Page 1

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

1 NEWS

Dance to local bands, beginning at 7:00pm Food and old friends on hand (Rain location is the Woolwich community arena on Snyder Avenue)

Livin' life at the Cabaret > STORY ON PG. 22

VOLUME.....15 ISSUE..........31

SATURDAY, AUGUST 07, 2010

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Public works

Woolwich art program seeks submissions for second year Katie Edmonds

S

heri-Lyn Roy of Breslau has had an interest in photography ever since she noticed that she could use her sunglasses to ‘filter’ a sunset and create an interesting image while on a high school canoe trip to Algonquin Park. Today, her passion for sharing the beauty and uniqueness

IN THE SPACE Local

painter Stefan Myles is one of the artists whose work was on display this past year at the Woolwich Township administration building as part of a new program.

WEEKEND WEATHER

> SEE ART ON PG. 03 SATURDAY Sunny

23°

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Opponents argue operations will be a net loss to local economy, township’s tax base Steve Kannon

T

he summer holidays have not dulled the fight against a series of new gravel pits proposed for Woolwich Township. With councillors returning from a month-long hiatus Tuesday night, opponents wasted no time, using the first meeting back to bolster their position. Residents of Conestogo, West Montrose and Winterbourne worry that plans for three gravel pits in close proximity to their homes will destroy their quality of life and bring financial hardship to homeowners while depleting township coffers. Woolwich is currently dealing with five gravel pit applications. Two are extensions

> SEE GRAVEL ON PG. 09

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Opinion...............10 Business.............13

Living Here..........15 Sports.................18

Entertainment....22 Classifieds.........23

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NEWS 2

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

Plans continue to evolve for large Elmira subdivision Latest changes would allow extension of Barnswallow Dr.; work could begin next spring Steve Kannon

A

bit of juggling at a subdivision planned for Elmira’s north end would clear the way for the extension of Barnswallow Drive past Church Street. The Official Plan and zoning changes introduced at a public meeting Aug. 3 also include a land swap between the developer, Lunor Group, and Elmira District Community Living (EDCL). The proposed changes are the latest tweaking of a major development that could bring some 1,400 residential units to what is cur-

rently farmland north of Church Street West. Most of the changes, involving small blocks of land along the Church Street frontage, are being made at the request of the township. In particular, to accommodate the extension of Barnswallow Drive to the north, said Shawn McGuire of the Guelph-based Lunor. “The township has always said they wanted to extend Barnswallow – it was stated right from day-one.” To do that, the developer will swap some land with EDCL, the local organization that

provides housing and other services for people with developmental challenges. Essentially, the agency gets more land than it gives up, allowing room for expansion: a 1.4-acre parcel adjacent to the existing ARC Industries facility would be rezoned to allow for a future condostyle building with 22 to 34 units. “They’re great people to deal with. And this could be a great benefit for them,” McGuire said of the deal. Although Lunor’s moves make the Barnswallow extension easier, Woolwich will still have to deal with

ON THE MENU Volunteers Stephen Gaessler, Arid Tracey, Andrea Fleming, Jill Perfect, Kristen Horst, Brynna Wasylycia and Deb Seabrooke welcome passersby with an assortment of refreshments during the first day of the Elmira sidewalk sale Aug. 5. Proceeds from the barbecue went towards Woolwich Community Services’ youth group.

PHOTO

» KATIE EDMONDS

Youth centre participants fire up the BBQ

at least one other property owner whose land falls outside the subdivision, he added. Other changes include rezoning proposed service commercial land to a more focused neighbourhood commercial designation, and the inclusion of an existing halfacre residential lot on Church Street into the new subdivision. While no one at the public meeting spoke out against the proposed changes, the township did receive a letter in opposition to the extension of Barnswallow Drive. Stephen and Rhonda Klinck, of 166 Church St. W., are worried about the impact the roadway will have on their property. “There are other access points which can be used and which will reduce the impact this development will have on our home. We request that those be used and Barnswallow Drive not extended,” they wrote. The overall design of the subdivision currently calls for the redevelopment of two existing farm properties on the north side of Church Street, adjacent to the Elmira Farm Service site. A four-acre portion at the rear of that property would in fact be includ-

THE FUTURE The latest plan of subdivision. The highlighted areas are those where changes are being considered.

ed in the subdivision. The bulk of the 180acre development will take place on two farms purchased in 2005. The deal involves three property owners. A 93-acre farm at 90 Church St. W., known as Riverbend, is the proposed site of 464 to 826 units of mixed housing types and a commercial block fronting on Church Street. To the west, the 82-acre site known as Northview is slated for 165 to 235 residential

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units (including homes near the Elmira Golf Club) and two commercial blocks. The four acres at the rear of the Elmira Farm Service, labeled Green Acres, would see 40 to 55 residential units of differing housing types. Plans also allow for a large block that could someday house a new school. A large park and a trail system connection to the Kissing Bridge Trail to the north are also in the works.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

3 NEWS

> Job for police, not the township

The art of public spaces

Being neighbourly only goes so far, Woolwich councillors believe. Having received complaints from some of its residents about speeding on Benjamin Road, the City of Waterloo has asked the township to investigate mitigation options, including dropping the speed limit to 50 km/h from 60. The route is a boundary road, and the township is believed to have jurisdiction over it. Discussing the issue Tuesday night, however, councillors showed little support in dropping the speed limit, nor in spending much time and money on the issue. Rather, the problem appears to be enforcement: the township will consult with Waterloo Regional Police to find out the extent of the problem. It will also look at deploying its mobile speed sign, which can be used to measure the speed of motorists using the road.

> Fire department seeks accreditation

COMING ATTRACTIONS Artist Audrey O’Hearn’s artwork will be on display this fall at the

township office. Organizers expect an even larger response to this year’s call for artwork than the 40 applicants who submitted pieces for consideration last year at this time.

> CONTINUED FROM COVER of the things she has seen is in full force and local residents can check out her photographs on display at the Woolwich Township administration building in Elmira as part of the Woolwich’s Local Art Program. Roy’s images hang alongside paintings by local visionary Jonathan Munz; the two artists were selected last fall to be featured during the first year of the township’s gallery-style project. The new initiative has been well received, according to Laurel Davies Snyder, Woolwich’s economic development and tourism officer. More than 40 artists sent in applications for con-

sideration by the selection committee. Over the past 12 months, four shows have been installed at the gallery. “We were really happily surprised by the number of applicants we had in our first year,” said Snyder. “We saw all kinds of artwork and would have loved to have been able to showcase more of it but there just wasn’t room this year.” Now, the township is putting out a call for its second round of artists, with the committee of volunteers hoping to see as much, if not more interest in the program. “The program is really twofold with benefits,” explained Snyder. “The exhibit allows local artists to showcase their work in a free venue and get their

name out there, and also we are engaging the public with different kinds of art that we have in the community that they might not know about yet.” Eligible submissions include anything from photography, to painting, metalwork, printmaking, fibre art, graphic art, quilting and other textile art, and non-traditional art such as graffiti. “Basically anything that you can hang on a wall,” said Snyder. “Currently we don’t have the right place to display things like sculptures but we are hoping to open it up to other art forms sometime in the future.” The open-call is for anyone who lives or works in

Woolwich Township and who would like to have their artwork displayed for a three-month period. To apply, an artist must fill out a registration for with basic information about their art form alongside high quality photos of their work. Submissions are due by Sept. 20. All submissions will be evaluated by a jury and artists will be contacted by the end of October. The first show of the second year will be installed at the beginning of January. The application form is available on the township’s website, www.woolwich.ca. For information about the program, contact Laurel Davies Snyder at ldaviessnyder@woolwich.ca or by phone at 519-669-6020.

Street dance organizers watching the sky Katie Edmonds

H

ugh Weltz is hoping that the third time really is the charm. Weltz is the chairman of the dance committee for this weekend’s street dance that will finish off the three-day sidewalk sale in Elmira put on

EE RY FR IVE L DE

by the BIA. For the past two years he has spent weeks organizing musicians, getting sound equipment and acquiring permits to close Arthur Street, only to have the event cancelled at the last minute due to rain. “We are lucky this year. We have a place to hold the

dance in case of rain,” said Weltz with a laugh. In case of a downpour, the committee will quickly move the 500-600 people expected to attend the festivities indoors to the Dan Snyder arena at the Woolwich Memorial Centre. “But we are crossing our

fingers that the weather will hold out for us this year – there is something really special about being able to listen to music outdoors.” This year the event will kick off at 7 p.m. tonight (Saturday) with King Roller,

> SEE STREET DANCE ON PG. 05

W • O • O • L • W • I • C • H

Speed is of the essence as Woolwich Township looks to help some of its residents get a break on their home insurance. To that end, the fire department needs to show it can meet certain standards for delivering water to areas of the township not served by fire hydrants. A test date has been set for Sept. 25, with Woolwich vying for what is known as superior tanker shuttle service accreditation, township fire chief Rick Pedersen told councillors meeting Tuesday night. Firefighters have been training for the test, brushing up on skills already in place and making use of new equipment. On Sept. 25, the Maryhill and Conestogo stations will be involved, as will a tanker from the St. Jacobs station. In order to pass, firefighters must shuttle water in from a site at least five kilometres away, maintaining an uninterrupted flow of water (1,200 litres per minute) for 90 minutes. Some insurers provide discounts to rural homeowners if the township possesses the shuttle accreditation.

> Church Street to remain closed Originally to be reopened Friday, the intersection of Church Street and Snyder Avenue in Elmira will remain closed until Aug. 20, Woolwich’s engineering department announced Thursday. The delay is being blamed on construction challenges encountered by work crews.

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NEWS 4

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

LAW & ORDER

Police looking for man who exposed himself JULY 28

A

17-year-old Wellesley Township girl was walking her dog along Lichty Road about 12:50 p.m. on July 27 when a white van stopped on the road beside her and a naked man got out of the vehicle exposing himself to the her. The man is described as white, approximately 35 to 40 years of age, 5’10”, 160 to 180 pounds, with a thin build and short brown hair, balding at the front. The man had no facial hair and little to no body hair. The suspect had no distinguishing marks or tattoos, but he was wearing

>>6:45 PM | A resident of

Manser Road in Linwood called police to let them know about a woman in her mid-twenties who was travelling from door to door in the area and asking for money. The woman was wearing black pants and a green shirt and had her black hair pulled back in a ponytail. When police arrived, the woman had left the scene. Police are reminding people not to give money to solicitors who come to the front door without proper identification.

>>8:00 PM | A vehicle was

broken into and cash was stolen from the car which was parked outside Elmira Pet Products on Martin’s Lane. The vehicle belonged to an employee of the plant.

JULY 29 >>1:30 PM | A postal worker

was bitten by a dog at a home on Oriole Parkway. The man was approaching the door of the home when a resident opened the door and a dog

glasses. The suspect had a small dog with him, possibly a Shitzu with reddish-brown and white fur. The van is described as a white work-style van, approximately a mid-90s North American model. There were no windows along the side of the van, however the driver’s side and passenger side windows were both tinted. Anyone with information regarding this incident is asked to contact Waterloo Regional Police at 519-6508500, ext. 4423 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-TIPS.

>>4:50 PM | Vandals repainted

came out onto the porch and bit him on the back of the leg, breaking the skin. The man drove himself to the hospital. The fine for assault by a dog is $620 to the owner; an unlicensed dog brings a further $200 fine.

charges for mischief that would be laid.”

a road speed limit sign near Union Street and South Field Drive in Elmira. The sign was originally painted to say a maximum speed limit of 50km/h but was altered to say 80km/h. The vandals also painted over two ‘prepare to stop’ signs near the railway tracks. “Someone was just trying to be funny but they weren’t thinking about what could have happened,” said Sgt. Sigfried Peters of the Elmira detachment. “Someone could have gotten very hurt, never mind the criminal

>>2:00 PM | A blue and white

four-speed CCM Navigator bicycle with a raised seat and handlebars was stolen from the Chateau Gardens Long Term Care residence in Elmira. If found, please return to the Elmira Police detachment.

JULY 30 broken into on Arthur Street North near Riverside Drive in Elmira. All had been parked at a garage there. Nothing has yet been reported stolen during the break-ins, which occurred sometime the previous night. The vehicles were a cube van, two vans and one car. All vehicles had their doors locked at the time.

>>10:40 AM | A horse-

drawn buggy was travelling westbound on Line 86 near the feed mill in Wallenstein when the driver merged from the shoulder onto the roadway to cross a bridge. The driver behind the buggy, a Kitchener man driving a Jaguar, slowed to allow the vehicle to merge safely, as did the car behind him. The following vehicle, a green Dodge pickup truck driven by a Waterloo woman, did not slow down, however, colliding with the car in front of it, a Volvo station wagon with five passengers including

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AUGUST 2

>>3:49 PM | A red bicycle

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two young children. The car was hit with such force that the children suffered minor injuries from their seatbelts, the rear window was smashed and the blueberries that were in the back window area were strewn across the highway. The Jaguar had minor damage from a subsequent collision. The Waterloo woman was charged with ‘careless driving’. She was transported to hospital and released with minor injuries.

firefighters responded to a shed fire on Lobsinger Line just east of Kressler Road in Woolwich Township. When emergency crews arrived on scene the shed was fully engulfed and flames were through the roof. The houses in the vicinity were evacuated by police while Woolwich fire crews extinguished the blaze. There were no injuries. Woolwich officials have deemed to fire to be suspicious and are investigating the cause.

JULY 31 >>12:50 PM | A yellow, manual

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AUGUST 1 >>10:18 PM | A taxi driver travelled

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AUGUST 3 >>4:00 PM | A 16-year-old girl came in to the police station in Elmira to confess that she had committed a crime. She explained that on July 25 she had stolen a couple of goldfish and some stones for a fish tank from a local pet store. She was hoping to replace her sister’s fish, which had perished in a root beer accident. She was dealt with according to the Youth Criminal Justice Act and was asked to pay back what she owed.

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DOUBLE-CHECKING Firefighters from Conestogo supervise the removal of grain from a bin at Cribit Seeds on Katherine Street near Winterbourne July 30. Conestogo was called to the scene for a fire in a grain bin, but employees had things under control when the trucks arrived.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

5 NEWS

Making a splash … but next year Regulatory issues delay construction of new splash park Katie Edmonds

WATER IN THE WORKS

I

» SUBMITTED

An artist's rendering of a the splash pad coming to Wellesley, though construction has been put off until next spring.

ILLUSTRATION

t seems as though there will be no relief from this summer’s heat for kids in Wellesley, who were eagerly anticipating the arrival of a new splash pad set to arrive. Complications surrounding permits granted by the Ministry of the Environment and the Grand River Conservation Authority have slowed building progress; it now looks like it will be next summer before the fun can begin. “Although we are still technically ahead of schedule, it doesn’t look as though we are going to be able to get the area ready for this summer, unfortunately,” said Jennifer Kays Sommer, a Lions Club member and splash park coordinator, adding that the original plan was to start building in spring 2011, but the outpouring of community support and fast fundraising had sparked the idea for earlier development. In 2008, a group of parents and community members approached the Wellesley Lions Club with the idea for a splash park. Without a lot of trees at the park to provide

shade from the hot summer sun, parents and community members from Wellesley decided that a splash pad would be a great incentive for their kids to spend some time outside and get some exercise. The splash park committee was formed, made up of club members and interested parents. Now, all the plans have been made by the committee, but the MOE is in the process of changing their recommended guidelines for splash park water safety. “The money has been raised, our plans are in place and our people are in place,” she said. “But we don’t want to $ Primeonly Rib rush things25.99 now, Steaks to find out that we are

not doing all the safety measures required by the ministry. We are happy to take all the precautions we need to make it as safe as possible.” The issue being debated by the MOE and the GRCA has to do with UV filtration and standards of water quality. Because splash pads are a relatively new and increasingly popular community fixture, requirements for safety are being updated. “What we think we will probably do is go ahead with the building, but make sure that the computer software we are using is advanced enough to accommodate new features that may need to

be added if the ministry decides to change the requirements in the future. The upgrade may cost us a bit more up front but it will save us thousands of dollars if the changes do need to be made.” Now the committee estimates that the build will begin closer to the end of August or beginning of September, and they hope the park will be set to open when the weather gets warm enough next spring or summer. “As the weeks go by I keep watching and waiting to hear from the different departments,” said Kays Sommer. “We are working as hard as we can, but you can’t rush the system unfortunately.”

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Street dance: Plan B in place in case of rain > CONTINUED FROM PG. 03 a five-piece band from Kitchener-Waterloo. They began playing together in 2005 and have taken musical influences from country artists like Johnny Cash, Merle Haggard and Willie Nelson, the southern style of the Allman Brothers Band and even the free spirited jams of the Grateful Dead and Phish. Following King Roller on stage is the headliner for the night, Gavin Knight & the Rhythm Resurgence, a nine-piece, soul-influenced outfit. “I am really interested to see their performance,” said Weltz, who has chaired the dance committee for the past 20 years. “They do a whole range of things, and I have heard lots of good things

about them.” The event is supported by a number of community organizations including the Kiwanis Club of Elmira, the Elmira Legion, the Knights of Columbus and the Elmira Scouting group. The profits from raffle tickets, as well as food and drink sales will go directly back to the clubs and the community projects they support. “It’s just a nice evening of entertainment for the community,” said Weltz. “There will be something for everyone – even for kids and families. Being out on the street with your neighbours and friends is something that is unique to this event – it’s a great time to get reacquainted and even meet some new people in town, make some new friends.”

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NEWS 6

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

St. Jacobs’ south end to remain unserviced

Properties to stick with private wells, septic systems; council frees up capacity Steve Kannon he development outlook got a little brighter in St. Jacobs this week, as the township freed up sewage capacity. With the move, 16 property owners in the south end of the village no longer face the prospect of paying up to $37,000 for hookups to municipal water and sewer systems. Instead, the affected homeowners will remain on private wells and septic systems. Most of the sewage capacity being held for the area will be released, increasing the

the majority (nine) opted for the do-nothing approach. Three were in favour of water and sanitary sewers; one chose the water-only option. The issue arose when water and sanitary sewers were extended to the south part of the village in 2003 with the development of the Valleyview Heights subdivision. While the township prefers to get people off of private services, the engineering department recommended simply dropping any plans for the remaining

unserviced properties, staff member Randy Miller told councillors meeting Tuesday night. The decision was welcomed by residents, including Bob Schaus. “We feel we’re quite capable of looking after our own systems,” he said. For Ward 2 councillor Mark Bauman, scrapping the idea provides property owners with some peace of mind, knowing the township won’t be forcing them to pay for hooking up to services. This week’s vote should also put to rest the regular inquiries from residents looking for updates. “Last year, I was getting phone calls all the

time, being asked, ‘are you going to force us to do this?’” Now, as there’s no need to force the issue, for health reasons for instance, the debate can be laid to rest. The fact that the majority of the affected property owners aren’t interested “made our decision as a council easy,” he added. The drawn-out process for what was ultimately a quick and simple decision prompted Bauman to suggest the township look at defining timelines for such studies rather than letting them drag on indefinitely. “Something like this should be dealt with …

much more quickly.” While the township will hold hookups for two of the properties immediately adjacent to existing pipes, the remaining 16 units go back into the pool. Under a new formula adopted by Waterloo Region, the servicing allocations on hold for the 16 properties represent 53 “people.” Overall, the wastewater treatment plant in St. Jacobs has capacity for an additional 289 people. The new calculating method in effect clears the way for more hookups and potentially more projects in the vil-

> SEE ST. JACOBS ON PG. 08

ABOUT FACE Notice of Public Information Centre PROPOSED REGION OF WATERLOO SIGN BY-LAW

The Region of Waterloo will be holding a public information centre to introduce a draft Regional By-law respecting signs on Regional roads. The proposed Sign By-law addresses all types of unofficial signs on Regional roads including election signs, business accessory signs, farm accessory signs, mailbox accessory signs, open house signs and poster signs. The proposed Sign By-law establishes requirements for unofficial signs including:

The municipalities of the of Waterloo, City of Tourism Kitchener, of Waterloo, Staff are also proposing an Region amendment to the Region’s andCity Essential Services Township of North Dumfries, Township of Wellesley, Township of Wilmot and Township Signing Policy to allow tourism signage on Regional roads for agri-toursim activities. of Woolwich invite interested citizens to apply for appointment to the recently created When: Tuesday, June Compliance 17, 2008, drop 4:00 - 8:00(MECAC). p.m. joint Municipal Elections AuditinCommittee Place: Regional Administration Headquarters (lobby) 150 will Frederick Street, The MECAC operate withinKitchener the provisions of the Municipal Elections Act, as amended. The MECAC will consider an application for a compliance audit of a This public information centre is being held for the purpose of providing information and candidate’s election campaign finances received under Section 81 of the Municipal receiving fromelector the public. A copy of the draft By-law is available for review in Elections comments Act from an to determine if the application should be granted or the Clerk’s Offi ce, Region of Waterloo, 2nd floor, 150 Street, Kitchener or onthe the rejected. If granted, the MECAC will appoint an Frederick auditor, receive and consider Region’s website at: auditor’s report and decide whether legal proceedings should commence. www.region.waterloo.on.ca - tab Newsroom, tab Public Notices Up to seven (7) persons are required for a four-year term ending November 30, If2014. you Individuals have questions concerningand/or the technical By-law, qualifications please contact Nancy Button, with professional in accounting and Manager, Transportation Engineering 519-575-4520 or by emaillegalat audit; academic expertise in political scienceator local government administration; bnancy@region.waterloo.on.ca background; or knowledge of the campaign finance rules contained in the Municipal Elections Act are invited to apply. Members shall not include members of any municipal If you require accessible services to participate in this meeting, please contact the above Council represented; employees or officers of the municipalities represented; or any noted person Junein10, 2008. persons who by areTuesday, candidates the election for which the committee is established. All comments and information received from individuals, stakeholder groups and agencies regarding this project being collected to assist Waterloo in making a decision. Under the Municipal Personsareinterested in serving on the Region MECACofmust file an application with the Regional Clerk Act, such asAugust name, address, telephone number, and property location may be priorpersonal to 4:30information p.m. on Friday, 27, 2010. Application forms and Terms of that Reference included in a submission becomes of the public Clerk, record.the Questions regarding of this may be obtained from the officepart of the Regional Regional websitetheorcollection by contacting information should be referred to the person indicated above.

Lee Ann Wetzel at 519-575-4410 or by emailing lwetzel@regionofwaterloo.ca. Nancy Button Kris FletcherTransportation Engineering Manager, Director, Council & Administrative Services / Regional Clerk Region of Waterloo 150 Frederick Street, 2nd 7th FloorFloor 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener, Ontario N2G Kitchener, ON N2G 4J34J3

Personal information is collected under the authority of the Municipal Act and will be used to determine suitability for appointment. Questions regarding the collection of personal information should be referred to Lee Ann Wetzel at 519-575-4410, Office of the Regional Clerk.

» JAMES JACKSON

• Location and placement; • Size, shape, construction and content; CITIZEN TO MUNICIPAL • Impacts to theAPPOINTMENTS function of the road; • Number of signsCOMPLIANCE and timing of placement; and ELECTIONS AUDIT COMMITTEE • Sign removal.

PHOTO

T

very limited stock, which has constrained growth in the village for years. The decision comes after more than a year and half of study, including a public meeting and the circulation of a questionnaire. The survey asked the 16 property owners if they would prefer to see the extension of water and sanitary sewers at a cost of $36,500 per household, the extension of municipal water only ($13,500) or stick with the status quo. Of the 13 who responded to the survey,

Stacey VanderMeer

Assistant, Elmira Library

What are some of your responsibilities? Good question. I check books in and out, and I help patrons find the books they’re looking for. I just basically help wherever I can.

I’ve been here about two years.

How long have you worked at the Elmira Branch of the Region of Waterloo Library?

How have you enjoyed the summer so far? More than last year's wet, cooler sum-

How long have you lived in Elmira? I actually live in Breslau, and I’ve lived there about two years.

mer? It’s been great! Just being at home with my kids as much as possible. Any big plans for the rest of August? No not really, just enjoying the sunshine. My kids have been at the park lots and lots!


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

7 NEWS

Giving song to the Underground Railroad Music festival celebrates area’s connection to the famed route and early black settlers Katie Edmonds

W

hen Toronto born blues singer Diana Braithwaite was growing up, she found the history she was learning in school to be not nearly as interesting as the history she learned at home from her mother: the story of her ancestors, the black pioneers of the Queen’s Bush Settlement. Now, she is returning to the area to host the second annual Underground Railroad Music Festival, which will feature a number of different musicians, all performing to honour the Underground Railroad and the pioneers who settled in the region. “It is going to be a celebration of all sorts of different kinds of music,” said Braithwaite. “There will be some gospel, some blues, a

bit of soul and traditional music and a bit of jazz.” Diana’s mother Aylestock, 87, is one of the oldest living descendents of the Queen’s Bush pioneers. Through a column she wrote for a newspaper in Toronto and family stories, Aylestock taught Diana the story of the largest black settlement in the region. “My mother wanted us to know our history,” said Braithwaite. “We used to make trips to the area to visit churches and family who still live there. It’s so important to take pride in where you come from.” Beginning around 1820, African-Canadians and African-American immigrants began building farms and constructing homes in the wilderness of

the area known as the Queen’s Bush, which extended from Waterloo County to Lake Huron. The majority settled in the southern half of Peel Township in Wellington County but the Queen’s Bush Settlement also included the northern half of Wellesley Township and the western portion of Woolwich Township. By 1840, it was home to the largest and by far the most widely dispersed of all Upper Canada’s black settlements, containing at its peak between 1,500 and 2,000 people. Although the conditions were harsh, these free and formerly enslaved black pioneers created farms throughout the land, establishing churches, schools and a thriving community life. Unfortunately for the settlers, the

Queen’s Bush Settlement was short-lived. In the 1840s, the government ordered the district surveyed and few settlers were able to purchase the land they had worked so hard to clear. By the 1850s, migration out of the Queen’s Bush had begun. Despite these odds, some AfricanCanadian families continued to live there well into the 20th century. “I wanted to do something to acknowledge and celebrate my ancestry, and music is a natural way for me to do

that,” explained Braithwaite. “It is a time for people to reacquaint and make new friends while hearing great music in a beautiful setting. I am really looking forward to seeing how the event will have grown since last year.” The festival takes place today (Saturday)

between 1 and 4 p.m. in the village of Glen Allan. All are invited and welcome to attend and visitors are encouraged to bring their own lawn chairs. For more information, contact Diana Braithwaite at 416857-4951 or visit www. braithwaiteandwhitely. com.

ROOTS

Diana Braithwaite along with guitarist Chris Whitely plan to celebrate the black settlers of Queen's Bush Settlement.

DRAYTON FAIR August 6, 7 & 8, 2010

Celebrating locally grown food and produce Friday, August 6, 2010 5:00 pm - Gates, Exhibits and Midway open 6:00 pm - Live Music with Derek Moore 6:30 pm - Truck Pull Saturday, August 7, 2010 7:30 am - Gates open 10:00 am - Local food and Produce Exhibits 10:30 am - Heavy Horse Show 11:30 am - Goat Show 12:00 pm - Dairy Cattle Show / Midway opens / Cooking Demonstration 1:00 pm - The Funky Mamas / Garden Tractor Pull 2:00 pm - Pet Show 3:00 pm - The Funky Mamas 4:00 pm - Baby Show 5:00 pm - Cooking Demonstration 6:00 pm - Song Circle, Local Musicians / Tractor Pull Sunday, August 8th 7:30 am - Gates open 9:00 am - Miniature Horse Show 12:00 pm - Beef Cattle Show / Midway opens 12:30 pm - Cooking Demonstration / Sheep Show 2:00 to 5:00 pm - Presentations and Meet Your Farmer 2:00 pm - Demolition Derby 5:00 pm - Midway closes

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NEWS 8

THE OBSERVER

Kids and critters get to know each other

St. Jacobs: Development gets added capacity > CONTINUED FROM PG. 06

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

LOSE WEIGH WEIGHT, GET

CASH

PHOTO

lage. Instead of calculating how much extra sewage the treatment plant can handle based on units, the region now uses the number of people as its basis. That means there’s a sliding scale to determine development’s impact on capacity – a single-family home, for example, represents 3.34 people, while an apartment

» KATIE EDMONDS

just 1.83 people. By freeing up capacity, the township should make life somewhat easier for developers looking to add new housing units in the village. That includes an expansion in the Valleyview Heights area and a proposal by Mercedes Corp. to build condos or townhomes at Front and King streets in the downtown core.

A BUG'S-EYE VIEW Children took turns looking through fly-eye glasses and getting up close and personal with a variety of bugs and insects at the Elmira branch library during the Wings of Paradise “creepy critters” presentation on Wednesday.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

9 NEWS

Gravel: Residents arming themselves with a bevy of facts for pit battle > CONTINUED FROM COVER to existing small pits, but the others would be much larger undertakings, especially the Capital Paving application for a site near the historic covered bridge in West Montrose and a sprawling pit proposed immediately east of Conestogo. Another, smaller operation is planned for a location north of the village. In a series of public meetings to discuss the developments, residents have called on councillors to axe the applications, citing the potential cumulative nightmare for those living in that part of the township. Tuesday night’s meeting, where three delegates spoke, was no ex-

ception. The presentations stressed the potential financial losses that would come from the approval of one or more of the applications. Using figures derived from a study in Caledon – the site of many battles over gravel pits – Conestogo resident Gordon Haywood predicted each of the three new operations would be a net loss to the local economy. The Caledon study found property values within two kilometres of a quarry decreased by an average of 19 per cent. Between two and five km, the decrease was eight per cent. Looking at the West Montrose pit, for instance, he calculated those numbers would

lead to a net loss of $34.5 million in property values and a $7.6-million loss in taxes over the 20year lifespan of the pit. Even with $2.6 million in extra taxes from the site and $200,000 in aggregate fees, Woolwich would still be down $4.8 million in revenue. Haywood’s figures for the Jigs Hollow pit (minus-$4.9 million) and the Hunder Developments pit east of Conestogo (minus-$12.4 million) painted an even bleaker picture. “Overall, they destroy more value than they create,” he told councillors. “What sense does it make to have a business destroy six to eight times the revenue it creates?” Woolwich will be forced to raise taxes

across the board or find ways to cut in order to make up for the lost assessment value in the areas around the pits, he argued. Coun. Ruby Weber, however, rejected that premise, saying falling property values would have no impact on taxes, as the township would simply adjust the rate to maintain its revenues. While a debate on that issue was sidestepped, Haywood added that even without extracting a single piece of gravel, the proposed operations have already had a negative impact on property values, noting that nine homes are up for sale in his neighbourhood, none of them moving quickly.

That argument was bolstered by Conestogo resident Brian Lipskie, who said the one home in the neighbourhood that did sell recently went for $100,000 less than the listing price. Pondering an expansion or a move in response to a growing family, he’s been advised by real estate agents not to list the property unless he’s prepared to take well below market value. “We’re literally stuck here,” he said. “Who’ll buy here on Golf Course Road? We’ll literally be surrounded by gravel pits.” The township should give priority to the existing residents given that the neighbourhood is already in place – “we were here

first,” said Lipskie, adding that approving the gravel pits would amount to stomping all over the rights of residents for the financial benefit of a few. Residents called on the township to conduct a study such as the one in Caledon, freezing all development within a kilometre of residential areas until a full study of the financial implications is completed. Councillors made no reply to the presentations. Coun. Mark Bauman, chairing the committee-of-the-whole meeting, noted the evening’s comments would be part of the detailed review of the gravel pit applications now under consideration.

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OPINION 10

THE OBSERVER

OPINION

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

To all of you who mourn the “jackpot” lost to Woolwich Township, how much value would you put on your family? Graham Gaessler

letter on pg. 12

VERBATIM

I

t’s one law for all, everyone is treated equally and this is not an invasive request to see someone’s face. This is Canada. We’re an open society. It’s part of our Canadian values and principles.

> Federal Transport Minister John Baird on the issue of women with veils boarding airplanes

THE MONITOR he Conservatives' 11-point lead in the polls Tbumbling last month has evaporated, partly due to on the census issue. The latest numbers: 29.7% CPC; 28.5% LPC; NDP; 11.1% Green.

17.4%

> EKOS Research

EDITORIAL

Tory crime agenda another misguided policy S

tockwell Day was at it again this week. Non sequiturs abounded. Defending the Conservative government’s plan to spend billions of dollars on new prisons even as the crime rate drops, the Treasury Board President said crime is going unreported. He had no statistics of his own, proof to back up his disregard of the actual statistics. In fact, the information we do have shows the level of unreported crime has remained steady through much of the decade. What we’re seeing here is yet another ideological move from the Harper government: as with the census issue, it’s not about facts, but about personal priorities. Planning to spend $10-$13 billion on prisons is excessive. Doing so after running up a record deficit is folly.

Harper, however, seems intent on pandering to his base, spouting tough-on-crime rhetoric. He also does the public a disservice by promoting fear merely to justify spending massive amounts of money – the same tactics being used to justify spending $16 billion on an untendered contract for jet fighters. Critics have been quick to compare Harper’s prison plans to the U.S. model, saying he’s taking another page out of the Republican playbook. The parallels exist, the prison issue being just the latest. Looking at the situation to the south, that’s certainly a model we don’t want to follow. The U.S. has the highest documented incarceration rate in the world – about 750 of every 100,000 people in the country, about seven times greater than in Canada – yet it’s unclear what, if any effect

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WOOLWICH OBSERVER 20-B Arthur Street North, Elmira, Ontario, Canada N3B 1Z9

> COPYRIGHT

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Joe Merlihan, Publisher | EXT 107 jmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Steve Kannon, Editor | EXT 103 skannon@woolwichobserver.com Joni Miltenburg, Reporter | EXT 101 jmiltenburg@woolwichobserver.com Katie Edmonds, Reporter | EXT 102 kedmonds@woolwichobserver.com

> LETTER POLICY

that’s had on the crime rate. Certainly, no one is going to argue the U.S. is safer than Canada. Much of the increase in U.S. incarceration rates has come in the last three or four decades – between 1970 and 2000, for instance, the general population grew by 40 per cent, the prison population by 500 per cent – aided lately by Republican governments and the push for private, forprofit mega-prisons. At the same time, cuts have been made to crime prevention and victims’ aid programs. As well, policies have exacerbated the link between poverty and crime rates. We’ve seen similar changes here under the Conservative government, including a 70 per cent cut to crime prevention funding. Even the talking points are the same. The Tories are already briefing

Donna Rudy, Sales Manager | EXT 104 drudy@woolwichobserver.com Pat Merlihan, Production Mgr | EXT 105 pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com Matthew French, Production | EXT 108 mfrench@woolwichobserver.com Lindsay Lehman, Production | EXT 109 llehman@woolwichobserver.com

The Observer welcomes letters to the editor on topics of interest to our readers. Letters may be edited for brevity, grammar, and legal considerations. All letters must be signed and contain the writer’s full name and telephone number for verification purposes. Unsigned or anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. If you have a legitimate concern and cannot sign your name to a letter, please contact the editor to discuss alternative means of resolving the issue. This newspaper declines announcements, poetry and thank-you letters in the opinion section. Maximum suggested length is 500 words.

members to apply the “soft on crime” label to anyone critical of the billions in spending the government can’t justify. While generally happy to share a border with the U.S., there are differences most Canadians want to maintain. With our lower crime rates, cleaner cities, better education system and universal health care, to name a few, we see ourselves as a more compassionate and liberal society. We admire many of the qualities exuded by our American cousins, but their crime issues aren’t among them. When it comes to crime, the U.S. has problems we want no part of here, including the proliferation of guns, a legacy of racial issues and a for-profit factor in its criminal justice system. The Tories, however, show the signs of wanting to take that road.

> CIRCULATION The Observer is an audited controlled circulation publication. Canadian Media Circulation Audit calculates and prepares The Observer circulation reports | 14,812.

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The Observer is a member of the Ontario Community Newspaper Association [OCNA], Canadian Community Newspaper Association [CCNA], Ontario Press Council, and The Greater KW Chamber of Commerce.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

11 OPINION

Attack on Iran a no-win situation for US W

hen Admiral Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the highest-ranking American officer, was asked recently on NBC’s Meet The Press show whether the United States has a military plan for an attack on Iran, he replied simply: “We do.” General staffs are supposed to plan for even the most unlikely future contingencies. Right down to the 1930s, for example, the United States maintained and annually updated plans for the invasion of Canada – and the Canadian military made plans to pre-empt the invasion. But what the planning process will have revealed, in this case, is that there is no way for the United States to win a non-nuclear war with Iran. The U.S. could “win” by dropping hundreds of nuclear weapons on Iran’s military bases, nuclear facilities and industrial centres (i.e. cities) and killing five to 10 million people, but short of that, nothing works. On this we have the word of Richard Clarke, counter-terrorism adviser in the White House under three administrations. In the early 1990s, Clarke revealed in an interview with the New York Times four years ago, the Clinton administration had seriously considered a bombing campaign against Iran, but the military professionals told them not to do it. “After a long debate, the highest levels of the military could not forecast a way in which things would end favourably for the United States,” he said. The Pentagon’s planners have wargamed an attack on Iran several times in the past 15 years, and they just can’t

International Affairs GWYNNE DYER make it come out as a U.S. victory. It’s not the fear of Iranian nuclear weapons that makes the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff so reluctant to get involved in a war with Iran. Those weapons don’t exist, and the whole justification for the war would be to make sure that they never do. The problem is that there’s nothing the U.S. can do to Iran, short of nuking the place, that would really force Tehran to kneel and beg for mercy. It can bomb Iran’s nuclear sites and military installations to its heart’s content, but everything it destroys can be rebuilt in a few years. And there is no way that the United States could actually invade Iran. There are some 80 million people in Iran, and although many of them don’t like the present regime they are almost all fervent patriots who would resist a foreign invasion. Iran is a mountainous country, and very big: four times the size of Iraq. The Iranian army currently numbers about 450,000 men, slightly smaller than the U.S. Army – but unlike the U.S. Army, it does not have its troops scattered across literally dozens of countries. If the White House were to propose anything larger than minor military incursions along Iran’s south coast, senior American generals would resign in protest. Without the option of a land war, the only lever the United

States would have on Iranian policy is the threat of yet more bombs – but if they aren’t nuclear, then they aren’t very persuasive. Whereas Iran would have lots of options for bringing pressure on the United States. Just stopping Iran’s own oil exports would drive the oil price sky-high in a tight market: Iran accounts for around seven per cent of internationally traded oil. But it could also block another 40 per cent of global oil exports just by sinking tankers coming from Iraq, Saudi Arabia and the other Arab Gulf states with its lethal Noor antiship missiles. The Noor anti-ship missile is a locally built version of the Chinese YJ-82. It has a 200-km. (140-mile) range, enough to cover all the major choke points in the Gulf. It flies at twice the speed of sound just metres above the sea’s surface, and it has a tiny radar profile. Its single-shot kill probability has been put as high as 98 per cent. Iran’s mountainous coastline extends along the whole northern side of the Gulf, and these missiles have easily concealed mobile launchers. They would sink tankers with ease, and in a few days insurance rates for tankers planning to enter the Gulf would become prohibitive, effectively shutting down the region’s oil exports completely. Meanwhile Iran would start supplying modern surface-to-air missiles to the Taliban in Afghanistan, and that would soon shut down the US military effort there. (It was the arrival of U.S.supplied Stinger missiles in Afghani-

THE VOICE

When it’s a beach day, where do you go?

“Sauble Beach. There’s a lot to do there and really good sand.” > Theresa Freeman

“I want to go to Hawaii! It’s warm there all year round.” > Bruce Martin

> SEE DYER ON PG. 12

THE VIEW FROM HERE

“I am new to the area but I hear that Port Elgin is really nice.” > Katerina Goodwin

The Woolwich Fire Department is taking very seriously its bid for superior tanker accreditation, pulling out all the stops for the speed trials.

“Goderich. I used to go to Sauble Beach but Goderich is much quieter and less crowded.” > Vineet Sood


OPINION 12

THE OBSERVER

Finally, a Canadian idle worth considering T

here are some kinds of scientific research that we welcome with open arms. The kind that lets chocoholics indulge themselves and tipplers reach for that bottle of Syrah, for instance. Add another to the list: an excuse to avoid working overtime. According to a new European study published this week, those extra hours spent at work are bad for your heart. Researchers compared people working a normal seven-hour day with those working a minimum of three hours extra. They found that this level of overtime is associated with a 60 per cent increased risk of heart-related problems, including death due to heart disease, non-fatal heart attacks and angina. Even after adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics (such as age, sex, marital status and occupational grade) and other risk factors, researchers determined that working three to four hours overtime – but not one to two hours – led to that greatly increased risk of coronary heart disease. Considering possible explanations, the authors of the study indicate that working overtime is associated with type A behaviour pattern (a tendency towards aggressive, competitive, tense, time-conscious and hostile behaviour), psychological distress (depression and anxiety) and poor sleep patterns. In addition, researchers highlight undiagnosed high blood pressure associated with work-related stress; and “sickness presenteeism” – employees who habitually work overtime also tend to work when ill, may ignore symptoms and not seek medical advice. The study also suggests that people working overtime, but in jobs where they have more freedom over workrelated decisions, may have a lower risk of heart disease. “The association between long hours and coronary heart disease was independent of a range of risk factors that we measured at the start of the study, such as smoking, being overweight, or having high cholesterol,” says Dr. Marianna Virtanen, an epidemiologist at the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health who participated in the study. Another of the researchers involved in the study, Gordon McInnes, professor of clinical pharmacology at the University of Glasgow, puts it out more plainly. “Overtime-induced work stress might contribute to a substantial proportion of cardiovascular disease. Physicians should be aware of the risks of overtime and take seriously symptoms such as chest pain, monitor and treat recognized cardiovascular risk factors, particularly blood pressure, and advise an appropriate lifestyle modification.” And what is that appropriate lifestyle modification? For that, McInnes goes to the famous British philosopher Bertrand Russell: “‘If I were a medical man,

From the Editor Steve Kannon I should prescribe a holiday to any patient who considers work important.’” While underscoring a serious issue, the study lends itself to a worthwhile pursuit, one made even more relevant in this most languid of months: idleness. In his 1932 essay In Praise of Idleness, Russell makes a case for less work and more leisure. He encouraged a four-hour workday. Even at that time, industrialization had left subsistence practices well behind: we could produce abundant supplies without working extraordinary hours. Early in the industrial era we began to hear about the leisure society. That ideal became even more talked about in the computer age: we were going to have so much leisure time that society would actually have to make arrangements for it. That’s certainly not been the case. In fact, statistics from the last three decades show we’re typically working increasingly longer hours for modest, if any gains. Where leisure had once been the domain of only the most privileged, Russell argues, industrialization should have paved the way for a more democratic distribution of idle time. “Leisure is essential to civilisation, and in former times leisure for the few was only rendered possible by the labours of the many. But their labours were valuable, not because work is good, but because leisure is good. And with modern techniques it would be possible to distribute leisure justly without injury to civilization,” he writes, though the post war gains on that front were already fading out when Russell died in 1970 at the age of 97. “I think that there is far too much work done in the world, that immense harm is caused by the belief that work is virtuous, and that what needs to be preached in modern industrial countries is quite different from what always has been preached,” he writes. “Everyone knows the story of the traveller in Naples who saw twelve beggars lying in the sun, and offered a lira to the laziest of them. Eleven of them jumped up to claim it, so he gave it to the twelfth. This traveller was on the right lines. But in countries which do not enjoy Mediterranean sunshine, idleness is more difficult, and a great public propaganda will be required to inaugurate it." The report from the European Heart Journal, and Russell’s advice, brings to mind the warning about working yourself into an early grave. When the overtime demands get to be too much, just tell the boss your heart’s not in it.

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Put slot revenue reporting to rest To the Editor,  Your article ‘Another Jackpot for Centre Wellington (Observer, July 24/10) highlights the ever-soprivileged township beside us that continues to reap the never-seean-end-to easy money. Why does

the Observer feel it necessary to continue to rehash and keep this issue at the forefront of people’s attention? Start looking ahead instead of behind and move on. Put this puppy to rest.

> Susan Weber, St. Jacobs

Slot revenue is no jackpot To the Editor, Re: Another jackpot for Centre Wellington (Observer, July 24/10).  More than half a million dollars gained over the last three months. More than $12.3 million in total received by Centre Wellington Township. Jobs created. An economic boost while recession threatens. Money to reduce our tax burden. Every few months it seems we must hear “I told you so.” Longing looks at money that could have been ours. Do the math people. Let’s use $500,000, money received by Centre Wellington for April through June. This accounts for five per cent of the winnings at the casino and 10 per cent at the track. Won not by gamers (the politically correct term for gamblers), but by our provincial government, through OLG, from its taxpayers. Won by a government that has to run programs to help those who use its own gaming products too much. Or how about the $12.3 million, the total money receive by Centre Wellington since the site opened? This means approximately $200$250 million has been won from the gamers. Just over $12 million for Centre Wellington from more than $200 million put in. If you consider that a jackpot, I have some land in Florida I’d like to sell you. Now, much of these winnings have come from discretionary income. For the sake of argument, let’s say 99 per cent of gamers will not feel any negative effect from their losses. But what is the social

cost of that one per cent, or even half a per cent of gamers? For all the “winners” at Centre Wellington, how many untold, unnamed real losses have there been? Homes lost, marriages broken, families wounded, even if only through the added financial stress gaming has brought? We’ll mourn in the papers the lost tax revenue, but what about the social cost to those who truly pay the price of the economic windfall we call gaming venues? How valuable is a stable family to a child? Probably more than the cost of a PS3 or iPad. Certainly more than the $12.3 million Centre Wellington has received. How many families have been affected? How many just in Centre Wellington? To all of you who mourn the “jackpot” lost to Woolwich Township, how much value would you put on your family? I ask you to think about this the next time you’re mourning having to pay a couple of bucks a month more in taxes. So who is the winner of the races in Elora? Centre Wellington? Our provincial government? Those who frequent the raceway? Sorry, but I can’t see a winner in these horses. As a wise man once said, you reap what you sow. If there are any winners, I’d say it is the citizens of Elmira and Woolwich who made a stand against placing a center of human misery in their community.

> Graham Gaessler, Elmira

Dyer: Iran tactics are only a bluff > CONTINUED FROM PG. 11 stan in the late 1980s that drove Russian helicopters from the sky and ultimately doomed the whole Soviet intervention there.) Iranian ballistic missiles would strike U.S. bases on the southern (Arab) side of the Gulf, and Iran’s Hezbollah allies in Beirut would start dropping missiles on Israel. The United States would have no options for escalation other than the nuclear one, and pressure on

it to stop the war would mount by the day as the world’s industries and transport ground to a halt. The end would be an embarrassing retreat by the United States, and the definitive establishment of Iran as the dominant power of the Gulf region. That was the outcome of every war-game the Pentagon played, and Mike Mullen knows it. So there is a plan for an attack on Iran, but he would probably rather resign than put it into action. It is all bluff. It always was.

> LETTER POLICY The Observer welcomes letters to the editor on topics of interest to our readers. Letters may be edited for brev-

ity, grammar, and legal considerations. All letters must be signed and contain the writer’s full name and telephone number for verification purposes. Unsigned or anonymous letters will not be considered for publication. If you have a legitimate concern and cannot sign your name to a letter, please contact the editor to discuss alternative means of resolving the issue. This newspaper declines announcements, poetry and thank-you letters in the opinion section. Maximum suggested length is 500 words.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

13 BUSINESS

BUSINESS

New direction for Elmira shopping space Now known as Village Shoppes and Business Centre, building is getting some tender loving care PHOTO

» JONI MILTENBURG

CHANGING IT UP New owner Michele Khandelwal sees the possibilities for office space and shopping at what was once Brox's Olde Town Village. She's working on refurbishing the building. Joni Miltenburg

Y

ears ago, the Elmira Shopping Village – back when it was Brox’s Olde Town Village – drew people by the busload to browse its shops and enjoy a meal in the restaurant. Over the years, the two dozen tenants have dwindled to a handful. New owner Michele Khandelwal of Varcan Property Management plans to spruce up the Church Street building, fill it with tenants and make it a draw for Elmira once more. Khandelwal plans to turn the upper floor into office spaces for an insurance agent, lawyer, accountant or other financial services. The ground floor is virtually full, with three anchor tenants: Schelter Office Pro,

Woolwich Total Health Pharmacy, and the Village Pet Shoppe. The biggest transformation will occur on the lower level, where Khandelwal envisions a central hallway designed like the main street of a village, with shop windows and storefronts in different colours. The lower level is already equipped with kitchen facilities from the days when it played host to a bar and restaurant, and Khandelwal thinks the space is perfect for a bakery. “We’d love to get little retail shops down here,” she said. This is the third commercial property that Khandelwal has bought with the intention of refurbishing and attracting new tenants. She

first tried her hand at property management nine years ago, soon after the first of her three children was born. She and her husband bought a student house in Waterloo, and Khandelwal discovered that property management allowed

learning to manage properties has been something of a trialand-error process. “When we first started, we had no clue,” she chuckled. Khandelwal has discovered that she prefers commercial properties, and she’s

We don’t want to make this place just a tourist attraction. We don’t want it to become St. Jacobs. Michele Khandelwal her to balance family and career. She bought a few more student houses and expanded from there into residential and commercial properties. Khandelwal’s degree in actuarial science wasn’t a lot of help in her new venture;

had some success in that line. Last year she bought a building in Kitchener and was able to bring it from 30 per cent occupancy up to 100 per cent. “We buy a place that needs tender loving care, bring it up, fill it up with tenants and

make it a success.” In the two months that she has owned the Elmira Shopping Village, Khandelwal has given the exterior a facelift: fresh paint on the doors and benches, new landscaping and hanging flower baskets. Work on the interior is now underway, with the public washrooms redone and the basement under renovation. Now Khandelwal and her assistant Diana Briand are making a concerted effort to find tenants to fill the 20,000-square-foot building, which is divided into spaces ranging from 300 to 2,000 square feet. Reflecting the mix of commercial and retail uses they’d like to see in the building, the name is changing from Elmira Shopping

Village to the Village Shoppes and Business Centre. Khandelwal said they’re focused on finding businesses that have something to offer to residents of Elmira, and she’s relying on Briand, who grew up in the area. “We don’t want to make this place just a tourist attraction. We don’t want it to become St. Jacobs.” The rest of Varcan’s properties are in Kitchener-Waterloo, and Khandelwal explained that it was the potential for growth and the possibilities they could see in the building that drew them to Elmira. “All of our places are about 10 minutes from where I live. We’ve made an exception for Elmira – it’s 15 minutes.”

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AUTO CARE 20 Oriole Parkway E., Elmira, ON N3B 0A5 Tel: (519) 669-1082 Fax: (519) 669-3084 info@leroysautocare.net

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NEW LOCATION!


BUSINESS 14

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

Profits, losses swing wildly through food sector F

armers rightly lauded Ontario Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs Minister Carol Mitchell last week for stepping up to the plate and agreeing to keep participating in a much-needed insurance program for grain and oilseed producers. Overall, prices to farmers in Woolwich Township, Wellington County and everywhere in the province have plummeted 25 per cent this year. It’s prompted the president of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture, Bette Jean Crews, to call the situation a crisis. Ontario and the other provinces are trying to get Ottawa to agree to a new insurance program, one that involves contributions from the federal and provin-

Food For Thought Owen Roberts cial governments as well as farmers, and pays out when prices dip. But at that level, change is agonizingly slow. The province decided it couldn’t stand by while farmers floundered, and anted up. The program they’re supporting was developed in conjunction with farmers three years ago, and has operated well since then. The sector thinks it’s a good model for Ottawa

Notice of Public Information Centre

2010 MUNICIPAL ELECTION PROPOSED REGION OF WATERLOO NOMINATIONS SIGNAND BY-LAW CANDIDATE The Region of Waterloo will beCAMPAIGNS holding a public information centre to introduce a draft

Regional By-law respecting signs on Regional roads. The proposed Sign By-law addresses The Municipal 1996, as amended, person who all types of unoffiElections cial signs Act on ,Regional roads includingprovides election that signs,every business accessory proposes be a candidate in theaccessory 2010 Municipal Election be and heldposter on Monday, signs, farmtoaccessory signs, mailbox signs, open house to signs signs. October 25, 2010 fileestablishes a Nomination Paper with Clerk. The proposed Sign shall By-law requirements forthe unoffi cial signs including: Location and placement; The• Municipal Elections Act further provides that a candidate’s election campaign • Size, construction and content; period for shape, any of the following offices begins on the day he/she files a nomination Impacts function of the for•the office. to No the contributions shall beroad; made to or accepted by or on behalf of the • Number and may timing of placement; candidate and of nosigns expenses be incurred by or onand behalf of a candidate prior to • Sign removal. filling the prescribed Nomination Paper with the Clerk. Money, goods and services given to and on behalf oftoathe person for his/her campaign are Staff are also accepted proposingbyanoramendment Region’s Tourismelection and Essential Services contributions. Signing Policy to allow tourism signage on Regional roads for agri-toursim activities. TAKE thatJune nominations by p.m. the Regional Clerk for the When:NOTICE Tuesday, 17, 2008, will dropbeinreceived 4:00 - 8:00 Place: Regional Headquarters (lobby) municipal election toAdministration be held on Monday October 25, 2010 for the Offices of: 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener • Regional Chair This public information is being held for the or purpose of providing information and • Regional Councillorcentre for Cambridge, Kitchener Waterloo receiving comments from the public. A copy of the draft By-law is available for review in the Clerk’s Offifor ce, Region of Waterloo, 2nd floor, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener or on the Nominations the office of REGIONAL CHAIR or COUNCILLOR, REGIONAL Region’s websiteOF at:WATERLOO must be filed in the office of the Regional Clerk, 150 MUNICIPALITY Frederick Street, 2nd floor, Kitchener, Ontario. - tab Newsroom, tab Public Notices www.region.waterloo.on.ca

If you have questions concerning the By-law, please contact Nancy Button, Nomination Procedures: Manager, Transportation Engineering at 519-575-4520 or by email at 1. The prescribed Nomination Paper may be obtained and filed in the Office of the bnancy@region.waterloo.on.ca Regional Clerk: If you require accessible services to participate in this meeting, please contact the above noted person by Tuesday, June 10, 2008. a) On any Monday through Friday until Thursday, September 9, 2010 between the hours of 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. ( Except Monday September - Labour Day)this All comments and information received from individuals, stakeholder groups and6th agencies regarding b) No Nomination Day, Friday, September 10, 2010, during the the hours of project arelater beingthan collected to assist the Region of Waterloo in making a decision. Under Municipal Act, personal information as name, address, telephone number, and property location that may be 9:00 a.m. to 2:00such p.m.

included in a submission becomes part of the public record. Questions regarding the collection of this information should be Paper referredshall to thebe person indicated above. 2. The Nomination accompanied by a filing fee in cash, certified cheque

or money order payable to the Region of Waterloo in the amount of: Nancy Button Manager, Transportation Engineering a) $200.00 for the office of Regional Chair Region of Waterloo b) $100.00 forStreet, the office Regional Councillor 150 Frederick 7thofFloor Kitchener, ON N2G 4J3 3. The onus is on the candidate for election to an office to file a bona fide Nomination Paper. For further information, contact: Lee Ann Wetzel Deputy Clerk/Deputy Returning Officer 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener lwetzel@regionofwaterloo.ca 519-575-4410

to adopt. Agriculture is vital to Canada’s economy. The federal government itself says agriculture drives eight per cent of the country’s gross domestic product, and it’s responsible for one in eight jobs. In 2009, its contribution to trade was more than $40 billion. And proportionately, most of that comes from Ontario, where food processing is king. If the primary sector is in trouble, it’s a harbinger for the entire value chain. Or is it? Although the prices to farmers have tumbled, some agriculture and food retailers and suppliers are basking in huge profits. As Mitchell was delivering her promise to help farmers, companies were issuing news releases announcing some staggering quarterly earnings. For example, Potash Corp. of Saskatchewan Inc., which makes fertilizer, reported second-quarter earnings of $472-million, the second-highest second-quarter total in company history. The figure raised the company’s first-half earnings to $921.2-million. On the seed side, DuPont Co.’s second-quarter profit nearly tripled. It said its agriculture division was a key future growth driver for the company. In farm equipment, Deere and Co. said it expects sales in Canada and the U.S. to grow by as much as 10 per cent. And at the retail level, George Weston Ltd. reported a second-quarter profit of $125-million. Growth at both Loblaw and Weston Foods rose

35 per cent to $389-million. For its part, Maple Leaf Foods Inc. said sales fell four per cent to $1.27 billion, but the company expressed optimism about increased earnings, thanks to the performance of its meat products division. Profit is vital. Companies need to be profitable, or they’re out of business. A profitable farm industry is much more desirable than one that’s living hand to mouth. But farmers need to be profitable too. And right now, it looks like every participant but them is making money. Even some members of the grocery sector, which is said to be among the most competitive part of the supply chain, are in a growth phase. But not so for those who supply their basic commodities. Farmers have been urged to branch out from basic commodities, to produce something with added value, to turn their harvests into marketable goods. That message will need to be globalized, as farmers figure out profitable ways to feed an increasingly hungry and expanding world. In the U.S., agriculture department undersecretary James Miller has been making headlines by saying poor nations must learn to grow their own food, and that emergency aid must be augmented by programs that help people feed themselves. I say poor nations must learn to grown their own food profitably. In the end, farmers have to make a living, no matter where they grow food. If they can’t survive as business people, we can’t eat.

Notice of Public Centre REGION OFInformation WATERLOO PROPOSED REGION OF WATERLOO SIGN BY-LAW 10-030 SIGN BY-LAW

EFFECTIVE JULY 31, 2010

The Region of Waterloo will be holding a public information centre to introduce a draft Regional By-lawof respecting on Regional roads. The proposed By-law addresses The new Region Waterloosigns Sign By-law 10-030 becomes effective Sign on July 31, 2010. The all types signsis on roadspublic including election business intent of of theunoffi new cial by-law to Regional help maintain safety and tosigns, reduce visual accessory blight on signs, farm accessory signs, mailbox openroads houseshould signs inform and poster signs. Regional roads. Owners of any signs accessory located onsigns, Regional themselves of by-lawSign and By-law its regulations andrequirements where necessary, take measures to Thethis proposed establishes for unoffi cialappropriate signs including: ensure all signs comply with the by-law. Requirements for the placement of permitted • Location and placement; signs including Business Accessory, Election, Event, Farm Accessory, New Home Builder, • Size, shape, construction and content; Open House, Rural Property Accessory and Poster signs are explicitly outlined in the by-law. • Impacts to the function of the road; • Number of signs and timing of placement; and A copy of Sign By-law 10-030 is available for review on the Region’s website at • Sign removal. www.region.waterloo.on.ca, under the Government/By-laws tab or by visiting the Regional Clerk’s Office, Floor, and Frederick to Street, during normal office hours. Staff are also2nd proposing an 150 amendment the Kitchener Region’s Tourism and Essential Services Any questions this by-law canonbeRegional directedroads to: for agri-toursim activities. Signing Policy concerning to allow tourism signage When: Tuesday, June 17, 2008, drop in 4:00 - 8:00 p.m. Bob Henderson, Place: Regional Administration Manager, Transportation Engineering Headquarters (lobby) 150 Frederick 519-575-4515 or by email atStreet, Kitchener bhenderson@regionofwaterloo.ca This public information centre is being held for the purpose of providing information and receiving comments from the public. A copy of the draft By-law is available for review in the Clerk’s Office, Region of Waterloo, FREE ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS AT 2nd floor, 150 Frederick Street, Kitchener or on the Region’s website at: www.region.waterloo.on.ca - tab Newsroom, tab Public Notices ONLINE. IN PICTURES. IN DEPTH. PRINT. ONLINE. IN PICTURES. IfIN PRINT. you have questions concerning the INBy-law, please contact NancyIN DEPTH. Button, Manager, Transportation Engineering at 519-575-4520 or by email at bnancy@region.waterloo.on.ca


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

15 LIVING HERE

LIVING HERE

Being healthy means balance Get healthy Stay healthy samuel & stacy Lancaster

PHOTO

» JONI MILTENBURG

H

BrINGING A PIEcE oF cANADA WITH THEM Paul and Nancy Lucier and their children Evan, Owen and Sarah leave next week for a two-year stay in Sweden. They’ve been preparing in advance, attempting to get a jump on the transition.

From Elmira to Stockholm Down to the last-minute preparations as Lucier family prepares for two years in Sweden Joni Miltenburg

“M

itt namn är Sarah.” Eight-year-old Sarah Lucier and her brothers Owen and Evan have spent their summer reading Pippi Longstocking books, eating lingonberry jam and listening to Swedish lessons on their iPods. The family is moving to Sweden for two years, taking the opportunity offered by Paul Lucier’s job at Research in Motion. He will be RIM’s managing director in Europe and Russia, focused on developing emerging markets in Poland, Russia, Ireland and the Nordics. The Luciers leave Aug. 10, so the next few days will be spent packing the last of their things, saying goodbyes and having last dinners with friends and family. They’ll be living in Bromma, a suburb of Stockholm famous for being the birthplace of NHL star Mats Sundin. That was exciting news for 10-year-old Owen, a hockey player himself. Owen and his younger brother Evan will be playing with Göta Traneberg, one of the biggest clubs in Sweden, on a twin ice pad five minutes from their house. A week before moving day, the kids were experiencing a bellyful of emotions: scared, excited, sad and nervous. “I can’t believe I’ll be seven when I get back,” Evan said. Evan celebrates his birthday just a few days after they arrive in Sweden, and his parents had to reassure him

that he would still get a birthday cake. The Luciers will be back in Canada for Christmas and for a visit next summer, but most of the next two years will be spent overseas. The kids are most worried about missing family and friends, so they’ve handed out cards to each of their classmates with their phone number, address and email address. The family also plans to start a blog, so they can post regular updates

One of the big reasons we want to go is so the kids can experience living in a foreign country. They’re going to have lots of opportunities to experience new things. Paul Lucier about life in Sweden. They’ve also done some research before arriving in Sweden, looking up their house on Google Maps and searching out pictures of their school and teachers. Owen, Sarah and Evan will be going to an international school where lessons are taught in English and three-quarters of the students are from outside Sweden. The family’s house is a few minutes from a tram stop, and the kids will be taking the tram and subway to school. Given the excellent public transporta-

tion system in Stockholm, the Luciers hope to make do with one car while in Sweden. One good thing that will help ease the transition is that most Swedes speak excellent English. Students learn English in school and movies and television shows aren’t dubbed into Swedish, so they have very little accent. “The bad thing is they don’t celebrate Halloween,” said a scandalized Sarah. But the Luciers will be bringing Halloween with them; they’ve packed all their decorations, and their grandmother has promised to send them bags of candy to hand out to the neighbours. The whole family is looking forward to the raft of outdoor activities that are popular in Sweden: hiking, canoeing, kayaking, cross-country skiing, skating and fishing on Lake Mälaren. Sweden has a tradition of common access – known as allemansrätten – that gives everyone the right to enjoy uncultivated land. That means anyone can hike, camp, use drinking water and pick wildflowers, berries and mushrooms throughout the country, even on private property. The European lifestyle is one of the big attractions for Paul, but the move will also mean more time at home. He’s been doing a lot of travelling overseas

> SEE SWEDEN ON PG. 16

ow would you define health? Some would say a strong, fit body. Others would say feeling young and vibrant. Maybe it’s eating natural, organic food and meditating daily. In fact, it’s all of these things and more. True health is made up of three main components and one without the other will set you off balance. How well do you measure up in these three important areas of health? The mind is a muscle and needs to keep active to stay sharp. The brain has the ability to create new neurons even as we age. However, a lack of mental exercise can cause us to lose our memory and motor skills for everyday functions. It’s important to keep educating ourselves and using our mind in order to make wise decisions, keep a positive attitude, develop self-confidence, and to have a better quality of life. I challenge you to read a book before the end of the summer, try something new like a craft, dance class or sport. Sign up for a course to learn how to renovate something at your home or a hobby you’ve always wanted to do. Take up piano or guitar lessons. As you do these things, watch your curiosity grow and your life experiences enhance. Yearning for more knowledge will help you better understand yourself, others and the world around you. A strong mind helps you cope with stress and emotions more effectively. Physical health is an obvious one. Moving our body is a necessity. Just look at critical patients in a hospital. If they don’t move,

> SEE FITNESS ON PG. 17


LIVING HERE 16

THE OBSERVER

MY sPAcE

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

>>WANT TO HAVE YOUR HOME OR WORKSPACE FEATURED? pmerlihan@woolwichobserver.com

WHo? 1st Elmira Cubs

8

CCJ 2010 Week Camp

WHErE?

3

Camp Everton, Rockwood 2

Campsite

1) GrEEN TENT 6

>>Not exactly a four-star Hilton, but these Eureka! tents are considered some of the best made tents on the market. This Alpine Meadows will set you back $600. They’re all-season and built tough. The vestibules at the front and back are great for storing packs and keeping the rain out. Pack leaders used these green ones, while the blue ones slept three Cubs to a tent.

9

4 5

10 7

2) orANGE TENT

>>Nicknamed “The Condo,”

this family-sized tent is also a Eureka! brand, Copper Canyon model. It sleeps a family of four comfortably with a separate room for gear. This big orange tent made a perfect target for rockets shot up from the adjoining field. A misfire led to the only casualty of the week, leaving this beauty with a hole through the fly.

3) WALKING sTIcK

>>Ben Psutka found this big

stick on the first day of camp and adorned it with skipping ropes and beads. It’s a Scouting tradition. The recommended stick should be 5’6” with each foot and last six

1

inches marked off for measuring. Adorning it with fish line and hooks make it a survival tool as well. Be prepared! During the 17th century, walking sticks became a popular accessory for gentlemen, used as a status symbol.

4) T-sHIrT

>>This concert shirt says “I Wish I

Had A Robot” for Waterloo rappers Dogbus. Ben purchased the shirt for $15 after the camp finale concert and other Cubs got autographs. Dogbus made an Apr. 8 appearance

on MuchMusic show Disband, where three industry judges gave them the thumbs up.

5) LANTErNs

>>These tin lanterns lit up the

night at the final formal campfire. Created throughout the week, Cubs used nails and templates to punch holes in the shape of a wolf on either side. A batteryoperated flame kept things safe. Other crafts were leather bracelets, a birdhouse, painted T-shirts and paper-making.

6) cAMPFIrE BLANKET

>>Phillippe Bertrand, better known amongst Cubs as Akela, displays his campfire blanket adorned with badges. These fleece ponchos keep you warm on a brisk evening and provide ample room to sew crests from past camps, jamborees and cool Scouting-themed collectibles.

7) BADGEs >>Badges are a huge part of the camp experience. Packs and groups are creating new badges all of the time to commemorate

special camps and events. At events like CCJ2010, Cubs and leaders bring their badges and trade for new and limited edition badges. Throughout the week random Cubs would show up at camp to trade.

8) sKY

>>As a special treat Cubs were

treated to a 15-minute barrage of fireworks that lit up the night sky.

9) JoHNNY oN THE sPoT >>At camp, these bright orange port-o-potties are more

commonly referred to as Kybos. The term Kybo is believed to have originated from a wilderness camp in Vermont. Kybo was a brand of coffee the camp used to disguise the waft eminating from below. About 15 of these serviced 350 campers and their leaders. After campers had been here a few hours, the funky smell near the camp was easily traced.

10) GETTING WET

>>Water shoes and swimwear

are standard crayfishing gear. Plenty of wet times were had.

For freshness, there’s no time like the present H

ere is the challenge. You need to make this recipe now. Do not cut it out, put it on your fridge and tell yourself that you are going to make it next month for so-and-so’s birthday or in December for a Christmas party. Some of you may think that I am talking crazy, because this dish contains scallops and so many of us reserve seafood for that special occasion, but this recipe cannot wait. A few weeks from now, our beautiful local corn will not be as great as it is today. Tomatoes are texture perfect, juicy and full of flavour. A small “tree” of basil can be bought for $1 right now at the market. Corn is at its sugary peak right now. At the St. Jacobs Farmers’ Market, I picked up a dozen bicoloured cobs of corn and a bunch of basil from Robert of “100 Mile Produce.” It was absolutely amazing. The corn in this recipe is not cooked, just cut straight off of the cob with a sharp knife and tossed

From The Chef's Table Kirstie Herbstreit & Jody o'Malley with the rest of the ingredients. I bought a pint of bright yellow cherry tomatoes from Family Farm Fresh Produce of Teeswater (also at the St. Jacobs market), which may just be the best tomatoes that I have tasted this summer. No, they are the best tomatoes that I have tasted this summer. For colour contrast I also picked up a pint of red grape tomatoes. Now for the scallops: purchase nice big scallops and make a real meal of it. I bought 10-12 count scallops from T&J’s Seafood (26 Elm St., Kitchener). Count means how many scallops there are per pound. This dish can be served as a first course or add a little rice to make it the entrée. Any left-

Scallops and fresh produce >>16 10-12 ct T&J’s scallops >>1-2 tbsp butter >>1 tbsp canola oil >>1 small shallot, finely diced >>1-2 cloves garlic, minced >>2 pints cherry or grape tomatoes, halved >>3 cobs corn, cut kernels off the cob >>1 handful basil, chopped >>2-3 tbsp white wine vinegar >>1/4 cup good quality cold pressed, extra virgin olive oil

>>Salt and pepper, to taste

over salad can be served on greens for another meal. I know that you are all up to the challenge. Enjoy this dish today. Maybe it is someone’s birthday or an anniversary this week. Or just celebrate the weather, and the wonderful food that this region has to offer. Combine diced shallots, garlic, tomatoes, corn and basil. Toss with vinegar, olive oil and salt and pepper. Set aside while cooking scallops; Heat the butter and canola oil in a sauté pan until hot but not smoking. Add scallops and cook without moving until golden and caramelized, turn and cook until desired doneness. We recommend that you leave a thin line of translucency in the middle of the scallop, so that they are not overcooked.

>>Chefs

Kirstie Herbstreit and Jody O’Malley are both Red Seal certified chefs. Together they run the company YouCanCook2, specializing in interactive dinner parties. You can also find them cooking at Entertaining Elements in St. Jacobs, where they hold private dinners for eight people. To contact the chefs, visit their website www.youcancook2.com.

Sweden: Family eager to discover a whole host of new experiences > CONTINUED FROM PG. 15 for the past few years and spending as many as 10 days away from home every month. Living in Sweden will

make it possible to travel to London or Moscow on business and return the same day. “This is a chance to spend a little more quality time with family,” he

said. Despite the butterflies as moving day approaches, Paul and Nancy are confident that the next two years will be good ones for the whole family.

“One of the big reasons we want to go is so the kids can experience living in a foreign country,” Paul said. “They’re going to have lots of opportunities to experience new things.”


THE OBSERVER

Âť Saturday, August 07, 2010

17 LIVING HERE

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> soLUTIoNs: Find the answers to all of the puzzles on pg. 30

Across 1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beowulf,â&#x20AC;? e.g. 5. Idaho, e.g. 10. Make soiled 16. Consumes 19. Catalan painter Joan 20. Express 21. One who calls something to mind 22. Egg cells 23. Unaccompanied 25. Defensive football player 27. Ban 28. When doubled, a Washington city 30. Halo, e.g. 31. A professional killer 33. Like Playboy cartoons 34. Heat energy 36. Ring slowly 37. Foe 38. Engine knock 39. Ever 40. Correct 41. Take a seat 44. Send to the canvas 45. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A likely story!â&#x20AC;? 47. Death on the Nile cause, perhaps 48. Bank offering, for short 49. One twelfth of a foot 51. Carve in stone 52. Halftime lead, e.g. 54. Long, long time 55. Fingerboard ridge 56. To a higher intensity 57. â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ bad!â&#x20AC;? 58. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;? problem 61. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My boyâ&#x20AC;? 62. Sonata, e.g. 63. Medium 68. The 4th letter of the Hebrew alphabet 72. Fig tree of India 73. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not on ___!â&#x20AC;? (â&#x20AC;&#x153;No way!â&#x20AC;?) 74. CĂŠzanne contemporary 75. â&#x20AC;&#x153;10â&#x20AC;? music 76. Befitting of a harlot 79. Grippers 80. Gentlemen: Abbr. 81. Cord fiber 82. Mournful poem 83. Danger 84. Compound lens





















 











 



 



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author 11. In a wicked manner 12. An atom having a valence of one 13. Mamieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s man 14. Confederate soldier, for short 15. Victorian, for one 16. Nonsense 17. Deflect 18. Fergie, formally 24. Beast of burden 26. Boatload 29. Lying, maybe 31. Bits 32. Skeet target 33. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Losing My Religionâ&#x20AC;? rock group 34. 1999 Pulitzer Prizewinning play 35. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go on ...â&#x20AC;? 36. Money in Bangladesh







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Fitness: Follow a balanced path to wellbeing > CONTINUED FROM PG. 15 bedsores develop. Bone density decreases and the muscles atrophy, leading to arthritic stiffness and many other problems. To stay healthy, regular exercise and a healthy diet are essential. Exercise increases the flow of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;feel goodâ&#x20AC;? hormones such as serotonin and endorphins, which give you a feeling of happiness and well-being. Eating good quality food frequently throughout the day will stabilize blood sugars and give you more energy. Some research shows that things such as positive beliefs,

comfort and strength gained from religion, meditation and prayer can contribute to healing and a sense of well being. Improving your spiritual health can help you cope with illness, stress and even death. Spirituality means different things to different people. What are the things in your life that give you a sense of inner peace, comfort, strength, love and connection? Is it reading the Bible, praying daily, speaking to others about your faith? Maybe itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long walks reflecting on nature. It may include volunteer work, helping those in need, meditating, stretch class or other breathing

techniques. We live in a very materialistic world that distracts us from doing the more important things in life. Do you feel stress, anger, fear, negativity, pain or discomfort more often then joy, laughter, happiness, peace, and calm? If you answered yes, it is time to put some focus on one or perhaps all these areas of your life. Doing so will bring you closer to true health and wellbeing.

>>Samuel and Stacy Lancaster are a husband-wife team

that has devoted their lives to teaching the importance of an active lifestyle and being physically fit. They are the owners of A Perfect Fit Sport Conditioning and Fitness Centre in St. Clements, providing personal training, group fitness and co-ed memberships for the entire family.


SPORTS 18

THE OBSERVER

SPORTS

Joni Miltenburg

W

ith a dozen players going overage at the end of last season, the Wellesley Applejacks are looking at significant changes to the roster this season. “We spent a lot of time since we finished [last season] recruiting, so we’re expecting a lot of changes this year. We could have up to 14 new faces on the team this year,” said head coach Kevin Fitzpatrick. Fitzpatrick said he’s been getting a number of calls and emails from players that are moving to the area for university or are graduating from local AAA programs. It’s an encouraging sign, especially given the Jacks’ struggles last season, when they went 7-23-6 and missed the playoffs. Fitzpatrick admitted that 2009/2010 was a dispiriting season but noted that he faced a learning curve in his first year back as coach after many years, and the team was challenged by significant illnesses and injuries. “It was a disappointment and I’d be the first to admit when the season ended I was glad, but there were a lot of encouraging things too,” he said. “It became apparent in January that we had to move on and we started to build for this year. I would guess that we’ve been to more than 100 games since January looking for potential recruits.” The Jacks have a number of experienced forwards returning from last season, as well as goaltender Kurt Martin. “He had an outstanding season last season as a rookie, so there’s no reason to think that’s not going to continue,” Fitzpatrick said of Martin. Four other players the team is counting on to make an impact are Rob Hinschberger, Mike Moggy, Read Shantz and Eric Parr. Hinschberger will wear the captain’s “C” on his sweater next season, and Moggy, Shantz and Parr will sport 'A's. Hinschberger was a natural choice after coming to the Jacks

> SEE JACKS ON pg. 20

In action with the boys of summer

IN TOUGH The KW Cubs, formerly the Elmira Cubs, were edged 7-6 by the Cobourg Force in the final game of the Ontario Amateur Softball Association championship at Hillside park last weekend. Top, the Cubs’ Bobby gillow swings at a pitch. Above, catcher Chad Wells hit the dirt to slide into second base but was called out.

» JONI MILTENBURg

With eager new recruits, Wellesley team hopes to build on last season

pHOTOS

Jacks see reason for optimism

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

KEEP IT MOVING Left, pitcher Ryan French winds up. French gave up eight hits and struck out seven batters during the game. Above, Nate Bauman beats the throw to second base.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

19 SPORTS

A project that requires plain blind luck T

Not-So-Great Outdoorsman Steve Galea Actually nothing could be further from the truth. A duck blind is a place where you sit, watch decoys and drink coffee. Sure, an errant duck does, on occasion fly by, but that’s only because he doesn’t believe that two rational people would go through all that trouble to fool a duck. And this is precisely that attitude that

causes most hunters to shoot at them. In any case, the idea is to build this platform in the middle of a marsh and then camouflage it so well that it will never be seen – or found. In the predawn light of opening day, Atlantis is easier to find than most duck blinds. That’s good too. Generally, the frame is built with rotting wood and poles that are either too short or too long. After several thumbs are incapacitated, you then connect the poles with an outside frame and build a floor made entirely from rotting planks that, in theory, shouldn’t hold your weight. Typically, you buy a

whole bag of nails to connect all the components. These are always left in the car or at home on your tool bench. That’s when someone remembers the rusty nails left in the front of the boat from last year. There are exactly twelve less than required. In the end you have a structure that beavers show to their young as a cautionary tale regarding what can go wrong when you don’t pay attention in school. But you also have a place where you can sit, drink coffee and shoot from on opening day. First, however, you need to figure out how to load a shotgun without the use of your thumbs.

» SUBMITTED

Bantam boys take Tavistock tourney

pHOTO

he calls came, as they always do, after dinner when I had been lulled into a false sense of security by the tuna casserole. It was my brother, passing along those chilling words that no one ever wants to hear. It was time to build the duck blinds. I did what any rational man would do. Nevertheless, he called back. “For the love of God, answer the phone,” my wife said. It was easy for her to say. She had never been through this ordeal. She knew better than to answer the phone this time of year. Contrary to popular belief, building a duck blind is not fun. In fact, I believe it was rejected as a torture at Guantanamo Bay because it was deemed too cruel. Let’s examine the process. First off, I think it is important to note that a typical duck blind building team starts the day with four good thumbs, not enough nails and a sledgehammer. Then someone says to you, “Hold this cedar pole straight up while I use this sledgehammer to tap it into the marsh.” Shortly thereafter, you won’t be much good at hitchhiking. If you are truly lucky, however, the boat will shift just enough so that the hammer misses your thumb and the pole and hits you square atop the head. This does two things: it saves a perfectly good thumb and it lowers your IQ enough so that building a duck blind actually seems like a good thing to do. Heck, if you get tapped twice, the whole ordeal actually becomes enjoyable. I suppose we should back up just a bit and define the purpose of a duck blind. Many actually think that it is a place where two hunters can sit, observe decoys and wait for ducks to fly by.

TOP O' THE LEAGUE The Elmira Laser Video Bantam Boys softball team came home winners of the North Waterloo Rural Minor Softball league championship tournament held July 30-Aug. 1 in Tavistock. The team won games against Drayton, New Hamburg, Tavistock, and Kitchener-Waterloo to become league champions. Back row: Terry Taylor (assistant coach), Jordan Moore, Adam Brubacher, Evan Buehler, Dalton Taylor, pat Quinn, Eric Brubacher (assistant coach), Roger Buehler (coach). Front row: Matt Hanley, Matt Schieck, Matt Townsend, Blake Cabeldu, Daulton Wagner.

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SPORTS 20

THE OBSERVER

IN ACTION

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

Jacks: Tough lessons learned last season, team looks to evolve

pHOTO

» JONI MILTENBURg

Annie Evans

A

nnie has been lawn bowling for 20 years, first at the Dufferin Club in Brantford and now at the Elmira

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pHOTO

from the Elmira Sugar Kings last year, the coach said. “Rob’s a real hard worker, he gives everything on the ice, he’s got a great attitude and outlook. He came in and found a niche in the dressing room where he fit in. It became apparent as the season went on watching him at practice, watching him in the dressing room and during the game that he had a real gift for being a leader.” The Jacks open their season Sept. 18 against old rivals Tavistock, with the home opener Oct. 9. The Southern Ontario Junior Hockey League has been reorganized this year, with the 15 teams split between two conferences. Fitzpatrick admits he isn’t delighted with the shuffle; while old rivalries against Tavistock and Ayr will continue, the Jacks won’t face traditionally strong teams like Thamesford, North Middlesex and Mt. Brydges until after the first round of the playoffs. There are a few positives to the reorganization, however; the eight-team conference means the Jacks are guaranteed a spot

» FILE pHOTO

> CONTINUED FROM pg. 18

ROB HINSCHBERGER in the first round of the playoffs and their travel costs will be significantly lower as they play more games closer to home. The Jacks are also having success with their entertainment package fundraiser, selling raffle tickets for prizes that include autographed jerseys and tickets to Toronto Maple Leaf, Toronto Raptor and Buffalo Sabres games. “We’re really encouraged as an organization that we turned a corner last year to improving a lot of things,” Fitzpatrick said. The Jacks’ training camp opens Aug. 28 at 2 p.m. in St. Clements. Any players interested in coming out can contact Fitzpatrick for more information at 519-656-2970.

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

21 SPORTS

Elmira lawn bowlers honour 'Tippy' Weber

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» JONI MILTENBURg

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pHOTOS

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ENTERTAINMENT 22

THE OBSERVER

ENTERTAINMENT

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

Theatre transformed into a Cabaret JM Drama production at the Registry takes us back to a time of decadence and discord that was Berlin in 1931 Steve Kannon

PHOTO

WILLKOMMEN Oliver Pavia is the Emcee and Laura Harding is Sally Bowles in the JM Drama production of Cabaret. Joining them at the Kit Kat Club are Sloane Pukarowski and Fran Roque. the stage production retains the doomed romance between German boarding house

owner Fräulein Schneider and her elderly suitor Herr Schultz, a Jewish fruit vendor.

Resolving the differences between the theatrical and movie versions makes for an

impact on the lives of individuals – political movements touch people in a personal way.” Beyond the message in the play – we see how the rise of Nazism creeps into the characters’ lives – there’s a whole lot of what musicals do best: infectious fun. There’s singing, there’s dancing and there’s laughing. “We’re having fun doing this, and we want people to have the same experience. We want the audience to come in and be transported for a couple of hours to another time,” she explained. In the confines of the Registry Theatre, the feeling of being in the Kit Kat Club is easily achieved – some of those attending performances will be right in the thick of it. “We’re making Cabaret very intimate. The first two rows of seating are cabaret tables, and the audience there is part of the cabaret.” The JM Drama production of Cabaret runs Aug. 12-14 and Aug. 1921 at the Registry Theatre, 122 Frederick St., Kitchener. Showtime is 8 p.m. Tickets are $18-$22 ($30 for cabaret seating), available at the Centre in the Square box office by calling 578-1570 or toll free 1-800-265-8977 or online at www.centresquare.com.

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AUGUST 8 Bring Your Lawnchairs SEASON SPONSOR

play based on a book becomes another play, which becomes an award-winning smash hit. It becomes a movie. Another hit. More awards. A revival on Broadway ensues. More accolades. Life really is a Cabaret, and you can find out why when the JM Drama production of the iconic musical hits the stage next week at the Registry Theatre. The scene is Berlin – 1931, before the war but with National Socialism on the rise. We’re introduced to the Kit Kat Club, the center of seedy decadence on which the growing tide of Nazism eventually intrudes. Based on Christopher Isherwood’s novel “Berlin Stories” and John Van Druten’s play I Am a Camera, Cabaret follows an English nightclub singer, an American writer, a German landlady and a Jewish shopkeeper who find their destinies linked and their futures uncertain on the eve of the Third Reich. First staged in 1966, the story is most closely linked to the 1972 movie starring Liza Minnelli as the young British singer Sally Bowles and Joel Grey as the Emcee. Where the movie skips over the subplots outside the Kit Kat Club,

» STEVE KANNON

A

extra layer of work for director Cheryl Ewing. “It’s always a bit frightening to do those types of shows where the audience has certain expectations because of the movie versions of the story,” she said, noting the film essentially saw Minnelli become Sally Bowles. “The stage version is different – this is not the Liza Minnelli Cabaret." Of course, there are many parts shared by both versions, including the rousing score that features “Willkommen,” “Maybe This Time,” “Money, Money,” “Don’t Tell Mama” and that familiar title tune, old chum. The cast JM Drama has assembled have put their own stamp on the performances, the director noted. That includes Oliver Pavia in the role of the Emcee, Laura Harding as Sally Bowles and Brett Roberts as Clifford Bradshaw. Having selected Cabaret because she “wanted to do something that's a little edgy,” Ewing said the musical is especially apropos today because of the similarities between the economic and political situations then and now. “There are parallels to our time. The [musical] gives you a glimpse of how those times

7 to 9pm

FREE

.com www. IN PRINT. ONLINE. IN PICTURES. IN DEPTH.


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

23 CLASSIFIEDS

CLASSIFIEDS

HelP WaNteD

HelP WaNteD

Then you should be working for us. WE’RE LOOKING FOR:

Construction Millwrights (apprenticeship available) Assets: • Arc Welding • Blueprint Reading • Agricultural background • Leadership Ability

Fitter Welder

Requires

Daytime Shifts Mon-Fri. You will be responsible for providing courteous and efficient service to our customers. You will process payments using debit, credit card and cash with G-Site. You will perform general housekeeping duties of facility along with stocking of merchandise. Some light lifting and unloading of shipments will be required. You must have good communication skills and a friendly, helpful attitude towards customers. We offer a competitive salary and a fast paced, fun environment. If you are interested in joining our team, please forward your resume or drop off in person to:

Dub-L-E Esso

390 Arthur St. S., Elmira, ON, N2B 2P6 Attn: Trent HelP WaNteD

(minimum 3 years experience) (must be able to pass CWB welding test, G.M.A.W. F.C.A.W.)

WE OFFER: • Competitive wages • Company uniforms • Pension plan • Company benefits Apply in person between 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. OR fax or e-mail resume to:

M&G MILLWRIGHTS LIMITED R.R.#1 Reg. Rd. 19

(1540 Floradale Rd.) Elmira, ON

519-669-5105

fax: 519-669-1450 email: bob@mgmill.com

Drivers & Helpers

FOr sale

reNtals

> Passport

Photos, Gun licences etc. $10. Brian’s Photo, 57 Arthur St. S., Elmira. 519-210-0608.

aUtOMOtIVe

> 2000 Chrysler Neon LE - 4 door sedan. Automatic, sunroof, safetied, 108,000 kms. 519-8078189. For rent large beautiful one bedroom apartment in St. Clements. Newly redone paint, floor etc. Floor heating! Parking available. Approx. 10 mins from Waterloo. Laundry facility, appliances, heat and water included. No smoking, no pets. First and last required. $795/month. Available Sept. 1. 519-4048879.

> elmira - 1 Bedroom. Central location, appliances, parking. $475.00 + utilities. Avail. Nov. 1. 519-669-1472. > elmira

FOr sale

FOr sale

> 2007 rockwood Premium 12 ft, tent trailer. Add a room, 3 way fridge, heated mattresses, electric brakes, electric lift. $8000 o.b.o. Call 519-669-5526.

> energy efficient Chest freezer. 12 cubic feet, 27”w x 46”l x 31”h, good condition. $85. Call Eileen at 519-669-5205.

> Blinds

> Mattress/Boxspring,

kitchen, vertical 54”w x 38”h, outside mount. 2 bedroom roller blinds 52”w x 36”h, outside mount, all oyster colour, all hardware included. Call 519-669-4430.

Watch your business

GROW

new, never used, still in sealed bag. Sacrifice $195. Delivery available. 519-635-8737.

Printed Promotional Materials

14 Spring St., Drayton

Washer/Dryer in unit

> apartment

Wallenstein Feed & Supply Ltd is a fast paced livestock feed manufacturing facility located outside of Elmira, Ont. We are currently seeking highly motivated individuals to mix and pellet livestock feed on an evening/night shift and an individual to bag feed on the day shift. If you are interested in a rewarding work life please submit your resume via mail to P.O. Box 22, 7307 Hwy 86, Wallenstein Ont., N0B 2S0 or via email to recruiting@wfs.ca by Aug 20th, 2010.

2 Bedroom Unit

available immediately

Must be physically fit, neat appearance. Full-time with benefits. License required. Apply in person with resume to Dan at: 66 Schaefer St., Waterloo or fax 519-747-5810

reNtals

Mig Welder

(must be able to pass CWB welding test, G.M.A.W. F.C.A.W.) Are you capable of: • Layout of plate and sheet metal from blueprints • Able to work with minimum supervision • High quality workmanship • Regular and punctual attendance

reNtals APARTMENT FOR RENT

Store/Fuel Sales Attendant

PLACING A CLASSIFIED AD | Classified ads can be obtained in person, by phone, fax or email from Monday to Thursday 8:30am-5pm or Friday 8:30am-4pm. All classified ads are prepaid. Deadline is WEDNESDAYS by 4pm.

Commercial 20-Word Ad $12.00 (Extra Words 30¢/word)

HelP WaNteD

DO YOU WANT? A wide range of jobs? Welding? Millwrighting? Assembly? Blueprint reading? Inside work? Outside work? Responsibility?

Residential 20-Word Ad $7.50 (Extra Words 20¢/word)

- 2 bedroom town house. Please, no smoking, no pets. $875 plus utilities. Must provide own appliances. Suitable for quiet tenants. Call 519-7437479. One Parking space included.

> For rent - Back split semi. 3 bedrooms, fenced in yard. Newly renovated, no pets,non smoking. $950 + utilities, Elmira. 519-6699059.

1st Flr. Unit

COMPUters

COMPUTERS - LAPTOPS

Sales and Service

CALL FOR DETAILS

Great Cond.

$650+

Come see our showroom at:

112 Bonnie onnie Crescent, Elmira r ra

519-669-5551

519-741-6368

> Industrial Bay for rent. 64 Howard Ave., Elmira. 2000 sq ft., open space. 14’ high bay door. 16’ ceiling height, good for mezzanine. separate hydro, gas and water meters. Inquiries please call 519-465-8421 or 519-669-1461 ext. 22. COMM real estate

> Wanted to Buy Home on quiet street, with nice sized lot, in Elmira or Conestoga. ecjon@rogers. com or call 519-577-2704. COMM/IND FOr reNt

> space

For lease Retail/light commercial up to 3200 sq ft available. Great location on busy main street of St. Clements. Approx. 10 mins. from Waterloo. Ample parking, many uses permitted. $1.05 sq ft inclusive. Certain conditions apply. For more details call 519-404-8879.

traDes & serVICes

> CrD

accounting services - Income Tax (E-File) Services. Small business accounting, payroll & gov/t filings. Chuck Downs, 95 Aspen Cr., Elmira. 519-669-1498, cell 519569-1744.

GaraGe sales

> saturday, august 7, 8a.m. - 1 p.m. 10 Bristow Creek Dr., Elmira.

traDes & serVICes

• Manufacturing of Landscape & Snow Removal Equipment • Custom Manufacturing and Machining • Agricultural, Industrial, Transportation & Construction Equipment Repairs

519.669.1501

100 Union St., Elmira, ON Toll Free 1.877.467.3478 www.reistindustries.com traDes & serVICes

Printing & Copying Services > Black and white, 8 1/2 X 11 flyers designed and printed for as low as 6¢. Professionally designed, quick turnaround, local service. Delivery, folding and colour work also available. Call 519.669.5790 ext 107 for details.

COMING eVeNts You are welcome to

Countryside Mennonite Fellowship (Hawkesville, ON)

Commemorating 50 years of God`s faithfulness, 1960-2010.

August 15, 2010

Special service at 2:30 p.m. followed by a time of fellowship, refreshments, and reflections from the past (photos).

50th anniversary books will be available.

aUCtION Police, Government, Repo, Bankruptcy, Fleets & Others

Monthly PUBLIC Vehicle

AUCTION

to be held ONSITE at:

BRESLAU AIRPORT ROAD AUCTION COMLEX 5100 FOUNTAIN ST. NORTH, BRESLAU (kitchener)

Sat Aug 14th 9:30am

Door Hangers Business Cards Brochures

Flyers Postcards And More

08 hyundai Sonata 07 Crown Victoria 05 Chev IMPALA 4 - 05 Crown Vic (P/G) 04 Crown Vic (P/G) 4 - 01/03 IMPALA’s 03 Ford Focus ZTS 03 lEXuS LS430 03 hyundai Tiburon 02 INTREPID SE 02 Sebring lxi 2000 Buick Century 2000 Buick LeSABRE

04 Freestar Wgn 04 Saturn VUE AWD 04 Ford F150 XL P/u 03 Astro Cargo Van 02 Ford E450 handi-Bus 02 Ford E450 handi-Bus 02 Windstar LX Wgn 01 GMC 3500hD Dump

04 SkiDoo MXZ-800 S/M 78 Kawasaki 1300 (Basket) 75 GMC Motorhome 1940 Dodge V8 - HOTROD

2005 STERlING TA Roll-off unit 2001 Freightliner Fl80 TA Dump, Plow & Wing 94 IhC 4900 Diesel 26’ Van www.mrjutzi.ca - website is updated daily as vehicles arrive Partial List ONLY!!!!!

Designed. Printed. Delivered.

519-669-5790

No Buyer’s Premium!! VIEWING: Friday, August 13th, 2010 - 1pm to 5pm TERMS: $500 Cash Deposit on Each Vehicle or as announced

M.R. Jutzi & Co

PRoFESSIoNAl IN ThE oRDERly lIquIDATIoN AND APPRAISAlS oF CoMMERCIAl, INDuSTRIAl, CoNSTRuCTIoN, MuNICIPAl EquIPMENT & VEhIClES

www.mrjutzi.ca

519-648-2111


CLASSIFIEDS 24

THE OBSERVER

        



                            

                          

                                                                      

                                                                                                                                                                       

straNGe BUt trUe

Are we alone? no one knows

                                                        

                

                                    

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

                                                                                        

               

                       

                                                                                                                           

Strange   But   True         Bill & rich sones

Q.

Are we humans alone in the    universe, or are there other    intelligent beings out there somewhere?

A.

  

“I can only answer this by    wearing three hats in succession,” says astrobiologist Paul   Davies  in The Eerie Silence. First, Davies  “The Scientist” believes     we’re probably the only intelligent beings in the observable universe,    and he would not be very surprised system   if the solar contains the only life of any kind. That “dismal conclusion” comes from  weighing   the many improbabilities involved    in the origin and evolution of life. But the disappointment of such an  answer  prompts Davies “The  Philos    opher” to wonder what all that stuff  out there might be for when only lowly homo sapiens get to see it.    “Of course, my hard-headed col    leagues tell me it’s not for anything, it’s just there.” Davies recalls his early fascination with the idea of intelligent life elsewhere. “It suits my temperament to suppose that our humble efforts on Earth, the daily round that consumes almost all our time and energy, are part of something grander and more meaningful.” So wearing his third hat, Davies “The Dreamer” confesses to feeling at home in a universe in which intelligent life is commonplace, though this is more of a “want” than a belief. “But it’s as far as I am prepared to go before the scientist in me reins me in. And that’s what makes SETI (the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence) so tantalizing. We just don’t know.”

Q. A.

How old are “computers” and who first used the word?

Computers are obviously as old linguistically as “people who compute,” first written as “computer” in 1646 by English author Thomas Browne to describe such a person. The word comes from the verb “compute,” meaning to determine by mathematical means, and is from the Latin “computare.” (Sci magazine.)     ence  Illustrated

            >  Send STRANGE questions to brothers Bill and Rich      at strangetrue@cs.com


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

25 CLASSIFIEDS

THE FIRST INSTALLMENT OF 2010 FINAL PROPERTY TAXES IS DUE FRIDAY AUGUST 13, 2010 NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDING ALERT: If you have been paying taxes on land only, you may be subject to a Supplementary Tax Bill later this year. DIDN’T RECEIVE A BILL? Non-receipt of a tax bill does not waive your obligation to pay and you may incur a penalty. If you did not receive a bill, contact the Township Office as soon as possible at (519) 6696000 or the Tax Collector at 519 669-6016. For more tax information see www.woolwich.ca. Marion Pollard, CMTC (A) Manager of Revenue/Tax Collector

FINE OF $300 FOR PARKING IN A DESIGNATED ACCESSIBLE PARKING SPACE WITHOUT MTO PERMIT TAKE NOTICE that the Township of Woolwich monitors designated accessible parking spaces to ensure that they are used by vehicles displaying an Accessible Parking Permit (APP) issued by the Ministry of Transportation (MTO). The individual to whom the permit is issued must be using the vehicle and the permit must be visibly displayed on the dashboard or sun visor when the vehicle is parked in the designated accessible parking space. The permit holder may use the permit in any vehicle in which they are travelling. There is no fee for an APP. The fine for parking a vehicle in an accessible parking space without an MTO permit is $300. Information about Accessible Parking Permits can be found on-line at http://www.mto.gov.on.ca/english/dandv/vehicle/app.shtml.

WOOLWICH MEMORIAL CENTRE PreSeason Ice Times Available! August 23 – September 11 Contact Gloria at: 519.669.6025 or gspencer@woolwich.ca

HELP WOOLWICH WIN THE 2010 POWER PLEDGE COMMUNITY CHALLENGE: SAVE ELECTRICITY, SAVE MONEY AND HELP THE ENVIRONMENT August 4, 2010, Township of Woolwich, ON – Mayor Strauss is calling on all residents to participate in Ontario’s province-wide Power Pledge Community Challenge – a friendly competition for bragging rights as Ontario’s most conservation-conscious community. There are two ways for Woolwich residents to help win the Challenge: 1. Take the Power Pledge at www.powerpledge.ca. The community with the most pledges per capita M&T Business Card Ad:Layout 1 04/03/09 10:22 AM Page 1

wins both a trophy and a $10,000 award to support a local renewable energy project;

win this Challenge,” says Mayor Strauss. “Join the Woolwich team and take the Power Pledge today. And on August 11, use electricity very carefully. We will all win.”

2. Use as little electricity as possible from 8:00am to 8:00pm—Community Challenge Day—Wednesday August 11. The community with the highest Competition for the Community Challenge is already megawatt reduction will win the prestigious Wood- heating up, according the Ontario Power Authority, stock Cup. organizer of the province-wide campaign. Some 90 communities representing 82% of Ontarians are join“As of today, 90 of our friends and neighbours have ing in. To date, over 117, 437 Power Pledges have already taken the Pledge. But we want Woolwich to been submitted from all corners of the province.


CLASSIFIEDS 26

THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

real estate

500

OPEN HOUSE Sat. 2-4

$

54 Memorial Ave., Elmira

BEAUTIFUL SEMI!

This attractive home is 1393sqft. 3 bdrms, 2 baths, lg eat-in kit, LR walk out to deck, roomy master w-walk in closet, very lg RR, garage, double drive. Partly finished bsmt w/3 pc bath rough-in. MLS. Call Paul direct.

Is Donated To

KidsAbility With Every Home I Sell!

NEW PRICE -

$264,000

5200SQFT HOME!

Paul Martin

BUNGALOW

This stunning home is only steps to golf course. Separate entrance to inlaw set up. 3 kit, 5 bdrms, 6 baths, 3 car garage, extra long driveway. MLS. Call Paul direct.

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Unique home perfect for Seniors. Close to downtown. Sep DR, kitchen addition with garden door to deck. Single detached garage. Many updates. MLS. Call Paul direct.

CALL DIRECT

519-503-9533

$875,000

Elmira is my home ... let’s make it yours!

OPEN HOUSE Sun. 2-4 32 Church St. East, Elmira

$195,000

1500 sqft semi, 3 bdrms, 2baths, big kit, sep DR, lg bdrms, FR & RR! 4car drive. Many updates. Put your TLC into this home. MLS. Call Paul direct

LARGE LOT!

Beautifully decorated family home. Recent upgrades. MF lndy/office, lg sep DR, hot tub. Lg detached 2 car garage/ workshop, 4 car driveway. MLS. Call Paul direct.

COTTAGE LIKE SETTING!

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

This 2800sqft home in quiet scenic setting only 10 mins to Waterloo. Surrounded by 100ft trees, 2 springs, pond, and riding trails. 6+1 bdrms and 4 baths. MLS. Call Paul direct.

Independently Owned and Operated 180 Weber St. S., Waterloo

HOME HOME 519-669-3074 OFFICE OFFICE 519-888-7110

$235,000

$199,900

EMAIL paul@remaxsolidgold.biz ONLINE www.homeswithpaul.ca

NEW PRICE

$379,000

$619,000

2075 SQFT

ATTRACTIVE TREED LOT!

Located on attractive fenced corner lot w/ mature trees. 5 bdrms, 3 baths, eat-in kit open to family rm w/FP, slider. Bright dining rm w/2nd slider. Lg living rm. Finished bsmt. MLS. Call Paul direct.

4 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, upgraded kitchen cupboards, pantry, upper laundry. Ready for you to move right in! Built by Verdone. MLS. Call Paul direct.

$431,900

BuyIng OR SELLIng?

You’ve come to the right place to find a home.

Independently Owned and Operated

519-669-1544 24hrs

17 Church St. W., Elmira

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

Each Office Independently Owned and Operated

ALLI NORRIS

BILL NORRIS

OFFICE:

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CELL:

SALES REPRESENTATIVE CELL:

FAX:

HOME FAX:

HOME FAX:

180 Weber St. S., Waterloo, ON N2J 2B2 519-888-7110 519-888-6117

519-577-6248 519-669-9885

SUNDAY AUGUST 8 • 2-4PM

Independently Owned and Operated

4B Arthur St. S. Elmira • www.remaxsolidgold.biz OFFICE: 519-669-5426

DIRECT: 519-572-2669 EMAIL: bert@remaxsolidgold.biz

BERT MARTIN, BROKER

billnorris@rogers.com

32 ROBIN DR., ELMIRA RED

UCE

D

RED

UCE

D

Gorgeous executive home on a quiet street in the small town of St. Clements. Main floor laundry, three fireplaces, master ensuite, workshop, in-ground irrigation system. Immaculately landscaped lot (.42 acre) with great street appeal. 700 sq. ft. Nanny/ In-Law suite. Minutes to North Waterloo.

Wishing everyone a safe and happy summer. Please feel free to call us for all your Real Estate needs!

Property offers three bedrooms, eat-in kitchen with sliders to large deck, french doors separating dining & living rooms, sun room, main floor laundry. MLS $149,900.

Your referrals are appreciated!

ST. CLEMENTS

Plenty of living space in this century home located in the downtown core of Linwood. Close to school, church, ball diamond and the new Community Centre. Presently a four plex. A very unique property with potential development possiblities or easily converted back to a single family dwelling. Rare find!

Four bedrooms, two bathrooms, main floor family room, finished basement, double garage (28' x 22'), large principal rooms. New in 2009, roof, garage doors, paved drive. Most original windows replaced. All this on 1/2 acre 10 minutes from Waterloo and 5 minutes from Elmira. MLS. Reduced to $319,900.

GREAT STARTER!

$597,000

$229,900

Sunday August 8th | 1:30-3:30

COUNTRY PROPERTY!

$310,000

LINWOOD

BROKER MANAGER

$315,000 | Well kept, older 2 storey home with huge double garage. Knotty pine eat-in kitchen, all new windows and railings. Wood floors throughout, close to downtown. MLS. Call Mildred Frey.

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage

519-669-9885

Beautiful brick bungalow located in desirable "Birdland" neighbourhood. Walking distance to all schools and new Rec Centre. This well maintained home is on a large lot, has beautiful mature maples, and a parklike backyard setting, with a lovely stone patio. Numerous updates including bathrooms, some windows, and roof. Come out and see this neat and tidy house, you'll want to move to beautiful small town Elmira. "A Great Buy"

Mildred Frey

mildred@thefreyteam.com

OPEN HOUSE | 30 QUEEN ST. ELMIRA

519-588-1348

allinorris@rogers.com

OPEN HOUSE

www.thefreyteam.com

THE FREY TEAM

Len Frey

SALES REPRESENTATIVE

PRICE REDUCED $390,000

MOOREFIELD | Almost 5 acres warehouses, lumber yard with retail store. Approx. 1/2 of yard is paved. Loading dock, repair shop w/ air lines. Great for retail + large storage area required for business. Selling land and building only. MLS Call Len Frey.

PRICE REDUCED - DRAYTON $149,900 Great commercial lot 135’X225’ with services on site LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION | allowing for many uses, located across from Grocery Store, Medical Centre and Library. MLS Call Len Frey - 519-669-1544

MACTON $259,000 Ideal for country store w/ home or gas bar. Hightraffic corner. MLS. Call Mildred Frey. Ideal for country store w/ home or gas bar. Hightraffic corner. MLS. Call Mildred Frey

Coach House Realty Inc. Brokerage

OFFICE PHONE: 519.343.2124

159 William St., Palmerston (Across from Home Hardware) N O ST 0 ER 90 , LM 54 PA $1

*SALES REPRESENTATIVE: LD IE EF 0 R ,00 O O 25 M $2

KATHY ROBINSON** EDITH MCARTHUR* Sales Representative Broker 519.638.2509 519.292.0362

Cute & Cozy home w/ 1+2 bdrm, 1.5 baths w/lots of character, must be seen to appreciate all it has to offer, 2 decks, great yard. Kathy MLS 0941463. Immaculate family home w/3 bdrm, 4pc bath, country kitchen lvrm & famrm w/wd stove, lg front porch & Back deck. 27’x32’ heated & insulated garage. Edith MLS 1031107.

FOR RENT - ELMIRA

Individual upstairs office`s or several together, whatever you require. Reasonable rates, all inclusive. Call Mildred Frey - 519-669-1544 for rent and sizes.

PRIVATE SALE OPEN HOUSE Sat & Sun 12-4pm

92 Oakcliffe Street, Elmira Freehold townhouse, open floor plan, 1497 sq ft, 3 bdrms, 2.5 baths. Large family room, central air, great stone patio backs on to park. For more info 519-577-8627 bytheowner.com / ID#198555


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

27 CLASSIFIEDS

real estate

ELMIRA REAL ESTATE Independently Owned & Operated, BrokerageSERVICES

BROKERAGE

519-669-3192 90 Earl Martin Dr., Unit 1, Elmira N3B 3L4

R.W. THUR REAL ESTATE LTD. 45 ARTHUR ST. S., ELMIRA

519-669-2772

BRAD MARTIN Broker of Record MVA Residential

Res: 519-669-1068

JULIE HECKENDORN Broker Res: 519-669-8629

TRACEY WILLIAMS Sales Rep. Cell: 519-505-0627

LEON MARTIN

Solid Gold Realty (II) Ltd., Brokerage | Independently Owned and Operated

BONNIE BRUBACHER Broker of Record

SHANNA ROZEMA Broker.

LAURIE LANGDON Sales Rep.

DALE KELLER Sales Rep.

MONIQUE BRUBACHER Sales Rep.

THIS WEEK'S FEATURE PROPERTIES

COUNTRY LOTS .5 acre don’t miss this chance to enjoy sunrises and sunsets. Within 40 minutes KW, or Guelph. High speed internet is available with fibre optic. Starting at $66,000 MLS

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-4PM

22 RobeRta stReet, elmiRa

STARTINg AT $299,900 | Paradigm homes new construction on Knapp Road. Great location to all amenities, 1500-2000+ sq ft homes available.Visit the model to pick your favourite plan. excl.

3 bedroom country bungalow with high speed internet available open concept. Master ensuite, main floor laundry, large 2 car garage, new ready to move in. Hobby shop allowed. $319,900 MLS

IMMACULATE bungalow nestled in the trees on 7 acres close to Elmira. Updated from top to bottom - bathrms. kitchen, hardwood flrs. windows, shingles. Fin. lower level. Professionally landscaped. MLS REDUCED TO $659,000

YOU’LL BE IMPRESSED! Open concept from maple kitchen with lge. island to HUGE family room w/ gas fireplace & oversized windows. 4 bdrms, 3 baths. Oversized dble. garage, triple drive. MLS $439,900

CHARMING older home, close to downtown. Maple kitchen. Hdwd. floors. Pocket drs. Recently painted. 2 bthrms. Main floor laundry. Bonus rm in attic. MLS $254,900

NICE BACK YARD! Cozy fam. rm. addition w/woodstove. Updated windows, refaced cabinetry. Rec. rm. w/gas stove 4th bdrm. Lots of storage. Great lot! MLS $279,900

OVERSIZED principal rooms. Lge. dining area. W/O from fam. rm. to deck & partly fenced yard. Fin. rec. rm. & 4th bdrm. Tastefully decorated MLS $319,000

LOTS OF SPACE! 1883 sq. ft.-3+ bdrms, 3 bths.(5 pc. enuite). LR, large DR PLUS main flr. family rm. Fenced yard w/shed. 4th bdrm. in lower level. MLS $291,900

ONLY 1 LEFT! Still time to choose interior finishings. 1900 sq.ft. condo backing to open parkland. Quality constructed. Fin. rec. room. Elevator. Oversized dble. garage. MLS $413,500

LOCATION! - Large wooded lot. Lots of living space in this 2500 sq. ft. + finished w/o bsmt. Rear addition. Potential for in-law suite. MLS $389,900

FLORADALE Opportunity knocks! Business opportunity or storage. 2 bldgs w/approx. 4680 sq. ft. 2 flr hoists incl. Overhead doors 10x10 and 14x12 Partial bsmt. A/C, gas heat. Drilled well. MLS $249,900

LINWOOD huge lot.Lge. kitchen w/island & b.i. appl. Sunken fam. rm. w/gas f.p. Mn flr. office & laundry. Ensuite bath. Lge. deck. Shed. Furnace & cac (2008). MLS $374,900

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 2-4PM

Great property on the edge of town, approx. 21 acres workable, the rest is wooded with a large portion of maple trees, 1.9 acres is inside an industrial designated area. $599,900 MLS

114 bRooKmeaD stReet, elmiRa

$344,900 | open concept plan with walkouts from family room and dinette. awesome kitchen with plenty of natural oak cabinets and breakfast bar. Front room den/office. 3 bedroom, 3 baths. mls.

Two storey 3 bed and 3 bath room home on a half acre lot, open concept, high speed fibre optic internet available. $317, 900 MLS

DRAYTON DETACHED

$224,000 | this well maintained home is sure to please. 3 bedrooms, 2 bath, fenced yard and huge deck off kitchen. Double asphalt drive. 55' wide lot. mls.

Country Property outside Elmira, 2 bedrm, finished basement. Enjoy sunsets and sunrises. $224,900 MLS

COTTAgE LIKE HOME

$239,000 DRAYTON | impressive landscaping with ponds, walkways, arbors and more! Hardwood & ceramic flooring, master ensuite, detached garage workshop, 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, roof/2005. mls.

4 acre country property with 5 bedroom, 2 bath home. Kitchen and dining room, family room, rec room, two car garage. Lots of area to entertain both inside and out. Camp fire site in the woods. Large garden and much more $459,900 MLS

CHARMINg & SPACIOUS

$279,900 gLEN ALLEN | beautiful home with pine flooring, 9 foot ceilings, family room with f/p and walkout to deck, 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, central air, some upgrades completed incl. roof/2010, counter tops, paint and more! mls.

91 acre farm, 81 acres systematically tile drained. House was built in 2006. 2170 sq. ft. home with Chervin kitchen, hardwood floors, 9 and 10 foot ceilings, geothermal ground source heating and air conditioning. Shed 45’ x 60’ and bank barn. Quiet country retreat set back from road. $1,500,000 MLS ADDRESS: 4-B

DARREN ROMKEY Sales Rep.

RETREAT OR HOME

$329,000 DRAYTON | looking for something different with charm and character? beautiful original refinished windows, hardwood flooring. Upper loft and 2 bedrooms and private yard. mls

Arthur St. S., ELMIRA • EMAIL: leonmartin@remax.net • OFFICE: 519-669-5426

DIRECT: 519-503-2753

PICTURESQUE COUNTRY SIDE

$789,000 GLEN ALLAN | 2.52 acres surrounded by mature trees, century barn, in ground pool. 6 years new 2800 sq ft + finished basement. Post and beam construction, natural wood work throughout, geo thermal heating, chef's kitchen! amazing Home and Property. mls.

LOOkIng FOR A HOmE? Find local open house locations listed hereevery Saturday.

Elmira@royallepage.ca | www.royallepage.ca/elmira

The latest news

delivered right to your inbox » It’s 100% FREE to sign up » Receive updates right to your email

Become a Fan for News Feed Updates

www.thurrealestate.com


CLASSIFIEDS 28

THE OBSERVER

Cub Jamboree

FaMIlY alBUM staG & DOe

MarrIaGe

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

STAG and DOE for

PHOTOS

» PAT MERLIHAN

Melissa Martin & Dale Frey

Roxanne and Peter Rubenschuh along with Norrine and Ronald Day are thrilled to announce the upcoming marriage of their children Tasha Rubenschuh and Ryan Day on August 14th, 2010 in St. Jacobs.

CCJ2010 First Elmira Cub pack participated in the Canadian Centennial Jamorboree at Camp Everton near Rockwood from July 26-31. More than 350 participants camped and participated in various events throught the week.

Saturday, August 21th, 2010 8:00pm - 1:00am Lion’s Hall, Elmira

Games * Dancing * Food

We love you!!!

$10 per person

BIrtHDaY

Happy 65th Birthday Love From Your Family

ClOse eNCOUNters Joseph Psutka man-handled a boa snake after a reptile show Jul 27.

BIrtHDaY

Happy 20th Anniversary of your 30th Birthday Happy 50th Birthday! We love you! Love, Bill, Kristina & Jake xoxoxo

FIre aWaY Cameron McGee had his sights set on some UP UP UP Erik Spencer made this Scouters looking to dodge these modified toilet paper rolls.

PLACES OF FAITH

HEARING ASSISTED

St. Teresa

Welcome to

Calvary United

Catholic Church

Celebrate Eucharist with us Mass times are: Saturday 5pm and Sunday 10am

19 Flamingo Dr., Elmira • 519-669-3387

St. Jacobs

Wheelchair accessible • Nursery Care provided • Hearing Assisted

Bloomingdale Mennonite Church

ELMIRA

Minister: Summer Worship Rev. Dave Jagger June 27 - Sept. 5 Sunday School During Worship 10 a.m. at Trinity

Sundays - 9:45 am Family Worship Service 11:00 am Sunday School for all ages

Visit our website at: www.wondercafe.ca 21 Arthur St., North • Church Office 519-669-5560 “Our mission is to love, learn and live by Christ’s teachings”

1151 Snyder’s Flat Rd., Bloomingdale • 519-745-2411 www.bloomingdalemennonite.com

MY FINANCES

Sunday, August 8, 2010 10:00 AM

August 8 The Art of Confrontation Church

SUNDAYS @ 10:30AM 5 First St., Elmira • 519-669-1459 Services at John Mahood www.elmiracommunity.org Public School

NURSERY PROVIDED

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE

“Wrestling with Contentment While Wandering in the Wilderness”

Speaker: Steve Sanchez 200 Barnswallow Dr., Elmira • 519-669-1296 Check out our website www.woodsidechurch.ca

SUNDAY SCHOOL

Sunday August 8th 11:00 AM Ray Jones

Upbeat Family Worship & Sunday School 10:00 am

48 Hawkesville Rd. • 519-664-2311

Trinity United Church

difficult rope climb look easy.

Discovering God Together

519-669-2319 | www.wbconline.ca 4522 Herrgott Road, Wallenstein

“Making Faith Live” Sunday Worship 9:30 am - 10:30am

2 First St., Elmira • 519-669-5030

Gale

Summer Worship 10am Sunday School during service

Minister: Rev. Dr. Linda Bell

Presbyterian www.galepresbyterian.com Church 2 Cross St., Elmira • 519-669-2852

Office Hours: M-TH 9-Noon & 1-3 • E galepresbychurch@golden.net

St. Paul`s 10am Worship Service Lutheran Pastor: Richard A. Frey Church www.stpaulselmira.com 27 Mill St., Elmira • 519-669-2593


THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

29 CLASSIFIEDS

serVICe PrOs aUtOMOtIVe

aUtOMOtIVe

TIRE

WHERE TIRES

Body Maintenance

at

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

ARE A

SPECIALTY, NOT A SIDE LINE.

aUtOMOtIVe

THOMPSON’S

Auto Tech Inc. accuracy and confidence.

Farm • Auto • Truck Industrial • On-The-Farm Service

21 Industrial Dr. Elmira

35 Howard Ave., Elmira

519-669-3232

serVICe PrOs

ONLY FROM CHEM-DRY

Worlds Largest & Most Trusted Carpet, Upholstery and Fine Rug Cleaners For Over 30 yrs

Renovating? Let us do the clean up

SPRING CLEANING

RENOVATION CLEAN UPS! Call for Details

budurl.com/SAVE139

www.completecarpetcare.ca

ROB McNALL

519-669-7607

LONG DISTANCE? CALL 1-866-669-7607

CONCrete

24 Hour Accident Assistance

519.669.8330

1-800-CARSTAR

AFTER HOURS

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

519-669-3373

FAX: 519.669.3210

519.669.8917

CONCrete FOUNDatIONs

WEICKERT& MEIROWSKI

IS FOR RENT

Concrete Foundations Limited

Ltd.

RESIDENTIAL & AGRICULTURAL

Find It Online At...

Call today to get your business listed!

Chem-Dry Acclaim ® 61 Arthur St., N Elmira

519-669-3332

519.669.5790

www.ObserverXtra.com

Driveways • Sidewalks • Curbs • Barn Renovations Finished Floors • Retaining Walls • Short Walls Call for estimate

Willis Martin

DRAYTON, ON

CraNe

CONstrUCtION

519-638-2699

DeCOratING

CONSTRUCTION

Design/ Build Agricultural/ Residential

-Framing -Roofing -Renovations -Repairs

ORTLIEB Read’s Decorating CRANE & Equipment Ltd.

519-669-3082

• 14 ton BoomTruck • 35 ton Mobile Crane

6982 Millbank Main St., Millbank 519-595-2053 • 519-664-2914

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL

ST. JACOBS

GLASS SYSTEMS INC.

Specializing in Paint & Wallcoverings

1600 King St. N., Bldg A17 St. Jacobs, Ontario N0B 2N0

FREE ESTIMATES

For all your home decorating needs

519-664-9999

• Store Fronts • Thermopanes • Mirrors • Screen Repair • Replacement Windows • Shower Enclosures • Sash Repair

ST. JACOBS

24 Hour Service 7 Days A Week

519-669-3658

TEL: 519-664-1202 / 519-778-6104

27 Arthur St. S., Elmira

laWN MaINteNaNCe

HeatING aND aIr CONDItIONING

YES... WE DO RESIDENTIAL WORK!

Glass serVICes SINCE 1961

6672 Ruggles Rd. Floradale RR#2 Wallenstain, N0B 2S0

RUDOW’S CARSTAR COLLISION CENTRE

101 Bonnie Crescent, Elmira, ON N3B 3G2

THIS SPACE

FREE Gift Offer $139 Value

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning on Location • Area Rug Cleaning Drop-off and Pick up Service • Bleached out Carpet Spot Repair • Janitorial • Grout Cleaning • Carpet Repair & Re-Installation • Pet deodorization • Floor Stripping

519-669-7652

31 ORIOLE PKWY. E., ELMIRA

CarPet Care

CarPet Care

Accredited Test & Repair Facility

519-669-4400

aUtOMOtIVe

Complete Collision Service

AUTO CLINIC

to repair your vehicle with

33 First Street, East Elmira, ON

eleCtrICal

aUtOMOtIVe

Providing the latest technology

Call Us At

519-669-3373

aUtOMOtIVe

FAX: 519 664-2759 • 24 Hour Emergency Service

MeDICal treatMeNt ER RS OVYEA 10

Reimer Hyperbarics of Canada F. David Reimer

Established 2000

Dennis Brubacher, RME Owner/Operator ECRA ESA # 7001311

UNDER PRESSURE TO HEAL

RESIDENTIAL Commercial Industrial

> Excavating > Trenching > Backfilling > Fine Grading > Overseeding & Top Dressing > Lawn Seeding

Call for your free estimate

Murray & Daniel Shantz

ELMIRA

ALMA, ONTARIO

519-669-8776 www.dentechelectric.com

eNtertaINMeNt

PHONE:

MessaGe tHeraPY

REGISTERED

MASSAGE THERAPIST Live music for wedding ceremonies & receptions Ashlinn O`Marra

519-210-0401 petacus@ rogers.com

IN YOUR HOME Relaxation & Deep Tissue Massage CALL TODAY TO BOOK AN APPOINTMENT!

Lisa Stemmler, RMT 519-504-8004

PaINtING 20 years experience

free estimates interior/exterior painting wallpapering & Plaster|Drywall repairs

519-669-2251 36 Hampton St., Elmira

YOUR

PLUMBING & HEATING SPECIALISTS!

C.J.

BRUBACHER LTD. 19 First St. E., Elmira

519-669-3362

● ● ● ● ● ● ●

Crush Injury Enhancement in Healing of Wounds Necrotyzing Soft Tissue Infections Intracranial Abscess Clostridal Myosistis and Myonecrosis Crush Injury. Compartment Syndrome Skin Grafts and Flaps

● Air or Gas Embolism ● Thermal Burns ● Acute Traumatc Ischemias ● Exceptional Blood Loss ● Decompression Sickness ● Carbon Monoxide Poisoning ● Delayed Radiation Injury + Many More

www.reimerhbot.com For more information call:

519.846.5427 FAX: 519.846.5134

PlUMBING

Safe, effective and proven for 13 + UHMS (Undersea Hyperbaric Medical Society) Approved indications:

519-669-0220

63 Arthur Street S., Unit 3, Elmira, ON, N3B 2M6

PrOPertY MaINteNaNCe

PlUMBING

Steve Co.

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL SERVICES Your Source for year round property maintenance

Now Booking For:

Plumbing and Maintenance Inc.

• Spring Clean-up • Top Dressing/Overseeding • Lawn Maintenance/ Landscaping • Mowing Packages Available • Mulch Delivery & Installation Telephone

RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL • INDUSTRIAL

For all your Plumbing Needs. 24 HOUR SERVICE Steve Jacobi

ELMIRA

519-669-3652

Jeff Basler Owner|Operator

519-669-9081 Mobile

519-505-0985 ever-green@sympatico.ca

We call Elmira home but we service the surrounding area.


CLASSIFIEDS 30

Âť Saturday, August 07, 2010

THE OBSERVER

serVICe PrOFessIONals reCOVerY & tOW

rOOFING

TOWING AND RECOVERY

AMOS R O O F I N G

CASH PAID

>Complete Complete Lawn Maintenance >Flower bed maintenance

>Commercial Commercial & Residential >Booking for Spring Cleanup

Phone: 519-669-1188 Fax: 519-669-9369

519-568-8666

selF stOraGe

sePtIC

salt

TOP QUALITY RESIDENTIAL ROOFING SYSTEMS Locally Owned & Operated

Softener Salt & Pool Salt

Since 19 96

Serving Elmira and Surrounding Area for over 30 years!

ď&#x192;žSteel ď&#x192;žCedar ď&#x192;žShingles ď&#x192;žFully Insured

CALL SCOTT SEILING FOR YOUR FREE ESTIMATE. CALL NOW AND BOOK FOR SUMMER!

Thousands of satisfied customers!

519-747-2708 Waterloo www.riepersalt.com

519.669.4484 benderroofing@gmail.com

In Business since 1971 â&#x20AC;˘ Fully Insured

sIGNaGe | VINYl & DIGItal

troductor y Offer

Taking Salt to Peoplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Basements Since 1988

Call or email Mike for your FREE estimate.

519.698.2114

FREE BAG In

> Superior Salt Products > Fast, Friendly Service > Convenient Delivery Times > Discounts for Seniors

â&#x20AC;˘ Specializing in residential re-roofs â&#x20AC;˘ Repairs â&#x20AC;˘ Churches

FOR YOUR UNWANTED SCRAP VEHICLES CARS, TRUCKS OR VANS WE PAY CASH WITH FREE TOWING PLEASE CALL

27 Brookemead, St, Elmira kdetweiler@rogers.com

rOOFING

INC

PrOPertY MaINteNaNCe

sKate sHarPeNING

BICYCLE SALES & REPAIRS

GET YOUR BICYCLES READY

graphfix ltd. Various sizes & rates

CLEAN â&#x20AC;˘ DRY â&#x20AC;˘ SECURE

Call

519-669-4964

Signs & Banners

Inspections for Real Estate Septic System Repairs & Restoration Catch Basin Cleaning

Vehicle Lettering Logos & Graphics

Waterloo Region â&#x20AC;˘ Woolwich Township

Decals & Safety Stickers

519-896-7700

100 SOUTH FIELD DRIVE, ELMIRA

serVICe PrOs

or

519-648-3004

www.biobobs.com

With an expert spring tune up

20

BILL SCHENKEL

$

519-664-1809

Large format printing

parts extra

1600 King St. N., Unit #18

ST.JACOBS

22 Church St. W., Elmira

Tel: 519-669-5537

FAST, FRIENDLY SERVICE AT COMPETITIVE PRICES!

STORE HOURS: M-F: 7-8, SAT 8-6, SUN 12-5

tree serVICe â&#x20AC;˘Tree Trimming & Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Aerial Bucket Trucks â&#x20AC;˘ Stump Grinding â&#x20AC;˘ Arborist Evaluations â&#x20AC;˘ Fully Insured & Certified â&#x20AC;˘ Certified to Work Near Power Lines

THIS SPACE IS FOR RENT

FREE ESTIMATES

Call today to get your business listed!

519.669.5790

www.ObserverXtra.com

sOIl

tree serVICe LOCNEW ATI ON

Triple Mix â&#x20AC;˘ Top Dressing Screened Top Soil â&#x20AC;˘ Sands Gravels â&#x20AC;˘ Natural River Rock NEW N IO LOCAT

www.remingtongraphfix.com

Septic Tank Cleaning

889 Bridge St. E. Waterloo (Corner of Bridge & McMurray)

Pick-up or Delivery

519-888-1007

trOPHY

RECOGNIZE OUTSTANDING EFFORT!

â&#x20AC;˘Removal of Trees or Branches of Any Shapes or Sizes in Almost Any location

T R

â&#x20AC;˘Hedge trimming

E

â&#x20AC;˘Branch Chipping

E

â&#x20AC;˘Stump Grinding

519-669-1836 Thomas Martin Waste MaNaGeMeNt

Golden Disposal Waste & Recycling Services a division of 1678834 Ontario Inc.

TROPHIES | CUPS | PLAQUES | MEDALLIONS RIBBONS | NAME TAGS | NAME PLATES DOOR PLATES | CUSTOM ENGRAVING QUICK LOCAL SERVICE | 245 Labrador Dr., Waterloo

www.UniTwin.com | 519.886.2102

â&#x20AC;˘ Roll Off Containers â&#x20AC;˘ Curbside Garbage Removal â&#x20AC;˘ Registered Hauler for OTS Tire Program â&#x20AC;˘ Total Trash Removal of â&#x20AC;˘ Apartments, Estates, Insurance, Residential sites â&#x20AC;˘ Locally owned and operated since 2001 P.O. BOX 111 Breslau, On. N0B 1M0 goldendisposal@bellnet.ca

Ken Kolpean Julie Lavigne-Kolpean Tel: 519-744-5246 Fax: 519-744-5295

519-744-5246 www.goldendisposal.com Serving Kitchener/Waterloo/Cambridge/Elmira/Guelph areas

PUZZle sOlUtIONs CrOssWOrD ( 3 , & 0 , 5 2 8 1 ( 6 7 , & ( 7 2 / / $ 7 $ / . $ < 2 $ 6 3 , 1 ( ' * ( ) 5 ( 7 7 2 2 6 2 1 3 6 < $ % / 2 : + ( 0 3 $ 1 $ 6 1 7 + * 2 $

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$ 3 5 2 1

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THE OBSERVER

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

31 CLASSIFIEDS

COMMUNItY eVeNts CaleNDar

OBItUarY

Foerster, Donald Passed away suddenly at his home in Elmira at the age of 64 on Friday, July 30, 2010. Predeceased by his wife Doreen (2007) and his daughter Colleen (1977). He was the beloved father of Darlene, Jen, Joan and Lisa all of Elmira. Dear brother of Shirley (Sonny) Kocher of Alban, Elaine (Hugh) McMahon of Waterloo, Terry (Patty) Foerster of Waterloo, Tony (Moira) Foerster of LaPasse, Marilyn (Dennis) Lackner of Elmira, Bryan Foerster of Elmira, Kathy (Kieran) Kelly of Elmira, Keith Foerster of Whitechurch, Rod (Kim) Foerster of Elmira. Predeceased by sister Carol Foerster and parents Clarence and Alma Foerster. He will be remembered by his nieces and nephews. He was a long time employee at Chemtura, Elmira, and was a huge Toronto Blue Jays and Toronto Maple Leafs fan. Visitation will be held at Dreisinger Funeral Home, Elmira, on Tuesday (today) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at St. Teresa of Avila RC Church, Elmira, on Wednesday, August 4, at 11 a.m. Interment to follow in St. Theresa’s RC Cemetery, RR 1, Elmira. In memory of Don, donations may be made to the Canadian Diabetes Association or to the St. Teresa of Avila Building Fund. www.dreisingerfuneralhome.com

“A GOOD JOB DONE EVERY TIME”

Kleensweep Carpet Care

West Montrose, ON

T. 519.669.2033

Cell: 519.581.7868

Truck & Trailer Maintenance Cardlock Fuel Management

COMMERCIAL 24 CARDLOCK FUEL DEPOT HOUR

DeatH NOtICes

> Bauman,

Erla ( Mrs. Mervin) (nee Mussleman) – On Tuesday, August 3, 2010 at her home. Erla Bauman, age 80 years, of St. Jacobs.

> Bauman,

Louise Audrey (nee Lehmann) – October 26, 1946 – July 31, 2010. Called Home to be with the Lord. It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our beautiful Louise… our little ray of sunshine. Louise passed away peacefully at home in Floradale on Saturday, July 31 after a brave and dignified battle with cancer, surrounded by her family.

> Brenzil, Gary Albert – At his residence on Tuesday, August 3, 2010, Mr. Gary Brenzi of Point Clark, age 58 years. > Heil, Henry – Suddenly at

his home on Tuesday, August 3, 2010, at the age of 77 years. Dear brother of Margaret (Hubert) Pixner Breslau.

MATERIAL HANDLING & PROCESSING SYSTEMS

> Roth, Gladys - Received

into the arms of her loving Lord, in her 89th year, on July 28, 2010 at Leisureworld Care Centre, Elmira.

> Water,

(Philip), Dora Lorraine – At Queensway Nursing Home, Hensall, Ontario, Wednesday, July 28, 2010, Dora L. (Philip) Waters of Grand Bend, Ontario, formerly of Drayton and Elmira, in her 95th year.

> Zimmerman, Bettie – Of

Harrison, passed away at Royal Terrace, Palmerston on Sunday, August 1, 2010. Mrs. Elizabeth Rose (Steinacher) Zimmerman was the wife of the late Harvey Zimmerman. Local relatives – Crystal Dobben and her husband Steve of Drayton, Melissa McDermitt and her husband Christopher of Drayton.

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Individual life insurance, mortgage insurance, business insurance, employee benefits programs, critical illness insurance, disability coverage,

RRSPs, RESPs, RRIFs, LIFs and Annuities. Suite 800, 101 Frederick St., Kitchener

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3435 Broadway St. Hawkesville

www.cooperators.ca

519-699-4641 www.freybc.com

aUGUst 7 > Underground Railroad Music

Festival, 1-4 p.m., Glen Allan Park. The second annual festival launched in honour of the Underground Railroad and early black pioneers of the Queen’s Bush Settlement is a project headed up by Diana Braithwaite, singer/songwriter who started the festival last year as a tribute to the lives of those men and women that first settled in the area. Please bring lawn chairs, all are invited and welcome to attend. For more information: Diana Braithwaite, 416-8574351.

aUGUst 8 > Third

Annual Drayton Singspiration and Fellowship 2-4 p.m. in the pavilion at Drayton Centennial Park on Wellington St. north of the main intersection. Parking across the street. Numerous guest singers and musicians, and a sing-a-long. Bring a lawn chair. Sponsored by Gospel Text Mission, London, Ont. For more information call Ruth Josephs 519-669-3699.

> Go Wild, Jungle Party at the

Region of Waterloo Library. Join us at St. Clements, Linwood, St. Jacobs, Bloomingdale and Wellesley branches for A Rainforest Adventure with the Destination Jungle TD Summer Reading Club! This free program includes stories, crafts and activities for children ages 6 to 12. For more information please contact your local branch. Aug. 10-13.

aUGUst 11 > The Reptile Show at St. Jacobs

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Branch Library 3 p.m. Join us for the Reptile Show from Hamilton Reptiles. Meet the reptiles and learn about where they are from, their eating habits and defenses. This show is recommended for children 5 and up. Tickets $3 per person or two for $5. For more information contact the St. Jacobs Branch Library 519-6643443.

aUGUst 11 > You are invited to join the fight to STOP the proposed Elmira BioWaste Dump and the negative effects it will have on Elmira. Your opinion matters! The meeting will be held from 6:30-8:30 p.m. in the community centre room at the Woolwich Memorial Centre, 24 Snyder Ave. S., Elmira. Join us for info & discussion, petition forms and lawn sign pick up. Contact: stopthestink@rogers.com.

aUGUst 12 > Awesome Animals at Wellesley

Branch Library, 3 p.m. Become a zoologist and explore the animal kingdom! Take home your own animal tack model. This event is for children ages 6 to 12. Tickets $3 per person or two for $5. For more information call Wellesley Branch Library 519-656-2001.

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> Music and Movies in the Park. Screening Diary of a Wimpy Kid, music with Hot Kitty and the Hellstrings, 7:30 p.m., free; donations to the Food Bank appreciated; Waterloo Park bandshell, Waterloo; 519-5798243.

New to the Community? Do you have a new Baby? It’s time to call your Welcome Wagon Hostess. Elmira & Surrounding Area

aUGUst 15 > Lynn Russwurm anniversary jam; 7 p.m., free, Gore Park bandstand, Elmira.

SHARON GINGRICH 519.291.6763

elmirawelcomewagon@sympatico.ca

> Kidspark! Hands on activities,

games, music, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.; free admission; Victoria Park Kitchener. 519-741-3330.

aUGUst 17 > Creature Feature from GRCA at

3 p.m. Learn about species that are local to Waterloo Region, the Grand River and more! This show is recommended for children 5 and up. Tickets $3 per person or two for $5. For more information contact the St. Clements Branch Library 519-699-4341.

aUGUst 22 > Family Fest 2010. Food, face

painting, rides, 3-6 p.m., free admission. Koinonia Christian Fellowship, 850 Sawmill Rd., Bloomingdale. 519-744-7447.

519.669.2884 Summer is Here! 21 Industrial Dr., Elmira

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BACK PAGE 32

THE OBSERVER

For the Month of August

50% OFF REGULAR PRICED

5

$

» Saturday, August 07, 2010

Summer Entertaining Merchandise

00 OFF

While quantities last.

Purina Dairy Milk Replacer

Purina®, Chow® and Checkerboard design are licensed trademarks of Nestlé Purina PetCare Company.

Next Senior’s Day Thursday, August 26th

1 Union St., Elmira THE SHOPS AT ROXTON

www.sharpefarmsupplies.com

519.669.3072

“Committed To Our Customer’s Needs”

www.elmiragiftoutlet.com

HOURS: Mon.-Wed. 9:30-5:30 Thur.-Fri. 9:30-7:00 Saturday 9:30-5:30

SUMMER PATIO Are you missing out? CLEARANCE

ENDS AUGUST 8TH

If you don’t already get the Observer, you can have it delivered right to your mailbox.

UP TO

70% OFF

*

In-stock only Floor Models and Discontinueds

Umbrellas

149

$

From

For Just

Yes, the Observer is free. But if you live outside of our distribution area and it’s not convenient to pick up the paper every week, you can have it delivered right to your mailbox. The subscription fee of $35.00 (plus tax) covers the cost of postage for the year.

$35

Choose from: Resin • Teak • Wicker • Sling Cast • And More

/YEAR

396 Victoria St. N., Kitchener

Call for details

519-669-5790 Or visit us at 20B Arthur St., North, Elmira

tel: 519.578.9663 * See store for details

STORE HOURS; MON. - WED. 9-6; THURS, FRI., 9-8, SAT. 9-5; SUN. 11-4


August 07, 2010  

The August 07, 2010 edition of the Woolwich Observer.

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