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» Saturday, December 17, 2011

MERRY CHRISTMAS

THE OBSERVER

1 NEWS

from our family to yours

MichaelHarrisMPP.ca 519.954.8679 MH_ObserverAdXmas_Banner.indd 1

11-12-07 8:59 PM

Kings take 3 of 3

VOLUME.....16 ISSUE.........50

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 17, 2011

.com

www.

> STORY ON PG.24

Season of Song

CHRISTMAS IN BRESLAU

The Breslau Evangelical Missionary Church quartet, Mark Domm, Katelynn Howard, Sun Millar Idsinga and Mark Dettweiler, perform at the Breslau Community Centre’s Christmas in Breslau event on Dec. 11. A chili dinner was served, with proceeds going to the community centre, followed by a visit from Santa Claus and carol singing.

Council balks at large hikes in ice rental rates While deferring some rec. fees, Woolwich approves a range of other price hikes Steve Kannon

P

lanned rate hikes that would see Woolwich Minor Hockey hit with an 11 per cent increase next year were quashed by council-

lors, who sent staff off to find a sharper pencil. While agreeing to a host of user fee increases – some of them huge – for a host of township services, councillors meeting Tuesday night

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opted to defer a decision on arena rental fees. The rates themselves are slated for an increase averaging 5.2 per cent under proposal tabled by recreation department staff. Primetime

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ice would jump to $201.76 an hour from $191.85 at the Dan Snyder Memorial Arena, and to $196.46 from $186.85 at the Jim McLeod and Woolwich Township arenas. A uniform $110.62 would be

Opinion...............12 Business.............15

applied to all non-prime ice times at the three arenas, up from $109.81 at the Snyder rink and $104.81 at the others.

> SEE FEES ON PG. 05

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NEWS 2

THE OBSERVER

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» Saturday, December 17, 2011

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

3 NEWS

> Covered bridge gets designation Council this week approved a cultural heritage landscape designation for the area surrounding the West Montrose covered bridge. The move provides an extra layer of protection for the area’s historic character, in some instances requiring a heritage study prior to development within the lands of the CHL, which covers some 1,670 acres. Although Coun. Allan Poffenroth expressed concerns about undue restrictions on homeowners, director of engineering and planning Dan Kennaley explained only those changes that require assessment under the Planning Act will trigger a review. Minor changes that require only a building permit, for instance, won’t be in play, and council will have some discretion of its own.

i-learning

> Putting a little soul into the holidays

HANDS-ON The John Mahood iPad focus group consisting of students Jesse Bowman (back left), Matt Yorke, Sean Heimpel, Alana Bauman, Hilary Bauman, Daniel Grant (front left) and Kyle Austin met for the first time on Wednesday afternoon to test the devices.

John Mahood PS introduces iPads to its curriculum James Jackson

O

n Wednesday afternoon, seven students from John Mahood Public School sat in the school’s library during their second nutrition break to try out a set of brand new iPads. It was a fascinating juxtaposition of old and new technology as John Mahood’s new iPad focus group, a collection of students ranging in age from junior kindergarten up to Grade 5, tested the latest addition to the school’s educational technology for the first time. Referred to as the iPad lab, it consists of 20 Apple tablet devices stored in a special cart that simultaneously charges and syncs them to a single laptop computer. The lab can be easily wheeled around to classrooms throughout the school, and school principal Tracy Tait has high hopes for the technology.

EE RY FR IVE L DE

“They certainly complement the curriculum,” she said, adding that all the programs known as applications, or apps, will have an educational component to them before being added to the iPads via the laptop and the school’s iTunes account. The students will have no access to the iTunes account and only staff can download apps onto the iPads. “There won’t be apps strictly for the purpose of playing games; there are math apps, music apps, language apps, and there are a wide variety of apps in the form of assistive technologies for students that struggle or have special needs.” For example, text-to-type apps will allow a child to speak into the microphone and their words are typed out, which can then be emailed to their teacher or sent wirelessly to a printer. “It’s easier for children

who struggle with fine motor tasks and writing to be able to get their thoughts on paper in a way that makes them feel successful,” Tait said. The iPads can be signed out by teachers just like any other piece of technology in the school, and staff has had a chance to test out the devices both at school and at home to get a feel for what the technology can offer. While some may call into question the increased role of technology in the classroom, there is a growing body of evidence in support of it. The National Institute for Education found that technology can support instant feedback and interaction among students, and research in the UK showed students using mobile learning technology such as the iPad increased their motivation and enthusiasm for their course. The devices have also been

W • O • O • L • W • I • C • H

shown to help those with developmental disorders such as Autism, and combined with computers, interactive smartboards and powerpoint projectors that are already in classrooms, technology has transformed the ways students learn. “Our board has a focus on a variety of different technologies, iPads being just one,” said Tait. John Mahood is far from the first school in the region to make use of iPad technology, and Tait said she was encouraged by administrators at Millen Woods P.S. and Lester B. Pearson P.S. in Waterloo who praised the impact the iPad has had on their students’ ability to learn in the classroom. This year the school started looking into getting their own iPad lab at the school, and with funds raised dur-

> SEE IPAD ON PG. 06

Stop in at the Baby Charlotte store in Conestogo this holiday season and you might notice the staff has gone barefoot. That’s all part of the “Baby Charlotte Little Souls Shoe Drive,” to raise awareness for those children who don’t have shoes this winter. The small, eco-friendly children’s shop got the ball rolling with a donation of 115 pairs of shoes. Wearing cheerful Santa t-shirts, with the words “Ask me why I’m barefoot,” four year old Charlotte, her mom Carla, and their staff are encouraging customers to add a small donation to their purchase, to help buy shoes for those kids outside of Baby Charlotte’s size range. “We are inviting other retailers to donate larger sized shoes as well,” said storeowner Carla Muller. “We’ll even send them some campaign t-shirts.”

> In search of bootlegging stories Prohibition-era bootlegging in Woolwich Township? Seems pretty likely given the region’s role in that bit of history, and Kitchener resident Janet Bock is looking for information about that kind of activity in the townships. “While not a writer, historian or researcher, I ‘m just interested in the implications of stories I’ve heard of whiskey traffic and stowaway locations not far from Waterloo,” she says, indicating she’s heard of liquor caches in the Sandy Hills area of Elmira. “I’m just curious about this … and I’m looking for stories about bootlegging or caching in Woolwich.” Bock can be reached at 519-7453296.

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NEWS 4

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

LAW & ORDER

Countdown on for police department’s anti-drug contest December 8 >>5:50 PM | Ontario Provincial

Police responded to a head-on crash near Greenhouse Road, east of Breslau when a pickup truck and a car collided, killing a 21-year-old Kitchener man, Cody Springall and sending the driver of the pickup, a 48-yearold man, to Guelph General Hospital with serious but nonlife-threatening injuries. The crash backed up traffic as far as Victoria Street North in Kitchener. The highway was closed until around 11 p.m. Police continue to investigate the incident.

T

he Waterloo Regional Police Service has partnered with local pop star Nate Hall to help promote a contest that invites the region’s youth to submit art, film, song, or words that highlight the benefits of living drug-free. The contest called “It’s Your Call” is being promoted in high

schools across the region. Students can visit www.itsyourcallcontest.ca for more information. Prizes include an iPad 2, a laptop computer, a HD camcorder and a Gibson Les Paul Studio Model guitar. The contest, which aims to empower teens to speak out about drug use, closes on Dec. 31.

>>6:00 PM | A 19-year-old

Jerusalem Road near South Field Drive. Police found the car on its side in the middle of the road. The car sustained moderate damage, but no injuries were reported.

Elmira man was charged with ‘careless driving’ after he flipped his white 1999 Nissan while driving along New

December 9 >>7:40 AM | A 53-year-old

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Brantford man driving a 2011 KIA along Chilligo Road slowed for a bend in the road when he slide on ice and lost control of his vehicle and entered a ditch before hitting a hydro pole. Damage to the vehicle was moderate. No injuries were reported, and no charges were laid.

>>4:30 PM | A 73-year-old Heidelberg

woman

driving

OP N E O A N7 W W D EE AY K S

a 1997 Sierra pickup truck pulled over on to the side of William Hasting Line when a 2009 Volkswagen driven by a 70-year-old Milbank man pulled in behind her. The two vehicles waited for traffic to clear and when the Sierra started to move it reversed into the Volkswagen. The woman was charged with ‘start from stop not in safety.’ No injuries were reported, with both vehicles sustaining minimal to moderate damage.

>>5:10 PM | On the way to a medical emergency, a police cruiser lost control on the icy road on Hutchinson Road and rolled into a cornfield. No serious injuries were reported, but the cruiser was destroyed in the accident. Traffic branch is investigating.

>>8:45 PM | A 22-year-old

Guelph woman driving a white 2009 KIA was charged with ‘disobey a red light’ when she hit a 33-year-old St. Jacobs woman driving a GMC van on Arthur Street near Whippoorwill Drive in Elmira. The van sustained severe damages and the KIA was

destroyed in the accident. No injuries were reported.

December 10 >>5:00 PM | Police were called

after a couple of teenagers left a red plastic wagon in the middle of Killdeer Road near First Street, Elmira, waiting for a vehicle to come by and hit it. Police picked up the wagon, which was believed to have been stolen, and are holding it at the Elmira detachment. The investigation continues.

December 11 >>10:55 AM | A 17-year-old

St. Jacobs man driving a 2002 Chevy Astro Van was exiting the Shoppers Drug Mart parking lot onto Church Street in Elmira when he struck a 2009 KIA operated by a 33-year-old Elmira man. The teenager was charged with ‘fail to yield.’ No injuries were reported and both vehicles sustained moderate damage.

>>1:00 PM | A collision occurred at King Street North near Martin Grove Road south of St. Jacobs when a 2009 Ford pickup driven by a 39-year-

old St. Jacobs man stopped for traffic on King Street and was rear-ended by a 2006 Chevy Equinox driven by a 50-year-old Brussels man who was blinded by the sun and did not see the pickup stop in front of him. No charges were laid, no injuries were reported and moderate damage was sustained by both vehicles.

December 12 >>9:00 AM | Police found

a girl’s purple and silver Raleigh Portage bike at the St. Clements arena. The bike may be claimed by its rightful owner at the Elmira detachment.

>>11:00AM | A boy’s white DX Bent Number 20 stunt bike was found in Bolender Park in Elmira. It’s now awaiting pickup by its rightful owner at the police station.

>>4:00 PM | A suspicious

maroon van was reported to police outside the Mennonite school on Line 86 south of Wallenstein. The van was parked on the side of the road with the passenger door open. When police arrived the van had left the scene.

Paradise & District Lions Club Would like to thank the following businesses and individuals who generously contributed $50.00 or more to our 4th Annual Tree of Light campaign which was a great success. Special thanks to Exotic Wings and Things as well as Foodland for their continuing support.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

5 NEWS

New air route will connect Waterloo Region to Chicago American Eagle service will offer 13 roundtrip flights each week starting in June James Jackson

A

merican Eagle, the regional affiliate of American Airlines, will offer daily flights to Chicago from the Region of Waterloo International Airport starting next year. The airline plans 13 roundtrip flights per week to O’Hare International Airport, one of its largest travel hubs, beginning June 14, 2012. “We’re really thrilled that American has joined on with us here,” said regional Chair Ken Seiling at the official announcement Tuesday morning at the

Breslau airport. “We see a lot of economic activity in this region that is supported by the airport, and businesses that use the airport in its operations around the world.” The service will be operated by the ERJ145 Embraer regional jets that seat 50 passengers. The partnership has been about two years in the making. Airport general manager Chris Wood said he was contacted by the airline shortly after he assumed the position in 2009, as they were looking to secure more business in Waterloo’s booming technology

CHICAGO-BOUND Brett Hooyerink of American Airlines is flanked by Region of Waterloo International Airport general manager Chris Wood (left) and regional Chair Ken Seiling (right) during Tuesday’s announcement the airline will offer twice-daily flights to Chicago starting next June.

sector. The answer from those companies was clear, Wood revealed. “They said ‘simple, put planes in Waterloo.’” The airport is already home to three Canadian airlines – Bearskin, WestJet and Sunwing as well as Great Lakes Helicopter – and American will be the first carrier with U.S.-bound flights out of the Region of Waterloo since Northwest (now Delta) ended flights to Detroit in 2009. “We’re very proud to become a part of

> SEE AIRLINE ON PG. 06

Fees: Township looking to boost it’s cost-recovery model with increases > CONTINUED FROM COVER

Combined with a shift in the primetime ice schedule – starting at 5 p.m. each weeknight rather than 6 – the increases would mean thousands of extra dollars in costs for the largest user of ice time. Noting that the bottom-line impact on the association would mean paying 11 per cent more next year over current expenses, Mayor Todd Cowan dismissed as semantics

the distinction between a fee hike and primetime ice changes, calling it a “shell game.” “I have a few difficulties with this. It could limit the number of kids who could play because it’s getting too expensive,” he said of the staff proposal, part of a broader slate of changes to fees and charges. “I think that’s asking way too much.” Acknowledging the overall impact, director of recreation and facilities Karen Makela said the changes were in

Thank You All!

The Elmira Kiwanis Club would like to thank the following community minded businesses and organizations who generously supported our very successful Santa Claus parade this year. Voisin Motors Waterloo Regional Police - Traffic Division Paul & Adele’s No Frills Food Market Elmira Legion Br. 469 Riverside Public School Walter Plein Martin Mills Inc. McKee Farm Technologies Resurfice Corp. Sulco Chemicals M&G Millwrights P.I.B. Insurance Brokers Sanyo Canadian Machine Works RBC Financial Elmira Elmira Home Hardware McDonald’s Restaurants Elmira Elmira Pet Products Elmira Insurance Brokers VHF Construction

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line with arena fees in neighbouring municipalities. The proposed hourly rate would put Woolwich in the middle of the pack, while some other municipalities start their primetime rates as early as 4 p.m. each day. Woolwich currently recovers about 54 per cent of the cost of operating arenas through fees paid by users, slightly lower than the average of 60 per cent. In order to recover all of its costs, the township would have to

charge $252 an hour for ice time. For Cowan, however, the goal is to reduce the township’s costs – “we can find some efficiencies” – rather than simply relying on fee increases to close the gap. “We have to find some better solutions for our best customer,” he said of the minor hockey issue. Having sent staff back to the drawing board on that issue, councillors did approve a host increased fees and charges for

everything from an Official Plan amendment ($4,500 from $4,299) to dog tags ($25 from $20). Increases range from inflationary to more than 100 per cent in some cases. A gravel pit application, for instance, jumps to $16,700 from $8,348. Other increases in the planning department include a doubling of many of the committee of adjustment rates, such as applications for severance jumping to $1,100 from $537 and a minor variance application

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going to $900 from $485. All of the fee hikes, including those well above inflation on the recreation side, reflect the township’s rising costs to provide the services, said director of finance Richard Petherick. Chief administrative officer David Brenneman noted the increases seen in recent years reflect a shift towards a userpay philosophy as the township tries to recover more of the costs associated with offering services.

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NEWS 6

THE OBSERVER

iPad: Another tool for teaching > CONTINUED FROM PG. 03 ing their annual Treasure Books fundraiser in September, the school collected more than $11,000, which was enough to order a lab in October, which included 10 iPads and the sync cart, and left enough money left over to purchase another 10 iPads. “We’re very thankful for the community’s support in raising those funds,” said Tait. The iPads are being used in conjunction with the school’s preexisting Digital Citizenship program developed when computers

LEARNING IS FUN Jesse

Bowman tries out one of the numerous educational apps on one of the school’s 20 new tablet devices. first entered the classroom, and it includes topics such as teaching students to interact appropriately with the

technology, how to care for it, how to be a responsible Internet user, and so on. As for the students in the focus group, the plan is for them to test out the iPads and provide some feedback on how they might be integrated into the curriculum using new and creative ways that teachers and administrators may not think of. “The hope is that those students will become leaders in their own classes, so when the class has an opportunity to use the iPads, they have an expert inhouse to assist their friends.”

REGION OF WATERLOO SIGN BY-LAW 10-030 – ENFORCEMENT ADVISORY An increasing number of illegal signs along Regional roads have led the Region to increase enforcement of its sign by-law to improve road safety and the appearance of Regional roads. Regional and municipal enforcement staff will be targeting small wire-mounted signs and other miscellaneous signs including but not limited to pole-mounted signs and mobile signs that do not meet the conditions of the by-law. Signs observed not complying with the Region’s Sign By-law will be removed immediately without notice and a ticket may be issued. The owner of any such sign found replacing or permitting the replacement of any removed non-compliant sign, will be issued a ticket by an enforcement officer and the replacement sign removed. Copies of the current Sign By-law 10-030 are available for review in the Clerk’s Office, Region of Waterloo, 2nd Floor, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener during normal office hours. Copies of the current by-law can also be obtained by visiting the Region of Waterloo website at www.regionofwaterloo.ca under the Regional Government / By-laws menu at the top of the home page. If you have any questions concerning the by-law, any questions concerning enforcement of the by-law, or wish to make a complaint about signs, you may contact Marty Sawdon, Administrator, Licensing and Enforcement directly at 519-575-4040 or lrs@regionofwaterloo.ca

Changes are coming to your Water and Wastewater Utility Bill in the Township of Wellesley The Region of Waterloo currently provides water and wastewater services directly to the residents of the Township of Wellesley. Beginning January 1, 2012, the Region of Waterloo will assume billing for local water and wastewater services from the Township of Wellesley. Water meters will no longer be read quarterly, but every second month beginning January 2012, and the bill will arrive two to three weeks following the reading. Payment must be sent to the Region of Waterloo. Please review your invoice or our website (www.regionofwaterloo.ca, click on the Water “Quicklinks”) for detail regarding the various methods of payment. If a new water meter is required, they will continue to be available at the Township of Wellesley Administration Office for pick up. Please contact Wellesley Township in advance at 519-699-4611. If you would like more information please visit www.regionofwaterloo.ca and click on the Water “Quicklinks”, or e-mail aradmin@regionofwaterloo.ca, or call Accounts Receivable - Water at 519-575-4490

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

Homeowners dinged with large increases in water rates Woolwich plans to hike fees by 6.9% for water and 7.9% for wastewater Steve Kannon

R

esidents on full municipal services will be shelling out another $50 next year for water and sewer fees, Woolwich councillors decided this week. For 2012, Waterloo Region has pushed water rates by 6.9 per cent and wastewater 7.9 per cent. In Woolwich, which buys water from the region and runs the distribution systems itself, that translates into a water rate hike of 6.9 per cent, to $1.52 per cubic metre from $1.43 (a jump of $16 to $22 per year for an average household) and wastewater increases of 7.84 per cent, to $1.90 per cubic metre from $1.76 ($25 to $33 per year). The Woolwich fees reflect the fact regional billing is the singlebiggest component of the township’s costs,

director of finance Richard Petherick told councillors Dec. 13. Water charges from the region will account for 67 per cent of the water budget in 2012, up from 60 per cent this year. On the wastewater side, the figures are 76 and 68 per cent respectively. “We’re holding the line. It’s really the region that is driving this,” he said. Given that the region plans similar increases over the next few years, water and sewage rates are likely to climb accordingly. Citing figures that show water costs are soaring because conservation measures have reduced regional revenues, Coun. Allan Poffenroth said customers are in effect being punished for good behaviour. The issue was discussed last week at a meeting of all mu-

nicipal councils in the region. Saddled with fixed costs and increasing expenditures to meet provincial regulations and future infrastructure needs, the region has seen revenues fall by $11 million over the past two years due to decreased demand. But Mayor Todd Cowan, the township’s representative on regional council, was quick to point out that conservations measures have helped defer more than $100 million in expansion projects, as well as a proposed Great Lakes pipeline. “It’s a heck of a lot cheaper than building a pipeline to Lake Erie,” he said of the rate increases. The Lake Erie project is slated for 2035 and could be pushed back by five or more years because of conservation efforts.

Airline: Bankruptcy of parent airline should have no impact on schedule > CONTINUED FROM PG. 05

the community and its great the way the community has welcomed us here,” said Dale Morris, managing director for state and community affairs with American, in an interview after the announcement. “When it starts up we’re expecting great things.” The partnership comes during a difficult time for American, whose parent company AMR Corp. filed for bankruptcy protection on Nov. 29 under Chapter 11 proceedings, and is currently undergoing restructuring in U.S. bankruptcy court. Morris said that restructuring plan included looking at new routes, such as the one to Waterloo, and that the filing of Chapter 11 would have no impact on their decision to continue their partnership with the airport.

“It’s business as usual. We had this route projected even before we went into that mode. It won’t have any affect on it at all.” Woolwich Mayor Todd Cowan admitted to having some reservations about the deal after the developments on Nov. 29, but said regional council and the township have been assured the agreement would continue as agreed. “Initially I had some concerns, but Chris (Wood) has said that just because they have filed for bankruptcy doesn’t mean they’re going under, it’s merely a reorganization of the company,” Cowan said. As for future plans, Morris couldn’t say whether or not the airline would expand upon its twice-daily route. He said the company has economic models that the market must reach first and that it would take some

time for the market to dictate their future action. “I think once the route gets going we’ll look at other options down the road but I think if it goes well it can lead to increased frequency.” Flights from Waterloo to Chicago start June 14, 2012.

Waterloo Region to Chicago Departs 6:30 a.m. and 4:40 p.m. (except Saturday) Arrives 6:55 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.

Chicago to Waterloo Region Departs 1:20 p.m. and 7:50 p.m. (except Saturday) Arrives 3:55 p.m. and 10:15 p.m.

American Eagle


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

7 NEWS

Woolwich launches Real vs. artificial The Christmas tree debate rages on comprehensive review of Breslau development N James Jackson

Council approves spending $235,000 for consultant to formulate secondary plan Steve Kannon

M

apping out the future of Breslau will cost Woolwich $235,000, the price for consultants to carry out what’s known as the secondary plan review for what’s expected to be the fastest-growing part o the township. The plan will lay out appropriate locations for future residential and commercial growth inside the settlement boundaries, as well as places for schools, recreational facilities and the like. Transportation issues, including a proposed GO train station, will also be part of the review, as will growth targets and staging of development, determining how many new homes should be built each year. The Planning Partnership, a Torontobased firm, submitted the lower of just two bids submitted in response to the township’s request for proposals. Most of the expenses will be covered by development charges – fees collected from new construction – with about $35,000 coming from general tax coffers, director of engineering and planning Dan Kennaley told councillors meeting Tuesday night. Questioned by May-

or Todd Cowan about the need for yet another consultant on the books, Kennaley explained the comprehensive review requires time and expertise not available in-house. Scheduled to run through mid-2013, the work will run in tandem with a review of the township’s Official Plan. It will also have a direct bearing on Thomasfield Homes’ recent application for a large, mixed-use development on land east of the village core. Owner Tom Krizsan would like to see the secondary plan completed as quickly as possible, telling councillors GO Transit is on a tight schedule for a proposed park-andride station that would form part of his development project. “We began asking for the secondary plan five years ago. We’re very pleased it has arrived,” he said, calling for the township to “complete it in an expeditious manner.” Thomasfield control about 70 per cent of the undeveloped land within the Breslau settlement area, so the secondary plan will have a large impact on his plans. The company earlier this year submitted an application for a project that would add 2,300 new residents and

3,330 jobs to the area. Proposed is a combination of residential (single-family, semis, townhouses and apartment buildings), commercial space, offices, retail stores, industrial uses, schools, open space, trails and wetlands extending over more than 335 acres east of the company’s current development, the Hopewell Heights subdivision. The development would cover two pieces of land, 226 acres immediately east of the subdivision and 109 acres east of Greenhouse Road, the site of much of the proposed industrial land. There would be 865 residential units; 53 acres of employment land; 15 acres set aside at the sound end of the western property, adjacent to the CN rail line, set aside for a GO station; and substantial amounts of protected wetlands and extensive trailways. Addressing the timing of the work, Coun. Mark Bauman noted the biggest hurdle is the Ontario Municipal Board hearing that’s holding up the new Regional Official Plan. Neither the secondary plan nor the township’s own Official Plan review can be finalized until the legal issues are resolved at the regional level.

ear the front entrance of Grobe’s Nursery and Garden Centre is a large sign welcoming you to Christmas tree country, and inside, hundreds of pre-cut Christmas trees line the interior of the greenhouse. It’s pretty clear where the company’s allegiance lies in the ongoing debate of real versus fake Christmas trees. “It starts in the ground and it ends in the ground,” said coowner Perry Grobe of the benefits of a real tree over a fake one. “An artificial tree has a lifespan and when it’s over it goes to the landfill.”

Grobe points to the myriad of other benefits of choosing a real Christmas tree every year, from the absorption of carbon dioxide, the protection of soil from runoff and erosion, and the creation habitat for wildlife. It can take between four to 15 years to grow a Christmas tree, depending on the species and the desired height. Meanwhile, proponents of the artificial tree point to the ease and convenience associated with not having to drag a real one inside. “They are cleaner than a live tree, and there is less mess with no needles falling off,” said Lindsey Dietrich, a spokesperson from

Home Hardware, which sells a wide range of artificial trees. “They’re a lot lower maintenance with no watering involved or needles to vacuum.” The Christmas tree has a long history. Records suggest that when St. Boniface travelled to Germany during the 7th century to convert the people to Christianity, he came across a group of pagans worshipping an oak tree. Legend has it that he cut down the tree in anger and, to his amazement, a young fir sprung up from the roots of the oak. St. Boniface took this as a sign of the Christian

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NEWS 8

Volunteers help WCS prepare hampers for Christmas

THE OBSERVER

Woolwich wants more study into visual impacts of proposed Jigs Hollow gravel pit Steve Kannon

PHOTO

» COLIN DEWAR

MANY HANDS ... Nancy Cooper (left) was one

of the 200 volunteers that came out to help prepare the WCS holiday food hampers at Lions Hall on Dec. 14. More than 170 hampers were filled over the week. Bruce Sieling (right) works with Elwyn Bridge as they pack food into one of the many hampers.

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» Saturday, December 17, 2011

T

he applicant seeking to create a gravel pit near Winterbourne will have to provide more information about the visual impact of the operation after the township found the first study to be wanting. A peer review of the visual impact study submitted by Kuntz Topsoil, Sand and Gravel having discovered a host of shortcomings, Woolwich will ask the company to address the issues. Among the findings in the report commissioned by the township, the original study submitted by the applicant failed to assess the visual impact from the perspective of the Grand Valley Trail, the Winterbourne bridge and the historic driving tour that winds through the valley. Nor did the report take into account the height and elevations of stockpiles of extracted and recyclable materials. A number of properties were unaccounted for in determining the views that would be changed if the pit went ahead. Those and other issues will have to be addressed, director of engineering and planning Dan Kennaley said at Tuesday night’s meeting of council. Council ordered the peer review last spring following concerns raised by residents. Sitting in a low spot in the Winterbourne valley, the applicant’s site at 125 Peel St. is close to Winterbourne, Conestogo and West Montrose. The findings were welcomed by residents, who took the opportunity to take aim at the application yet again, highlighting the reasons why the pit should not be allowed to go ahead. For Isabella Price, a resident of Sunset Drive in Winterbourne, the prospect of the pastoral view being blotted

out by a gravel pit is unacceptable. “It’s a beautiful view. For many of us, this is the primary reason why we live here,” She took exception with a portion of the report that berms would be an acceptable method to address residents’ concerns about the tainted view, noting they too would block out the countryside. That sentiment was shared by neighbour Laurie Breed, who argued berms of three or four metres would do nothing to block the view from some vantage points, especially with stockpiles of materials that could reach 20 metres, while simply offering another obstruction while taking part in the historical driving tour through the area. “Quite simply, berms are not an acceptable solution,” she said. Conestogo residents, meanwhile, were upset the study doesn’t take into account the impact on that community. Bill Norris told councillors 17 homes on Golf Course Road have views of the valley that would undoubtedly suffer if the pit goes ahead, not to mention the noise and dust problems that will also come along with the project. He dismissed assertions from township planning staff that there would be no unacceptable visual impact on his and other properties. “I invite you to come out our backyards and see for yourself,” he said, calling the peer review study incomplete. While they listened to the public’s input, councillors made no comments about the application because the matter is now a legal issue, having been referred to the Ontario Municipal Board. The process is still at the prehearing stage, and no formal hearing has been set.


Âť Saturday, December 17, 2011

9 NEWS

faith, but it wasn’t until the 16th century that fir trees were brought indoors at Christmastime. Martin Luther is purported to have started the tradition of decorating trees to celebrate Christmas around 1500. He was struck by the beauty of the snow-covered evergreens shimmering in the moonlight and returned home and set up a fir tree indoors and decorated it with candles in honour of Christ’s birth. Meanwhile, the first artificial trees were developed in the 19th century in Germany after growing concerns of widespread defores-

tation, and they were made of goose feathers that were dyed green. Since then they have been made out of brush bristles, aluminum and now plastic PVC. Nowadays customers can purchase an artificial tree to match their own decorating needs, including memory wire so they hold their shape year after year, pre-lit, and they come in a wide range of colours as well, said Dietrich. Plus, they save you time during the hectic holiday season – at a price. The artificial Christmas tree market has grown into a $44-million industry, with prices ranging from $50 up to $500, yet that price is worth it

for many customers, said Dietrich. “They look real without the hassle. I think over the years we’ve come a long way in making artificial trees look very real and authentic,� she said, adding that fake trees are non-allergenic and that real trees can sometimes grow mold at the base. “They can also be assembled in just a few minutes.� Despite that ease, however, Grobe still prefers the tradition that comes with finding that perfect tree, taking it home and decorating it with the family. He said that they sell thousands of trees each year, indicating he isn’t alone in that assertion.

“After selling as many trees as we have here, there is no question that some folks see it as a tradition to do it as a family, and it would become part of a ritual for many folks – going out and getting the Christmas tree and putting it up is part of their celebration of Christmas.� And Grobe knows a thing or two about tradition – he proposed to his wife while decorating the Christmas tree, and it’s become an important part of their family story ever since. “The date is pretty well engrained in her head as to when it should go up (Dec. 2),� he laughed, “and I have yet to take it down before Jan. 6.�

TIPS FOR PICKING THE RIGHT CHRISTMAS TREE Fraser Fir and Balsam Fir are the most popular, Grobe says, because of their soft needles and pleasant aroma; Trees depend on moisture,

but buying it closer to Christmas doesn’t guarantee a better tree; they are all cut around the same time (mid-November) and the amount of moisture inside the

tree at the time they’re cut will dictate its longevity; Most folks don’t have a large enough reservoir for their tree. It should hold no less than about

“meeting all your health & wellness needs�

4 litres (one gallon) of water; When leaving to pick a tree, ensure you bring string, straps, blankets, etc. to get it home safely.

PHOTO

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

Âť JAMES JACKSON

Trees: History and tradition versus convenience

THE NATURAL CHOICE Perry Grobe holds onto a scotch pine in his company’s greenhouse. The co-owner of Grobe’s Nursery in Breslau is a proponent of choosing a real Christmas tree over an artificial one.

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THE OBSERVER


OPINION 10

THE OBSERVER

OPINION

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

I read so often that people are not using the green bin. I have used mine from the start and find it’s no problem. Joanne Sarah Dillon

letter on page 12

VERBATIM

N

ow that they have a majority government, the Conservatives have clearly demonstrated they do not care about defending Canadian workers, or upholding the law, or about transparency and accountability to the public.

> Wayne Fraser of the United Steelworkers reacts to a secret deal to end a court case against U.S. Steel for failing to meet investment obligations in its purchase of Stelco

THE MONITOR

S

ome 3,000 people died on U.S. roads last year due to distractions, including the use of cell phones and similar devices. Studies show drivers using cell phones look but fail to see up to 50% of the information in their driving environment, leading to a call for a ban on the use of such devices, such as Ontario’s.

> National Transportation Safety Board

EDITORIAL

With fees and taxes, something’s gotta give

I

n discussing increases to a host of Woolwich’s fees and charges this week, staff repeatedly emphasized comparisons to other municipalities. It’s a favourite trick in the public sector, used regularly to justify wage hikes in particular. As is always the case, the findings – often cherry-picked – are never used to put downward pressure on salaries and prices, though one could just as easily point out the data show it’s possible to do the job with less. It’s a self-serving closed circuit. Woolwich raises fees this year, citing its neighbours’ prices. Next year, another municipality can point to us in justifying its desire to take more from taxpayers. And so on and so on in an upward spiral that, unchecked, has no bounds. Well, of course there is an endpoint: an increasingly disgruntled public’s ability to pay. Or, more

pressingly, its willingness to pay for an unaccountable system that does not appear to be in its interests. That idea is coming into focus, just as it has with the corporate agenda, most notably the Wall Street faction. The two go hand in hand, as the recession fueled by greed and incompetence in the corporate world puts pressure on governments of all levels, from demands for proper regulation to an increased need for social services. With the now well-documented decrease in our incomes and standards of living, governments, too, have to make do with less, scaling back to focus on the essentials. Hard choices will have to be made. That does not involve comparators. In the end, staffing is going to be a key issue. Labour costs make up more than 50 per cent of the budget – significant savings will come only with cuts here. There’s no need to

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Joe Merlihan, Publisher | EXT 107 jmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Steve Kannon, Editor | EXT 103 skannon@woolwichobserver.com James Jackson, Reporter | EXT 101 jjackson@woolwichobserver.com Colin Dewar, Reporter | EXT 102 cdewar@woolwichobserver.com

> LETTER POLICY

be draconian, but wage and hiring freezes as well as attrition are likely to be required to get spending back in line. Governments of all stripes have been guilty of unnecessary bloating, taking on more and more functions without thought for the long-term implications. There is also a tendency to forego reviews of programs and spending to see if each item is still needed – once instituted, they become entrenched. The argument is made that the public has come to expect the level of service now offered, plus, of course, whatever new addition is contemplated, which will become next year’s status quo. More and more, however, we’re seeing higher costs without any commensurate increases in the level or quality of service. At best, we’re paying more for more of the same (see

Donna Rudy, Sales Manager | EXT 104 drudy@woolwichobserver.com Pat Merlihan, Production Mgr | EXT 105 pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Jon Sarachman, Production | EXT 108 jsarachman@woolwichobserver.com Leanne Boron, Production | EXT 109 lboron@woolwichobserver.com

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this week’s story on water rates). This is the heart of the conundrum that must eventually be addressed: public sector spending is outstripping the productive sector’s ability to pay. As the former depends entirely on the latter, the gap must inevitably cause upheaval as we question the value-for-money scenario: what are we getting for the cash we pour into the system? And how often can governments keep going to the well before it runs dry? At some point, local politicians will have hard decisions to make. In the long run, the system we’ve developed is untenable, but the crisis will come long before that. A series of hikes that have driven property taxes and fees to egregious levels leaves no room for hitting the beleaguered residents with still more taxes to make up the shortfall. It’s crunch time.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

11 OPINION

Political self-interest blocking progress in eurozone crisis O

ne senior European politician said angrily that British Prime Minister David Cameron was “like a man who comes to a wife-swapping party without his wife,” and there was some truth in that. Britain does not even use the euro currency, shared by 17 of the 27 EU members, but Cameron insisted on being part of the discussion in Brussels about how to save it. And in the end, he vetoed the solution that all the others had agreed on. It was the eighth crisis summit of the European Union’s leaders this year, and it produced the fourth “comprehensive package” of financial measures to deal with the debt crisis. (The other three have already failed.) And if you judged the importance of the meeting by the scale of the uproar when Britain vetoed the EU treaty that was meant to stop the rot, it must have been a very important summit indeed. But in fact they were all barking up the wrong tree in Brussels: the financial crisis over the euro will roll on, and the collapse of the common EU currency continues to be a real possibility. What the summit actually showed was how divided, distracted and deluded Europe’s leaders still are. Cameron went to Brussels knowing that his partners intended to come up with a treaty that would enshrine new financial rules for EU members, in order to reassure the “markets,” which have been demanding higher and higher interest rates to roll over the debts of EU members. He also knew that the nationalistic, “europhobe” faction in his own Conservative Party would never vote for such a treaty. They want out of the EU, not further in. The only way out of Cameron’s

THE VIEW FROM HERE

International Affairs GWYNNE DYER dilemma, therefore, was to make sure that there would not be such a treaty. His stated reason for vetoing it was to avoid more stringent regulation, and possibly taxation, of the London financial markets, but his real reason was naked self-interest: a new treaty would split his own party and probably destroy his government. His stated reason was nonsense. Any new financial regulations that would affect the London markets would have to be agreed unanimously by the EU countries at a later date; there was no need to veto the treaty if he just wanted to protect the free-wheeling, “casino” aspect of the London markets that had done so much to precipitate the crisis in the first place. Cameron just needed a cover story. The other EU members feigned great anger at this, but some of them were secretly quite grateful for Cameron’s bad behaviour. They agreed to adopt the same rules anyway, but to do it outside the legal framework of the EU in order to get around the British veto. This had two great advantages: it meant that no referendums would be necessary – and if these new measures failed to reassure the markets, they could all blame Britain. What were these fabulous new measures? They were all about “balanced budgets” in the eurozone countries, which would face sanctions if they let their budget deficit exceed three per cent of GDP. They would even have to

submit their national budgets to the European Commission, which would have the power to ask that they be revised. These are exactly the steps that will be needed if the euro is to have a longterm future: it cannot survive if the countries using it do not have a unified fiscal regime. But the markets don’t give a damn about the long-term future of the euro; they just want to know for sure that they will get back the money they lend to eurozone countries, and until they have that assurance they will demand exorbitant interest rates on their loans. In this context, the decisions taken in Brussels this week are merely a displacement activity. The bigger EU governments are using the crisis as a pretext to force through centralizing measures that they have long wanted to impose on the weaker economies. But they are still not doing what the markets want, which is to take responsibility for the weaker countries’ debts. Can it really be that simple? Can they really be that irresponsible? Yes, and yes again. Tip O’Neill, former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives, explained why this sort of thing happens in politics 70 years ago. “All politics is local,” he said, and that is true in spades in Europe today. It’s not just David Cameron who is putting his local political interests above the interests of a broader European community. So is German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who refuses to allow the EU to make a collective commitment to honour the debts of the weaker members. That’s the only thing that will calm

THE VOICE

What is one of your family holiday traditions?

We go to my grandparents and open presents. > Alana Bauman

We always open presents and then the day after we go to my grandpa’s and have a big dinner. > Matt Yorke

> SEE DYER ON PG. 12 BY SCOTT ARNOLD

We have an Advent calendar and usually on Christmas morning my brother and I put a Santa hat on our car. > Hilary Bauman

A host of fee increases, including ones proposed for sports facilities, has the township looking a whole lot like the Grinch when his heart was still two sizes too small.

We go to a Christmas Eve service, and my aunt and uncle come all the way from Toronto. > Sean Heimpel


OPINION 12

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

Growing debt is what’s keeping the middle class afloat

H

aven’t even started your Christmas shopping yet? Maybe you should just take a pass on it this year. Bank of Canada Governor Mark Carney has given you the perfect out: we’ve already got too much household debt. Retailers may not be amused by the timing of Carney’s latest pronouncements, but they needn’t worry, as most of us aren’t paying attention. We continue to spend, spend, spend … on credit. In a speech this week, he reiterates points he and others have been making for some time, namely that we’re maintaining our middle-class lifestyles mostly through debt. While Canada is in better economic shape than other countries, we’re headed down the same road, with the same crises and austerity measures as our reward when we get to the same point as, say, Italy and Greece. “We might appear to prosper for a while by consuming beyond our means,” Carney said Monday. “Markets may let us do so for longer than we should. But if we yield to this temptation, eventually, we, too, will face painful adjustments.” Easy credit and low interest rates have fueled the borrowing, but it’s our spending habits that have got the better of us: bigger homes, new cars, electronic toys and so on. Our wants are

From the Editor Steve Kannon limitless. Our wallets, not so much. Worse still, our real incomes and net worth are in decline, meaning we’re borrowing just to maintain the status quo. So, even as household debt climb by 13 percentage points relative out our incomes, we had less than we did last year. Or even last quarter, as household net worth fell by 2.1 per cent in the third quarter, its second quarterly decline. Although residential realestate assets increased, this was more than offset by the decline in the value of our investment in stocks (including mutual funds) and our pensions: the Standard and Poor’s/Toronto Stock Exchange composite index fell by more than 12 per cent during the quarter. Per capita household net worth declined to $180,100 in the third quarter from $184,700, the sharpest quarterly reduction in stock prices and per capita household net worth since the fourth quarter of 2008, reports Statistics Canada. More of us are getting caught between falling incomes and growing household debt, which reached an

Dyer: Everyone likely to suffer > CONTINUED FROM PG. 11

the markets, but Merkel’s voters are fiercely opposed to hard-working, thrifty Germans covering the debts of lazy, spendthrift Greeks and Italians (as many of them would put it), so she will not permit it. And so the

euro crisis rolls on interminably. But don’t worry: interminably is not the same as forever. Sooner or later there will be a real crash, and all these people will be duly punished for their fecklessness. Unfortunately, everybody else in the EU will be punished too.

all-time high of $1.5 trillion earlier this year. Worse still, increasingly the borrowed money is being used to finance day-to-day expenses rather than consumer goodies. This is no accident, nor is it the result of the financial crisis that began with the meltdowns of 2008, as the middle class has been under assault for more than three decades. The recession and “recovery” that followed collapse caused by the financial services industry is indicative of the trend: corporate profits and executive bonuses quickly bounced back, while unemployment remains high and those with jobs work longer and harder to tread water. In his speech, Carney notes the corporations have been sitting on those profits, hording cash or speculating in the markets rather than investing in real economic activity that would create jobs and get the economy back on track. Greater productivity and a concerted effort to seek customers in emerging markets would do wonders for the Canadian economy – and, ultimately, the global situation – if only firms would do something useful. “This would be good for Canadian companies and good for Canada,” he says. “A virtuous circle of increased investment and increased productivity would increase the debt-carrying capacity of all, through higher wages, greater profits and higher government revenues. This should be our common focus.” That’s mostly wishful thinking, however, as governments have done nothing to encourage that kind of behaviour. Just the opposite, in fact, given the emphasis on corporate tax reductions, deregulation, mobile capital and a host of other measures that have reduced corporate accountability. Those who call for tax policies to prompt compa-

nies to spend accordingly – taxing at a much higher rate profits not put back into productive use, for instance – have been dismissed by the business lobby, which continues to exercise tremendous influence despite the self-made crises. This kind of bad behaviour is nothing new. Look at the history of automation and productivity gains in industry. They were supposed to bring us a higher standard of living and more leisure time. Instead we got neither. In fact, just the opposite happened. Corporations did in fact make larger profits, but the money was shuffled into the hands of a few and into dubious financial transactions. At first, workers in Canada, the U.S. and other advanced economies were displaced by the productivity gains. Real wages fell as unemployment levels rose, putting more downward pressure on incomes due to the competitive job market. Later, of course, more of the jobs were transferred offshore to low-wage countries, a trend that continues today. The result? More profits, with almost all of the gains concentrated in a few hands. Governments routinely aid and abet the shift. That the likes of Carney and some of his European counterparts are making even low-key mention of the inequities means those who’ve created the lower standard of living are taking note of the social unrest that’s starting to bubble to the surface. In an economy based on consumerism – a problem in its own right – debtbased spending is unsustainable, as is a shrinking middle class. In the short term, heading out to the mall with your shopping list provides an economic boost. In the long run, we may have to curb our enthusiasm … at least until the bills that will arrive in the New Year have been paid off.

had to remind parents not to include dangerous objects like really sharp scissors. Why stop at scissors? Why not add broken glass and razor blades, as John Mahood parents are obviously so stupid? The previous week another email about a couple of children skateboarding on township property had to be addressed to the entire student body, leading to the banning of wheels on the school property. Students were told no more biking to school because it wasn’t safe – long before any snow hit the ground. This is a school that is onestep away from banning balls on school property, as was the case recently at a school in Toronto. Parents did not create this parking issue. The school created the problem with restrictions on what time kids can set foot on the property, specifically not before 8:55 a.m. They expect 400 students to arrive within a 15-minute window. Put yourself in the shoes of a typical working parent that starts work at 9 a.m.: combine the time and lack of parking and you have a recipe for problems. It is insulting that the administration continues to put the onus on parents to solve a problem the school clearly created.

Why is the Township of Woolwich even involved in this debate? Spending local tax money to close off a parking lot to residents and re-tool another one at Gibson Park is a waste. This is a school parking problem. The fact that the township and now Waterloo Regional Police are involved is ridiculous. Things maybe don’t look so bad now on First Street, but just drive down adjacent streets and you have more problems in the making. The side of the street that they allow parking doesn’t have a sidewalk and in the winter has huge banks of snow. I’m sure township councillors will do anything they can to avoid another sidewalk debate with Second Street residents, for instance. The administration at John Mahood is really good at telling parents what to do and creating ridiculous rules. It’s time they were told to fix the problem. Provide safe parking, change the allowable time on the property to 8:30 a.m. and the problem will be solved. Work with parents, rather than against them. Rude people are generally unacceptable; in this instance, I can understand their frustration.

LETTERS

Really, it’s easy being green To the Editor, „ I read so often that people are not using the green bin. I have used mine from the start and find it’s no problem. At the time, we were asked to reform from plastic bags I thought, “Well, what did my mother use way back when there was no such thing as plastic?” Newspaper! I phoned the authorities to be sure it was OK, and their reply was, “Oh, yes, that is what we want you to do.” So each night I take my green bin garbage out of the pretty blue jug my daughter gave me. It was made to have a plastic bin for ice cream, but I take a few newspapers out of my drawer – and throw on some of those pain in the neck flyers we are deluged with – to prevent leaking, take out the ice cream plastic filler, dump in the newspaper, roll it up firmly and put it in the green bin. Voila! No fuss, no muss.

> Joanne Sarah Dillon, Elmira

School created the problem, so it should solve it To the Editor, „ The parents of John Mahood Public School students are rude, lazy, stupid, and aggressive drivers. That’s the impression you would get reading the Observer’s front-page story about the two years of on-going parking issues (Observer, Dec. 3/11). I wasn’t surprised that there weren’t letters to the editor in last week’s paper: who wants their kids to become targets in an already unhealthy school environment? That’s why I’ve asked to remain anonymous. If you are a parent of a student attending John Mahood, you would almost feel like encasing your children in bubble-wrap before they step on school property. Last week an urgent memo was emailed to parents that we talk to our children about playing in the Gibson Park creek: a trickle of water three inches deep. The same week a flyer was sent home about collecting items for a stocking-stuffer program that

> A parent of a John Mahood student, Elmira


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

13 BUSINESS

BUSINESS

An entrepreneur with all the answers James Jackson

MAKE YOURSELF SMARTER

Elmira resident Michael Stevens is the editor-in-chief of a new trivia magazine called Get Your Facts Straight.

» JAMES JACKSON

e all know one: that person who, for one reason or another, knows the answer to every trivia question possible. Watching a television quiz show with that person is an exercise in tedium because they get every answer right, and you spend your nights combing the internet in search of an obscure piece of information with which to finally stump them. Well, Michael Stevens has the utmost respect for all the trivia masters out there, but he may have developed a secret weapon to finally stump even the most experienced quiz master. The Elmira resident is the editor-in-chief of the newlylaunched magazine Get Your Facts Straight, and he is so confident in his product that he has called it “the magazine that makes you smarter.” “For the longest time I’ve been amazed by people who knew something about everything,” said Stevens, sitting on the couch in his Carriage Hill Trail home that also doubles as his office. “It always amazed me that they knew so much information, and I know that they got it because they read a lot.” Yet in this technological

PHOTO

W

world where the lifespan of a news story can be measured by the second, Stevens also realized that many of us don’t have the time or energy to read endless stacks of books. That’s why he decided to release his own magazine, a way of “cheating and finding out a lot of information without reading books and books and books,” he said. Of course, the irony is that he has been doing a lot more reading since he came up with his idea nearly two

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years ago. “I guess I’m sacrificing for everyone else,” he laughed. It all started back in 2008 when he graduated from the University of Waterloo with a degree in speech therapy. Since then he has worked at a sales job in Guelph, but always had the idea for a trivia magazine in the back of his mind. Finally, after sitting on the idea for some time, he employed the help of his wife Elaine and some friends with design experience, Ju-

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magazine against reputable sources such as Encyclopedia Britannica. “Obviously I can’t come out with something that is claiming to be factual and have all these holes or incorrect information,” he said. The magazine contains information ranging from the origins of the barrier reef to the history of Snakes and Ladders. Yet in the digital age, why should someone pay for his magazine instead of simply logging onto the computer and finding the information online? Stevens said he has received a lot of feedback from people who like the product because it isn’t online. He notes since we spend most of our day looking at a computer screen, the last thing we want to do when we get home is look at it some more, all the while trying to find information that is reliably accurate. “This is in no way a competition to the internet, it’s complementary. You can take this on the recliner, on the bus, on the airplane, even on the toilet,” he smiled. The first issue includes more than 50 pages of highdefinition and full-colour photos purchased from an

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BUSINESS 14

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

Forecast: Grocery price battles will become war

P

rice wars are being predicted for food in 2012, thanks mainly to imminent arrival of the latest big box store to hit Canada. But in a strange twist, that could actually end up working in local food producers’ favour. According to the new 2012 Food Price Index report from economics Profs. Sylvain Charlebois and Francis Tapon at the University of Guelph, next year’s overall price increase in food should be about two per cent. Input costs such as fuel, fertilizer and crop protection products have leveled out for farmers, putting less pressure on gro-

Food For Thought Owen Roberts cery prices that have risen as much as 10-11 per cent for some commodities this year, such as vegetables and dairy products. This depends significantly on a couple of things, starting with the weather. Unpredictable heat, cold and rainfall continue to influence farm-

ing in ways never experienced in modern-era agriculture. Charlebois doesn’t know if, or whether, we’re experiencing short-term or longterm climate change. He just knows that when he looks into the future of food prices these days, he gives a nod to Mother Nature. “It’s the first thing we mention in our report,” he says. “If the weather cooperates, our predictions will be fine. But how can we know what Mother Nature will do?” Generally, bad weather means less production and higher consumer prices. But equally as unpredictable

is the global economic situation. Europe is a chronic mess. The U.S. recovery is sluggish and faltering. Even China is experiencing a slowdown as consumers everywhere tighten their belts. Still, though – and this has always been agriculture’s ace in the hole – people have to eat. And they have to shop somewhere to buy food. Lately, consumers had more interest in buying local food. Yet they also have a drive to buy food as cheaply as possible, a long-standing trait of Canadian food shoppers.

> SEE FOOD ON PG. 30

Magazine: A product heavy on catchy graphics and easy-to-read trivia > CONTINUED FROM PG. 13 online stock agency, and the entire package is printed in a glossy magazine format. There are also no advertisements within the magazine, and he said the full colour and visual appeal of the product is critical in the beginning – and that includes zero ads. “You’ve got a couple seconds for them to glance at it and if it looks interesting they’ll pick it up and read it, and if it’s not they’ll put it back down,” he said. “I definitely put a big focus

on high quality, high definition photos throughout the magazine to keep it interesting.” Of course, it’s no secret that most publications make their money by selling ads to companies, leaving a big question mark on how he plans to monetize the product moving forward. He has already distributed about 250 issues to offices and businesses around town, but hopes to pitch his brand to the school board as a piece of educational material that can be used to increase student interest in reading.

“If that’s the case, I would probably stay away from ads. I don’t think the education industry would want a magazine cluttered with ads for their students.” Yet if his magazine does get picked up by larger distributors such as Chapters, he may go the advertising route to generate more income. He isn’t sure how that will work, but has toyed with the idea of sponsorship. On a page containing trivia on a certain country, the space could be sponsored by a travel agent, for example. He is already hard at work

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“My idea was to come up with something out of the ordinary and outside the box, something inventive and creative that is different than what all other magazines traditionally are. There is a huge risk with that, it could flop on its face but it could be so new and creative that people pick up on.” Get Your Facts Straight sells for $7.50 an issue and to order a copy call (519) 669-9643, email michael@ getyourfactsstraight.ca, or visit them online at www. getyourfactsstraight.ca.

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on his second issue, which he hopes to release in February, and is still unsure of how frequently it will be published. He is wary of setting a firm schedule given the uncertainty of the market right now. And while many of the facts are just random right now, he is aiming to establish a pattern to that randomness, such as always having trivia on a destination such as Venice, an important monument such as the Eiffel Tower, and key events that occurred in a given year.

A Mennonite financial cooperative serving communities of faith across Ontario 02/12/11 10:33 AM


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

15 LIVING HERE

LIVING HERE

When Christmas is just another workday C

hristmas Day for most of us is usually spent with family and friends celebrating the holidays, relaxing and enjoying the time off work. But for some it’s just like any other day where they have to wake up early, put on that uniform and head off to work. Most offices, businesses and restaurants are closed on Dec. 25 but there are a few in the township who will turn on the “Open” sign to invite in those that need that forgotten item or some batteries for the newly unwrapped toys. Andrea Gagne, manager at the Short Stop on Church Street, says she doesn’t mind working on Christmas Day because she is single and has no children or family close by.

“It allows my employees that do have families to be able to spend time with them. I don’t mind working to give them some family time,” said Gagne, who keeps the store open from 9 to 5 on the holiday. “It is also nice to be able to help those customers that have forgotten a thing or two and come in here in a panic looking for something.” For the most part people are friendly and very thankful that the store is open and are usually looking for cranberry sauce, bread or batteries. “It is usually the small things that people end up forgetting or they have unexpected guests that arrive and they come here looking for small gifts like lottery tickets or cards because there is nothing else open to sell things to them.” Just down the street, the lights

ANSWERING THE CALL Constable Joshua

PHOTO

» COLIN DEWAR

Kerr of the Waterloo Regional Police Service in Elmira will be working on Christmas Day this year. There are a few people in the township that work on the holiday, providing services that may be needed.

PHOTO

Colin Dewar

» COLIN DEWAR

Most of the township will be shut down, but there are those who’ll still be at it on Dec. 25

of the Mac’s Milk will be lit up as Vineet Sood opens for business. The manager of the convenience store doesn’t mind working Christmas day because she never celebrated it back in her home country of India. “It can be very busy here on Christmas Day because as far as I know we are the only place open for 24 hours on Christmas Day,” said Sood. “People like knowing that we are open just in case they need something that either has gone bad or they forgot to buy over the busy holiday season.” Customers come in looking for eggnog or breakfast foods like bacon, eggs, milk and bread, and Sood is happy to be able to make sure the people in her community have a place to shop when all the other stores are closed. “I love working on Christmas because you are usually greeted with such big smiles on that day and people are very thankful that we are open.” Convenience store clerks are not the only people working on Christmas Day. It is business as usual at the Waterloo Regional Police detachment in Elmira. For those police officers that work over the holiday it can be either very quiet or quite hectic as the department tends to go to minimal staff to let as many people off as they can. Sgt. Sig Peters, who has worked more Christmas Days than he can

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remember over the last 30 years, has seen the gamut when it comes to Christmas Day incidents. “I remember one Christmas morning we had a fellow show up with a knife at his girlfriend’s door who wanted the Christmas presents back he gave her the night before so he could cash them in to buy more alcohol. We ended up having to lock him up over the holidays,” said Peters. “There are times when it is just like any other day.” In keeping with the spirit of the season, community members tend to bring in some treats or baked goods for the officers that are working and it is greatly appreciated because sometimes the officers forget to bring a coffee or something to eat and would have to do without as all the coffee shops, including Tim Hortons, are closed on Christmas Day. Senior officers are given first dibs on the holiday schedule but a lot of senior officers that are single or do not have a family close by end up working on Christmas Day to allow younger officers with children a chance to spend time at home. Officer Joshua Kerr has been on the force for six years and this is will be the first Christmas he has had to work. “It is unfortunate, but my family will still make the best of it. We will just have our celebration on a differ-

> SEE ON DUTY ON PG. 28

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LIVING HERE 16

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ike it or not, prepared or not, the holidays are here. We often talk about different family traditions. Some keep it very traditional, roasting a turkey with all of the fixings. In chatting with our friends, family and clients we have found a number of them are choosing to treat themselves to a prime roast of beef. We receive many questions on how to roast it to perfection. At our roasting class this week we created a delicious holiday prime rib meal. Please check out next week’s column for Yorkshire puddings.

Here are a few of our tips for that perfect prime rib:

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» Saturday, December 17, 2011

• Temper you roast (allow the meat to come to room temperature) for more even cooking over all. This takes about 1-2 hours; • Generously season with salt and pepper and a good handful of your favorite herbs if you would like; • Allow 1 rib for every 2 people (a standing rib roast is 7 ribs cut from the 7-14 ribs; • Cook your roast on the natural rack of the ribs, start the oven out high 425F for the first 15 minutes and than turn down the oven to 350F for the remainder; • It is approximately 15-20 minutes per pound to cook the roast to medium-rare; • You need to account for carry over cooking, which means your roast will continue to cook and rise in temperature 10-15 degrees once out of the oven. Remove the roast 10 degrees early than the doneness that you are looking for (i.e. if you would like medium rare or 125F, remove the roast when an instant read thermometer reached 115F); • Cook your roast to medium rare, this will satisfy most the diners, those that prefer a bit more well done will enjoy the end pieces or their slice can be returned to the oven for a minute or two to cook it to medium; • Allow your roast to rest at least 30 minutes

>>Chefs Kirstie Herbstreit and Jody O’Malley are both Red Seal certified chefs. Together they run The Culinary Studio, which offers classes, demonstrations and private dinners. To contact the chefs, visit their website www.theculinarystudio.ca.

From The Chef's Table Kirstie Herbstreit & Jody O'Malley after removing it from the oven. This allows the juice to redistribute and they will be retained in the meat when it is carved rather the drain out onto your cutting board.

Perfect Prime Rib Roast >>1 3-4lb prime rib roast >>Kosher salt and fresh ground black pepper >>2 cups of beef or chicken stock, preferably home-made or

no sodium (because it will be reduced, we do not want it to be salty to begin with)

Pre-heat oven to 425°F; Sprinkle roast liberally with salt and pepper; Place beef roast on top and roast in oven for 20 minutes; Turn oven down to 350°F and roast a further 20 minutes, per pound, for rare; Insert instant-read thermometer into the center of the roast, avoiding the bone; For rare: 120°F; for medium rare: 125°F and medium: 130F°. It is recommended that a prime rib roast be no more than medium; Transfer roast to carving board and loosely cover; rest at least 15 minutes; Place roasting pan atop stove and add stock; simmer, using a wooden spoon to scrape up and browned bits on the bottom of the pan; Continue to simmer and reduce by half; strain juices through a fine mesh strainer into a small pot; keep hot; Begin to carve roast by slicing the whole roast off of the bones; set bones aside, slice between the bones and offer along with meat slices; Slice the roast, using a long, sharp, carving knife. Slice to desired thickness; Serve meat slices hot, drizzled with a little jus, and served with more jus.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

17 LIVING HERE

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AGE ADDITION K C S: PA 2 1 • 1 Large - 3 item Pizza • 2L Pop

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LIVING HERE 18

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THE CROSSWORD

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THE OBSERVER

+ 8 6 & 1 ( , ' 7 % / ' 2 $ 7

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> SOLUTIONS: Find the answers to all of the puzzles on pg. 28

ACROSS 1. Concrete; cast into form before being transported to the site of installation 8. Express displeasure 13. Tell or spin a yarn 19. The capital of the state of Maine 20. Essence 21. Secrets 22. An animal kept as stock until suitable for breeding 23. Peculiar to the individual 25. Doleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s running mate, 1996 26. Remove a portion of space between (adjacent letters) 27. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Look here!â&#x20AC;? 28. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ to Billie Joeâ&#x20AC;? 29. Go straight 32. 100% 33. Young domestic cat 35. Figure skaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jump 36. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Men always hate most what they ___ mostâ&#x20AC;?: Mencken 38. Wavelike design 40. Basket material 45. Abandon 46. A film presenting the facts about a person or event 47. Language of Lahore 48. Street fleet 49. Cantab, for one 50. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is that ___?â&#x20AC;? 51. Actor Green of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buffy the Vampire Slayerâ&#x20AC;? 52. Bad look 54. â&#x20AC;&#x153;John ___ richâ&#x20AC;? 55. Objective form of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;? 56. Doctorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s degree in osteopathy 58. Introduces a conditional clause 59. â&#x20AC;&#x153;... or ___!â&#x20AC;? 62. Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ___ 64. Adaptable truck, for short 65. Annexes 66. Ado 67. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I had no ___!â&#x20AC;? 68. An oceangoing vessel equipped to make meteorological observations 78. LP player 79. Big dipper 81. Exhaust 82. ___ bread 83. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ___â&#x20AC;? 84. Stinks 86. Film crew member 88. Fraudulent; having a misleading appearance 90. ___ grecque (cooked in olive





































 











 

 

 











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oil, lemon juice, wine, and herbs, and served cold) 93. Starchy tuber 94. City on the Po 96. Bridges of Los Angeles County 97. Rid of contamination 100. Lacking sufficient water or rainfall 104. Right, in a way 105. Important food and source of oil 106. Who is expected to ensure fair play 107. Strand 108. Memory units 109. An awl for making small holes for brads or small screws DOWN 1. ___ de deux 2. Same old, same old 3. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;? problem 4. Unfaithful to oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s partner in marriage 5. Someone who asks a question 6. Having the stem removed 7. Ball field covering 8. Exodus commemoration 9. Ancient galley 10. Soon, to a bard 11. Kit containing a metal dish and eating utensils; used by soldiers and campers





























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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

19 SPORTS

PHOTO

» COLIN DEWAR

SPORTS

THE GOAL IS TO KEEP IT OUT Elmira netminder Nick Horrigan blocks a shot off the stick of Cambridge Winter Hawks forward Michael Christou (14) as defencemen Colton Wolfe-Sabo and Craig Johnson clean up during action Dec. 11 at the Dan Snyder Memorial Arena. The Kings beat the Hawks 5-1.

Kings give themselves an early Christmas present Three wins in three nights a reward for squad that failed to let fatigue be a factor Colin Dewar

I

t was the Elmira Sugar Kings’ weekend. Three days, three games, three wins. The odds were against the boys in green to continue the streak that began back on Dec. 4 with a win over Brantford, as the team was playing with a shortened bench due to injuries and players away completing their university finals. The first game of the weekend saw the Kings on the road against Owen Sound, where they skated away with a 9-2 win over the Greys Dec. 9. Elmira started out strongly in the first period, scoring three unanswered goals off the sticks of Michael Hasson, Riley Sonnenburg and Mitch Dunning. The second frame began with the same intensity as Andrew Smith and Brett Preistap scored two goals before the seven-minute mark of the period, giving the Kings a 5-0 lead. During a power play at 8:05 with Elmira’s Lukas Balesh-

ta in the box for a high sticking, the Greys finally potted one against netminder Justis Husak. The Kings responded seconds later, however, with a Pat McKelvie/Will Cook combination that beat Greys’ goalie Paul Boyadjian at 8:26. Elmira forward Brady Campbell would then score his first of two for the night with a minute left in the period to give the visitors a comfortable 7-1 lead. After the second intermission the Kings tallied two more goals, while the Greys managed to get one back. Elmira forwards Campbell and Sonnenburg both added to the total. “We came out of there with out any injuries or suspensions so we were happy. We just rolled line and lead every play and the guys came out strong in the first period and set the tempo right off the bat and then we had some fun,” said head coach Dean DeSilva. The next night the Kings faced the Brantford Golden Eagles at the Wayne Gretzky

Sport Centre. The Eagles were looking for revenge after losing 4-1 to the Kings the weekend before. It was not to be, however, as Elmira came away 2-1 victors. “It was a long game and there was not a lot of flow to it but it was a very gutsy win on our part and I was very proud with how the team played,” said DeSilva. “All weekend we were short and the guys came in with a gutsy effort but to his credit, Bryce O Hagan kept the game close, it could have been a different game if he was not in the net for the Eagles. He was outstanding and made about four or five great saves that kept his team in the game. Over all it was a solid team effort from the get go and I was happy with the win.” Elmira did not waste anytime putting points on the board, with Smith scoring in the opening minute of the period. Baleshta collected the assist. The rest of the period would see action down at both ends of the ice but neither team would be able to

capitalize. The game was a hardfought battle between the two teams who have been vying for second place in the division for the last few weeks. Hasson would add another point to Elmira’s lead in the second frame. Brantford was unable to score until the third

when Ryan Blunt finally beat goalie Nick Horrigan, who finished the night with 38 saves to preserve the 2-1 win. Finally back on home ice Dec. 11, the Kings played unwelcoming host to the Cambridge Winter Hawks by post-

> SEE KINGS ON PG. 20

After slow start, Jacks turn it on to beat Norfolk

Third-place Wellesley squad faces two tough games at home this weekend Colin Dewar

T

he Wellesley Applejacks scored three unanswered goals in the second period en route to a 5-2 win over the Norfolk Rebels during action at the Wellesley arena Dec. 10. After a lackluster first period that would end with neither team scoring, the Jacks

came out flying after the first intermission, taking it to the Rebels who seemed sluggish returning to the ice after 20 minutes of play. Wellesley defenceman Geoff Parr got things rolling with his team shorthanded – James Mildon was in the penalty box for hooking –

> SEE JACKS ON PG. 22

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Complete Automotive Maintenance & Repair


SPORTS 20

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

There's no doubt we’ve come a long way, baby J

ust the other day I was reading an old hardcover called The Modern Rifle, written in 1975 by one of my favourite gun writers, Jim Carmichel. Unlike me, Carmichel is one of the classic outdoor writers who makes even the most mundane and technical subjects both interesting and exciting. This book is a great example. Still, time had not been kind to it. You see, while the information within was very good, some of the thoughts that Jim divulged were definitely from the old school. And by that I mean the politically incorrect one. For instance, in one of the more memorable passages, he writes “a gun like this puts me in mind of a man who, after marrying a crosseyed woman, learns to forgive her faults because she cooks good meals and keeps him warm in bed at night.” And while it was a colourful way of making his point, I submit this simple sentence to you as an example of just how far my species (the human male) has come. For one thing, these days most men know enough to keep thoughts like this to ourselves. Unfortunately, I don’t happen to be one of those men. So I immediately phoned my best buddy Tom, who also works from home and I read him the sentence. “Ah, those were the days when

longer the case. Now due to enlightened thinking, we live in a world where rough and tumble men are free to do the very same thing. Talk about progress. I didn’t give this issue much more thought, until later that night when Jenn and I turned in for bed. That’s when she thanked me for a fine dinner and for, once again, doing the dishes. Then, on a side note, she commented that the sheets were kind of cold. So, quick as a flash, she

Not-So-Great Outdoorsman Steve Galea men were men,” Tom proclaimed. “You know, I almost think we’ve lost something along the way.” I am not sure why that comment bothered me, but it did. So much so that I almost stopped stirring the garlic and basil spaghetti meat sauce that I was cooking. “That’s nonsense Tom. Modern man is just as manly as we ever were,” I said. Then, as if to prove it, I deftly tossed a garden salad and aggressively checked the spinach fettuccine to ensure that it was coming along. “Well, I’d like to talk about this more,” he said gruffly, “but Linda will be home soon and, if she has to wait for this quiche, there will be hell to pay.” “Tell me about it,” I muttered. “I didn’t do laundry yesterday and Jenn seemed peeved.” And just like that, it occurred to me that maybe something had changed. Maybe, just maybe, my buddy was right. I mean it used to be that women did all the house work, stayed at home, felt underappreciated and not taken seriously. Thankfully, that’s no

Kings: Home Sunday vs. Kitchener > CONTINUED FROM PG. 19 ing a 5-1 win, laying claim to second place in the Mid-Western Conference just behind the Stratford Cullitons. The Kings kept the weekend trend alive by scoring first against their opponent when Baleshta fed Smith who in turn found Campbell, allowing him to flick the puck over the stick of Cambridge goaltender Lucas Michalski at 7:55 of the opening frame. The period would end with a CookSonnenburg-Priestap combination that once again found the back of the net, giving the Kings a 2-0 lead. An obviously tired Elmira squad took to the ice in the second frame and was found flatfooted as the Winter Hawks scored to bring the game within one: Cambridge captain Ryan Clarke fired a shot from beyond the blue line past Horrigan, who was caught off guard for the moment. Elmira struggled with their passes and stick control for the rest of the period while Cambridge continued to keep the pressure going but where unable to get anything past Horrigan. The period would end 2-1. “Our guys were tired, their legs were heavy in the second period and Cambridge should be given credit for their work in the second period: they came out and did what they had to do and we managed to hang on. (Horrigan) was very solid for us and during the intermission we just reminded

I D L A O Y H S Y ! P P A H CHRISTM24AS H25OUR26S 23

1 - 4 PM & 6 - 11:30PM FRI.

27

CLOSED

CLOSED

SUN.

MON.

28

29

30

1 - 5 PM & 7 - 10PM TUES.

1 - 5 PM & 7 - 10PM WED.

1 - 5 PM & 7 - 10PM THURS.

31

1

2

NEW VE E YEAR’S LOTS

S 3 TIME | 3-5 PM • 1-3 PM-7 PM •5 M | 9-11 P • 7-9 PM OR

CLOSED

CALL F IONS! AT S E R ERV

CLOSED

SAT.

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snuggled up to my side and proceeded to rob me of every last vestige of warmth. A moment later, after I brought her tea, I put down my book and then asked the question that had been nagging me all day. “Do you appreciate me?” I asked. “Of course I do; you cook for me every day and keep me warm in bed each night,” she giggled. Tomorrow, I’m setting up an eye appointment.

1 - 5 PM & 7 - 10PM

the guys that we needed to play a full 60 minutes of hockey,” said DeSilva. The Kings were rejuvenated in the third and managed to score three unanswered goals off the sticks of Priestap (his second of the night), Sonnenburg and Smith. “We managed to win this game on guts and hard work and even though we were tired we pulled it off,” said DeSilva. “Three weeks ago I am not sure we would have had the results we got this weekend but that shows you the corner we have turned and the players have battled through a lot of things and they are stepping up and doing what they need to do. We had a goal to come out of the weekend with three wins and we needed to do the little things to do that and the guys responded and everyone did their job.” The home game was the Sugar Kings’ annual teddy bear toss and the organization managed to collect a few hundred stuffed animals for less fortunate children and hospitals in the area. This weekend, the Kings are in Stratford Friday to take on the firstplace Cullitons before returning to the friendly confines of the Dan Snyder Memorial Arena on Sunday at 2 p.m. to face off against the Kitchener Dutchmen. The Kings will be playing their last game of 2011 on the road when they head to Kitchener to face the Dutchmen once again on Dec. 20.

FRI.

1 - 5 PM

MON.

PHOTO

(Great Stocking Stuffers!)

» COLIN DEWAR

GIFT CERTIFICATES AVAILABLE !

15 FIRST STREET E., ELMIRA • 519-669-2833 • elmirabowl@rogers.com

ANOTHER ONE STOPS HERE Goaltender Nick Horrigan manages to stop the puck during the third period against the Cambridge Winter Hawks on Dec. 11.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

SCORECARD WOOLWICH NOVICE LL #1 – GIRLS DEC. 10

Woolwich 9, Cambridge 0 Goals: Julia Doerbecker x5, Kristen Busse x2, Ella Campbell, Maggie Sabean (Payton Ravelle x2, Emma Derrigan, Ella Campbell, Julia Doerbecker) Shutout: Amy Dueck DEC. 11

Goals: Liette Fife (Holly Faries) DEC. 11

Woolwich 1, Kitchener 1 Goals: Liette Fife (Holly Faries) WOOLWICH ATOM B - GIRLS DEC. 8

Woolwich 4, Kitchener 1 Goals: Mya Brubacher x2, Caylee Gallant, Delaney Douglas (Caykee Gallant x2, Delaney Douglas, Mya Brubacher, Alenna Martin, Ali Harnock, Hannah Carr) DEC. 10

Woolwich 5, Wilmot 4 Goals: Julia Doerbecker x3, Maddie Goss x2 (Ella Campbell x2, Bethany Hebbourn x2, Amy Dueck x2, Karissa Schouppe, Delaney Keen, Maggie Sabean, Emma Derrigan) TWIN CENTRE NOVICE LL #1 - GIRLS DEC. 10

Twin Centre 13, Ayr 0 Goals: Marlee Fraser x3, Katie Lee x2, Avery Bender x2, Kara Dietrich x2, Lindsay Miller, Brooklyn Reid, Chloe Hislop, Halle Murray (Macoda Pitsch x4, Katie Lee x3, Chloe Hislop x3, Halle Murray x2, Brooklyn Reid x2, Avery Haid, Avery Bender, Megan Haid, Marlee Fraser, Kara Dietrich, Lindsay Miller) Shutout: Kendra Pauser TWIN CENTRE NOVICE LL #2 - GIRLS

Twin Centre 11, Waterloo Ravens 0 Goals: Emily Krueger x5, Mia Thompson x2, Katya Pym x2, Lauren Skanes, MaKenna Krulicki (Claire Higgins x2, Emily Krueger x2, Katya Pym, Mackenna Krulicki, Rachel Jantzi) Shutout: Nicole Hehn

WOOLWICH ATOM LL - GIRLS NOV. 26

Woolwich 2, Oakville 2 Goals: Delaney Douglas, Cassidy Moser (Mya Brubacher, Sydney Dettweiller) TWIN CENTRE PEEWEE LL GIRLS DEC. 9

Twin Centre 2, Ayr 1 Goals: Kate Seip x2 (Grace Kalbfleisch Libby Henderson) Twin Centre 6, Grand River 0 Goals: Kate Seip x2, Olivia Bolender, Elena McKee, Tiana Bruns, Emma Banbury (Sadie Richmond x3, Tiana Bruns, Julia Dakin) Shutout: Riley Barnhardt TWIN CENTRE PEEWEE B GIRLS DEC. 10

Twin Centre 1, Ayr 1 Goals: Lauren Quehl (Leah Sebben, Laura Weber) DEC. 11

Waterloo 2, Twin Centre 1 Goals: Sophie Jantzi (Jocelyn Oja, Deanna Mainland) WOOLWICH BANTAM BB GIRLS DEC. 5

Woodstock 2, Woolwich 1 Goals: Randi Paul (Kendra Harold) DEC. 7

Woolwich 1, Wilmot 1 Goals: Liette Fife (Holly Faries, Brooke Richardson) DEC. 3

Woolwich 1, Cambridge 0

Woolwich 1, Waterloo 0 Goals: Emily Willms (Michelle Bauman, Randi Paul) Shutout: Megan Harron DEC. 10

GOJHL

ALL STAR GAME

21 SPORTS Woolwich 3, Guelph 0 Goals: Marlee Kernick, Meghan Martin, Cora Kieswetter (Sydney Meunier, Maddie Wang, Claire Hanley, Cora Kieswetter, Kendra Harold) Shutout: Megan Harron WOOLWICH MIDGET LL #1 GIRLS DEC. 12

Twin Centre 4, Waterloo 2 Goals: Mackenzie VanBargen, Jessica Dunbar, Shannon Lorentz, Shannon Novak (Carling Cisecki, Janessa Heywood, Dominique Bruns, Mackenzie VanBargen) WOOLWICH MIDGET LL #2 GIRLS NOV. 20

Woolwich 4, Twin Centre 2 Goals: Jenna Martin x2, Emily Chapman, Mandy Martin (Katie Murray, Lori Atchison) NOV. 29

Woolwich 3, Twin Centre 2 Goals: Kayla Wilging, Lize Schuurmans, Courtney Horst (Kayla Wilging x2, Maggie Lariviere x2, Katie Murray DEC. 4

Woolwich 2, Cambridge 0 Goals: Courtney Horst, Emily Chapman (Kayla Death, Kayla Wilging DEC. 5

Twin Centre 3, Woolwich 2 Goals: Kayla Wilging x2 (Emily Chapman, Kayla Death TWIN CENTRE MIDGET LL #2 - GIRLS DEC. 12

Waterloo 2, Twin Centre 1 Goals: Kaitlyn Jantzi (Becky Cornwall)

WOOLWICH MIDGET B – GIRLS DEC. 7

Woolwich 1, Haldimand 0 Goals: Rebecca Luis (Lindsey Bauman, Leah Olsthoorn) Shutout: Lindsey Lesage WOOLWICH TYKE (MINOR NOVICE) SELECT - BOYS DEC. 10

DAN SNYDER MEMORIAL ARENA

Tickets are

$

7

Tickets available for advanced sales at Sugar Kings games leading up to Jan. 9 Silent auction prior and during the game.

DEC. 11

Woolwich 5, Brampton 0 Goals: Reid Burkholder x2, Tyler Brezynskie, Ian Speiran, Andrew Gear (Jocelyn Pickard x2, Sebastian Garrett, Tyler Brezynskie, Andrew Gear, Carter Rollins) Shutout: Colin Bray WOOLWICH NOVICE LL #1 BOYS DEC. 10

Woolwich 1 1, Ayr 3 1 Goals: Ben Fretz (Coleton Benham) DEC. 11

Woolwich #1 4, Woolwich #3 1 Goals: Mac Benham x3, Ben Fretz (Colton Benham, James McCormick, Zach McMurray, Ben Moyer, Liam Moyer, Ethan Murr, Corbin Schmidt, Nolan Williamson)

WOOLWICH NOVICE AE - BOYS DEC. 8

Stoney Creek 7, Woolwich 2 Goals: Kolin Weigel, Gavin Wilson (Kieren Oberholzer, Braxten Breen, Danny Soehner) DEC. 10

Woolwich 2, Dundas 2 Goals: Cameron Leonard, Connor Waters (Kody Lewis x2, Cameron MacLachlan) DEC. 12

Caledon 7, Woolwich 4 Goals: Danny Soehner, Braxten Breen, Nathan Snyder, Gavin Wilson (Cameron Leonard, Danny Soehner x2, Andrew Weber, Braxten Breen, Gavin Wilson, Kolin Weigel) WOOLWICH NOVICE MAJOR A - BOYS DEC. 10

Woolwich 7, Caledon 1 Goals: Jake McDonald x2, Kyler Austin x2, Cole Slade, Owen Lee, Spencer Young (Spencer Young

REGISTRATION - DECEMBER 2011 WED., DEC. 21 | 7-9PM

GOLDEN HORSESHOE vs. MID WEST

MONDAY, JANUARY 9 Game Time: 7:00PM

Woolwich 2, Guelph 0 Goals: Sebastian Garrett x2 (Tyler Brezynskie x2, Jocelyn Pickard, Mitchell Hartman) Shutout: Colin Bray

RATES UNTIL DEC. 31, 2011

Mini L6:

$80 House/Rural $125 $185 L5: $225 L4/L3: $285

x2, Alex Hutton, Brett Moser, Kyler Austin, Colton Schmitt) DEC. 13

Woolwich 6, New Hamburg 4 Goals: Jake McDonald x4, Tyler Martin, Kyler Austin, (Nolan Steringa x2, Colton Schmitt, Spencer Young, Weston Bradley) WOOLWICH ATOM LL #1 BOYS DEC. 11

Woolwich 12, Paris 1 Goals: Nathan Curtis x3, Ryan Parrott x3, Jake Good, Kyle Deyell, Andrew Kieswetter, Matthew Deyell, Josh Kohlsmith, Connor Kroetsch (Kyle Deyell x2, Andrew Kieswetter x2, Nathan Curtis x2, Connor Kroetsch, Jake Good, Blake Richardson) WOOLWICH ATOM LL #2 BOYS DEC. 3

Woolwich 6, St. George 4 Goals: CJ Sider x2, Tanner x2, Matt Dunn, Brendan Grant (CJ Sider, Matthew Fleischmann, Own Hill-Ring) DEC. 4

Woolwich 9, New Hamburg 1 Goals: Brendan Grant x3, CJ Sider, Joseph Bolhm, Jonathan Dingelstad, Matthew Fleischmann, Tanner Mann, Max Nitche (Tanner Mann x2, Sam Nitche x2, Brannon Slade x2, Joseph Bolhm, Matt Dunn, James Ormson, Tyson Kraemer) DEC. 10

Woolwich 6, Twin Center 1 4 Goals: CJ Sider x2, Tanner Mann x2, Matt Dunn, Brendan Grant (CJ Sider, Matthew Fleischmann, Owen Hill-Ring) WOOLWICH ATOM LL #3 BOYS DEC. 10

DATE

TIME

LOCATION

Thursday Thursday Saturday Thursday Saturday Thursday Saturday

19-Jan 19-Jan 21-Jan 26-Jan 28-Jan 16-Feb 18-Feb

7pm - 9pm 7pm - 9pm 9am - 11am 7pm - 9pm 9am - 12pm 7pm - 9pm 9am - 12pm

WYSC Office Breslau Rec Center Breslau Rec Center WYSC Office WYSC Office WYSC Office WYSC Office

RATES AS OF JAN. 01, 2012

Mini L6:

$90 House/Rural $135 $200 L5: $240 L4/L3: $300

Location: Woolwich Youth Soccer Office First St. Elmira (Formerly Visitor Info. Center) TO REGISTER BY MAIL:

Woolwich Youth Soccer Club Box 301 Elmira ON, N3B 2Z7

For the most up to date information please go to our website www.woolwichyouthsoccer.com

TWIN CENTRE ATOM AE BOYS DEC. 9

Twin Centre 5, Paris 0 Goals: Brock Krulicki x2, Alex Kaufman x2, Curtis Butler (Tyler Zyta x2, Ben Hayden, Josh Hubert, Peter Holmes, Devon Lee) Shutout: Blair Gowing DEC. 10

Twin Centre 4, Paris 1 Goals: Cameron Hoy x2, Tyler Zyta, Jack Koebel (William Weber x2, Curtis Butler x2, Alex Kaufman, Brock Krulicki, Ben Hayden) DEC. 13

Twin Centre 9, Tavistock 1 Goals: Ben Hayden x2, Cameron Hoy x2, Josh Hubert, Jack Koebel, Curtis Butler, Alex Kaufman, Dylan Hehn (Brock Krulicki x3, Curtis Butler x3, Cameron Hoy x2, Tyler Zyta, Devon Lee, Caleb Wellman, Peter Holmes, Blair Bender, William Weber) Shutout: Blair Gowing WOOLWICH ATOM AE – BOYS DEC. 9

OSHAWA HOCKEYFEST TOURNAMENT

Woolwich 4, Kingston 0 Goals: Zac Picakard, Kieffer Beard, Hunter Weigel, Ryan Belanger (Matthew Steringa x2, Kieffer Beard, Ethan Young, Seth Morrison, Hunter Schmitt) Shutout: Bryce Dettweiller DEC. 9

Woolwich 2, Plattsville 0 Goals: Nathan Maier, Sullivan Keen (Simon Zenker, William Carter, Matthew Thaler) Shutout: Liam O'Brien WOOLWICH ATOM LL #4 BOYS

Oshawa 3, Woolwich 2 Goals: Ethan Young, Seth Morrison (Kieffer Beard, Matthew Steringa) DEC. 10

> SEE SCORES ON PG. 23

SUNDAY December 18, 2011

Dan Snyder Memorial Arena at 2:00 PM

KITCHENER

REGISTRATION 2012 DAY

DEC. 10

Woolwich 3, New Hamburg 1 Goals: Benjamin Witmer, Jesse Martin, Tyler Horst (Dante Del Cul, Ryan Martin, Nicholas Lunz, Ben Martin)

DUTCHMEN

GAME SPONSORED BY:

Remax Solid Gold Realty (II) Alli Bauman & Bill Norris

The Elmira Sugar Kings invite you to Skate With The Kings

ENJOY A FREE SKATE

WITH US AFTER THE GAME. HELMETS FOR CHILDREN REQUIRED.

FOR A FULL LIST OF UPCOMING GAMES

visit www.kings.on.ca


SPORTS 22

THE OBSERVER

> CONTINUED FROM PG.19

UNDER SEIGE Norfolk Rebel goal tender Jeff Stillman dives at the feet of a couple of Applejack players to stop a play in the first period of a Dec. 10 game that Wellesley won by a score of 5-2.

PHOTO

» COLIN DEWAR

Jacks: Coach hopes strong play carries over to pair of home games

VOISIN CHRYSLER CHRYSLER VOISIN Wishing you and your family aahappy ly haappppyy i m a f r u o y d and mily a h ng you anholiday ishihealthy your faseason! W

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when he received a quick pass from Shawn Fitzpatrick and fired a one-timer above the right shoulder of Norfolk goalie Jeff Stillman. A minute and half later the Jacks were once again in the Rebels’ end when Parr found Blair Witmer alone in front of the net. Witmer made no mistake, chipping the puck over the glove of Stillman to give his team a 2-0 lead. To finish off the second frame the Jacks, who had been defending vigorously for the remainder of the period, were given a powerplay after the Rebels’ Matt Vansickle was called for interference. That led to Tyler Eckert, Mark Detzier and Brent Vickers combing to give the home side three heading back to the room. Perhaps a little too comfortable up 3-0, the Jacks got a rude awakening in the third period when Norfolk’s Steve Parker broke out during a play in his own end and headed down the ice, beating goaltender Josh Heer to put the Rebels on the scoreboard. Connor McLeod would reply for the Jacks a short time later after receiving a beautiful pass from Eckert just inside the blue line and firing a wrist shot high right that beat Stillman. A minute after taking a 4-1 lead the Jacks were given a penalty when Josh Herd was called for cross checking. The 5-on-4 Rebel advantage was too much for the defending Jacks, as Rebel Matt

» Saturday, December 17, 2011 Vansickle slipped the puck low across the ice and squeezing it in between the post and Heer’s glove. The Jacks quickly recomposed themselves and with less than three minutes on the clock Parr picked up the puck at centre ice and make his way through the Rebel defence, sliding it to Eckert who was waiting patiently to the left of the goal to cash number 5. The Rebels continued to push but where unable to score again in the remaining minutes of the game. Heer stopped 25 of 27 shots for the win. Head coach Kevin Fitzpatrick was pleased that his team pulled off a win after a hard loss to the first-place Delhi Travellers last weekend. The win moved Wellesley into third place in the McConnell Conference. “We still have to start playing a lot better than we did,” said Fitzpatrick referring to the fact that the team had a slow start in the first period. “We made some nice plays during the game but we should never have let (Norfolk) score that second goal. That penalty cost us a goal but any win is a good win. We had some players that really held us together including Parr who a terrific game and Heer who was been solid in net for us all season.” The Jacks play two at home this weekend, starting Friday night against the Hagersville Hawks and then on Saturday versus the Tavistock Braves. Both games begin at 7:30 p.m.

oil changes make a great gift.

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PHOTO

Monday December 25 &26th 26 -&CLOSED Closed December 24th, 27th Tuesday January 1 -Street CLOSEDSouth, Elmira 361 Arthur Closed January 2nd 519-669-2831 www.voisinchrylser.com 361 Arthur Street South, Elmira

» COLIN DEWAR

Holiday Hours Sales/Service & Parts Department Monday December 25 & 26 - CLOSED Tuesday JanuarySales/Service 1 - CLOSED & Holiday Hours Sales/Service & Parts Parts Department Department Holiday Hours

IN CONTROL Shawn Fitzpatrick makes his way down the ice at the Wellesley arena Dec. 10.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 21

23 SPORTS

DEC. 9

Woolwich 5, North York 1 Goals: Jacob Clemmer, Kieffer Beard, Hunter Weigel, Seth Morrison, Ryan Belanger (Ethan Young x2, Jacob Clemmer, Jackson Hale, Brendan Gilles, Travis Weber, Ben Weigel) DEC. 10

Woolwich 4, Richmond Hill 2 Goals: Travis Weber, Ryan Belanger, Ethan Young, Hunter Schmitt (Travis Weber, Ryan Belanger, Kieffer Beard, Jacob Clemmer)

Woolwich 6, Guelph 3 Goals: Dawson Good x2, Mitch Lee x2, Ryan Elliott, Isiah Katsube (Isiah Katsube x2, Ryan Elliott x2, Spencer Young, Nathan Taylor, Trevor Ferretti) DEC. 11

Woolwich 5, Milton 2 Goals: Dawson Good x2, Mitch Lee, Colin Merlihan, Ryan Elliott (Trevor Ferretti, Lucas Huber, Colin Merlihan) DEC. 13

DEC. 11

Woolwich 2, Leitrim 0 Goals: Travis Weber, Ben Weigel (Travis Weber, Jacob Clemmer, Ryan Belanger) Shutout: Bryce Dettweiler DEC. 11

Woolwich 3, Oshawa 2 (OT) Goals: Zac Pickard x3 (Ethan Young, Jody Weiss, Ben Weigel) DEC. 12

Woolwich 7, Stoney Creek 0 Goals: Blake Roemer x3, Mitch Lee x2, Dawson Good, Isiah Katsube (Mitch Lee x2, Isiah Katsube x2, Ryan Elliott x2, Dawson Good, Brady Brezynskie, Connor Bradley) Shutout: Zach Verwey

WOOLWICH MAJOR ATOM AA - BOYS DEC. 9

Burlington 2, Woolwich 1 Goals: Austin Cousineau DEC. 12

REGULAR SEASON

Oakville 7, Woolwich 2 Goals: Kayden Zacharczuk, Joshua Martin (Griffen Rollins, Brody Waters, Jake Code)

Woolwich 3, Hespeler 0 Goals: Matthew Steringa, Hunter Schmitt, Kyle Deyell (Matthew Steringa, Kieffer Beard, Hunter Weigel, Seth Morrison, Ethan Young, Zac Pickard) Shutout: Bryce Dettweiller

WOOLWICH NOVICE MAJOR A - BOY

Woolwich 10, Paris 0 Goals: Austin Whittom x4, Tegan Schaus x2, Nathan Horst x2, Mike Devries, John Wang (Tegan Schaus x2, Austin Whittom, Mike Devries, Alex Berry, Nathan Horst, Ryan Diemert, Dylan Smith) Shutout: Terry Chau, Alex Harnock WOOLWICH 11 MINOR PEEWEE A - BOYS NOV. 30

Oakville 5, Woolwich 1 Goals: Cole Altman (Nolan McLaughlin) DEC. 1

Woolwich 4, Georgetown 1 Goals: Chase Mooder x2, Sammy Huber, Cole Altman (Nolan McLaughlin x3, Liam Hartman) DEC. 3

Burlington 6, Woolwich 3 Goals: Austin Cousineau x2, Nolan McLaughlin (Chase Mooder x2, Bradley Hale)

DEC. 10

DEC. 5

New Hamburg 6, Woolwich 4 Goals: Spencer Young, Jake McDonald, Nolan Steringa,

WOOLWICH MINOR ATOM AA - BOYS

DEC. 10

Woolwich 2, Owen Sound 0 Goals: Riley Runstedler, Chase Mooder (Cole Altman) Shutout: Matty Turkalj

Burlington 5, Woolwich 2 Goals: Cole Slade, Spencer Young (AJ Mitchell, Nolan Steringa, Cole Slade)

Woolwich 2, New Hamburg 0 Goals: Matthew Steringa, Ben Weigel (Seth Morrison) Shutout: Jody Weiss

WOOLWICH PEEWEE LL #2 BOYS

DEC. 4

DEC. 3

DEC. 13

Kyler Austin (Kyler Austin, Spencer Young, Gavin Roemer)

Caledon 3, Woolwich 1 Goals: Riley Runstedler (Cole Altman) DEC. 11

Woolwich 1, Brampton 1 Goals: Riley Runstedler (Sammy Huber)

TWIN CENTRE PEEWEE REP DEC. 10

WASAGA BEACH PEEWEE B SILVERSTICK

Twin Centre 6, Wasaga Beach 0 Goals: Troy Hemmerich x2, Mitch Esbaugh, Adam Runstedler, Evan Gowing, Jessica McLachlan (Brett Hartin x2, Evan Gowing x2, Troy Hemmerich) Shutout: Spencer Adam DEC. 11

Twin Centre 5, Oro 2 Goals: Troy Hemmerich x2, Mitch Esbaugh x2, Evan Gowing (Troy Hemmerich, Evan Gowing, Adam Runstedler, Will Martin) DEC. 11

Twin Centre 3, Penetanguishene 1 Goals: Troy Hemmerich, Jessica McLachlan, Will Martin (Mitch Esbaugh x2, Derek Wagner, Troy Hemmerich)

WOOLWICH PEEWEE AE- BOYS DEC. 11

Woolwich 4, Dundas 3 Goals: Matthew MacDonald x2, Brett Henry, Mathew Uhrig (Daniel Gallant x2, Aaron Logan x2, Earl Schwartz Cade Schaus) WOOLWICH BANTAM LL #1 – BOYS DEC. 10

Woolwich 7, Twin Centre 0 Goals: Alex Taylor x2, Nick Berlet, Matthew Greene, Bradley Mathieson, Connor Atkinson, Connor

Bauman (Bradley Mathieson x2, Nick Berlet x2, Jacob Cornwall x2, Terrell Piper, Connor Atkinson, Alex Taylor, Matt Jessop) Shutout: Kyle Ropp DEC. 12

Woolwich #1 4, Woolwich #2 3 Goals: Nick Berlet, Connor Bauman, Jacob Cornwall, Alex Taylor (Alex Taylor x2, Bradley Mathieson, Nick Berlet, Connor Bauman) WOOLWICH MIDGET LL #2 – BOYS NOV. 25

Woolwich #2 4 Woolwich #3 3 Goals, Cole Burkhart, William Frank, Shane Young, Cole Martin (William Frank x2, Shane Young, Cole Martin) DEC. 1

Woolwich #2 3 vs New Hamburg 3 Goals: Brendon Taylor, William Frank, Cameron Strickler (Spencer Inglis, Kadison Hipel, Blake Cabeldu) DEC. 9

Woolwich #2 8 Woolwich #1 2 Goals, William Frank x3, Lucas Nosal x3, Blake Cabeldu, Aaron Burkhart (Blake Cabeldu x3, Aaron Burkhart x2, Brandon Taylor, Cameron Ferante, Cole Martin, Spencer Inglis, Shane Young)

WOOLWICH MIDGET AE - BOYS NOV. 13

Sokolowski, Quinten HunterRhodes) DEC. 9

Woolwich 5, Arthur 3 Goals: Tristen White x2, Clinton Dechert x2, Justin Schlupp (Jordan Vanderwoude, Clinton Dechert Sab Lane, Justin Schlupp Tyler Mayberry, Jordan Vanderwoude, Tyler Mayberry, Dalton Wojcik, Tyler Fulcher) WOOLWICH MIDGET MINOR A - BOYS DEC. 10

WASAGA BEACH PEEWEE B SILVERSTICK

Twin Centre 6, Wasaga Beach 0 Goals: Troy Hemmerich x2, Mitch Esbaugh, Adam Runstedler, Evan Gowing, Jessica McLachlan (Brett Hartin x2, Evan Gowing x2, Troy Hemmerich) Shutout: Spencer Adam DEC. 10

Twin Centre 3, Penetanguishene 2 Goals: Troy Hemmerich, Brett Hartin, Will Martin (Jessica McLachlan, Noah Donsig) DEC. 11

Dundas 5, Woolwich 2 Goals: Jordan King, Tyler Seguin (Adrian Gilles, Timmy Shuh, Bo Uridil) WOOLWICH MAJOR MIDGET A - BOYS DEC. 3

Woolwich 3, Arthur 0 Goals: Dalton Wojcik x2, Matt Halter (Drew Jansen, Clinton Dechert, Connor Jansen, Mike

Dundas 2, Woolwich 1 Goals: Matthew Townsend (McKinley Ceaser, Sebastien Huber)

Celebrate Safely... DUB-L-E • GAS • DIESEL • PROPANE • TOUCH-FREE CAR WASH

390 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA (Hwy 86 & Road 21)

519-669-2015 Registered to ISO 9001, 14001 Manufacturers of Sulphuric Acid and Sodium Bisulphite

Sulco Chemicals Limited

60 First St. E. • 519-669-5166

Bonnie’s Chick Hatchery Ltd. Day-old Egg Layers Day-old Meat Varieties Turkeys - Ducks - Geese Ready-to-lay-pullets

18 Arthur St. N. • 519-669-2561

Toll Free (In Canada 1-888-569-8843) • Fax: 1-519-669-5982 Web: www.martinmills.com

Serving you for over 100 Years

SANYO CANADIAN

1145 Printery Rd., St. Jacobs | TEL: 519.664.2263

33 Industrial Dr. • 519-669-1591

“Proud to be part of the community.”

PO Box 130, Elmira • 519-669-5171

Don't Drink & Drive

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

49 Industrial Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1631

Please Don’t Drink and Drive! Allen Morrison Insurance Inc. 25 Industrial Dr. Elmira 519-669-2632

Mon., Tues., Wed., & Sat. 10AM-6PM Th., & Fri. 10AM-9PM Sun. 12PM-4PM

31 Church St. W, Elmira • 519-669-5565

PLEASE BE RESPONSIBLE THIS HOLIDAY SEASON.


CLASSIFIEDS 24

THE OBSERVER

CLASSIFIEDS

HELP WANTED

Residential 20-Word Ad $7.50 (Extra Words 20¢/word)

JOIN OUR GROWING TEAM

FOR SALE

Delivery Driver Wanted! Part time position available at a large animal vet practice.

Apply today & work tomorrow

• Responsibilities include packing and delivering orders • Attention to detail beneficial • Vehicle provided • Requires some heavy lifting • Must be available some Saturdays & holidays • Good standing driver’s license mandatory • Benefits available

MANUFACTURING POSITIONS NOW AVAILABLE:

• CNC Operators • Welders • Metal Fabricators • Shippers/Packagers Great Rates/Benefits/Group RRSP/Clothing Allowances Please email resume to: careers@trylon.com or Drop in from between 10 – 2 to complete an application. Trylon TSF, 21 South Field Drive, Elmira, ON N3B 0A6

Please submit resume to:

Our St. Jacobs Furniture Retail Store currently has the following opportunity...

Home Furniture Sales Associate

You will provide courteous and efficient customer service, while selling furniture, appliances and accessories. You will process customer purchases in computerized inventory system, order merchandise, respond to Dealer and telephone inquiries, and arrange attractive merchandise displays, moving furniture and tidying sales floor regularly.

HELP WANTED

>>Winter Maintenance help needed for sidewalk crew. Experience preferred but will train. Must be reliable and dependable. Fax resume to 519-6699369, email kdetweiler@ rogers.com

hr@homehardware.ca

We offer a competitive salary and great working conditions. If you are interested in becoming part of Home Hardware, please submit your resume quoting Home Furniture Sales Associate by Thursday, December 22, 2011 to: Dayna Weber, Recruitment, Human Resources Department, Home Hardware Stores Limited, 34 Henry St W, St. Jacobs, ON N0B 2N0 Fax: 519-664-4711 Phone: 519-664-4975 E-mail: hr@homehardware.ca (Microsoft Products Only)

RENTALS

>>Christmas Sale at Hillcrest Home Baking. December 6 - 31. Closed Sun. & Mon. 519-6691381. 5% off all groceries excluding eggs, milk, butter, cheese and baking. 10% off 10lb or 5lb chunks of cheese. Chapman’s Preumium Ice Cream $3.99; Chapman’s Original Ice Cream $2.99. 10% off throughout rest of store excluding china and coats. 50% off selected fabrics. 10% off all other fabrics and sewing notions. Dec. 15 & 16 - Free coffee and Crestbits or cookies.

>>Moving Sale - leather, reclining sectional (Lane), medium brown/burgundy, 5 years old, excellent condition $1800. 12 piece dining room set, solid maple $2800; French Provincial bed, queen size boxspring and mattress and dresser with mirror $450. 519-6982506.

>>Drum Kit 5 piece Pearl. Sabian cymbals - crash, ride, highhats, plus 3 extra and case. $750. Lots of extras. 519-669-4913.

>>$ Goes Further with SENIORS DISCOUNTS at Creature Comfort Pet Emporium. Your Pet’s Store & So Much More! FREE PawZone K9 Play Park on site. Open 7 days, 1553 King St. N. St. Jacobs. 519-664-3366. www.creaturecomfort.ca

FIREWOOD

>>Firewood, delivered. 519-669-1836. PETS

PRINTING & COPYING SERVICES

>>Black and white,

8 1/2 X 11 flyers designed and printed for as low as 6¢. Professionally designed, quick turnaround, local service. Delivery, folding and colour work also available. Call 519.669.5790 ext 107 for details.

Only selected candidates will be contacted for an interview.

Term position January 2012 to June 2012

You get along well with others, are service oriented, and have good computer, math, and communications skills. You are willing to work some weekends. Fluency in both English and French and sales experience are assets.

FOR SALE

>>Foosball table excellent condition. $60 o.b.o. Call 519-664-2823.

Metzger Veterinary Services 5200 Ament Line Linwood ON N0B 2A0 Fax: (519) 698-0037 office@metzgervet.com

HELP WANTED

PLACING A CLASSIFIED AD | Classified ads can be obtained in person, by phone (519-669-5790), fax or email from Monday to Thursday 8:30am-5pm or Friday 8:30am-4pm. All classified ads are prepaid. Deadline is WEDNESDAYS by 4pm.

Commercial 20-Word Ad $12.00 (Extra Words 30¢/word)

HELP WANTED

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

CHILD CARE

>>Need Child-Care? Loving, caring babysitter with 15 years experience. Close to schools, Birdland Plaza. References available. Call Ellen 519-669-8188.

>>Try Bowen Therapy for treatment of pain and numerous health conditions. Daytime hours now available! Contact Kevin Bartley, Certified Bowenwork Practitioner. 519-669-0112, Elmira.

Catholic Church Mass times are:

Sat. 5pm, Sun. 9am and 11:15am

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

Trinity United Church, Elmira “Our mission is to love, learn & live by Christ’s teachings” Sunday Worship: 10:30 am Sunday School during Worship Minister: Rev. Dave Jagger

rm A Wlcaome We all! to

www.execulink.com/~unitedchurch/index.html Visit us at: www.wondercafe.ca 21 Arthur St. N., Church office 519-669-5560

We get you

Time To Let Go Of Worry

SUNDAYS AYS @ 10:30AM Services at John Mahood Public School A www.elmiracommunity.org

>>Smaller 1 Bedroom high end apartment in quiet building. Close to downtown, perfect for working professional or retired person. Please no pets and non smoking. Rent $660 + utilities. Available Feb. 1. Call 519-669-2212.

Results.

.com

IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH NURSERY PROVIDED

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

Zion Mennonite Fellowship

Ron Seabrooke

Christmas Eve Service - 7:00pm

Sermon-Kings of Kings

No Service Christmas Day Finding The Way Together

47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 www.thejunctionelmira.com

Sunday School at 9:30am Service at 10:30am REACH WITH LOVE. TEACH THE TRUTH. SEND IN POWER. 290 Arthur St. South, Elmira • 519-669-3973 www.ElmiraAssembly.com (Across from Tim Horton’s)

Sunday, December 18, 2011 9:15 & 11:00 AM

200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 Check out our website www.woodsidechurch.ca

SUNDAY SCHOOL

Dec. 18 at 11am

- The Junction -

Series: More Than A Story "#3 - Made for More” 5 First St., Elmira • 519-669-1459

>>MOOREFIELD - one bedroom apartment, furnished, laundry facilities, parking, deck, electric heat, cable TV. No pets, adult building. References. $695 inclusive. First & last. 519638-3013

www.

Discovering God Together

519-669-2319 | www.wbconline.ca 4522 Herrgott Road, Wallenstein

Gale

Christmas Eve

Family Candlelight Christmas Eve Service at 7pm

Christmas Day

Christmas Communion

Worship at 10am Presbyterian www.galepresbyterian.com Church 2 Cross St., Elmira • 519-669-2852

Office Hours: M-TH 9-Noon & 1-3 • E galepresbychurch@golden.net

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

Dec. 11th 18th

>>2 Bedroom main floor of bungalow. 1200 sq. ft. Washer, dryer, fridge, stove, parking, garage included. $1050 plus utilities. Phone 519-741-6548. Available Dec. 15.

Plus a whole lot

HEARING ASSISTED

No God, No Hope; Know God, Know Hope! Celebrate Eucharist with us

RENTALS

Everything that’s fit to print...

HEALTH CARE

PLACES OF FAITH

St. Teresa

>>1 Bedroom Basement apartment for rent. $750 all inclusive. Looking for one responsible adult for Jan. 1. Shared kitchen and entrance. 519-580-1478.

9:15am Sunday School 10:30am Worship Service Pastor: Richard A. Frey www.stpaulselmira.ca

27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593

Check the Observer for your local faith listings!


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

25 CLASSIFIEDS

FAMILY ALBUM ANNIVERSARY

FAMILY ALBUM

BIRTHDAY

STAG & DOE

Happy 65th Birthday Dad!

New Years Eve Celebration Stag & Doe for Brittany Crossley and Nick Hardman

Share The Good News! With a Family Album Ad in the Observer

» Anniversary » Birthday » Engagement » Stag & Doe » Thank you » Birth Notice » and a lot more.... For as little as...

23

$ Gordon and Gunhild (Albrecht) Scheifele invite you to join them in the celebration of their 50 years of marriage. Open House at St. Jacobs Mennonite Church, St. Jacobs, on Friday, December 30, 2-4 p.m. There will be cake and refreshments. TO GOD BE THE GLORY, GREAT THINGS HE IS DOING.

+HST

Call

All friends and family are welcome to celebrate Len Wideman's 65th birthday January 8th from 2:00-4:00pm at Bethel Mennonite Church. Love From Your Family Best wishes only please!

Township of Woolwich Notice of Study Commencement Hopewell Creek Extension of Services Class‘B’Environmental Assessment

December 31, 2011 St. Jacobs Community Centre, 8p.m.-1a.m. Hot food, games & amazing prizes Semi-formal $15 per person Contact: Lyndsay 519-664-2138

519.669.5790 ext 104

IN PRINT | ONLINE IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH

route for the extension of municipal services across Hopewell Creek to service lands on the east side of the creek in the Breslau settlement area. This study will be conducted in accordance with the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment. This study will review the existing conditions, identify potential alternatives, and evaluate them through an environmentally sound process. The result of this study will be the selection of a preferred route for service extension. An integral component of this study will be public consultation with various interested stakeholders (both public and regulatory agencies). One Public Open House will be held to present the project details and to collect community feedback and input before finalizing the preferred strategy. The Open House is expected to be held in February 2012. Details regarding this meeting will be advertised as the study progresses.

STUDY AREA

HOPEWELL CREEK

A mailing list for notification purposes is being prepared. If you are interested in being placed on the project mailing list to receive future information, or if you have any questions, please contact either of the representatives listed below.

Mr. Randy Miller, C.Tech. Township Project Manager Township of Woolwich 24 Church Street West Elmira, Ontario, N3B 2Z6 Phone: (519) 669-1647 Fax: (519) 669-4669 The Corporation of the Township of Woolwich is initiating a study to identify the preferred Email: rmiller@woolwich.ca

SIDEWALK SNOW REMOVAL

Ms. Barbara Robinson, M.A.Sc., P.Eng. Project Manager Stantec Consulting Ltd. 49 Frederick Street Kitchener, Ontario, N2H 6M7 Phone: (519) 585-7379 Fax: (519) 579-8806 Email: barbara.robinson@stantec.com

NOTE:

Am I required to clear my sidewalk of snow? Yes, you may be afraid of breaking a sweat, but Elmira residents are not required to clear their sidewalks; a separate tax levy is collected your neighbour may be afraid of breaking a hip! Be helpful to neighbours, all sidewalks must for snow removal. The Township’s contractor is responsible for clearing sidewalks within 24 hours after the snow has stopped. be cleared of ice and snow within 24 hours of a snow fall.

275

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CLASSIFIEDS 26

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

REAL ESTATE

From Our Family to Yours,

Oh, let us turn away from noise, The clamor of the day, To rest in solitude with Him; Our blessings to survey. Oh, let our inner joy release Our carol to The King, To worship Him, to feel the touch Of Heavenly angel's wing. May we escape the tinseled trees, The gifts that soon expire,

To see the glory of God's way That meets our soul's desire. Oh, let us pause to contemplate Each priceless happening; Children's laughter, tender words... The daily "little things." Oh, may we feel our brother's need, His inner plea for peace, Promote good will, and sacrifice God's Kingdom to increase.

Oh, let our celebration be A tribute to The One Who is The Father's Gift to us, His Own Begotten Son.

The

Martin

Family

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Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated | 180 Weber St. S., Waterloo

OFFICE 519-888-7110

Paul Martin SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL DIRECT

519-503-9533 www.homeswithpaul.ca

$500.00 donation will be made with every home bought or sold by Paul in Woolwich.

$475,000

FABULOUS HOME

Only minutes to Waterloo. This family oriented home is complete with 3rd flr. family rm and laundry, separate DR., 4 bdrms. Airy eat-in kitchen with reverse osmosis, breakfast bar & island, lrg LR w/gas fireplace. Basement w/o to fenced yard. Put your personal touches on the unfinished basement. MLS Call Paul direct.

$624,000

IMPRESSIVE HOME

On picturesque setting. Only 20 min to Waterloo. Spacious grand foyer w/curved oak staircase & french drs leading you to through this exceptional home. Complete w/sep DR, MF laundry, LR, FR& fin'd basement. Master w/FP, walk in closet & captivating ensuite complete w/stand up shower & corner whirlpool bath. Sit back & enjoy the lg deck overlooking inground kidney shaped pool w/brick privacy wall & country setting. MLS Call Paul direct.

Alli Bauman SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL DIRECT

519-577-6248

$303,000

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

QUALITY BUILT SEMI DETACHED

$749,900

HOBBY FARM

Elmira - This open concept, raised bungalow is currently being built by Huron Homes in mature area. Close to downtown, walking distance to restaurants & banks. Complete w/deck, MF laundry, spacious master w/lg closet & 4 pc ensuite. Double garage (17.5 x 20 ft) perfect for storage & still easily have parking for 3 vehicles. Convenient separate side entrance. MLS Call Paul direct.

Woolwich - Loc’d on 20 acres. Spacious 2400 sqft bungalow equip’d w/MF lndry, sep dr, huge fin’d bsmnt & walk up to garage. Open kit & FM w/wood fp. Master w/huge walk in closet & attractive slider to 3 tiered composite deck w/hot tub. 25x36 ft insulated, heated shop, 100amp w/bathrm & phone. 20,000 sqft 2 storey barn equipped for chickens or turkeys, currently empty. 17 acres of bush w/trail, mostly hardwood & poplar. MLS Call Paul direct.

$303,000

$262,900

Bill Norris SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL DIRECT

519-588-1348

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

OPEN CONCEPT RAISED BUNGALOW

Elmira - This quality built semi detached home is currantly being built by Huron Homes in mature area. Close to downtown, walking distance to restaurants & banks. Complete w/deck, MF laundry, spacious master w/lg closet & 4 pc ensuite. Double garage (17.5 x 20 ft) perfect for storage & still easily have parking for 3 vehicles. Convenient separate side entrance. MLS Call Paul direct.

MOVE RIGHT IN!

Very nice and well kept 3 bedroom home in Drayton. Very impressive with open concept. Spacious kitchen with an island. The great room with cathedral ceiling has a walkout to a fenced and treed backyard with a private deck for entertaining. Finished basement with large L shaped rec room and roughed in for future bathroom. Double garage and driveway. MLS Please call Bill or Alli direct.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

27 CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE

Sunlight Homes

ELMIRA REAL ESTATE SERVICES When you buy or sell your home with us, part of our commission supports women’s shelters & violence prevention programs.

Drayton Heights

Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage 519-669-3192 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

VISIT US SATURDAY AND SUNDAY!

BONNIE BRUBACHER Broker of Record

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

The Edge Semi-detached homes from

SHANNA ROZEMA Broker.

LAURIE LANGDON Sales Representative

MONIQUE ROES Sales Representative

FAMILY HOME IN THE COUNTRY

VACANT LAND

61 ROLLING SCENIC ACRES

$294,900. This very spacious 4 level back-split in the ideal village setting is carpet free and features a large kitchen with oak cabinetry, upgraded quality laminate floor, 2-4pc baths, fully finished family room and stone patio.

$249,000. This ideal property consists of 2 separate 4.5 acre lots is zoned agricultural and allows you to build a single family dwelling on each parcel. Build on one and enjoy the other or build on both and just enjoy country living!

$2,500,000. Location bordering Waterloo city limits, making for University and amenities minutes away. 3500 sq ft ranch 4 Bedroom Bungalow, 4000 sq ft Shop with heated walk out area. Spectacular grounds are in park like condition and includes spring fed pond. MLS

$189,990

Choose from one of our plans or let us custom build your home fully detached. Homes starting from

LOVELY HOME

RANCH BUNGALOW

$319,900. BRESLAU. Single detached 2 storey, built in 2008, 3 bdrms, 3 bathrooms, open concept kit/dining and living room, stainless steel appl., walkout to large deck, finished walkout basement to fenced yard. MLS

$369,900. MOOREFIELD. Village setting on a wooded lot. Spacious 3 Bedroom, 3 Bath home. Eat in kitchen with built in appliances and fully finished basement. MLS

$239,990

VACANT LOT

COMPLETELY FINISHED!

Many models to choose from Learn More About Sunlight Heritage Homes and Our fine communities by Visiting us Today!

Alyssa Henry Sales Representative

www.sunlighthomes.ca

519.787.0203

Have a question? Email us at: info@sunlighthomes.ca

We get you Results.

ELMIRA. Single $69,000. Glen Allan .85 Acre Lot $299,900. overlooks farmland and country. detached 2 storey home, immediate possession, 3 bdrms, 4 baths Call for further details. MLS including ensuite!!! Backs onto greenspace, double driveway, 1.5 car garage, gas fireplace, central air, central vacuum, walkout to deck & fenced yard. +++ MLS

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

BROKERAGE

Independently Owned and Operated

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. 45 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

BRAD MARTIN

519-669-2772

MVA Residential

Broker of Record,

JULIE HECKENDORN

TRACEY WILLIAMS

Res: 519.669.1068

Res: 519.669.8629

Cell: 519.505.0627

Broker

LEON MARTIN

COUNTRY LOTS .5 acre don’t miss this chance to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. Within 40 minutes KW, or Guelph. High speed internet is available with fibre optic. Starting at $68,000 MLS

Gorgeous home, 3 bedroom back split, on a large landscaped lot, with an awesome family room, eat in kitchen, 2 bath, central air, gas fireplace. $229,900.00 MLS Hobby Farm with 7 stalls and 7 individual pastures, brick bungalow with country kitchen, oversized recroom. $510,000. MLS

AFFORDABLE BACKSLPIT SEMI on a deep fenced lot. Parquet floors in bdrms. Updated bathroom. Replacement windows and furnace. Newer rec. room with walkup. Deck. Shed. Central air. Lots of storage! MLS REDUCED to $209,900.

ADDRESS: 4-B Arthur St. S., ELMIRA • EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net DIRECT: 519-503-2753 • OFFICE: 519-669-5426

LOOKING FOR THE PERFECT HOME? Whatever the occasion?

Stag & Do

e

for

WOODED LOT! Spacious bungalow with full walkout bsmt. Recent hardwood on most of the main floor, 2pc. ensuite. Fin. bsmt. with lovely stone fireplace. Updated windows, furnace, & garage dr. Huge lot. EXCL $359,900.

DOUBLE AD SIZE SHOWN.

Christine At & Jesse Sckinson hott

NICE OLDER HOME on the edge of town. Natural staircase, pocket doors. Oak kitchen & spacious dining area overlooking the deep yard. Family room and living room. 2 bathrooms. Some replacement windows. Detached garage. MLS $249,900.

are thrilled to of Heidelberg Marg & Brian Craig ing marriage of their son upcom Southorn, announce the to Amanda Jane Coldwater. Michael Brian Southorn of Tim y &Sa tur day, Seonptember th daughter of Sherr ing will take place The wedd 11 , 8:0Bridg at Three 0pmes 2010 25, Sat. Sept. s, Ontario. 1:00am St. JacobLio ns Banquet Hall,

Celebrate it by placing it in the Observer’s Family Album. 2010

Anniversaries | Birthdays Wedding Announcements | Stag & Does

Hall, Elmira

(LiallvetheBand love and ) Wishing you both& forev er. Tickets $10 at the best now

door

SINGLE $23 DOUBLE $38 TRIPLE $48 2.475”x1.6906”

www.thurrealestate.com

OFFICE: 519-669-5426

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage | Independently Owned and Operated

Sales Rep.

For your business and your friendship we are deeply grateful and wish you all a very Merry Christmas season!

OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE Approx. 3000 sq. ft. Large open room, private offices, board room and washrooms. Lots of parking. Great exposure on a busy highway between Elmira & St. Jacobs. MLS $2,500/MONTH.

3 Arthur St. S. Elmira • www.remaxsolidgold.biz

2.475”x3.75”

3.7687”x3.75”

519-669-5790 IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH

info@woolwichobserver.com

BERT MARTIN, BROKER

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

Call Bert For Your FREE Market Evaluation

“To all my loyal clients and friends, thanks for your support. You are appreciated. Merry Christmas & Happy New Year.” BEAUTIFUL

3 year old with 3rd floor loft and view of countryside, 3 bathrooms, 3 bedrooms, walkout from dining room to new deck, walkout from basement to rear yard, new central air, master ensuite w/corner tub. Call Bert to view. MLS.

$379,000

COUNTRY ACREAGE!

Great property on the edge of town backing to river offers century home with 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, large family room addition, attached single garage, 5 acres of manicured orchard with a mix of fruit trees, 12 acres workable. Three one storey out buildings totaling 10,000 s/f. Cold storage, apple juice processing equipment included. MLS. Call Bert to View.

$375,000

COMMERCIAL OFFICE SPACE

Two adjoining offices in Multi-Tenant Plaza. Also 920 s/f unit consisting of two offices, reception area, kitchenette and bathroom. Located in busy plaza 10 minutes from Waterloo. MLS. Call Bert to view.

Your referrals are appreciated!


CLASSIFIEDS 28

THE OBSERVER

On duty: At work for the holidays

DEATH NOTICES

SERVICE PROS AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

TIRE Complete Collision Service

WHERE TIRES

Body Maintenance

RUDOWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

ARE A

at

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.

RUDOWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

519.669.8330

Farm â&#x20AC;˘ Auto â&#x20AC;˘ Truck Industrial â&#x20AC;˘ On-The-Farm Service

1-800-CARSTAR 519-669-3373

FAX: 519.669.3210

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

24 Hour Accident Assistance

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

Call Us At

519-669-3373

AFTER HOURS

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519.669.8917

519-669-3232

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

THOMPSONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

AUTO CLINIC

Auto Tech Inc. Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

21 Industrial Dr. Elmira Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400

519-669-7652

31 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

CONCRETE

SKATE SHARPENING

While you wait! $4.99 per pair

Driveways â&#x20AC;˘ Sidewalks â&#x20AC;˘ Curbs â&#x20AC;˘ Barn Renovations Finished Floors â&#x20AC;˘ Retaining Walls â&#x20AC;˘ Short Walls Decorative/Stamped and coloured concrete

5th pair FREE.

CALL NOW TO BOOK YOUR FALL PROJECTS

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Tel: 519-669-5537

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ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd.

CONSTRUCTION

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24 Hour Service

Chem-Dry AcclaimÂŽ 61 Arthur St., N. Elmira

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STORE HOURS: M-F: 8-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

CARPET CARE

CRANE

Farr, Russell

Sharpening M

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

Plus a whole lot

6672 Ruggles Rd. Floradale RR#2 Wallenstain, N0B 2S0

519-669-3082

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Riedstra, Richard F. (Dick) Richard F. Riedstra, 84, passed away on Wednesday, December 7, 2011 at Parkwood Mennonite Home, Waterloo, formerly of Elmira and of St. Jacobs Meadows. Devoted husband of 58 years of Maria Riedstra (nee Langerak). Loving father of Lutzen Riedstra and Carolynn Bart-Riedstra, Stratford, Henry and Linda Riedstra, Stratford, and Maria Riedstra and Andrew Hellebust, Toronto and grandfather of Lutzen, Kyla (Rob), Janelle (Steven), Davin, Eric and Laila. Also survived by three brothers in Canada and three sisters and a brother in the Netherlands. Richard was a music teacher at Elmira DSS 1965-1985 and was an accomplished French horn player in the KW Symphony and several orchestras in the Netherlands. He was co-founder and president of the KW Chess Club. In 1990, Richard and Maria were joint recipients of the KW Arts Award. The family received friends and relatives at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira, on Sunday, December 11, from 2:00 to 5:30 p.m. The funeral service was held at Gale Presbyterian Church, Elmira, on Monday, December 12, at 1:00 p.m. with interment in Elmira Union Cemetery. A reception followed in the church hall. Donations may be made to Heart & Stoke Foundation, KW Symphony, or Gale Presbyterian Church. www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

DEATH NOTICES

State of the achAinert

Ltd.

Everything thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fit to print...

www.

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 15 ent day,â&#x20AC;? said Kerr. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of times our families will build their Christmas celebrations around our schedules. If we have to work during the day they tend to hold off opening presents or eating the Christmas dinner until we arrive home. Being a police officer, it is something that they expect to happen from time to time. It is not that horrible because I have my second family here that I will spend time with.â&#x20AC;? All the pharmacies in town will be closed on Christmas Day. Damenjit Banwait, a pharmacy intern at the Shoppers Drug Mart at the corner of Church and Arthur streets, suggests that people who need to take medication stock up on their tablets, pills and liquids to make sure they have enough to last until the New Year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People want to make sure that they have enough medication to get through the holiday season because usually doctorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; offices are closed between Christmas and New Year,â&#x20AC;? said Banwait, adding the pharmacy will help those that need refills to contact their doctors before Christmas holidays begin. For parents that have newborns or small children they should make sure they know which stores are open on Christmas Day because they may need something like Tylenol or Advil for a child but again the best idea is to stock up on those items before Christmas, said Banwait.

Âť Saturday, December 17, 2011

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

Peacefully passed away on Thursday, December 8, 2011 at Freeport Health Centre of Grand River Hospital, at the age of 62 years, of Elmira. Devoted husband of Sharon (McAllister) Farr. Loving father of Darren and Jillian of Barrie, and Charlene of Waterloo. Grandpa of Derek, Kelsea, Brayden, Charlotte, Emilie, Spenser and great-grandpa of Caleb. Dear son of Marion (Collins) Farr of Elmira and the late Ken Farr (2000). Brother of Marilyn and Don McIntosh of Drayton, Jerry of Woodstock, Wayne and Barb of Kelowna, BC, Larry and Renee of Elmira, Debbie of Elmira, Cheryl and Ed of Cambridge, and Tom of Elmira. Son-in-law of Don and Bessie McAllister of Elmira. Brotherin-law of Ron McAllister of Mabel Lake, BC. Russ is lovingly remembered by his aunt Audrey MacDonald, Marg Farr and his many nieces, nephews and their families. Predeceased by his sister Colleen (1975) and his sister-in-law Dawn (2005). At Russâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s request, cremation has taken place. A memorial visitation was held at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira on Tuesday, December 13th from 2-5 p.m. and was followed by a Legion Service and reception at 6:45 p.m. at The Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 469, 11 First St. E., Elmira. In Russâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memory, donations to the Poppy Fund would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

29 CLASSIFIEDS

SERVICE PROS PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

CARPET CARE

PAINTING

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

Renovating? Let us do the clean up

RENOVATION CLEAN UPS! Call for Details • Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location • Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off and Pick up Service • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair • Janitorial • Grout Cleaning • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping

519-669-7607

LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

MEDICAL TREATMENT

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING

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F. David Reimer

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519-669-0220

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www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102

36 Hampton St., Elmira

kdetweiler@rogers.com

PIANO SERVICE

SEWING SERVICES

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

PIANO

Sew Special

TUNING

MANY APPLICATIONS:

• Industrial lots • Pasture reclaimation • Golf courses • Cottages • Trail maintenance & development • Real estate lots • Orchard maintenance • Ski resorts • Wooded lot thinning, etc.

Custom Drapery Custom Blinds Free Estimates In Home Consultations Over 20 Years Experience

Armand St. Jean

Lois Weber 519-669-3985

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Elmira

PLUMBING

OUR EQUIPMENT CAN HANDLE TOUGH BRUSH & LONG GRASS!

C.J.

For all your Plumbing Needs.

BRUBACHER LTD.

24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

19 First St. E., Elmira

ELMIRA

519-669-3362

519-669-3652

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE

519-669-4964

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

Inspections for Real Estate Septic System Repairs & Restoration Catch Basin Cleaning

The Sharp Shop | 112-D Bonnie Cres., Elmira

519.669.5313

MON-FRI 12PM TO 6PM | SAT 9AM TO 5PM SUN 12PM TO 3PM

DECORATING

ELECTRICAL

READ’S Specializing in Paint & Wall coverings

• Residential • Commercial • Industrial ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

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519.669.3658

or

519-648-3004

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More Info & pricing | vinylp2cd@gmail.com

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•Tree Trimming & Removal • Aerial Bucket Trucks • Stump Grinding • Arborist Evaluations • Fully Insured & Certified • Certified to Work Near Power Lines

FREE BAG In troductor y Offer

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Taking Salt to Peoples’ Basements Since 1988

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HOME IMPROVEMENTS

GLASS SERVICES

We`ll take your favourite albums, clean up clicks, pops and surface noise and enhance the overall sound of the recording.

EAVESTROUGH

ST. JACOBS

Randy Weber FOR ALL YOUR HOME DECORATING NEEDS.

519-896-7700

For the music-lover on your list we`ll transfer music from LPs, 45s, 78s and cassettes to CDs.

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

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Waterloo Region • Woolwich Township

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TREE SERVICE

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

Septic Tank Cleaning

• Environmentally friendly • Extremely low ground pressure • Returns nutrients back to soil • No erosion problems - leaves soil structure intact • No Burning • No harm to keeper trees

MUSIC SERVICES

Various sizes & rates

SALT

HELPING RECLAIM YOUR UNUSED LAND!

For more information contact: JEFF BASLER

SELF STORAGE

Call

Davco Forestry Brush Mower capable of mowing up to 6" diameter brush and also for mowing any long grass.

RR 1, Elmira, Ontario, N3B 2Z1 | Mobile: 519-505-0985 | Office: 519-669-9081 Fax: 519-669-9819 | Email: ever-green@sympatico.ca

SPECIALISTS!

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OWNER-OPERATOR

SERVICE ANYWHERE IN ONTARIO

YOUR Steve PLUMBING Co. & HEATING Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

KEVIN DETWEILER

P: 519-669-1188 | F: 519-669-9369

OFFERING A QUICK AND EASY WAY TO RECLAIM UNUSED LAND

Custom Sewing for Your Home

& REPAIR

> Commercial & Residential > Fully Insured > WSIB Clearance > Senior Discount

Lawn Maint Maintenance Main tenance Programs | Spring Clean-up Flower Bed Maintenance Programs Leaf Clean-up and Removal | Soil & Mulch Delivery & Installation | Snow Clearing & Removal | Ice Control 27 Brookemead, St, Elmira

SEPTIC SERVICES

SKATE SHARPENING

free estimates interior/exterior painting wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

Services

519-669-2251

QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

PLUMBING

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada

20 years experience

Outdoor

www.completecarpetcare.ca

ROB McNALL

LAWN MAINTENANCE

519.669.1462 Fax: 519.669.9970 Tel:

18 Kingfisher Dr., Elmira

GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

FREE ESTIMATES • Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

TEL: 519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104 FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

Home Improvements

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ROOFING | SIDING | SOFFIT & FACIA DRYWALL INSTALLATION

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AGRICULTURAL • COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL • High Quality Installation of Steel & Aluminum Eavestrough • Rugged Steel Eavestrough for Today’s Metal Roofing Systems

JEREMY MARTIN

PH 519-502-4679 | Fax 519-291-6624

xcountryeaves@live.ca

8632 Concession 3, RR#3 Listowel, ON, N4W 3G8


CLASSIFIEDS 30

Food: Possible local bonanza > CONTINUED FROM PG. 14 The latter is well-understood by retailers, and it’s sparked massive grocery competition in this country based mainly on price. The economists predict turf battles will only intensify when the Target chain moves into Canada. Target competes head to head with Walmart, which has said it wants to capture as much as four per cent more of the food retail market this year. That’s huge. The economists say that will turn the current price battles into an epic war. For his part, Charlebois says price pressure on farmers will continue as the war catches fire. Grocers will need to take profits from somewhere, and if consumers won’t pay at the finished-product end, farmers and processors could take a hit. Yet even through all this, there’s good news for fans of local food and farmers alike. Target has supply arrangements with Sobeys, which Charlebois describes as being among the most receptive of the grocery chains to local preferences. So even though a price war is likely, more opportunities could exist to put local food in front of grocery store shoppers year round. Imagine, a price war based on local food. It’s a long shot, because local food is not likely the kind retailers would discount. But given the ultra-competitive nature of the market, who knows? Local food opportunities will depend not just on availability, but also on price. Research influences both factors. Through research programs such as at the University of Guelph, sponsored by the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs, faculty come up with new technologies, techniques and varieties to help farmers be as efficient as possible. Because if costs are going up, so must profit. And in an era of small margins and major price wars, research is needed to help profitability grow.

THE OBSERVER

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR “A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Carpet Care

Rugs and Upholstery

•Mattress Cleaning •Residential •Commercial •Personalized Service •Free Estimates West Montrose, ON COLLEEN

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS • Design • Installation • Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

519.669.5105

P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

TOTAL HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

519.664.2008

SANYO CANADIAN

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

NANCY KOEBEL

>>MUSSELMAN, Perceda “Percy”- It is with heavy hearts

Home: 519.747.4388

>>WIDEMAN, Lucinda-

Died peacefully at her residence in Floradale on Tuesday, December 13, 2011, in her 91st year.

519-699-4641 www.freybc.com

DECEMBER 16

>>Meatloaf Dinner, $7. Royal Canadian Legion, 11 First St., Elmira. 6 p.m. DECEMBER 17

>>The

Waterloo Regional Police Male Chorus with special guests the Ceremonial Bank of the Waterloo Regional Police Service will perform “We Need a Little Christmas” at Grandview Baptist Church, 250 Old Chicopee Dr., Kitchener at 7:30 p.m. Proceeds from this year’s concert will go to the Waterloo Region Sexual Assault/ Domestic Violence Treatment Centre. Advance tickets $13 for adults and $7 for children and can be purchased from Choir Members. Tickets at the door $15. Tickets can also be ordered by calling the Chorus voice mail 519-208-9326.

>>R J Kruisselbrink Sisters in Concert 7:30 p.m. at Wallenstein Bible Chapel. Freewill offering. Proceeds International Needs – Ghana. For more information, call 519934-2608. >>Christmas in Bridgeport – An evening of Music to Celebrate the Birth Of Our Lord with Seborah Klassen. 7 p.m., Bridgeport United Church, 40 Bridge St. E Kitchener. Admission is free with a ticket. A free-will offering will be received. Tickets available by calling the church 519-745-0931. >>St. Clements Santa Claus Parade starting at 1 p.m. Ending at Lions Park, St. Clements for hot dogs, hot apple cider and a visit with Santa. All donations kindly accepted. For more information call Paul Hergott 519-699-5730. DECEMBER 18

>>Menno Singers invite the community to a Singalong Messiah at 3 :00pm at St Jacobs Mennonite Church 1310 King St. N, St Jacobs. Handel’s Messiah is of course the most well known musical telling of the Christmas story (part I), continuing with the rest of the story of Jesus (parts II and III). >> Simply bring a score (we will have some loaners on hand) and your sense of humour and adventure as we sing through some of the favourite Choruses and Arias with absolutely no rehearsal whatsoever. We will sit in voice parts, with room for an audience of those who simply want to listen. We will be joined by a small orchestra and soloists. The Singalong is a fundraiser, so we invite you to bring your donations (tax receipts for donations over $20). Come and sing the Christmas story!www.mennosingers.com info@ mennosingers.com. DECEMBER 20

December 13, 2011 at St. Mary’s Hospital, Kitchener, with his sisters by his side. Carl was born in Wellesley Township 66 years ago on January 28, 1945.

Bus: 519.895.2044 ext. 217 Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Suite 800, 101 Frederick St., Kitchener

Check Us Out Online!

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville

Cell: 519.581.7868

>>MARTIN, Elmer S. - On Tuesday, December 13, 2011 in his 87th year, at Countryview Retirement Home.

that we share the news of the loss of a very dear sister, sisterin-law, aunt and friend. Peacefully at Freeport Health Centre of Grand River Hospital on Monday, December 12, 2011, in her 80th year.

KIN KORNER

T. 519.669.2033

DEATH NOTICES

>>MOSER, Carl Jerome - Passed away peacefully on Tuesday,

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

Kleensweep

>>FARR,

Russell - Peacefully passed away on Thursday, December 8, 2011 at Freeport Health Centre of Grand River Hospital, at the age of 62 years, of Elmira

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

>>Tuesday Luncheon at Gale Presbyterian

Church, 2 Cross St, Elmira; 11 :30 a.m. – 1 p.m. Menu : turkey with dressing, mashed potatoes and gravy, turnip and peas,mince tart with ice cream, coffee or tea. $10.

DECEMBER 22

>>Weekly Bingo 7 p.m. at Elmira Lions Hall, 40 South St., Elmira. All proceeds go to support the many projects of the Lions Club of Elmira. For more information call 519-500-1434.

woolwichkin.com

DECEMBER 23

>>H.U.G.S. Program – 9:15-11:15 a.m. Meet with other parents to discuss parenting and child health issues. Topic: A visit from Santa! Christmas crafts and activities. Held at Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Drive, St. Jacobs. Call Heidi at 519-664-3794, ext. 237 for more information.

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess. Elmira & Surrounding Area

DECEMBER 31

>>New Year’s Eve Dance. Royal Canadian Legion, 11 First St., Elmira; $17.50/person, late night dinner. DJ – Sounds of Our Times.

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763 psgingrich@hotmail.ca

JANUARY 5

>>Weekly Bingo 7 p.m. at Elmira Lions Hall, 40 South St., Elmira. All proceeds go to support the many projects of the Lions Club of Elmira. For more information call 519-500-1434. >>Storytime for children ages 3 to 5 – at Linwood Branch Library of the Region of Waterloo Library. Join us for stories and fun activities on Thursday afternoons from Jan. 5 – Feb. 23 from 2-2:45 p.m. Call or visit the library for more information at 519-6982700.

21 INDUSTRIAL DR. ELMIRA

519-669-2884

JANUARY 8

>>Elmira Sugar Kings Hungryman’s Breakfast with the Elmira Legion Branch 469; 8:30 a.m. – 1 p.m., 11 First St., Elmira. JANUARY 10

>>Come Read With Me Family Storytime – 6:45-7:30 p.m. at Wellesley Branch Library. An evening family storytime program recommended for parents/caregivers and children 3 to 7 years old. Tuesday evenings from Jan. 10 – Feb. 28. Read, play games and learn about literacy in fun ways. For more information call the Wellesley Branch Library at 519-656-2001. >>Toddler Tales is for children 24 to 36 months old and a parent or caregiver and runs on Tuesdays 10:30-11:15 a.m. from Jan. 10 – Feb. 28. For more information call the Elmira Branch of Region of Waterloo Library at 519-669-5477. JANUARY 11

>>Toddler Tales is for children 24 to 36 months – at the Wellesley Branch of the Region of Waterloo Library, and is held on Wednesdays 9:30-10:15 a.m. from Jan. 11 to Feb. 29. For more information call the Wellesley Branch Library at 519-656-2001. JANUARY 12

>>Weekly Bingo 7 p.m. at Elmira Lions Hall, 40 South St., Elmira. All proceeds go to support the many projects of the Lions Club of Elmira. For more information call 519-500-1434. >>Storytime is for children 3 to 5 years old and will run on Wednesdays 2-2:45 p.m. from Jan. 11 to Feb. 29 and Thursdays from 10:15 to 11 a.m. from Jan. 12 – Mar. 1. For more information call the Elmira Branch of Region of Waterloo Library at 519-6695477.

CORPORATE WEAR PROMOTIONAL APPAREL WORK & SAFETY WEAR | BAGS T-SHIRTS | JACKETS | HATS

245 Labrador Drive | Waterloo

519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com

PRINTING & COPYING SERVICES Black and white, 8 1/2 X 11 flyers designed and printed for as low as 6¢. Professionally designed, quick turnaround, local service. Delivery, folding and colour work also available. Call 519.669.5790 ext 107 for details.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

Just how much money will buy happiness? Q.

A pressing question for these hard economic times: How much money do you need to be happy?

Strange But True

A.

That’s the wrong way to look at it, say happiness experts. While it’s true the wealthy are happier than the poor and wealthy countries are happier than poor ones, money actually buys little happiness, reports the University of California, Berkeley “Wellness Letter.” “That’s because people don’t spend it right,” according to a recent study in the Journal of Consumer Psychology. The authors offer tips on spending money with happiness in mind. 1. Buy more experiences -- vacations, adult-education classes, concert tickets -- and fewer material goods. Any pleasure from possessions quickly wears off. 2. Consider how purchases might affect your day-to-day life, aiming for more “uplifts” and fewer hassles.

PHOTOS

Second-place finish for Novices at Guelph Power Play tourney

Bill & Rich Sones

3. Buy many small pleasures rather than one large one, especially if money is limited. 4. Delay consumptions and prolong anticipations. Looking forward to an event is a great source of pleasure, even if the event ends up being a letdown. 5. Spend money on others. Giving money or gifts strengthens social bonds by amplifying the happiness of others, which in turn amplifies our own happiness.

>> Send STRANGE questions to brothers Bill and Rich at strangetrue@cs.com

Lancers fall short against Southwood UP AND AT IT EDSS’ Adam Brubacher drives to the net as he is surrounded by Southwood’s Austin Gordan (4) and Zack Sayer during high school basketball action Tuesday in Elmira. The visitors won 38-29. Inset: Lancer Angus Docherty takes aim as Sayer defends.

31 CLASSIFIEDS

RUNNERS UP The Woolwich Major Novice A team finished second in the Guelph Power Play Tournament Nov. 26-27. Back row: Derek Austin (assistant coach), Matt Roemer (head coach), Steve Martin (assistant coach), Kevin Schmitt (trainer). Third row: Spencer Young, Tyler Martin, Gavin Roemer, Jake McDonald, Brett Moser. Second row: Weston Bradley, Kyler Austin, Owen Lee, Alex Hutton, AJ Mitchell, Cole Slade, Nolan Steringa. Front: Brett Strohoff, Quinn Brown. Absent: Colton Schmitt. PHOTO

» SUBMITTED

Atom AE squad wins it all at Hockeyfest tourney in Oshawa

» COLIN DEWAR

TOP SPOT The Woolwich Wildcats Atom AE team participated in the Oshawa

M&T Business Card Ad:Layout 1 04/03/09 10:22 AM Page 1

Hockeyfest Tournament Dec. 9 -11 and came out on top as tournament champions. The championship game saw the Wildcats win by a score of 3-2 in overtime. Players include Zac Picakard, Hunter Weigel, Ryan Belanger, Matthew Steringa, Kieffer Beard, Ethan Young, Seth Morrison, Hunter Schmitt, Bryce Dettweiller, Jacob Clemmer, Ryan Belanger, Jackson Hale, Travis Weber, Ben Weigel. Coaches Dave Weiss and Kyle Young, trainer Gerald Morrison and manager Gerry Beard. PHOTO

» SUBMITTED


BACK PAGE 32

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, December 17, 2011

Spectacular TV. Spectacular offer. • Stunning HD picture quality • Watch what you want, when you want, with our HD PVR • On Demand movies in 1080p HD

19

95/MO.

FROM

BELL TV

$

For 12 months

1

$29.95 one-time activation fee applies. 2

FREE HD PVR

rental for 36 months.3 Choose to own it afterwards at no additional charge.

In a TV, Internet and Home phone bundle. All monthly fees included.

Available at the following Bell stores:

Kitchener Highland Hills Mall 519 744-7781

Guelph Clairfield’s Centre 519 826-0980

Waterloo Conestoga Mall 519 888-9615

Offer ends December 31, 2011. Available to residential customers in Ontario where access and line of sight permits. As of December 10, 2011, e-bill will be provided at no cost and paper bill will be available for $2/month. The paper bill fee will begin appearing on your next bill. Visit bell.ca/mybell to switch your monthly billing from paper bill to e-bill at no cost. Receivers may be new or refurbished at Bell’s choice. Where applicable, monthly prices include a fee of 1.5% to fund Bell’s contribution to the CRTC’s Local Programming Improvement Fund (LPIF); see bell.ca/LPIF. LPIF will be itemized separately on your Bell invoice. Subject to change without notice; not combinable with other offers. Taxes extra. Other conditions apply. (1) Available to new Bell TV customers who continuously subscribe to Bell TV, Internet and Home phone; see bell.ca/bundle. Promotional $19.95 monthly price: $38 monthly price, less the $5 Bundle discount, less $16.34 credit for months 1 to 12 (cannot be combined with International programming credit), plus the $3 digital service fee and $0.29 LPIF. Total monthly price after 12 months is $36.54. (2) For new subscribers. Installation fees may also apply; see bell.ca/installationincluded. (3) $0 rental of HD PVR based on $13.86 monthly rental fee, less a $13.86 monthly credit. All charges will appear on your monthly Bell TV invoice. Rental term is month to month. If you rent without default for 36 consecutive months, you may choose to take title to and own the receiver by notifying Bell TV within 30 days of making your 36th payment. If you choose not to take title to or to terminate rental of the receiver, you must return it to Bell TV within 30 days or pay the damages suffered by Bell. You may terminate your rental at any time without termination fees provided you return the receiver; however, early termination fees may apply to the programming portion of your account if you also terminate your programming. Receiver warranty up to 39 months.


December 17, 2011