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» Saturday, August 27, 2011 Join Elmira Golf Club today!

THE OBSERVER

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The family that wheels together > STORY ON PG. 15 VOLUME.....16 ISSUE..........34

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Stockyard lands eyed for offices Developer looking at building on vacant Weber Street site review of the stockyards lands could see Woolwich get a piece of the action as the area undergoes something of a boom in new office space. There’s already a proposal in place, and others are likely to follow if full municipal services are extended to lands surrounding the farmers’ market and King/86 power centre. Development would hinge on a secondary plan study planned for next year and reaching a crossborder servicing agreement with the City of Waterloo, which provides water and sanitary sewers to the area. A proposal that would see some 150,000 square feet of office space built on a vacant six-acre parcel at 865 Weber St. N., north of the TSC store, makes the

> SEE STOCKYARDS ON PG. 06

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Mayor enjoys sky-high view of the township Colin Dewar

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» COLIN DEWAR

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long-planned review more pressing, says the township’s manager of planning. John Scarfone noted the township has requested that Waterloo Region put on hold plans to reconstruct portions of Weber and King streets until the secondary plan is completed and a servicing agreement is reached with Waterloo, if needed. A comprehensive plan is preferred to a piecemeal approach, he added. Along with the planning review, the complete set of changes would require environmental assessments and new arrangements with the neighbouring city. Under the current agreement with Waterloo, full municipal services cannot be extended to the site of the proposed office build-

Mix of sun & clouds

t was no regular day at the office for Woolwich Mayor Todd Cowan, who jumped out of a plane last weekend during the Waterloo Air show as part of a tandem parachute jump with the Canadian Forces Parachute Team, the SkyHawks. “It was awesome and a lot fun,” said Cowan. “It was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity and chance to highlight Woolwich Township, the airport and the Waterloo Air show. I was thrilled and honoured to have a chance to join the SkyHawks.” Tandem parachuting refers to a form of skydiving where a guest skydiver

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NEWS 2

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

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Book aims to help children cope with loss through the story of Winterbourne family’s dog James Jackson

T

years ago in January while sleeping in her doghouse, the family’s decision to bury her along with her doghouse in the yard of their farm just west of Conestogo and to plant a maple tree over the grave the following fall – known as the Sadie Tree.

The book was written shortly after Sadie’s death, but was lost for nearly a decade in the family’s basement before Susan’s father, John, discovered it again. He has spent that time since fine-tuning the story and hiring different artists to help visualize the story with the help of some family portraits of the dog. He ultimately chose illustrator Brooke Rothshank from Pittsburgh, and presented the finished story to his daughter and granddaughter as a surprise last winter. He has also had help from Graf-Martin Communications Inc. in Elmira to market the book. “It took a lot of time, and you’re enthused for a while but then you hit a brick wall and get discouraged,” said John of trying to get the book into print, “but then things started to flow again.” Susan hopes that the book can become a tool to help children and adults cope with a death in their life – be it a pet, or a human – and is trying to get the book into as many local stores as possible. Brien Thurston of Pet Loss Canada has endorsed the book, which is available

at Farmers Plus in Elmira and Creature Comfort Pet Emporium in St. Jacobs, but Susan says she has also experienced some difficulty along the way, saying that one store told her they didn’t want to sell a sad children’s book. “It’s always been ‘it’s just a dog, get over it’ but it seems that more people are giving more credibility and importance to the feelings that people have for their pets, and how it is a real loss that we have to deal with,” she said. Emily, now 20 and entering her third year at the University of Guelph, said that she still has certain memories of Sadie, such as the dog walking her down the laneway to the bus then being there to walk back with her at the end of the school day. Even though Sadie was only about five years old when she died, John said the dog had a major impact on his life. “The relationship between a farmer and his dog is different than it is in town, because they become a part of the whole fabric of what the farm is all about,” he said. For more information on The Sadie Tree, visit www. sadietree.com.

he loss of a family pet can be a traumatic and difficult time for any family. A local woman has written a children’s book she hopes will help guide children and their families through the pain. The Sadie Tree, by St. Jacobs’s Susan Weber, documents the life and death of Sadie, her father’s Australian Shepherd, and the difficulty of her fouryear-old daughter Emily’s attempts to come to grips with the loss of the family farm dog. “Emily was so upset, I thought it was a good way for her, and all of us, to remember Sadie,” said Susan of why she decided to write the book. “There is a very special bond between a farmer and his dog, and the role that it plays in the lives of farm families.” The book explains WHERE IT ALL STARTED John, Susan and Emily Weber, standing beneath The Sadie Tree on John’s farm near Sadie’s death about 16 Conestogo, hope their book will help young and old alike cope with loss.

> Book of condolence at MP’s office Kitchener-Conestoga residents looking to mark the passing of NDP Leader Jack Layton can sign a book of condolence at MP Harold Albrecht’s constituency office. The book may be signed until Sept. 16 at 153 Country Hill Dr. in Kitchener. After this time it will be hand-delivered by Albrecht to Layton’s wife, Olivia Chow. In a release this week, Albrecht encouraged his constituents to add their condolences, saying, “I understand, that in a time like this, the knowledge that your pain is shared in some measure by others can be a powerful tool to provide healing. I know how caring our riding is. We will be there for Jack’s family.”

> And then there were seven Following the elimination round Aug. 21, seven performers will be moving on to the semi-finals of the Wellesley Idol competition. Ali Carroll of New Dundee; Regan Schneider of Wellesley; Taylor Pfaff of New Hamburg; Amy Rola from St. Agatha; Greg Rola of St. Agatha; Sarah Gingerich of New Hamburg and Ashley Jeffries from Wellesley will compete at the Wellesley fall fair Sept. 13. From there the top three will be chosen to compete at the Wellesley Apple Butter & Cheese Festival, as well as a “People’s Choice” voted on by the audience at the fair. The finals at the ABC Festival are scheduled for 2 p.m. Sept. 24 on the stage by the Wellesley Post Office. Cash prizes are awarded to the top three contestants, $500, $300 and $200 respectively. The people’s choice winner will receive $125. Twenty young people started the competition June 12 at the Wellesley Community Centre.

> Utilities want you to take the pledge

» JAMES JACKSON

Learning a lesson under The Sadie Tree

3 NEWS

PHOTO

THE OBSERVER

Waterloo Region’s three electrical utilities are encouraging residents to take the saveONenergy pledge whereby they agree to take action when it comes to conserving energy. Pledgers will earn 15 Air Miles reward miles in recognition of their commitment. The campaign recommends energysaving actions, including the use of saveONenergy coupons to purchase and energy-efficient products; shift ing electricity use during high-demand periods; and retiring old, energy-guzzling refrigerators and freezers for free.

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NEWS 4

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

LAW & ORDER

Elmira woman charged in pedestrian death Driver charged after head-on collision

>>6:30 PM | Police received

a call about a white Toyota Corolla driving along Northfield Drive near West Montrose swerving into the on coming lanes and travelling at speeds of 90 kilometres an hour. Police intercepted the car on Arthur Street and charged a 55-year-old Kitchener man with ‘impaired driving’ and ‘failure to provide a sample.’ Police are asking for any witnesses to contact the Elmira detachment.

>>11:20 PM | Police were

alerted to three young teens throwing and placing large rocks on Bridge Street near Bloomingdale Road. When police arrived on the scene they found concrete blocks the size of footballs on the road. The suspects fled into the bush. Police are continuing to investigate. Anyone with information about this occurrence is asked to contact the Elmira police station.

marijuana plants were found near a GRCA bush land off Lundy Road. Police seized the plants for destruction.

August 18

>>4:00 PM | A collision involving a 51-year-old man from Kitchener driving

>>2:00 PM | More than 1,100

PHOTOS

21-year-old Elmira woman has been charged with ‘careless driving’ in the death of a pedestrian east of Atwood last month. Becky Weber was driving along Road 158 July 17 when she hit North Perth residents Candice Grube, 20, and her 15-year-old sister Beverly, who were on there way to meet up with friends at the Listowel Fair. The older sister was pronounced dead at the scene, while Beverly Grube was taken to the hospital with non-life-threatening injures. Weber is scheduled to appear in a Stratford court Sept. 13.

» PAT MERLIHAN

A

August 17

TRAFFIC BACKED UP A collision involving a 2011 Jeep and 2005 Acura occurred on Arthur Street south of Elmira on Tuesday. Police closed the street to investigate the accident and charged the 18-year-old driver of the Jeep with ‘careless driving.’

a silver 2003 Nissan XGX and a 65-year-old man from Waterloo driving a black 2000 Ford F-150 occurred on Bridge Street near Bridgeport Road. The driver of the Ford was charged with ‘careless driving’ after rear-ending the Nissan. No injuries were reported and only moderate damages occurred to both vehicles.

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call about a man in a black car throwing rocks at the white Mennonite church on Church Street in Elmira. The male is described a white, late teens and wearing boxer shorts and no shirt. The investigation continues.

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had her wallet stolen while grocery shopping in New Hamburg. Police believe a male and female suspect were attempting distraction thefts at the store, as other shoppers reported being crowed by the pair. Police would like to remind the public to be vigilant while shopping and keep their valuables secure. The police have released security camera images of the two suspects and ask anyone with information contact Rural South Division or Crime Stoppers.

>>6:40 PM | Police received a

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August 20 >>11:30 AM | A collision occurred at Arthur Street and Sawmill Road. A 27-year-old Elmira man driving a 1997 Ford Mustang rear-ended a 2008 GMC pickup driven by a 57-year-old Dresden man who had stopped for traffic. No charges were laid at the time of the accident. There were no injures reported and only minor damages to both vehicles.

August 21 >>5:20 PM | A 22-year-old

man from Quebec was charged with ‘failure to yield’ after he drove his 2008 Honda into a 2000 Chrysler being driven by a 23-year-old Linwood man. The collision occurred at intersection of Sawmill Road and King Street North in St. Jacobs. No injuries were reported.

>>12:00 PM | An elderly woman

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Police are looking for help identifying a man and woman suspected of distraction thefts at a supermarket in New Hamburg. Anyone with information can contact police or Crime Stoppers.

from Hawkesville called police about a possible money fraud. The woman received a call from someone claiming to be her grandson who was in an accident in Montreal and needed $2,800. The woman did not recognize the voice of the male on the phone and declined to proceed.

>>5:20 PM | Police received a

call from a Maplewood Road resident about a sick or injured raccoon on their driveway. When police arrived they found the animal and dispatched it.

August 23 >>12:30 AM | A silver Ford

Fusion was broken into on Queensway Drive in St. Jacobs. The suspects took sunglasses and a wallet from the vehicle. Three youths were spotted in the area of the incident and are described as being in their mid-teens. Police would like to remind the public to keep their vehicles locked to stop thefts of opportunity.

>>5:20 PM | A collision

occurred on Arthur Street just south of Elmira. An 18-yearold man driving a 2011 Jeep had to swerve in an effort to avoid hitting a stopped vehicle and ended up in the oncoming traffic lane, subsequently striking a 2005 Acura headon. The driver of the Acura, a 56-year-old Elmira man, was taken to the hospital with nonlife-threatening injuries. The 18-year-old driver was charged with ‘careless driving.’ Speed and alcohol were not factors in the collision.

>>8:20 PM | Police were called

about a pickup truck that was travelling along Three Bridges Road when the driver, a 17-year-old male, lost control of the truck and ended up in a ditch and rolling over. The police suspect speed was an issue to cause the truck to slide along the gravel road. No injuries were reported but the pickup sustained major damages.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

5 NEWS

We’re still adjusting to a roundabout world Number of accidents climb, but collisions are much less severe James Jackson

T

he numbers are in, and they don’t look good … at least at first blush. Last week, the Region of Waterloo released a new report citing a 54 per cent rise in roundabout collisions last year, jumping to 131 in 2010 from 85 in 2009. According to the report the majority of the crashes were of the fender-bender variety and no serious injuries, with 11 of the region’s 15 roundabouts accounting for those 131 collisions. Regional staff has attributed this rise in crashes to an increase in traffic volume and inattentive drivers. The sharp rise in collisions last year seems to suggest that drivers just aren’t getting the message when it comes to navigating a roundabout safely, despite ongoing efforts to educate drivers. On the surface it might even be easy to suggest that traffic planners should do away with them and revert back to the traditional stop sign or signal light. These statistics don’t tell the whole story, though. Since 2004, when the first roundabout was

built in the region, their numbers have risen to 15 just seven years later. Planners expect roundabouts will continue to be an important part of roadway landscape in the area, despite the rise in collisions. To understand the region’s ongoing support of traffic roundabouts in the face of the growing number of collisions, it’s important to go beyond the crash statistics and look at how the region decides on where to install roundabouts, and why. Waterloo Region isn’t alone in its increased adoption of roundabouts; in 1999 there were some 100 roundabouts in North America, and now that number is estimated to be about 1,200. Roundabouts have been shown to improve traffic flows, there is less stopping and starting and idling which helps improve air quality, and roundabouts are able to push more traffic through an intersection when compared to other traffic signals, according to regional staff. “We just don’t throw darts at a map and say ‘here is where they will go’ – every location is

End of Summer

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evaluated,” said Bob Henderson, the region’s manager of transportation engineering, adding that under regional bylaws, whenever staff look at intersection improvements, roundabouts must be considered. Factors used in determining intersection controls include space constraints, current and future traffic volumes, collision history, pedestrian activity and cost. Every intersection in the region is evaluated based on a 20-year lifecycle plan to determine which type of traffic control measure is used, Henderson explained. “More or less, the moral of the story is we choose the most appropriate traffic control for every intersection.” When making that decision, the region must crunch the numbers carefully. The infrastructure alone for traffic lights – poles, signal heads, underground wiring – typically costs $100,000, but that doesn’t include any changes necessary to the intersection, such as building left or right turning lanes, which can push the costs up into the $500,000 range. Meanwhile, a typi-

AROUND WE GO A recent study by the Region of Waterloo suggests motorists are having a difficult time navigating the area’s 15 roundabouts, like this one in Woolwich Township at Sawmill Road and Arthur Street near St. Jacobs.

cal two-lane roundabout can cost about $1,000,000, Henderson noted. However, roundabouts tend to have fewer accidents than intersections controlled by traffic lights, and those collisions also tend to be much less serious. Henderson said that roundabouts can reduce the number of injuries in collisions by up to 75 per cent, and over 20 years, that is a lot of money saved. The reduction in accidents is attributed to slower speeds and a reduced number of conflict points – points at which vehicles or pedestrians may collide. “Transport Canada says that an injury col-

lision costs you, me and society $82,000. So if you have, on average, two injury collisions per year that’s $160,000 in societal costs,” he said. “Add that up over 20 years and you’ll find that if you can reduce injury collisions by 75 per cent, that is a significant cost saving.” The region doesn’t use Transport Canada’s $82,000 measurement, but a figure closer to about $30,000 to determine the costs associated with injuries in a collision, which means that there are actually fewer roundabouts in the region than there would be if they used the Transport Canada

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numbers. “We’re being conservative using that figure when we evaluate the merits of a roundabout at any given location.” In Woolwich Township, there is only one roundabout in operation – at the intersection of Sawmill Road and Arthur Street – and none in Wellesley, but there are discussions of possibly installing one at the troublesome Crowsfoot Corner, just west of Conestogo. Another roundabout was considered at the intersection of Northfield and Sawmill Road, but never came to fruition after the existing

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NEWS 6

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» Saturday, August 27, 2011

Stockyards: Township plans comprehensive review of land uses > CONTINUED FROM COVER ings. Any change for the one location would almost certainly bring a rush of requests from other landowners in a similar situation, said Scarfone. “The secondary plan would ultimately determine the planned function of the stockyards, as well as address other land-use, servicing transportation and environmental issues. “The secondary plan

would be a way to finally determine how the stockyards should develop and grow,” he said. Preliminary plans for the office development call for two four-storey buildings on the site. But the realtor representing the property owner, an investment group incorporated as 214638 Ontario Inc., said the configuration would be based on the tenants ultimately attracted to the site. That could mean

one, two or three buildings, said John Whitney, president of DTZ Barnicke in Waterloo, adding there’s a strong demand right now for office space. He sees good potential for Woolwich given its proximity to nearby development just across the border in Waterloo. The stockyards area has good transportation links with access to the expressway, King and Weber streets, as well

NOTICE OF INTENTION OF PASS AMENDMENTS TO THE TAXI-CAB METER BY-LAW AND TO THE LICENCE FEES AND CHARGES BY-LAW The Region of Waterloo intends to pass a by-law to amend By-law 04-069, A By-law to License, Regulate and Govern Brokers, Owners and Drivers of Taxi-Cabs Equipped with Taxi-cab Meters within The Regional Municipality of Waterloo, as well as a by-law to amend By-law 04-072, A By-law to Establish Licence Fees and Charges for The Regional Municipality of Waterloo. The proposed amendments would affect taxi fares charged by licensed taxi brokers in the Region of Waterloo, and fees for obtaining and renewing licences for taxi-cab drivers, owners and brokers. The proposed changes to the by-laws will be considered at a meeting of the Licensing and Retail Committee meeting scheduled for:

as bus service and the potential for light rail transit. “The stockyards are certainly on the radar screen now,” said Whitney, adding the recent move of Quarry Integrated Communications to St. Jacobs also put the township on the map. “It said to others that Woolwich is a good office location.” That’s a sentiment welcomed by Mayor Todd Cowan, who cam-

paigned last fall on attracting high-tech businesses into the township. He, too, sees considerable potential in the stockyards area. “This is just the kind of thing that was part of my election platform,” he said of the office building project. “I will be exploring ways to make it work.” Don’t expect to see construction imminently, however. The process will take time.

Scarfone said the secondary plan review is slated for next year. In requesting a delay on road reconstruction in the area – there’s no point ripping up the road before deciding if water and sewers will be extended to unserviced land – the township wants to see the work pushed back to 2015 from 2013 to allow planners time to formulate a comprehensive strategy.

ABOUT FACE

Monday, September 19, 2011 6:00 p.m. Regional Municipality of Waterloo Council Chamber, 2nd Floor, Administration Building 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener A copy of the report detailing proposed changes to the by-law will be available on Friday, September 9 at 4:30 p.m. on the Region of Waterloo website www.regionofwaterloo.ca under the ‘Regional Government’ tab, ‘Agenda & Minutes’, ‘Standing Committees’. Click on ‘Licensing and Retail Committee’. Following this meeting, the by-law will proceed to the Regional Council meeting to take place on Wednesday, October 5, 2011 at 7:00 p.m. for final approval. The by-law has been developed in accordance with the Municipal Act, as amended. If you have questions concerning the by-law, please contact Marty Sawdon, Administrator, Licensing and Enforcement Services directly at 519-575-4040. If you wish to speak at the meeting, please register as a delegation before noon on Thursday September 15, 2011 with the Region’s Council and Administrative Services Division at 519-575-4420. If you can’t attend the meeting and wish to make a written submission, please do so before noon on Thursday, September 15, 2011. Written submissions can be made via email regionalclerk@regionofwaterloo.ca or mailed to the address below: Kris Fletcher Director, Council and Administrative Services/Regional Clerk 2nd Floor, Administration Building 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener, ON N2G 4J3 519-575-4420 If you require accessible services to participate in this meeting, please contact the Council and Administrative Services office at least five days prior to the meeting. All comments and information received from individuals, stakeholder groups and agencies regarding this project are being collected to assist the Region of Waterloo in making a decision. Under the Municipal Act, personal information such as name, address, telephone number, and property location that may be included in a submission becomes part of the public record. Questions regarding the collection of this information should be referred to Marty Sawdon.

ANdREA HiEBERT Assistant Manager at New Orleans Pizza How long have you worked at New Orleans Pizza? I have been here for 4 years. What do you like best about working in Elmira? It’s close to home, I grew up here and the people in the

community are really friendly. What is your favorite pizza? I really like the grilled chicken club pizza. What is one thing people don’t know about you?

I have a huge movie collection. I have hundreds of movies. What is your favorite movie? I don’t think I have one. I really like action adventure movies.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

7 NEWS

Skydiving: Cowan makes tandem jump with Sky Hawks parachute team > CONTINUED FROM COVER

team travels around the world, participating in celebrations and parachute performances.

» SUBMITTED

highly professional, skilled, and experienced soldiers from the Canadian Forces. The

PHOTO

is attached to an instructor by a harness. The instructor guides the guest through the whole jump, from exiting the plane to freefall, piloting the parachute and landing. Attached to Chief Warrant Officer Trevor Lavellee, Cowan said he was not nervous about the jump, adding he’s more nervous before he gives a speech than jumping out of the plane. “A lot of it had to do with the fact that I was in the hands of the Canadian Forces: they know what they are doing. I had a good level of comfort there and I really didn’t have to do anything.” Two jumps were scheduled the morning of Cowan’s dive. The first was a practice run at 6,000 feet for a squad of SkyHawks who would perform during the air show on the weekend. The second, Cowan’s jump, took place at 12,500 feet. “It seemed almost surreal,” said Cowan. “It was almost like I was dreaming. We counted to three and we just jumped out of the back of the plane.” Cowan and Lavellee did a 6,000-foot freefall before deploying the chute. “We were traveling at 125 miles an hour,” said

The SkyHawks are celebrating their 40th anniversary this year and are comprised of

THUMBS UP Mayor

Todd Cowan and Chief Warrant Officer Trevor Lavellee of the SkyHawks execute a 6,000-foot freefall before deploying their parachute during a tandem jump.

Cowan. “There was surprisingly no sensation of falling. You just couldn’t hear anything during the freefall so we used hand signals for that part.” Cowan said once the chute was deployed everything became peaceful as he floated to the ground. Lavellee handed the controls of the chute over to Cowan so he could maneuver to the left or right and make turns and circles as they descended. “As you come down closer to the ground you could feel it getting warmer, it was quite cold when we first jumped out of the plane,” he explained. “When I was at about 1,000 feet I could see my family waiting for me at the drop zone.” A very nervous fam-

ily awaited Cowan on the ground. His wife, Joanne, and his children were quite tense waiting for Cowan to appear above them in the cloudless sky. “My wife was freaked out a little bit before the jump. Initially she wasn’t even going to show up but I convinced her that she needed to be there,” said Cowan. “It’s not like I was jumping out with the Smurfs or something, these are the SkyHawks.” “Once I landed and they saw that I was safe, I saw some huge smiles as they ran towards me to give me hugs.” The whole jump was filmed by a member of the SkyHawks team who stayed next to the mayor to photograph the experience.

Lions raise funds for Sunbeam Home van

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» COLIN DEWAR

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READY TO RIDE Rosie Steffan (left) and Shannon Frederick are two of the residents of the St. Jacobs Sunbeam Group Home who’ll benefit from the new mobility van that arrived on Aug. 19. The St. Jacobs Lions Club raised more than $10,000 towards the purchase of the wheelchair-accessible van.

15 First St. E., Elmira | 519-669-2833 | www.elmirabowl.com


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Air Time

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

» COLIN DEWAR

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THE OBSERVER

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THUNDEROUS The Waterloo Air show held at the Region of Waterloo International Airport over last weekend saw a lineup of performers from around the world. From top, The Canadian Forces Snowbirds perform; Liam Pratt, 7, covers his ears as a USAF F-16 flies over head; four Canadian Harvards stay in formation, and a CF-18 takes to the sky.

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Forces parachute team, the SkyHawks, removes his parachute after performing a stunt. Right, Captain Erick O’Connor from the CF-18 demonstration team signs autographs for children at the show.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

9 NEWS

Minister brings news of firefighter tax credit Gail Shea in St. Jacobs to discuss new budget measure to benefit volunteers and women give to our country and provide what is a very essential service,” said Shea. “Some of the men here

have over 50 years of dedication to the service, they are what make Canada, Canada, and we are extremely

proud of them. I just want them to know that their commitment and courage do not go unnoticed.”

NOTICE OF COMPLETION Biosolids Master Plan Update

RECOGNIZING THE CONTRIBUTION National Revenue Minister Gail Shea announces a

new tax credit for volunteer firefighter Monday at the St. Jacobs fire station, accompanied by KitchenerConestoga MP Harold Albrecht and Woolwich Mayor Todd Cowan.

Colin Dewar

T

he National Revenue Minister brought words of thanks and details of a new tax credit as she addressed a large group of volunteer firefighters Monday morning in St. Jacobs. Gail Shea was joined by Kitchener-Conestoga MP Harold Albrecht in announcing a new non-refundable Volunteer Firefighter Tax Credit. The tax credit, which was as part of the 2011 federal budget, will be available to volunteer firefighters who serve more than 200 hours of service for their communities through one or more fire departments. Any volunteer service that has been accumulated since January 1, 2011 counts towards the 200-hour total. Eligible services include responding to and being on call, attending meetings held by departments, and taking courses in prevention

and suppression of fires. There are approximately 85,000 volunteer firefighters in Canada. In Woolwich, there are 140 volunteers who serve in five stations. “Our townships and any of the smaller communities in our area wouldn’t be able to support full-time firefighters, it’s just not fiscally possible, so now it’s just fantastic to have the availability of the volunteers who are eager to serve and this is just one way of giving them some recognition and the sacrifices they make,” said Albrecht. For 2011, the credit is 15 per cent, which is the lowest personal income tax rate multiplied by $3,000, for a reduction of taxes payable of up to $450. “We appreciate the recognition we are receiving through the volunteer firefighters tax credit, this is big step for our volunteer firefighter service in

retention and recruiting new volunteers across the nation,” said Woolwich Township fire chief Rick Pedersen. Currently only 10 of the 140 volunteer firefighters from Woolwich will qualify for the credit. “Volunteer firefighting is one of those tasks that no one does for the money. From a townships view we are always looking for ways to retain the volunteers and this is just one more step,” said Woolwich Township Mayor Todd Cowan, who attended the event. To date there are more volunteer firefighters than paid ones in Canada. “More often than not volunteer firefighters are the first on the scene, and I can tell you that is very much appreciated by those people who need that service. This is recognition of all the volunteerism that these men

Roundabout: Education needed > CONTINUED FROM PG. 05 light was deemed appropriate for the area. With roundabouts becoming much more common, the region has taken driver education seriously and implemented programs to try and reduce the number of collisions at these intersections. Since 2004, the regional budget has allocated $50,000 to educational materials and

programs, including television and radio ads, but for 2011 Henderson said he tripled that figure to $150,000, including a series of television spots featuring the Kitchener Rangers called “Practice Makes Perfect.” “I challenge anyone to find a more comprehensive education plan that what we have,” he said. “I would say that we have the most comprehensive plan in

North America.” For now, he urges drivers to take their time when approaching roundabouts and be patient with other drivers until everyone becomes more comfortable with navigating roundabouts safely. For more information on roundabouts in the region, visit their website at www.regionofwaterloo.ca and click on the Getting Around tab.

The Region has updated the 2003 Biosolids Master Plan in light of recent growth in the Region, changes to the regulatory environment, climate change, and adoption of the Region’s new Environmental Sustainability Strategy. The objectives of the Biosolids Master Plan Update were to help the Region assess the status of its biosolids treatment, management, and disposal facilities; and reconfirm or develop a preferred biosolids management strategy, to the year 2041, that is environmentally sustainable, economically viable, and that can be maintained over the long term. The Region of Waterloo has prepared the Master Plan following Phases 1 and 2 of the Municipal Class Environmental Assessment. Based on the study findings and input from the technical agencies, the public, and stakeholder groups, the recommended Biosolids Management strategy includes the following components: - Construction of a heat drying facility to process the Region’s dewatered biosolids to meet the requirements for a Class A biosolids product that can be land applied, marketed as a fertilizer, or used as renewable fuel; - Upgrades to the aerobic digestion system at the Ayr Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) to produce Class A biosolids that can be land applied or marketed as a fertilizer. The Ayr WWTP will process biosolids from Ayr, New Hamburg and Hespeler WWTPs; and - Implementation of Cogeneration/Combined Heat Power (CHP) facilities at the Waterloo, Kitchener, and Galt WWTPs to generate heat/electricity from WWTP biogas. The recommended Master Plan incorporates the comments received from the public and agencies during the course of the study. While the Master Plan addresses need and justification at a broad level, more detailed studies for a number of the projects included in the Master Plan will be done at a later date following the Municipal Class EA process. The Master Plan is available for review at the following website or at the locations indicated below between August 29, 2011 and September 27, 2011: http://www.regionofwaterloo.ca/en/aboutTheEnvironment/biosolidsmasterplan.asp Region of Waterloo Clerk’s Office 150 Frederick Street 2nd Floor Kitchener, ON N2G 4J3

City of Waterloo 100 Regina Street South Waterloo, ON N2J 4A8

City of Cambridge 50 Dickson Street Cambridge, ON N1R 5W8

Township of North Dumfries 1171 Greenfield Road, RR#4 Cambridge, ON N1R 5S5

Township of Wellesley 4639 Lobsinger Line RR#1 St. Clements, ON N0B 2M0

Township of Wilmot 60 Snyder’s Road West Baden, ON N3A 1A1

Township of Woolwich 24 Church Street West Elmira, ON N3B 2Z6 For additional information, please contact: José Bicudo Senior Project Engineer, Water Services Region of Waterloo 150 Frederick Street, 7th Floor Kitchener, ON N2G 4J3 Phone: 519-575-4757, X3416 Fax: 519-575-4452 E-mail: JBicudo@regionofwaterloo.ca

Tom Mahood, P.Eng. Project Manager CH2M HILL 72 Victoria Street South, Suite 300 Kitchener, ON N2G 4Y9 Phone: 519-579-3500 Fax: 519-579-8986 E-mail: tom.mahood@ch2m.com

Please forward any comments to the study contacts by September 27, 2011. This notice issued August 26, 2011. All comments and information received from individuals, stakeholder groups and agencies regarding this project are being collected to assist the Region of Waterloo in making a decision. Under the Municipal Act, personal information such as name, address, telephone number, and property location that may be included in a submission becomes part of the public record. Questions regarding the collection of this information should be referred to José Bicudo.


OPINION 10

THE OBSERVER

OPINION

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

So, if Bio-En is out of the question, coal plant in Elmira anyone? Douglas Draper letter on page 12

VERBATIM

I

think this sends a strong message to the federal government that their unethical and shameful behaviour will not be tolerated by the physicians of Canada.

> Dr. Barry Turchen, speaking at a Canadian Medical Association conference, calls out the Harper government for its support of asbestos exports

THE MONITOR

P

ublic transit users were more likely than car commuters to be dissatisfied with their commuting times (23% versus 18%). This was primarily because it takes them longer on average to get to work.

> Statistics Canada

EDITORIAL

Canadians still far from sold on public transit

A

new study that shows the overwhelming majority of commuters avoid public transit is not good news for proponents of a light rail system in Waterloo Region. If commuters stay away from transit in cities where traffic is heavier and the transit system more robust than what’s in store here, odds are that’s exactly what will happen in the region, which is very much carcentric. Released this week by Statistics Canada, the survey shows 82 per cent of commuters travelled to work by car in 2010, while 12 per cent took public transit and six per cent walked or bicycled. Those using transit had roughly twice the commute time, and were far more likely to be dissatisfied with their trips to and from work. Canadian commuters took an average of 26 minutes to travel to work

on a typical day in 2010, including all modes of transportation. The average commuting time was longest in the country’s six largest communities, each of which has a population of more than one million. Commuters in these metropolitan areas spent 30 minutes on average getting to work. Those in mid-sized metropolitan areas of between 250,000 and fewer than 1 million people, such as Waterloo Region, took 25 minutes. Commuters who used public transit took considerably longer to get to work than those who lived an equivalent distance from their place of work and went by car, the study says. Nationally, users of public transit spent 44 minutes travelling to work, compared with 24 minutes for those who went by car. (Commuting times are door-to-door. Times for public

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> LETTER POLICY

transit are generally longer because its use can involve walking to a transit stop and waiting for a bus.) In the six largest metropolitan areas, the average commuting time was 44 minutes for public transit users and 27 minutes by car. The gap in average commuting time was slightly larger in mid-sized metropolitan areas: 46 minutes on public transit and 23 minutes by car. The survey found most commuters shunned public transit because of the inconvenience. “Of the 10.6 million workers who commuted by car, about nine million reported that they had never used public transit for their commute. About 7.4 million of these people thought public transit would be somewhat or very inconvenient,” the general social survey found. “About 1.6 million car commuters, or 15 per cent of the total, said they

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had tried using public transit to get to work. A slight majority of them (53 per cent) considered it inconvenient.” Increasing the percentage of commuters using transit – the key goal, as those without cars are in essence forced to use the service – would require major improvements, even in communities with more comprehensive systems. Transit is typically slower, more expensive and less convenient. Add in poor public perception, including safety concerns and lack of personal space, and the task becomes even more insurmountable. The investment needed to reduce wait times to minutes, ensure reliability, eliminate overcrowding and boost cleanliness would dwarf the money spent today. A reality that needs to be considered before undertaking the rapid-transit plan under consideration in the region.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

Putting the theory of non-violence to the test

“B

rother Colonel” Muammar Gaddafi’s time is up: the rebels are now in the heart of Libya’s capital, Tripoli. But Libya has seen six months of fighting, at least a thousand deaths, and foreign military intervention in support of the rebels. This is not the kind of nonviolent revolution that we have come to expect in the 21st century. Are the rules changing again? From Lisbon in 1974 to Manila in 1986, East Berlin in 1989, Moscow in 1991, Jakarta in 1995, Belgrade in 2000, and Cairo early this year, popular revolutions using nonviolent tactics have driven dictators from power. Violent revolutions have been commonplace for more than two centuries now, but the great discovery of our own era has been how to make the dictators quit without shedding blood. The success of the early nonviolent revolutions was a surprise to almost everybody, including those who led them, but as time passed and the list of successes lengthened we grew to think of them as normal. Now, in Libya, we seem to have a throwback to an earlier time. It’s a good thing that Gaddafi is finished, but nobody can claim that this is a success for nonviolence. What lessons should we draw from this, especially at a time when several other attempts to use nonviolent techniques to bring about a democratic revolution, notably in Yemen and Syria, are struggling to survive? Are there places where these techniques simply won’t work? Nonviolent revolutions can succeed when the great majority of people in a country share the same basic identity. If we all belong to the same society, then it is an act of great moral import for its members to kill one another, or for the rulers to kill the citizens. So long as the

THE VIEW FROM HERE

International Affairs GWYNNE DYER rebels do not resort to force, it is surprisingly difficult for even a cruel and repressive regime to start using lethal force against peaceful protesters. We had a vivid demonstration of this in the Egyptian revolution early this year, when the protesters in Tahrir Square in Cairo and elsewhere defied Hosni Mubarak’s regime. He did kill some of them, but he did not dare to use the police or the army. The killing in Cairo was done by plain-clothes thugs, mostly at night, because Mubarak simply could not openly repudiate his duty not to kill his fellow-citizens. The Egyptian revolution triumphed when the army publicly announced that it would never use force against civilians, and Mubarak and his close associates are now on trial for murder. But Bashir al-Assad clings to power in Syria and uses the army openly to kill the protesters there. Yemen is even messier, and in Libya it took six months of war (and foreign military intervention) to get Gaddafi out. What’s the problem? Nonviolence works much less well in countries whose populations are deeply divided by language, religion, or ethnicity, since it depends heavily on people having a shared identity. Syria, for example, has a Kurdish-speaking minority, and even the Arabic-speaking majority is divided into Sunni Muslims, Shia Muslims (including the Alawite minority who dominate the regime), Christians and Druze.

Yemenis all speak Arabic, but their society is divided into Shias and Sunnis and riven by tribal rivalries of long-standing and great complexity. Libya is homogeneous in language and religion and much more prosperous than Syria or Yemen (thanks almost entirely to oil), but it is not a fully unified society despite all that. It’s an urbanized, seemingly modern country, but for a great many Libyans, tribal loyalties come first. So the revolution in Libya was violent from the start. In Syria, the protests began nonviolently and have largely remained so, but the regime has not felt constrained to avoid the use of force and some 2,000 civilians have been killed. In Yemen the students who launched the protest movement were trying to emulate Egypt’s nonviolent democratic revolution, but they have been sidelined by powerful tribal rivalries. This is regrettable, but it is not actually surprising. Nonviolence works best in fairly cohesive societies, which is not what we are dealing with here. And yet ... The remarkable thing in Libya is not that the revolution has been violent, but that the revolutionaries have worked so hard to keep the tribalism from taking over. What they are aiming for, quite explicitly, is a Libyan society that is not only democratic but post-tribal. If the fall of Tripoli is not too bloody, they stand a reasonable chance of creating it. The remarkable thing about Syria is that after five months of official killing, the protesters are still avoiding violence, and are also resisting the regime’s attempts to play on sectarian and ethnic divisions. Even more remarkably, Yemen has not toppled into

11 OPINION

THE VOICE

What was your first reaction when you heard Jack Layton had died?

“I didn’t know a whole lot about him, or politics, but it’s sad whenever anyone dies.” > Landon Hall

“Sad.”

> Larry Moss

> SEE DYER ON PG. 12 BY SCOTT ARNOLD

“It was a sad day. They had just won the Opposition and it was hard to see him fade away, but hopefully his legacy can carry on through the NDP.” > Chad Nicholls

With earthquake tremors felt in the area, Woolwich ponders taking advantage of all the demolition projects underway in the township.

“I was surprised. I thought he had gotten over the worst of it.” > Carolyn Shoemaker


OPINION 12

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

Reaction to Layton’s death indicates we lack leaders I

s Jack Layton’s death a national tragedy? Perhaps not, but the public reacted to his death in a way that’s unthinkable with any of the other politicians currently sitting in Ottawa. Politics aside, he seemed like a nice guy. The party leader we’d most like to have sitting down with us at the kitchen table. A straight-talking politician who really seemed to have the average Canadian’s interests at heart. The way he carried himself through last spring’s election campaign, retaining the Smilin’ Jack moniker through his battle with prostate cancer and a broken hip, endeared him to many voters. Here was a fighter, someone with a cause and the drive to see it through. That Jack Layton went on to become the first NDP leader to claim a place in Stornoway, the residence of the Leader of the Official Opposition. That image of Layton made it all the more shocking over the last few weeks to see a man clearly in failing health. A rapid decline and his death on Monday morning led to a public outpouring well beyond what you would expect from someone who had been in the national spotlight a relatively short time. Layton was well known in To-

From the Editor Steve Kannon ronto, of course, where he served on municipal councils for years beginning in 1982. Along with his wife Olivia Chow, who would later also join Toronto council and, then, the federal NDP caucus, he was a highly visible social activist in the city. His reputation, outspokenness and personable style earned him a considerable amount of attention when he won the NDP leadership in January 2003, despite the fourthparty standing. Minority governments in 2004, 2006 and 2008 gave Layton a stage, keeping his policies front and center. It was the big breakthrough in May, however, that caught the public’s attention. Winning 103 seats in an election that saw both the Liberals and Bloc Quebecois take significant hits, the NDP surged largely on the strength of its leader, somebody many of us could relate to. His passing puts the party in a difficult position, though given the Conservative majority it has four

years before going back to the polls. The party’s new challenge is to find someone the public can believe in, someone who can advance policies that favour average Canadians despite the constant attack from the right and other corporate interests. While the party has moved towards the centre over the decades, it still faces many hurdles. It now has to undergo much of the same soulsearching and identity crisis the Liberals face. Layton’s untimely death at age 61 lays bare the dilemma of relying on the leader to shape the public’s perception of the party. In the last election, he was certainly the most affable and charismatic leader. Polls showed he was the most trusted. Jack Layton was the party, for all intents and purposes. Completely different, of course, than the closed rule of the leader-first approach of the Harper government, but still enough of a problem to have pundits questioning the fate of the NDP. Replacing Layton will be difficult. Truly likeable politicians are in short supply. As are those with a vision, and the ability to put the public interest ahead of self-interest. Jack Layton projected that image, which endeared him to people in numbers that went well beyond tra-

ditional support for the NDP. That’s what made his final words, carefully crafted as he knew the battle with cancer was lost, feel genuine rather than contrived. “Canada is a great country, one of the hopes of the world. We can be a better one – a country of greater equality, justice, and opportunity. We can build a prosperous economy and a society that shares its benefits more fairly. We can look after our seniors. We can offer better futures for our children. We can do our part to save the world’s environment. We can restore our good name in the world,” he wrote, closing with, “My friends, love is better than anger. Hope is better than fear. Optimism is better than despair. So let us be loving, hopeful and optimistic. And we’ll change the world.” Grand words, in keeping with the situation. But a political sentiment we hear less of these days, to our loss. Oh, platitudes abound, but rare is the politician who rises above the managerial these days – and even at that diminished level, we’ve had poor representation, as fiscal mismanagement is the rule these days in Ottawa. If nothing else, Jack Layton’s death and parting words should prompt us to aim higher.

energy.” It doesn’t matter that any environmental benefit will be more than wiped out by trucking the waste. Tell the provincial government this is a bad idea; people live in this town.

a power plant closer to home. The signs on rural roads around local townships say that people aren’t too keen on wind power. The Japanese earthquake and tsunami has not helped the much maligned nuclear power industry. Except for places where there is already a waterfall, building a dam for electricity causes ecological devastation. Plants powered by oil or natural gas compete with our cars and our homes respectively for fuel, driving up the price. The conditions for tidal and geothermal electricity only occur in certain places and solar, as everyone knows, only works when the sun is shining. So, if Bio-En is out of the question, coal plant in Elmira anyone?

LETTER

Hudak’s stance is contradictory To the Editor,  So Tim Hudak admitted that he smoked a bit of recreational weed as a young man. This is hardly a revelation. At the same time however he states that he does not support the decriminalization of the possession of small amounts of marijuana. I wonder if he has ever stopped to consider how different his life would be today if he had been caught as a youth and convicted under the law he supports. He certainly wouldn’t be taking a run at the premiership of this province. It seems that the law is fine as it is as long as you or your children don’t fall foul of it.

> Paul Marrow, Winterbourne

Biogas plant has too many negatives To the Editor,  My child attended Riverside Public School. I served on the PTA and volunteered for years, and found it a wonderful community. But I feel sorry for the children who will go there in future if the Bio-En facility is built two minutes away from the school. So much of elementary school life is lived out of doors: recess, phys-ed, track and field, jump rope for heart, fun fairs, Hallowe’en parades ... The proposed Bio-En facility is a stone’s throw from Riverside Public

School. Google maps calculates the distance as 750 metres, or two minutes away. And that’s measuring from the street address at the front; the schoolyard in back is closer still. If this biogas facility is built here, it will impact on the staff, parents and children. As for the residential neighborhood in which the school is located, I live twice as far away, but there are days I smell the adjacent pet food plant. The proposed Bio-En site is half that distance to Bolender Park, a green space that is the traditional site of the town’s annual Easter egg hunt, school picnics and family outings. And, of course, the Kissing Bridge Trail runs right beside the Proposed Bio-En site. I think this facility will negatively impact on the quality of life for all the people who live and work in the town of Elmira. And it will devastate the local economy. They say the odour will be contained. Yet the waste material will be trucked through town in open tarpaulin topped trailers, past the high school attended by students from all over Woolwich Township. At the plant, it will be unloaded, disturbing waste material and releasing mold and compost odours begun in transit. The dramatic increase in truck traffic through the town of Elmira will risks health and safety at the same time it breaks down the roads. Even though Woolwich council stands in opposition to the project, the authority rests with the Ministry of the Environment, since the biogas project is supposed to generate “green

> Laurie Jonkman, Elmira

Biogas oppontents take wrong tack To the Editor,  Opponents of the Bio-En project seem to be doing a fine imitation of chicken little. The limit is 80 trucks per day but never mind that, there is going to be 160 trucks each day, every day. An average of one more truck per hour of the workday will single-handedly decimate our pavement and intensify Elmira’s rush hour. Move over gasoline, propane, acid and molten sulfur, manure is the most hazardous material being transported on our roads. No longer will children be able to illegally jaywalk in safety. Never mind that the facility recycles biological waste into useful materials, it’s a dump because our signs say so. For some reason, according to a concerned 10-year-old that may or may not have a parent against Bio-En looking over their shoulder while writing, our taxes will go up and it will be solely BioEn’s fault. Seriously though, as our population grows we need more power, because electricity is lost the further it travels, sooner or later we will need

> Douglas Draper, Elmira

Dyer: All the easy targets are gone > CONTINUED FROM PG. 11 full civil war, and the students who started the pro-democracy protests are still there, camped in the centre of the capital. Nonviolence has mostly run out of easy societies to transform, which is a measure of how successful it has been in the past 40 years. But even in the most divided societies it has a role to play, and people who are willing to risk their lives to make it work. This story still has some distance to run.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

13 BUSINESS

BUSINESS

PHOTO

» JAMES JACKSON

Gotta stay sharp New venture is just the thing for a hockey-mad place like Elmira, says owner of The Sharp Shop He says that in a hockeymad town like Elmira, it was t’s that time of year again. a perfect fit. The Wellesley Applejacks “We’ve always had a pasand the Elmira Sugar Kings sion for it, my wife and I both have both opened their train- play,” said Shaus, whose wife ing camps, OHL training Stephanie is the sister of forcamps also opened this week, mer NHLer Jamie Wright, and in the coming days and who spent last season playing weeks tryouts will begin in the Swiss league. for rep-level hockey clubs “He’s probably one of the throughout the townships. main reasons that we have Yes, hockey is back, and such a passion for it, he drew for many players that might us to that for sure,” he added. mean digging out the equipThe emphasis at The Sharp ment from the basement and Shop will be on skate sharpmaybe asking for a new stick ening and selling tarps used or set of shoulder pads. One to help build outdoor ice of the most important pieces rinks, another winter hobby of equipment that shouldn’t of Schaus for his 11-year-old be overlooked, however, is twin children, Teegan and a players skates, and good Cade, who both play rep hockcare of those skates includes ey in Woolwich. making sure they’re properly He will also sell hockey sharpened – something Marv memorabilia and collectSchaus knows well. ibles such as posters, t-shirts, On Sept. 5, Schaus will be mouth guards, water bottles opening his second business, and mini-sticks – a personal The Sharp Shop, to take care favourite of his kids. of that very problem. After “When they went to John spending the past eight years Mahood for school, at lunch sharpening blades for his they had a mini-stick league, friends and family, “I’m going so that’s where we got the to start charging for it now,” idea for the mini-sticks from,” he laughed. he laughed, noting that alLocated at 112-D Bonnie though the sticks and water Cres. in Elmira, the shop – bottles might appeal more to which shares space with his the younger crowd, players other company, Gro-Pro Land- of any age are welcome to get scaping – is a seasonal endea- their skates sharpened at his M&T Business Card Ad:Layout 1 04/03/09 10:22 AM Page 1 vour that he hopes to fill his shop. slower winter months with. Aside from helping to fill

James Jackson

I

MAINTAINING HIS EDGE Identifying a need in the community, Marv Schaus is set to launch The Sharp Shop, which offers skate sharpening and a variety of hockey-related items. The store opens Sept. 5 in Elmira.

their slower hours during the winter months, Schaus hopes that his two kids will take an interest in the store as they grow up, and that it will provide a good place for them to work in the coming years. His three employees with GroPro could pick up some hours here and there by working in the store during the slower months. He intentionally does not carry hockey sticks, helmets or other sporting equipment

because he said he did not want to create any competition for other companies in town who rely on those sales to stay in business. “We just wanted to have something that we could do for about eight months of the year when we’re a little slower.” One unique aspect of the store is his plan to include a drop-box for skates. Customers can drop them off in the evening, and pick them up the

next morning, sharpened and ready to go, he said. “I’ve seen it at a few other arenas and I thought that it was a great idea. I’ll have a foam pad at the bottom of the drop-box so they don’t have to worry about damaging their skates.” Despite having the experience of running his own business for the past 25 years, Schaus admits that there is

> SEE SHARP ON PG. 14


BUSINESS 14

THE OBSERVER

Strength and hope starts with hunger relief W

hen human disaster such as the unrelenting famine in the Horn of Africa hits, aid is the immediate answer. More than 12 million people are starving and need our support to secure food, medicine, shelter and water. Those who have witnessed the devastation first-hand, such as University of Guelph president Alastair Summerlee, plead for help on behalf of those who have no voice. And in Canada, those pleas are being heard – the Canadian government is now matching every relief dollar raised through donations to the Canadian Red Cross, and 10 financial institutions in Canada are accepting cash donations in support of that cause. Farmers too help alleviate hunger, in many ways. Next month, Ontario farmers will jump on 100 combines to try harvesting 160 acres of soybeans in world record time – that is, under 10 minutes – through an initiative called Harvest for Hunger. It’s a fundraiser for the Canadian Foodgrains Bank, a partnership of 15 churches and church agencies working together to battle global hunger. With support from Syngenta Canada, they’re trying to raise $200,000 for global hunger relief projects through Harvest for Hunger. Feeding hungry people has a longer-term component, too, that involves helping people help themselves. It’s an approach being taken by, among others, several Rotary clubs in Ontario, including those in

Food For Thought Owen Roberts Guelph-Wellington, Grey-Bruce and beyond. Their efforts are going towards helping farmers and villagers secure clean water sources in what is hoped will become the breadbasket of eastern Africa, Cameroon. Rotarians see things in much the same way as former UN special envoy Stephen Lewis. He long maintained that food production was a key to fight HIV/AIDS and manage disease. Food gives people strength, and healthy people who are properly nourished are better at fighting disease than those who are weak to begin with. Food production requires land and water availability. In Cameroon, water is bountiful during the rainy season. Long-time Rotarian and former U of G rural extension professor Ab Moore, who visited Cameroon many times, recalls seeing water streaming down tall hills there. But it was never retained for the dry season. No infrastructure was in place to harvest it and hold it. As a result, members of the family who were responsible for gathering water (women, usually) had to walk for hours to try to find a water source.

scholarships to poor families to send their daughters to school. Moore says it’s become a popular program in communities, where mothers – who are typically the principal labourers – want to see their daughters’ lot in life improved. Then finally, once people are healthy and productive, they can look towards feeding others. To that end, Rotary is supporting a pilot project that will ply a food distributor in east central Africa with ground, processed cassava from Cameroon. Rotary pays for the grinding mills for the cassava, so it doesn’t have to be done by hand. “Cameroon stands to become the breadbasket of east central Africa,” says Moore. “We can help them move forward.” And in doing so, Canadians can take one step towards feeding the hungry world.

Sharp: What the public wants > CONTINUED FROM PG. 13 always some apprehension when setting out on something new. Aside from the hefty financial investment, he said there is always the worry that customers won’t like what he offers. “[You] are just hoping that you’re picking things that people are actually going to like, and making sure that the themes are good ideas,” he said. Yet in a town like Elmira – which

boasted two OMHA titles last season, the Ontario Junior B champion Elmira Sugar Kings and numerous professional hockey players – chances are any business related to the sport is a pretty safe bet. Following the Sept. 5 opening, The Sharp Shop will be in operation Monday to Friday, 12-6 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday 12-3 p.m., as well as the 24-hour drop box for skates.

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And then, inevitably it would be contaminated. Moore says an estimated 20 per cent of the children living in rural Cameroon chronically suffer from cholera, from drinking unfit water. To help, Rotarians are providing money for projects that direct and hold the rainy season run-off. That means paying for plastic pipe, plumbing and water storage devices that the local people couldn’t make or otherwise afford. Rotarians provide the materials, and through local nongovernment organizations, Cameroonians provide the labour to construct it, as well as the indigenous sand and gravel to secure it. When children are healthy, they can attend school. But in Cameroonian society, boys get preferential treatment when it comes to education. So some Rotarians are also providing

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

A Mennonite financial cooperative serving communities of faith across Ontario

The Family Violence Prevention Program would like to thank the following businesses and individuals for supporting the Jeanne Renault Golf Classic. SPONSORS:

Eldale Machine & Tool Ltd. Elmira Independent Elmira Insurance Brokers Limited Exigent Solutions Frey Building Contractors Frey’s Plumbing Works Inc. Haney, Haney, and Kendall Home Hardware Stores Ltd. Josslin Insurance Broker’s Limited

M&G Millwrights Limited Martin’s Tax Service North Waterloo Veterinary Hospital PIB Elmira Plein Disposal RBC Elmira Robert Cooke Trucking Inc. Royal LePage Elmira Real Estate

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Earlidale Meats East Side Mario’s King Street East Side Mario’s Gateway Park Edelweiss Tavern Elmira Stove Works Elmira Theatre & Co. Ennio’s Waterloo Erban Corner ESM Farm Equipment Ltd. Fergus Fireplaces Fidelity First Choice Haircutters Laurelwood Fitness 360º for women Floral Fusion Fore U Enterprises Frank Cooper Fred Astaire Dance Studios Frenzi Hair & Spa Waterloo Frey's Flowers Golf North Golf Steak House Goodlife Fitness Weber Great Canadian Tours/ Casino Express Guelph Gryphons Harvest Moon Restaurant Heffner Toyota Hergott's Flower Shoppe Home Sweet Home Jack’s Family Restaurant Jeremy Tracey Fairles Benefits Karen Wilson Interior Design Inc. Kiddie Kobbler Waterloo King Crab Oyster Bar & Grill

King Street Trio Kings Buffet Kitchener kw health connection Le Kadia Spa Magic Mountain St. Jacobs Marble Slab Creamery Gateway Park Marbles Marilyn Hartwick Mark's Work Wearhouse Erb Street Max's Golf Centre Merry Hill Golf Club Miller Thomson New Orleans Pizza St. Clements ohm healing massage Old Heidelberg Restaurant Tavern & Motel Ossia Salon and Spa Perfect Touch Pike Lake Golf Centre Plein Disposal Power-Up Quality Coatings RareFunk Red Coral St. Jacobs Reichard's Research In Motion Rogers Kitchener Radio Group Romeo Salon Spa Aveda Royal Doulton St. Jacobs Ryan Arts and Fine Crafts Sampson’s Clothing Outlet St. Jacobs Scotia Bank Laurelwood Scotia Bank St. Jacobs

Advance Millwrights Inc. BridgelandTerminals Limited Carlson Wagonlit Travel CHYM FM Crawford & Company (Canada) Inc. Decortile Limited Double R Automotive Dub-L-E-Auto Service Ltd. 20/20 Vision Clinic A Perfect Fit Allen Zink AM 740 Anytime Fitness Laurentian Plaza Baby Charlotte Bast Tire and Auto Service Belgian Nursery Big Al’s Kitchener Bikram Yoga BJD Water Systems Ltd. BMO King and Hickory Bobby O’Briens Kitchener Bonnie Lu's Boston Pizza King Street Boston Pizza Gateway Park Boston Pizza Ottawa Street Breslau Art and Glass Channer's Check Mate Chip's Garage CIBC King Street CIBC Ira Needles and University Columbia Lake Health Club Country Blue Crabby Joe’s Tap & Grill Downtown Kitchener Crawford & Company (Canada) Inc. Curves King Street Dairy Queen Laurelwood Data Bank Computer Systems Inc. David Findlay Delta Kitchener Dundee Insurance Agency Ltd. Dundee Wealth Management

Shirley & George Scott Simpson Screen Print & Lithography Ltd. St. Jacobs Country Inn Inc. St. Clements Heart and Home Stress Be Gone Talbot Marketing Waters & Hastings Law Office Woolwich Observer Scrubbles siht Optical Sip N Bite Restaurant Solé Restaurant St. Jacobs Furniture St. Louis Bar and Grill Waterloo Starbucks Columbia Street Steffen Brush & Broom Inc. Stemmler's Meat & Cheese Sun Magic Westmount Road Supper Works Waterloo T. Weber Co. Ltd. Talbot Marketing TD Canada Trust King Street The Building Zone The Embassy The Gospel Lighthouse The Keg The Poultry Place The Rude Native The Thymeless Apothecary The Waterloo Inn The Waters TireCo Toronto Maple Leafs Toy Soup Unique Coffee Victoria Park East Golf Club Walper Hotel Waterloo Region Museum Weiland Ford Sales Ltd. Wild Wing Laurelwood Wings of Paradise Woolwich Community Lions Club Woolwich Total Health Pharmacy Words Worth Books


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

15 LIVING HERE

LIVING HERE

BASICS To mount the unicycle without holding on to a fence or railing, says Jeremy Tracey, you have to start in the original position and push hard on your right foot. Don’t do it too fast or you’ll lose your footing. Push up on the right pedal, get your left foot on the left pedal, and get your butt on the seat while it’s lifting up, all at the same time. Then just start to pedal and off you go.

» COLIN DEWAR

THE

PHOTO

One wheel, four fans Elmira’s Jeremy Tracey and his three sons embrace the art of the unicyle Colin Dewar

T

he bond a family forms spending time with one another can be incredibly nurturing and gratifying. For the Tracey family that bond is strengthened when they hit the streets of Elmira on their unicycles. One could say ‘the family that unicycle together stays together.’ Performing tricks and stunts in their driveway, on sidewalks and empty parking lots, the Traceys have come a long way since they first tried out the singletrack vehicle just a few months ago … Actually, let’s start this story sometime earlier. It was on Mother’s Day

last May when Jeremy Tracey entered a bike store looking for a bike for his wife, Elaine, when his life changed forever. There hanging on the wall of the store was a unicycle. “It was something I always wanted to do when I was little and kind of forgot about it until I walked into that store and my eyes lit up like a little kid on Christmas morning,” said Tracey. The following month, on his birthday, Tracey received the unicycle from his family and began the arduous task of learning to ride it. Taking to the Internet, he searched videos and websites for tips on how to mount and ride a unicycle.

“I watched a video on line that said to go along the side of a fence and hold on to it,” said Tracey. So he did. Using the chain linked fence that runs down the side of his property Tracey would balance himself and slowly make his way down the driveway. After a few falls and a severe cut to his finger, he tried another approach. “I decided to put my MacGyver hat on and I grabbed two hockey sticks and holding them one on each side as support poles I began to learn to ride the unicycle. Over the course of about two weeks I just slowly weaned myself off the sticks.” Once Tracey knew how

to ride, he decided to get a unicycle for each of his sons, 12-year-old Reid, 11year-old Garret and Nolan, 8. Within weeks the three boys were up and running and taking greater chances at performing stunts than their father. “Reid is better than I am, no question. They are at the age where they have no fear and can take to something right away,” said Tracey. Through some contacts Tracey found Drew Ripley, a unicyclist and performer in Kitchener, and asked him for some advice on how to keep the boys safe and learn some tricks. Ripley had planned to

start a unicycle club in Kitchener and was eager to help out the Traceys. “One of the most entertaining things I have seen was when we were riding with (Ripley) one night and he got all excited and ran down to his house and came back a few minutes later with pool noodles so we could do some unicycle jousting,” said Tracey. “Reid and (Ripley) squared off and went at it for 20 minutes trying to poke each other off with the pool noodles, it was hilarious.” When it comes to safety, Tracey makes sure his sons wear helmets. He suggests new riders invest in a pair of ankle or shin guards, espe-

> SEE UNICYLE ON PG. 16

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LIVING HERE 16

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

Unicycle: Family quickly comes to appreciate its unique features

PHOTO

» COLIN DEWAR

> CONTINUED FROM PG. 15

ONE FOR ALL Reid Tracey, 12, brothers Nolan, 8, Garret, 11 and dad Jeremy

took up the unicycle this summer as a family bonding experience. They’ve since managed to master the art of riding and performing tricks.

cially if riders are keen on off-road trails. “One of the biggest concerns I hear is that people think they will crack their head open, but with a unicycle there really is no chance of falling on your head; you have a better chance hurting yourself on a two-wheel bike because there is more bike to get caught up on. With a unicycle, if you fall it’s gone and your feet hit the ground,” said Tracey. “I can actually count on one hand how many times I have actually hit the ground.” Tracey admits he does get the odd look or comment as he rides pass people walking down the streets of town. “I’ve heard it all, ‘where’s your other wheel, can you pull a pop-awheelie, did you forget something, and couldn’t you afford a whole bike.’ You just let it roll off you,” jokes Tracey. He rides a 24-inch wheel, as does his son Reid, whereas Garret rides

a 20-inch and Nolan uses a 16-inch unicycle. “The smaller the wheel you don’t have to be quite as strong to ride it, if you jump on a 24- or 36-inch you can really feel the difference on how much strength it takes to start it going and stop,” said Tracey. “I am addicted to it, I will get home at nine o’clock at night and I will be out in the street until 11. I’m just trying to keep up with (Reid) and trying to do what he can do.” When Tracey and his sons are not practicing new tricks they are watching stunt videos of unicyclists, which has inspired Reid to save for a trick unicycle that has a 20-inch wheel but the tire is extra wide to handle bounces and give the rider more spring. Having already mastered the bunny hop and turns, Reid has put his focus on learning a new trick in which he will pull the seat out from underneath him while still in motion. “Only my son would try riding seat-less on a unicycle,” jokes Tracey.

Got leftovers? Try this simple burger soup O

pening the fridge and seeing it filled with leftovers is not always a happy sight. Leftovers can feel very uninspiring and boring. After a week of enjoying the outdoors and the barbecue, I found my fridge jampacked with leftovers. At The Culinary Studio we love to give you options so that you do not feel bound by the recipe or that you cannot make it if you do not have all the ingredients. This week’s offering will work for you with leftovers or fresh ingredients. As always we like to give you some substitutions. You do not have corn on the cob, use 1 cup of frozen corn

From The Chef's Table

Hamburger Soup >>1 medium onion, diced finely

Kirstie Herbstreit & Jody O'Malley or even a can of corn. Instead of hamburgers, use leftover sausage, smoked pork chops or ham. Also, change up the starch if you would like and use orzo pasta, brown rice or barley. Using leftovers I was able to have dinner on the table in under 20 minutes. Melt butter in heavy-bottomed pot.

>>2 cloves garlic, minced >>3 medium carrots, sliced into rounds >>4 cobs corn, removed from cob >>5-6 small, cooked potatoes, cubed >>5 cooked hamburgers, cubed >>2 litres stock (chicken or beef)

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THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, August 27, 2011

17 LIVING HERE

SUDOKU

THE CROSSWORD

HOW TO PLAY: Fill in the grid so that every row, every column and every 3x3 box contains the numbers 1 through 9 only once. Each 3x3 box is outlined with a darker line. You already have a few numbers to get you started.

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Stole Suit Tails Tam Tiara Tights Toga T-shirt Veil Vest Woolly

> SOLUTIONS: Find the answers to all of the puzzles on pgs. 23 & 31

ACROSS 1. Blows away 7. A light, plastic disk propelled with a flip of the wrist 14. Peddle 18. One of two basic subdivisions of a tribe 19. Horizontal beam used as a finishing piece over a door or window 20. Bottled spirits 21. The state of being behind in payments 23. Unable to function normally and without pain 25. Amniotic ___ 26. Cesspool 28. Pub game 29. Bouquets 30. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dearâ&#x20AC;? ones 32. Tablet 34. Drone, e.g. 35. Torpedo 36. Legislate 38. Fee paid for instruction 40. Addis Ababaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s land: Abbr. 41. Snacks and drinks served as a light meal 43. Cut in three 47. Heavy, durable furniture wood 48. Except 49. Greyhound, e.g. 50. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___-Teamâ&#x20AC;? 52. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rocksâ&#x20AC;? 53. Anger 55. Slap on 57. Coming next after the first in position 59. Nosh 61. A method of representing the sounds of a language by written or printed symbols 65. Something to chew 66. By chance 68. Indian melodies 69. Blight 71. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Catch-22â&#x20AC;? pilot 72. Any year of the Christian era 75. Meted (out) 76. Good-for-nothing 78. A chorus line 79. Ashes holder 81. Boy 82. Bank claim 83. Bubkes 84. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To ___ is human ...â&#x20AC;? 86. Cut, maybe 88. Awakening 91. Extensive glaciation of the northern hemisphere; the time of human evolution 95. Lulu 96. Cleansing agent consisting of soaps or detergents used for washing the hair 98. friend of Garfunkel 99. Jot 102. Big ___ Conference 103. Exec 105. Large rigid neck ring made from strands of metal twisted together 106. Expire 107. Late princess 109. Eastern European 111. Amateur video subject, maybe





























  

  





  







 







 







 

 

 

 

  











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1. One who amasses 2. Accumulated earth and stones deposited by a glacier 3. A large warship that carries planes and has a long flat deck for takeoffs and landings 4. Sleep unit? 5. Flight data, briefly 6. Egg cream ingredient 7. Winter bug 8. Coat 9. Exist or be situated within 10. Dorm room staple 11. Formed or made thin by hammering 12. Building additions 13. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;___ la vie!â&#x20AC;? 14. Toxin secreted by animals 15. An injection of a liquid through the anus to stimulate evacuation; sometimes used for diagnostic purposes 16. Month after Adar 17. Treat, mention, or speak to rudely 20. The distance around a personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body



 



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74. Eager to investigate and learn or learn mor 77. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walking on Thin Iceâ&#x20AC;? singer 80. After expenses 83. Back of the neck 84. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Nightmare on ___ Streetâ&#x20AC;? 85. Gym set 87. Affairs 89. Improvement 90. Mud or clay or small rocks deposited by a river or lake 91. Make a sweeping movement 92. Agronomistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; study 93. County in East Anglia in the east of England 94. Extra or repeated performance; usually given in response to audience demand 96. Old beer; sharp or strong liquor 97. Spill 99. An electronic receiver that detects and demodulates and amplifies transmitted signals 100. Large short-tailed lemur of Madagascar having thick silky fur in black and white and fawn 101. The alignment of the front wheels of a motor vehicle closer together at the front than at the back 104. Consideration in dealing with others and avoiding giving offence 106. Con 107. Bell the cat 108. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aâ&#x20AC;? of ABM 110. Six-stringed instrument 113. What â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;? plays 114. Fed. construction overseer 116. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So ___ me!â&#x20AC;?

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SPORTS 18

THE OBSERVER

SPORTS

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

It's hockey time again

TRYING IT OUT A group of some 30 Sugar King hopefuls took to the ice this week during the team’s official tryout camp, including last year’s Sutherland Cupclinching goaltender Nick Horrigan. The team played its first exhibition match Friday, and go again Sunday at the WMC versus Kitchener. PHOTO

» JAMES JACKSON

Rusty Bats mark 20 years of slo-pitch Woolwich league sees older players have fun while staying active through the season Colin Dewar

T

he Woolwich Rusty Bats Slo-Pitch league is wrapping up another year on Sept. 17 with their annual tournament. That it’s the leagues 20th anniversary adds to the occasion. The non-competitive club for players over the age of 40 has seen its share of players take to the field year after year. “We are hoping to have some of the older guys who use to play come out and enjoy the day with us,” said

Doug Trimble, the organization’s secretary-treasurer. “The league has certainly grown and held it’s own over the years.” Trimble along with six other players has been with the league since its inception in 1992. “We have played a lot of ball over the years and it would be great to see as many former players come to the park during the tournament and renew acquaintances and watch a game or two as they enjoy a burger,” said Trimble.

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During the course of the year the four teams that are drafted annually play every Thursday night at Lions Park. League play begins the Thursday before the May long weekend and usually wraps up mid-September. Two games are played every Thursday as to allow players to watch a game either before or after their own games. The oldest player in the league, Elwyn Bridge, is 75 years old and still manages to keep some of the younger guys on their toes.

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Although there are some players who consistently play the same position the appeal of the league is that participants are able to play different positions through out a game. “I could be on first base at the beginning of the game then move to the outfield and then end up at third base to finish,” said Trimble. “Some guys stay in one position for the whole game because they can’t run, but everyone is pretty easy going.” The end of year tournament is schedule to begin at

8 a.m. and last until 4 p.m. A barbecue is scheduled to run from 11 a.m. until 1 p.m. As with every year there will be a prize awarded to the last-place team, a plaque with a horse’s rear and tail. “It’s all for fun. It’s just for a good laugh,” said Trimble. Many of the players will be transitioning from soft ball to hockey as the old-timers’ hockey league begins the Monday after the tournament. The rain date for the tournament is scheduled for Sept. 18.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

19 SPORTS

Perfecting the art of looking the other way T

he other day I was minding my own business, fishing along a rocky, productive shoreline when, quite unexpectedly, six young women in very skimpy bikinis ran down to the nearby dock. They then proceeded to bounce and frolic in the water and, shortly after, began the slow process of applying sunscreen to each other while giggling. Suddenly, and not for the first time, I found myself in a very awkward situation. The problem is that, at times like this, taking a good look is inevitable and perhaps even natural. There’s a lot of eye candy on display and, human nature being what it is, a person is almost forced to stare. In this case, there was tawny, sunkissed skin, firm muscles, delicate curves and dramatic tan lines. And, if we are to be honest, the supple heaving bosoms were also hard to ignore. And those are just a few reasons why I can’t really blame

Not-So-Great Outdoorsman Steve Galea those women for gawking at me. The other, of course, was my angling prowess. And the 10-inch smallmouth bass that I was fighting. I mean what woman can resist the sheer athleticism of a middle-aged man doing battle with mediocre smallmouth bass? These ones, that’s who. Yes they were very different. Not once, did they whistle or cat call. Not once, I tell you. Go figure. Instead, they just lay on the dock, either belly up or down, trying very convincingly to act as if they weren’t at all impressed or excited by my exceptional angling ability. A casual bystander might have

thought that they didn’t even know I existed. But I knew better. Still, it was awkward for us all. At times like this, it’s difficult for an angler to figure out the best course of action. Sure, I was there first and the fishing was very passable. By all rights I should have just stayed there and endured those shapely women in skimpy bikinis. Even if it meant risking whistling and catcalls. But, as any angler knows, there’s much more to it than that. If I had stayed there any longer, I would have run the risk of being objectified – something I have successfully avoided up ‘til this point in my life. But even leaving was fraught with risk. For one thing, this meant I had to raise the anchor. And, as anyone who has ever seen a middle-aged man raise an anchor knows, this is a highly erotic endeavour. The sensuous sounds of vertebrae popping

Under their own steam Farming’s past comes to life in annual Waterloo County Steam Thresher’s Reunion this weekend

THE WAY THINGS WERE Amsey Metzger hosts the annual Waterloo County Steam Thresher’s Reunion at his farm just outside of Wallenstein. He participates in the annual antique tractor run on his 1957 John Deere tractor. PHOTO

» JAMES JACKSON

out are often enough to drive most bikini-clad women wild. But, again, much to their credit, these ones showed great restraint. Frankly, I was amazed. When I think of how tempting it must have been for those women to whistle at my final cast, which landed clearly within striking distance of a log that obviously harboured fish, I am led to believe that sexist behaviour is almost a thing of the past. Not only does this speak well of the younger generation but also the convent that they were trained in. Sure, every fibre of their being was screaming out that they should comment favourably on my apparent fishing skills. Yet they just sat there pretending to ignore the white elephant in the room – even after I landed that 16-inch bass. What discipline! You have to hand it to them. After all, a lot of people would fantasize in a situation like this.

James Jackson

T

oday (Saturday) is your last chance to get a glimpse into farming’s past at the 17th annual Waterloo County Steam Thresher’s Reunion as the three-day event wraps up for yet another year. Displays include a demonstration of antique steamdriven grain threshers, antique tractor displays and horse-drawn wagon rides, among others. “It’s the old type of tractors and machinery that people would use years ago that draws people every year,” said Amsey Metzger, who has hosted the event at his farm west of Wallenstein for the past three years. “They want to see the tractors that were used years ago – it’s nostalgia, and we’re trying to get the younger people interested in the old machinery so they can carry it on.” Entry to the event is just $5, or $15 per family and all the money goes to a good

cause; anything over and above the group’s expenses will go to the Mennonite Central Committee and Gospel Echoes, which operates a prison-outreach program. The decision of where to donate the money is decided on by the group’s executive, which meets every month starting in March to plan the reunion. “We think both groups do good work so we chose to help them out,” said Metzger, adding that the group has also donated money to the Grand River Cancer Centre in the past. The event sees nearly 2,000 people walk the grounds of Metzger’s farm to appreciate the old machinery, enjoy gospel music and taste the authentic steamed corn at their famous gospel sing and corn roast on Friday nights. This year, the event kicked off with the annual antique tractor run on Thursday

> SEE THRESHERS ON PG. 22

Sunday August 28

Grass Tax

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SPORTS 20

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

PHOTOS

» COLIN DEWAR

Jacks gear up for another season with tryout camp at St. Clements arena

SHOWING WHAT THEY'RE MADE OF The Wellesley Applejacks held try outs for the 2011 squad at the St. Clements arena on Aug. 20. Left, goalie Zach Shomphe keeps his eye on the puck; middle, Sean Hanely shows off his stick work; right, goalie Jordan Bauman reacts during a shootout.

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Traveling to and from School

• Plan a walking route to school or the bus stop. Choose the most direct way with the fewest street crossings and, if possible, with intersections that have crossing guards. • Walk the route with your child before-hand. Tell him or her to stay away from parks, vacant lots, fields and other places where there aren't many people around.

• Teach your child never to talk to strangers or accept rides or gifts from strangers. Remember, a stranger is anyone you or your children don't know well or don't trust. • Be sure your child walks to and from school with a sibling, friend, or neighbor. Teach your kids -- whether walking, biking, or riding the bus to school -- to obey all traffic signals, signs and traffic officers. Remind them to be extra careful in bad weather.

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• If your child bikes to school, make sure he wears a helmet that meets one of the Traveling to and from School safety standards (U.S. CPSC, Snell, ANSI, ASTM, or Canadian). Research indicates that a helmet can reduce the risk of head injury by up to 85 percent. • Teach children to arrive at the bus stop early, stay out of the street, wait for the bus to come to a complete stop before approaching the street, watch for cars and avoid the driver's blind spot. • Remind your children to stay seated at all times and keep their heads and arms inside the bus while riding. When exiting the bus, children should wait until the bus comes to a complete stop, exit from the front using the handrail to avoid falls and cross the street at least 10 feet (or 10 giant steps) in front of the bus.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

21 SPORTS

Woolwich Memorial Centre home to Tony Code's hockey camp

BRESLAU

Recreation Association Breslau Community Centre 200 Woolwich Street, Breslau Ontario N0B 1M0 Phone: 519-648-9524 for all inquiries.

www.breslau.org FA L L P R O G R A M S | FA L L P R O G R A M S | FA L L P R O G R A M S | FA L L P R O G R A M S We are eagerly searching for Volunteers either on a committee or Instructing a program or event. Whether you can commit to 3 hours a month or more, we need your help… please feel free to inquire or come out to a meeting.

PROGRAM REGISTRATION FOR ALL FALL PROGRAMS:

ONLINE: beginning Thursday, September 8th, 9:00 AM and/or IN-PERSON: Saturday, September 10th, 9:30-11:00 AM & Monday, September 12th, 6:30-8:00 PM at the Breslau Community Centre (cash and cheque only, no ability in person for credit card)

FALL PROGRAMS

• All sessions are 8 weeks (unless otherwise noted); done on a first-come, first-served basis. • All programs have limited spaces; may be cancelled if registration is insufficient and may be subject to change in date, time and fee. • Participants under 18 years of age require a parent/guardian signature at registration. • Online registration also available for Fall as of Thursday, September 8th at 9:00 AM. Check Breslau.org for a link to online registration and payment. • For “In-Person” registration: please print and complete registration form at Breslau.org and bring to registration dates; must be completed IN FULL to be accepted; methods of payment: Cash or Cheque ONLY (Post-dated cheques will NOT be accepted); Cheques payable to Breslau Recreation Association. • NOTE: HST will be calculated in addition to the listed rates below for adult programs. Children/youth programs are HST exempt. • Your privacy is important to us; information is only used for administration of Recreation Association programs and events. • If you are unable to attend either date, registration forms and cheques MUST be received by Lisa Nadon at 139 Horseshoe Crescent, Breslau, ON N0B 1M0 by Monday, September 12th to ensure your spot in the program. Please Note: During inclement weather, if the school boards have closed the schools, then the Breslau Recreation Association programs will be CANCELLED. School closures will be announced on 96.7 CHYM FM or 105.3 KOOL FM. Cancellations will also be posted on the Breslau Facebook page by 5:00 PM on the day of the cancellation. The Centre will be closed for Thanksgiving from Saturday, October 8th to Monday, October 10th.

ADULT PROGRAMS

• Adult Co-Ed Indoor Volleyball (Rec/Non-Competitive): Come out and join us for some fun. 6 on 6 traditional style game; self-officiated. Played at a premier sports facility ideal for volleyball, where the ceilings are high. Coordinator: Sherri Benki: H: (519)648-3467; C: (519)404-4760; sherribenki@hotmail.com. Sundays, 5:00-10:00pm, Sept 18 - Dec 4, $50/individual OR $400/team of up to 8 players (12 games). • Men’s Ball Hockey: Recreational ball hockey. Plastic blade sticks required. Coordinator: Craig. (No program Oct. 6). Thursdays, 8:30-10:00pm, Sept 22 Nov 17, $35/8 wks • Men’s Basketball: Drop-in for a weekly game of pick-up basketball. Coordinator: Joe. Fridays, 7:45-9:30pm, Sept 23 - Nov 11, $5/wk; 8 wks • Photo Group: Share your passion for photography with like-minded individuals. Share ideas on photo composition, tips on getting the right shot, information about post-processing your digital images. This group is facilitated by Patrick McDonald, whose background includes Photo Arts at Ryerson, Professional photography and he is currently a network, colour and application specialist with Xerox. Instructor: Patrick. (No program Sept. 28). Wednesdays, 8:00-9:00pm, Sept 21 - Dec 14, $20/12 wks

YOUTH PROGRAMS

• Comic Book Art: Must have taken the Multi-Media Art class or had previous art experience. Instructor: Ana. (No program Sept. 29) Ages 6-12, Thursdays, 6:30-7:30pm Sept 22 - Nov 17, $35/8 wks • Homework Buddies: Books and games designed to help kids get ahead with their homework. Kids will move through a selection of games and activities at their own pace and level. Kids are welcome to bring their reading books and logs from school as well as their homework books. Instructor: Taryn. (No program Sept. 26) JK-Grade 3, Mondays, 6:30-7:30pm, Sept 19 - Dec 5, FREE • Multi-Media Art: Come explore the amazing world of art with a variety of creative art supplies. Enhance your child’s creativity and self-expression through art. Instructor: Ana. (No program Sept. 29). Ages 5-8, Thursdays, 5:30-6:30pm, Sept 22 - Nov 17, $35/8 wks • Youth Basketball: Learn the basic skills of basketball and enjoy a scrimmage at the end of each class. Instructor: Joe. Ages 6-8, Fridays, 6:30-7:30pm, Sept 23 - Nov 11, $35/8 wks • Youth Group: Come out and enjoy the fun, games, sports, snacks and an introduction to God. Host: Sam, Youth Pastor at BEMC. Grades 6-8, Tuesdays, 7:00-8:30pm, Sept 13 - Dec 6, FREE

PRESCHOOL PROGRAMS

• Instructed Playgroup: Instructor will lead children in a co-operative play group setting. Children will experience science experi-ments, make crafts, play games and participate in special themed days. Instructor: Jess. Ages 0-5, Fridays, 9:30-11:30am Sept 23 - Nov 11, $40/8 wks; per child • Preschool Storytime: The Region of Waterloo Library will be hosting Storytime throughout the Fall! The program is designed for 3-5 year olds but younger siblings/families are welcome. Instructor: Susan. Ages 3-5 (younger children welcome), Thursdays, 10:00-10:45am, Sept 29; Oct 20; Nov 24; Dec 8, FREE • Rhythm & Music: Come and find out how enjoyable it is to make and explore music with your child. We’ll have fun using both traditional pieces and some less known songs from around the world while we sing, dance and discover rhythm using instruments, movement and more. Space is limited. Instructor: Sasha. Parent & Child(ren) (Infants-Age 6) Thursdays, 12:00-12:45pm, Oct 13 - Dec 1, $60/8 wks; $40 for each additional child

FITNESS

• Bootcamp: Energize yourself in this high-energy interval training class. Intervals of cardio and strength training will help you achieve the results you’re after. Instructor: Deb. (No program Oct. 10). Mondays, 7:30-8:30pm, Sept 19 - Dec 12, $60/12 wks • Bootcamp: Energize yourself in this high-energy interval training class. Intervals of cardio and strength training will help you achieve the results you’re after. Instructor: Deb. (No program Oct. 6). Thursdays, 7:00-8:00pm, Sept. 22 - Dec 15, $60/12 wks • Core Abs: This 30 minute class is sure to strengthen your abdominals and lower back. A great core workout! All levels. Instructor: Deb. (No program Oct. 10). Mondays, 7:00-7:30pm, Sept 19 - Dec 12, $30/12 wks • Core Abs: This 30 minute class is sure to strengthen your abdominals and lower back. A great core workout! All levels. Instructor: Deb. (No program Oct. 6). Thursdays, 6:30-7:00pm, Sept 22 - Dec 15, $30/12 wks • Muscle: This class is a combination of Core and BLT. This fitness class has no cardio, but instead focuses on the BUTT, LEGS, and THIGHS, using a variety of exercises/resistance training. A portion of the class is also devoted to strengthening your abdominals and lower back. Instructor: Deb. (No program Oct. 8 & Nov. 26). Saturdays, 10:00-11:00am, Sept 24 - Dec 10, $60/12 wks

• Running: Learn To Run Club: A progressive learn-to-run training program including health and nutrition information sessions. Instructors: Lisa and Linda. Tuesdays, 6:30-7:30pm, Sept 20 - Nov 22, $50/10 wks • Running: 5-10 Km Club: Stay motivated with this 5-10km training program that will keep you fit. Instructor: Denise. Thursdays, 6:30-7:30pm, Sept 22 - Nov 24, $50/10 wks • Running: Open Run Club: Begin the weekend on the right foot. All runners welcome for this open run. Saturdays, 9:00-10:00am, Sept 24 - Nov 26, FREE • Pilates: Mat pilates is a unique form of exercise that emphasizes the balanced development of the body through core strength, flexibility and body awareness. Develop leaner, long muscles, improved balance and coordination with Pilates to become a fitter you. Instructor: Kellie. Tuesdays, 5:30-6:30pm, Sept 20 - Nov 8, $50/8 wks • Post-Natal Aerobics: This fitness class is designed with the new mom in mind. Come meet other moms while exercising with your baby! Instructor: Lynda. (No program Sept. 22). Tuesdays, 9:30-10:25am, Sept 27 - Nov 15, $40/8 wks • Step: Work it out and get your butt and legs in shape! Instructor: Sophie. (No program Oct. 6). Thursdays, 5:00-6:00pm, Sept 22 - Nov 17, $40/8 wks • Sweat ‘N’ Sculpt: Elevate your heart rate as you tone and sculpt your muscles. This class combines low impact aerobics with muscular conditioning to blast calories. Instructor: Deb. (No program Oct. 8 & Nov. 26). Saturdays, 9:00-10:00am, Sept 24- Dec 10, $60/10 wks • Tai-Chi And 15 Minutes To Health (Level I): This class focuses on short and easy to learn exercises, empowering everyone to develop a rewarding 15 minutes daily program for health and stress relief. The core principles of the “15 Minutes to Health” program are detailed out and ap-plied to Qigong, meridian stretching, and Tai-Chi. No prior fitness or Tai-Chi experience required. More information at: www.LeShiatsu.com. Instructor: Patricia. Note: 10 week program; beginning Sept. 21. Wednesdays, 7:00-8:00pm, Sept 21 - Nov 23, $75/10 wks • Tai-Chi And 15 Minutes To Health (Level II, Part A): Intermediate students will learn the most practiced Tai-Chi form in the world: the Yang style 24 postures form. The first half of the form will be detailed out, while the entire form will be covered for a general overview. The instruction style remains the same: enjoyable warm-up exercises, Qigong, drills to break down key principles, and lots of practice. Preferably for people who attended Level I a couple of times or more, however beginners are also welcome at any time. More information at: www.LeShiatsu.com. Instructor: Patricia. Note: 10 week program; beginning Sept 21. Wednesdays, 5:30-6:30pm, Sept 21 - Nov 23, $75/10 wks • Yoga: Beginner’s Class: In this introductory class you will explore the basic foundation, alignment and stability elements of yoga asana. Instruction in awareness and the breath will also allow you to explore the mind/body connection that is integral to this practice. Please wear clothing that is comfortable enough for you to move freely in. Instructor: Peggy. Wednesdays, 7:30-8:45pm, Sept 21 - Nov 9, $60/8 wks • Yoga: Level 1 Class: Prerequisite: previous yoga experience required. Continuing with the blend of the alignment principle of Iyengar Yoga with the flow and vigour of Ashtanga Yoga, we will explore further refinements of familiar poses, as well as opening to experience new ones. You will gain a deeper understanding of the mechanics of yoga poses, get sweaty, work hard and have fun! Instructor: Peggy. Wednesdays, 6:00-7:15pm, Sept 21 - Nov 9, $60/8 wks • Zumba: Get your heart rate up and have some fun in this aerobic class inspired by Latin rhythms. Instructor: Sophia. (No program Oct. 10). Mondays, 6:00-6:50pm, Sept 19 - Nov 14, $45/8 wks • Zumba Gold: This introductory Zumba class is designed for beginners and seniors. Move to the Latin beat while you burn calories, stay active and have fun! Instructor: Lynda. (No program Sept. 22). Tuesdays, 10:35-11:30am, Sept 27 - Nov 15, $45/8 wks Note: For all fitness classes, please download the Par-Q form from Breslau.org and bring the completed form to your first class (unless you handed in the form during the Winter or Spring sessions). If you handed the form in during the Winter session but your health has changed, you also need to hand in an updated Par-Q form. Thank you!

PROGRAM “DEMO DAY!”

The B.R.A. will be hosting a program demonstration day on Thursday, September 8th from 6:00-8:00 pm for residents to come and speak with instructors to learn more about the different programs being offered this Fall. Fitness instructors will also be providing a 10 minute demonstration of their classes. Check Breslau.org for a schedule of events closer to the date. Registration for all Fall programs will be on Saturday, Sep. 10th, 9:30-11:00 am and Monday, Sep. 12th, 6:30-8:00 pm.

PHOTOS

About 130 kids took part in Tony Code’s first hockey academy that started this past week at the WMC in Elmira. The camp continues next week as well. Code has experience as a player at the Junior B and NCAA level, and has coached in Woolwich the past four years.

» JAMES JACKSON

PRESEASON LESSONS


SPORTS 22

THE OBSERVER

U16 boys claim Challenge Cup CAPPING THE SEASON The Woolwich boys U16 soccer club claimed the title at the Challenge Cup in Tillsonburg, beating Lambeth 2-1 in the finals. The team also clinched first place in the league last Wednesday with a 4-2 win over the Lambeth Lancers. Front: Mitch Kernick. Second row: Dan Cockburn, Michael Weber, Lucas Nosal, Devin DeCorte, Christopher Paleshi, Codi Forrest. Back row: Scott Nosal (head coach), Callum Johnson, Jake Moggy, Sebastian Huber, Tyler Mayberry, Robbie Mazocca, Jordan Tipler-Corpuz, Adam Cook, Joseph Rosales. Absent: Alex MacLean. PHOTO

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

Threshers: Event has history in real time > CONTINUED FROM PG. 19 morning that left Metzger’s farm and made its way to Countryside Christian School in Hawkesville, where brunch was served as a fundraiser for the students. Some 70 tractors participated in last year’s run from as far away as Guelph and Stratford, with about the same expected this year. The reunion runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Metzger’s farm, R.R. 1 Wallenstein, 7590 Line 86. For more information visit their new website, www.waterloocountysteamthreshers.com.

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» JAMES JACKSON

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A LITTLE HELP Camp counsellor Erika Grant keeps fiveyear-old Abby Hales balanced as they skate around the WMC as part of an Aug. 19 free skate for the Woolwich summer program. 2008 Jeep Compass North 2.4L 5 Speed Manual Trany, Power Windows/Locks/Mirrors, Keyless Entry,Tinted Windows, A/C, Heated Seats, Anti/lock Brakes, Side Impact Air Bags, Aluminum Wheels. Jeep Green 21,750km $15,900 Deal#9353

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CALL ON E OF OUR PROFESSION AL SALES REPS TODAY: R AY FREDERICK , COLI N K ROPF A ll sale pr ices exclude H.S.T, and License Fee. Fi xed r ates, based on bi-week ly payments O. A .C. Finance r ates are only good for date of publication.

WOOLWICH YOUTH SOCCER ATTENTION:

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or by contacting our office at 519-669-1000 or woolwichyouthsoccer@gmail.com Submit by email or drop off at our office - 5 First St., Elmira ON.


» Saturday, August 27, 2011

THE OBSERVER

23 CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS

HELP WANTED

Residential 20-Word Ad $7.50 (Extra Words 20¢/word) Commercial 20-Word Ad $12.00 (Extra Words 30¢/word)

ENGRAVING

HELP WANTED

PLACING A CLASSIFIED AD | Classified ads can be obtained in person, by phone (519-669-5790), fax or email from Monday to Thursday 8:30am-5pm or Friday 8:30am-4pm. All classified ads are prepaid. Deadline is WEDNESDAYS by 4pm.

COMPUTERS

Custom Engraved Plastic Mailbox Plates

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT

A busy, progressive, communication tower installation company requires a full time Administrative Assistant effective immediately. The individual who fills this position will be efficient in Windows environment including Microsoft Office, Excel and Word. Please submit your resume in confidence to:

AZ DRIVER

8½” long x 3½” wide $12.95 each Choose from Red, Blue, Green, Burgundy or White

VHF Construction Ltd.

P.O. Box 66 Elmira, ON N3B 2Z5 (519) 669-5786 fax, no telephone calls please info@vhfconstruction.com

Tired of sleeping in the bunk? Wintermar Farms (aka Cribit Seeds or Wintermar Grains) is seeking to add a qualified full time AZ driver to operate both DZ and AZ class vehicles to haul grains and finished goods to and from our facility. Local day runs with flexible hours but may need to work some evenings and Saturdays. Type of work includes; bulk trailer and dry van. Ag related experience an asset but not a necessity. A clean abstract is necessary.

We thank all applicants: however only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

HELP WANTED

CHILD CARE

> Plasterers

and labourers needed. 40+ hours a week. Must have reliable transportation. Apply to: Martin Stucco by fax 519-638-2339 or email: martinstucco@gmail.com

CHILD CARE

> Child care required in

Elmira in our home or yours weekday mornings from 7:45am until 9:00am for a 10 year old. Transportation needed to John Mahood or be within reasonable walking distance. Call 669-2551.

For a more detailed description contact Craig Martin @ 519-664-3701 ext#25 or craig@cribit.com. HELP WANTED

Immediate openings for qualified technicians.

Tank Builder - Fitter/Welder: Fit and weld large steel vessels in production environment. Chassis Upfitter - Mechanical: Mount new equipment on trucks: pumps, hydraulics, pneumatics, PTO’s, trouble shooting and repairs to customer units. Chassis Upfitter - Body Builder: Fitter/Welder: Manufacture and mount fenders and vacuum components. Layout, fit & weld traps, compartments, reels, cyclones, etc. Experience with shear, brake, plasma, torch.

Ph: (519) 669-2064 Fax: (519) 669-4422

GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALES

> Reliable Daycare has > Saturday,

2 openings. Offering healthy meals, safe outdoor play, crafts, educational toys and games and a nurturing environment. 519 210 0314.

CHILD CARE REQUIRED

> Early Morning, parttime childcare required in Elmira. Monday - Friday, 6:00 - 9:00 a.m. for two children (9 and 6). Call Jen 519-897-0851. > Wanted - PT Nanny. Flexible hours, in-home, 2-3 children, in St. Jacobs. Call 519-664-3083. HEALTH CARE

ENVIRONMENTAL TRUCK BUILDERS

Box #6, 6377 Yatton Sideroad | Wallenstein, Ontario N0B 2S0

> Try Bowen Therapy for treatment of pain and numerous health conditions. Daytime hours now available! Contact Kevin Bartley, Certified Bowenwork Practitioner. 519669-0112, Elmira.

August 27, 7:30am to 1pm. Multifamily garage sale. Lots of quality items including beanie babies, coins, sports collectibles, model cars, household items, antiques, tools, misc. furniture, books and tapes. 74 Muscovey Dr., Elmira.

GARAGE SALES

> Saturday,

August 27. 9am to 2pm. Home and school books, music equipment, games, toys, furniture, hardware, household items, pet supplies. 5 Pheasant Drive, Elmira.

100% Local.

PLACES OF FAITH

Gale

Worship 10:00a.m. Minister: Rev. Dr. Linda Bell

Presbyterian www.galepresbyterian.com Church 2 Cross St., Elmira • 519-669-2852

Office Hours: M-TH 9-Noon & 1-3 • E galepresbychurch@golden.net

> HUGE GARAGE SALE. Rain or Shine. Friday, Sept 1 to Monday, Sept 5th. 8am to 8pm. Antiques, furniture, freezer, bikes, toys, baby clothing and other baby stuff, trees and perennials, collectibles, household items too numerous to mention. Take Hwy 86 North towards Listowel, sideroad between Glen Allan and Dorking, watch for signs. HEARING ASSISTED

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

NURSERY PROVIDED

Catholic Church

No God, No Hope; Know God, Know Hope! Celebrate Eucharist with us Mass times are:

Sat. 5pm, Sun. 9am and 11:15am

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

“Our mission is to love, learn & live by Christ’s teachings”

www.execulink.com/~unitedchurch/index.html Visit us at: www.wondercafe.ca 21 Arthur St. N., Church office 519-669-5560

> Adorable

Farm Pups for sale. Collie/black lab cross born June 26th. Great with children. $50. Call 519638-2642.

Zion Mennonite Fellowship - The Junction -

Worship Service - 10:00am

Dog Training, Fall Classes - group session or private, starting September 13, 4 weeks $100.00. www.megamutts. com. or 519-669-8167.

Finding The Way Together 47 Arthur St., S. Elmira • 519-669-3153 www.thejunctionelmira.com

Sun August 28th at @ 11:00 am

Richard Haverkamp

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4522 Herrgott Road, Wallenstein

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

10:00am Worship Service Pastor: Richard A. Frey www.stpaulselmira.ca

27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593

August 28- Forgive...But... Don’t Forget

COMM/INDUSTRIAL FOR RENT

> Industrial Bay for rent. 64 Howard Ave., Elmira. 2000 sq ft., open space. 14’ high bay door. 16’ ceiling height, good for mezzanine. Separate hydro, gas and water meters. Inquiries please call 519-465-8421 or 519-669-1461 ext. 22.

Matt 7:13-23

519-669-2319 | www.wbconline.ca

> Spacious

WORDSEARCH % ( $ 7 ( 1

“Words Without Works”

- one bedroom apartment, furnished, laundry facilities, parking, deck, electric heat, cable TV. No pets, adult building. References. $695 inclusive. First & last. 519638-3013

PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

rm A Wlcaome e W all! to

Sunday 10:30am am Sunday Worship: Worship: 10:00 Sunday School during during Worship Worship Minister: Rev. Rev.Dave DaveJagger Jagger

PETS

One Bedroom apartment for rent in Elmira, available October 1, with private entrance, gas fireplace, private laundry. Also includes hydro, heat, air conditioning, cable and wireless internet. $700/ month. 519-669-0306.

SUNDAY SCHOOL

St. Teresa

RENTALS

20 Martins LN, Elmira, ON. N3B 2A1 Fax: 519-669-8331 Email: info@vacutrux.com

> St. Clements Community Wide Garage Sale & BBQ Saturday September 10, 2011 8:00am to 1:00pm For information contact Jen Connolly 519-699-9277 or Melanie Martin 519-6995116 Find us on Facebook! Search St. Clements Recreation Service Board

Trinity United Church, Elmira

> MEGAMUTTS

Progressive truck body builder requires team players for days and evenings. Apply in person, 8 am to 5 pm, Monday to Friday.

GARAGE SALES

Sunday, August 28, 2011 casual dress | contemporary music | christian church

SUNDAYS AYS @ 10:30AM Services at John Mahood Public School A

5 First St., Elmira • 519-669-1459 www.elmiracommunity.org

10:00 AM

“When You’re Struggling With Depression” 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 Check out our website www.woodsidechurch.ca


CLASSIFIEDS 24

THE OBSERVER

NOTICE OF COMPLETE APPLICATION AND PUBLIC MEETING Tuesday September 20, 2011 7:00 p.m. Township Council Chambers 24 Church Street West, Elmira Regarding the following Applications Benjamin Realty Inc. – Zone Change 13/2011 and Weide-Lea Farms Limited – Zone Change 14/2011 Take Notice that in accordance with the Planning Act, R.S.O., 1990, as amended, the Township of Woolwich has received complete applications for the above noted Zone Change applications for proposed Zoning By-law Amendments as detailed below. Please be advised that Notice of a Complete Application does not indicate whether the municipality is in support of, or in opposition to the proposals. That determination will be made at a later date.

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

Use Area in the Township Official Plan and is zoned Agricultural (A). The 36 hectare property contains two single family dwellings, a barn and three sheds. The purpose of the application is to amend the Agricultural zone with a site specific provision to recognize the second permanent single family dwelling located on the property. Please Note: APPEALS: Zoning Amendments If a person or public body that files a notice of appeal of a decision of the Council of the Township of Woolwich in respect of the proposed zoning by-laws does not make oral submissions at a public meeting or make written submissions to the Council of the Township of Woolwich before the proposed zoning by-law amendments are passed:

The Township of Woolwich will hold a Public Meeting, under Section 34 of the Planning Act, to consider the following Zone Change applications. No decisions will be made at this meeting; its a)the person or public body is not entitled to appeal the decision of the Township of Woolwich to purpose is to provide additional information to the public and agencies and to receive comments the Ontario Municipal Board; and b)the person or public body may not be added as a party to the hearing of an appeal before the and information from them. Ontario Municipal Board unless, in the opinion of the Board, there are reasonable grounds to add the person or public body as a party. Benjamin Realty Inc. – Zone Change 13/2011 The Township has received a Zone Change application from Benjamin Realty Inc. for the property located at 758 Benjamin Road and described as German Company Tract Part Lot 25 (see Map 1). The property is designated Rural Land Use Area in the Township Official Plan and is zoned Agricultural (A). The 19 hectare property contains a single family dwelling, detached garage, shed, barn, two hoop house structures and a tree farm.

NOTIFICATION: If you wish to be notified of additional Township public meetings, Township staff reports or the decision of the Township of Woolwich regarding these applications you must make a written request to Engineering and Planning Services at the Township of Woolwich at the address shown at the top of this page. If you cannot attend the meeting, you can express your concerns/comments about the proposed change in writing to the Township of Woolwich. Any comments received on or before September 13, 2011 (Note that this date is before the public meeting) will be included in a report prepared by Engineering and Planning Services and presented at the Public Meeting. Any comments received after the Public Meeting, but prior to Council making a decision on the applications, will also be considered.

The purpose of the application is to amend the Agricultural zone with a site specific provision to The personal information accompanying your submission is being collected under the authority allow the following within the area of the barn and two hoop houses: of the Planning Act and may form part of the public record which may be released to the public. • permit the retail of products, including but not limited to bagged soil, fertilizer, mulch, and grass Questions about this collection should be directed to the Records and Freedom of Information seed, and assorted pots and containers, all of which are complimentary or accessory products Officer at 519-669-6005 or 519-664-2613 ext. 6005. to the sale of nursery trees grown on the property. The proposed retail area is approximately 2 square metres inside the existing barn and approximately 7 square metres outside the barn / MORE INFORMATION: The public may view planning documents and background material relating to this application at the Township of Woolwich, Engineering and Planning Services Department hoop house; between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, or on the Township website at • permit the retail of greenery items, including but not limited to wreaths, boughs, garland, urn www.woolwich.ca. fillers, and centre pieces in an approximate 150 square metre area inside one of the existing Questions or written submissions may be directed to: hoop houses. The greenery is currently grown at a family farm located outside of the Township of Woolwich municipality; and Engineering and Planning Services Department Box 158 • provide for an approximate 99 square metre indoor work / seating area in the existing barn for 24 Church Street West agri-tourism related uses such as school and club tours and a customer rest area. Elmira, Ontario N3B 2Z6 Weide-Lea Farms Limited – Zone Change 14/2011 Telephone: 519-669-1647 / 519-664-2613 The Township has received a Zone Change application from Weide-Lea Farms Limited for the property located at 1770 – 1772 Shantz Station Road and described as German Company Tract Part Lot 105 (see Map 2). The property is designated Rural Land Use Area and Restricted Land Dated at the Township of Woolwich this 27th day of August, 2011. New Maryhill Community Fitness Program-“Come and get fit as a bell with Mel!” 10 week fitness program to be offered on Tuesdays starting September 20 from 6:45 pm to 8:00 pm at the Maryhill Community Centre. Registration will take place attend the info/registration session on Tuesday, September 13 at 6:45 pm at the Maryhill Community Centre of call Dave Ruetz at 519-669-7047 ZOOMERS, BOOMERS, AND SENIORS IN WOOLWICH TOWNSHIP-Come and participate in a newly formed group “New Horizons”. Program runs the 2nd Thursday of the month starting Thursday, September 8, 2011 from 10am-11:30 am at the Maryhill Heritage Park Community Centre 58 St. Charles St. E. For further information contact: Joan Haid-New Horizons Program Coordinator-519-648-2742 Dave Ruetz-Program Coordinator Township of Woolwich-519-669-7047 or druetz@woolwich.ca


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

25 CLASSIFIEDS

Township of Woolwich

TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH

Registration Information

Website Calendar

Why Wait IN LINE? Register ONLINE! Why Register Online? 3 Easy Steps!

Showcase A Local Event for FREE! 5

7

6

8

YOU CAN POST YOUR EVENT ON THE TOWNSHIP ONLINE CALENDAR IF IT IS: 9

• BENEFICIAL TO THE COMMUNITY • HELD IN10WOOLWICH • A NOT FOR PROFIT EVENT

11

12

14

WOOLWICH MEMORIAL CENTRECENTRE - August Public SkatingPublic Skating WOOLWICH MEMORIAL - August The ice ice is in! skatesyour and joinskates us at the WMC... The is Grab in! your Grab and join us at the WMC... Tuesday Aug 23 & 30 9:30 – 10:20 am

Loonie Skate $1/person Loonie Skate 12 – 12:50 pm $1/person Shinny Hockey 2:30 – 3:20 pm 2:30 – 3:20 pm $6.70/person Loonie Skate 3:30 – 4:20 pm 3:30 – 4:20 pm $1/person

Wednesday Aug 24 & 31

Visit www.woolwich.ca and click on “Recreation Program Registration” under the Quicklinks. This will bring you to the ActiveNet client website: enter your information, and press ‘Submit’

01

Choose an Activity

Easy

24 

Three simple steps and you’ll be enrolled in the program of your choice.

02

In less than five minutes, you can setup your account and enrol for your program.

For more information contact: Christine Broughton Director of Council and Information Services/Clerk Phone: 519-669-6004 Email: cbroughton@woolwich.ca

Monday Aug 22 & 29

24

The flexibility to register and pay at your convenience, anytime, from anywhere.

Saves Time

For more event posting policies, or to post an event visit: www.woolwich.ca 13

Set up an Account

Convenient

Thursday

Aug 25 & Sept 1

Friday

Aug 26 & Sept 2

Immediate!

You know immediately if you have secured your spot.

Fall 2011

2:30 – 3:20 pm 2:30 – 3:20 pm

2:30 – 3:20 pm

3:30 – 4:20 pm 3:30 – 4:20 pm

3:30 – 4:20 pm

* No Sticks be allowed any of the Loonie Skates * NoSkate Skate Aids Aids ororSticks willwill be allowed duringduring any of the Loonie Skates * As CSAApproved Approved helmets are required for 16 anyone 16 and under, NO EXCEPTIONS! * Asalways, always, CSA helmets are required for anyone and under, NO EXCEPTIONS! For more information call the WMC at 519.669.1647 x7001 For more information call the WMC at 519.669.1647 x7001

WOOLWICH MEMORIAL CENTRE CLOSURES The WMC Pool will be CLOSED September 3 – 25, 2011 for annual maintenance. The Woolwich Memorial Centre will be CLOSED to the public on Thursday September 8, 2011 from 6:30 am – 4 pm for Facility Maintenance. For more information please contact Customer Service at: 519.669.1647 ext. 7001

THE WOOLWICH TOWNSHIP RECREATION GUIDE TO PROGRAMS & SERVICES will be distributed with the RECORD for those with subscriptions

or the weekend flyers for non subscribers, this weekend August 27. Please watch for your delivered copy or pick one up at the WMC, Woolwich Township Arena (WTA), Township Administration Building, Public Library in Elmira or St. Jacobs Medical Offices, businesses around the Township, or call 519-669-6026 to request a copy. Large print copies will be available at the Township Administration office 24 Church St. W. Elmira.

Pay and Relax!

03

 

Pay using your Credit Card Your spot is confirmed “on the spot” Please note that a small online convenience fee will apply

Adult Programs

Aquatics

PD Days & Daycamps

Registration Starts September 6th Online and Inline Programs Run

Registration Starts Sept. 13, 6:30 am Online and Inline Program Runs Sept 26 – Dec 19

PD Days: Sept 23 & Nov 18 Christmas Camp: Jan 3 – 6th, 2012 Registration Ongoing Online and Inline www.woolwich.ca/register

Registration Starts December 20th Online and Inline Programs Run Beginning January 9th

Registration Starts December 20, 6:30 am Online and Inline Program Runs Jan 9 – Mar 10

PD Days: Feb 3 & Apr 20 March Break Day Camp: Mar 12 – 16 Registration Ongoing Online and Inline www.woolwich.ca/register

Beginning September 26th

12 – 12:50 pm

Fall / Winter Registration Information

9:30 – 10:20 am

12 – 12:50 pm

Under “Other Services” select Register for Programs Register for Swim Lessons and Adult Special Programs Narrow your search using Program Category and SubCategory - choose your class based on which day and time suits you best!

Winter 2012

APPLY TO BE A MEDAL BEARER IN THE 25TH ANNIVERSARY RICK HANSEN RELAY The Rick Hansen Relay will be travelling through St. Jacobs and Elmira on Saturday December 3rd. You can be a part of the Tour by applying to be one of two Township of Woolwich MedalBearer representatives. A medal-bearer must: • Be at least 13 years of age as of August 24, 2011. There is no maximum age limit. • Have transportation to the assigned meeting point and from the finish of the Relay segment. • Be able to participate unaccompanied in the two- to three-hour Medal-Bearer experience. • Wear the Medal-Bearer uniform – created by Nike – provided by the Relay team for the duration of their experience. Submissions: All submissions will be reviewed by Township of Woolwich Staff and the Mayor. Two medalbearers and two alternates will be selected. All submissions must include: 1. First Name & Last Name, date of birth, address, telephone number, email address. 2. 500-words (maximum) on how you have made a difference in your community through determination, courage, leadership or teamwork, and why you should be chosen to represent the Township of Woolwich. All submissions are due by Friday, September 2, 2011. Submissions can be: 1. completed through the online survey on the Township’s Website, www.woolwich.ca under the “News & Events” menu; 2. dropped off at the Township Administration Building to the second floor; or 3. emailed to Steph Thomas at sthomas@woolwich.ca. Thank you for applying. Successful applicants will be notified by the end of September.


CLASSIFIEDS 26

THE OBSERVER

FAMILY ALBUM

ANNIVERSARY

ANNIVERSARY

Michelle Nadine Zitars

Coles, Beverley Catherine

June 22 1974 - August 24 2010 I thought of you with love today, But that is nothing new. I thought about you yesterday. And days before that too. I think of you in silence. I often speak your name. Now all I have are memories. And your picture in a frame. Your memory is my keepsake. With which I'll never part. God has you in his keeping. I have you in my heart. ...miss you so much...

Love & Best Wishes From Your Family

Big sister Kaylin Announces… The arrival of the hot new little slugger on the Vogel team.

> HARE, David Henry – With great sadness the family of

David Henry Hare announces his tragic passing on Saturday, August 20, 2011. David was born December 22, 1975 in Meaford.

> JANTZI,

Ira J. – Passed away peacefully at St. Mary’s Hospital, on Tuesday, August 23, 2011, Ira of Wellesley in his rd 83 year.

> SAUDER, Minerva – Passed away peacefully on Friday, August 19, 2011 at Louise Marshall Hospital, Mount Forest at the age of 71. She had many local relatives.

JACKSON TRAVIS VOGEL After 9 months in the farm league he made his major league debut on July 7th, 2011 @ 6:03 p.m. Stats: 7 lbs 12 oz, 21.5 inches Proud Coaches: Travis & Sarah Vogel Proud Assistant Coaches: Kevin & Diane Vogel and Peter & Cheryl Reynolds. Special #1 fans: St. Jacobs midwives, Dr. Shannon and The Grand River staff. We love you now and always and will forever – Kaylin, Mommy & Daddy.

TOWNSHIP OF WOOLWICH CLASS ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT

HECKENDORN

DEATH NOTICES

LOVE YOUR FAMILY

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENT

Mom

OBITUARY

Happy 40th Anniversary

Happy 25th Anniversary

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

Floradale Road Structure #050106

NOTICE OF STUDY COMMENCEMENT

Stacey and Mike Heckendorn of Elmira are pleased to announce the safe arrival of their baby boy,

Blake Michael born August 6, 2011, weighing 7 lbs 13 oz. Welcomed by big sister Rachel and proud grandparents, Karen and Harold Taylor and Julie and Brian Heckendorn of Elmira. Many thanks to Doctor Oliver and the staff at Grand River Hospital. We love you so much little Blake xo.

Mr. Richard Sigurdson, C.E.T. Manager of Engineering Township of Woolwich 24 Church Street West Elmira, ON N3B 2Z6 Tel: 519-669-6033 Fax: 519-669-4669 E-mail: rsigurdson@woolwich.ca

Mr. Scott Davis, P. Eng. Senior Structural Engineer, Bridge Design AECOM Canada Ltd. 50 Sportsworld Crossing Road, Suite 290 The Project Team invites public input and comments, and will incorporate them into the Kitchener Ontario planning and design of this project. The public will be notified in advance of the Public Tel: 519-650-8705 Information Centre that will be held to present information on the project and receive Fax: 519-650-3425 public feedback. To submit comments or request further information, please contact: E-mail: Scott.Davis@aecom.com The Township of Woolwich, through their consultant AECOM, is undertaking an Environmental Assessment for the Floradale Road structure #050106, to assess whether the bridge should be rehabilitated or replaced. The project will be carried out under Schedule “B” in accordance with the requirements of the Class Environmental Assessment for Municipal Projects. The map below shows the location of the structure.

Peacefully after a courageous battle with cancer on Tuesday, August 23, 2011 at K.W. Health Centre of Grand River Hospital. Beverley Catherine (Habel) Coles age 69 years of Elmira. Dear wife and best friend of Gerry for 46 years. Beloved daughter of Jean (Leis) Habel and the late Lloyd Habel (February 11, 2011). Loving and devoted mother of Cara Jean and Brad Janson of Kitchener and grandma of Cole, Parker and Sidney. Predeceased by her brother Warren (1966). Cremation has taken place. Friends and relatives may call at the Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira on Friday, August 26th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A memorial service to celebrate Beverley Catherine’s life will be held in the funeral home chapel on Saturday, August 27th at 11:00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to Grand River Regional Cancer Centre or Sunnybrook Hospital would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. A special thank you to the Care Partners team of Nurses, for their wonderful care and compassion to Beverley Catherine and her family. www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com TRAVEL WITH THE

Take your Observer on all your travels, take a picture with it and then send it in to us. info@woolwichobserver.com


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

27 CLASSIFIEDS

REAL ESTATE FEATURE PROPERTY

$284,900

3bdrm, 2bath home features MF Cathedral ceilings. Loc’d on lg beautiful treed corner lot full of perennials. Potential for pool or double garage. Bright, open kit w/breakfast bar. X-lg slider in DR to 17ftx19ft deck. Airy LR w/hrdwd flrs. Whirlpool bath, RR gas FP, lndy rm walk out, Lg 19x24ft storage rm. MLS Call Paul direct.

$575,000

Come and see this attractive 1810 sq ft raised 3+1 bdrm. bungalow on approx 1 acre w/ beautifully manicured gardens. Newer roof and mostly newer flooring. Oriented to seniors with main floor bedroom and laundry. Wood Fireplace. w/o Basement. Backs on Greenbelt, Separate Dining Rm. Rec Room. Family Room. Detached Workshop. MLS Call Paul direct.

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage Independently Owned and Operated | 180 Weber St. S., Waterloo

OFFICE 519-888-7110

RAISED BUNGALOW

Paul Martin SALES REPRESENTATIVE

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-503-9533 www.homeswithpaul.ca

Paul will donate $250.00 with every home he buys or sells in Woolwich to both Park Manor PS & WCS Family Violence Prevention Program.

UNIQUE SIDESPLIT!

Meet “Olivia”, another fabulous home by Verdone. 2216sqft plus fin'd bsmnt. Many quality finishes some incl: Ceramic, Hrdwd, oversized trim & mf crown moulding. MF lndy, spacious LR, Dinette walk out to covered 16.4 x 9.4ft deck. Fabulous must see kit built for convienience, French drs to mf den. Lg master w/crown moulding, 2 walk ins, lg beautiful ens w/free standing tub & oversized glass shower. MLS Call Paul Direct

CHARMING BUNGALOW

$269,000

Located on quiet street, only a 2 min walk to park. This extremely well kept home features 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, large finished basement and big laundry room. Newer carpet in living room dinette and hall. Handsome newer oak kitchen cupboards. Nice, private 71ft x 122ft yard with wonderful perennial gardens, large vegetable garden and deck. MLS Call Paul Direct

$274,900

Don’t miss this handsome open concept home in Sought after Southfield. Loc’d right beside park backing onto farmland. MF consists of LR, bright kit w/fabulous skylight & dinette w/slider. Upstairs has 3 nice sized bdrms & master walk in & main bath w/tub surround. Downstairs is the lg FR w/gas FP, open to dinette. Fin’d RR w/closet wall perfect for storage. MLS Call Paul direct.

Alli Bauman CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-577-6248

BRIGHT AND SPACIOUS

$299,900

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

OPEN HOUSE - 142 Oriole Pkwy, Elmira | Sunday, Aug 28th, 2-4pm

SPACIOUS RAISED BUNGALOW

$369,900

$273,000

$393,500

NEW LISTING

$192,900

CALL CALL DIRECT DIRECT

519-588-1348

www.elmiraandareahomes.com

$849,000

$319,000

0.78 acre lot in the quaint little village of Glen Allan. MLS Call Paul direct.

$154,900

First time home buyers, this is a great starter home with a huge lot backing onto park. The large living room with patio door opens to a spacious deck & very private yard. Features a large country eat in kitchen. Some updates include furnace (2008), laminate flooring, deck, and some newer windows. Lots of potential and very affordable. MLS Please call Bill or Alli direct.

LARGER THAN IT LOOKS

$375,000

Spectacular home larger than it looks. 4bdrms, 2 full baths, updated eat-in kit w/cupboards to spare, den, lg cold room. Hrdwd flr in LR & DR, gas heating stove in FR. Fantastic home for any hobbyist w/craft rm & workshops. Balcony overlooking stunning perennial gardens, vegetable gardens & fruit trees surrounding this tranquil home loc’d on lg .69 acre lot. MLS Call Paul direct.

FABULOUS BUNGALOW

INDUSTRIAL LOT Exceptional corner lot. Great exposure. Industrial 0.95 acre lot on the corner of Union and Donway. MLS Call Paul direct.

$199,500

Impressive 13 ft. cathedral ceiling in great rm. with hrdwd flrs opening to a modern kitchen featuring ceramic flooring, an island, maple cabinets, a desk and a w/in pantry. All 9 appliances included AND a 46" Sanyo wall mounted flat screen TV….WOW!!! Possible In-law set-up in a professionally finished basement with private entrance through garage. Located in a well desired Drayton neighbourhood. MLS Call Alli or Bill direct.

MOVE TO THE SMALL TOWN OF DRAYTON!

Build your dream home on this 0.48 acre lot. MLS Call Paul direct.

BUILD YOUR DREAM HOME ON THIS $79,000

Fantastic opportunity for car buff or hobbyist, 3 car garage & detached 4 car garage/workshop. Inlaw suite w/2 bdrms, full kit, bath, & lndry. lg 87x250ft lot steps to golf course. 5200 sq. ft. of fin’d living space. Grand yrd over looking farm land. MLS Call Paul direct.

MOVE IN AND ENJOY!

Welcome to small town Drayton. A perfect home for that young family. Spacious, neat and tidy semi-detached located close to schools, park, and shopping. Walk-out from dinette to two tiered deck with gazebo and enjoy the privacy of your fenced yard backing onto greenbelt. Lots of updates. MLS Call Alli or Bill direct.

ABSOLUTELY STUNNING

EXCEPTIONAL HOME W/INLAW!

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

$59,000

1853sqft luxurious Verdone home. Carpet free MF, Hrdwd & ceramic, mudrm, MF lndy. Bright LR equip’d w/gas fp. Lg kit abundant w/cupboards, under cabinet lights, breakfast bar. Lg master your own private oasis, spacious walk in closet, 2nd closet, fabulous ensuite: lg vanity, 2 sinks, stunning glass dr shower, soaker tubs in both baths. French door walk-out to covered 16x15ft patio. MLS Call Paul direct.

Unbelievable value to own your own piece of countryside in a small peaceful village with a beautiful panoramic view of the Conestoga River Valley, right from your front porch. Large 24ft X 40ft detached insulated and heated workshop (220amp service) situated on a .74 acre lot. 3 Bedroom and 2 Bathroom. Enjoy the cottage feel right at home! MLS Call Alli or Bill direct.

OPEN HOUSE - 51 Dales Drive, Drayton | Sunday August 28th, 2-4pm

FOUND IT, YOUR NEW HOME!

DOWNTOWN GLEN ALLAN

3 plus bedrooms. Large sunken family room addition features gas fireplace, skylight and walk-out to a huge deck with hot tub and gazebo. Lots of updates through-out including furnace, a/c, windows, flooring and much more. Finished basement with workshop. MLS Call Alli or Bill direct.

COUNTRY SETTING

OPEN CONCEPT

Bill Norris

Raised bungalow in immaculate condition and extremely well maintained. This is a solid brick home with three plus bedrooms located in desirable “Birdland” and is perfect for all ages and ready for immediate occupancy. MLS Call Alli or Bill direct.

BUILT WITH FAMILY IN MIND OPEN HOUSE - 7798 Wellington Rd. 45, Glen Allan | Sat. Aug 27th, 2-4pm

$453,900

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

OPEN HOUSE - 20 Grosbeak Rd, Elmira | Saturday, Aug 27th, 2-4pm

$429,000

On 150ft x 150ft treed lot. Only 30min to Waterloo. Captivating custom built home equip’d w/attractive sunken LR featuring wood burning FP, eat-in kit & sep DR both with walk-outs to wrap around deck. MF lndry & ens. Huge fin’d bsmnt incl RR, FR. MLS Call Paul direct.

No matter what your style...we’ve got what you’re looking for every week in the Real Estate section of the Observer.

IN PRINT | ONLINE | IN PICTURES | IN DEPTH


CLASSIFIEDS 28

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

REAL ESTATE

Sunlight Homes Drayton Heights

VISIT US SATURDAY AND SUNDAY!

ELMIRA REAL ESTATE SERVICES

Independently Owned & Operated, Brokerage 519-669-3192 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

BONNIE BRUBACHER Broker of Record

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

The Edge Semi-detached homes from

ELMIRA SEMI!

NEW CONSTRUCTION

ELMIRA 2 STOREY

$259,900. Starter on 4 years

$219,900. Clean, 3 bdrms, 2 baths, some newer windows, large bright living rm., spacious kitchen and dinette, all appliances included, central air, rec. rm., walkout to deck & 150’ deep fenced yard. NEW MLS

$319,900. 1580 sq ft, 4 Bedroom

$309,900. Single detached! Backs onto greenspace, 1.5 car garage, dbl driveway, open concept main floor w/spacious kit & dinette, sunken liv rm., w/gas fireplace, walkout to deck & private fenced yard, finished basement, 3 bdrms, 4 baths. MLS

$239,990

Barrister and Solicitor

Learn More About Sunlight Heritage Homes and Our fine communities by Visiting us Today! Alyssa Henry Lisa Hansen Tribble Sales Representative

519.787.0203

Have a question? Email us at: info@sunlighthomes.ca

Find local open house locations listed here every Saturday.

Phone: 519-669-1736 Fax: 519-210-1736 scott@propertyshop.ca

BROKERAGE

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. 45 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

BRAD MARTIN

519-669-2772

MVA Residential

Broker of Record,

JULIE HECKENDORN

TRACEY WILLIAMS

Res: 519.669.1068

Res: 519.669.8629

Cell: 519.505.0627

Broker

Sales Rep.

Independently Owned and Operated

OFFICE: 519-669-5426

BERT MARTIN, BROKER

DRAYTON BUNGALOW!

This home located in a private setting offers four bedrooms, three bathrooms, one & one half garage and a heated pool on a large lot. MLS. Call Bert to View.

CLOSE TO DOWNTOWN - Open concept bungalow backs to greenspace. Fireplace in L.R./D.R. Hdwd. floor. W/O to deck. Ensuite priv. Fin. bsmt. w/lge. windows - huge rec. rm. games area, 4th bdrm. 3pc. bath. Single+ garage, dble. drive. MLS $309,900.

Charming older home with lots of character located on a quiet tree lined street offers 3 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, many recent renovations including kitchen, bathrooms, windows, doors, trim, flooring, lighting, drywall, paint, soffits & eaves. MLS. Call Bert to view.

$319,900

COUNTRY ACREAGE!

Great property on the edge of town backing to river offers century home with 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, large family room addition, attached single garage, 5 acres of manicured orchard with a mix of fruit trees, 12 acres workable. Three one storey out buildings totaling 10,000 s/f. MLS. Call Bert to View.

$375,000

BUNGALOW!

Mature trees surround this home featuring 3+1 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, finished basement with fireplace & walk-up, large attached 2 car garage, great deck & patio, backs to green space. Only 10 minutes to Guelph and K-W. MLS. Call Bert to View.

$414,900

COMMERCIAL OFFICE SPACE for lease in busy plaza in Elmira. Your referrals are appreciated!

CRESCENT LOCATION - Village of Heidelberg. Hardwood flooring in D.R. & all bedrooms. Main flr. family room addition w/ walkout to deck & patio. Updated windows, shingles and furnace. Extra-long concrete driveway. MLS $319,900.

www.thurrealestate.com

$264,900

LEON MARTIN

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage | Independently Owned and Operated

Y2 ONL

! LEFT

THIS WEEK’S LISTINGS WITH PROPERTYSHOP.CA

PRICE: $210,000

4B Arthur St. S. Elmira • www.remaxsolidgold.biz

Call Bert For Your FREE Market Evaluation

CALL A PARTICIPATING LAWYER TO FIND OUT HOW PROPERTYSHOP.CA CAN WORK FOR YOU IN THE SALE OF YOUR MOST IMPORTANT ASSET.

75 Edward Street, Drayton - Property ID# 2531

CUSTOM BUILT! - Private back yard. Open concept bungalow offers lost of cupboards and a lge. island. W/O to large deck and gazebo. 3pc. ensuite bath. Guest bdrm. or office. Fin. bsmt. offers huge rec. rm./ games area, 2 bdrms., 4pc. bath and lots of storage. MLS $499,900.

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

ED UC D RE

home built by Paradigm Elmira Homes. Offers gas fireplace, 3 baths including 4 pc ensuite. Natural oak cabinetry with breakfast bar. Walk-in front foyer closet, great for the family. Covered future back porch area. Exclusive.

Scott Grainger

Many models to choose from

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

MONIQUE ROES Sales Representative

FIRST TIME BUYERS

old. 3 Bedrooms, 2 baths, walk out from dinette to deck and fenced yard. Oversized garage with access to back yard. Kitchen appliances included. Visit this Sunday. MLS

from

www.sunlighthomes.ca

LAURIE LANGDON Sales Representative

$189,990

Choose from one of our plans or let us custom build your home fully detached. Homes starting

Sales Representative

SHANNA ROZEMA Broker.

COUNTRY LOTS .5 acre don’t miss this chance to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. Within 40 minutes KW, or Guelph. High speed internet is available with fibre optic. Starting at $68,000 MLS

Two storey 3 bed and 3 bath room home on a half acre lot, open concept, high speed fibre optic internet available. $319,900 MLS. Financing available O.A.C.

A GREAT PLACE TO START! A great place to settle for empty nesters! This 3 bedroom semi presents amazing value to the sharp buyer. You won’t find a private, shaded yard like this in other semis at this price point, this close to home. The backyard is green, quiet fully fenced, ready for your active children, pets and barbecues. Entering the home you will note a spacious, separate dining room, adjacent to a tidy kitchen and dinette...everything NEW LISTING you need to entertain friends and family. A main floor addition adds excellent living room space, including a beautiful gas fireplace and patio sliders to the deck. Completing the picture downstairs, you will find a 2 piece bath, conveniently located to the front door, kitchen and dining area. Upstairs, you will discover three bedrooms, all spacious with ample closets. Your basement is partially finished and could be easily dressed up as a recreation room or play space...Lots of room for your home theatre or kids playroom. Drayton isn’t far away, just half an hour to Kitchener-Waterloo or Guelph. Discover the value and live better for less! Call Carlos to arrange a viewing today!

63 Sugar King Drive, Elmira - Property ID# 2525

PRICE: $328,800

LOCATION EQUALS CONVENIENCE! This 3 Bedroom Ivystone Home is only 5 years old and could not be more conveniently located to recreational and school amenities in the desirable town of Elmira. 63 Sugar King Drive, originally intended as a builder’s model, features premium finishes, “character” maple hardwood in the livingroom and solid maple cabinetry in the well appointed kitchen. The “Lilac”, includes a master with walk-in closet and ensuite bath, in addition to the main bath on the second floor and a powder room on the main level. Approaching the home you will note a full two car garage and lovely landscaping as you ascend the porch to the front entry. Entering the foyer, your eyes lead you into the kitchen where you will discover beautiful maple cabinetry, flowing towards a spacious dinette. The adjacent livingroom room is blessed with maple hardwood and provides enough room for separate dining space! Upstairs, this home includes a generous master bedroom with a vaulted ceiling, palladium window and a 3 piece ensuite. The second and third bedrooms are also located on this level and are large enough in size for your children to share. Closet space is excellent in all three bedrooms. This home has been professionally painted and is well decorated throughout. You will find that the yard is fully enclosed and ready for the kids with a substantial deck and an impressive play house. The basement is unfinished but insulated and ready for drywall, including rough-ins for a downstairs bath. When you do bring the drywall in, you’ll be pleased to discover that the basement windows are oversized and will accommodate a full 4x8 sheet! Central air, a high efficiency furnace and rough-in for central vac complete the technical picture. Call Carson or Joanne at (519) 503-1355 to arrange a viewing or watch for open house announcements on this site!

PROPERTY ID#’s 2525 & 2531

Space for lease. 4000 square feet. Available immediately. Industrial in Waterloo. $2700 per month. MLS

CALL THE 24 HOUR INFO LINE FOR MORE DETAILS: 519-742-5700 | 1-866-432-6884 + Property ID# is extension

ADDRESS: 4-B Arthur St. S., ELMIRA • EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net DIRECT: 519-503-2753 • OFFICE: 519-669-5426

for photos & full descriptions • www.propertyshop.ca

or visit us online at:

TEL: 519.669.5790 EMAIL: info@observerxtra.com


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

29 CLASSIFIEDS

Insects to blame for many of our illnesses over the years Q.

From a Cleveland reader: “Are you good at math? Then try to complete the last two in this sequence: 1=3, 2=3, 3=5, 4=4, 5=4, 6=3, 7=5, 8=5, 9=4, 10=3, 11=?, 12=?”

A.

Though the setup question implies a need for good math skills, the answer doesn’t involve math so much as “thinking outside the box.” Since the answer to each example is the number of letters in the written number (“one” = 3 letters, “three” = 5), then 11 = 6 and 12 = 6, because “eleven” and “twelve” both have 6 letters.

Q.

Taken from the title character of T. S. Eliot’s 1915 poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” comes the adjective “Prufrockian.” What kind of lover is that?

A.

One marked by timidity and indecisiveness and beset by unfulfilled aspirations, says Anu Garg in The Dord, The Diglot, and an Avocado or Two. The aging hero Prufrock is haunted by his cautious approach to life, lament-

Strange But True Bill & Rich Sones

ing “I have measured out my life with coffee spoons.” He also wonders about all the possible romances he didn’t dare broach: “Do I dare disturb the universe?” Concludes Garg, “If only Prufrock had known Tennyson’s lines written in 1850: “’Tis better to have loved and lost Than never to have loved at all.”

Q. A.

What are a few of history’s truly diabolical bugs?

Members of Christopher Columbus’s crew cut off their toes, so desperate were they to rid themselves of infestations of the chigoe flea, which burrows under toenails and lays eggs there, says Amy Stewart in Wicked Bugs. Typhus-infested body lice helped bring down Napoleon Bonaparte’s army during its failed 1812 campaign against Russia; a century later, during the Russian Civil War, Vladimir Lenin declared, “Either so-

cialism will defeat the louse, or the louse will defeat socialism.” Malaria, called our “forever enemy,” comes from the Italian word for “bad air,” mirroring the commonly held belief that malaria was simply present in the air. But some early medical texts referencing malarial fever suggested an insect bite could be the cause. We now know that mosquitoes are to blame, as they also are for dengue fever, yellow fever, Rift Valley fever and about a hundred others. In fact, roughly one in five of all insect-transmitted diseases come from mosquitoes, making them the world’s deadliest insect, Stewart says. “Malaria is believed to have killed more people than all wars combined.”

Q.

The “Oxford English Dictionary” described finding “kangaroo words” as a “fiendishly difficult word game.” Are you word-maven enough to cite a few examples?

A.

Within the letters of a “marsupial” word “nestles” (and “nests”) a small word, or “joey” (baby kangaroo), that means the same as the grown word, says

wordsmith Richard Lederer online. The letters of the joey must be in proper order though not entirely adjacent; for example, playing with kangaroo words, your mind will “blossom” and hence “bloom.” Balled up inside your “stockings” are your “socks.” Hiding in “nougat” and “neurotic” are two different kinds of “nut.” Things “Brobdingnagian” and “lumbering” are “big.” Some kangaroo words even contain multiple joeys: Open up a “container” and you get a “can” and a “tin”; when you’ve “feasted, you “eat” and have “fed”; and when you “deteriorate,” you “rot” and “die.” To be “stealthy,” “slippery” or “slinky” is to be “sly.” To “broadcast” “bombast” is to “boast” and “boast.” Lurking in “falsities,” “falsifies,” “fallacies,” “calumnies,” “hyperbolizes” and “plagiarizes” is the word “lies.” And “dead” reposes in “deactivated,” “desiccated,” “decayed,” “disintegrated,” “decapitated,” “departed” and “deceased.”

>

Send STRANGE questions to brothers Bill and Rich at strangetrue@cs.com

SERVICE PROS AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

AUTOMOTIVE

TIRE Body Maintenance

at

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

WHERE TIRES

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE. Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial • On-The-Farm Service

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

519-669-3232

BIKE REPAIRS

BICYCLE SALES & REPAIRS

Buy your bike from us and get a FREE annual inspection!

519.669.8330

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519.669.8917

CARPET CARE

ORTLIEB CRANE & Equipment Ltd.

ST. JACOBS

PARTS EXTRA

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

STORE HOURS: M-F: 8-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

ELECTRICAL

READ’S • Residential • Commercial • Industrial ECRA/ESA Licence # 7000605

519.669.3658

(Emergencies only)

7 Days A Week

NOW ACCEPTING NEW CLIENTS

$139 FREE Gift Offer Learn More Online At...

budurl.com/SAVE139 Chem-Dry Acclaim® 61 Arthur St., N. Elmira

669-3332

THOMPSON’S

Auto Tech Inc. Providing the latest technology to repair your vehicle with accuracy and confidence.

21 Industrial Dr. Elmira Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400

519-669-7652

31 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA www.thompsonsauto.ca

CONCRETE

CONSTRUCTION

CONSTRUCTION

Design/ Build Agricultural/ Residential 6672 Ruggles Rd. Floradale RR#2 Wallenstain, N0B 2S0

-Framing -Roofing -Renovations -Repairs

519-669-3082

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

GLASS SERVICES

AUTO CLINIC

Ltd.

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Decorative/Stamped and coloured concrete CALL NOW TO BOOK YOUR FALL PROJECTS

519-638-2699

EAVESTROUGH

ST. JACOBS

Randy Weber

27 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

24 Hour Service

World’s Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

AUTOMOTIVE

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

DECORATING

FOR ALL YOUR HOME DECORATING NEEDS.

519-669-3373

AFTER HOURS

519-664-9999

20

Specializing in Paint & Wall coverings

1-800-CARSTAR

FAX: 519.669.3210

• 14 ton BoomTruck • 40 ton Mobile Crane

$

SINCE 1961

24 Hour Accident Assistance

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

CRANE

PROFESSIONAL BIKE MECHANIC ON STAFF

DECORATING

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

ARE A

Call Us At

519-669-3373

Complete Collision Service

AUTOMOTIVE

519.669.1462 Fax: 519.669.9970 Tel:

18 Kingfisher Dr., Elmira

GLASS SYSTEMS INC. 1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

FREE ESTIMATES • Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

TEL: 519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104 FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

Home Improvements

WINDOWS & DOORS

ROOFING | SIDING | SOFFIT & FACIA DRYWALL INSTALLATION

MURRAY MARTIN | 519.669.9308 1722 Floradale Rd., Elmira, ON, N3B 2Z1

AGRICULTURAL • COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL • High Quality Installation of Steel & Aluminum Eavestrough • Rugged Steel Eavestrough for Today’s Metal Roofing Systems

JEREMY MARTIN

PH 519-502-4679 | Fax 519-291-6624

xcountryeaves@live.ca

8632 Concession 3, RR#3 Listowel, ON, N4W 3G8


CLASSIFIEDS 30

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

SERVICE PROS PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

PAINTING

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

Renovating? Let us do the clean up

RENOVATION CLEAN UPS! Call for Details

www.completecarpetcare.ca

ROB McNALL

519-669-7607

LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

MEDICAL TREATMENT

Established 2000

F. David Reimer

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications: ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102 PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

Murray & Daniel Shantz ALMA, ONTARIO

PHONE:

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

www.reimerhbot.com

519.846.5427 FAX: 519.846.5134 PLUMBING

519-669-0220

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

ROOFING

519-669-2251

27 Brookemead, St, Elmira

36 Hampton St., Elmira

kdetweiler@rogers.com

C.J.

For all your Plumbing Needs.

BRUBACHER LTD.

24 HOUR SERVICE

19 First St. E., Elmira

ELMIRA

KEVIN DETWEILER

P: 519-669-1188 | F: 519-669-9369

OWNER-OPERATOR

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES

YOUR SOURCE FOR YEAR-ROUND PROPERTY MAINTENANCE • Lawn Mowing Packages • Lawn Maintenance & Landscaping • Top Dressing/Overseeding • Mulch Delivery & Installation • Commercial & Residential Snow Plowing & Ice Control

519-669-3362

SEPTIC SERVICES

NOW BOOKING OFFERING A QUICK AND EASY WAY TO RECLAIM UNUSED LAND

Brush Mowing/Long Grass | Capable of mowing up to 6 inch diameter brush Tracked Skid Steer equipped with Brush Mower

Call Jeff Basler, Owner/Operator, today 519.669.9081 mobile: 519.505.0985 fax: 519.669.9819 | ever-green@sympatico.ca

SELF STORAGE

- Trail Maintenance and Development - Wooded Lot Thinning - Pasture Reclaimation All other - Orchard Maintenance tracked skid steer services - Industrial Lots are available - Real Estate Lots

ROOFING

AMOS

SPECIALISTS!

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

519-669-3652

56 Howard Ave. Unit 2, Elmira, ON, N3B 2E1

Lawn Maint Maintenance Main tenance Programs | Spring Clean-up Flower Bed Maintenance Programs Leaf Clean-up and Removal | Soil & Mulch Delivery & Installation | Snow Clearing & Removal | Ice Control

YOUR Steve PLUMBING Co. & HEATING Steve Jacobi

For more information call:

free estimates interior/exterior painting wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

Services

> Commercial & Residential > Fully Insured > WSIB Clearance > Senior Discount

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

> Excavating > Trenching > Backfilling > Fine Grading > Overseeding & Top Dressing > Lawn Seeding

PLUMBING

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada

20 years experience

Outdoor

ER RS OVYEA 10

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location • Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off and Pick up Service • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair • Janitorial • Grout Cleaning • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping

LAWN MAINTENANCE

Various sizes & rates

CLEAN • DRY • SECURE

Call

519-669-4964

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

SALT

R O O F I N G

• Specializing in residential re-roofs • Repairs • Churches Serving Elmira and Surrounding Area for over 30 years!

BOOK NOW FOR SPRING INSTALLATION. CALL SCOTT SEILING FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE.

519.698.2114 In Business since 1971 • Fully Insured

TREE SERVICE

TOP QUALITY ROOFING SYSTEMS Locally Owned & Operated

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

Since 19 96

Septic Tank Cleaning Roof Replacement Specialists Cedar Shakes Composite Tiles All Flat Roofing Systems

Inspections for Real Estate Septic System Repairs & Restoration Catch Basin Cleaning

Call or email Mike for your FREE estimate.

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Office: 519.206.4484 | Cell: 519.575.0311

or

mbender@rogers.blackberry.net

TREE SERVICE

T R

E

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519-896-7700

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BACKHOE SERVICES

now available

CFB

BACKHOE SERVICES Specializing in ag. drainage, repair, installation

•Hedge trimming

• Welding • Fabricating • Painting • Assembly

•Branch Chipping •Stump Grinding

519-669-1836 Thomas Martin

•Tree Trimming & Removal • Aerial Bucket Trucks • Stump Grinding • Arborist Evaluations • Fully Insured & Certified • Certified to Work Near Power Lines

METALWORK

WINDOW COVERINGS

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

INC

CARPET CARE

• Industrial • Commercial • Agricultural • Residential 381 Hill Street West Montrose

• REPAIR DRAINAGE SYSTEMS WRECKED BY EXCAVATING, ETC.

SERVICE DIRECTORY

THIS SPACE IS FOR RENT

• LAWN, GARDEN DRAINAGE • STUMP REMOVAL • TILE SYSTEM LOCATES

Call Clare at

519.669.1752

Call today to get your business listed!

519.669.5790

www.ObserverXtra.com


THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, August 27, 2011

OBITUARY

31 CLASSIFIEDS

COMMUNITY EVENTS CALENDAR

Austin Paul Martin

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIMEâ&#x20AC;?

1997-2011

Kleensweep Carpet Care

Rugs and Upholstery

â&#x20AC;˘Mattress Cleaning â&#x20AC;˘Residential â&#x20AC;˘Commercial â&#x20AC;˘Personalized Service â&#x20AC;˘Free Estimates West Montrose, ON

T. 519.669.2033

COLLEEN

It is with unspeakable pain and sorrow that we announce the sudden passing of Austin Paul Martin, in his home in St. Jacobs on the evening of Friday, August 19, 2011. He was our life and we will deeply miss the joy and purpose he blessed us with for the past 14 years. If we are granted half of the strength and determination that Austin had, we can somehow make it through this. Our very special boy will be in many hearts and minds forever. Forever remembered by his parents Deborah Louise Martin (Witmer) and Paul Simeon Martin; his big sisters Michelle and her husband Anthony Krasovec of Elmira, Robin and her husband Adam Truppe of London; treasured uncle to Zachary, Cameron, Dominic and Stone. He will also be remembered by his aunts and uncles, Keith Witmer of Hawkesville, Susan and Keith Howard of Alberta, Eric Martin of Kitchener, Jean Swartzentruber and Ron Cressman of Mount Forest, John Martin of Kitchener, Linda and Harry Sahagian of Stouffville, James Witmer of St. Clements; cousins Anne (Zach), Stephen, Daniel (Kathleen), Amanda, Matthew, Jennifer, Tim, Lindsay, and Kyle. Predeceased by his loving Pa-Pa, Allen Witmer, and grandma and grandpa, Carol and Simeon Martin. The family received friends and relatives at Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira, on Tuesday, August 23rd from 7-9 p.m. Funeral service to celebrate Austinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life took place at the Funeral Home Chapel, in Elmira on Wednesday, August 24th at 11 a.m. Friends and family shared their memories following the service at the home of Michelle and Tony Krasovec. In Austinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s memory donations to Hamilton McMaster, Neo-Natal Ward would be appreciated by the family as expressions of sympathy. He will be missed by all whose lives he touched and inspired. www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS â&#x20AC;˘ Design â&#x20AC;˘ Installation â&#x20AC;˘ Custom Fabrication

MILLWRIGHTS LTD.

519.669.5105

P.O. BOX 247, ROUTE 1, ELMIRA

24-HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

TOTAL HOME ENERGY SYSTEMS

RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL

YOUR OIL, PROPANE, NATURAL GAS AND AIR CONDITIONING EXPERTS

11 HENRY ST. - UNIT 9, ST. JACOBS

519.664.2008

SUDUKO - HARD

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PUZZLE SOLUTIONS         

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

        

Puzzle Answers Continued from Page 23.

Skilled craftsmanship. Quality materials. CONSTRUCTION STARTS HERE.

KIN KORNER

519-699-4641

Meetings 3rd Monday of the month, Cedar Barn, Lobsinger Line

www.freybc.com

woolwichkin.com

3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville

AUGUST 27

> WTHHS Historical Room at the Old School, 1137 Henry St., Wellesley between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., featuring old pictures of people and events in Wellesley Township. Come and see if you can help us identify people in the photos. We open the last Saturday of each month, except December. Free admission. AUGUST 30

> Foster Parent Information Night. Did you know there are children in your community who need safe, nurturing homes? To learn how you can help a child in need, please join us at the Foster Parent Information Night at 7 p.m. Call 519-576-0540 or visit www.fosteringkids.ca for more information. SEPTEMBER 5

> 2011 7th Wellesley Soap Box Classic; 2 p.m. (Labour Day). Start: Ramp opposite First St Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lutheran Church, Nafziger Road, Finish: Nafziger Road at Lawrence Street. Four race classes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ages 8 and up. Come out for an afternoon of racing and fun. More information visit www. wellesleyboardoftrade.com. > Wellesley

Lions Fishing Derby will be held again on Monday Sept. 5 at the Albert Erb Conservation Area. A prize of $150 will be offered for the first angler to catch the tagged fish. A great prize table and food booth will be included. Registration begins at 9 a.m.; $7 per angler. Anglers over 16 must have a valid fishing license. All proceed go to fund youth-oriented activities in the village.

SEPTEMBER 6

> Caregiver Coffee Hour 10-11:30 a.m. at Chateau Gardens LTC., Elmira. This group is comprised of those caring for family members who have Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease or related dementia. For more information call Lorraine at Woolwich Community Health Centre 519-664-3794 or Cara at the Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Society 519-742-1422. SEPTEMBER 8

SANYO CANADIAN

MACHINE WORKS INCORPORATED

33 Industrial Dr., Elmira 519.669.1591

> Caregivers Support 10-11:15 a.m. Come join this informal group of caregivers who are acquainted with the struggles you experience. This is an opportunity to meet with others who are in similar situations and to share care giving tips and coping strategies. Call Lorraine at 519-664-3794. Meet at the Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs. SEPTEMBER 9

> H.U.G.S.

NANCY KOEBEL

Bus: 519.895.2044 ext. 217 Home: 519.747.4388

Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Suite 800, 101 Frederick St., Kitchener

Program â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9:15-11:15 a.m. Come meet with other parents to discuss parenting and child health issues. Topic: Developmental and behavioural milestones birth to 5 years. Christine Tofflemire N.P. and Karen Reitzel R.D. will present. No registration required. Held at Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Drive, St. Jacobs. Call Heidi at 519-6643794 ext. 237 for more information.

SEPTEMBER 11

> Calling all former students of S.S. #28 Victoria School for their second reunion to be held at 1 p.m. Please bring any school pictures, memorabilia, stories, favourite potluck dish, refreshments and lawn chairs. This will be held at the home of Danny and Diane Strickler, 467 St. Charles St. E., Maryhill. Let other family and friends know. RSVP to dstrickler@continuum.org or 519-648-2432. > Elvis Gospel Tribute 7 p.m. Everyone welcome, no tickets required. Doug McKenzie in tribute to Elvis. Waterloo North Presbyterian Church, 400 Northfield Dr. West. Free-will offering, wheelchair accessible. For more information call 519888-7870.

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess. Elmira & Surrounding Area

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763 psgingrich@hotmail.ca

SEPTEMBER 12

> Making Baby Food 1-3 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Join a Registered Dietitian at Woolwich Community Health Centre and learn about the foods that are good for your babyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s age and stage, how to choose, make and store baby food and ways to avoid â&#x20AC;&#x153;picky eating.â&#x20AC;? Session will be held at WCHC, 10 Parkside Drive, St. Jacobs. Call 519-664-3794 for more information.

21 INDUSTRIAL DR. ELMIRA

519-669-2884

SEPTEMBER 18

> Two-hour hike and geocaching on the Lions Lake Trail near Floradale 2 p.m. Discover geocaching: the adventure that uses GPS to locate hidden â&#x20AC;&#x153;cachesâ&#x20AC;? around the world. Join hike leader and geocacher John Robinson for an introduction to this exciting trend. Meet at the main entrance to the conservation area. From Elmira, travel north on Arthur St. to Reid Woods Drive. Turn left or west on Reid Woods Drive. Travel approx. 1 km to municipal address #7224 and enter the conservation area on the north side of the road. Meet in the parking lot near the dam. Trail rating: easy, well maintained trail; includes gravel, earthen and grassed sections. Washroom available. Please contact Paul Miller at 519-664-3643 to confirm meeting times and locations. Maps with meeting locations are posted at www.healthywoolwich.org. SEPTMEBER 20

> Do

You Have High Blood Pressure? Join a Registered Dietitian at Woolwich Community Health Centre 2-4 p.m. and learn tips and tools to help control your high blood pressure. Explore how salt intake, portion sizes and weight management can impact your blood pressure. Class will be held at WCHC, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs. Call 519-664-3794 for more information.

SEPTEMBER 22

> First Link Family Learning Forum â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a 4 week educational series designed for family and friends of individuals with Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disease and related dementias. Thursdays, Sept. 22 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Oct. 12, 10-11:30 a.m. Woolwich Community Health Centre, 10 Parkside Dr., St. Jacobs. For more information call 519742-1422.

CORPORATE WEAR PROMOTIONAL APPAREL WORK & SAFETY WEAR | BAGS T-SHIRTS | JACKETS | HATS

245 Labrador Drive | Waterloo

519.886.2102 www.UniTwin.com

PRINTING & COPYING SERVICES Black and white, 8 1/2 X 11 flyers designed and printed for as low as 6¢. Professionally designed, quick turnaround, local service. Delivery, folding and colour work also available. Call 519.669.5790 ext 107 for details.


More Power. Less Fuel. Great Value is a comparison between the entire current Chrysler Canada lineup and the entire 2010 Chrysler Canada lineup. Wise customers read the fine print: •, *, ††, § The Summer Drive One Home Event offers are limited time offers which apply to retail deliveries of selected new and unused models purchased from participating retailers on or after August 3, 2011. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Offers subject to change and may be extended without notice. See participating retailers for complete details and conditions. •$18,995 Purchase Price applies to the 2011 Jeep Wrangler 2-door Sport 4x4 (23B) only and includes $3,250 Consumer Cash Discount. $16,995 Purchase Price applies to the 2011 Jeep Compass Sport 4x2 (25D) and includes $2,500 Consumer Cash Discount. $15,995 Purchase Price applies to the 2011 Jeep Patriot Sport 4x2 (25D) only and includes $2,500 Consumer Cash Discount. See participating retailers for complete details. Pricing includes freight ($1,400), air tax (if applicable), tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailers may sell for less. *Consumer Cash Discounts are offered on select 2011 vehicles and are manufacturer-to-retailer incentives, which are deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. Amounts vary by vehicle. See your retailer for complete details. ††Customer Choice Financing for 36-, 48- and 60-month terms on approved credit through TD Financing Services and Ally Credit Canada is available at participating dealerships to qualified retail customers on select new 2011 Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge and Ram models. Taxes on the full negotiated purchase price are payable at the beginning of the contract term resulting in higher payments than payments taxed on a periodic basis and are not reflected in advertised payments. The following terms apply to TD Financing Services contracts. (Different contract terms apply to Ally Credit Canada offers. See your retailer for complete details.) Vehicles are financed over a 36-, 48- or 60-month term with payments amortized over a term of up to 96 months and the pre-determined residual balance payable at the end of the contract. At contract’s end, customers have the choice of returning their vehicle through a Chrysler, Jeep, Dodge, Ram dealership with no further obligations (except payment of a $199 return fee and excess wear and tear, mileage and similar charges), financing the remaining balance for the rest of the amortization period at then-current standard rates or paying the residual balance in full. Some conditions apply. Customer Choice Financing offered by TD in Quebec is subject to different terms and conditions. All advertised Customer Choice Financing offers are TD offers. Example: 2011 Jeep Wrangler 2-door Sport 4x4 (23B) with a Purchase Price of $18,995 financed at 6.49% APR over 36 months with $3,299 down and payment amortized over 93 months equals 78 bi-weekly payments of $99 and one final payment of $10,545 for a cost of borrowing of $2,585 and a total obligation of $21,579.70. Taxes, licence, insurance, registration, excess mileage and wear and tear charges, any retailer administration fees and other applicable fees and charges not included. Retailers may sell for less. See participating retailers for complete details. §2011 Jeep Patriot Limited shown. Price including applicable Consumer Cash Discount: $23,330. Pricing includes freight ($1,400), air tax (if applicable), tire levy and OMVIC fee. Pricing excludes licence, insurance, registration, any retailer administration fees, other retailer charges and other applicable fees and taxes. See bottom of the ad for range of potential retailer fees. Retailer order/trade may be necessary. Retailers may sell for less. ¤Based on 2011 EnerGuide Fuel Consumption Guide ratings published by Natural Resources Canada. Transport Canada test methods used. Your actual fuel consumption may vary. ΔBased on Ward’s 2011 Middle Cross Utility Segmentation. Excludes other Chrysler Group LLC designed and/or manufactured vehicles. ®SIRIUS and the dog logo are registered trademarks of SIRIUS Satellite Radio Inc. ®Jeep is a registered trademark of Chrysler Group LLC. Customer Choice Financing is a trademark of Chrysler Group LLC.

BACK PAGE 32

DON_111145_KB_JEEP.indd 1

THE OBSERVER

$

18,995

$

$ PURCHASE FOR

16,995 PURCHASE FOR

15,995 PURCHASE FOR

• INCLUDES $3,250 CONSUMER CASH,* FREIGHT, TIRE LEVY AND OMVIC FEE. TAXES EXCLUDED. OTHER RETAILER CHARGES MAY APPLY.+

INCLUDES $2,500 CONSUMER CASH,* FREIGHT, TIRE LEVY AND OMVIC FEE. TAXES EXCLUDED. OTHER RETAILER CHARGES MAY APPLY.+

2011 Jeep Compass Sport 4x2 shown.

2011 JEEP PATRIOT SPORT 4X2

INCLUDES $2,500 CONSUMER CASH,* FREIGHT, TIRE LEVY AND OMVIC FEE. TAXES EXCLUDED. OTHER RETAILER CHARGES MAY APPLY.+ OR CHOOSE

CUSTOMER

2011 JEEP COMPASS SPORT 4X2

(with side seat air bags)

$

CHOICE FINANCING

99 BI-WEEKLY

@

» Saturday, August 27, 2011

NOW BOTH YOU AND YOUR MONEY CAN GO FURTHER.

2011 JEEP WRANGLER 2-DOOR SPORT 4X4

%††

FOR 36 MONTHS AND $3,299 DOWN

6.49

WITH THE OPTION TO RETURN AFTER 36 MONTHS

2011 Jeep Wrangler 2-door Sport 4x4 shown.

6.8L/100 KM HWY¤

42 MPG

HWY

• Hwy: 6.8L/100 km and City: 9.1L/100 0 km¤ • One of the most affordable SUVs in Canada anada Δ • All-new exterior appearance: Completely ely new from the A-pillar forward, enhanced ced soft interior touch points, and improved ed ride and handling

6.9L/100 KM HWY¤

42 MPG

HWY

• Canada’s most affordable SUV∆ • IIHS Top Safety Pick (with side seat air bags) • Best-in-Class rear seat legroom ∆ • Hwy: 6.9L/100 km and City: 8.9L/100 00 km¤ • Electronic Stability Control

2011 Jeep Patriot Limited shown.§

+Your local retailer may charge additional fees for administration/pre-delivery that can range from $00 to $1 $1,098 098 and anti-theft/safety products that can range from $0 to $1,298. Charges may vary by retailer.

Jeep.ca/Offers

SCAN HERE FOR MORE

GREAT OFFERS

8/18/11 8:41 PM

August 27, 2011  

Local news in Elmira, Ontario

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