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12 | 01 | 2012 VOLUME 17 | ISSUE 51

SOUP SISTERS A GOOD FIT WITH CULINARY STUDIO VENTURE PAGE 20

COMMENT PAGE 10

FUND INFRASTRUCTURE WITH CUTS TO BUREAUCRACY

Kings rack up pair of victories

The Elmira Sugar Kings banked four points with a pair of wins last weekend, including a 3-1 decision over the Brampton Bombers on home ice Sunday. Top, Jake Weidner battles for the puck. Above left, Matt Harding beats a Bomber to the puck. Above right,: Kings James Mildon and Craig Johnson close in on a Brampton puck-carrier. See the story on page 14. [CELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

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Woolwich council shifts tax target to a 2% increase Reduction in keeping with delegate’s plea for township to get its spending under control, rein in staff costs STEVE KANNON Saying that Woolwich residents have had enough of unsustainable tax increases, Coun. Bonnie Bryant this week led a charge that would see the 2013 tax hike limited to 2 per cent, down from the 4.3 per cent proposed last month. Instead of a 1.8 per cent general tax increase and a 2.5 per cent special levy for infrastructure, those numbers are now set at 1.5 and 0.5 respectively. “They are finding it very difficult to keep up with tax increases. They’ve reached the breaking point,” said Bryant, relaying the comments she’s heard from the public. Her proposal at Tuesday night’s council meeting was treated dismissively by Mayor Todd Cowan, but quickly found support from councillors Julie-Anne Herteis and Allan Poffenroth, allowing for Bryant’s motion to pass. Coun. Mark Bauman said he was “not prepared to give in on 2.5 per TAXES | 4


2 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

Jigs Hollow gravel pit cleared to proceed OMB sides with applicant’s plan to mine aggregate in Winterbourne Valley STEVE KANNON

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To nobody’s surprise, the scenic Winterbourne Valley will be turned into an industrial site, as the Ontario Municipal Board this week gave the goahead to the Jigs Hollow gravel pit. Board member MaryAnne Sills rendered her decision just moments after Monday’s hearing in which residents made a last-ditch plea to keep the valley intact. They knew it was an uphill battle after the township abandoned the residents, signing off on a deal approving the application by Kuntz Topsoil, Sand and Gravel. Relying only on expert evidence presented by the applicant, Sills determined “there’s not a problem with this application,” arguing the plan is in conformity with provincial, regional and township regulations. The residents offered up no evidence that would allow the board to deny the appeal brought by Kuntz, supported by Preston Sand and Gravel, she said. Her declaration that council’s mediated settlement was in the best interest of the township found no traction with some 70 residents who packed Woolwich council chambers Monday morning. Applauding the presentations of fellow residents and scoffing at the claims of the applicant’s lawyers and planners, the audience made its feeling known and had to be reminded by Sills on more than one occasion that the proceedings were a quasi-judicial hearing, not a public meeting.

In the end, however, the residents were not surprised by the outcome, given the OMB’s long history of siding with developers rather than with the public interest. Jan Huissoon, one of five residents given participant status at the hearing, said allowing residents to speak essentially amounted to so much window dressing. “Nobody was really expecting anything different. We had to try.” As with the many presentations to Woolwich council, the participants who testified before the OMB maintained that the gravel pit would have a detrimental impact on both the environment and the quality of life of those living in nearby Winterbourne and Conestogo. “Noise carries right across this hollow. It’s going to go from natural sounds to commercial noise,” said Golf Course

Road resident William Norrish, arguing the noiseattenuation measures proposed by Kuntz would be ineffective. He also questioned the inclusion of asphalt and concrete recycling in the settlement after township council expressly voted against allowing that industrial use at the site. West Montrose resident Lynn Hare picked up on the recycling aspect, arguing the noise levels, potential contamination of the nearby Grand River and dust-suppressant measures had all been inadequately addressed. Sills, however, did not agree with any of concerns raised by the residents. “The applicant has really bent over to try to alleviate the concerns of the public,” she said, adding the parties had been gracious in allowing residents to say their piece in the first place. Her decision clears the

way for Kuntz, in partnership with Preston Sand and Gravel, to extract up to 150,000 tonnes of gravel each year from an 89-acre site at 125 Peel St. The company may also import up to 30,000 tonnes of asphalt and concrete for recycling, as well as topsoil for screening and resale. Although the township opted out of a battle to protect the public in the Jigs Hollow case, there are two larger gravel pit fights on the horizon. Hunder Developments, the group behind plans for a pit immediately east of Conestogo, has appealed to the OMB Woolwich’s denial of its bid for a pit on some 150 acres of land on two farm properties located at 128 Katherine St. S. and 1081 Hunsberger Rd. Also up in the air is Capital Paving’s bid for a large pit near the West Montrose covered bridge.

EDSS HELPS WITH WINTER WARM-UP

This week EDSS students and Ray of Hope volunteers Alicia Waring and Tessa Charnuski were asking for student donations for the organization’s winter clothing drive. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

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NEWS | 3

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

Wellesley Lions propose dog park for village Service club, seeing need for off-leash facility, willing to organize development expected to cost $100K COLIN DEWAR The Wellesley Lions Club is looking to build a leash-free dog park in the Village of Wellesley. A delegation headed by club member Richard Franzke addressed councillors meeting Tuesday, pitching the park proposal. “We recognize there is

an outstanding need in Wellesley for more parks and recreation space,” said Franzke. “There are a high proportion of dog owners within the village and the township overall so a new recreational park with a lease-free park would be a welcomed addition to the community.” The new park, which

Dog owners are currently using parks that are not designated for dogs, including Albert Erb Park, the ball diamonds and soccer fields in the village, said Franzke. “We would like to develop a leash-free dog park within the village limits of Wellesley and we are willing to purchase the

would be called Lions Park, would also offer safe walking trails as well as the fenced in area where dogs could run freely. Franzke told council that 25 per cent of households in the village own a dog and that number increases to 34 per cent taking the whole township into account.

required land to build this park.” The club will be partnering with the Wellesley Trail Association to fully develop the land located at the corner of Nafziger Road and Gerber Road near the hydro substation in Wellesley. The property is owned by Ken Lazenby and Bill Melnik, who have agreed

to sell the land to the Lions Club, said Franzke. The Lions will handle the development of the dog park, while Wellesley Trail Association will look after trail development. In the proposal, the dog park will have a small parking area with up to 10 spots DOG PARK | 4

Wellesley housedecorating contest a Christmas fundraiser ELENA MAYSTRUK Claire Barrel wanted to do something special for those who help out in Wellesley. Just in time for the holidays, the village resident and mother wants to start a holiday tradition and fundraising effort for the Wilmot Resource Centre, which organizes a popular drop-in centre in Wellesley. “I was trying to think of raising a little bit of money for the Wilmot Resource Centre in New Hamburg. They are Wilmot Township of course but they do come to Wellesley to do a drop-in centre for the small children in the neigbourhood and it’s used quite a bit by the moms in the area; there are a lot of kids in Wellesley now,” she explained. Having lived in Wellesley for six years, Barrel saw an opportunity to showcase the township’s beauty come yuletide by organizing a house-decorating contest, with proceeds from registration fees going to the WRC. “I just though it’s so pretty to see the houses all lit up for Christmas and I was thinking about National Lampoon and how some people go absolutely crazy,” she said of the Christmas movie starring Chevy Chase, now a holi-

day staple “I started thinking about maybe having a friendly competition in the neighbourhood to see who could dress their house the nicest. Then people would be able to vote.” First she approached Mothers of Wellesley; a tightknit group, some of whom use the services of the Wilmot Resource Centre. After receiving good reviews on the idea, Barrel plunged into the organization of it all. Wellesley’s decorating enthusiasts register their house with Barrel and start decorating. The goal is to have maps of the township handed out to its residents, with each house represented by a star. Local families can take a stroll or a drive to locations around the township and vote on their favorite house decorations. Flip to the back of the map and you can find a list of registered houses next to a checkbox. Viewers can check a box and drop off their vote at 1101 Henry St. in Wellesley Village. The registration fee is $10, with all of the funds going to the organization. From December 1-6, those interested in participating can drop of an address, their theme and the registration fee at the same

HOW TO REACH US

EE RY FR IVE L DE

FUNDRAISER | 7

Members of the 1st Maryhill Beavers and Cubs stack some of the cans of food they collected over the month of November as part of a food drive for Woolwich Community Services. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

Community groups pitch in with seasonal help for WCS mas. As a bridging activity the leaders of the group asked all 12 Beaver members and five Cubs to bring in non-perishable food items to meetings as part of a food drive for the Woolwich Community Services (WCS). “We thought we could tie in learning about food and sharing by asking the kids and their families to canvas their cupboards and bring

COLIN DEWAR In the month of November the 1st Maryhill Beavers learned all about food with activities to introduce the young children to the four basic food groups and the difference between perishable and non-perishable foods. This month the troop begins its sharing-themed month in time for Christ-

in items for the food bank,” said Janet Cox, co-leader of the 1st Maryhill Beavers. Taking the challenge to heart, the children went beyond what the leaders expected to see from them and brought in 202 items to fill seven cardboard boxes. “The kids completely rose to the challenge. We pictured them coming in with a can of tuna and box of Kraft Dinner and instead

week after week they were bring in bags and boxes of food,’ said Cox. At a troop meeting held November 26 at Breslau Public School, WCS executive director Don Harloff was a special guest as the children presented him with their collection of food. “There are some people WCS | 6

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4 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

TAXES: Presentation from resident highlights the perils of large year-over-year tax increases FROM | COVER

cent” as the amount for the special levy earmarked for repairs and upgrades to roads, bridges and water pipes. Councillors were unanimous, however, in voting to freeze their own wages for 2013, with most arguing in favour of similar measures for township staff. For chief administrative officer David Brenneman, the prospect of a wage freeze presents a dilemma heading into negotiations with unionized workers.

In maintaining that position, he said, the township would almost certainly be taken to arbitration by the Canadian Union of Public Employees. That would likely result in a settlement akin to Wellesley Township’s recent three-year deal offering outside workers increases of 1.5, 1.5 and 1.75 per cent over the term of the agreement. Picking up on Poffenroth’s suggestion of an overall increase of zero, Bauman suggested a wage cap similar to a sports team, whereby the size of

the pie would be capped, with the individual slices divvied up to remain within the budget, perhaps through less overtime or reduced hours of work. That would also require a freeze on hiring. Poffenroth also suggested the township look at eliminating “redundant” positions, those that provide no benefit to the public, as part of an effort to reduce overall spending. The debate was music to the ears of Breslau resident Peter Durksen, who earlier had made a presentation

to council calling for measures to reel-in out-ofcontrol spending and tax increases. Retired and living on a pension, he noted that over the last three years his income has increased an average of 1.48 per cent, less than the average inflation rate of 1.75 to 2 per cent and well below the average tax increase of 5.78 per cent. “Thus my property taxes have increased almost four times as much as my income, and about three times as much as the rate of inflation,” he said. Durksen added he’s not alone in his evaluation of the property tax situation, presenting a petition signed by 21 of his neigh-

bours and calling on council to hold tax increases to the rate of inflation at most, to tell staff cost overruns are unacceptable, and to reduce the overall percentage of revenues spent on wages and benefits. In making his case, Durksen said he’s aware that the Woolwich portion of tax bills amounts to 23 per cent, while 56 per cent goes to Waterloo Region and 21 per cent to the school boards. Other items such as rising assessment rates and arbitrated wage settlements are also outside of township control. “Still, our concern is about the bottom line – the final tax bill.” Attempting to counter

Durksen’s points, Cowan dismissed the percentages, saying the average tax increase last year amounted to $40. “I’m sure your pension went up more than $40.” Cowan’s remark, however, failed to take into consideration the compounding effect of large year-over-year increases, with Durksen noting his taxes rose to $4,435 this year, from $3,747 in 2009. He also noted the dollar figures quoted by the township apply to a regional average ($254,000) that falls well below the assessed value of most homes in the township, meaning the actual increases are much larger.

MAKING THE ROUNDS TO ROUND UP FOOD

PUBLIC MEETING ON 2013 REGIONAL BUDGET

Public meetings are scheduled to gather public input on the 2013 Regional Budget. Several critical public policy issues are being addressed during this budget process. A public input meeting will be held on:

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2012 6:00 p.m. REGIONAL COUNCIL CHAMBER 150 FREDERICK STREET, 2ND FLOOR, KITCHENER If you are interested in Regional services you may wish to attend. Final budget approval for user rates (water and wastewater) is scheduled for Wednesday, December 5, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. and final budget approval for all other Regional services is scheduled for Wednesday, January 16, 2013 at 7:00 p.m. Notice of these meetings is being given in accordance with the Municipal Act, as amended and the Region’s notice policy. Please visit our website (www.regionofwaterloo.ca) for more information on the Regional Budget or pick up a budget package at the Council & Administrative Services Office, 150 Frederick Street, 2nd Floor, Kitchener. To speak to a Finance Department staff person on the budget, please call Allan Wong at 519-575-4705. You are welcome to attend any of the scheduled budget meetings or the Council meetings. For a copy of the budget schedule please visit our website. You will only be allowed to register as a delegation at the public input meeting on December 5, 2012. Please call the Council & Administrative Services Office by 12 Noon on Thursday, November 29th at 519-575-4420 to register to speak. Kris Fletcher Regional Clerk

CHANGE IN COUNCIL MEETING TIME Please be advised the Regular Council meeting for the Regional Municipality of Waterloo scheduled for Wednesday, December 19, 2012 will start at 4:00 p.m. in the Council Chamber, 2nd Floor, Regional Administration Building, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener. For more information or to register as a delegation, please contact Council & Administrative Services Office at 519-575-4420.

ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON COUNCIL COMPENSATION CITIZEN APPOINTMENTS Each term Regional Council appoints an advisory committee to review Council compensation and any other matters referred to it for the next term of Council (2014-2018). You live in the Region of Waterloo and should be prepared to commit to up to four meetings to conduct the review and prepare the final report to Council. It is expected that the work of the Committee will conclude by June 30, 2013. Please submit a letter of interest and resume no later than Friday, December 21, 2012 to: Kris Fletcher Regional Clerk and Director, Council & Administrative Services Regional Municipality of Waterloo 2nd Floor, 150 Frederick Street Kitchener ON N2G 4J3 Email: regionalclerk@regionofwaterloo.ca Fax: 519-575-4481 For further information please call Council & Administrative Services, 519-575-4420. If you require accessible services to participate in these meetings, please contact the Council and Administrative Services office at 519-575-4420 by the Friday prior to the meeting. All comments and information received from individuals, stakeholder groups and agencies regarding this project are being collected to assist the Region of Waterloo in making a decision. Under the Municipal Act, personal information such as name, address, telephone number, and property location that may be included in a submission becomes part of the public record. Questions regarding the collection of this information should be referred to the Council & Administrative Services office.

Boxes of non-perishable food items filled the Elmira Kiwanis Club house as volunteers hauled in the goods on Saturday morning. Volunteer Wojtek Monkiewicz unloads his car. Inset: Savannah Cassel, 12, and Haylee Gribbons, 13, team up to unload a flatbed full of food. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

DOG PARK: Service club will take the lead on

raising funds, trails group would maintain it FROM | 3

for vehicles, as well as dog waste disposal unit, biodegradable bag dispensers and will be fenced in with a gated transfer area. “We are very conscious of the neighbours and the residents of Wellesley and we don’t want to disturb them. We have chosen the location that we believe will have the least impact on the neighbours,” said Franzke. “If we build it, they will come.” The Lions conducted a survey between November 23 and 27, determining that 54 residents are interested in the idea of a dog park and are willing to use it five to 10 times a month. The cost of the park is projected to be $74,000 including the purchase of the property. An estimated

$32,000 will be needed to develop the trails through the land and build a bridge across the creek that runs along the northeast section of the property, bringing the total of the proposed park to $106,000. The Lions are willing to spearhead the funding for the park and will be approaching funding agencies for support. The club is willing to buy the land, develop the park and then donate it to the township, which means the township would be liable under its existing insurance policy. “This has a lot of positives to it, including developing a piece of land that is just sitting there. However, there are a lot of things that can put the brakes on this project. If this land turns out to be a brown field there is no

way the township is going to take liability for that,” said Coun. Jim Olender, worried about potential contamination issues. “That is why we want to work in partnership with the township and look at what might be obstacles and move forward,” said Franzke. Mayor Ross Kelterborn had reservations as to who would operate the park, who could use the park and who patrols the park if an incident occurred involving a dog. Further discussions will need to take place with the Lions Club and township staff and management group as to what the next step will be in developing the off-leash dog park. The goal of the club is open the park by late summer 2013.


NEWS | 5

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

Woolwich opposes KitchenerConestoga changes Woolwich council will press for the Kitchener-Conestoga federal riding to remain tied to Waterloo Region rather than having it torn apart, with communities linked to others with no obvious shared interests. Meeting this week, councillors endorsed having Mayor Todd Cowan

send a letter to the Federal Electoral Boundaries Commission protesting the planned changes. Currently, the commission plans to eliminate the KitchenerConestoga riding, a move that would see Wellesley and Wilmot township joined to Perth County to form the Perth-Wellesley-Wilmot federal riding, while Woolwich would join a new Woolwich-Wellington electoral district. “I just see it as a very odd-shaped map,” said Coun. Mark Bauman of the proposed Woolwich-Wellington riding, adding he’d sooner see Woolwich lumped in with a Waterloo riding.

The federal commission had considered adding a fifth riding into Waterloo Region as part of plan to add new seats in Ontario, but the opted to allocate that seat in the Milton area, requiring changes to KitchenerConestoga. Others, including MP Harold Albrecht, also oppose the plan.

Rental fee waived for horticultural society meeting The Elmira and District Horticultural

Society’s work – maintaining flowerbeds and a host of other beautification projects in the township – are more than enough reason to waive a WMC room rental fee, Woolwich council decided this week. When the organization hosts a district meeting Apr. 13, 2013, there’ll be no $216 charge for use of the community room. A request for the fee reduction from Mary Austin was quickly endorsed by Coun. Allan Poffenroth, who recognized the value of the work done by the 223 members of the horticultural society.

Mitchell awarded Woolwich parking lot contract Mitchell Property Maintenance will clear snow from municipal parking lots in Woolwich for another three years, after council this week awarded them the contract. Mitchell is the same company that earlier this year won the tender to clear sidewalks in Elmira. Though not the outright lowest of the four bids received, the company

has larger equipment that allows for efficiencies, lowering the cost in the long run, director of engineering and planning Dan Kennaley told councillors meeting Nov. 27. As well, the lowest bid was submitted by the company that previously had the sidewalk-clearing contract, resulting in poor service and many complaints, he added, noting that when the same company used to clear municipal parking lots, there were also problems. The township has budgeted $61,000 for snow and ice removal from its parking lots.

TWO BADLY INJURED IN EARLY-MORNING COLLISION

POLICE BLOTTER

Return of wintry conditions prompts reminders from police Police are reminding motorists to check weather conditions regularly along intended routes and make adjustments when necessary. Always allow extra time to reach your destination as poor conditions may mean slower travel and a higher risk of delays. Leave adequate space between vehicles and look well ahead for potential hazards. A sudden drop in temperature following rainfall can lead to a flash freeze and icy patches – use extra caution. On slippery surfaces, accelerate, steer, and brake

gradually. Communicate with others well in advance of any change in direction or speed. When visibility is extremely poor, consider delaying travel or changing routes. Advise others of your plans. Ensure your vehicle is properly maintained – e.g. wipers, defroster, lights, tires, brakes. Ensure that all windows and mirrors are clear. Pack an emergency kit (shovel, candle, matches, and blanket). In case of emergencies, call police for assistance. As in any weather, avoid distractions, wear seatbelts, drive within speed limits and only when sober.

NOVEMBER 22

black Honda Civic. A crowbar was found at the scene. The police are continuing to investigate.

9:10 AM | A 20-year-old Wellesley woman was charged with failing to stop when she drove her 2006 Pontiac through a stop sign on Weimar Line and Hutchinson Road, causing her vehicle to enter a field and become stuck. 11:30 AM | A break-andenter occurred on Townsend Drive near East Tree Drive in Breslau. When the owners arrived home, they discovered their front door was pried open and missing from the home was a Mac laptop, a man’ s wedding ring, two watches and money. Witnesses said there was a suspicious person around the house, described as six feet tall, thin with short to medium length hair wearing a black jacket and jeans and possibly driving a

5:50 PM | A 37-year-old Listowel man driving a 2007 GMC pickup rear-ended a 52-year-old Alma man operating a 2011 GMC on Arthur Street near Wyatt Street in Elmira. Moderate damage occurred to both vehicles. No charges were laid and no injuries were reported. NOVEMBER 23

10:00 PM | Police were called to the Woolwich Memorial Centre about a fight that occurred outside the dressing rooms of the arenas. A 17-year-old Ayr male was charged with assault after he punched the assistant coach of an Elmira team who was trying to

9:30 AM | A boy’s blue bike was found on Elmira’s Flamingo Road near the church. The rightful owner can claim the bike at the Elmira detachment. NOVEMBER 25

7:40 PM | A mailbox was destroyed by vandals on Florapine Road near Floradale Road. The investigation is ongoing. 11:45 PM | A 62-year-old Woolwich man was operating a horse-drawn buggy on Apple Grove Road near Weber Street in St. Jacobs when the horse bucked, causing him to drop the reins. The man tried to stop the buggy using hydraulic brakes but was unsuccessful and fell off the buggy, which then ran over him. The man was taken the Grand River Hospital with fractured ribs. The horse was caught and returned to its owner. NOVEMBER 26 A collision involving four vehicles occurred on Arthur Street North November 26. Police closed the road for several hours as they investigated the incident. Two drivers were taken to the Grand River Hospital with non-life-threatening injuries only to be transported to Hamilton General when it was realized their injuries were much more severe. Police continue to investigate. [JOE MERLIHAN / THE OBSERVER]

break up the fight. The Ayr player had been ejected from a hockey game earlier in the evening. Police are requesting the man not return to the rink. 11:15 PM | A 62-year-old Kitchener man driving a 2005 Chevy lost control of the vehicle on Arthur Street near Union Street in Elmira and crossed the median

into a ditch. His vehicle sustained moderate damage. No charges were laid, and no injuries reported. NOVEMBER 24

2:30 AM | A 2003 Silverado Chevy pickup driven by a 25-yearold Brussels woman on Church Street in Elmira crossed the median and hit a parked 2011 Dodge. Damage to the vehicles was described

as moderate. No injuries were reported. No charges were laid. 6:30 AM | A 59-year-old Fergus man lost control of his 1999 GMC on Arthur Street near Floradale Road and slid into a ditch. The vehicle was destroyed. No injuries were reported. No charges were laid.

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5:55 AM | A 27-year-old Port Colborne man was travelling northbound on Arthur Street North when he lost control of his Jeep on the icy roads and crossed over into southbound traffic before being struck by a Toyota driven by a 38-year-old Palmerston man. Two other vehicles, a Dodge van being driven by a 28-year-old Rothsay man and a Toyota driven by a 28-year-old Moorefield woman, were travelling southbound when BLOTTER | 4

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6 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

WCS: Various groups pitching in to collect items for those in need FROM | 3

in the community that don’t have supper because they don’t have food in their house because they don’t have the money to go out and buy food. That could be because they were sick or had other difficulties in their lives,” said Harloff as he explained to the children the need for a food bank. “You have all collected this food I am going to make sure that all this food goes to people in this community that don’t have food so they can eat,” he told them. “It is an amazing amount of food collected by such a small group.” The shelves at the WCS are still well stocked from the Thanksgiving Day food drive, said Harloff but it doesn’t hurt to have more. “The food we have should last us through until Christmas. I think we will be looking for food in February and March, that is when the shelves usually start to become bare,” he said. Along with the Scouting food drive, the Kiwanis Club of Elmira held their annual door-to-door food drive which also helped to replenish any food that was used over the Thanksgiving holiday. “From what I understand the door-to-door food drive was quite successful again this year,” said Harloff. For their part, the Elmira Sugar Kings held a hats and mitten toss at last week’s game against the Brampton Bombers, with all the donations going to WCS. The hat

Emergency crew workers are at the scene of a four-vehicle collision on Arthur Street North on Monday. [JOE MERLIHAN / THE OBSERVER]

BLOTTER: Wintry weather

brings slew of traffic accidents FROM | 5

After their first goal at Sunday’s game, the Sugar Kings helped minor hockey players collect items thrown onto the ice during the hat and mitt toss for WCS. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

WCS director Don Harloff, left, was a guest at the weekly 1st Maryhill Beaver meeting as the troop presented him with their donations. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

and mitt toss replaced the annual teddy bear toss. “That was an unbelievable event and we received so much from the community. It was such a great idea changing the teddy bear toss into the hats and mittens toss. Teddy bears are wonderful, don’t get me wrong everybody loves a teddy bear, but when it’s cold you can’t wear a teddy bear. It was a tremendous effort put on by everyone involved,” said Harloff. The WCS is still looking for toys and anyone interested in donating a new toy has until December 14 to drop them off. After that date the WCS will be busy working to put together 180 hampers for those in need for the Christmas holiday.

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they were unable to stop on the icy roads and collided with the Jeep and Toyota. The drivers of the Jeep and Toyota were taken to hospital with what were thought to be non-life-threatening injuries. The Port Colborne man had to be airlifted to Hamilton General as he had internal bleeding. The Palmerston man was also taken to Hamilton with broken bones. The road was closed for several hours as police investigated the collision. The investigation is still ongoing. Anyone with information regarding the collision is asked to contact the Waterloo Regional Traffic Services Branch at (519) 653-7700, ext. 8856.

The investigation continues. 8:55 PM | A 74-year-old Heidelberg man operating a 1999 GMC was charged with fail to stop when he drove through the stop sign at Kressler Road and Hessen Strasse in Wellesley Township, hitting a 68-year-old Heidelberg woman driving a 2004 Hyundai. No injuries were reported. Moderate to significant damage occurred to the vehicles. November 27

8:00 AM | A Skil power drill fell off the back of a truck travelling along Arthur Street. The rightful owner of the black and red drill can claim their property at the Elmira detachment.

1:15 AM | A 21-year-old Heidelberg man lost control of his white Honda pickup truck on Lobsinger Line, rolled the vehicle and hit a hydro pole that pinned him inside the vehicle. Police closed the road as hydro workers repaired the pole. The man was charged with careless driving and suffered minor injuries.

9:30 AM | Police were contacted about the theft of some scrap metal from TMT Inc. on Shantz Station Road in Woolwich Township. The suspect crossed the golf course and entered the business' yard from the east side. They broke several locks to release the metal.

1:40 PM | A 22-carat gold ring with a purple gemstone was turned over to the Elmira police detachment. The ring was discovered in the parking lot of the St. Jacobs Farmer’s Market. The rightful owner can claim their property by contacting the Elmira police.

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NEWS | 7

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

St. Nick and Mrs. Claus heading to St. Jacobs

WORK GETS UNDERWAY ON RESIDENTIAL SUBDIVISION IN ELMIRA

It’s almost time for breakfast with Santa courtesy of St. Jacobs Optimists ELENA MAYSTRUK It’s that time of year again when the jolly man in red pays a visit to an eager group of St. Jacobs kiddies at the annual Optimist Breakfast with Santa. But the fun and games are not just for the children, says Optimist member Robyn Gromeder, this year’s organizer of the event’s silent auction. “I think the members enjoy it as much as the kids. They enjoy seeing the kids up there. It’s the first event we ever did as a club and it’s going strong,” she said, adding that there will be plenty of diversions for adults as well. Now in its eighth year, the event has undergone many transformations. The members have added a face-painting station and perfected a hearty breakfast menu to include popular favorites that keep enthusiasts coming back every year. “We use pretty much every table and chair in the place,” Gromeder said of the event in past years. The club is used to full attendance from members at the event, with most if not all showing up to spread the holiday

cheer. Optimist Club members will be on location as early as 7 a.m. to set up for the event. They will then participate in the various activities and serve a schmorgesborg breakfast of pancakes, sausage, eggs, hash browns and beans before getting down to the activities at hand. A penny auction for the kids will allow them to purchase an arms-length of tickets, place one half of each ticket into a container next to an item they wish to purchase. Then names get drawn for prizes such as toys and children’s accessories. The silent auction for adults is the main event that raises money for next year’s festivities. Gromeder said that during Wednesday’s meeting the Optimist Club learned more about the items that will be auctioned off at the silent auction. Items usually include various pieces of jewelry and artwork donated by local individuals and businesses. Last year’s proceeds from the auction brought in $1,246. Increasing the number BREAKFAST | 8

Sun. December 2 ‘12

Delegates from the Lunor Group and Woolwich Township were on hand for a sod-turning ceremony at 90 Church St. W. in Elmira on Nov. 22. The site will be home to some 1,500 homes. Taking part were Steve Menich, Donna Haid, Shawn McGuire, Danny Finoro, Peter Finoro, Sam Scicluna, Mayor Todd Cowan and Dan Kennaley. Grading has begun on the site and will continue through the winter as long as weather permits. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

FUNDRAISER: Looking at making it an annual yuletide event FROM | 3

location and slip it into the locked drop box in front of the house. The votes will be tallied on December 15, the day after Wellesley’s Christmas parade, and a winner will receive a trophy with a “V” for victory. Participants are free to be as creative or minimalistic as they wish, and crazy themes are welcome. “I’m happy to organize it again next year and see if we get more people out and maybe next year it’ll be a different charity that gets the money I don’t know but I think for now Wilmot Resource Centre does support Wellesley Township so I though it was a nice way to give back,” she said.

Over the Christmas holidays, co-organizers of the Best Dressed House fundraiser in Wellesley Claire Barrel (right) and Becky Hill hope to bring out the inner festive decorators in the township’s citizens. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

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8 | NEWS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

WELLESLEY HOSTS ZUMBATHON FOR DIABETES RESEARCH

Santa rolls into Elmira Saturday for parade in his honour COLIN DEWAR Jolly old Saint Nick will once again be visiting the streets of Elmira during the annual Santa Claus parade. This year marks the 19th year for the parade and organizers are hoping to present a bigger and better event. Organized by the Elmira Kiwanis Club, this year’s parade, to be held today (Saturday), should prove to the best yet with nine bands and 25 floats confirmed, the most to date for the event proving to the popularity of the annual event. The parade starts at 10 a.m. sharp in front of Riverside Public School on William Street before it starts along Arthur Street through downtown Elmira and finishing at the Elmira Legion on First Street. It usually takes about an hour and half to complete but since the parade has increased in size that time could run over by 10 or 15 minutes this year. “We have lots of different people participating this year and have more bands than ever before,” said Lyndon Ziegler, who has organized the event for the

last 15 years. The first Elmira Santa Claus parade started when Ziegler and other members of the now-defunct Jaycees service club decided that instead of sending children and parents to the Kitchener-Waterloo Santa Claus parade they would organize one for the town. When the Jaycees disbanded eight years ago, Ziegler joined the Kiwanis Club and brought the parade with him. “It’s a great event that supports the local community,” he said. “There is no need to rush off to the Kitchener-Waterloo parade we have a great event planned this year.” It’s not just local people participating in the parade, as Ziegler has lined up bands from Burlington and volunteers and floats from Fergus, Elora and Kitchener-Waterloo. “We have a lot of people coming from all over the place to help make the parade come to life.” There will be many volunteers walking the parade route handing out candy and will be followed by the man himself – Santa Claus as he greets all the children of Elmira.

BREAKFAST: Local kids have

chance to meet up with Santa FROM | 7

The Wellesley Community Centre was home to a Zumbathon Nov. 24. The event was a fundraiser for diabetes research. Top, Shelby Cook, 3, bounces on mom Martha’s hip. Above left, Celeste Goring, diagnosed with diabetes last June, and friends show off their nails painted blue for diabetes. Above right, Debbie Goring in a crowd of other zumba enthusiasts . [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

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NEWS | 9

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

Club scales back bridge, not carol sing With the real thing closed for repairs, Kiwanis Club comes up with a backup plan for West Montrose holiday event ELENA MAYSTRUK The West Montrose Kissing Bridge is still closed for repairs and will likely stay that way throughout the holidays. But members of the Elmira Kiwanis Club are refusing to let that put a cramp in their style. Every year the service club hosts a carol sing, with residents gathering on the bridge to belt out the favorite songs of the season, but this Christmas the florescent warning signs and blockages are anything but festive. “The engineers are studying the weight-bearing ability of the bridge. So we figured that rather than trying to get back in there with 75 or 100 people on the bridge we were wondering if there was a way to move the carol sing for this year,” Kiwanis member Tony Dowling explained. Carolers have found the answer in a covered bridge float used in Santa Claus parades in previous years by the BridgeKeepers, the West Montrose Residents Association. This year instead of joining a multitude of other floats on Arthur Street during the parade, the 50-footwide and 12-feet tall makeshift covered bridge will provide a fitting backdrop for the carol sing. “So we still have a covered bridge for the covered

bridge carol sing,” Dowling said. Club members will move the mobile bridge float to West Montrose United Church on Covered Bridge Drive before covering it with bright lights for the annual event, placing two decorated Christmas trees atop platforms on either side of the float. Weather permitting, some 75 to 150 carolers are expected to participate in the long-time Kiwanis Club Christmas tradition of singing the festive favorites that welcome the holidays each year. This year carolers have a “backup plan for the backup plan,” Dowling said. With unpredictable, likely cold weather in store for the night, the host church will be opening their doors should the event need to be taken inside. The church will also provide a cozy getaway for visitors from the chilly weather, complete with hot apple cider and other festive refreshments. The Kiwanis carol sing will take place on the evening of December 10 starting at 7 p.m. at the West Montrose United Church, located on 42 Covered Bridge Drive. Dowling advises everyone to dress for the weather and bring a non-perishable food or cash donation for the Kiwanis Christmas goodwill food drive.

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Notice Information Centre NOTICEofOFPublic PUBLIC INFORMATION CENTRE PROPOSED REGION OF WATERLOO St. Jacobs – Elmira Wastewater Treatment Master Plan SIGN BY-LAW

The Regional Municipality of Waterloo (Region) is undertaking a Wastewater Treatment Master Plan for the communities of The Region of Waterloo willofbe holding a publicTheinformation centre to introduce draft St. Jacobs and Elmira in the Township Woolwich (Township). wastewater systems in both communitiesaare operated as a 2-tier system withrespecting the Township signs responsible for wastewater collection Regional By-law on Regional roads. The proposed Sign By-law addresses and and thesigns Regionon responsible for wastewater treatmentelection signs, business accessory all general types pumping, of unoffi cial Regional roads including and biosolids management.

signs, farm accessory signs, mailbox accessory signs, open house signs and poster signs. proposed Sign By-law requirements for unofficial signs including: AThe Region-wide Wastewater Treatmentestablishes Master Plan (WWTMP) was completed in 2007, and identifiedand the need to develop a Master Plan for St. Jacobs and • Location placement; Elmira which specifically examined the treatment requirements for these two • Size, shape, construction and content; communities.

• Impacts to the function of the road; Number of signs and timing placement; This • Master Plan is reviewing wastewater treatment of servicing for these twoand • Sign removal. and will recommend servicing requirements to meet growth in St. Jacobs and Elmira for the next 30 years.

Staff are also proposing an amendment to the Region’s Tourism and Essential Services Signing to allow tourism signage on Regional roads for agri-toursim activities. The study isPolicy being conducted in accordance with the requirements for Master Plans under the Municipal Class EA 17, (Municipal Engineers When: Tuesday, June 2008, dropAssociation, in 4:00 -June 8:00 p.m. 2000, as amended in 2007 and 2011). The Master Plan is following Phases 1 Place: Regional Administration Headquarters (lobby) and 2 of the Municipal Class EA.

150 Frederick Street, Kitchener

A Public Information Centre (PIC) has been scheduled to receive input and comments from interested members of the public. This public information centre is being held for the purpose of providing information and The PIC will provide information on the project, including population and flow projections, the identification and evaluation comments fromthethe public. copy of the draft By-law available preferred for review in ofreceiving potential servicing alternatives, evaluation of A a short-list of feasible options, and theisrecommended alternathe Clerk’s Offi ce, Region of Waterloo, 2nd fl oor, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener or on the tive for servicing St. Jacobs and Elmira. The PIC will be held as follows:

Region’s website at:

Tuesday, December 4, 2012 www.region.waterloo.on.ca - tab Newsroom, tab Public Notices 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM

If you have questions concerning the By-law, please contact Nancy Button, St. Jacobs Community Centre, 31 Parkside Drive Manager, Transportation Engineering at 519-575-4520 or by email at St. Jacobs, Ontario bnancy@region.waterloo.on.ca Information on the St. Jacobs – Elmira Wastewater Treatment Master Plan study is postedplease on the Region’s web siteabove at: If you require accessible services to participate in this meeting, contact the www.regionofwaterloo.ca. The information presented at this PIC will be available on this web site after December 4, 2012. noted person by Tuesday, June 10, 2008.

All comments andofinformation frommembers individuals, groups agencies this Please contact either the followingreceived project team if youstakeholder have any questions or and comments, wishregarding to obtain more project areonbeing collected assistlike the a decision. the Municipal information the study, or if youtowould to Region be addedoftoWaterloo the mailinginlistmaking to receive future studyUnder notifications: Act, personal information such as name, address, telephone number, and property location that may be included in aMs. submission becomes part of the public record. Questions Pam Law, P.Eng. Mr. Stephen Nutt,regarding M. Eng., P.the Eng.collection of this information Project shouldEngineer be referred to the person indicated above. Consultant Project Manager Water Services, Region of Waterloo XCG Consultants Ltd. Nancy Button 150 Frederick Street, 7th Floor 820 Trillium Drive Manager,Kitchener, Transportation Ontario, Canada,Engineering N2G 4J3 Kitchener, Ontario N2R 1K4 Region ofPhone: Waterloo 519-575-4095 Phone: 519-741-5774 150 Frederick Street, 7th Floor Fax: 519-575-4452 Fax: 519-741-5627 Kitchener, ONPLaw@regionofwaterloo.ca N2G 4J3 E-mail: Email: stephen@xcg.com All comments and information received from individuals, stakeholder groups and agencies regarding this project are being collected to assist the Region of Waterloo in making a decision. Under the Municipal Act, personal information such as name, address, telephone number, and property location that may be included in a submission becomes part of the public record. Questions regarding the collection of this information should be referred to Pam Law (as above). Accessibility: This event is accessible for people with disabilities. Accessible Parking is available. If you require assistance to attend or participate in this meeting, or to access information in alternative formats, please contact Pam Law (as above). This notice was first issued on November 16, 2012.


10 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

JOE MERLIHAN PUBLISHER STEVE KANNON EDITOR

COMMENT

DONNA RUDY SALES MANAGER

COLIN DEWAR REPORTER

ELENA MAYSTRUK

PAT MERLIHAN PRODUCTION MANAGER

LEANNE BORON GRAPHIC DESIGN

REPORTER PUBLICATION MAIL AGREEMENT NUMBER 1004840 | ISSN 12039578

OUR VIEW / EDITORIAL

THE VIEW FROM HERE

Cut bureaucracy to fund needed capital projects WOOLWICH COUNCIL TOOK A step in the right direction Tuesday night, opting to reduce to 2 per cent a planned tax hike for 2013, down from 4.3 per cent. A motion from Coun. Bonnie Bryant, who said taxpayers have reached the breaking point, was quickly endorsed by councillors Julie-Anne Herteis and Allan Poffenroth, while Mayor Todd Cowan continued to dismiss any attempts to reel in tax hikes and township spending. “We have to start looking at ability to pay,” she argued, an indication that the compounding effect of large tax increases year over year – basic math typically ignored by bureaucrats and politicians – means property taxes are growing at an unsustainable rate. Prior to discussing the 2013 budget, councillors got a crash course in just such mathematics courtesy of Breslau resident Peter Durksen, who showed them in black in white just what happens when tax increases outstrip both inflation and the little, if any, growth in people’s incomes. In case, as a pension he’s seen his income rise by 1.48 per cent a year over the last three years, while taxes have gone up an average of 5.78 per cent annually at a time when inflation has been running at less than 2 per cent a year. At that rate of increase, it would take a little more than 12 years for property taxes to double. Residents would be paying much more and receiving no more for their money. Durksen also pointed out an obvious solution: stop doling out increases in wages and salaries, all the while adding new staff. Woolwich has certainly been suffering from bureaucratic bloat, particularly in the last five years, with most of the new positions adding no value to the residents of the township. It’s telling that in discussing the ramifications of a lowered tax hike, there was talk of service cuts, not reductions in staff numbers at the management level, where several positions could easily be eliminated to save $300,000 to $400,000 a year, far in excess of the extra revenues that would be raised by the proposed tax hikes. Only Poffenroth suggested the township look at reducing unnecessary staff members. In 2012, the number of full-time staff members rose to 63, up from 56 five years ago. In that time, total staff costs, including part-timers such as firefighters (304 people, up from 272 in 2008) increased by 26.4 per cent, to $6.05 million from $4.8 million. In budget talks last month, there were hints staff will be looking to increase those numbers next year. There were some long faces on the staff side of the council chambers as councillors discussed wage and hiring freezes as a way to taming expenditures en route to lowering tax increases, in part because it will fall to them to deal with the new targets: a 1.5 per cent general tax increase (below the 1.8 forecast as 2013’s inflation rate), and a 0.5 per cent levy for a special infrastructure fund. As noted, however, easy cuts with no impact on residents will provide plenty of extra revenue that can be applied to the township’s infrastructure deficit. Reduced spending on the operating side will allow the municipality to focus on the priorities, hard services essential to the community, while stripping away the bureaucratic bloat and runaway salaries that steal away money from the productive part of the local economy. If it adopts that focus, council will be doing its job and actually representing the public good.

With the 2013 budget under discussion, Woolwich residents can brace themselves to hear a pitch for even more unnecessary hiring. WORLD VIEW / GWYNNE DYER

Egypt in for rough ride on road to Islamist rule WORLD AFFAIRS “There is no middle ground, no dialogue before (Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi) rescinds this declaration,” said prodemocracy advocate and Nobel Peace Prize winner Mohammed ElBaradei. “There is no room for dialogue when a dictator imposes the most oppressive, abhorrent measures and then says ‘let us split the difference.’” Morsi won last June’s presidential election fair and square, but many Egyptians really are frightened that his decree of November 22 sweeps aside the democratic gains of last year’s revolution. The decree gives him absolute power, although he swears it is only for a limited time. Morsi was already governing by decree pending a new parliamentary election, since the courts had dissolved the lower house of parliament because the election was flawed. His latest decree declares that the courts cannot challenge any

of his edicts until that new election takes place. The decree also states that he can take any steps necessary to defeat undefined “threats to the revolution” – and nobody can ask the courts to decide whether those steps are legal and justifiable. In theory, at least, Morsi has given himself greater powers than the former dictator, Hosni Mubarak, ever possessed. This is as puzzling as it is alarming, since nothing in Morsi’s previous history suggests that he wants to be Egypt’s next dictator. He is a prominent member of the Muslim Brotherhood and shares its conservative social and religious values, but that organisation, the mainstay of opposition to Egypt’s military dictators during half a century of tyranny, has moved a long way from its radical and sometimes violent origins. So was Morsi a wolf in sheep’s clothing, just waiting for the chance to impose Islamic rule on everybody, including liberals, Christians, and secular Egyptians? How else can you explain what he has just done? The answer

matters, because if Egypt, by far the most populous Arab country (90 million people), succumbs to a new tyranny, then the whole “Arab Spring” was just a brief illusion. Morsi’s actions are wrong, but he is not actually aiming at a dictatorship. He just wants to thwart the Supreme Judicial Council, made up of judges who almost all date from the Mubarak era, which had already dismissed the first body charged with writing a new constitution. There were indications that it might be about to dissolve the second one on the same grounds. The grounds were legally sound, for the first assembly chosen by parliament included a large number of MPs who belonged to the Islamic parties, although the law said that members of parliament could not themselves sit in the Constituent Assembly. A second Constituent Assembly, chosen in June, once again included members of parliament in clear defiance of the law, which is why it is facing further court challenges. In the last month or

so, the prospect that this new body will produce a constitution based mainly on Islamic law led most of the secular and Christian elements to withdraw. That deprived it of a voting quorum, but the remaining members, including many MPs linked to the Muslim Brotherhood, carried on regardless, so there was a growing probability that a new court ruling would dismiss this assembly too. Morsi moved swiftly, not only giving himself supreme powers beyond the ability of the courts to challenge, but specifically forbidding the Supreme Judicial Council to dismiss the second Constituent Assembly. He also gave that assembly an extra two months to finish writing the constitution, after which it would have to be approved by referendum. Only then (perhaps next May) would a new lower house of parliament be elected – and once the constitution is in place and the subsequent election is past, Morsi promised, he will relinquish his extraordinary powers. But by then Egypt DYER | 12


COMMENT | 11

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

THEIR VIEW / QUESTION OF THE WEEK

What do you welcome about the change to wintry weather?

»»Jeannette Kok

»»Sue Champagne

»»Doug Nayler

»»Beata Hutyra

It’s just cold. I probably say a million times, I hate winter.

The snow

Christmas and the snow. It’s the nice thing about being Canadian; the seasons and the lights.

All of the music, the displays, the atmosphere. I like the seasons. I’d like winter to be winter. It’s better than rain.

»»Doug Forman

"Kudos to Coun. Bonnie Bryant for having the integrity to be a woman of her word. The mayor might want to takes notes. " Laurie Breed | page 12 HIS VIEW / STEVE KANNON

OMB decision reinforces belief officials have no desire to protect public interest EDITOR'S NOTES Woolwich council, with the exception of Bonnie Bryant, is taking the heat for this week’s OMB decision that clears the way for the Jigs Hollow gravel pit. Residents feel the township sold them down the river, abandoning the fight and agreeing to a settlement that doomed what today is a scenic valley. Councillors maintain the battle was unwinnable: they settled to avoid a costly and fruitless legal process. That’s probably true, as the OMB has a history of siding with developers over the wishes of municipalities and their residents. Councillors are guilty, however, of failing to adequately assess blame, as this is another mess that can be laid squarely at the feet of the provincial government, which has created a process that bypasses the public interest. With the Ontario Municipal Board, and indeed

almost every other bureaucratic process, the province has set up a system whereby it can distance itself from unpopular decisions, essentially creating a third party that can force through poor policies. Of course, this is done to allow the few to benefit at the expense of the many, the overriding reason for our political and economic system. In the case of gravel pits and other unpopular developments, the argument is made that the process is necessary to prevent NIMBYism: if every decision sided with the public, nothing would ever get done, including some things that are necessary. This attitude says the need for gravel overrides the health, safety and quality of life considerations of those who live near pits. Councillors could have made these arguments, calling out the province for its poor policies and showing more solidarity with the citizens. That they didn’t is a political failure to recognize the long game: using public opinion to shame upper levels of gov-

HOW TO REACH US

other applications in the works, councillors will have to weigh the likelihood of their denial being immediately appealed to the Ontario Municipal Board, which has a track record of ignoring local decisions in favour of developers. The poor provincial record of respecting local wishes is magnified in the case of gravel pits, where the Aggregate Resources Act is practically a cudgel, and the Ministry of Natural Resources seen as a defender of operators, not Ontarians. Of course, we do need gravel, and it does have to come from somewhere. Because of its geography, this stretch of the province is rife with aggregate, as witnessed by the numerous pits already in operation. If every application for an extraction licence was turned down, we’d have to find alternative sources for an essential material. Clearly, then, we need to find a balance point. Currently, provincial policies favour developers, putting far too much power in the hands of the OMB. Opponents such as

Gravel Watch Ontario say the same is true of the aggregate policies. They also lament the actions of the MNR in enforcing what feeble rules do exist. Fixing those inadequacies would go a long way in reducing the disputes over gravel pit applications. High on the priority list is the enacting of sunset clauses on gravel licences: hard and intractable timelines for the decommissioning of pits. As it stands today, operators can continue to work an “active” site for years, a favourite tactic for avoiding the remediation now required of pit owners. Such a move would assure nearby residents that the health and safety risks would exist for a fixed time only, an important step. Today, however, even where municipalities have tried to impose sunset clauses, the MNR has simply

@

stepped in and voided them. Equally pressing are rules to assure quick and full rehabilitation of pits, returning them to the identical state seen before excavation began. Here, too, the record has been abysmal. Changes haven’t been forthcoming. In that environment, residents are right to be skeptical about assurances that any violations at the newlyapproved pit – excessive noise or dust, pollution of the groundwater, unacceptable visual impacts – will be dealt with in a timely manner. That’s usually not the case. Rarer still are orders to cease operation. Permanent closures are beyond the pale. We’ll have to see those kind of measures, moves that protect citizens, before anyone believes that the parties, the township included, are working in the public interest.

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ernment into changing the processes that undermine democracy. There’s also a very practical reason for the township to turn down gravel pit applications: the costs are higher than the revenues Woolwich receives. The municipal share of aggregate profits are miniscule, not enough to cover the direct costs associated with road repairs and safety measures, let alone the health and well-being of residents. Again, no mention of that in council’s defense of its deal. On the horizon is another OMB hearing, this time over the Hunder Developments project near Conestogo. Council turned down the application, prompting the applicant to appeal that decision. Now residents wait to see if the township will stay on course. And whether all efforts to block the development are simply overturned by an agency with no accountability to the public, let alone those who would be directly affected by the proposed extraction operation. As with Jigs Hollow and

Letters to the Editor should be exclusive to The Observer. Include name, address and daytime phone number. Unsigned letters must contact Editor for publishing consideration. Keep letters under 350 words. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. This newspaper declines announcements, poetry and thank-you letters.

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12 | COMMENT

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

THE MONITOR

VERBATIM

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

In the mid-1970s, the top 60 Canadian-based firms accounted for 15% of all equity market capitalization and 30% of all corporate profit. More recently, the top 60 made up 67% of all equity market capitalization and 60% of all corporate profit. In the mid-1970s, an average firm within the top 60 was three times larger than an average firm listed on the TSX. In 2008, it was 23 times larger.

“It’s currently an unspoiled area. A gravel and recycling operation will put an end to that.”

Woolwich avoided a legal battle over its new rules governing gravel pit applications, formally known as Official Plan amendment (OPA) 13, by agreeing to some compromises before an Ontario Municipal Board hearing. The amendment came as the township faced a slew of new applications for aggregate operations.

»»Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives

»»Winterbourne resident Jan Huissoon addresses the OMB hearing in a fruitless

»»From the Nov. 28, 2009 edition of the Observer.

effort to block the Jigs Hollow gravel pit, which will go ahead in an area close to homes in two Woolwich communities.

DYER: Protesters can see

NATIONAL VIEW

democracy slipping away FROM | 10

would have an Islamic constitution, and almost certainly a lower house of parliament dominated by the Islamic parties. What is happening now, therefore, is not the rise of a new dictatorship but rather a ruthless political manoeuvre aimed at creating a democratic but Islamic Egypt. Naturally, it frightens a large proportion of the 49 per cent of Egyptians who voted against Morsi in the presidential election earlier this year, and it absolutely terrifies the country’s eight million Christians. Morsi’s edict has been met with impassioned protest in the streets, and the formation of a National Salvation Front aimed at uniting all non-Islamist groups to force Morsi to rescind his edicts. Its leaders include three of the

YOUR VIEW / LETTER

We don’t need a casino in Woolwich To the Editor, I was intrigued with your Nov. 24, 2012 coverage of the public meeting in Woolwich specific to the question of a Casino for Woolwich. While you laid out well the OLG position you failed to pay much attention to many of the key presentations against bringing a casino to Woolwich. Dr. David Wolkoff, M.D., the psychiatrist who lives with his family in Breslau, made a powerful presentation coming out of his experience as former head of addictions at Homewood in Guelph. He noted many instances of the negative impacts of gambling on patients there. Then there was the very thorough presentation of Rob Simpson, now retired from his position of being executive director of the Ontario Problem Gambling Research Centre who made many

candidates who ran against Morsi in the election earlier this year. But that may not be enough. The truth is that the elections produced a parliamentary majority and a president who want to impose Islamic law, and that its opponents are using various legal devices in an attempt to stop the process. Moreover, a new constitution imposing Islamic law would almost certainly get a “yes” in a referendum. But the other truth is that majorities in a democracy should not try to impose their religious and social views on large minorities who do not share them. Morsi is already showing signs of wanting to compromise – but, as ElBaradei pointed out, he cannot take these extreme measures and then offer to “split the difference.” Egypt is in for a rough ride. points about the negative consequences of gambling on individuals and communities. He especially emphasized the little financial return to the communities for the millions of dollars sucked out of their communities. What about the young couple where she spoke so well about the alternatives that have been introduced into Woolwich when the Agriculture Society pulled out and went to Centre Wellington? All of which are family friendly and have enhanced our community. Then there was the fellow who really questioned the whole issue of “private sector involvement” asking the pertinent question who these people might be. Are they big USA operators of gambling casinos? We don’t have a clue, but you can bet your bottom dollar (if you’re a betting person) they will have a major grab. While, as I said at the public meeting, this all seems like a “big joke” that here we are after 10 years dealing with a question we dealt with then. There is no doubt many forms of gambling

are here to stay and we are bombarded with it all. However, we do not need, nor do many of us want to see a casino, with slots and gambling tables located here in Woolwich. We are much too caring a community and health conscious to tap into this kind of venue as a source to pay our bills. Let’s continue to build our communities and the township on values and activities that strengthen us equally.

T ROHR, ST. JACOBS

How about a casino for Jigs Hollow? To the Editor, I sincerely hope that when considering the merits of allowing gambling in Woolwich Township that council and staff use the same good planning sense that was apparent in their decision to approve the Jigs Hollow gravel pit in the beautiful Winterbourne Valley.

Come to think of it, the valley might also be considered an ideal location for a casino. There’s lots of room for parking and it is close to both Conestogo and Winterbourne, providing easy access (and an outlet) for the many the residents of these communities who can no longer enjoy their properties due to the dust, noise and unsightly views of the gravel pit. The neon lights shouldn’t be a problem either, since the township should be able to find an expert that will state there will be no “unacceptable impact.” Perhaps the revenue generated from gambling would offset the lost revenue the township faces from the decrease in tourism and property values. Kudos to Coun. Bonnie Bryant for having the integrity to be a woman of her word. The mayor might want to takes notes. Now, when is the next election? LAURIE BREED, WINTERBOURNE

It’s clear who’s to blame for gravel pit fiasco To the Editor, Who is to blame for allowing a gravel pit to go ahead in the Winterbourne Valley? Is it the mayor, who was elected largely on a platform of “no gravel pits” but ultimately voted in favour of the Jigs Hollow Pit? Is it our elected council members, who, with the exception of Coun. Bonnie Bryant, seemed unable or unwilling to understand just what is at stake here? Or is it the planning staff, who failed to ask for a cultural heritage impact study as required by OPA 13? For those folks unfamiliar with OPA 13, it is an amendment to the Official Plan that was supposed to “clarify the requirements and expectations” for gravel pit applications. Now, the township spent a great deal of time and money on OPA

13, but for some reason that the residents don’t quite understand, the mayor, most of the councillors and the planning staff chose to ignore it in this case. OPA 13 requires “an identification of all cultural heritage resources” and a quick trip to tourism section on the township’s own website reveals the existence of a historical driving tour, the Grand Valley Trail, a heritage bridge, a heritage river, and uninterrupted views over the Winterbourne Valley, which are all considered cultural heritage resources. They must have forgotten to look at their own website. No, clearly the blame for the ruination of the Winterbourne Valley must be borne by the residents. Despite years of trying, we failed to convince the township that perhaps it’s bad planning to locate a noisy, dusty, ugly gravel pit and asphalt recycling facility in a LETTERS | 13


COMMENT | 13

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

FROM | 12

valley that is scenic, rich in heritage resources and overlooked by two communities. Ultimately, we have failed in our duty to look out for the residents’ best interests. No, wait a minute, I’m getting confused: wasn’t that the township’s job?

ISABEL PRICE, WINTERBOURNE

Council failed to protect the public interest To the Editor, Re: Jigs Hollow gravel pit approval. I teach my children by example to exercise their right to vote, and that their vote will make a difference. However, this week they learned a lesson in futility, and that in order to be elected, politicians can make promises, but are not required to keep them. The residents of Winterbourne, Conestogo and area surrounding this gravel pit location, made their position clear at the last election and voted in a new mayor and council that promised to work on behalf of the residents and fight the multiple gravel pit applications in our community.

This gravel pit location does not offer one benefit for Woolwich residents, which is why I find it difficult to understand how our mayor and council could vote in favour of the application. It appears that Bonnie Bryant was the only councillor truly working on our behalf and in our best interest. I feel cheated, and consequently now am forced to endure 12 hours a day – for an undetermined number of years – of noise, dust, excessive truck traffic, pollution and an unsightly view. I am disappointed with the OMB’s decision, especially after the testimony of residents at the final OMB hearing. The residents brought forward many discrepancies and inconsistencies in information and studies submitted on behalf of the applicant. These discrepancies were brushed aside simply because the residents were not so-called experts. One does not need a formal degree in a specific field to use common sense. The process and approval of this gravel pit gives me no confidence that any of the so-called guidelines or limitations put on this pit will be enforced. How

will the residents really know what goes on, metres from our homes and schools? Who will monitor the outside topsoil, asphalt and concrete recycling brought into this pit to ensure that it is not contaminated? I am surprised that GRCA and MNR have

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signed off on this application, when the Grand River, a water source for over half-a-million people downstream, is in close proximity, and it is known that a drainage ditch from this aggregate pit will run into it. Our peaceful valley will be replaced with tailgates slamming, backup beepers, power shovels, crushing machinery, engine and other noises generated from the pit. Surely there will be an impact from the exhaust of crushing machinery and trucks, not to mention unknown contaminants in the dust. Our pristine view of the Grand River and surrounding fields will be replaced with artificial berms and a few trees that, in my opinion, won’t hide the stockpiles of aggregate, machinery and gaping holes, especially when Winterbourne is well above the elevation of this pit, possibly as much as 40 feet. Residents and visitors to our area will be less inclined to walk, run, bike, and even drive on Peel Street past the bridge. Perhaps residents in the area should apply for an MPAC reassessment, since I doubt property values will be increasing

as much as estimated over the (undetermined length of) time this pit will be in operation. So perhaps there is a plus side, and my property taxes will be lowered? And, perhaps elephants will fly. Trucks loaded with gravel do not mix well with horse-drawn buggies or young Mennonite children walking to their school. There are no sidewalks to buffer these children from heavy trucks. Throw in a foggy or dark morning and the risk of harm becomes even greater. The intersection of Jigs Hollow Road and Northfield Drive is already a hazard. What about the impact of increased truck traffic in Conestogo? As residents, I do not believe we should have had to make it our job to fight

gravel pit applications. It’s my understanding that is why we vote in our mayor and councillors, to work on our behalf and in our best interest. I commend those citizens (and Coun. Bonnie Bryant) who have fought this application on behalf of the residents. For many years, and especially at the OMB hearing, they have done an outstanding job. Maybe they should run in the next election. Perhaps a casino on this site would have been a better option, with no environmental concerns. The township would have received a sizeable benefit in revenue. For residents, it would be less of a gamble.

MARG MINSTER, WINTERBOURNE

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14 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

SPORTS HOCKEY / JUNIOR C

HOCKEY / JUNIOR B

Kings post another four points Pair of wins puts Elmira in third place in Midwestern Conference with record of 14-8-2 ELENA MAYSTRUK

The boys in green had a good weekend on the ice, coming away with four points after wins over Listowel and Brampton. A new addition to the Sugar Kings team had a chance to show his stuff, as well, getting his first goal for Elmira Nov. 23 against the Cyclones. Steven Jakiela was acquired in a trade for defenceman Clayton Greer. “That’s probably one of the toughest buildings to play in. We were real pleased with how we played. Hayden Neuman played net for us and he made saves when we needed him to. Our power play was very, very good Friday night,” said Sugar Kings head coach Dean DeSilva. The coach was proud of the tough 3-2 win against Listowel, where the Kings opened the scoring midway through the first frame when Craig Johnson and Jake Weidner set up Brady Campbell. Listowel evened things up with a goal of their own at 17:34, but the second period would see Elmira start to dominate the game when Jake Weidner potted one at 11:12. The two teams were jostling for goals with the Kings receiving nine of the 16 penalties awarded in the game, racking up a total of 24 minutes. The visitors secured a two-goal lead 16 minutes into the third frame when Jakiela scored his first as a King. The 6’2”, 220-pound forward was acquired No-

Jacks shut the door en route to pair of wins Netminder Josh Heer stops everything he faces as Wellesley hands defeat Burford 3-0, Norfolk 6-0. ELENA MAYSTRUK

Sugar Kings Zac Coulter and Mitch Wright try to corral the puck during Sunday’s game against the Brampton Bombers at the WMC. Elmira skated to a 3-1 victory, the second of two over the weekend. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER] vember 21 from the Kitchener Dutchmen. Listowel would make it a one-goal final by potting a goal at 19:09, but it went into the books as a road win. Back at home for Sunday’s game; the Kings were

ready for the Brampton Bombers. “They work very hard, we knew that coming in. We’d beaten them pretty good early in the year but they’ve improved a lot. They’re one of the more physical teams in our

league we had to be prepared for that,” DeSilva said of the competition, which ended 3-1. Frey made it rain hats and mitts as onlookers tossed donations onto the ice for Woolwich Community Services, signaling

Elmira’s first goal of the night just 4:46 in. The night’s win would depend on Mackenzie Blackwood’s goaltending, as he kept pucks out of the Kings’ net while both

There were a couple of zeros on the board last week as the Applejacks took on Burford and Norfolk. Happily for Wellesley fans, the goose eggs applied to the opponents, with the Bulldogs falling 3-0 Saturday and the Rebels going down by a score of 6-0 the following day. If that wasn’t enough of an accomplishment, the Jacks were playing with a skeleton of a lineup, dressing only 12 players due to injuries. The undermanned success is pleasing to the coaches, who feel the Jacks are making great strides as a team. “Our power play is improving, our penalty calls improved. Our work ethic is the main thing: our work ethic has really improved,” said head coach Kevin Fitzpatrick. Holding second place in the McConnell Conference, the Burford Bulldogs didn’t make it easy and played a skilled game, despite their loss on Saturday, Fitzpatrick said. The visitors kept goalie Josh Heer busy defending

KINGS | 16

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SPORTS | 15

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

WOOLWICH MIDGETS TAKE TOP SPOT IN TORONTO

THE SCORE WOOLWICH WILDCATS

Atom: LL #3

Novice: LL #1 Nov. 24 vs. Ayr Woolwich: 2 Ayr: 2 Goals: Mitchell Brubacher x2 Nov. 25 vs. Beverly Woolwich: 1 Beverley: 4

Novice: LL #2 Nov. 24 vs. St. George Woolwich: 2 St. George: 2 Goals: Nolan Karger, Thomas Hill-Ring Assists: Ryan Brubacher Novice: LL# 3 Nov. 24 vs. Paris Woolwich: 8 Paris: 2 Goals: Turner Duldhardt Coleton Benham x4, Michael Gear Corbin Schmidt x2 Assists: Ethan Murr

Novice: LL# 4 Nov. 24 vs. Paris Woolwich: 0 Paris: 1 Nov. 25 vs. Twin Centre Woolwich: 2 Twin Centre: 6 Goals: Ryan Curtis x2

x2, Brett Allen, Lucas Huber, Keaton McLaughlin, Gavin Nov. 25 vs. Embro Roemer, Trevor Ferretti LL#3: 3 Embro: 3 Atom: MINOR AA Goals: Cole Seabrook Cameron Nov.16 vs. Guelph Martin Jordan Dickieson Woolwich: 5 Guelph: 1 Assists: Nate Curtis, Max Nitsche Goals: Owen Lee x2, Alex Hutton x2, Kyler Austin, Atom: B Assists: Cameron Leonard x4, Nov. 24 vs. Grand River Owen Lee x2, Alex Hutton x2 Woolwich: 0 Nov. 18 vs. Burlington Grand River: 2 Woolwich: 2 Burlington: 6 Atom: MINOR AA Goals: Kyler Austin, Tyler Martin Nov. 23 vs. Brampton Assists: Ethan Birmingham, Woolwich: 5 Tyler Martin, Kyler Austin Brampton: 4 Nov. 26 vs. Flamborough Goals: Owen Lee, Alex Hutton, Colton Schmitt x2, Cole Slade Woolwich: 1 Flamborough: 2 Assists: AJ Mitchell x2, Alex Goals: Tyler Martin Hutton, Owen Lee, Cameron Leonard, Ethan Birmingham, Colton Schmitt, Tyler Martin PeeWee: LL# 1 Nov. 25 vs. Orangeville Nov. 24 vs. Twin Centre Woolwich: 1 Woolwich: 1 Orangeville: 2 Twin Centre: 0 Goals: Kyler Austin Goals: Noah Bauman Assists: Kolin Weigel Assists: Kyle Gingrich, Jake Good Shutout: Liam O’Brien

Juvenile: A

Woolwich Wildcats Major Midget A team won gold at the 2012 Toronto Wolverines CAA Cup Nov. 23-25. The Wildcats beat the Erindale Spitfires 2-1 to become the tournament champs. Players: Keaton Weiss, Travis Bauman, Evan Yantha, Cameron Mohle, Tyler Seguin, Adam Cook, Eric Hanley, Matt Lair, Grant Kernick, Adrian Gilles, Matt Townsend, McKinley Ceaser, Bo Uridil, Tim Shuh, Sebastian Huber, Tyler Mayberry, Alex Uttley. Absent: Mitch Kernick. Coaches: Rick Moser, Kevin Moser, Ryan Dowler and Luke Shantz. [SUBMITTED] Hespeler: 1 Goals: Jacob Uridil Assists: Owen Read

Atom: MAJOR AA

Nov. 20 vs. Ancaster Woolwich: 9 Ancaster: 0 Goals: Ryan Elliott x3, Brett Allen, Nathan Taylor, Conner Bradley, Jesse Martin, Isiah Katsube, Ben Witmer Assists: Blake Roemer x3, Novice: AE Nathan Taylor x2, Isiah Katsube Nov. 21 vs. Centre Wellington x2, Ryan Elliott, Brett Allen, Centre Wellington: 4 Trevor Ferretti, Lucas Huber, Matt Woolwich: 1 Fleischmann, Conner Bradley, Goals: Carter Cousineau Gavin Roemer Assists: Adam Pauls, Aiden Von Shutout: Simon Huber Kannen Nov. 17 vs. Oakville Woolwich: 1 Novice: MAJOR A Oakville: 1 Nov. 26 vs. Guelph Goals: Blake Roemer Woolwich: 2 Assists: Ryan Elliott, Nathan Guelph: 2 Taylor Goals: Carter Rollins, Ian Speiran Nov. 18 vs. Centre Wellington Assists: Sebastian Garrett Woolwich: 3 Centre Wellington: 3 Atom: LL #1 Goals: Brett Allen x2, Ryan Nov. 24 vs. Plattsville Elliott Woolwich: 2 Assists: Isiah Katsube x2, Trevor Plattsville: 2 Ferretti, Conner Bradley Goals: Matthew Brubacher, Mac Nov. 24 vs. Caledon Benham Woolwich: 3 Assists: Ben Fretz, Braxten Breen Caledon: 2 Goals: Blake Roemer, Jake Atom: LL# 2 Clemmer, Isiah Katsube Nov. 24 vs. New Hamburg Assists: Gavin Roemer, Brett Woolwich: 4 Allen, Ryan Elliott New Hamburg: 2 Nov. 25 vs. Brampton Goals: Jonathon Dingelstad x3, Woolwich: 6 Matthew Yorke Brampton: 1 Assists: Lucas Weber, Simon Goals: Conner Bradley x2, Shantz, Patrick Perry, Cole Keaton McLaughlin, Blake Brubacher Roemer, Isiah Katsube, Ryan Elliott Assists: Isiah Katsube x2, Ryan Elliott x2, Blake Roemer

PeeWee: LL# 2

Bantam: MAJOR A

Nov. 24 vs. Tavistock Woolwich: 3 Tavistock: 1 Goals: Corbin Kaufman, Tim Brunkard, Ryan Belanger Assists: Corbin Kaufman x2, Ryan Belanger

Nov. 23 vs. Georgetown Woowich: 4 Georgetown: 2 Goals: Daniel Kauth x2, Ryley Cribbin x2 Assists: Tyler Martin, Kelby Martin

Midget: LL #3 PeeWee: MINOR AA Jan. 10 vs. Georgetown Woolwich: 2 Georgetown: 2 Goals: Nolan Hislop, Josh Martin Assists: Josh Martin, Sam Davidson, Austin Cousineau, Owen Harnock

PeeWee: MAJOR A Nov. 7 vs. Guelph Guelph: 3 Woolwich: 1 Goals: Riley Runstedler Assists: Brad Hale Nov. 24 vs. Georgetown Woolwich: 5 Georgetown: 1 Goals: Jordan Lee, Chase Mooder, Garrett Reitzel, Nick Ravelle x2 Assists: Jordan Lee, Daniel Carr x 2, Chase Mooder, Riley Runstedler Nov. 25 vs. Brampton Woolwich: 1 Brampton: 1 Goals: Kyle Bruder

Bantam: MINOR A Nov. 18 Woolwich: 1

Oct. 12 vs. LL#2 LL#3: 8 LL#2: 3 Goals: Spencer Anderson x2, Brent Fay x3, Sean Wilton, Spencer Inglis x2 Assists: Josh Totzke x2,Spencer Inglis x2, Joseph Fife, Joe Dube, Brad Talbot x2, Brad Thomas x3, Jasper Bender x2, Drew Hoffer, Mike Sololowski x2 Oct. 19 vs. Embro Woolwich: 4 Embro: 4 Goals: Blake Cabeldu, Alex Bean x2, Brent Fay Assists: Brad Talbot x2, Joe Dubue, Blake Cabeldu, Brent Fay, Sean Wilton Oct. 20 vs. Tavistock Woolwich: 13 Tavistock: 4 Goals: Joseph Fife x2, Brad Thomas x1, Spencer Inglis x4, Sean Wilton x2, Joe Dube x2, Josh Totzke, Brad Talbot Assists:Joseph Fife x2, Spencer Inglis x1, Alex Bean, Brad Thomas x3,Joe Dube x2, Josh Totzke x3, Brent Fay x2 Oct. 26 vs. Beverly Woolwich: 6 Beverly: 6

Goals: Spencer Inglis x2, Blake Cabeldu x3, Jacob Bruder Assists: Brent Fay x2, Brad Talbot x2 Nov. 8 vs. St. Clements Woolwich: 6 St. Clements: 1 Goals: Jasper Bender, Mike Sokolowski x2, Brent Fay, Joseph Fife, Jacob Bruder Assists: Kyle Arsenault x2, Blake Cabeldu x2, Spencer Inglis, Brent Fay, Joseph Fife, Jacob Bruder Nov. 10 vs. Embro Woolwich: 11 Embro: 3 Goals: Brad Talbot x2, Brad Thomas, Spencer Inglis, Blake Cabeldu x3, Mike Sokolowski x2, Drew Hoffer, Joseph Fife Assists: Blake Cabeldu x2, Brent Fay, Joe Dubue x3, Alex Bean, Jasper Bender

Juvenile: A 13 Nov. 23 vs. Caledonia Woolwich: 6 Caledonia: 3 Goals: RJ Good, Clinton Dechert, Tommy Bearinger x2, Alex Albrecht, Brent Kron, Assists: Clinton Dechert, Justin Van Elswyk, Brandon Brubacher, RJ Good x2

Juvenile: A 62 Nov 25 vs. Port Colborne Woolwich: 14 Port Colborne: 0 Goals: Clinton Dechert x3, Alex Albrecht x2, Ryan Ament, Andrew Moore, RJ Good, Justin Schlupp, Logan white x2,

Brandon Brubacher, Justin Van Elswyk Assists: Jordan Moore x4, Dalton Taylor x3, Andrew Moore, Logan White x4, Brandon Brubacher, Ryan Ament x2, Alex Albrecht, Justin Van Elswyk Shutout: Blake Ziegler

HOCKEY TOURNAMENTS

Novice: AE

Dan Pulham Memorial Tournament London, ON |Nov.23-25 Game 1 vs. Milton Woolwich: 1 Milton: 4 Goals: Sam Siopiolosz Assists: Mitchell Hartman, Owen Brown Game 2 vs. North London Woolwich: 3 North London: 4 Goals: Oscar Fitch, Shelby Rempel, Sam Siopiolosz Assists: Mitchell Hartman x 2, Adam Pauls, Lucas Radler, Owen Brown, Logan Beard Game 3 vs. Oakridge Woolwich: 7 Oakridge: 1 Goals: Lucas Carson x 2, Sam Siopiolosz, Adam Pauls, Carter Cousineau, Logan Beard, Lucas Radler Assists: Logan Beard, Mitchell Hartman, Shelby Rempel, Lucas Carson, Adam Pauls, Jocelyn Pickard, Aiden Von Kannen

Novice: MAJOR A

Guelph Powerplay Tournament Guelph, ON |Nov. 23-26

Game 1 vs. Brampton Woolwich: 2 Brampton: 2 Goals: Ian Speiran, Sebastian Garrett Assists: Andrew Gear x2 Game 2 vs. New Hamburg Woolwich: 1 New Hamburg: 3 Goals: Brett Moser Assists: Ian Speiran, Zack Bender Game 3 vs. Guelph Woolwich: 4 Guelph: 3 Goals: Ian Speiran x3, Sebastian Garrett Assists: Brett Moser, Zack Bender, Sebastian Garrett Game 4 vs. Nepean Woolwich: 3 Nepean: 2 Goals: Ian Speiran x3 Assists: Nolan Bridge, Tyler Brezynskie Game 5 vs. New Hamburg Woolwich: 1 New Hamburg: 4 Goals: Brett Moser Assists: Andrew Gear

Aaron Yeck Memorial Tournament Embro, ON |Nov.24 Game 1 vs. Embro Woolwich: 1 Embro: 2 Game 2 vs. Bradford Woolwich: 7 Bradford: 1 Game 3 vs. Ilderton Woolwich: 9 Ilderton: 1

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PeeWee: MINOR A

London Tournament London, ON |Nov.23-25 Game 1 vs. Oakville Woolwich: 2 Oakville: 1 Goals: Jackson Hale, Kieffer Beard Assists: Tyler Horst, Seth Morrison, Travis Weber Game 2 vs. Kitchener Woolwich: 2 Kitchener: 1 Goals: Zac Pickard, Ben Weigel Assists: Kieffer Beard, Ethan Young, CJ Sider Game 3 vs. Stratford Stratford: 2 Woolwich: 1 Goals: Kayden Zacharczuk Assists: Jackson Hale Game 4 vs. Richmond Hill Woolwich: 3 Richmond Hill: 0 Goals: Kieffer Beard, Ethan Young, Tyler Horst Assists: Zac Pickard x 2, Seth Morrison, CJ Sider, Ben Weigel Shutout: Bryce Dettweiler Game 5 vs. Kitchener Kitchener: 2 Woolwich: 1 Goals: Jackson Hale

Atom: LL #3

MARTIN’S PHARMACY PROUDLY SERVING OUR COMMUNITY FOR OVER 10 YEARS.

STORE HOURS: Monday,Tuesday & Thursday 9:00 am - 7:00 pm Wednesday & Friday 9:00 am - 5:00 pm

Greg Dietz Memorial Tournament Mildmay, ON |Nov.10-17 Game 1 vs. Zurich Woolwich: 1 Zurich: 3 Goals: Jordan Moore Assists: Logan white, Dalton Taylor Game 2 vs. Saugeen Shores Woolwich: 3 Saugeen Shores: 1 Goals: Ryan Ament x2, Justin Schlupp Assists: Josh Wade, Clinton Dechert, Tommy Bearinger Shutout: Alex Martin Game 3 vs. Shallow Lake Woolwich: 4 Shallow Lake: 2 Goals: Ryan Ament, RJ Good X 2, Josh Wade Assists: RJ Good, Dalto Taylor Game 4 vs. Wainfleet Woolwich: 4 Wainfleet: 1 Goals: Alex Albrecht, Ryan Ament, RJ Good, Clinton Dechert Assists: Ryan Ament, RJ Good

Alan S. Martin B.Sc. Phm Pharmacist / Owner

Midget: MAJOR A

2012 Toronto Wolverines CAA Cup Toronto, ON |Nov.23-25 Game 1 vs. Erindale Woolwich: 2 Erindale: 2 Goals: Grant Kernick, Bo Uridil

CONTINUED ON PG 17

ST. JACOBS


16 | SPORTS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

NOT SO GREAT OUTDOORSMAN / STEVE GALEA

It’s the time of year when bucks roll out their cheesy deer pick-up lines OPEN COUNTRY As I write this column, there are four deer milling in the woods just behind my office window – the most distant is within 20 yards of my desk. Every one is a doe that is eligible, good looking and of age. In short, they are what the bucks in this area would refer to as fine. I only mention this because the second whitetail rut is fast approaching – it follows the first by 28 days, I’m told.

For those who are not familiar with the term rut, it describes the period when the does come into heat and the bucks vie to breed them. Having once been a young single buck myself, rut seems to me to be a very good word to describe this. You see, when I was younger, every time I suggested similar activities to the young women I knew, they flatly denied my request and often laughed uncontrollably. Therefore, in those dark days, when characterizing my love life, my buddies would tell everyone who would listen that I was in a rut. Getting back to the deer

– in the second rut, all those does that were not bred in the first rut will, theoretically at least, be receptive to the awkward advances of young and old bucks alike. And maybe, it’s just me projecting, but I’d like to think that even the short, middleaged, balding bucks stand half a chance. As with all species, during this critical period, the males will do incredibly reckless and stupid things to impress their potential suitors. They smash antlers with each other to establish dominance; they throw caution to the wind, blindly following the scent of a doe

in heat and, in keeping with males of all species, they do things that they think will impress the opposite sex but that probably don’t. Bucks, for instance, will paw up the leaves and urinate in the bare earth that they have scraped up in an effort to attract does. For some reason, they believe this is very attractive to females of their species. I can only go by one experience, but if it was any indication, believe me, they don’t. Still, in one of the true miracles of nature, the bucks and does finally do pair up, mate and create offspring. I’m no

biologist, but I can only assume it is because the bucks have perfected a few great pick-up lines. I’m not talking about crass one-liners like, “Hey it looks like I’m not the only one with a nice rack” or “Who has four cloven hooves and is hung like an elk? This guy.” No, I suspect the successful bucks show a little more respect and creativity. Perhaps something like “Are you from the Tennessee sub-species? Because you are the only ten I see.” Or the ever popular, “You know, hunters aren’t the only ones who’d like to get close to you.”

I suspect there are more. And, unless I am completely off-base, sometime within the next week or two, the bucks around here will be using pick up lines just like this to woo the ladies in their lives. Or, if my past experiences is any indication, at least to make them shake their heads in utter disbelief. Either way, the rut will continue as it always has and, come spring, many does will be dropping fawns created in these brief encounters. Many bucks, on the other hand, will be left wondering why they laughed uncontrollably.

JACKS: No time to rest on laurels as Wellesley finishes this week with three games in three nights FROM | 14

the net, keeping the puck firmly in the Jacks’ territory for much of the game. Heer had an outstanding weekend as he kept everything he faced out of the net. With Heer holding the fort, teammate Devon Wagner was able to get the Jacks’ offense rolling, potting one at 4:19 of the first to put the home team up 1-0. Despite being back on the heels for much of the second, the Jacks again providing the only offense of the period. This time it was Taylor Doering doing the honours at 14:12. Troy Williams would make the lead 3-0 with the game’s final goal at 7:09 of the third, even as Heer continued to work hard in defence of his first of two shutouts. He would earn his second on the road against Norfolk the next day, as Wellesley dominated the Rebels 6-0. Devon Wagner, Derek Lebold and Williams each scored twice, with Wagner getting on the scoreboard first at 2:26 in the first frame and Lebold following just seconds after to put the Jacks up 2-0 in

short order. Despite the final score on the board, Norfolk held its own at times, posting 41 shots on Heer, who remained unbeatable, versus Wellesley’s total of 48. Norfolk’s efforts weren’t enough to keep Jacks at bay, as Williams got two more in a row at 10:25 and 17:34. In the final 20 minutes, Lebold and Wagner would cement the win with two more consecutive goals, Lebold’s at 16:22 with assists from Doering and Steve Tait, and Wagner’s just 18 seconds later. The wins were sweeter still given the short bench. In two previous games against Hagersville and Burford, coaches were able to pull players from Wellesley’s Midget affiliate to fill in. Last weekend, due to a tournament the Jacks won the victory on their own. The injured players should be back on the ice in the next couple of weeks. The week finishes on a busy stretch for the Applejacks, who return home Friday night to face Delhi after a game in Ayr the night before. Norfolk is in Wellesley Saturday night looking for revenge. The puck drops at 7:30 for both home games.

With barely enough bodies on the roster, the Jacks dominated last weekend’s competition, including a 3-0 win over the Burford Bulldogs at home Saturday night. Top left, Devon Wagner takes control of the puck. Top right, Steve Tait chases down a Bulldog. Above, Mark Detzler prevents the opposition from getting a scoring chance. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

KINGS: Elmira faces the conference’s best and worst this weekend, lose Cass Frey for one game FROM | 14

teams went on the offence in a back-and-forth attempt to score, with 36 shots for Elmira and 32 for Brampton. Kings launched an attack first as the boys attempted three consecutive shots on net. Brampton

got the puck out of their end and tried to score on a breakaway but were unsuccessful. In the second it was Bomber Erik Angeli’s time to sweat as a constant onslaught on the goalie’s net earned the Kings a second goal at 5:13, this time off of Campbell’s stick.

Brampton brought the game to the Kings in their own attack, but Blackwood held his own again until Cass Frey turned the action back the other way, scoring glove-side on a breakaway at 15:21. It was an emotional contest at times, as the team took penalties to the tune

of 29 calls and 64 minutes, 50 of which the Kings spent in the bin. “I think there was a few questionable calls. The penalties were not as obvious as some of the calls that were made. By no means do I think that a lot of those penalties were deserved,” DeSilva said.

The Kings’ defences would be tested in third, when the Bombers renewed their effort, allowing Josh Villaflor to score for his team four minutes into the frame, but that was as close as they’d get before the buzzer. On Monday, forward Cass Frey was handed a

one-game suspension for a check-from-behind penalty doled out in the game’s dying minutes. In Caledonia Friday night to take on the conference-leading Corvairs, the Kings return home to face Guelph on Sunday night at the WMC. Game time is 7 p.m.


SPORTS | 17

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

LANCERS VICTORIOUS OVER ST. DAVID’S

THE SCORE CONTINUED Assists: Tyler Seguin, Tim Shuh Game 2 vs. Toronto Woolwich: 7 Toronto: 0 Goals: Adrian Gilles, Sebastian Huber x3, Grant Kernick, McKinlay Ceaser x2 Assists: Alex Uttley, Evan Yantha, McKinley Ceaser, Matt Townsend, Grant Kernick Shutout: Travis Bauman Game 3 vs. Mississauga Woolwich: 6 Mississauga: 1 Goals: Tyler Seguin x2 Grant Kernick Cameron Mohle Sebastian Huber McKinley Ceaser Assists: Tim Shuh x2 Alex Uttley x2 Cameron Mohle Matt Townsend McKinley Ceaser Adrian Gilles Game 4 vs. Missisauga Woolwich: 5 Mississauga: 1 Goals: Bo Uridil, Tyler Seguin, Cameron Mohle x2, Evan Yantha Assists: Adrian Gilles, Tim Shuh, Eric Hanley x2, Evan Yantha x2, Tyler Seguin, Matt Lair Game 5 vs. Erindale Woolwich: 2 Erindale: 1 Goals: Grant Kernick, Matt Townsend Assists: Evan Yantha, Cameron Mohle, McKinley Ceaser, Grant Kernick

WOOLWICH WILD

Novice: LL# 7108 Nov. 24 vs. Wilmont Woolwich: 3

Wilmot: 2 Goals: Ayla Brubacher x3 Assists: Sophia Hanley, Madison Martin, Taya Diefenbacher x2

Bantam: LL Nov. 21 vs. Kitchener Woolwich: 4 Kitchener: 3 Goals: Rosemarie Hartman x3, Amanda Fleischmann x1 Assists: Amanda Fleischmann x1, Karli Keen x1, Lauren Windfield-Ward x1, Jessica Schoop x1, Alyssa WinfieldWard x1

Midget: B Nov. 27 vs. Mitchell Woolwich: 1 Mitchell: 0 Goals: Claire Hanley Shutout: Lauren Lesage

HOCKEY TOURNAMENTS

Bantam: B

Kitchener Fallfest Tournaments Kitchener, ON |Nov.23-25 Game 1 vs. Tillsonburg Woolwich: 1 Tillisonburg: 2 Goals: Jaycee Kaufman

Bantam: BB Game 1 vs. Orangeville Woolwich: 4 Orangeville: 0 Goals: Rachel Weber x2, Leah Bauman, Meghan Martin Assists: Sydney Meunier x3, Michelle Wang

Shutout: Corinne Roesink Game 2 vs. Clarington Woolwich: 2 Clarington: 0 Goals: Rachel Weber, Michelle Wang Assists: Marlee Kernick, Meghan Martin Shutout: Megan Harron Game 3 vs. Niagara Woolwich: 1 Niagara: 1 Goals: Marlee Kernick Game 4 vs. Stoney Creek Woolwich: 2 Stoney Creek: 0 Goals: Emily Willms, Megan Chapman Assists: Corinne Roesink

TWIN CENTRE STARS

Novice: LL# 2 Nov. 25 vs. Twin Centre Twin Centre: 6 Woolwich: 2 Goals: Thomas Eggert x5, Noah Gedcke Assists: Nolan Straus x 2, Jacob Monk x2, Alan Duckworth x2, Michael Boller, Alex Lavallee

PeeWee: REP Nov. 22 vs. Ingersoll Twin Centre: 3 Ingersoll: 0 Goals: Mitch Esbaugh, Tyson Bolender, Cole Bender Assists: Josh Monk, Nick Zyta, Cole Bender, Tyson Bolender Shutout: Nathan Belcourt

TWIN CENTRE HERICANES

PeeWee: LL Nov. 25 vs. Cambridge Twin Center: 1 Cambridge: 4 Goals: Grace Kalbfleisch

Intermediate: LL Nov. 23 vs. Cambridge Twin Centre: 1 Cambridge: 0 Goals: Holly Lorentz Shutout: Lindsay Dietrich

HOCKEY TOURNAMENTS

Atom: REP

Stratford Acres Tournament Stratford, ON |Nov.23-25 Game 1 vs. Stratford Twin Centre: 0 Stratford: 2 Game 2 vs. Brantford Twin Centre: 3 Brantford: 1 Goals: Blythe Bender, Avery Bender, Megan Jantzi Game 3 vs. Wilmont Twin Centre: 1 Wilmont: 1 Goals: Blythe Bender Assists: Emily Whitney Game 4 vs. Wilmont Twin Centre: 1 Wilmot: 2 Goals: Blythe Bender Assists: Kara Dietrich The EDSS boys’ hockey team defeated the visiting St. David’s Celtics 4-3 at the Dan Snyder Arena on Nov. 27. Elmira’s Jordan Moore potted two goals, with teammates Spencer Brick and Matt Bannon adding to the tally. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

DONATIONS WANTED The Co-operators in Elmira will be collecting food items and gift card donations for the Christmas Goodwill Program.

CHRISTMAS

Donations will be distributed for children or entire families through the Goodwill Program co-ordinated by Woolwich Community Services.

in Concert

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Donations can be made at our office from November 19th to December 14th.

Thank you for your support.

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Home Auto Life Investments Group Business Farm Travel

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18 | GIFT IDEAS

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

GIFTIDEAS THE HOLIDAYS ARE JUST AROUND THE CORNER! BE SURE TO GET THE PERFECT PRESENT FOR EVERYONE ON YOUR LIST AT YOUR LOCAL STORES.

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GIFT IDEAS | 19

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

GIFTIDEAS THE HOLIDAYS ARE JUST AROUND THE CORNER! BE SURE TO GET THE PERFECT PRESENT FOR EVERYONE ON YOUR LIST AT YOUR LOCAL STORES.

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20 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

VENTURE FOOD FOR THOUGHT/ OWEN ROBERTS

COMMUNITY BUSINESS / GIVING BACK

Soup’s on for those who need it most Culinary Studio plays host to Soup Sisters’ monthly event that provides food staple to local shelters

How much will consumers pay for animal welfare? FIELD NOTES

Jan Uffleman and Norma Weiner of the Soup Sisters found a good fit with the Culinary Studio’s Kirstie Herbstreit and Jody O’Malley, whose facility hosts monthly events where volunteers make soup for local shelters. ELENA MAYSTRUK Nothing fights the oncoming frosty weather like a warm bowl of hearty soup. Nobody knows that better than the Soup Sisters of Waterloo and the owners of The Culinary Studio in Kitchener. Jody O’Malley of St. Jacobs and business partner Kirstie Herbstreit of Waterloo are the owners of the culinary school who’ve been helping the Sisters with their mandate to deliver warm, homemade soups to charities and shel-

ters in Kitchener-Waterloo. Three Waterloo women started the local branch of the national non-profit last September, inviting residents of the region to visit The Culinary Studio for an aromatic evening of cooking and socializing while providing a service to the community. “They come in and use our space to create a hundred litres of soup to donate to charity,” O’Malley explained. By last October the soup-making event started by Norma Weiner, Sandi

McCrory and Jan Uffleman – which invites some 20 people to register and participate each month – was completely booked for a year in advance. The demand continues to grow, with people signing up for classes in September 2013. “The community really has embraced it and we’ve been fortunate because the community has supported us so well,” Weiner said. The Culinary Studio is a recreational cooking school that accommodates corporate events and farmers dinners while promot-

ing local foods. But one Tuesday night per month they host the Soup Sisters event where Herbstreit and O’Malley demonstrate safe knife techniques to visitors before they get down to cooking for a good cause. The $50 registration fee for the monthly event goes towards covering the expenses of using the venue and the products needed to make the soups. “It’s a break-even situation – no money for the Culinary Studio, no money for Soup Sisters – it just keeps the wheel in opera-

[ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

tion,” Weiner explained. One Tuesday each month, starting at 6 p.m., the Soup Sisters and a number of volunteers commandeer five stations at which 20 visitors make five different soups. The event’s participants choose from more than 50 recipes collected by the Soup Sisters organization, sent to local chapters on DVD. Classes have also made soups from recipes developed by the Culinary Studio. SOUP SISTERS | 21

You pay extra for some local foods, because they’re not mass produced. Likewise, you pay extra for certain imported foods, because they’re delicacies. So, will you also pay extra for food raised with the aboveaverage standards of animal welfare? That’s the question agricultural economist Jayson Lusk of Oklahoma State University asked the crowd gathered Wednesday night at the University of Guelph for the annual F.W. Presant Memorial Lecture, hosted by the Campbell Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare and supported by the Alumni Foundation of the Ontario Agricultural College. Lusk maintains that farmers will not maximize animal welfare unless they’re compensated for it. He believes in society, there’s a paradox: on one hand, consumers demand that farmers employ the highest standards of animal welfare, yet, at the cash register, consumers want the cheapest prices possible. Against this backdrop, he says farmers cannot afford exceptional animal welfare measures, because it costs too much money. So he’s proposing a type of animal welfare credit unit system, similar to carbon credits. According to his ROBERTS | 21


VENTURE | 21

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

SOUP SISTERS: Venue an ideal spot for volunteers to learn new recipes while helping others FROM | 20

“We make sure we have at least one vegetarian so that people here if they are vegetarian can enjoy [some] soup, but also at the shelters if anybody’s vegetarian,” said Weiner. The Sisters keep favorites in mind and make sure those popular choices like hamburger soup and chicken noodle are made on a regular basis, along with soups that accommodate possible dietary needs. All in all, the evening yields close to 100 litres of soup, with their creators rewarded with a bowl of their own, complete with a glass of wine and fresh-baked bread, before the night’s products are ladled into containers for delivery the next day. Though many of the participants come from clubs and organizations, many are there to celebrate anniversaries and personal

events by participating in a one-of-a-kind evening. “They come, they mingle, they laugh, they have fun; we get a demonstration on how to cut without cutting off our fingers with really sharp knives and they make soup – it’s a mixed affair. We’ve had more women than men but it’s wonderful,” O’Malley said. The local Soup Sisters chapter started with delivering to two local shelters last year. Merillac Place, a organization and threestory shelter for young mothers in Kitchener, and ROOF (Reaching Our Outdoor Friends), a Kitchenerbased organization that reaches out to youth and the homeless. Last month the Sisters were proud to bring The Women’s Crisis Service of Waterloo Region’s Anselma House into their fold as well. As a national charity

organization, Soup Sisters has a dozen branches throughout Canada. Other Ontario locations include Toronto, London and Ottawa. The Culinary Studio has been with Waterloo’s Soup Sisters from the start, O’Malley said. The organization held an event at the studio when they first started and fell in love with the central location known to many local residents as the former Vincenzo’s location at 740 Belmont Ave. W. “It’s a wonderful experience. A good time is had by all. It’s a beautiful venue and they are well equipped to accommodate what amounts to 20 participants,” Weiner said. Herbstreit and O’Malley have renovated the former food store (and one-time Beer Store) beyond recognition to include cozy, fully stocked cooking studio with all the trimmings,

including a demonstration area and high-end cooking equipment perfect for events like the Soup Sisters’ monthly get-togethers. “They are a new organization as well,” Weiner said

of the Culinary Studio. “This was a way of them doing something as well in the community. We get 20 new faces each month so it’s a great opportunity for the Culinary Studio to show who they are as well.

People are at least familiar with the physical site. They come in and see what the Culinary Studio has to offer.” For more information about the Soup Sisters, visit www.soupsisters.org.

Every month the Culinary Studio is host to the Soup Sisters’ event, which has a waiting list of those eager to help the cause. [ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

ROBERTS: Credit system proposed as a way to help farmers cover the costs of higher standards FROM | 20

vision, experts would gather to determine how much certain animal welfare practices were worth. Ultimately, these would become accepted industry wide. (Assigning these values would be quite a task, but agriculture has climbed bigger mountains before.) Then once these values were determined, farmers practicing them would be rewarded with credits they could use to both promote their own operations and sell to those who support

an elevated level of animal welfare. To Lusk’s way of thinking, among those who might buy these credits are vegans and vegetarians who, although not meat eaters themselves, accept that animal agriculture exists and want livestock to have the best life possible. He says others who might buy into the system include those who support small and large farmers dedicated to raising animals “the old fashioned way,” however they define it. That may

mean giving the animals free rein to roam within lesser confined spaces than their modern-raised counterparts, which seems to be one of the biggest gripes about today’s livestock production. Lusk’s approach has a long ways to go before it sees the light of day, but it underlines one of the main roles of a university in society – that is, to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas. Among those gathered to hear him Wednesday were several agricultur-

al college students who are destined to become farmers themselves. “Should we be setting up our farms with advanced animal welfare in mind?” one asked? Good question. The reality is that consumers, in some way, already pay for animal welfare, and farmers know it. Overwhelmingly, farmers look after their livestock, the beef, pork and chicken destined to end up on our plates. If they don’t, the value declines. Conceptually, it’s not unlike a car. Look

after it, and when it’s time to sell it, it’s worth something. Treat it poorly, and it’s trash. No one wants it. The same goes for animal agriculture. Well-treated animals are productive animals, appreciating assets in fact. Animals treated poorly aren’t valuable. They may have some value, but it’s not nearly what it could be. And considering that farming is a business, why then, for purely economic reasons, would farmers not treat their animals well? I think consumers already

expect farmers to practice the highest possible levels of animal welfare. It’s a matter of food safety, quality and economics. But moreover, it’s a matter of integrity. Society holds farmers in the highest esteem. That wouldn’t be the case if people thought farmers abused animals. Expectations exist on both sides of the farm gate about quality, and only time will tell whether animal welfare credits will take those expectations to an even higher level.

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22 | VENTURE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

Complete Automotive Maintenance & Repair Hometown Computer Experts Since 2003 112 Bonnie Cres., Elmira 519-669-5551 920 St. David St. N., Fergus 519-787-0006 www.realitybytescomputers.com Choosing a computer is simplified by consulting with your hometown computer professionals at Reality Bytes Computers. They are proof that you can get big box pricing and personal customer service. Owner Troy Witter and the team at Reality Bytes Computers will ask the right questions to be sure you are getting the right computer to handle your usage requirements within your budget. Additionally, they can provide networking solutions for access to the Internet or sharing files. If you want to discuss plans for backing up your data or keep your system free of malware such as Viruses, Spyware, Intrusions and Spam, just ask. Reality Bytes Computers first specialized in buying off-lease from corporations and selling them to other wholesalers and computer stores. Today, they have two retail operations offering desktop, tower and laptop computers, workstations and/or servers, and monitors from IBM/Lenovo, HP, Compaq, Dell, LG, plus all the needed accessories. If you want to upgrade your existing system, Reality Bytes can recommend quality components from respected brands. They are also your source for monitors, printers, wireless products, media storage devices, OS/software and networking. If you have a computer problem that needs professional attention, let the qualified technicians at Reality Bytes fix it, including slow running computers and dealing with virus removal or pesky adware pop-ups. Give the gift of information and power with Holiday Season gift ideas and stocking stuffers from Reality Bytes.

120 Oriole Parkway (Birdland Plaza) Elmira 519-669-1115 Whether it’s choosing from a large selection of gift items for the garden and home, or high quality supplies for attracting birds to your yard, Martha’s Mixes Wild Bird Store should be your destination. Many have found backyard bird feeding to be an enjoyable hobby by bringing nature close to home. When it comes to the best birdfeeding products, specially formulated seed blends and great advice, Martha’s Mixes has all your needs under one roof. Martha’s Mixes Wild Bird Store offers a wide array of bird feeders including many that are squirrel proof, nyjer seed feeders, eco friendly feeders, peanut feeders, suet and nectar feeders, etc. They also stock mounting hardware, pole augers, hooks and pest baffles. Martha’s Mixes carries respected brands such as Droll Yankees, Duncraft, Stokes Select, Perky-Pet, and Brome Squirrel Buster. They also offer reference books and field guides galore. Transform a plain yard into a serene and tranquil birdscape that is a favourite for family and guests alike. Placing nest boxes (bird houses) in your yard is a great way to attract more birds, including some species that typically do not come to feeders. Adding water sources such as a bird bath will draw many varieties, especially during those hot summer days. Martha’s Mixes Wild Bird Store was founded at 10 Maple Street in 1998, and then moved to The Shops of Roxton at 1 Union Street in August 2009. On October 6th 2012, they re-opened at their present site in the Birdland Plaza. It is a family owned and operated business, overseen by Martha & Don Jewitt who are assisted by daughter/store manager Amanda Jewitt and staff member Dan Martin. These specialists have the product knowledge and experience to help you find the perfect Holiday Season gifts! Stop in soon and visit them online at www.marthasmixes.com.

10 Church St. W. Elmira Shopping Village—Main Level 519-669-4374 Many people are trying to eat healthy all-natural, organic and holistic foods because we know it’s the best for the body and the environment. So, why don’t we do the same for our pets? There’s no reason to feed our animal companions dyes, by-products, chemicals and preservatives found in some commercial pet food products. At Village Pet Food Shoppe they offer many alternatives. This conveniently located 3,000 square foot store features numerous lines of all-natural, preservative-free, organic and holistic pet food lines. It’s all about helping your pet live a long and healthy life, and minimizing the chance of food related problems such as allergies, intolerance, digestive upset, etc. Choose from such pet food brands as Blue Buffalo, Taste of The Wild, Felidae/Canidae, Natural Balance, Nutram, Holistic Blend, Royal Canin, Science Diet, Harvest Blend, Go!, Now, Merrick, Tripett, Techni-Cal, Maxim, Oven-Baked, and Wellness. Ask about Frequent Buyer Rewards on most pet food lines! Village Pet Food Shoppe was founded in May 1991, and is locally owned & managed by Steve Thur. This store has treats and pet toys galore for most pets, training aids, grooming supplies, travel cages, pet beds, dog coats, sweaters and boots for the colder weather, litter, plus health care products, magazines and books. They also have supplies for rabbits, small animals, reptiles, fish, domestic and wild bird feed, aquariums and fish tank accessories. Stop in soon to Village Pet Food Shoppe to say hello and pick up great gift ideas and stocking stuffers for this Holiday Season! www.villagepetfoodshoppe.com

20 Oriole Pkwy. E., Elmira www.leroysautocare.net

My Health. My Way. 11 Arthur St. N., Elmira (corner of Church St.)

519-669-1653 www.shoppersdrugmart.ca

Shoppers Drug Mart has been meeting the health care needs of Canadians since its foundation as a small drug store in Toronto 50 years ago. Today, the Shoppers Drug Mart® organization has 1,100 affiliated stores nation-wide. Shoppers Drug Mart® has been serving the Elmira area since 1998, and opened their new format store on October 1, 2008. The Elmira store features exclusive LIFE Brand products—a selection of premium quality private label products that cost less. Other store features include boutique style cosmetics & fragrances department, an Informed Magazines & Books section, Greeting Cards, Healthy Living section, Lotto Centre products, plus Foods and Beverages galore. Digital photo prints are made fast, easy and convenient with Shoppersphoto.ca online photo upload and print pick-up in Elmira. A Connected Kiosk is available for instant prints, enlargements and more. Passport photos are available, too. The Shoppers Drug Mart® HealthWATCH System® keeps a record of prescription and patient information to help prevent complications from occurring before you combine prescriptions. Whether it’s fulfilling your health care needs, or providing guidance on over-the-counter medications and herbal remedies, your HealthWATCH® pharmacists, Christin, Ann, and owner Stefan Gudmundson, have the training and knowledge to help you make the right choices. You can also get HealthWATCH Easy Refills™ by Telephone or Online. The Elmira store provides Free Local Prescription Delivery. Ask about their on-premises Flu Clinics. You get valuable reward points every time you use your free Shoppers Optimum™ card at Shoppers Drug Mart®. They are open daily until 10pm. ®

Some motorists with newer vehicles and used vehicles still under warranty may be misinformed, thinking their vehicle must be maintained at its original place of sale or dealership of origin to keep the warranty valid. The truth is that independent service centres such as Leroy’s Auto Care are legally authorized to meet the factory scheduled maintenance requirements of your family’s vehicles. Owner Leroy Martin and his team of technicians install high quality CARQUEST Auto Parts that meet the specifications of the manufacturer—which is still obligated to honour any valid warranty issues that may arise. Leroy’s Auto Care is a member of the TECH-NET Professional Auto Service association, offering a North American warranty on most labour and parts for 12 months or 20,000 kilometres. From newer vehicles needing scheduled maintenance to high mileage vehicles that you want to keep running economically and reliably, Leroy’s Auto Care services them all at this 8,500 square foot facility. Whether it’s lube-oil-filter service, new tires, wiper blades or a new battery, or expert troubleshooting, diagnostics and expert repairs, they can do it. They can also provide tune-ups (gas & diesel), brakes, exhausts, suspension, wheel alignments, air conditioning, transmission maintenance, pre-purchase inspections or Motor Vehicle Safety Inspections. Leroy’s Auto Care holds 8 vehicles and has 18 foot tall ceilings in the main shop, and 5 hoists including a big one for heavier trucks. Experience the trust and reliable workmanship that has kept customers coming back to Leroy’s Auto Care since 2006. Call to arrange your appointment.

Fresh Products, Great Value 2065 Floradale Rd., RR 1, Elmira

An Upscale Casual Restaurant Showcasing Local Products

1193 Queen’s Bush Rd., Wellesley 519-656-9057 (at Nafziger Rd.) www.nithchophouse.com

Upon your visit to Nith River Chop House and you notice the rustic décor, wooden tables & booths with cowhide seating, you’ll immediately realize that you are in for a unique dining experience. Look around and take in the barnboard walls and beams, eclectic lighting fixtures, and collection of antique farm tools, yokes, saws, snowshoes, toboggans, and sliding barn-type door that doubles as the men’s bathroom entry. Country music is always in the background. The creative chefs and kitchen team at Nith River Chop House use only the finest ingredients, showcasing local products grown & raised in the area for the best taste and peace of mind. Start with tasty appetizers, soups and salads at Nith River Chop House, then try their Sandwiches, Chicken Fingers, Sauteed Ginger Beef & Vegetable, and signature ABC Burger. Entrees include heavily-aged Steaks, Meat Loaf, Liver & Onions, Baby Beef Pork Ribs, Chicken Supreme, Slow Roasted Beef Dip, Shepherd’s Pie, Smoked Pork Kessler, Fettuccine and Cannelloni pasta, and the "Farmer’s Platter". Seafood lovers will find Pan-seared Atlantic Salmon, PEI Mussels, Ale Battered White Bass & Chips, plus Haddock & Chips. There is also a Children’s menu, and a Sunday Brunch. Nith River Chop House opened in June 2010, and is overseen by General Manager Mate Wyles. It is part of the Egger Hospitality Group, which also brings you the Fergus Breadalbane Inn, Drayton Chop House, and Grand River Chop House in Grand Valley. Nith River Chop House is wheelchair accessible and fully licensed with bar area and outdoor patio. They offer Catering, and can accommodate Group Parties.

45 Arthur St. S., Elmira

519-669-5484

When it comes to buying insurance or renewing a policy, consulting the right broker can make all the difference in service, price, and value. Price is always an important factor when shopping for auto and home insurance. However, the lowest price won’t necessarily mean that you’ll get good service, too. To get the best value for your money, the level of claims service offered by an insurance company is also important. Elmira Insurance Brokers Limited has built their reputation for reliability by choosing to deal with insurance companies that are known for competitive premiums and prompt, fair claims settlement to ensure your losses are repaired or replaced quickly. Celebrating 85 years in business, Elmira Insurance Brokers Limited is locally owned & operated. Licensed insurance brokers Wil Lichty, Mark King, Lee Clemens, Kerry Mullen, CAIB, Brittany Hahn and Lori Moser can search the market on your behalf, and help you to choose an insurance policy that has the right provisions without being in excess of your needs. They will also determine your eligibility for the best available discounts. Look to Elmira Insurance Brokers Limited to meet your insurance needs, whether it’s home, auto, commercial, home-based business, farm or travel insurance, plus insurance for your recreation products—RVs, boats, snowmobiles, motorcycles, etc. Saving you money without sacrificing service is why many of your neighbours are already insured with Elmira Insurance Brokers Limited. OUR POLICY-YOUR PROTECTION-SINCE 1927

519-669-1082

519-669-2300

If consumers simply wanted a meat supply for the family, they could go to a self-serve refrigerated counter located in a grocery or big box store and purchase pre-packaged meats. However, many are discovering Earlidale Meats as a meat processing company that offers you more at their retail store. Custom cutting is available for the amount of meat you require for your family. Their products have characteristic flavours unique to their prepared meats and made-on-the-premises sausages. The entire plant is Gluten-Free. Earlidale Meats offers many carefully trimmed beef cuts— roasts, steaks, ribs, plus ground beef and more. Delicious pork products include hams, roasts, tenderloin, ribs, bacon, chops, pig tails, sausage and pepperettes. Turkey is also available. If you like sausages, try their plain, smoked, garlic, cheese, and maple cranberry styles. For deli meats, you can find salami, bologna, summer sausage, and various rolls—honey, pizza, bacon & cheese, all beef, and turkey. The retail store also sells farm fresh eggs, maple syrup, Pine River Cheese, and custom gift baskets for personal or corporate gift giving. With their home freezer service, Earlidale Meats will cut, wrap and quick-freeze a large meat order at better prices so you don’t have to buy from meal to meal. If you have a small freezer, try splitting an order with a friend or family member. Owners Andrew & Esther Martin invite you to visit Earlidale Meats and be assured of quality meats--value priced.

For Nuts, Confectionery, Gifts & More

3011 Sawmill Rd., St. Jacobs (Regional Rd. 17 & Hwy 86) www.picardpeanuts.ca

519-664-2400

Home of the Canadian peanut, Picard’s Peanuts is a pioneer in agri-diversity, from farm production to retail sales. Picard’s family business has been producing peanuts in Ontario for over 3 decades. Best known for great taste and superior flavour, Farm Fresh Ontario Grown Peanuts and other specialty products from Picard’s have become a favourite among local residents and visitors to the area. Picard’s now retails four types of peanuts from the Ontario Valencia, Jumbo Cocktail, Extra Fancy Redskin to Oldtime Spanish peanuts. Roasted Cocktail are available in16 different flavoured peanut styles from Salt & Vinegar to Ranch to the newest “Cheddar & Bacon”. Picard’s has introduced unique creations such as Chipnuts-which are jumbo cocktail nuts coated with a crispy potato chip covering again in over 12 flavours, all sampled daily to the curious customer. The store also processes and sells jumbo cashews, pistachios, sunflower seeds, toasted corn, trail mix & other mixes. Sweet temptations include milk chocolate covered nuts and dried fruits like almonds and pecans to blueberries and cranberries, peanut brittle, sponge toffee, and over 16 types of fudge. If you love Swiss Style Milk Chocolate, Dark or White Chocolate, try Picard’s almond or blueberry bark, caramel & pecan clusters, pretzel Q’s, plus chocolate covered ginger. There’s also yogurt covered peanuts and raisins. Popcorn lovers can find various caramel corns like maple syrup covered, milk and white chocolate covered and almond & pecan varieties Other store offerings include local jams, honey, maple syrup and dried apple slices. Other specialty confections like fresh toasted coconut marshmallows, chocolate covered marshmallows and Picard’s very own hand-scooped ice cream. Coming this fall, their new Extreme Kettle Chips will be available in 6 varieties each in larger 220g packages or the quick nibble 50g bags. Watch for information about “THE BREWERY FARM” where they are starting to brew their own line of RAMBLIN’ ROAD Premium Beers! This Holiday Season, think of Picard’s for gift boxes and baskets, plus tasty foods and treats for your family and guests.


THE ARTS | 23

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

THE ARTS LIVE MUSIC / THERE AND BACK AGAIN

Picking up right where they left off Reunited Major Hoople’s Boarding House set to offer up some classics during Sunday’s concert at the Commercial Tavern STEVE KANNON You really can go home again, picking up right where you left off even after a 25-year hiatus. Just ask Ed Miller. A long-time member of Major Hoople’s Boarding House, a group with roots that go back to the 1960s, Miller headed out west when the band broke up in the early ’80s. In 2010, back in Kitchener, he met up again with some of his bandmates: a reunion seemed like just the thing. “At that first rehearsal after 25 years, everything fell into place – it came together fairly quickly,” Miller said this week in advance of Sunday afternoon’s concert the Commercial Tavern in Maryhill. “After the first song, we were all together and I thought ‘Oh my god, this doesn’t sound too bad after 25 years.’” It sounded so good, in fact, that the band began writing new music, recording a single and working on a new album due to be released in February or March. Today, Miller is enjoying the music as much as he ever did back in the heyday. Not, of course, that it’s been a smooth ride. Major Hoople’s Boarding House began circa 1967 in Cambridge the Shande-leers, featuring Rocky Howell, Peter Padalino, Gail Selkirk, Dave Lodge and Rick Riddell. This group recorded the singles “Lady” and “Face on the Wind” for the Polydor label. In the early 1970s, Peter

The recentlyreunited Major Hoople’s Boarding House, a local mainstay from the late 1960s through mid-’80s, takes to the stage at the Commercial Tavern in Maryhill on Sunday afternoon. [SUBMITTED] (Moss) Beacock – originally from Gaslight – replaced Selkirk on keyboards, and Miller replaced Riddell on drums. In 1975, the band was signed to Axe Records. Founding member Dave Lodge then left the band, moving into the songwriting/production/management side of the business, and he was replaced by vocalist/bassist Keith (Chippy) Stahlbaum. Padalino left the band just as they released their first and biggest hit in August 1975, “I’m Running After You,” which reached num-

ber 16 on Canada’s top record chart and is still played on many Top 40 and oldies stations to this day. As the single climbed the charts, they added David Gregg (trombone) and David Gooding (saxophone/ flute) and lost no time in capitalizing on their new radio success with a crosscountry tour and a second hit single “You Girl.” This was followed by “Got You on my Mind” and “Someone.” These songs were all included on The Hooples Album. The classic ’70s lineup

of Howell, Stahlbaum, Beacock, Gooding and Miller travelled the country throughout the decade. The group changed its lineup again with the loss of Rocky Howell, and the addition of James Leroy (formerly of James Leroy & Denim) and the departure of Gregg and Gooding (who joined the Lulu’s Roadhouse Band). In 1985 after the release of the ‘New Adventures Of Hooples’ album, the group made the Top 10 on the

Space Available for ALL Due Dates.

Adult Contemporary charts in Canada with the song “Late Night Invitation” on the Major Records label. By the mid-‘80s, however, all that touring was taking its toll, said Miller. “We’d been on the road forever and ever. It just got to be too much. ... But it was a friendly parting of the ways,” he said of the decision to break up the band.

For the next couple of decades, those involved with Major Hoople’s Boarding House (the name comes for a comic strip that began in the 1920s) continued to play music in a variety of capacities, eventually drifting back to their roots. In 2008, a new band, under the name The Fossilz, was formed featuring original Hooples members Beacock and Keith Stahlbaum, as well as former Gaslight lead guitarist Brian Tozer, former Trollie/Beothuck drummer John Rankin, and former Eddie & The Edsels drummer/vocalist Ron Duke. In 2010, Gooding and Miller returned, prompting the band to go back to the name Major Hooples. They were joined by Stahlbaum’s brother Brad on keyboards. Today’s band includes Keith and Brad Stahlbaum, Brian Tozer, Dave Gooding and Ed Miller. When they take the stage at the Commercial Tavern tomorrow (Sunday), they’ll be featuring the classic songs of the band’s heyday, but they’re not just reliving the past, so there’ll be new Hooples music on tap, said Miller. Major Hoople’s Boarding House performs at the Commercial Tavern Sunday (December 2) at 3 p.m. Tickets are $15, available at the venue, 1303 Maryhill Rd., or by calling 519-6483644. For more information, visit www.commercialtavern.ca.

• Prenatal, labour and postpartum care for healthy low-risk women • No referral needed; call as soon as you’re pregnant • Always available 24 hours, 7 days a week • Your midwives will see you for regular check-ups and will arrange or ultrasound, labwork, and any other testing

9 Parkside Dr., Unit 2, St. Jacobs

3777 Manser Road, Linwood

(Near Picard Peanuts)

(In Nurse Practitioner’s Office)

519-664-2542

TEL:

www.stjacobsmidwives.on.ca

• After the birth, midwives will care for you and the baby for 6 weeks, including home visits • Free care for permanent Ontario residents • Choice of hospital or home birth • Monthly information sessions available


24 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

AUCTIONS

CLASSIFIED HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

AUCTION SALE

OF PROPERTY, APPLIANCES, ANTIQUES AND HOUSEHOLD ITEMS FOR SHIRLEY MacKENZIE, 64 PELLISTER ST.W., HARRISTON AUCTION HELD AT GRAY’S AUCTION CENTRE 5737 HWY 23, 1 MI.W. OF HARRISTON AUCTION DECEMBER 8TH @ 10:30 AM

HELP WANTED

OPEN HOUSE NOV. 24, & DEC. 1 10 AM – 4 PM

DO YOU WANT? A wide range of jobs? Welding? Millwrighting? Assembly? Blueprint reading? Inside work? Outside work? Responsibility?

Position: Parts Consultant Location: Elmira Essential Duties: • Assist with counter sales focusing on internal and external customer satisfaction. • Maintain attractive showroom and current promotional displays. • Promote and merchandise parts and accessories. • Assist with the verification, stocking and ordering of parts.

Then you should be working for us. WE’RE LOOKING FOR:

Construction or Industrial Millwrights 3-4 Years Experience Assets: • Arc Welding • Blueprint Reading • Agricultural background • Leadership Ability • Must be able to pass CWB Welding Test SMAW all position

Apply in person between 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. OR fax or e-mail resume to:

M&G MILLWRIGHTS LIMITED R.R.#1 Reg. Rd. 19

(1540 Floradale Rd.) Elmira, ON

519-669-5105

fax: 519-669-1450 email: bob@mgmill.com

100% LOCAL PERKS COFFEE HOUSE Elmira. Seeking P/T employee with full availability. Shifts include - early mornings/ afternoons/evenings and weekends. Experience associated with the food industry and customer service preferred. Please drop off your resume to 25 Industrial Dr. or email perksltd@gmail.com

Skills and Requirements: • Must be computer savvy, parts system knowledge an asset. • Knowledge of Agriculture/Construction equipment an asset. • Must be customer oriented, with a positive attitude. Please forward resume to the Human Resources Department at: hr@premierequipment.ca

TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH based company is looking to fill a full-time position with an experienced AZ/Float Driver/Heavy Equipment Operator. Job entails some out town work and manual labour and equipment maintenance. Please email resume with references to takethepressureoff@ sympatico.ca

HOW TO REACH US

Essential Duties: • Market, demonstrate and sell new and used Ag and Turf whole goods products. • Promote any products and services that Premier offers. • Profile new and existing customers while ensuring existing customer satisfaction. • Attend training seminars, product intros and trade shows. Skills and Requirements: • Competitive, disciplined and goal oriented. • Excellent communication skills to determine customer needs. • Good organization and time management skills required. • Knowledge of Agricultural Equipment/Farming Communities. • Familiarity with current farming practices/GPS and Precision Ag. Please forward resume to the Human Resources Department at: hr@premierequipment.ca

HELP WANTED

Schelter Office Plus is a growing Family owned Office Products supplier serving Waterloo-Wellington Region.

“HERE WE GROW AGAIN!“ DELIVERY & SERVICE TECHNICIAN

Monday to Friday ( days only ) - Full time ( overtime potential ) primary support co-worker to our office customers through the delivery and service of a wide range of office products, printers/copiers and fax machines, office technology and office furniture. • working locally in Waterloo and Wellington County • physical job, some heavy lifting required, ideal for active person who enjoys being busy • works well independently, capable of multi task ing, enjoys variety of challenges • clean drivers abstract preferred, customer service experience would be an asset • training provided, computer literacy and a smile are a must. • benefits package including health plan available • remuneration commensurate with experience

Apply in person with resume to:

Position: Sales Consultant Location: Elmira

WE OFFER: • Competitive wages • Company uniforms • Pension plan • Company benefits

HELP WANTED

PROPERTY: LOT 56’ Frontage X 115’

WORK WANTED

CHILD CARE REQUIRED

DRYWALLER & CARPENTER looking for work. Sprayed ceiling California or popcorn. Taping & prime paint walls. Install doors, casing & baseboard. 519-669-5866, Don.

ATTENTION LADIES AGES 15 60. I need help with my kids on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Kids attend John Mahood Public. Please call Jen at 519-669-9630 or email jenjodney@hotmail.com

CONTINUED ON PG 29

ELMIRA LOCATION 10 Church Street West

AUCTIONS Police, Municipal, Fleets & Others

Monthly PUBLIC Vehicle

AUCTION to be held at

Breslau Airport Road Auction Complex

5100 Fountain St., North, Breslau (Kitchener)

Sat. Dec. 8th 9:30am 2011 Ford Fusion SE 7+ 07/10 Crown Victoria’s 2009 Dodge Charger SE 6- 07/08 Chev Impala’s 2007 Dodge Magnum 2- 07 Dodge Charger’s 2007 Dodge Grand Caravan 3- 05/08 Chev Uplander’s 2006 Chev Malibu LT 2005 Chev Impala 2005 Toyota Sienna LE 2006 Chev Optra5 2003 Ford Expedition 4- Ford 8N / Ferguson / IHC Tractors

www.mrjutzi.ca - Website is updated daily as vehicles arrive!

PARTIAL LIST ONLY!!!

No Buyer’s Premium!

VIEWING: Friday Dec. 7th, 2012, 1:00 pm to 5:00 pm TERMS: $500.00 Deposit on Each Vehicle or as announced

M.R. Jutzi & Co

Deep with 1040 Sq.Ft. House & 360 Sq.Ft. Garage. Alum. Siding on House, Vinyl Siding on Garage. New 30 Yr. Shingles in ‘11. House Consists of 3 Bedrooms, 3Pce. Bath, Kitchen w/ oak cabinets & Living Room. Basement Partially Finished, 2 Pce. Bath. Frigidaire Stacking Washer/ Dryer; Frigidaire Bottom Freezer Fridge; Frigidaire Stove, As New H.E. Gas Furnace w/Air Conditioner 75,000 BTU, Water Heater. 100 Amp Service. Cement Double Car Driveway; 10’x8’ Wooden Shed in Backyard. House Built in 1959. This Home is in very good condition. Property selling with reserve bid. House selling @ 1:00 pm from Gray’s Auction Centre TERMS OF PROPERTY: $5,000.00 Down day of sale, Balance in 30 Days or Sooner.

HOUSEHOLD ITEMS: Kenmore Upright

Freezer; Microwave; RCA TV; Kenmore Upright Vac; Double Bed; Chest of Drawers; Dresser & Mirror; (2) Recliner Chairs; (2) Bookcases; Chrome Table & Chairs; Wooden Ext. Table; Captains Chair; Oval Back Wooden Chairs; Trunk; 2 Door Wardrobe; Glass Top China Cabinet; End Tables; Double & Single Ped. Wooden Desks; Wooden Steno Chair; Shelf Unit; Card Table & Chairs; Gingerbread Clock; Pocket Watches;1965 White Rose Zippo Lighter; Harriston Shell Oil Cuff Links; 1928 &29 Ideal Supply Toy Trucks; 1941 Ford Toy Truck; Model A Matchbox Truck; 1931 Model A Ford Toy Truck; 1928 Studebaker Toy Car; Adlake Kero CNR Lantern; Memories of Dreams Maple Leaf Gardens 1998 & 1999 Tickets for Games; Can. Rail Express Book; Old Pictures of Towns; Oval Picture Frame w/Painting on Glass; Royal Family Collector Plates; Royal Airforce Plates; Carnival Glass Basket; Spoon Collection; Pcs. Silver; Large Lot of Pictures; Radio; (2) Dehumidifiers; Elec. Organ; Christmas Decorations; Plus Many Other Items too Numerous to mention. TERMS: Cash, Debit, Visa, M/C day of sale

. Owners or auctioneers not responsible for accidents day of sale. Any verbal announcements day of sale take precedence over written ads.

For Viewing. other than open house: Call Kim 519-338-3306 or Mark 519-338-2641 AUCTIONEERS:

PROFESSIONALS IN THE ORDERLY LIQUIDATION AND APPRAISALS OF COMMERCIAL, INDUSTRIAL, CONSTRUCTION, MUNICIPAL EQUIPMENT & VEHICLES 5100 FOUNTAIN ST. NORTH, BRESLAU, ONTARIO, N0B 1M0

www.mrjutzi.ca

GRAY’S AUCTION SERVICE INC., HARRISTON | (519) 338-3722

519-648-2111

#1

LICENSED & BONDED

IN THE REGION

SEE THE WEB FOR COMPLET LIST & PICTURES OF THE HOME www.graysauction.ca

PHONE 519.669.5790 | TOLL FREE 1.888.966.5942 | FAX 519.669.5753 | ONLINE WWW.OBSERVERXTRA.COM

ADDRESS 20-B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA, ON N3B 1Z9

CLASSIFIED ADS

DISPLAY ADS

519.669.5790 EXT 0

519.669.5790 EXT 104

ads@woolwichobserver.com

sales@woolwichobserver.com

RESIDENTIAL COST $7.50 /20 WORDS EXTRA WORDS 20¢ PER WORD

COMMERCIAL COST $12.00 /20 WORDS EXTRA WORDS 30¢ PER WORD

PLACING A CLASSIFIED WORD AD In person, email, phone or fax submissions are accepted during regular business hours. Deadline for Saturday publication is Wednesday by 5 p.m. All Classified ads are prepaid by cash, debit, Visa or MasterCard. Ask about Observer policies in regard to Display, Service Directory and Family Album advertising.


CLASSIFIED | 25

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICES

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

Complete Collision Service

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE. 101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

519.669.8330

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial On-The-Farm Service

FAX: 519.669.3210

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

AFTER HOURS

519-669-3232

THOMPSON’S

Auto Tech Inc.

ARE A

Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

AUTO CLINIC 21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

24 Hour Accident Assistance Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400 30 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

519.669.8917

Quality Collision Service

1-800-CARSTAR 519-669-3373

519-669-7652

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

BODY MAINTENANCE AT:

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

Call Us At (519)669-3373 33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

GENERAL SERVICES

World’s Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location

While you wait! State of the acAhinrte Sharpening M

NOW ACCEPTING

• Janitorial

NEW CLIENTS

• Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off / Pick up Service • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair

$4.99 per pair

$139 FREE Gift Offer Learn More Online At...

budurl.com/SAVE139

ROB McNALL 519-669-7607 LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

ST. JACOBS

22 Church St. W., Elmira

669-3332

• 14 ton BoomTruck • 40 ton Mobile Crane

519-664-9999

5th pair FREE.

Chem-Dry Acclaim® 61 Arthur St., N. Elmira

www.completecarpetcare.ca

ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd.

Tel: 519-669-5537

STORE HOURS: M-F: 8-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

24 Hour Service (Emergencies only) 7 Days A Week

GENERAL SERVICES

CUSTOM MACHINING CNC LATHES • CNC MILLS CNC BRAKE • PLASMA & LASER CUTTING

MUSIC-LOVER GIFT ALERT! COUNTR Y

’s 60’s / 70

HIGH SCHOOSL BAND

GOSPEL

ROCK

MUSIC TRANSFERS FROM LPs, 45s, 78s, CASSETTES TO CD

We do small jobs with fast turnaround

Your favourite albums get a whole new life on CD after we clean up the clicks, pops and surface noise.

Martin Machining

MORE INFO | 519.669.0541

Linwood, Ontario

(519) 698-2283

EMAIL: vinylp2cd@gmail.com

Various sizes & rates

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE Call

CUSTOM TARPS, COVERS & REPAIRS (519) 698-2754

4445 Posey Line Wallenstein ON.

BAUMAN PIANO

SERVICES TUNING & REPAIRS

Sew Special Custom Sewing for Your Home

Custom Drapery Custom Blinds Free Estimates In Home Consultations

JAMES BAUMAN Craftsman Member O.G.P.T. Inc NEW PHONE NUMBER

519-880-9165

Over 20 Years Experience

Lois Weber 519-669-3985 Elmira

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada Established 2000

Steve Co.

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs. 24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

ELMIRA

519-669-3652

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

FREE BAG In troductor Offer y

> Superior Salt Products > Fast, Friendly Service > Convenient Delivery Times > Discounts for Seniors

Taking Salt to Peoples’ Basements Since 1988

519-747-2708

Waterloo www.riepersalt.com

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

F. David Reimer

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications:

519.669.5313

Mon.-Tues. 3pm-6pm | Wed.-Fri. Noon-6pm Saturday 9-5 | Sunday Noon-3pm

6376 Perth Rd. 121 Poole, ON

100% SUPERIOR QUALITY CUSTOM WOODWORKING

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

The Sharp Shop | 112-D Bonnie Cres., Elmira

519.595.4830

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

GENERAL SERVICES

● ● ● ● ● ● ●

General Repairs

HOME IMPROVEMENTS SERVICES

GRAIN/ FORAGE BOX • TRUCK • TRAILER • BOAT AWNINGS • STORAGE COVERS AND MORE!

ivan@aaronmartin.com

•Ratches, Hooks, Straps, Webbing etc. •Canvas, Vinyl, Polyester, Acrylic Fabrics

519-669-4964

GENERAL SERVICES

MAR-TARP

Boat Covers | Air Conditioner Covers | Small Tarps Storage Covers | BBQ Covers | Awnings & Canopies Replacement Gazebo Tops | Golf Cart Enclosures & Covers

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

www.reimerhbot.com For more information call:

519-669-0220

56 Howard Ave. Unit 2, Elmira, ON, N3B 2E1

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING

QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102

KENJI ORITA • Custom Kitchens • Custom Furniture • Libraries • Exotic Woods

TEL: +1 (519) 574-6734 oritakenji@gmail.com 20B ARTHUR ST. N., ELMIRA

WE’RE AT YOUR SERVICE. We specialize in getting the word out. Advertise your business services here. Get weekly exposure with fantastic results. Call us at 519.669.5790.


26 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

OBSERVER SERVICE DIRECTORY HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

AMOS

Custom Window Coverings

www.budgetblinds.ca

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

Each Franchise Independently Owned and Operated

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Decorative/Stamped and coloured concrete www.facebook.com/marwilconcrete

519-638-2699

R O O F I N G

INC

(519)746-3498

Ltd.

Shutters • Draperies Wood Blinds Honeycomb Shades Roller Shades Woven Wood and More!

Expert-Fit Measuring and Installation Included.

One stop shop for all your needs. PLUMBING, FURNACE REPAIRS, SERVICE & INSTALLATION, GAS FITTING

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches

66 Rankin St. Unit 4 | Waterloo

519.501.2405 | 519.698.2114

A Family owned and operated business serving KW, Elmira and surrounding area for over 35 years.

WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED

CALL JAYME FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE.

519-885-2828

In Business since 1973 • Fully Insured

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

$275.00/OUT

pump

• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

(1800 Gallon Residential) Waterloo Region • Woolwich Township

519-896-7700

or

Home Improvements

FREE ESTIMATES

519-648-3004

TEL:

519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

General Construction | 12 Years Experience Residential & Agricultural • Barns / Shops • Decks & Railings • Poured Concrete • Driveways & Sidewalks • Siding, Fascials, Soffits • Interior Renovations Call Lawrence Metzger (226) 789-7301 Wallenstein, ON

www.biobobs.com

ROOFING | SIDING | SOFFIT & FACIA DRYWALL INSTALLATION

MURRAY MARTIN | 519.638.0772

7302 Sideroad 19 RR#2., Alma, ON, N0B 1A0

FREE ESTIMATES

FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

WINDOWS & DOORS

HOME IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

RA HOME COMF ELMI (519) 669-4600 ORT

WEICKERT& MEIROWSKI Concrete Foundations Limited

ď Ż WOOD ď Ż GAS ď Ż PELLET www.fergusfireplace.com

YES... WE DO RESIDENTIAL WORK!

CONESTOGO

6982 Millbank Main St., Millbank 519-595-2053 • 519-664-2914

1871 Sawmill Road

519-664-3800 877-664-3802

• Residential • Commercial • Industrial

No job too small.

20 years experience

CFB

SINCE 1961

Specializing in Paint & Wall coverings

free estimates interior/exterior painting, wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

Randy Weber ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

519.669.1462 Fax: 519.669.9970

FOR ALL YOUR HOME DECORATING NEEDS.

Tel:

27 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

519.669.3658

18 KingďŹ sher Dr., Elmira

FOR RENT

27 Brookemead, St, Elmira

Call Clare at 519-669-1752

SERVICES

- Trail Maintenance and Development - Wooded Lot Thinning - Pasture Reclaimation All other - Orchard Maintenance tracked skid - Industrial Lots steer services are available - Real Estate Lots

kdetweiler@rogers.com

OWNER-OPERATOR

OBSERVER PUZZLE SOLUTIONS ( 6 3 5 , 7

, 7 + $ & $

* 5 2 : ( 5

2 3 $ /

0 , 6 (

$ 1 2 8

& 2 2 1 6

$ ( 6 7 + ( 7 , & 6

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THE CHALLENGE

Got long grass? Our tracked skid steer equipped with a forestry brush mower can handle ANY long grass!

KEVIN DETWEILER

P: 519-669-1188 | F: 519-669-9369

CROSSWORD PUZZLER

OFFERING A QUICK AND EASY WAY TO RECLAIM UNUSED LAND

Services

> Commercial & Residential > Fully Insured > WSIB Clearance > Senior Discount

Lawn Maintenance Programs | Spring Clean-up Flower Bed Maintenance Programs Leaf Clean-up and Removal | Soil & Mulch Delivery & Installation | Snow Clearing & Removal | Ice Control

â&#x20AC;˘Tamper (Jumping Jack) â&#x20AC;˘Power Drain Cleaner (Electric Snake)

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

Call Jeff Basler, Owner/Operator, today 519.669.9081 mobile: 519.505.0985 fax: 519.669.9819 | ever-green@sympatico.ca

Outdoor

BACKHOE SERVICES

36 Hampton St., Elmira

â&#x20AC;˘ Lawn Mowing Packages â&#x20AC;˘ Lawn Maintenance & Landscaping â&#x20AC;˘ Top Dressing/Overseeding â&#x20AC;˘ Mulch Delivery & Installation â&#x20AC;˘ Commercial & Residential Full Flower Bed Maintenance â&#x20AC;˘ Snow Plowing & Ice Control â&#x20AC;˘ Tractor Snowblowing

ehc@hotmail.ca (519)-669-4600

888-871-4592

Mini Excavator Available

6656 Sideroad 19 | RR#2 Wallenstein ON N0B 2S0

YOUR SOURCE FOR YEAR-ROUND PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

1 Union Street, Elmira

519-843-4845

â&#x20AC;˘ Specializing in farm drainage repair/installation â&#x20AC;˘ Footing / cellar / eavestrough / drains â&#x20AC;˘ Stump removal

519-669-2251

OUTDOOR

FERGUS

180 St. Andrew St. W.

OUTDOOR SERVICES

IMPROVEMENT IMPROVEMENT SERVICES

READâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S DECORATING

APPLIANCES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FURNACES â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FIREPLACES AIR CONDITIONERS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; WATER HEATERS SPRING SPECIAL ON AIR CONDITIONING TUNE UP $99, INSTALLED FROM $1999 FURNACES INSTALLED FROM $2499 FRIDGES $499, STOVES $399, WASHERS $399, DRYERS $369, FREEZERS $199 Come visit our show room FREE QUOTES


CLASSIFIED | 27

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Our Team will meet your Needs and fulfill your Dreams Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

3 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5426 $500.00 DONATION will be made to WCS Family Violence Prevention Program with every home bought or sold by Paul, Alli or Bill in Woolwich.

Paul Martin

D L O S

$239,900

HOME SWEET HOME!

Elmira - Don’t miss this 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom semi. Convenient upper floor laundry, carpet free except stairs, finished basement with large bathroom including corner whirlpool bath and separate shower. Bright eat-in kitchen with French door walk out to nice sized fenced yard. 20ft x 13ft patio and 10ft x10ft shed. Large 4 car driveway. MLS 1244577 Call Alli or Paul direct.

$354,900 CHARMING AND UNIQUE!

Elmira - Century home boasting original woodwork and hardwood throughout, 9ft ceilings, and pocket doors. spacious main bath and bedrooms with bonus room off master. Fully finished attic with skylights and gas fireplace. Within walking distance to all amenities. Detached workshop. MLS 1241191 Call Alli or Paul direct.

18.2 ACRE LOT $500,000

$495,900 VERDONE MODEL HOME!

Elmira - Attractive upgrades and finishing touches

through-out this 4 bedroom home. Convenience at its best with main floor laundry/mudroom, walk-in pantry and completely finished basement with gas fireplace. 9ft ceilings thoughout main floor. Bright eat-in kitchen with granite counter tops, cupboards to the ceiling and island. Large living room with wood floors, gas fireplace and French door walk-out to yard. MLS 1241535. Call Alli or

Paul direct

$345,000 IN BY CHRISTMAS

Elmira - Fantastic Layout in this bright home!

Modern colours & décor throughout. Hardwood floors in the lg open living room & master bedrm. Eat-in kitchen w/slider to deck overlooking green space. Convenient upper floor laundry w/lg window. Finished basement w/slider walkout to back yard. Large 1.75 garage (18x20ft). MLS 1241698. Call Alli or Paul direct.

St. Clements - A great opportunity to purchase a 18.2 acre lot only minutes from K-W. Future development potential. Located on Park St. St. Clements across for the Soccer field. MLS 1244345 Call Bill Direct.

D L O S

$264,900

LOCATION, LOCATION!

Kitchener - Fantastic bungalow close to expressway, amenities, bus routes and in quiet neighbourhood. The carpet free main floor is complete with 3 bedrooms, living room and eat-in kitchen. Large finished rec room with gas fireplace. Both bathrooms recently renovated. Convenient second garage door to fenced backyard featuring patio and large 10x16ft cedar shed. MLS 1241620. Call Alli or Bill direct.

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-503-9533 www.homeswithpaul.ca

$219,900 SPACIOUS TWO STOREY

Floradale - 1866 sq.ft. home in Floradale with

a large lot backing onto green belt. This century home is one of Floradale's originals. This home is priced right for a young family and has great potential . Close to Floradale School and the park. 20 min to K-W. MLS 1241726. Call Alli or Bill direct.

Alli Bauman SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-577-6248

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

D L O S

$255,000 $279,000

GREAT VALUE!

Heidelberg - Bungalow with lg Workshop. This

home is complete with 4 Bedrooms, plus office, living room, family room and finished basement. The bright living room is open to dinning room and kitchen. Unfinished walk up attic. Located on large lot featuring detached 17ft x 18ft, insulated, heated workshop, fantastic gazebo and 10ft x 20ft shed. MLS 1234999. Call Alli or Paul direct.

Bill Norris SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-588-1348

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

OUTSTANDING AGENTS. OUTSTANDING RESULTS.

$249,000

RARE FIND!!

Elmira - A perfect family home located on a mature treed lot complete with shed and detached garage. This 2 storey, 3 bedroom home features a finished rec room, separate dining room, and main floor family room with sliders to large wrap around deck. New main floor and rec room windows excluding living room. All appliances included with the exception of freezer. MLS 1237778. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$218,500

VERY AFFORDABLE!

Elmira - This semi is only steps to downtown! Fantastic hardwood floors, high ceilings, original built in cupboards and trim provide charm and character. Bright spacious kitchen with walkout to sun porch. Featuring; large front porch, carpet free, 3 bedrooms, living room, family room and lots of parking. MLS 1237444. Call Alli or Paul direct.

D L O S

$399,900 $399,900

IMPRESSIVE

Elmira - 3 bdrm, 2baths birdland bungalow

backing onto farmland on a family oriented st. From the welcoming eat-in kit, to the oversized LR, to the gorgeous master w/walkout , this home is bright & spacious. Add in the huge unfinished basement, beautiful covered patio & well-kept yrd complete w/shed, this home is everything you are looking for! MLS 1231378. Call Alli or Paul direct!

$359,900 PRIME LOCATION!

Elmira - Backing onto farmland! Open welcoming front entrance to this, like new, open concept home. The main floor is bright and airy featuring: large breakfast bar, powder room, main floor laundry and is carpet free. The second floor is carpet free, master bedroom complete with walk in closet and spa like ensuite. Appliances are included. MLS 1241487. Call Alli or Paul direct.

D L O S

$299,900

YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS THIS! Elmira - Brand new semi detached raised bungalow.

Complete with main floor laundry, 4 piece ensuite, open concept eat-in kitchen and living room with French door walk out to deck. All the conveniences on one floor. The large garage is perfect for storage and have room for a vehicle. Located close to downtown, walking distance to library, restaurants and banks. MLS 1234444. Call Alli or Paul direct.

$234,900

GREAT STARTER!!

Elmira - Bright Home Backing onto farmland and directly across the road from Ann Street Park. Carpet free with Hardwood and ceramic through out main floor. Family room with cozy wood stove, large windows and walk out to fenced yard. This home is complete with mudroom and very large dining room. 24 x 20ft double garage. MLS 1244010. Call Alli or Paul direct.

FOR RENT. WITH REAL INVESTMENT YOU WILL SEE A REAL RETURN. MAKE THIS SPACE YOUR NEW HOME. ADVERTISE WITH US TODAY.

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com


28 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. BROKERAGE

COUNTRY LOT .5 ACRE | $73,500 Don’t miss this chance to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. Within 40 minutes of KW or Guelph. High speed internet is available with fibre optic. MLS

519-669-2772

This 1 ½ story, 5 bedroom home is situated on a 1 acre lot backing onto greenbelt and flowing creek complete with apple trees and a 38’x50’ hobby barn just minutes from Elmira. MLS

HOME

Bert Martin BROKER

Broker of Record, MVA Residential

Res:

519.669.1068

JULIE HECKENDORN Broker

Res:

519.669.8629

TRACEY WILLIAMS Sales Rep.

Cell : 519.505.0627

SOUTH PARKWOOD - Spacious custom built home backing to farmland. 4+ bdrms, 3 baths. Hardwood & ceramics thorughout. Lots of kitch. cupboards - open to dining area & fam. room. High ceilings & oversized windows. Gas fireplace. Finished basmt. with lots of living space & seperate entry. MLS

$254,900

CLOSE TO DOWNTOWN - 5 appliances included. Lots of counterspace in the oak kitchen. Open concept from D.A. to liv. rm. Main flr. 2pc. Ensuite privilege. Central air (2012). Walkout to fenced backyard. Finished rec. room & 3pc. bathroom in lower level. Early possess. available. MLS

$389,900

EVALUATION

WITH A REAL INVESTMNET YOU WILL SEE A REAL RETURN

BRAD MARTIN

$679,900 BUILD TO SUIT

PERFECT STARTER IN QUAINT VILLAGE! | $349,000

FREE

45 Arthur St. S., Elmira Office:

$324,900

$255,000

JACOBS - Lovely updated bungalow on a large lot (85‘x170’). Oak kitchen w/island. Main flr. family rm. (could be a master suite w/ensuite). Main floor laundry. Hardwood & ceramic floors. Fin. rec. room & 4th bdrm in lower level. Updated bathrms, windows, and furnace. MLS REDUCED

ST.

One owner bungalow with walkout basement. 200’ deep lot. Overlooks GRCA and walking trails. Elevated deck. Gas furnace (2004). Steel roof. Fireplace in rec. room. Oversized garage. MLS FLORADALE

-

IMPRESSIVE cathedral ceiling & lots of windows in the addition. Oversized dining area w/hrdwd. floor.. Main flr. laundry, bathrm & master bdrm. Huge rec. rm. w/high ceiling. Gas heatstove. Newer doors, windows, furnace & deck. Short walk to downtown. Long Driveway. MLS

LET OUR 50+ YEARS OF EXPERIENCE WORK FOR YOU!

www.thurrealestate.com

Sunlight Homes Drayton Heights OPEN HOUSE EVERY SATURDAY AND SUNDAY 1-5PM Come take a look you won't be disappointed! The last home in the Sunlight Heritage Homes Phase 1!! Beautiful 1400 sq ft home, features 3 beds, 3 baths, master with ensuite and walk in closet. Open concept main floor, with custom kitchen and island. Buy today and celebrate the holidays in your brand new home! Quick Possession available! 15 Green St., Drayton only

$259,990

Live mortgage FREE for 4 months!! Ask Alyssa for details

Don't forget to check us out in 2014 when Sunlight Heritage Homes begins its second Phase!! Learn More About Sunlight Heritage Homes and Our fine communities by Visiting us Today!

Alyssa Henry

www.sunlighthomes.ca

519.787.0203

Broker Re/Max Real Estate Centre Inc.

Have a question? Email us at: info@sunlighthomes.ca

FIND YOUR PERFECT HOME !

Elmira Real Estate Services Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage

90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

519-669-3192

When you buy or sell your home with us, part of our commission supports women’s shelters & violence prevention programs.

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

Remax Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 OFFICE: 519-669-5426

3 Arthur St. S. Elmira

www.remaxsolidgold.biz

PRIVATE SALE | ELMIRA

EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

Bonnie Brubacher Shanna Rozema Jason Shantz

FREE Market Evaluation

Broker of Record

Your referrals are appreciated!

$429,900.

ELMIRA | 3 Bedroom Bungalow in Birdland. Central air/vac. New kitchen, 2 new bathrooms (2pc & 3pc). Gas fireplace, finished rec room, car port. $280,000 For more information call: 519-669-1268

Picturesque mature park like yard in the Village. Cozy Bungalow with its own unique flair. 3 Season sunroom, sunken living room, main floor den/bedroom; upper loft; lower level family room; walkout. Master or inlaw suite, including kitchenette and bath. MLS.

DON’T WORRY, BE HAPPY. SEE AN IMAGE IN THE OBSERVER THAT YOU LIKE? DON’T WORRY, WE DO PHOTO RE-PRINTS! VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR SIZES, PRICING AND ORDER FORMS.

www.OBSERVERXTRA.com

Broker

CONESTOGO BUNGALOW

COMMERCIAL LEASE SPACE

Commercial space for lease in busy plaza only 15 minutes to K-W. Office space from 144 s/f to 2400 s/f. Zoning allows numerous uses. Lots of parking. MLS.

Broker


CLASSIFIED | 29

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

CLASSIFIEDS CONTINUED FOR SALE ACORN SUPERGLIDE STAIRLIFT. Fits right side of stairs, length is 12ft 22” or 12 standard steps. 2 years old, $1500 o.b.o. Bruno Curbside Lift fits in back of pick up truck or vans to lift in scooter for handicap people. 2 years old, $1500 o.b.o. Heat Surge electric fireplace in handmade Amish oak frame $200 o.b.o. For more information call 519-669-5388. GET IN SHAPE or Give as a Gift! Bowflex Sport (Blaze), Excellent condition, accessories incl. $395.00. Wii Fit Game Consoled, controllers, balance board, excellent condition $175.00. Phone 519-669-4360. HILLCREST HOME BAKING 519-669-1381. CHRISTMAS SALE Dec. 1-29. Closed Sun & mon. Open Dec. 24 till 4:00 p.m. Free coffee & doughnuts Dec. 13 & 14, open late on Dec. 14 till 9:00 p.m. 5% off groceries excluding baking, dairy & eggs. 10% off candy. 10% off all fabrics; 50% selected fabrics. 10% off throughout rest of store excluding mens and ladies coats. 20% off in stock china ware sets. 10% china ware sets ordered in December. Check out our NEW line of Walther-Glas dishes. Holiday hours: Closed Dec. 25, 26, 30, 31, Jan. 1,2,3. USED INTERIOR DOORS. White 32x80, 26x80. Two sets of double closet doors 24x80. Doors with bevelled glass: two 26x80, one 36x80. Hardware included. Phone 519-664-2992.

FOR SALE NEW ITEMS ADDED DAILY! Visit our 2nd floor clearance centre for mega deals on hand tools, small appliances, artwork, home-decor, lighting, paint sundries, and so much more. All at least 35-50% off retail prices. Elmira Home Hardware. OPEN Mon Fri 8 a.m. - 8 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. & Sun noon - 5 p.m.

AUCTIONS SAT. DEC 8 at 10:00 AM Property auction of a 4 bedroom 2 storey brick house located in a highly sought after area of town to be held at 399 Dunvegan Dr. in Waterloo off Lexington for Bill Tregunna and Arlene Zimmerman. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 www.jantziauctions.com SAT. DEC 1 at 11:00 AM Clearing auction sale of property on almost half acres; household effects; antiques; and miscellaneous items to be held at 14 Menno St. in Breslau for the estate of the late Jean Cober. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 www.jantziauctions.com WED. DEC 12 at 10:00 AM -Auction sale of antiques; collectables; household effects; tools; and miscellaneous items to be held at the St. Jacob’s Community Centre in St. Jacob’s for a Waterloo estate with additions. Jantzi Auctions Ltd. 519-656-3555 www.jantziauctions.com

BIRTHDAYS, MARRIAGE & BIRTH NOTICES, STAG & DOE. SHARE IT ALL!

FIREWOOD FIREWOOD FOR SALE. $65.00/ face cord. 4-ft Wallenstein wood splitter for rent. Isaac Martin, 851 Sandyhills Dr. 519669-9332. SEASONED FIREWOOD ALL Hardwood cut & split $70.00 a face cord, picked up, no deliveries. 519-580-2607. Quantity discounts.

COMING EVENTS COME OUT TO Jordan Ruppert and Jacquie Stuarts Stag and doe! Friday December 7th, from 7pm-1am. Located at Elmira’s Lions Hall, 40 South St West. Admission is $10 at the door! ONE STOP CHRISTMAS Shop craft and gift show. December 8th 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Lions Hall, 40 South St. W, Elmira. 40 unique vendors gifts, crafts, jewellery, baby apparel, candles, baked goods, and tone more! Get you Christmas shopping done early! Free admission. Door prizes.

PETS FREE CATS & Kittens for the farm. 519-698-2785.

RENTALS WINTER CAR STORAGE. $150.00 until May 1st. 519-669-3740.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE - 100’x100’ serviced building lot Moorefield. Please call 519-654-2695 for more information.

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE - 1.5 Acres serviced lot, currently zoned C2, quanzant shed 100’x22’ located on property with 40’x22’ off the shed being insulated, oil fired furnace, 10’ insulated roll up door. For more information please call 519-654-2695.

COMM/ INDUSTRIAL FOR RENT ELMIRA STORE 1560 sq. ft. plus unfinished basement with shelving - front & rear entrances, move in condition. $1175.00/mth plus utilities and taxes. Suitable for retail or office. Phone Allan 519-669-8074 or Paul 519-669-8582. Email allanpoffenroth@gmail.com FOR SALE OR Rent - 2500 sq’ Industrial Shop, 400 sq’ office, 3 phase hydro, gas burner in-floor heat, 16’ & 14’ insulated overhead doors, 2 washrooms, kitchenette, storage mezzanine, located in Moorefield. Please call 519-654-2695 for more information.

GARAGE SALES HUGE INDOOR GARAGE Sale! Christmas, toys, clothes, books, collectibles, household & much more. Enter at The Sharp Shop, 112-D Bonnie Cres. Elmira. Fri. Nov. 30, noon to 6 p.m.; Sat. Dec. 1, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Sun. Dec. 2, noon to 3 p.m.

OBITUARY

Seifried, Jennifer Lynn (Quill) July 2, 1972 - November 28, 2012

LIKE US. FACEBOOK, A GREAT PLACE TO MAKE FRIENDS. FIND US. LIKE US. FRIEND THE OBSERVER AND STAY INFORMED.

Passed away at K.W. Health Centre of Grand River Hospital. Beloved wife of Mike Seifried for 14 years. Loving mother of Breyer, Kate and Madi, all of Elmira. Precious first born daughter of Katherine and Harold Watson. Daughter-in-law of John and Hermine Seifried. Dear sister of Karen and Brian Button, Derek and Sarah Quill. Funloving aunt of Tyler, Sarah and Nathan Button. A memorial visitation for family and friends will take place at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira on Sunday, December 2, 2012 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A memorial service to celebrate Jen’s life will be held at Woodside Bible Fellowship, 200 Barnswallow Drive, Elmira on Monday, December 3, 2012 at 11 a.m. In Jen’s memory, donations to a Trust Fund for Breyer, Kate and Madi may be made as expressions of sympathy and can be obtained at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira 519-669-2207.

“On My Way Home” www.OBSERVERXTRA.com

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

COMMITTEE OF ADJUSTMENT NOTICE OF HEARING On December 17, 2012 at 5:30 p.m. the Committee will meet to consider the following applications. All persons interested in the applications may attend and may contact Nancy Thompson regarding meeting details or visit the Township Webpage – News and Events – Current Public Notices. The Committee will also consider submissions for or against the applications if submitted to the Township of Woolwich no later than 5:00 p.m. on December 11, 2012. Submissions can be forwarded to Jeremy Vink at the address noted at the top of this page, by email jvink@woolwich.ca or by fax 519-669-4669. Minor Variance Application A13/2012 – Kevin and Monique McVicar, 408 Country Squire Road The applicant is requesting permission to amend the definition of a duplex to allow a second dwelling unit on the property by means of a vertical separation. The property is zoned Settlement Residential (R-1) and contains a single detached dwelling, detached garage and accessory buildings. Minor Variance Applications A14/2012, A15/2012, A16/2012 and Consent Applications B22/2012 to B27/2012 (inclusive) C3 Group and Township of Woolwich, 320 and 350 Woolwich Street South, vacant lot Woolwich Street South and Woolwich Street Road Allowance, Breslau The Township of Woolwich declared surplus a portion of the Woolwich Street South road allowance which is to be purchased by and conveyed to three adjacent property owners. To facilitate this transaction the following variance and consent approvals are required: • Applications A14, 15 and 16 – reduce the required lot width from 23 metres to approximately 5 metres for each of the properties at 320 and 350 Woolwich Street South , and to approximately 8 metres for the vacant lot on Woolwich Street South; • Application B22 – sever a strip of land being approximately 0.03 ha in area to be conveyed as a lot addition to 320 Woolwich Street South; • Application B23 – sever an irregular piece of land being approximately 0.04 ha in area to be conveyed as a lot addition to 350 Woolwich Street South; • Application B24 – sever an irregular piece of land being approximately 0.36 ha in area to be conveyed as a lot addition to the vacant lot on Woolwich Street South; and • Applications B25, B26 and B27 are proposed to facilitate a shared rightof-way over the current road allowance for each of the three properties and in favour of each property. The proposed new configuration provides all three properties with a small amount of lot frontage and access to Woolwich Street South and the proposed conveyance of the larger portion will provide for a more versatile vacant lot for future development.

NOTICE TO RESIDENTS TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the Township of Woolwich intends to discuss the 2013 Draft Water and Wastewater Budgets and changes to the water and wastewater rates at the Committee of the Whole meeting on December 11, 2012 commencing at 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers, Municipal Office, 24 Church Street West, Elmira. ALSO TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the Township of Woolwich intends to discuss a by-law to amend fees or charges for planning, fire, and general services on December 11, 2012 at 6:00 p.m. in the Council Chambers situated at 24 Church Street West in Elmira. Richard Petherick, CMA Director of Finance & Treasurer


30 | CLASSIFIED

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

FAMILY ALBUM BIRTH NOTICE

RETIREMENT

It’s a boy....again!!!!

After 44 Years Its Time to Relax

NATHAN CHRISTOPHER PFANNER

PFANNER/LALIBERTE Paul, Kim and big brothers Michael and Nicholas are thrilled to announce the arrival of Nathan Christopher. Born October 29, 2012 at Grand River Hospital. Proud grandparents are George and Betty Pfanner of Elmira, Gord Pringle and Linda Laliberte of Hawkesville and Clare and Loraine Laliberte of Chatham. Another nephew for Deana and Scott Pfanner/Groves and cousin for Emily and Natalie.

Happy Retirement Roger Ritchie! Love, Your Family

THANK YOU

IN MEMORIAM

Thank You!

Landyn Richard Martin

Thank you to everyone who came to my Birthday Celebration; with best wishes, flowers, gifts & cards.

Truly Missed

August 14, 2006 - November 29, 2006

It was so wonderful to see so many of my family, friends, previous co-workers and the class of ‘58. A very special thank you to my children and their families, who worked so hard to make the celebration a beautiful memory for me! Love to all, Betty Ertel

OBITUARY

OBITUARY

Frey, Hilda

Martin, Robert L.

Peacefully passed away on Wednesday, November 28, 2012 at Chateau Gardens, Elmira at the age of 89 years. Hilda (Arnold) Frey, of Elmira, was the beloved wife of the late Albert “Abbie” Frey (1999). Dear mother of the late John (2010), Kenneth and Ellen of Stratford, Richard and Tracey of Elmira, Pat Fisher and the late Wayne Fisher (1997) of Kitchener. Lovingly remembered by her grandchildren Jamie (Julie), Tracey (Barry), Kenneth (Melanie), Adam (Jocelyn), and by her great-grandchildren Kyle, Kelton, Kaleesha, Kaya, Addison, Brody, Logan and Ashley. Hilda is fondly remembered by Linda Frey. Sister of Josephine McKay, Delta and Dalton Brooks, Coleman and Norma Arnold, Mary and Bruce Marshall, Anne and Gary Watson. The family will receive their relatives and friends at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira on Saturday, December 1, 2012 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at Calvary United Church, St. Jacobs on Sunday, December 2, 2012 at 2 p.m. followed by interment in Calvary United Cemetery. In Hilda’s memory, donations to Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario or Chateau Gardens Auxiliary would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. A special thank you to all the staff at Chateau Gardens for the tender loving care given to our mother.

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Robert Lloyd Martin, age 80 years, at Heritage House in St. Jacobs on Tuesday, November 27, 2012 with his loving wife of 60 years by his side. Robert is survived by his wife Alice (Wideman); children Brenda Martin (Lloyd), Chester (Sharon), Rob (Marilyn), Gwen Narimalla (Vidya), and Brad (Leigh); 13 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Robert is also survived by his siblings Elmeda Martin Baker, Ibra Martin, Florence Martin, Erla Buehler and Wilbert Martin. Robert is predeceased by his father Eli B., mother Hannah (Bearinger), infant son Rodney (1960), infant grandson (1990), brothers-in-law Sam Martin and Mel Buehler. Robert and Alice farmed in Alma for 32 years before retiring to Elmira in 1988. Relatives and friends may call at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira on Friday, November 30th from 7-9 p.m., Saturday, December 1st from 2-4 p.m. and at Bethel Mennonite Church, RR 1, Elora on Sunday, December 2nd from 1:30-2:10 p.m. followed by interment in Bethel Mennonite Cemetery. A memorial service to celebrate Robert’s life will follow at Bethel Mennonite Church at 2:30 p.m. The family would like to thank the staff at Derbecker’s Heritage House in St. Jacobs for the excellent care which they provided. Donations in memory of Robert’s life may be made to MCC Ontario or the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com Always Missed, Forever Loved. Mommy, Daddy, Cameryn & Liam, our extended families xoxo.

DEATH NOTICES

DEATH NOTICES

EYDT, ALMA DOROTHY | Peacefully on Saturday, November

SCHMITT, FREDERICK CLARENCE | Passed away on Tuesday,

24, 2012, at her residence Knollcrest Lodge, Milverton. Alma was born 93 years ago in Wellesley Township.

November 27, 2012 at Freeport Health Centre of Grand River Hospital, in his 83rd year. Local relatives are his daughter Nancy Bester and husband Patrick of Elmira.

www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

DEATH NOTICES

DEATH NOTICES

BUNYAN, FRANCIS XAVIER | At Louise Marshall Hospital, Mount Forest on Monday, November 26, 2012. Frank Bunyan of Mount Forest passed away one week prior to his 94th birthday. Local relatives are his daughter s Elaine O’Donnell and husband Pat of Maryhill and Cheryl Speiran and husband Scott of Elmira.

BAUMAN, OWAN | At McMaster University Medical Centre,

Hamilton on Saturday, November 24, 2012. Grandson of Earl and Almeda Bauman of St. Jacob’s and Alvin and Carol Martin of Floradale and great-grandson of Alvin and Anna Bauman of St. Jacob’s and Vera Wideman of Elmira.


LIVING HERE | 31

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

LIVING HERE CHEF’S TABLE/ DIERRE ACHESON

FOR THE CAUSE / GETTING CREATIVE

She thinks the tractor’s sexy

Gifts from the kitchen

Calendar featuring models with antique tractors aims to raise funds for breast cancer research ELENA MAYSTRUK A tractor is usually just a useful piece of farm equipment, but make it an antique, throw in a uninhibited model, some mood lighting and a photographer with a charitable vision and you’ve got the making of something that goes well beyond simply utilitarian. Craig Sitter, a Hagersville accountant, has long been proud of his collection of antique tractors. Proud enough to create the Sitter’s Massey Memories Museum around the concept of his many collectibles and antiques. Little did he know that hiring a cataloguer and Waterloobased artist Karen Zandersons would lead to the first Classic Tractor Beauties calendar in support of breast cancer research. “We were working one day and we just ended up developing an idea on seeing if we could get women and tractors together for a calendar,” Zandersons explained. The calendars are now back from the printers and ready to be distributed. Each page features a Zandersons photo of a model, some tastefully nude, next to one of Sitter’s antique tractors. What started out as an idea for an eye-catching calendar soon morphed into a cause Zandersons is eager to contribute to. Having been diagnosed with stage-3 breast cancer herself in May 2009, the artist and photographer went

RECIPE NOTES

Photographer Karen Zandersons with the Classic Tractor Beauties Calendar she helped to create in support of breast cancer research. through many difficult rounds of chemotherapy and surgery on both her breasts. After many difficult battles Zandersons is healthy, going in for regular checkups with a physician, and growing out a long head of blond hair. “We found it totally by accident,” she said of the

cancer. “I felt lucky enough to live in this part of the world that has treatments available and I took full advantage of that.” On the back of the calendar she chose to place a paragraph explaining the reason for the calendar and a black-and-white photograph of a smiling Zandersons with shorter hair and

of the calendar, while two stylists and a makeup artist made the girls look their best for the shoot. Zandersons said she wanted a diverse group of women to model and represent a variety of body types, keeping the shoots natural and earthy, so stylists were instructed to keep

Nothing says thoughtful like a handmade gift. Although I chose to cook for a living, one of my favourite things has always been creating gifts for others. These ideas with our label on the jar have been a source of satisfaction for many years. That’s where the inspiration for our Never Enough Thyme storefront was born. The gift of food provides a unique personality that is yours only. Of course, books, pinterest and the web are a great source for ideas but your personal touch and attention to detail will make it special. We make things like spice rubs, preserves, teas, cocoa-dipped marshmallow and candy just for fun. One of our favourites is our signature cookies. This year we are making “Kookies for Kate” again to raise money for the sensory wall at the park. One dollar for every dozen sold will go to this wonderful inspiring park in our community. Developing your own signature cookie can be as simple as starting with a recipe. Whimsical cupcakes, handmade soup, felted soaps or savoury biscottini are also appreciated by friends, family as well as our favourite teachers. Shopping local and handmade is a sure way to provide a unique gift for those special people in

CALENDAR | 34

CHEF’S TABLE | 34

[ELENA MAYSTRUK / THE OBSERVER]

a mastectomy scar. While the back of the calendar shows how the team of creators came to the idea, the inside is the product of months of work and the dedication of skilled volunteers who flocked to participate. Derek Potma of Elmira volunteered to look after the graphics and layout

CUSTOMER APPRECIATION

SALE & SPECIALS

December 3rd to 8th, 2012

“At the corner of Queen’s Bush & Nafziger”

1200 Queens Bush Road | Wellesley | 519-656-3400

Great deals on selected candy & bulk food items, natural health supplements etc. Specials on games, books, tractors, dolls & much more! HOURS: Mon-Sat. 9-5 | During Sale Week Th.-Fri Open Until 7:30pm


32 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

“A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

Kleensweep Carpet Care

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates West Montrose, ON

T. 519.669.2033

COLLEEN

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville 519-699-4641

Rugs and Upholstery

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS • Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

519.669.5105 P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

KIN KORNER

www.freybc.com

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

E-MAIL: ads@woolwichobserver.com

United Church, 21 Arthur St. N. $5 (kids 3 and under are free). Pancakes and sausage. Come have breakfast with St. Nick before the Christmas parade!

NOVEMBER 30 RIB DINNER - $8. Royal Canadian Legion, 11 First St. Elmira; 6 p.m. Take-outs available. Call 519-669-2932 to place order for pick up Friday.

DECEMBER 4

GET INTO THE SPIRIT of Christmas. Three community churches of the village of St. Jacobs are putting together a production of Charles Dickens’ inspiring Christmas Carol. This year’s readers are Mark Bauman, our local councilor, Ken Seiling, Chair of Waterloo Region, and Jack Annis, Kristin Dippel and Jocelyn Lubert, three young community members. 7 p.m. at St. James Lutheran Church, 1407 King St. N. St. Jacobs. Tickets $15 for adults ($7.50 for children over 12 and $30 for a family) available at Home Hardware Store, the Mennonite Story and at local churches. Proceeds will support Elmira District Community Living. For more information call Martin Giebel, Pastor 519-664-2511.

BINGO AT THE ST. Clements Community Centre sponsored by the Paradise & District Lion Club. 7 p.m. For more information contact Joe Brick, 519-699-4022.

WCS YOUTH CENTRE IS going on a shopping trip to prepare for winter. We will leave the YC at 6:00 p.m., make sure to have your permission form and some spending money. For more information contact Catherine or Anna at (519) 669-3539.

ELMIRA LIONS CLUB WEEKLY Bingo 7 p.m. at Elmira Lions Hall, 40 South St., Elmira. All proceeds go to support the many projects of the Lions Club of Elmira. For more information call 519-500-1434.

THE CAREGIVER COFFEE HOUR group will meet at The Crossroads for a social time of sharing while enjoying breakfast together 9:15-10:30 a.m. This is an opportunity for those caregivers supporting people with dementia to meet with others who share similar concerns. For more information please call Lorraine at WCHC 519-664-3794 or Cara at Alzheimer’s Society K-W 519-742-1422.

DECEMBER 6

DECEMBER 7

DECEMBER 1

ST. TERESA’S ANNUAL CHRISTMAS Dinner will be held at St. Teresa of Avila Church Hall, 19 Flamingo Dr. Elmira. Meal begins at 5p.m. Those who purchase take out tickets can pick their meals up at 5:30 p.m. Limited number of tickets which can be ordered through the Parish Office Mon. – Fri. 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. or by calling 519-669-3387. Tickets: adults $15; children 6-12 years $7.50 and children under 5 free. There will be door prizes. Last chance for tickets is Dec. 5. All

PARADISE & DISTRICT LIONS Club 5th Annual Tree of Light at 6 p.m. beside the library in St. Clements. Santa & Mrs. Claus will arrive at 5:45. Come enjoy apple cider, carolling a cookies. Bulbs $5 each, $50/ strand, $100 for a Star light. For more information contact Annette Kuhn 519-699-5917. BREAKFAST WITH ST. NICHOLAS 8-9:30 a.m. Trinity

are welcome.

Check Us Out Online! woolwichkin.com

DECEMBER 8 8TH ANNUAL BREAKFAST WITH Santa & Silent Auction. 9 a.m. – 12 noon. Kids – come out and meet Santa and Mrs. Claus at St. Jacobs Community Centre. Breakfast served 9 a.m. – 12 noon, Santa & Mrs. Claus arrive at 9:30. Entertainment by Klazz Klown, free coffee. Breakfast $4 per person at the door – pancakes, sausage, eggs, hash browns, baked beans & drink. Proudly sponsored by the St. Jacobs Optimist Club.

DECEMBER 9 COMMUNITY CHRISTMAS CONCERT, “AN Ancient Yuletide Story,” presented by Elmira area churches at Floradale Mennonite Church, 22 Florapine Rd. Free-will offering in support of Woolwich Counselling Centre. Everyone welcome.

21 INDUSTRIAL DR. ELMIRA

519-669-2884

DECEMBER 10 WELLESLEY AND DISTRICT OPTIMIST Club Information Night; 7-9 p.m., Millstream Restaurant, Wellesley. Come out and mingle with Optimist members, enjoy finger foods and learn how you can enhance the lives of children in Wellesley and surrounding areas. For more information contact Wayne Kneisel 519-5052138.

DECEMBER 11 BINGO AT THE ST. Clements Community Centre sponsored by the Paradise & District Lion Club. 7 p.m. For more information contact Joe Brick, 519699-4022.

CORPORATE WEAR PROMOTIONAL APPAREL WORK & SAFETY WEAR | BAGS T-SHIRTS | JACKETS | HATS

245 Labrador Drive | Waterloo

519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com

SUBMIT AN EVENT The Events Calendar is reserved for Non-profit local community events that are offered free to the

public. Placement is not guaranteed. Registrations, corporate events, open houses and the like do not qualify in this section. 24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

NANCY KOEBEL

Bus: 519.744.5433 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Suite 102, 40 Weber St. E., Kitchener

TOTAL HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby?

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess.

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

BE IN THE KNOW. Everyone wants to know what’s going on in the community, and everyone wants to be in the know.

Elmira & Surrounding Area

SANYO CANADIAN

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

Advertise here.

VERMONT Castings

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763

519.664.2008

psgingrich@hotmail.ca

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

PLACES OF FAITH | A DIRECTORY OF LOCAL HOUSES OF WORSHIP

St. Teresa Catholic Church No God, No Hope; Know God, Know Hope! Celebrate Eucharist with us Mass times are:

Sat. 5pm & Sun. 9am & 11:15am

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

Trinity United Church, Elmira “Our mission is to love, learn & live by Christ’s teachings”

Sunday am Sunday Worship: Worship: 10:30 10:30 am Sunday School during during Worship Worship Sunday School Minister: Rev.Dave DaveJagger Jagger Minister: Rev.

rm A Wlcaome We all! to

21 Arthur St. N., Elmira • 519-669-5560 www.wondercafe.ca

Zion Mennonite Fellowship -The JunctionSunday School 9:30am Worship Service 10:45am

NURSERY PROVIDED

SUNDAY SCHOOL

HEARING ASSISTED

THERE ARE SOME QUESTIONS THAT CAN’T BE ANSWERED BY GOOGLE. KEEP FAITH ALIVE, ADVERTISE HERE.

Finding The Way Together 47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 www.thejunctionelmira.com

Sunday School at 9:30am

Service at 10:30am Rev. Paul Snow REACH WITH LOVE. TEACH THE TRUTH. SEND IN POWER. 290 Arthur St. South, Elmira • 519-669-3973 www.ElmiraAssembly.com (Across from Tim Horton’s)

Sun. Dec. 2, 2012 11:00am Speaker: Jeff Martin Discovering God Together

4522 Herrgott Rd., Wallenstein • 519-669-2319 www.wbconline.ca

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

9:15 Sunday School 10:30 Worship Service Pastor: Richard A. Frey

Sharing the Message of Christ and His Love 27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593 www.stpaulselmira.ca

Sunday, Dec. 2nd, 2012 9:15 & 11:00 AM

December 2nd Will I Accept God’s Destiny For Me?

“From Shepherd to King” Speaker: Randy Baker 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 www.woodsidechurch.ca

SUNDAYS @ 10:30AM Services at Park Manor School 18 Mockingbird Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1459 www.elmiracommunity.org


LIVING HERE | 33

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

STRANGE BUT TRUE / BILL & RICH SONES PH.D.

Disasters at sea may not be as chivalrous as we commonly think they are

Q. Which row of numbers stands out here? 1st: 1 6 3 4 9 2 2nd: 9 3 1 2 6 4 3rd: 9 6 4 3 2 1 4th: 1 2 3 4 9 6 A. No pattern seems apparent until you start looking for a â&#x20AC;&#x153;monotonicâ&#x20AC;? sequence, with all the numbers in increasing or decreasing order. Which makes the 3rd row the standout here. (From â&#x20AC;&#x153;ScienceIllustrated.Comâ&#x20AC;? magazine) Q. In the past, the study of the dead was integral to the education of young physicians. So why has the number of autopsies

from graves. In fact, says Wolfe, perhaps the key reason for the decrease of autopsies is financial: Much time and paperwork are required, and reimbursement is lacking. Only the future can answer â&#x20AC;&#x153;if the autopsy again becomes a central tool of modern medicine or is allowed to become a relic of medical historyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s storied past.â&#x20AC;?

Q. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women and children first,â&#x20AC;? ordered the captain in evacuating the sinking Titanic. Ultimately, 70% of the women and children were saved but only 20% of the men. Is such â&#x20AC;&#x153;chivalry at seaâ&#x20AC;? typical of maritime disasters? A. Actually, the Titanic was more the exception than the rule, according to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The expression â&#x20AC;&#x153;women and children firstâ&#x20AC;? was coined in connection with the 1852 shipwreck of the HMS Birkenhead and only became widely known after the 1912 sinking of the Titanic. While longstanding maritime conventions have held that it is the duty of the crew -- particularly the captain -- to conduct a shipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s safe evacuation, findings by Swedish researchers Mikael Elinder and Oscar Erixson suggest such chivalry may be more myth than fact: Of the 16 ship sinkings they studied from 1852 through 2011 (excluding the Titanic and Lusitania), average survival rates were 61% for the crew, 44% for the captain, 37% for male passengers, 28% for females, 16% for children. Naturally, many factors influence survival rates:







   

  



  



THE CHALLENGE

HOW TO PLAY: Fill in the grid

SOLUTION: on page 26

Q. Food for thought: Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the more satisfying ways of satisfying your bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;thirstâ&#x20AC;? for water? A. Eat hearty, folks! â&#x20AC;&#x153;All foods contain water, even those that seem very dry,â&#x20AC;? says â&#x20AC;&#x153;ScienceIllustrated. Comâ&#x20AC;? magazine.

For example, cucumbers are 95% water, potatoes 80%, bananas 75%. A bowl of dry corn flakes is 4% water, and salted peanuts, one of the truly arid foods, has a bare 1%. Where much of these â&#x20AC;&#x153;wetâ&#x20AC;? foods go is into human bodies that are largely water from head to foot, with young men at 60% body weight vs. 55% for young women, who typically have more fatty tissue with a lower water content. Even our brains are about 70% water. Surprisingly, while we can generally survive a month without food, seven days is about our limit with no water.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS Bill a journalist, Rich holds a doctorate in physics. Together the brothers bring you â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strange But True.â&#x20AC;? Send your questions to strangetrue@compuserve.com

OBSERVER CROSSWORD PUZZLER

SUDOKU

so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. We have got you started with a few numbers already placed in the boxes.

weather and sea conditions, the availability of life-preserving equipment, how fast the ship sinks, etc. Perhaps the high survival rate for the crew comes from their training and familiarity with the ship, while the high male rate reflects their greater physical strength on board and as swimmers. Conclude Elinder and Erixson: In other words, â&#x20AC;&#x153;what happened on the Titanic may have spurred misconceptions about human behavior in disasters.â&#x20AC;?























SOLUTIONS: 1. SANTA'S HAT 2. SANTA'S HAIR 3. MISSING HAT HOOK 4. MISSING SHADOW 5. ELF'S SHOE 6. SANTA'S MOUTH 7. ELF'S EAR























 









The Elliott family (Greg, Annamae, Heike & Amber) ended their summer vacation on the bridge connecting the French and UK pavilions in EPCOT at Walt Disney World in Florida, with the Observer.







OBSERVER SPOT THE DIFFERENCE

CAPTION



 





Orlando, Florida









LOCATION



















OBSERVER TRAVELS

 

 







     





 



OPEN 24 HOURS | 7 DAYS A WEEK





DELIV SER ERY AVAILVICE Call fo ABLE rD

  

ACROSS 1. Black billiard ball 6. Baby slipper 12. Colloquial British abbreviation 16. Scarecrow stuffing 17. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Access Hollywoodâ&#x20AC;? cohost 18. Frauâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s partner 19. By photoelectric means 22. Informal term for nakedness 23. Ottoman governor 24. Fort ____, in Birmingham, England, 25. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rocksâ&#x20AC;? 26. In favor of 27. Boarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mate 30. Lilac, e.g. 31. A man raised by apes 35. Aloof 36. Abalone found near Channel Islands 37. Cowboy boot attach-

etails

315 Arthur St. S., Elmira | 519-669-5403 ment 40. Certain Arab 43. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So ___ me!â&#x20AC;? 44. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harper Valley ___â&#x20AC;? 46. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ momentâ&#x20AC;? 47. Most important dish of a meal 51. Balaamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mount 52. Boozehound 53. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For shame!â&#x20AC;? 54. Glorify 55. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ go!â&#x20AC;? 57. Objective male pronoun 58. Maple genus 60. Do, for example 61. Enlist in 62. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ bitten, twice shyâ&#x20AC;? 63. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Back in the ___â&#x20AC;?

DOWN 1. Lively intelligence 2. Cornellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home 3. Business of cultivating

4. Bowlers 5. Quip, part 3 6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;10â&#x20AC;? music 7. Comply with 8. Mythical monster 9. Little bird 10. Always, in verse 11. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Idylls of the Kingâ&#x20AC;? character 12. A risk involving danger 13. Separates European Turkey from Asian Turkey 14. Acrylic fiber 15. Underground chamber 20. Black 21. Astrological transition point 26. Characteristics of a rock deposit 27. A thoroughfare 28. Electrical unit 29. A sentimental novel 32. Brass component 33. Lou Gehrig, on the

diamond 34. Song and dance, e.g. 38. To a remarkable degree 39. Casting need 40. â&#x20AC;&#x153;How ___ Mehta Got Kissed, Got Wild, and Got a Lifeâ&#x20AC;? (Kaavya Viswanathan novel in the news) 41. ___-en-scène 42. Theory as to what is beautiful 43. Undertake, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;outâ&#x20AC;? 45. Absorbed, as a cost 48. Engage in 49. To a very great extent 50. Chop or split 56. Completely clear 58. Pear variety 59. North American raccoon

SOLUTION: on page 26

WEIRD NOTES

plummeted from nearly 50% before 1950 to around 6% today? A. The word â&#x20AC;&#x153;autopsyâ&#x20AC;? is from the Greek â&#x20AC;&#x153;to see for oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s self,â&#x20AC;? says pathologist Darin L. Wolfe in â&#x20AC;&#x153;American Scientistâ&#x20AC;? magazine, who developed his early understanding of malignant tumors from the procedure. During one autopsy of a cancer victim, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I felt honored to be the only one to lay eyes and hands on the very substance of the disease that had brought this woman to her death.â&#x20AC;? Autopsy remains the gold standard for assessing causes of diseases and traumas and for evaluating the accuracy of diagnoses. This wealth of information has been prized by medical schools, so much so that years ago bodies became scarce, driving up prices and leading to body snatching


34 | LIVING HERE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

CHEF’S TABLE: Homemade items from your own kitchen are a special way to mark the holidays FROM | 28

chilli flakes and sugar. Bring to a rolling boil for 5 minutes; Stir in sparkling wine and pectin. Remove from heat and skim off foam.

In large pot combine peppers, garlic, cracked pepper, vinegar,

your life. Avoid the mall and enjoy your kitchen for 2012. Your favourite people and your pocketbook will thank you.

Sparkling Bell Pepper Jelly

Fill sterilized jars until there is 1/4-inch of head space; Place prepared lid on top, screw on finger tight and finish in boiling water bath for 12 minutes. Wait for the sweet “ting” to know that your jar has sealed.

3 tbsp brown sugar, packed down 4 tbsp of cocoa 2 tsp of white sugar

LINWOOD BLOOD DONOR CLINIC Grandma: Emergency blood transfusion. Sunday 11:00am

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[SUBMITTED]

1-1/2 tbsp of cinnamon 1/2 tsp of chilli powder 4 tbsp of chopped good quality chocolate

Layer ingredients in a jar; Bring 4 cups of milk to a simmer. Add cocoa mix from jar;

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Mexican Hot Chocolate Mix

1/3 cup finely diced red peppers 1 clove garlic 1/4 tsp cracked pepper 1/4 tsp chilli flakes 3/4 cup cider vinegar 3 cups sugar 1/4 cup sparkling wine 1 pkg pectin

Bring to a rolling simmer until the chocolate melts; Put into mugs and add whipped cream or marshmallows and enjoy.

hair and makeup soft and simple. “It was new in the way that I wasn’t sure where to start organizing something like that,” she said of starting the process. “ I didn’t have anyone to go to so I had to do it all by myself out of my imagination and just take it one step at a time and see how it developed. It all went really, really well.” Zandersons started by contacting friends and putting an ad online for models. Just a couple of days in she had to take the ad down, overwhelmed by the response from at least a hundred eager women.

In the end she chose about 17 models, purposely overbooking in order to safeguard against no-shows and emergencies. Many models wanted to know if they could participate next year and Zandersons is considering the idea of making the calendar an annual project. Calendars cost $20 each, with all of the proceeds, after printing costs, going to the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, an organization Zandersons and her team are eager to support in coming years. “It was only going to be this year, but with the response we’ve had I think we’re going to do it every year.”

Township of Wellesley Give Blood ... to save lives.

TAKE NOTICE that the Council of the Corporation of the Township of Wellesley will hold a PUBLIC INFORMATION SESSION on the 3rd day of December, 2012 at 6:45 p.m. in the Council Chambers at 4805 William Hastings Line, Crosshill, Ontario, to consider an Official Plan Amendment (OPA 02/11) and Zoning By-law Amendment (ZBA 05/11) for the property known as PT LOT 2, CON 12, EAST SEC, Wellesley Township.

The Next Linwood Clinic:

Friday December 7, 2012 from 2:30pm - 8:30pm Linwood Community Centre, Linwood CALL 1 888 2 DONATE for more information or to book an appointment.

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL INDUSTRIAL • POLE LINE CONSTRUCTION

Proud to support the community effort to donate blood.

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3860 Manser Rd., Linwood • 519-698-2610 linwoodvet@linwoodvet.ca

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Reist & WebeR butcheRing

Cleason Weber Mon - Thurs 9 - 5 Fri 9 - 8, Sat 9 - 5

www.lwcb.org 3865 Manser Rd., Linwood • 519-698-1198

South West Ontario Veterinary Service 1010 Industrial Crs., St. Clements

519.699.0600

Public Notice

Custom Killing Wholesale Pork

RR #1, St. Jacobs • 519-664-2656

THE STAINLESS STEEL SHOP O.W. Mfg. Orvie Wideman

MILK EQUIPMENT REPAIRS & STAINLESS FARM SPECIALTIES CUSTOM CHIMNEY LINERS

4155 Ament Line, RR#3 Wallenstein • 519-698-2911

The Township of Wellesley held a public meeting for the above-noted applications on Dec. 20, 2011 to fulfill the requirements for public participation as per the Planning Act R.S.O. 1990, as amended. The Township is holding a PUBLIC INFORMATION SESSION to allow for further public discussion and input based on newly available information. The purpose of Applications OPA 02/11 and ZBA 05/11 is to permit dry industrial uses on a lot designated and zoned for agricultural uses. A report was submitted by the Applicant dated September 2012 to provide further information. The report is available at the Township of Wellesley office for public inspection during regular business hours. Any persons may attend the public meeting and make written and/or verbal representation either in support of or in opposition to the proposed amendment.

i. If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at a public meeting or make written submissions to the Township of Wellesley before the by-law is passed, the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of the Council of The Corporation of the Township of Wellesley to the Ontario Municipal Board. ii. If a person or public body does not make oral submissions at a public meeting, or make written submissions to the Township of Wellesley before the by-law is passed, the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to do so.

Additional information relating to the proposed application is available for inspection during regular business hours at the Municipal Offices of the Township of Wellesley. Information requests may also be submitted to Sarah Peck, Junior Planner: speck@wellesley.ca 4639 Lobsinger Line, St. Clements, ON N0B 2M0 PH: 519.699.4611 FX: 519.699.4540

Dated at the Township of Wellesley this 22nd day of November, 2012


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A different take on some classic fairy tale characters

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THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

Values in effect till Closing Sat. Dec. 8, 2012

EDSS drama department’s latest production has a whole lot of fun putting a new twist on the treatment of good and evil we usually find in classic stories

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EDSS drama students will be tackling classic fairy tale characters with a twist in this year’s school production of A Not So Fairy Tales, an original story written by their teacher DJ Carroll. [COLIN DEWAR / THE OBSERVER]

ENTIRE STOCK

Have you ever wondered how your favorite childhood fairy tale would have played out having the villain win? That is exactly what the EDSS drama students will be exploring during this year’s school production called A Not So Fairy Tales, an original story written by drama teacher DJ Carroll. The story is a twist on fairy tales, with the villains having a chance to re-write their stories and take control. In the play there are story tellers who guard the stories and are tasked with having to stop the villains with the help of some unlikely heroes, including a baker, wood cutter and ogre. Of course along the way some classical fairy tale characters appear to help the trio, including Snow White and the Seven Dwarves and Rapunzel. This is an adaptation play, said Carroll, who took stories that friends of his have written, his own

thoughts on fairy tales and classic fairy tales and mixed them all into one cohesive story. “At first it is a band of unlikely heroes that have to stop the evil queen, wicked stepmother and Grothel the witch from destroying all the stories. Eventually they free more fairy tale characters and build an army that goes up against the bad guys,” said Carroll. “It’s a fun twist on all those stories.” During the play characters come across a magical singing sword and when any character touches it a song is played leading the characters into a well choreographed dance number or fight routine. Through out the play there are 20 different occasions when this occurs, he explained. “We have disco wolves that come out and do this fantastic disco dance and we have an amazing routine where we have the giant exploding apple, which is set to the Harlem Globe Trotters’ [theme]. It’s just fun, fun, fun.” The cast is close to some

60 students and during the big dance numbers all of them will be on stage which has been quite the undertaking for the students and Carroll. “It can be pretty hectic at times out on the stage but the students have worked hard and it looks great.” The students have been rehearsing since the end of September and are eager to show off their hard work. Laura Martin, who plays Grothel the Witch, said it was difficult at first playing an evil character. “Once you find out who the character is it feels really good and becomes a lot of fun. The evil characters are more interesting than the good guys, who are always so happy,” she said. Co-star Kira Buckley, who plays a wicked stepmother, agrees, saying she emulates some villains she has seen in the movies and television to help her get into the mindset of being evil. “It’s really great playing

a character that is evil, because it’s not that common and there are quirks like cackling. You basically get to play something that is completely different than who you actually are.” There are a lot of characters that the audience will recognize and they will probably know most of the story or at least some of it and be able to identify really quickly, said Carroll. “This story stays very true to the fairy tale characters. It’s just looking at them from a different point of view.” The curtain opens on A Not So Fairy Tales on December 6 at 7:30 p.m. in the EDSS gymnasium, followed by an evening show on December 7 and two shows on December, 8 including a 2 p.m. matinee family show, with tickets priced at $15 per family. The night shows are $10 for general admission, $7 for students and seniors and $5 for children under the age of 12. Contact the school for tickets at 519669-5414.

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36 | BACK PAGE

THE OBSERVER | SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012

Fill up your stockings...

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1 Union St., Elmira THE SHOPS AT ROXTON

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December 1, 2012  

Elmira Ontario Local Newspaper

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