. Links rental 28. Apartment 33. An end to sex? 34. Aug. follower 35. Eurasian primrose with yellow flowers clustered in a one-sided umbel 36. Bowl over 38. Sign of the infinitive case 39. To or toward the inside of 40. Informal term for a mother 41. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ and the King of Siamâ&#x20AC;? 44. Blood carrier 45. Center of a ball? 50. A specialist in gynaecology 53. Draconian 55. Reason to close up shop 57. Branch 58. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bye nowâ&#x20AC;? 59. Ancestry 60. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Back in the ___â&#x20AC;? 62. Convention V.I.P. 64. Band booking 65. Friendly

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SPORTS 18

THE OBSERVER

SPORTS

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

Kings come out on top of netminders’ duel for 4-3 win

PHOTO

» COLIN DEWAR

Tight contest against Hurricanes thrills fans with exciting final two minutes of play

A BUSY NIGHT Guelph netminder Taylor O’Keefe denies Elmira forward Andrew Smith during second period action at the Dan Snyder Arena on Feb. 5. The Kings would go one to beat Guelph 4-3. Colin Dewar

M

ichael Hasson was the Kings’ hero Sunday afternoon. But the goaltenders were the real stars. Elmira goaltender Nick Horrigan and Guelph Hurricanes puckstopper Taylor O’Keefe put on a display of unforgettable skills in front of 668 fans at the Dan Snyder Arena. Hasson ended the goaltending battle, firing a wrist

shot to beat O’Keefe with just a minute remaining in the game to give the Kings a 4-3 win. “The opportunities were there and we had a couple of things that we wanted to focus on that created a lot of our shots,” said Elmira head coach Dean DeSilva. “I give Guelph full credit: they made most of their opportunities.” Elmira came out flat in the first period, which allowed Guelph to draw first blood

during a man advantage on a goal by Chris Zubac with an assist from netminder O’Keefe. Cash Seraphim, however, tied the game when Lukas Baleshta circled the net with the puck, drawing out O’Keefe. A quick chip to Seraphim allowed him to easily tap in the equalizer. Defenceman Brodie Whitehead would give the Kings the lead heading into the first intermission when he was fed the puck by Baleshta and fired a one-timer that struck

Guelph’s Chad Bauman in the leg before bouncing into the net. Scott Nagy would collect the other assist. Returning to the ice for the second period, Elmira again had a sleepy start, allowing Guelph’s Shane Kinsella to tie the game at 6:51. “We were a little soft in our own zone and soft at our blue line – we have to be stronger than that,” said DeSilva. “We have to do a better job of supporting our zone and not leaving too early and

keep the back pressure on which will help our defence. We have a young defence and they have come along way.” With the teams tied 2-2 early in the second, Guelph’s Chris Taylor one-timed a pass from the top of the crease, but Horrigan flashed the right pad to keep it out. Not to be outdone, O’Keefe came up with a mammoth diving glove save off Elmira’s Brett Priestap with sev-

> SEE KINGS ON PG. 21

Injuries plague Jacks as they drop five in a row Team set to finish off the regular season with two games on home ice this weekend Colin Dewar

A

slew of injuries and two more losses last week have pushed the Wellesley Applejacks’ losing streak to five. The Ayr Centennials blew open a close game Feb. 2 with a three-goal second period en route to a 6-3 victory

over the Jacks at the North Dumfries Community Complex. The next night while visiting the Travistock Braves the Jacks were on the wrong end of a 6-2 final score, managing only 13 shots on net. Despite the losses, the team remains in fifth-place in the conference stand-

ings. “The problem was that we had so many injuries in the second period against Ayr that we lost an entire line. We had eight guys out and we really missed them on the ice. The rest of the team did the best they could,” said head coach Kevin Fitzpatrick.

The Jacks started well against the Centennials, potting the first two goals of the game. Corey Way scored early in the first period at 3:45 with Connor McLeod and Rob Hinschberger collecting the assists. Ten minutes later Brett Vickers would give the Jacks an early lead. But it was down-

hill from there as the team suffered injuries, including James Mildon, Vickers and Mitch Metzger. Ayr managed to score two goals to tie the game before the first intermission and would return to the ice in the second period scoring three more.

> SEE JACKS ON PG. 23


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

19 SPORTS

Come on baby, lint my fire

R

ecently, I was reading yet another book on wilderness survival. This is something I do whenever I feel the need to find needlessly difficult ways to solve simple problems. The book I was reading advised me that dryer lint was a great material to have on hand in a survival situation because it makes excellent tinder. This, of course, is a useful thing to know should you ever find yourself hopelessly lost in a laundromat. Not that this has ever happened to me. OK, I’m not ashamed to admit that it has happened. And, somewhere between the spin and rinse cycles, I went through the entire gamut of human emotions before finally settling on abject panic. Luckily, the history of lost people has a proud tradition of this, so I don’t feel so bad. Take the Donner Party, that

Not-So-Great Outdoorsman Steve Galea most famous American example of survival gone wrong. They also panicked, just prior to resorting to cannibalism. And, as they demonstrated, panic leads to horrible outcomes. I’m sad to say that, during those dark hours in the laundromat that my panic caused me to read Golf Digest. I’ll leave it to God to decide what’s worse. The point is, at times like this, panic makes you do uncharacteristic things; horrible, unspeakable acts that you are not proud of and hope to one day forget. But – and this is the good news – if you happen to have a bit of dryer lint on you, things will turn out just fine.

If only I had known that back then. Look, as someone who has started at least two fires with nothing but dryer lint and a full load of laundry, I can attest that lint really works. This, more than anything, is why I now insist that all those who travel with me in the outdoors must carry six pounds of dryer lint or, failing that, a fully functioning dryer. This is a very important safety measure. You see, if you don’t have dryer lint on hand, you are going to have to find it in the wild – which, of course, is not as easy as it sounds. In any case, my new policy has already provided immediate survival benefits. The simple act of me insisting that my companions carry dryer lint means that I now always travel alone – and that means that my provisions go a lot farther. It also saves countless others from getting lost. But that’s almost beside the

point. Because of that book, I now know that if I ever forget to pack life-giving dryer lint, I would likely find myself searching, among the countless birch trees and spruces, for a reliable, flammable material to pour lighter fluid over. Oh sure, I have heard tales of people starting fires the oldfashioned way – without dryer lint – but having read several survival books, I am now quite skeptical of such outlandish claims. This has also caused me to wonder whether ancient man had to use belly button lint – and, if so, how many of them had their tummies needlessly charred before someone determined that you could remove the lint before starting the fire? As a side note, I’ve also wondered if this is how manscaping was discovered. Let’s hope not. Sadly, these thoughts – and Golf Digest flashbacks – are what keeps me up at night.

Lady Lancers come up just short in battle against St. Mary's STOP THAT PUCK

PHOTOS

» COLIN DEWAR

EDSS goaltender Heather Bauman makes a save during second period action against St. Mary’s High School at the Dan Snyder Arena on Wednesday. (Inset) Lancer Tori Freeman makes her way around an opponent. EDSS lost 4-3 to the visiting team.

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SPORTS 20

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

INDIAN RIVER DIRECT Renegades get the upper hand on Lancers

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senior girls’ volleyball team faced off Tuesday against the Waterloo Collegiate Institute at the EDSS gymnasium. The Lancers lost all three games 25-15, 2517, 25-23. The two teams would meet up again on Thursday for the WCSSAA girls' volleyball playoff qualifying match at WCI. PHOTOS

» COLIN DEWAR


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

21 SPORTS

A GAME OF INCHES Cash Seraphim (above) makes his way around Guelph’s Chad Bauman during third period action. Below left, Bauman checks King Andrew Smith into the boards. Below right, Smith is robbed by Guelph goaltender Taylor O’Keefe.

PHOTOS

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 18 en minutes remaining in the frame. Horrigan continued the game of whatever-you-cando-I-can-do-better with his own incredible glove save, stoning Taylor once again with five minutes remaining on the clock. O’Keefe was magical in the second period stopping 19 shots until Andrew Smith, who had been antagonizing the keeper all period, beat him with a chip to the stickside, giving the boys in green a 3-2 lead heading back to the room. The third frame was a hard-fought battle for both teams that saw many chances easily stopped by the two goaltenders. O’Keefe continued to showcase his talent as he stopped 17 shots in the period. Priestap sent a cross-ice pass to Riley Sonnenburg, who crushed a one-timer just

» COLIN DEWAR

Kings: Solid goaltending battle decided in action-packed final push

two minutes in but O’Keefe slid across the crease to make the save. It was a sign of things to come as O’Keefe made a pair of glove saves during an Elmira surge, robbing both Smith and Sonnenburg once again. Guelph would make the contest interesting with less

than two minutes to play when Baleshta was sent to the box for a slashing call. Pulling their netminder and giving them a 6-on-4 advantage, the Hurricanes would beat Horrigan when Kinsella fired a wrist shot high left to tie the game 3-3. That is when the Elmira fans turned up the volume

and started chanting “Go Kings Go,’ and 13 seconds later the Kings would pot the winning goal when Brett Catto passed to Brady Campbell as he skated down the ice into Guelph’s zone and slipped the rubber to Hasson, who fired a beautiful wrist shot that eluded O’Keefe on the blocker side.

Horrigan stopped 21 of 24 shots for the win while O’Keefe stopped 55 of 59 for the Hurricanes. With seven games to go in the regular season, the Kings are third in the Midwestern Conference with a record of 34-9-1. Brantford (37-6-3) leads, followed by Stratford (37-8-0) who face off against the Kings on Friday night. DeSilva was pleased with his team’s win and is preparing for the Kings’ playoff run. “Our goal moving forward to the playoffs is that we want to do those ordinary things better than everybody else, the things that teams take for granted like getting the puck out, being stronger on our blue line and finishing our checks. We need to be doing a better job on those than any other team.” The Kings play at home against Waterloo Sunday. Game time is 7 p.m.

ON THE LOOSE Guelph defenceman Mark Bell pins Elmira forward Brett Priestap to the ice as goalie Taylor O’Keefe tries to clear the puck during second period action.


SPORTS 22

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

Something Special with the Kings Next weekend sees rematch against Woolwich Wolves Special Olympics floor hockey team James Jackson

T

» JAMES JACKSON

PREPARING FOR A REMATCH The Woolwich Wolves Special Olympics floor hockey team faces off against the Sugar Kings Feb. 18 at Woodside Bible Fellowship. Left, James Howells runs down the floor and takes a shot against goaltender Ryan Martin (above) during their regular Wednesday night game. Right, Paula McGuire tries to get her team back into the match.

PHOTOS

he Elmira Sugar Kings are accustomed to lining up against opponents who would like nothing more than to pound them into the ice. Next Saturday, however, they’ll be matching up against some of their biggest fans as members of the Kings will be playing against the Woolwich Wolves Special Olympics floor hockey team at Woodside Bible Fellowship, located at 200 Barnswallow Dr. in Elmira. This will be the second time that the Kings have played against the Special Olympic athletes, and the Wolves’ head coach says the team is looking forward to the rematch. “A lot of our athletes attend the Sugar King games quite regularly, and they look up to them so much,” said Darren Martin prior to the team’s weekly game on Wednesday night. “Ever since the last time we played the Kings they’ve talked about it a lot,” he added with a laugh. The team normally heads to a tournament this time of year to play against other Special Olympic athletes from across the province, but Martin said this year they wanted to try something different and stay a little closer to home, adding that it would be a “fun and memorable” day for the athletes who idolize the Kings. The Special Olympics have been in Elmira since the mid90s, and now boasts about 50 athletes who play sports ranging from floor hockey and bowling in the winter, to baseball in the summer. About 17 regularly attend the floor hockey matches at Woodside, and while they do focus a little bit on skills and drills, the majority of the night is spent playing intersquad games against each other.

“It’s great for them. This is often the highlight of their week, and it’s good for them to get some exercise running and moving, but even just playing,” said Martin, adding that the players, who range in age from teenagers to middle-aged adults, can be just as competitive as other

athletes. “It can get quite heated, just like the Sugar Kings,” Martin said, “but we always shake hands at the end.” The event next Saturday gets started at 10 a.m. with an opening ceremony and an hour of drills with the Kings. Then, the Wolves and

the Kings will faceoff for an hour-long matchup. At noon, a pizza lunch will be served, which will be free to all participants and $1 per slice for fans and observers. At 12:45 p.m. the Kings will play against the staff and elders of Woodside, and at 1:30 p.m. the Wolves will take on

the Woodside staff. Finally, from 2 to 2:30 there will be a pick-up game of floor hockey for anyone who wishes to participate. Martin encourages anyone from the public to come out and cheer for their favourite player, and to enjoy the day’s events.

Kings support Teens for Jeans program at game Sunday James Jackson

F

ans heading to the Elmira Sugar Kings game tomorrow (Sunday) to watch the Kings take on the Waterloo Siskins should remember to bring an extra pair of jeans with them. They’re not to change in to should you spill your

ketchup, but to donate to the Teens for Jeans clothing drive that wraps up that day. This is the fifth year of Teens for Jeans, the brainchild of clothing company Aeropostale. They’ve collected more than 1.5 million jeans that have been donated to the homeless,

and any size, brand, colour, or style will do as long as they’re in good condition. For Nancy Zajac, the Aeropostale store manager at the Conestoga Mall and an Elmira resident, recruiting the Kings to help out was an easy decision. “I know how big the Kings

are around here, and they have a really big heart.” Zajac said that her store collected 850 pairs of jeans during last year’s Teens for Jeans clothing drive, and she hopes to collect 1,000 this year. Zajac also said that Kings general manager Paul Jennings issued a challenge

to Siskins players and fans to bring a pair of jeans as well to help boost the number of donations. “He’s been super supportive.” The puck drops at 7 p.m. and volunteers will be located throughout the Woolwich Memorial Centre to collect donations.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

23 SPORTS

SCORECARD TWIN CENTRE NOVICE LL #2 - GIRLS FEB. 5

Twin Centre 3, Woolwich 2 Goals: Emily Krueger x2, Megan Jantzi (Emily Krueger) WOOLWICH ATOM B - GIRLS FEB. 5

Woolwich 3, Cambridge 1 Goals: Delaney Douglas x2, Hannah Petrosino (Mya Brubacher, Hannah Carr, Jade Lipczynski, Sydney Detweiller, Ali Harnock)

TWIN CENTRE ATOM LL 7547 - GIRLS

Twin Centre 2, Waterloo 0 Goals: Briony Jantzi, Olivia Bolender Shutout: Kylee Zacharczuk FEB. 5

Waterloo 2, Twin Centre 1 Goals: Olivia Bolender (Jordyn Torti)

TWIN CENTRE PEEWEE B – GIRLS FEB. 6

Twin Centre 1, New Hamburg 1 Goals: Leah Sebben (Lauren Quehl) WOOLWICH BANTAM BB - GIRLS FEB. 3

THE SARAH TOURNAMENT, ERIE PA

West Seneca 1, Woolwich 0 FEB. 3

Woolwich 1, Ancaster 0 Goals: Cora Kieswetter (Meghan Martin, Claire Hanley) Shutout: Megan Harron FEB. 4

Bluewater 3, Woolwich 1 Goals: Cora Kieswetter

TWIN CENTRE MIDGET LL #1 - GIRLS FEB. 6

Twin Centre 3, Waterloo 1 Goals: Sarah Van Allen, Jessica Dunbar, Sarah Miltenburg (Jill Sebben, Janessa Heywood, Samantha Haid) WOOLWICH TYKE (MINOR NOVICE) SELECT - BOYS FEB. 5

Centre Wellington 5, Woolwich 1 Goals: Mitchell Hartman (Sebastian Garrett, Tyler Brezynskie) WOOLWICH NOVICE LL #1 - BOYS FEB. 4

Woolwich LL #1 3, Woolwich LL #3 1 Goals: Ben Fretz x3 (Nolan Williamson x2, Ben Moyer) WOOLWICH NOVICE LL #4 - BOYS FEB 4

Paris 5, Woolwich 4 Goals: Simon Shantz x2, Dustin Good x2, (Lucas Radler x3, Thomas Hill-Ring, Daniel Kelly)

FEB. 5

Beverly 6, Woolwich 1 Goals: Simon Shantz (Oscar Fitch, Daniel Kelly) WOOLWICH NOVICE AE - BOYS FEB. 4

Woolwich 3, Flamborough 3 Goals: Danny Soehner x2, Evan Roth (Cameron Leonard) FEB. 5

Elora 4, Woolwich 3 Goals: Evan Roth, Connor Waters, Danny Soehner (Danny Soehner, Andrew Weber)

WOOLWICH ATOM LL #1 - BOYS FEB. 4

Woolwich 1, Embro 1 Goals: Matthew Brubacher (Kyle Deyell) TWIN CENTRE ATOM LL #2 - BOYS FEB. 3

Beverly 3, Twin Centre 2 Goals: Nathan Brideau, Hayden Martin (Nathan Brideau) FEB. 5

Twin Centre 6, Paris 1 Goals: Nathan Brideau, Dawson Stevenson, Nathan Brideau, Linden Jantzi, Conall Gillett, Linden Jantzi (Hayden Martin x2, Conall Gillett, John Buddinger) WOOLWICH ATOM LL #2 - BOYS FEB. 4

New Hamburg 7, Woolwich 3 Goals: CJ Sider x3 (Matthew Radler, Tanner Mann) WOOLWICH ATOM LL #3 - BOYS FEB. 5

Woolwich 5, Ayr 0 Goals: Simon Zenker x2, Nathan Kocher, Sulivan Keen and Nathan Maier (Nathan Maier and Eric Martin) Shutout: Liam O’Brien WOOLWICH ATOM LL #4 - BOYS FEB. 4

Woolwich 4, Plattsville 0 Goals: Jesse Martin x2, Ryan Martin, Benjamin Witmer, Cameron Martin (Jesse Martin, Ben Witmer, Ryan Martin, Cameron Martin) Shutout: Nick Lee TWIN CENTRE ATOM AE - BOYS JAN. 29

Twin Centre 2, Plattsville 0 Goals: Josh Hubert, Cameron Hoy (Tyler Zita, Alex Kaufman, Blair Bender, Curtis Butler) Shutout: Liam Robertson JAN. 29

Twin Centre 3, Plattsville 2 (OT)

Goals: Cameron Hoy, Ben Hayden, Brock Krulicki (Blair Bender, Curtis Butler, Josh Hubert, William Weber) FEB. 5

Twin Centre 4, Plattsville 3 Goals: Peter Holmes, Josh Hubert, Curtis Butler, Brock Krulicki (Caleb Wellman, Curtis Butler, Jack Koebel)

WOOLWICH MINOR ATOM AA - BOYS JAN. 21

Woolwich 6, Guelph 0 Goals: Mitch Lee, Brady Brezynskie, Keaton McLaughlin, Ryan Elliott, Dawson Good, Isiah Katsube (Keaton McLaughlin x2, Ryan Elliott, Lucas Huber, Trevor Ferretti, Brady Brezynskie, Isiah Katsube, Blake Roemer) Shutout: Simon Huber JAN. 22

Woolwich 5, Georgetown 1 Goals: Mitch Lee x2, Ryan Elliott, Connor Bradley, Isiah Katsube (Bret Allen x2, Nathan Taylor, Ryan Elliott, Lucas Huber, Brady Brezynskie) WOOLWICH MAJOR ATOM AA - BOYS FEB. 3

Woolwich 4, Flamborough 1 Goals: Josh Martin, Griffen Rollins, Jake Code, Mackenzie Willms (Brody Waters x2, Mackenzie Willms, Austin Cousineau, Owen Harnock, Lukas Shantz, Josh Martin) FEB. 4

Woolwich 2, Milton 0 Goals: Austin Cousineau, Jake Code (Kurtis Hoover, Josh Martin) Shutout: Cyrus Martin WOOWICH PEEWEE LL #1 - BOYS FEB. 2

Woolwich 1, Ayr 1 Goals: Devin Williams (Alex Metzger) FEB. 4

New Hamburg 3, Woolwich 2 Goals: Walker Schott, Ben Lenaers (Hayden Fretz, Noah Scurry) WOOLWICH PEEWEE LL #2 JAN. 20

Woolwich 6, Paris 0 Goals: Brendan Knipfel, John Wang, Max Bender, Tegan Schaus, Keean Dowdell, Nathan Horst (Noah Rawlinson x3, Mike Devries, Keean Dowdell, Tegan Schaus, Brendan Knipfel) Shutout: Terry Chau FEB. 4

Embro 3, Woolwich 1 Goals: Nathan Horst (Ryan Diemert, John Wang) WOOLWICH PEEWEE AE – BOYS

JAN. 28

Woolwich 2, Owen Sound 1 Goals: Earl Schwartz, Cade Schaus (Cade Schaus, Tim Mayberry, Alex Turchan, Earl Schwartz) JAN. 29

Woolwich 2, Centre Wellington 0 Goals: Mitch Rempel, Nick Campagnolo (Cade Schaus, Brett Henry, Alex Turchan) Shutout: Ryan Conrad FEB. 2

Woolwich 3, Waterloo 0 Goals: Benton Weber, Daniel Gallant, Cade Schaus (Cade Schaus, Tim Mayberry, Riley Shantz, Benton Weber) Shutout: Riley Weigel & Ryan Conrad

WOOLWICH MINOR PEEWEE A - BOYS JAN. 18

Woolwich 3, Dundas 1 Goals: Jordan Lee, Chase Mooder, Nolan McLaughlin (Liam Hartman, Jordan Lee, Kyle Bruder) JAN. 23

Woolwich 7, Georgetown 2 Goals: Austin Cousineau x3, Liam Hartman, Jordan Lee, Chase Mooder, Garrett Reitzel (Garrett Reitzel x2, Nolan McLaughlin x2, Cole Altman x2, Austin Cousineau) FEB. 7

Oakville 4, Woolwich 1 Goals: Sammy Huber (Justin Urhig) TWIN CENTRE PEEWEE REP FEB. 6

Twin Centre 4, Waterford 4 Goals: Troy Hemmerich x2, Joel Heise, Adam Runstedler (Evan Gowing x2, Mitch Esbaugh, Jess McLachlan) WOOLWICH BANTAM LL #1 - BOYS FEB. 4

Woolwich 7, New Hamburg 1 Goals: Alex Taylor x3, Connor Bauman x2, Nick Berlet, Jordan Luis (Nick Berlet x2, Jared Beacom x2, Liam Dickson, Vince Dally, Alex Taylor) WOOLWICH BANTAM LL #2 - BOYS JAN. 20

Lambton Shores 3, Woolwich 2 Goals: Mason Buehler, Isacc Fishbein (Joseph Hanley, Adam Elliott) JAN. 21

Woolwich 5, Tavistock 1 Goals: Luke Charter x3, Nathan Schwarz, Isacc Fishbein (Chris Taylor x2, Isacc Fishbein x2, Luke Charter) Brussels 6, Woolwich 2 5 Goals: Nathan Schwarz x2, Dylan Arndt, Luke De Corte, Luke Charter (Jeff Talbot,

Isacc Fishbein, Luke De Corte) JAN. 28

New Hamburg 2, Woolwich 1 Goals: Luke De Corte FEB. 4

Woolwich 8, Ayr 2 Goals: Luke Charter x4, Joeseph Hanley x2, Adam Elliott, Isacc Fishbein, (Jeff Talbot x2, Isacc Fishbein x2, Luke DeCorte x2, Spencer Anderson, Joseph Hanley, Adam Elliott, Nathan Schwarz, Dylan Arndt)

WOOLWICH BANTAM MINOR A - BOYS FEB. 4

Oakville 3, Woolwich 2 Goals: Ryley Cribbin x2 (Blake Doerbecker) FEB. 5

Oakville 4, Woolwich 1 Goals: Garrett Schultz (Ryley Cribbin)

WOOLWICH BANTAM MAJOR A - BOYS FEB. 4

Woolwich 4, Burlington 0 Goals: Cole Conlin, Matthew Leger, Harrison Clifford, Grant Kernick (Josh Kueneman x2, Scott Martin, Matthew Leger) Shutout: Thomas Vickers FEB. 5

Woolwich 5, Burlington 1 Goals: Matthew Leger x2, Grant Kernick, Josh Kueneman, Connor Peirson (Grant Kernick x2, Troy Nechanicky, Nicholas Pavanel, Jason Gamble) WOOLWICH MIDGET MINOR A - BOYS FEB. 5

Owen Sound 4, Woolwich 2 Goals: Tyler Seguin, Wes Martin (Adam Cook, Alex MacLean, Matt Lair) FEB. 4

Woolwich 3, Owen Sound 2 Goals: Tyler Seguin, Wes Martin, Bo Uridil (Jasper Bender, Alex MacLean, Jason Joostema, Johnny Clifford, Adam Cook)

WOOLWICH MIDGET MAJOR A - BOYS FEB. 3

Owen Sound 8, Woolwich 3 Goals: Logan White, Ryan Ament, Sebastein Huber (Matthew Scheick x2, Jordan Moore, Matthew Townsend, McKinley Ceaser) FEB. 4

Owen Sound 7, Woolwich 5 Goals: Brayden Stevens x2, Dalton Taylor, Matthew Schieck, Matthew Townsend (Nathan Playford x2, Justin Neeb, Logan White, Sebastein Huber)

Jacks: Coach hopes to have something like a full roster as season wraps up > CONTINUED FROM PG. 18 Ayr forward Andrew Richard would score his first of three on the night against Jacks netminder Josh Heer three minutes into the second frame. He then found the back of the net two minutes later to give his team a two-point lead. “We just lost control of the game. Our defence had a tough second period and when you are missing key players it makes it hard for the rest of the team,” said Fitzpatrick. Centennial forward An-

drew Tapsell sealed the Jacks’ fate by scoring the third unanswered goal of the period to give Ayr a 5-2 advantage heading into the second intermission. The Jacks returned to the ice more focused in the third period and scored when Tyler Eckert beat Ayr goaltender Lee Doherty seven minutes into the frame. Matt Sovereign and Chris Bauman collected the assists. But the Jacks were too far behind to make a comeback and all hope was lost when Richard scored his hat trick. Doherty stopped 29 or

32 shots for the win, while Heer stopped 32 of 38 for the Jacks. Things didn’t get any better the next night at the Travistock arena against the fourth-place Braves. Travistock scored six straight goals – two in the first frame, three in the second and one in the third – as the Braves dominated the Jacks. “Unfortunately we started that game with 13 players because of all the injuries from the night before. By the end of the game we had only nine players, but I have to give them credit,

they worked hard,” said Fitzpatrick. The Jacks finally managed to get on the scoreboard in the third when Eckert beat goaltender Luke Zehr at the three-minute mark. The Jacks would add another to the tally from Hinschberger to finish the game. Heer stopped 28 of 34 for the Jacks while Zehr blocked 11 of 13 for the win. With the playoffs looming the Jacks will need to find a way to break out of their current slump. “I am hoping to have about two-thirds of the

guys back on the ice before the playoffs. The injuries and guys getting sick just came at the wrong time for us, but I am sure we will be back in fighting form in time for the playoffs,” said Fitzpatrick. The Jacks face the task of ending its seasonhigh five-game losing streak when they’re back on home ice against the St. George Dukes Friday night and then face the Burford Bulldogs at the Wellesley arena on Saturday for the last regular season game. The puck drops at 7:30 p.m.


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DAVE MILLARD

Do you take a logical & systematic approach to problem solving?

LOOKING FOR EXPERIENCED HAIRSTYLIST For full-time employment at Expressions Salon in Elmira. Please email resumé to sarahedmond@ymail.com and include phone number.

ALTECH Drilling and Investigative Services 3217 Hemlock Hill Dr. Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z3

Ph. 519.664.3331 Fx. 519.664.3335

The #1 Weekly in the Region. HELP WANTED

M & G Millwrights has designed, manufactured and installed custom process & material handling equipment for the food, animal feed, aggregate and automotive industries since 1967. Dedicated to providing exceptional service and support to our employees and clients; we are currently seeking one individual to join our growing team.

MECHANICAL DESIGNER/DRAFT PERSON Responsibilities

• Production of detail drawing and bills of material for fabricated equipment • Liaise with in-house estimating, technical and shop staff • Assist fabricators and installers in solving problems

Requirements

• Must have throrough knowledge of drafting principles • Must have the ability to use 3D modeling software • Must be familiar with MS Office Applications • Experience with Solidworks an asset • Successful applicant will posses strong organizational • skills and attention to detail.

Qualifications:

• Graduate drafting apprentice/technologist or equivalent with related experience • Experience in a mechanical fabrication environment an asset Please forward resume to:

M&G MILLWRIGHTS LIMITED P.O. Box 247 Elmira, ON N3B 2Z6 Attention: Human Resources or Fax: 519-669-1450 or Email: bob@mgmill.com

We thank all applicants for their interest, but only those considered will be contacted.

HELP WANTED

WOOLWICH TOTAL HEALTH PHARMACY Part-time Pharmacy Technician required. Must have flexible availability including some evenings and Saturdays. Drop resume at 10 Church St. W. Elmira or fax resume to 519.669.8863 Attention: Samer Mikhail HELP WANTED

>>Downtown Elmira retail outlet looking for part time help. Call 519-591-3428 after 4:30 p.m. >>Established

Framing Company in KW area requires framers with a minimum of 1 year experience. Must have own transportation. Top wages offered to energetic and responsible applicants. Please call 519-656-9200.

Payables/Receivables Administrator Wintermar Farms/Cribit Seeds is seeking a candidate to fill the listed role. Core responsibilities include issuing and paying invoices, journal entries, preparing bank deposits along with bank reconciliation. Other duties would include inventory entries and general office support. Candidates need to show an attention to detail, have bookkeeping experience and adapt to changing demands that one would find in a small business office.

For a more detailed description contact Craig @ 519-664-3701 ext. 25 or craig@cribit.com. HELP WANTED

>>Rona Cashway Elora requires a full time driver/ yard person for driving, cutting, getting loads ready and customer service. Candidate must be flexible and able to work some Saturdays. A good background in lumber and building products would be an asset. Required also is a part time person that can work Saturdays for yard duty and customer service. Bring resume to Rona Cashway in Elora. >>Warehouse Manager required. Must have DZ licence, and lift truck operator’s certificate. Please fax your resume to 519669-3505, or email dvoll@ vollscontract.ca

WORK WANTED

>>Are

Your To “do list” too long? Weekends “too short?” Let me help or do it for you. Over 20 years experience in renovations, decks, fences, household maintenance. Call Rick 519-669-2130.

>>Experienced Mennonite cleaning lady. In Elmira area only. Call Darlene at 519-669-2285, evenings. TRAINING & LESSONS

>>Standard First Aid Course (includes CPR & AED). March 15 & 16. Student discounts available. For more information call or email Erin Miles 519-669-1747. e_l_miles@yahoo.ca or www.elmtraining.ca

100% Local.

HELP WANTED

Advance Millwrights Inc. has been serving the aggregate, feed mills, fertilizer, food & foundry industries since 1992. We are looking to add the following to our team of skilled employees:

• • • • • • • • •

CONSTRUCTION MILLWRIGHT (2-3 positions) Minimum 5 years experience License CFQ ticket or qualified experience (3 year apprentice) Stick welding experience & CWB Tickets Ability to read & follow blue prints & field sketches Must be mechanically inclined Ability to work with minimal supervision Trade experience with heavy duty equipment Trade experience in Agricultural, Industrial & Food plants Innovative & problem solver

We offer competitive wages, benefits & RRSP package. Please fax resumes to 519-669-4659 or email to brads@advancemillwrights.com FOR SALE

>>Frocks and Fabrics Spring fabric sale. February 20 - March 2. 519-846-9250. >>Legend 4 Wheel Scooter. Model #SC3400. New batteries, and charger and under carriage. Like new. Call 519-698-2107. >>Roasters

or Fryers for sale. Fresh or frozen. Also, chicken products. Call to order 519-698-2616.

FARM EQUIPMENT

>>Seed drill, JD 8350, 18 run combination, DD, $3,750.00. JD 1120 loader tractor, $6,900.00 Oliver 1800 diesel 3PH $4,900.00. 18.4-38 tractor chains $525.00. Dan Seifried, Harriston. 519-3382688. >>All Pet Apparel 30% to 50% Off! Creature Comfort Pet Emporium. Open 7 days, 1553 King St. N. St. Jacobs. 519-664-3366. www.creaturecomfort.ca

Material Handlers

Afternoon and Night Shift Positions Responsible to the Shift Foreman, you will contribute to the smooth flow of merchandise through the Distribution Centre by picking, packing, and performing other functions, ensuring health and safety regulations are adhered to. You are able to perform strenuous physical activities including walking, standing, bending and lifting, have excellent attention to detail, and good reading, writing, and number skills. High school graduation or equivalent preferred. Forward your resume, referencing “Material Handler” in the subject line, by Monday, February 27, 2012 to: Dayna Weber, Recruitment, Human Resources Department, Home Hardware Stores Limited, 34 Henry St. W., St. Jacobs, ON, N0B 2N0 E-mail: hr@homehardware.ca Ph: (519) 664-4975 (Microsoft Documents Only)

Are you self motivated self starter who takes pride in their work?

PETS

Our St. Jacobs Distribution Centre has the following opportunities...

RENTALS

hr@homehardware.ca

Is seeking a motivated individual to join our team. The ideal candidate would have experience in mechanics, heavy equipment/farm equipment repair, electrical or welding (or all of the above).

PLACING A CLASSIFIED AD | Classified ads can be obtained in person, by phone (519-669-5790), fax or email from Monday to Thursday 8:30am-5pm or Friday 8:30am-4pm. All classified ads are prepaid. Deadline is WEDNESDAYS by 4pm.

Commercial 20-Word Ad $12.00 (Extra Words 30¢/word)

ALTECH

ALTECH DRILLING AND INVESTIGATIVE SERVICES

» February 11, 2012

>>3 Bedroom house for rent in Drayton. Appliances included. $900/month + utilities. Available April 1st. Call 519-638-7781. >>HOME

FOR RENT in Elmira. Spacious 4 level backsplit semi. 3 bed, 2 bath, appliances included, central air, central vac, fenced backyard with deck/fence. $1450 +. 519-210-0142.

RENTALS

>>Recently Renovated 1 bedroom apartment for rent. Bloomingdale Maryhill area. Appliances included. $540/ month + utilities. Non smoker, no pets. Available March 1. Call Ron 519-501-3894. >>Wanted: Mature professional seeks apartment or house to rent in Elmira. Non smoker, no pets. Call 519-505-3059. >>Pain In The Neck, arms and shoulders? Backaches? Pain doing down legs? Trouble sleeping? Winter blues? Call today: 519577-3251. Grant’s Hands On Therapy. Elmira office or house calls. TRADES & SERVICES

>>Pet Transportation & Cleaning Services. Vacuuming, dusting and mopping. Reliable, honest and prompt. Wages negotiable. Bondable and police check. Call 519-208-2785. GARAGE SALES

>>Indoor Yard Sale. Saturday, Feb. 11, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. 47 Aspen Crs. Elmira. Household items, furniture and more! Many new and like new items. PRINTING & COPYING SERVICES

>>Black and white, 8 1/2 X 11 flyers designed and printed for as low as 6¢. Professionally designed, quick turnaround, local service. Delivery, folding and colour work also available. Call 519.669.5790 ext 107 for details.


THE OBSERVER

» February 11, 2012

25 CLASSIFIEDS

NOTICETO OWNERS OF LIVESTOCK

Woolwich Memorial Centre  24 Snyder Ave. S. Elmira, ON Œ 519.669.1647 ext. 7001 

Join us for an afternoon of  

Family Day February 20, 2012 

Activity!

     

Family Crafts  Public Skating ‐ FREE! 

To Apply for Compensation:

Family ZUMBA ‐ FREE!  Family YOGA ‐ FREE!  *Sponsored by the WMC Fitness Centre 

Skating   12 ‐ 12:50 pm              3 ‐ 3:50 pm   

* Sponsored by Elmira McDonald’s  

* Sponsored by Pumps Plus 

Family Shinny ‐ FREE! 

Swimming 1:15 ‐ 3:15 pm  

Ontario Wildlife Damage Compensation Program The Ontario Wildlife Damage Compensation Program was launched in July 2011. Through this program, the Township of Woolwich may compensate owners for the cost of livestock killed or injured by coyotes. Additional information is available at www.ontario.ca/predation. Farmers must have a valid Farm Business Registration (FBR) Number and Premises ID Number to be eligible for the program. Call 1-866-327-3678 for information about obtaining an FBR number. Call 1-877-424-1300 about obtaining a Premises ID Number.

Family Activities  (WMC Community Centre)   12:15 ‐ 1 pm   1:15 ‐ 2 pm          2 ‐ 4 pm   

NOTICETO RESIDENTS

Public Swim ‐ normal rates apply 

Hot Chocolate & Coffee Compliments of BADEN COFFEE  Popcorn Compliments of the WMC Concession  Hourly Draws for DOOR PRIZES from 1 ‐ 4pm! 

If your property is located in the Township of Woolwich and you have had livestock killed or injured by coyotes, report the situation to the Township within 48 hours. You must retain the remains of the kill for inspection by the Township’s Livestock Valuer. To notify the Township of damage to livestock, or to ask questions or request an information package, call the Township at (519) 669-6005 or (519) 669-6009.

TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the Township of Woolwich intends to adopt the following 2012 budgets as required by section 290 of the Municipal Act, 2001, as amended: • Tax-supported operating budget; • Capital budget; • Water budget; and • Wastewater budget; at its regular Committee of the Whole meeting on February 21, 2012 at 6:00 PM with final Council approval set for the Council meeting on March 6, 2012 at 7:00 PM. Both meeting will be held in the Council Chambers, Municipal Office, 24 Church Street West, Elmira. Richard Petherick, CMA Director of Finance & Treasurer

PLACES OF FAITH

HEARING ASSISTED

St. Teresa Catholic Church No God, No Hope; Know God, Know Hope! Celebrate Eucharist with us Mass times are:

Sat. 5pm, Sun. 9am and 11:15am

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

Trinity United Church, Elmira “Our mission is to love, learn & live by Christ’s teachings” Sunday Worship: 10:30 am Sunday School during Worship Minister: Rev. Dave Jagger

rm A Wlcaome We all! to

www.execulink.com/~unitedchurch/index.html Visit us at: www.wondercafe.ca 21 Arthur St. N., Church office 519-669-5560

Feb. 12 Building Bridges In Your Marriage

Zion Mennonite Fellowship Finding The Way Together

47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 www.thejunctionelmira.com

Series: Family Apps #6 - The “Live Grace-Filled Lives” App 5 First St., Elmira • 519-669-1459 www.elmiracommunity.org

Ron Seabrooke Discovering God Together

519-669-2319 | www.wbconline.ca 4522 Herrgott Road, Wallenstein

Sunday School at 9:30am Service at 10:30am REACH WITH LOVE. TEACH THE TRUTH. SEND IN POWER. 290 Arthur St. South, Elmira • 519-669-3973 www.ElmiraAssembly.com (Across from Tim Horton’s)

SUNDAY SCHOOL

The Gospel in the OT Blazing Serpents

- The Junction -

Sunday School - 9:30am Worship Service - 10:45am

Sunday, February 12, 2012 9:15 & 11:00 AM

SUNDAYS @ 10:30AM Services at John Mahood Public School

NURSERY PROVIDED

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

10:30am Worship Service 9:15am Sunday School Pastor: Richard A. Frey www.stpaulselmira.ca

27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593

Check the Observer for your local faith listings!

200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 Check out our website www.woodsidechurch.ca

.com

www.

Any photo that appears in the Observer and was taken by our staff is available for reprints. Visit us online for details.

REPRINT PRICING IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH

4x6...............$9 5x7................$11

8x10.............$15 11x17.............$35

Pick-up is free | Shipping charge is additional $2.00

Order a 2nd reprint of the same image for half price.

519-669-5790


CLASSIFIEDS 26

THE OBSERVER

» February 11, 2012

REAL ESTATE

Visit us at our NEW LOCATION! 3 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5426

Call for your

FREE Market E valuation!

OPEN HOUSES - 16 & 18 Wyatt St. Elmira | Saturday, February 11th. 2-4pm | Sunday, February 12th. 2-4pm CLOSE TO BEAUTIFUL NE W DOWNTOWN OPEN CONCEPT PR Elmira - This quality built, open Elmira - This quality built, open I CE concept semi. Built by Huron concept semi. Built by Huron homes in mature area. Close to homes in mature area. Close to

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

downtown, walking distance to restaurants and banks. Main floor laundry, spacious master with large closet and 4 piece ensuite. The double garage is 17.5ft x 20ft, perfect for storage, easily have parking for 3 vehicles between garage and driveway. Convenient separate side entrance.. MLS Call Paul direct.

Paul Martin SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-503-9533 www.homeswithpaul.ca

$299,900

$299,900

downtown, walking distance to restaurants and banks. Main floor laundry, spacious master with large closet and 4 piece ensuite. The double garage is 17.5ft x 20ft, perfect for storage, easily have parking for 3 vehicles between garage and driveway. Convenient separate side entrance.. MLS Call Paul direct.

$500.00 donation will be made with every home bought or sold by Paul in Woolwich.

$249,900

$453,900

MAKE YOUR MOVE!

MODEL HOME FOR SALE

Elmira - Looking for your first home? Look no further! This convenient home is full of personality. Close to downtown and bus route. Many updates including: mudroom at side entrance, kitchen updates, unique ceramic tile throughout and finished basement. Single garage equipped with separate workshop room. Back slider to fenced yard with large deck and shed. MLS Call Paul direct

Alli Bauman SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

Elmira - Meet “Olivia”, another fabulous home by Verdone. 2216sqft plus fin'd bsmnt. Many quality finishes some incl: Ceramic, Hrdwd, oversized trim & mf crown moulding. MF lndy, spacious LR, Dinette walk out to covered 16.4 x 9.4ft deck. Fabulous must see kit built for convienience, French drs to mf den. Lg master w/crown moulding, 2 walk ins, lg beautiful ens w/free standing tub & oversized glass shower. MLS Call Paul Direct

519-577-6248

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

A donation of $250.00 with any home bought or sold through Alli or Bill.

Bill Norris SALES REPRESENTATIVE

$749,900

HOBBY FARM ON 20 ACRES

Woolwich - Loc’d on 20 acres. Spacious 2400 sqft bungalow equip’d w/MF lndry, sep dr, huge fin’d bsmnt & walk up to garage. Open kit & FM w/wood fp. Master w/huge walk in closet & attractive slider to 3 tiered composite deck w/hot tub. 25x36 ft insulated, heated shop, 100amp w/bathrm & phone. 20,000 sqft 2 storey barn equipped for chickens or turkeys, currently empty. 17 acres of bush w/trail, mostly hardwood & poplar. MLS Call Paul direct.

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-588-1348

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

$624,000

COUNTRY SETTING WITH POOL!

West Montrose - On picturesque setting. Only 20 min to Waterloo. Spacious grand foyer w/curved oak staircase & french drs leading you to through this exceptional home. Complete w/sep DR, MF laundry, LR, FR& fin'd basement. Master w/FP, walk in closet & captivating ensuite complete w/stand up shower & corner whirlpool bath. Sit back & enjoy the lg deck overlooking inground kidney shaped pool w/brick privacy wall & country setting. MLS Call Paul direct.

BUYING OR SELLING?

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

3 Arthur St. S. Elmira • www.remaxsolidgold.biz OFFICE: 519-669-5426

DIRECT: 519-572-2669

BERT MARTIN, BROKER

EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

NE W

PR ICE

Call Bert For Your FREE Market Evaluation

BEAUTIFUL

3 year old with 3rd floor loft and view of countryside, 3 bathrooms, 3 bedrooms, walkout from dining room to new deck, walkout from basement to rear yard, new central air, master ensuite w/corner tub. Call Bert to view. MLS.

$370,000

COMMERCIAL OFFICE SPACE

Two adjoining offices in Multi-Tenant Plaza. Also 920 s/f unit consisting of two offices, reception area, kitchenette and bathroom. Located in busy plaza 10 minutes from Waterloo. MLS. Call Bert to view.

Your referrals are appreciated!

34 PINTAIL DRIVE, ELMIRA - $570,000

Desirable street in gorgeous Elmira. 4 bedroom home with quality updates & immaculately landscaped. Hardwood & heated floors, fin. rec room, open concept kitchen/family room, backing onto mature trees! MLS 1144603. Miranda O'Sullivan, Sales Representative, 519-742-5800 ext. 2025. Coldwell Banker Peter Benninger Realty, Brokerage 508 Riverbend Drive, Kitchener

YOU’VE COME TO THE RIGHT PLACE TO FIND A HOME. Coach House Realty Inc. Brokerage

159 William St., Palmerston

(Across from Home Hardware)

OFFICE PHONE: 519.343.2124

KATHY ROBINSON ***Broker of Record

519.292.0362

EDITH MCARTHUR

*Sales Representative

519.638.2509

coachhouse@wightman.ca I www.coachhouserealty.ca

YOUR DOLLAR WILL GO FURTHER HERE!

PRIVATE SALE

$379,000 61 Memorial Ave. ELMIRA Large 4+ bedroom family home on 1/4 acre lot. Shaded and fenced backyard, central vac, central air, large country style kitchen with island, den, main floor laundry, hardwood flooring, 2.5 bathrooms, hobby room, recreation room with in-floor heating. Large master bedroom with 2-man shower and walk-in-closet. Large deck, veranda, and heated garage (12x40). Comfree.ca #297197 or mls.ca #815012

519-669-1456 - dvm975@bell.net.

OPEN HOUSE SUN., FEB. 12, 1-3 | 58 Ridgeview Dr. Drayton 552 MAIN ST. PALMERSTON

NEW Impressive all brick bungalow w/walkout bsmt. 3 bdrms, 2 baths, great rm w/vaulted ceilings, gas fp & mantel, rich oak kitchen w/island, main floor laundry, central air & carpet free floors. Double garage w/basement entrance. House is maintenance free on an oversized lot with deck & paved driveway and Tarion Warranty. $349,900 Call: Edith 519.638.2509(h) 519.741.6791(c) MLS 1211587.

NEW LISTING! PALMERSTON 3 bdrm, 2.5 bath bungalow on nice lot w/double car garage. Home boasts galley kitchen, main floor laundry, separate dining rm w/walkout French doors to covered deck, bright, spacious living rm and oversized entrance/foyer. Lower level; features 28 x 26 rec rm w/built in oak bar, office, 3 pc bath, cold rm, storage rm & large utility rm. Perfect location, close to parks & amenities. $239,900 Call Kathy 519.292.0362 MLS 1214335.


THE OBSERVER

» February 11, 2012

27 CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE

Sunlight Homes ELMIRA REAL ESTATE SERVICES

Drayton Heights MODEL HOME OPEN EVERY SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 1-5PM

Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

When you buy or sell your home with us, part of our commission supports women’s shelters & violence prevention programs.

519-669-3192

BONNIE BRUBACHER Broker of Record

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

The Edge Semi-detached homes from

SHANNA ROZEMA Broker.

LAURIE LANGDON Sales Representative

MONIQUE ROES Sales Representative

WOW FANTASTIC LIVING SPACE!

BAMBERG/WATERLOO LIMITS

$799,900 LOCATION LOCATION. 3.74 acres bordering Elmira’s edge.

$1,900,000. PICTURE PERFECT SETTING. Secluded landscape of

$193,990

Choose from one of our plans or let us custom build your home fully detached. Homes starting

Estimated 4000 sq ft on main and 2nd floor. 2011 updates include kitchen, open concept dining and breakfast area. New ceramic flooring, some windows and garage doors. Spacious rec room/games rooms with cozy wood burning fireplace. Many outdoor features, inground pool, 32 x24 heated shop. Call for details. MLS

BEAUTIFUL & SPACIOUS

hills, pond and trees welcomes you this spacious ranch bungalow. 61 Acres of agriculture land, 1998 amazing shed and workshop. MLS

GREAT SINGLE DETACHED HOME EXCELLENT COMMERCIAL BUILDING!

from

$249,900 Many models to choose from Learn More About Sunlight Heritage Homes and Our fine communities by Visiting us Today!

Alyssa Henry

www.sunlighthomes.ca

519.787.0203

Broker Re/Max Real Estate Centre Inc.

Have a question? Email us at: info@sunlighthomes.ca

ELMIRA, $384,900. Tastefully decorated home, neutral colors, living room, oak kitchen w/island, pantry, & valance lighting, walkout from dinette to interlock patio w/built-in Pergola, fenced yard, shed w/hydro, 2nd floor family room w/gas fireplace & California shutters, 2nd floor laundry room w/built-in cabinets, master bdrm w/walk-in closet, 5 piece ensuite bathroom w/whirpool tub, heater & California shutters. C/V, C/A, water softener, stainless steel dishwasher & microwave included! You'll be impressed! Call to view. MLS

$314,900

BRESLAU. Excellent family neighbourhood. Close to schools and backs onto park. 3 bdrms, 3 bathrooms, walkout basement to fenced yard, attractive kitchen with 6 appliances included, walkout off dinette to deck, living room with gas fireplace, master with walk in closet and 4 pc ensuite. MLS

$229,900 ELMIRA. Many possible uses for the building zoned C-2, onsite parking, nice upper level 1 bedroom apartment with separate entrance & hydro, one street over from downtown, corner lot, gas furnace. Don’t miss this business/investment opportunity in an awesome LOCATION!!!! MLS

OPEN HOUSE

SUN., FEB. 12/12 2-4 P.M.

11 VICTORIA GLEN ST., ELMIRA VICTORIA GLEN - spotless raised bungalow across from protected parkland. 3 bdrm, 2bth. Roof (‘11). Furnace (‘11). C/air (‘11). Reno’d main bth w/granite & maple vanity. Rec. rm. Dble conctrete driveway. Quiet street close to public school. New MLS $304,900.

LEON MARTIN

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage | Independently Owned and Operated

COUNTRY LOTS .5 acre don’t miss this chance to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. Within 40 minutes KW, or Guelph. High speed internet is available with fibre optic. Starting at $68,000 MLS

Gorgeous home, 3 bedroom back split, on a large landscaped lot, with an awesome family room, eat in kitchen, 2 bath, central air, gas fireplace. $229,900.00 MLS Hobby Farm with 7 stalls and 7 individual pastures, brick bungalow with country kitchen, oversized recroom. $510,000. MLS Immaculate 2 bedroom bungalow, open concept, with game and recroom, watch wild life from deck, bird wachers paradise. Approx. 600 sq ft finished in basement. $305,000 MLS

SOLD

DOUBLE AD SIZE SHOWN.

De Married

45 Arthur St. S., Elmira

Brad Martin

Broker of Record, MVA Residential Res:

519.669.1068

Julie Heckendorn Broker

Res:

in an-Cron Hyndm

&

saries Anniver

Daddy, ummy, Love M nd Luke a

ys Birthda

AFFORDABLE CONDO - Why rent? 2 bdrm (extra-large master). 4 appl. Incl. Fin. rec. room & 2 pc. washroom. Laminate in L.R. Private patio backs to courtyard. Well maintained bldg. Private parking spot. MLS $143,500.

Brokerage

st Doe Happy 1 enya! Stag & for son ,L y e Atkin tt a in t d is h r t h r o C ch Bi Jesse S

iends mily & fr se ation, fa Hou In celebr d to an Open 11 te are invi , January 2, 20 Sunday 30 - 4:30 2: ip om fr Fellowsh ide Bible , at Woods arnswallow Dr. B . 200 Ontario Elmira,

WOODED LOT! - Spacious bungalow with full walkout bsmt. Recent hardwood on most of the main lfloor. 2 pc. ensuite. Fin. bsmt. with lovely stone fireplace. Updated windows, furnace & garage dr. Huge lot. EXCL. $359,900.

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD.

ADDRESS: 3 Arthur St. S., ELMIRA • DIRECT: 519-503-2753 EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net

iversary 0th Ann Happy 5 Rosie Baum96a0n 1 Abner & cember 31,

QUIET neighbourhood close to downtown. Large lot (backs to a park). Detached garage 24’x16’. Replacement doors & windows, cupboards, furnace and shingles. 3 bedrooms (2 w/hdwd. flrs.). MLS $219,900.

NICE OLDER HOME on the edge of town. Natural staircase, pocket doors. Oak kitchen & spacious dining area overlooking the deep yard. Family room and living room. 2 bathrooms. Some replacement windows. Detached garage. MLS Reduced to $219,900.

LET OUR 50+ YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WORK FOR YOU!

ry l are ve Nerdah Norma ounce the d n a n Bria to ann hter, pleased of their daug in, th 2010 er 11 , gement to David Cron b a m g n te e p 0am ay, Se ndman Cronin. Saturd 8:00pm - 1:0 ira Julie Hy im and Karen for all, Elm son of T lanned p g Lions H Band) bein ding is t. Jacobs. (Live r d e oo d w e e th Th in S $10 at July 9th Tickets

oes Stag & D

519.669.8629

519-669-2772

Tracey Williams Sales Rep.

Cell:

www.thurrealestate.com

519.505.0627

Whatever the occasion?

Celebrate it by placing it in the Observer’s Family Album.

ments Engage

IN PRINT ONLINE IN PICTURES IN DEPTH

SINGLE $23 2.475”x3.75”

DOUBLE $38 2.475”x3.75”

TRIPLE $48 3.7687”x3.75”

519-669-5790 info@woolwichobserver.com


CLASSIFIEDS 28

THE OBSERVER

» February 11, 2012

SERVICE PROS CARPET CARE

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

Renovating? Let us do the clean up

RENOVATION CLEAN UPS! Call for Details • Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location • Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off and Pick up Service • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair • Janitorial • Grout Cleaning • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping www.completecarpetcare.ca

ROB McNALL

519-669-7607

LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

MEDICAL TREATMENT

F. David Reimer

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications: ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102 MUSIC SERVICES

SEWING SERVICES

FOR THE MUSIC-LOVER IN YOUR LIFE

Sew Special

We’ll take your favourite albums, clean up clicks, pops and surface noise and enhance the overall sound of the recording.

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

FREE ESTIMATES

519-669-2251 36 Hampton St., Elmira

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

OFFERING A QUICK AND EASY WAY TO RECLAIM UNUSED LAND MANY APPLICATIONS:

• Industrial lots • Pasture reclaimation • Golf courses • Cottages • Trail maintenance & development • Real estate lots • Orchard maintenance • Ski resorts • Wooded lot thinning, etc.

Free Estimates In Home Consultations

More Info & pricing vinylp2cd@gmail.com

Over 20 Years Experience

519-669-0541 ELMIRA, ON

Lois Weber 519-669-3985 Elmira

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tions. “You can’t take it with you,” he added with a chuckle. Februaryof 11,cash, 2012 howevTHE OBSERVER The large»influx er, is no laughing matter and both ALBUM groupsFAMILY said they will make wise use of the funds. ANNIVERSARY “Like many of our programs the family violence prevention program tends to run with a little bit of a deficit and we don’t get funding from the ministry for preventative work,” said Kelly Christie, director of community support at WCS. She also noted that the donation coincides well with the fact that November is recognized as family violence prevention month. “This money in particular will go to support the women’s groups that we support.” This year marks the 20th anniversary of the program, and every year it helps about 100 women who are struggling with violence in their lives. It includes a fourCongratulations Mom & Dad, stage women’s group that meets

chase to help make that happen?” remarked James Bond. “Whether it’s more technology, or classroom resources, we have to decide.” Bond also knows that the money not only helps the school, but it will ANNIVERSARY indirectly help the entire region by producing better educated and more community-minded students. “There soand many things Auntieare Fern Uncle Jackthat our school community does to sup(Tabbert) port the Elmira community, and February 17, 1962 this will help support the school and allow us to do more of those things. “It’s a great way for him to give back to the community, and a great way for us to give back as well.” This most recent donation by Martin takes his four-year total past the $70,000 mark. He donated $10,000 to the Dan Snyder Memorial Arena in 2008, $8,500 to both John Mahood and Riverside public schools in 2009, $27,000 to KidsAbility in 2010, and another $17,000 this year for a grand total of $71,000.

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ANNIVERSARY

GET NOTICED

STAG AND DOE

GIVING BACK TO THE COMMUNITY Re/Max agent Paul Martin29has donated $8,500 to CLASSIFIEDS both Park Manor school and the Family Violence Prevention Program in Elmira, a sum of money greatly appreciated by Kelly Christie of WCS (above) and Park Manor principal James Bond (below). Martin donated $500 from every home sale in Woolwich Township in 2011 to the cause. BIRTH NOTICE BIRTHDAY

It's a girl!!

Our Little Miracle...Emily Beth Bauman was born Jan. 23 2012, 7lbs 3oz at McMaster Hospital in Hamilton. Thrilled parents Dwayne & Marcia (Brubacher) Bauman & big brother Evan, are so excited to be blessed with this precious little girl!! Proud Grandparents, Beth & Glen Martin (Elmira), Jim & Faye Brubacher (Heidelberg) & Erma Bauman (Hawkesville) Special thanks to our wonderful midwives, Gaby & Katy from St. Jacobs Midwifery & all the amazing doctors & nurses at McMaster!

ANNIVERSARY

STAG AND DOE

Happy 80th Birthday Helen L.(Stickney) Richmond!

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CLASSIFIEDS 30

THE OBSERVER

» February 11, 2012

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

THANK YOU

Diebold, Helen

The family of the late Helen Diebold would like to express their most heartfelt thanks to relatives, friends, neighbours and coworkers for the love and support during Mom’s passing. Your words of comfort, cards, flowers, donations and Mass Cards were greatly appreciated. Thanks to staff at Chateau Gardens, Bayshore Home Health and Dr. Michael Norris for the excellent care given to our dear mother. A sincere thank you to Dreisinger Funeral Home for your guidance and support, Father Jim Valk of St. Teresa of Avila and the CWL for the luncheon. The Diebold Family

“A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

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DEATH NOTICES

Cardlock Fuel Management

Gray, Grace

Peacefully passed away at Chateau Gardens LTC, Elmira on Friday, February 3, 2012 at the age of 90 years. Grace Gray, formerly of Guelph, is lovingly remembered by her daughter Carole Woods and her husband Art of Elmira, her grandson Steve Woods and his wife Wendy of Milton, and great-granddaughter Zoe. She is the last surviving member of her family and was predeceased by her mother Catherine Johnson, her brother Bill and sisters Molly and Sally. Grace was born in Scotland but immigrated to Canada with her family at an early age. She was always proud of her Scottish/Irish ancestry and brought a smile to everyone with her stories and sayings. The family will receive friends and relatives at 10 a.m. on Saturday, February 11, 2012 at Chateau Gardens in the Activities Room, lower level, with memorial service to follow at 11 a.m. Special thanks to all staff and residents at Chateau Gardens for your kindness and caring. As expressions of sympathy, donations may be made to Lions Foundation of Canada–Dog Guides or Chateau Gardens Auxiliary. Funeral arrangements entrusted to the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira. May the road rise up to meet you May the wind be always at your back May the sun shine warm on your face And the rain fall soft upon your fields And until we meet again, May God hold you in the palm of his hand.

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>>MARTIN, Lyle -

At Listowel Memorial Hospital on Sunday, February 5, 2012, Mr. Lyle Grant Martin of R.R. 3, Brussels near Ethel, in his 68th year. Local relatives are his siblings Glennis Koenig and her husband Maurice of Wellesley, Claude and Lynne Martin of Hawkesville, Jim Martin and his friend Helen of Linwood, Joyce and Cliff Freeman of Elmira, and Doreen and Ken Martin of St. Jacobs.

519.664.2008

>>SCHWINDT, Ruth - 1931- 2012 Passed away peacefully to

SANYO CANADIAN

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

be with her Lord and Saviour on February 1, 2012 at Chateau Gardens in Elmira. Of R.R. 1, Hanover, passed away on Saturday, February 04, 2012. He was 53. Local relatives are his sister Diane Schumacher and her husband Larry of Heidelberg.

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>>H.U.G.S. Program 9:15-11:15 a.m. Meet with other parents to discuss parenting and child health issues. Topic: What Can I Claim? Understanding Tax credits. Colleen Coglin, tax manager with BDO Canada LLP will present. Held at Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs. Call Heidi at 519-664-3794, ext. 237 for more information. >>The Breslau Recreation Association is holding it’s 1st Annual Breslau Winterfest on Feb. 10-12. Events include: “Wines of Winter” Tasting Event ($15/person), horse drawn wagon rides ($5/family), orienteering, outdoor games and familyfriendly activities, family movie night, community breakfast, skate on the mill pond, and a bonfire! For more information please visit breslau.org or contact breslaurecreation@woolwich.ca. FEBRUARY 11

>>Maryhill Knights of Columbus & CWL Valentine Supper at the Maryhill Community Centre. Doors open at 5 p.m. Two seatings, 5:30 and 7 p.m. Rolled ribs, mashed potatoes and all the fixings followed by coffee, tea and dessert. Tickets $15/adult, $7 for children 11 and under. Five & younger free. Advance tickets only. Mike Runstedler 519-648-3394, Doug Zinger 519-648-2939. >>Mamma Mia Italian Night, Trinity United Church. Lasagne, Caesar Salad, garlic bread, spaghetti and sundae bar for children under 10. Two seatings, 5 or 6:30 p.m.; $10 per adult, $5 children, family rate $25 (2 adults, 2 children). Tickets available at Read’s Decorating, Trinity United Church 519-669-5560 or at the door, great Valentine’s outing. >>Chocolate

& Elvis unforgettable Valentine’s celebration; 7 p.m. An evening with Doug McKenzie, award-winning Elvis tribute artist. Waterloo North Presbyterian Church. Come prepared for a freewill offering, refreshments extra. For more information call 519-888-7870. Wheelchair accessible.

>>Hungryman’s Breakfast in support of the Children’s Wish Foundation. Royal Canadian Legion, 11 First St. E. Elmira. 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.; $6, all you can eat. FEBRUARY 14

>>STEFFLER, Gary -

KIN KORNER Pamper Yourself For A Year Raffle

FEBRUARY 12

>>YATES, Leon - Suddenly, yet peacefully in his sleep at home, on Thursday, February 2, 2012, Leon Yates of Woodstock and formerly of Elmira, Guelph and Toronto, in his 67th year.

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

>>Tuesdays Feb. 14 – Mar. 6, 1-3 p.m. Craving Change, a four-week “how to” course that will help you discover why you eat the way you do, why you find it difficult to change your eating habits and what you can do to change those habits. Classes will be held at Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs. For more information call 519-664-3794. >>Bingo – 7 p.m. at St. Clements Community Centre sponsored by Paradise & District Lions Club. For more information contact Joe Brick 519-699-4022. FEBRUARY 15

>>Stamp

Camp – 7-8 p.m. at Elmira Branch Library. Join us for beginner stamp

woolwichkin.com collecting. Free for ages 5 to 15. Space is limited. Event will take place at the library, 65 Arthur St. S in Elmira. For more information call the Elmira Branch Library at 519-669-5477.

>>Waterloo Rural Women Day, Calvary United Church, St. Jacobs, 9:30 a.m. Speakers: Andrea Gal: “Rural Women a Hundred Years Ago”, Peggy Bauman: “Farm Family Dynamics,” Tea Lady: Peggy Schieck of Steep Tea. For more information call 519664-3794, ext. 237 or visit our new website www.waterlooruralwomen.org. FEBRUARY 16

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess. Elmira & Surrounding Area

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763 psgingrich@hotmail.ca

>>Weekly Bingo, 7 p.m. at Elmira Lions Hall, 40 South St., Elmira. All proceeds go to support the many projects of the Lions Club of Elmira. For more information call 519-500-1434. >>Living with celiac disease and wheat sensitivity; 10:15-11:15 a.m. This topic will be presented by Dr. Sue Fisher, naturopath/ pharmacologist. Held at Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs. For more information call 519664-3794. FEBRUARY 17

>>Games Night – 6:30-8:30 p.m. at Elmira Branch Library. Join us for a fun evening of board games. Play or watch great getaway games such as Atlantis, Settlers of Catan, Mississippi Queen, 10 Days in Africa and more! Just drop in – free event. For more information call the Region of Waterloo Library at 519-669-5477. FEBRUARY 18

>>The Gloryland Chorus presents “Great Gospel Favourites;” 7:30 p.m. at Floradale Mennonite Church. Fundraiser for Meserete Kristos College. Free-will offering. For more information call 519-669-2861.

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FEBRUARY 19

>>Jubilation Male Chorus, 7 p.m. Director Carol Giesbrecht; 50 members, 30 area churches, 15 denominations, one voice. Wateloo North Presbyterian Church. Freewill offering, wheelchair accessible. For more information call 519-888-7870. FEBRUARY 20

>>Elmira & District Horticultural Society presents: “How To Kill A Tree” with arborist Mike Hayes; 7:30 p.m., Trinity United Church, Elmira. Members free; visitors $2. new members welcome. Information: 519669-2458. FEBRUARY 21

>>Bingo – 7 p.m. at St. Clements Community Centre sponsored by Paradise & District Lions Club. For more information contact Joe Brick 519-699-4022. >>Gale Presbyterian Church, 2 Cross St., Elmira. Monthly Tuesday luncheon, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. Menu: ham and scalloped potatoes, garden salad, strawberry cheesecake, beverage, $9. >>Pancake and Sausage Supper at West Montrose United Church, 42 Covered Bridge Dr. West Montrose. 5-7 p.m. Free-will offering. All welcome.

PRINTING & COPYING SERVICES Black and white, 8 1/2 X 11 flyers designed and printed for as low as 6¢. Professionally designed, quick turnaround, local service. Delivery, folding and colour work also available. Call 519.669.5790 ext 107 for details.


THE OBSERVER

Âť February 11, 2012

31 CLASSIFIEDS

Roy G. Biv is somewhere over the rainbow Q.

Who is Roy G. Biv, and what name does he go by in Great Britain?

Home of the competitive handy men

Strange But True

A.

Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the U.S. acronym for rememBill & Rich Sones bering the colors of the rainbow-Red Orange Yellow Green Blue Indigo you to see a rainbow, you need to have Violet--which has also been the title your back to the sun. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once, on an of a couple of songs, says F. Ronald exam paper I marked,â&#x20AC;? jokes Young, Young in Fizzics: The Science of â&#x20AC;&#x153;the student wrote that the rainbowBubbles, Droplets and Foams. was on the observerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s backside!â&#x20AC;? In Britain, the mnemonic is â&#x20AC;&#x153;RichThere arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t many things ard of York Gave Battle in Vain.â&#x20AC;? we humans do 100 trillion But remember that in a double rain(100,000,000,000,000) times a bow, the colors of the secondary, year. Likely youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve made your weaker rainbow are reversed. own contribution to this one. Best times to see a rainbow are Contributed what? late afternoon and early morning, when the sun is not too high According to one recent (rough) in the sky. Yet rainbows are rarer estimate, some 3 million e-mails than might be thought: In any one are sent throughout the world every place in rainy England, there are second, making the daily total fewer than ten bright ones in a year. about 250 billion, or 100 trillion evRarer still are lunar rainbows, also ery year, reports â&#x20AC;&#x153;ScienceIllustratlow in the sky, requiring enough ed.Comâ&#x20AC;? magazine. Unfortunately, reflected moonlight to be visible. about 90% of these e-mails are If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re with a crowd of people on spam! Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hope youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re too e-cona rainy, yet sunny day, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be sursiderate to be part of that decidedly prised to hear someone shout, â&#x20AC;&#x153;A raininconsiderate contribution. bow!â&#x20AC;? and yet you see nothing. But if >> Send STRANGE questions to brothers you turn around, you may behold the M&T Businessarc CardofAd:Layout 1 04/03/09 Page 1 enthralling refracted light in10:22 AM Bill and Rich at strangetrue@cs.com the heavens. This happens because for

Q.

PHOTOS

Âť COLIN DEWAR

A.

THEY KNOW THE DRILL Cameron Loker (above) competes in the Saw by Sight Contest as part of the Contractor Skills Competition at the Home Hardware Tough as Nails Contractor Tradeshow held Monday at the Waterloo Memorial Recreation Complex. Jeremy Koutstaal (inset) participated in the Driver Drill Competition. The event attracted some 1,200 professional contractors.

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BACK PAGE 32

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, February 11, 2012

Snow or not, the show must go on as Linwood celebrates its annual Snofest FACES OF FUN The lack

PHOTOS

» COLIN DEWAR

of snow didn’t put too much of a damper on the annual Linwood Snofest held Feb. 4 at the Linwood Community Centre with Kricket the Clown making balloon animals (top left), Erick Traplin entertaining families with his music, and a hay ride. Zackory Bauman, 14, shows off his painted face and Alexandra Matthew, 4, (top right) gets adorned with a butterfly.

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DRESS PANTS

DRESS SHIRTS

50% TO 60% OFF 40% OFF 40% OFF 70% OFF

40% TO 70% OFF

50% OFF

50% OFF

CASUAL PANTS

MEN’S BUSINESS CASUAL SPORT JACKETS

DENIMS

50% TO 70% OFF

50% TO 70% OFF

50% TO 60% OFF

40% TO 50% OFF

SELECT Group

in Reduced gt s o Clear

W.C. BROWN & SONS MENS CLOTHIER • TAILORS • DRY CLEANING & ALTERATION SERVICES • COMPANY UNIFORMS

UPTOWN ELMIRA | T. 519-669-1152

www.brownsmenswear.com

STORE HOURS: Tues.-Fri. 9-6 Sat. 9-5

ALL SALES FINAL. EXCLUDES NEW ARRIVALS. NO LAYAWAYS. ALTERATIONS EXTRA.

Picking Now!

NEW CROP

BEEFSTEAK

TOMATOES

15 Days Juicy, vine-ripened, summer fresh flavour, ready SOON!

2191 Arthur St. N., Elmira 519-669-3154

February 11, 12  

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