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O’Brien for Schools 2010-2011

www.obrien.ie


TEACHING t The O’Brien Press we realise that reading is a core skill at the heart of the curriculum. We know that each child will present their teacher with an individual interest and ability profile. We realise that teachers need adaptable, versatile and engaging resources that will help them to plan and develop high-level thinking and communication skills in the classroom. That’s why we have developed, and are constantly updating, a comprehensive range of FREE resources that support you, the teacher, and encourage children to develop these skills to their maximum potential.

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O’BRIEN FOR SCHOOLS CONTAINS: O Details of hundreds of FREE TEACHING RESOURCES created by teachers for teachers to support O’Brien Press books O Information on NEW BOOKS from O’Brien Press for all class levels from 4 years to 12 years+ O Four-page comprehensive THEMATIC BREAKDOWN of all O’Brien Press books for ease of use in the classroom O Samples of TEACHING SUPPORT MATERIALS for all reading levels and abilities READ ON!

NEW BOOKS

TEACHING GUIDES

Lots of great new books for all reading levels and abilities!

Are you choosing a new novel for your class? Or perhaps you are using O’Brien Press novels already. O’Brien Teaching Guides provide detailed suggestions for getting the most out of your chosen novel, with plot summaries, activities, discussion points and more. Teaching Guides are available for over 65 O’Brien Press books and more are added all the time. Check out www.obrien.ie/TeachingGuides


RESOURCES AVAILABLE FREE FROM WWW.OBRIEN.IE OVER

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ACTIVITY SHEETS

SSpecialised activity sheets for reluctant re readers, specially developed by re resource teachers. Available FREE at www.obrien.ie/DiscoveryChallenge w

HUNDREDS of FREE activity sheets, created by teachers for teachers, with the primary school curriculum in mind. Ideal for classroom use, with puzzle pages, suggested activities, language development and visual arts activities and much more. www.obrien.ie/ActivitySheets

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ALFIE GREEN: CREATE YOUR OWN CHARACTER

Perhaps you are already using O’Brien Press books in your classroom, or maybe you’re thinking about it. Whatever the case, we realise that teachers need adaptable and versatile resources when choosing and using books in the classroom. That’s why we’re giving you an in-depth list of the different THEMES and TOPICS covered in our books, at all of the different class and reading levels, completely FREE! This unique thematic breakdown offers help and advice when selecting a book or novel, and enables you to get the most out of O’Brien Press books in the classroom. BAINEADH GEIT ASAM! b ! leaba árr sa assá ea ine Tá din

BÉILE (MÍ?)OIRIÚNACH

BILLEOGA SAOTHAIR R Billeoga saothair bunaithe ar na leabhar SOS; Fíor nó Bréagach, Aimsigh na Difríochta, Deir Ó Grádaigh, Rabhlóga, … www.obrien.ie/SOS/Billeoga

1. Roghnaigh béile oiriúnach do na carachtair.

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YOUR SCHOOL LIBRARY Get great advice and suggestions on setting up and maintaining a fantastic library in your school – available FREE at www.obrien.ie/SchoolLibrary

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COVER GALLERY An innovative way of introducing your class to creative visual arts, cultural diversity and language development. Log on to www.obrien.ie/CoverGallery and find out more

By Peter Heaney. Based on the Alfie Green books by Joe O’Brien. © Copyright reserved. The O’Brien Press Ltd www.obrien.ie

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Tarraing an pictiúr tiúr ceart cearrtoirtín t sa bhosca bhosca cuí. sméara

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Use the boxes provided to draw a picture of your character and write a description of him or her in your copybook. Don’t forget to give your character a name!

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A PICTURE OF MY CHARACTER

You will need to decide if your character is a plant or an animal, and whether he lives in our world or Arcania. Think about whether he or she is a friendly character or an unpleasant one. You can even base your character on yourself if you like!

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Alfie Green meets lots of interesting characters on his adventures, now he’d like you to invent a new one!

POSTERS, BOOKMARKS & DISPLAY MATERIAL Email marketing@ obrien.ie today and we’ll send you a selection of colourful posters and bookmarks to brighten up your classroom or school library, completely FREE!

REAL BOOKS FOR SCHOOLS Check out this fantastic integrated Reading Programme based on over 80 books – make O’Brien Press books work for you. Find out more at www.obrien.ie/ReadingProgramme


Bridging Cultures, Building Reading Success

AN EXCITING SERIES OF MULTI-CULTURAL AND INTER-CULTURAL BOOKS FOR CHILDREN, IDEAL FOR CLASSROOM USE I Won’t Go to China by Enda Wyley Poor Chang-ming! He has been picked for the school team but his family will be in China then, visiting his grandma. It’s not fair. ‘I won’t go to China,’ he decides. But what about Grandma? And isn’t a visit to China the most exciting thing ever? Especially when it’s Chinese New Year? Chang-ming doesn’t think so ... But China is full of surprises! ISBN: 978-1-84717-159-7 PRICE: €7.99/£6.99 FORMAT: 260x197mm Hardback/32 pages ABOUT THE AUTHOR ENDA WYLEY is an author, poet and teacher and has had several books published including Socrates in the Garden and Poems for Breakfast. Her book for young readers, Boo and Bear, is in the O’Brien Panda Cubs series and she has also written The Silver Notebook for readers aged 10+.

The Romanian Builder by Peter Prendergast JJoe has so many questions for the new builder: Which tool was the most important? What if you were afraid of heights? How do you put scaffolding together? He is really disappointed when he finds out that Radu doesn’t speak any English. Now he will never find out about building – or will he? ISBN: 978-1-84717-105-4 PRICE: €7.99/£6.99 FORMAT: 260x197mm Hardback/32 pages ABOUT THE AUTHOR PETER PRENDERGAST is the author of one previous novel and one children’s book. His first work of fiction for older children, Dancing in the Dark, will be published in October 2010. He works in Dublin as a teacher.

Olanna’s Big Day by Natasha Mac a’Bháird There’s great excitement when the school band is chosen to march in the Saint Patrick’s Day Parade. Olanna practises really hard on her tin whistle. At last the big day arrives and they line up with the stilt-walkers, the bagpipers, the dancing leprechauns. Then disaster strikes. But Olanna – with a little help from her granny back in Nigeria – saves the day! ISBN: 978-1-84717-171-9 PRICE: €7.99/£6.99 FORMAT: 260x197mm Hardback/32 pages ABOUT THE AUTHOR NATASHA MAC A’BHÁIRD is a contributing book reviewer for several publications. She is the author of The Irish Bride’s Survival Guide. This is her first book for children.


Bridging Cultures, Building Reading Success

The Dreaming Tree by Eithne Massey Back home in Brazil, Roberto loved playing the world’s best football! Now he lives in Ireland, and he’d really like to have a game with the boys in the park, but he’s too shy. When his granny reminds him of the Brazilian story of the dreaming tree, he doesn’t see how a story can help him … But maybe it can! ISBN: 978-1-84717-158-0 PRICE: €7.99/£6.99 FORMAT: 260x197mm Hardback/32 pages ABOUT THE AUTHOR EITHNE MASSEY is the author of the children’s novel The Secret of Kells and is also a short-story writer. She works as a librarian in both Dublin and Brittany and is also the author of Best-loved Irish Legends.

ABOUT THE ILLUSTRATORS Cartoon Saloon is an award-winning animation and illustration design studio in Kilkenny, founded by Paul Young and Tomm Moore in 1999. The Secret Of Kells, Cartoon Saloon’s flagship feature film directed by Tomm Moore, was released in 2009. Cartoon Saloon also illustrated the award-winning best-seller The Story of Ireland.

A NOTE FOR TEACHERS Bridges celebrate Ireland’s ethnic and cultural diversity. Stories shed light on our common and contrasting experiences, and these beautiful full-colour hardback books with highquality stories and engaging illustrations can help children with their understanding of other cultures and of the many different experiences of living in Ireland today. Bridges are an ideal classroom resource and can be enjoyed by children with a wide range of language proficiency and differing reading abilities. Bridging Cultures, Building Reading Success Bridges can also be used as the basis for projects or class learning about different cultures. With high-quality and entertaining storylines and engaging illustrations from the award-winning Cartoon Saloon, these full-colour hardback books are an invaluable resource for the Resource Teacher, the Learning Support Teacher and the EAL Teacher, and equally to the classroom teacher engaging with the mainstream curriculum. TEACHING RESOURCES

Visit www.obrien.ie for lots of great Bridges resources includingg Teaching Guides, suggested class projects, Activity Sheets and more a I Won’t Go To Chin

17-159-7 ISBN 978-1-847

The Dreaming Tree

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Teaching Guide

By PETER HEANEY LE AND THEMES

l l

l

Making choices

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caused him to begin What do you think people Chinese any longer. any other things Can you think of to think this way? ed? What sort of feeling very disappoint do when they are s to feel better? do to help themselve things could they to get Changteacher has managed you (Read pp16-18) The to China. How do mind about going his change to ming for everyone to feel Why is it necessary think she did that? important? is do they that what believed that there Chang-ming’s granny p (Read pp 24-27) Do you think that to bring ‘Good Luck’. were lots of ways do you think people really true? Why any of these were superstitions from any heard you Have have superstitions? your granny?

p

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1. My Name ns

Valuing contributio Unhappiness.

SUMMA RY

team coincides for the school football to Chang-ming’s selection granny in Beijing holiday, visiting his with a planned family New Year. y celebrate Chinese to miss the opportunit unhappy at having begins to Chang-ming is very team and, in his frustration, parents. of his to play for the school much to the concern Chinese, things all reject a together they devise s his teacher and His mum approache Chang-ming and distracts which diversion and celebrate the subtle yet creative y to reassert, share allows him the opportunit traditions. of his Chinese rich cultural diversity

called ‘Forever g didn’t want to be there (Read pp 6-7) Chang-min the name because and dad had chosen Bright’. His mum was born. full moon when he had been a bright yourself that described choose a name for it be? If you were able to you, what would and interesting about something special a with the name and a personal bookmark You could design it. chose you picture of why

2. My Year

usually begins in late Chinese New Year after an animal (Read pp19-20) The Each year is named January or early February. animals. and there are twelve is of the Snake, which born during the year Chang-ming was the year of the Horse. of the Dragon and between the year page of the animals from could make a chart Do you think you they represent? APPROA CH to 20 and what year can you calculate offer fertile scope year of the Dragon, are universal and the story was the of to 2000 The themes If the year can contribute of disappointment g is? tes how examine how feelings what age Chang-min you story also demonstra which Chinese year and actions. The chart to calculate negative thoughts a distraction from Can you use your energy can provide strengthen feelings positive action and were born? to contribute to and disappointment, helping of self worth.

time discussion/ circle favour whole class The approach should to identify and assess y for the children and offer the opportunit by personal can be influenced how their own behaviour ments. experiences of disappoint

DISCUSS ION POINTS p

g decided that he

(Read pp5-7) Chang-min

I Won’t Go To China

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Teaching Guide

RATIONA from disappointment which weaves a path . This is a gentle story, pride and acceptance gentle support to and rejection through charting how story is universal, g to The essence of the match leads Chang-min missing a football disappointment at life. that is special in his begin to reject all this process and n of the teacher distracts . re-asserted The subtle interventio be to his cultural tradition allows his pride in SPHE and include: The themes are essentially

ISBN 978-1-847 17-158-0

Eithne Massey

ENDA WYLEY

3. The Photograph

for lots of photos of China Chang-ming took (Read pp 22-31) you think was his Which of them do front his school report. going to use for the the one that he is favourite? It will be of his report. Do you think that

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1

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you could help Chang-min

Teaching Guide

RATIONA LE A N D THEMES

Roberto finds the The Dreaming Tree confidence to adapt is a gentle story, to and participate in ACTIVITI ES which examines how his new surroundin gs, insecurity in a new and is able to offer and strange environme his own gifts and nt can limit the 1. A Friend for Roberto talents without fear opportunities for of rejection. integration and (Read pp 8 – 9) Roberto The approach should participation. wants to be emphasise that friends with the other everyone has both children in his The essence of the talents and the story falls within the class; however he potential to contribute effectively, is not sure how to SPHE range of issues and examines the begin. Can you help especially where him? What sort of way self image can circumstances might dictate how we things limit or discourage should he say or do perceive our circumstan participation as was and what should he not do? ces. The story the case with Roberto. also shows how support and Use a class brainstorm Whole class strategies encouragement can to make a list of all and discussion-led energise a positive the things you think group work should self image and provide might help him and provide an effective the courage to then in small groups focus to examine take control of any pick the three things the issues from the circumstances. that you think will story. help the most. You The themes include: could make a little l Self image DISCUSS / perception ION POINTS DO & DON’T CARD l Courage l (Read P5): Fergus never asked for him and decorate it with a helpful Roberto to play. Do l Cultural pride picture. you think he was being mean or did he just not think l Integration & participation about asking him 2. The Cúpla Focal to play? What do l Anxiety you think Roberto (Read p 7) Roberto should have done can speak two himself and why do l Avoidance languages, English strategies you think he did and Portuguese. How not do it? many languages are l Support and encouragement spoken in your l (Read pp school? 13 – 15): Amanda l Taking the was a initiative. good dancer and Roberto thought If you had children in your school who that she was ‘showing SUMMA RY did not speak English, off’. His mum what do you think said that she wasn’t the five most useful ‘showing off’ and Roberto is unable phrases that you that it was OK to to take the first step be proud of things could learn to say towards integration in another language that you can do. Who with his new to make them feel welcome do you think is environment. His would be? right? When do you younger sister, think that being Amanda, has already Do you think that proud of something begun to make new you could get the you can do friends, but Roberto phrases translated becomes ‘showing is finding it more and write them out off’? on difficult. It is only a chart with a picture when he speaks on to show what is l (Read p16): the telephone to his granny Why do you think being said? Do you in Brazil, and she think that you could Roberto hated to reminds him of the look different from practise them until Legend of The you could say them everyone else? How Dreaming Tree and easily? did he try to the Jaguar King, that hide his embarrassm he finds the courage ent? Can you to seek his own think of other ways 3. Five Gold Stars Dreaming Tree. This that people might sets in motion a behave if they were chain of events that embarrassed? (Read pp31 -32) lead to him achieving Roberto pulled off What could you do his ‘heart’s desire’. his if you thought jacket to show his green and yellow that someone you knew was jersey with the five gold stars – his embarrassed about APPROA CH something? Brazilian football top. Today he is playing Roberto’s story is as a striker for Ireland. a universal tale of loving family support; with Can you use your his family’s support, imagination to write a short match report to describe what is happening? The Dreaming Tree

1 Teaching Guide

FOOD REAL CHINESE available in just those that are

few ingredients, usually garlic, Chinese cooking uses sauce, sesame oil, ginger, eg soy sauce, oyster are cheap, cook every Chinese kitchen les are easy to grow, Five Spices. Vegetab go well spring onions and full of nutrients, and hot woks, are tasty, southern China. in a short time in very food, especially in an important staple especially in northern with rice which is wheat, from made staple food, people a Noodles are another feasts as a way of wishing served at birthday , and duck or China, but are also at special banquets is expensive and served long life. Seafood at very special meals. goose would be used

‘four beautifully written and very colourfully illustrated books’ ‘could be used in the area of integration, geography and religious studies’ InTouch Magazine ‘an excellent and thought-provoking new series of multicultural books from O’Brien’ Sunday Independent ‘invaluable both in the school and home environment’ ‘these thought-provoking books will be of immense value to teachers, parents and of course children’ Inis Magazine

nist) Mainland (commu Chinese New Year. th . Both in Ireland usually celebrate Day is 10 October Chinese people living Taiwan’s National st Chinese ion is 1 October and in restaurants and the National Day of Celebrat or from parties at home or ders hold their own ts and invites the ambassad Taiwanese and Mainlan Year parties in restauran rce holds annual New Comme of r Chambe pancake. wrapped in a thin c and others. Duck, slices of duck gs, the People’s Republi famous dishes is Peking jiaozi (wrapped dumplin make hundreds of One of Chinas’s most keep a few of China – families would much in families meat past many Pork is the favourite Eve feasts, and in the pork) for New Year’s usually filled with meat for festivals. be killed to provide pigs which would

by Enda Wyley. Won’t Go To China Wong. Based on I Recipes from Lucy Ltd www.obrien.ie The O’Brien Press © Copyright reserved.

Kindly Supported By


Whoever said that learning to read and write is easy? Sarah is unhappy - when learning to read and write, she tries to remember which way the letters go but she often gets them ‘Ideal for schools all mixed up. After she discovers that dyslexia is the and libraries’ InTouch Magazine reason for her trouble, she begins to understand that with extra practice and some help from others, she can begin to read and write correctly. At the same time, she also discovers a hidden talent she never knew existed! ISBN: 978-1-84717-203-7 PRICE: €9.99 /£8.99 FORMAT: Paperback/36 pages

Published in association with the Dyslexia Association of Ireland

New

Traditional Irish legends retold with a fresh approach, brought to life with stunning full-colour illustrations. Ideal for all classes, either as a self-read or for reading aloud. Includes: • The Salmon of Knowledge • The Children of Lir • Fionn and the Giant • Oisín

• • •

How Cú Chulainn Got His Name The King with Donkey’s Ears The White Wolfhound

ABOUT THE AUTHOR EITHNE MASSEY is the author of Legendary Ireland, The Secret of Kells and The Dreaming Tree. She is also a short-story writer and has had a lifelong interest in mythology.

New smaller-size is edition of th ing award-winn bestseller

ISBN: 978-1-84717-137-5 PRICE: €12.99/£10.99 FORMAT: Hardback/160 pages

A ffascinating & comprehensive overview of Irish history from the Ice Age to the present day. It’s the ideal book for teaching your class all about the island of p IIreland and our eventful and exciting past. I Includes full colour illustrations, photographs, easy-to-read maps aand quirky cartoons that bring history to life! Irish Children’s Book of the Year (Irish Book Awards 2008)

‘Deserves a place in every school and home library’ InTouch Magazine

Shortlisted Sh li for the Reading Association of Ireland Awards 2009 TEACHING RESOURCES ISBN: 978-1-84717-184-9 PRICE: €9.99/£8.99 FORMAT: Hardback/96 pages

We’ve made it even easier for you to use The Story of Ireland in your classroom – check out all the innovative new teaching resource materials now available FREE from www.obrien.ie/TheStoryofIreland. Over 25 resources available including History Detectives, Saints and Pagans, The Celts and lots more.

Looking for a book on nature and wildlife? Visit www.obrien.ie to see Wild Dublin by Eanna Ní Lamhna. Lots of great teaching materials available to download free.

Bring history to life with The Secret of Kells picture book, novel and DVD – all available from www.obrien.ie


Senior Infants/Year 1: Reading Level 4+

At O’Brien Press we realise the need for bright, colourful, engaging and energetic books for younger readers, to help build up confidence during the early stages of learning to read.

Where Reading Begins …

An exciting series of full-colour illustrated books for young children – ideal for reading with a child or helping them to begin reading on their own.

‘The O’Brien ries Panda Cubs se to has all it takes ing’ encourage read Irish Examiner PRICE: €5.99/£4.99 FORMAT: Paperback/48 pages Full colour

For details of all Orange Flag books, visit www.obrien.ie/OrangeFlag today

A charming full-colour picture book for little people who can’t wait to be big!

New

Perfect for reading aloud ISBN: 978-1-84717-176-4 PRICE: €7.99/£6.99 FORMAT: Paperback/32 pages

Need something a little more advanced for your class?


First Class/Year 2: Reading Level 5+

are specially designed to introduce the beginner reader to the wonderful world of books. With exciting stories and lots of illustration and simple text, pandas have proven highly popular with young readers, PRICE: €5.99/£4.99 both in Ireland and abroad. FORMAT: Paperback/64 pages

With quirky characters and original stories, pandas are also perfect for older readers who may have difficulties learning to read. Over 38 books in the series! ‘… These easy stories with their simple texts and lively illustrations should encourage even the most recalcitrant reader’ Sunday Independent ‘should appeal to children learning to read, including older children who are struggling.’ The School Librarian

New from best-selling Irish author Sarah Webb

New

ISBN: 978-1-84717-195-5 PRICE: €5.99/£4.99 FORMAT: Paperback/64 pages

The school play was Noah’s Ark and Emma wanted to be a dog. But the teacher said she was to be a penguin. A penguin! Emma was not pleased … But being a penguin turns out to be good fun after all!

ABOUT THE AUTHOR SARAH WEBB worked as a children’s bookseller for many years before becoming a full-time writer. She has written eight bestselling novels for adults and also writes the Amy Green, Teen Agony Queen series for young teens. Emma the Penguin is her first book for younger readers.


First Class/Year 2: Reading Level 5+

Like all O’Brien pandas, are ideal for beginner readers, with exciting stories and illustrations throughout. With new tales and old legends retold, are truly magical! ‘O’Brien Legends series provide an exciting introduction to Irish legends for the young child. They are guaranteed to capture and sustain the interest of the emergent reader’ InTouch Magazine

PRICE: €5.99/£4.99 FORMAT: Paperback/64 pages

For details of all Purple Flag books, visit www.obrien.ie/PurpleFlag today TEACHING RESOURCES Activity Sheets

At The O’Brien Press, we recognise the importance of teaching support especially at younger reading levels. That’s why we have hundreds of FREE Activity Sheets available, including nearly 40 different specialised Activity Sheets to support the panda series, so when you choose an O’Brien panda you know you’re not just getting a book; you’re getting a whole teaching support package. O’Brien Activity Sheets are created by teachers for teachers, with the primary school curriculum in mind. They are ideal for classroom use, with puzzle pages, language development and visual arts activities and more. www.obrien.ie/ActivitySheets

ACTIVITY SHEET

ISSUED FREE. Created by Gillian Perdue Based on Conor’s Cowboy Suit by Gillian Perdue ISBN 0-86278-778-5 © Copyright reserved. The O’Brien Press Ltd www.obrien.ie

A Cowboy’s Clothes

ISSUED FREE. Created by Patrice Aggs Based on Ducks in Trouble by Patrice Aggs ISBN 0-86278-738-6 © Copyright reserved. The O’Brien Press Ltd www.obrien.ie

Pintail wants to be a real musician. What type of music will he play? See if you can find what instruments and clothes he needs to be in: 1. An orchestra 2. A pop group 3. A carnival band 4. A marching band

GRANNY’S TEETH – PANDA 10 by Brianóg Brady Dawson, illustrated by Michael Connor earch: wordsearch: Can you find the following words in thee wordse ISBN: 0-86278-570-7 • D5.50 pb • 64 pages ans, waistcoat, spurs jeans, ssoo, jea chaps, hat, scarf, boots, belt, guns, lassoo,

R W S F H I L J U

G H A T H B O O T

P Q V I G T I U Q

G E A N S M G U N

K O F G P T S V P

D O C X U Z C Y A

FIRST/SECOND

Danny Brown is very excited because his Granny is coming to stay. He helps his

O E L Cmum to tidy his room by hiding his football under the bed and then sits at the window to watch wait. Later, she announces that they will celebrate her S S A Lbirthday the next and day with a meal in Danny’s favourite restaurant. When he H A P Sborrows Granny’s teeth from the glass on the bedroom shelf he only means to have some fun with them at school, but the teeth go missing and are thrown and B M Earound N kicked the classroom before landing, damaged, in a puddle outside. Granny is cross, Mum is too, andD R S as heTeats mashed potatoes at home instead of the giant burger he had hoped for, he decides that he will never, ever, ever play such tricks again. A very funny tale, with the hint of more C K L to Acome! foods and drinks which are good for growing teeth. E R F – ENGLISH ALANGUAGE t Language of water: Wet, slippery, dipped, rinsed, t Myself and others: Ways in which members of dried. O B O B families can help, support and care for one another; t Word-portraits: Granny’s hugs too tight, her respecting the belongings of others; practising care, N when cross, her arms were consideration and good manners when J awful; perfume S Asmelled dealing with folded, her lips in a thin line. Create oral word-portraits around the class, other children guess who is being described. t Discussion: Favourite places to eat, favourite party foods. t Creative: Write a simple birthday party invitation to a friend or relation. t Creative: Finishing a story. ‘Granny’s boiled egg rolled off the tray and …’ t Creative: ‘Good Time Grub.’ Think of other suitable names for restaurants. SESE – SCIENCE

t Living things: Human life processes. Differences between milk teeth, permanent teeth, false teeth/dentures. Characteristics of different materials when wet and dry. Identify

the five senses. Explore sense of taste – why did Granny’s teeth taste strange? SPHE

Reading Programme Our Reading Programme includes inter-disciplinary teaching ideas for 20 Panda books. Available FREE at www.obrien.ie/ReadingProgramme

ACTIVITY SHEET

t Myself: Becoming more independent and self-reliant, taking care of personal belongings, tidying own bedroom, picking up bathroom towels. t Discussing and exploring the effects of poor personal hygiene; practising effective dental care;

others. Making mistakes and making amends, accepting the consequences of our actions. t How friends can influence personal actions and decisions: Impressing friends by mimicking, jeering, playing tricks. PHYSICAL EDUCATION

t Movement: Show excitement, turning around in a rush, waving arms, smiling. t Mime activities: Granny searching high and low for her teeth. Granny’s face without her teeth. Try to eat, drink, speak without teeth. t Game: Two children link arms and make a mouth shape with their arms. Others line up with three small beanbags each. Aim is to throw the food (beanbag) into the mouth as it opens and closes. Children take turns being the mouth. VISUAL ARTS

t Danny’s giant burger: Using a large piece of paper, create the fillings for the burger, include all your favourites. t Peephole teeth: Sheet of card with hole cut out,

place hole over photo/magazine picture of teeth and mouth, children focus on copying exactly what they see through the peephole.

O’BRIEN READING PROGRAMME

By Patrick Deeley, illustrated

LANGUAGE – ENGLISH

CLASS

MY DOG LIVE LY

by Martin Fagan

Jenny loves dogs. For ISBN: 0-86278-723-8 each of her birthdays • 64 pages she has received a dog spaniel, a golden retriever, and now owns a Dalmatian, a sheepdog and a terrier a cocker – toy dogs all. Then best birthday present on her sixth birthday ever – a real live dog she gets her of her own. But this everything, destroys dog is trouble and Mum’s flowers and dirties digs holes, chases washing. Lively is well-named school. A heart-warmin and even causes trouble g story of friendship with a message about at dog the responsibilities of pet ownership.

t Language of Movement – eg bounced, danced, flopped, flew, somersaulted, rolled, jumped, bumped, wagged, leaped, danced round in circles, tumbled t Language of Similes – Lively is ‘as good as gold’ (p59). List as many similes as possible and each child or group could choose one. Illustrate on A4 card with chosen phrase written on back – can the class guess which simile matches the illustration?

under a large illustration of a classroom in this Dog School. t Creative – What is Lively’s impression of the Dog School? Does he like the woman

running it, does he enjoy learning to walk on a lead? Write a group or class piece from Lively’s point of view.

could make that shape using their hands/bodies. Ask children to make other shapes using their bodies eg make a square (need 2 or 4 children working together), make a triangle/diamond/rectangle etc. SPHE

SESE t Myself and Others – My Friends and Other People – On p43 t Living Things – Jenny tells Lively he is Plants and Animals: her best friend. Discuss Domestic dogs and their and examine what characteristics, their makes ‘a best friend’ t Vocabulary Extension need for food, what or a good friend. What they eat and drink. Look eg brisk, exhausted, are the qualities and at whimpered, obedient, different types of dog skills associated with troublesome and identify differences. friendship – forgiving Jenny has a toy dalmatian, t Discussion each other, trusting each cocker spaniel, other etc. golden retriever, terrier, (a) of favourite words sheepdog and Lively – Lively’s favourite is a collie. Extend this list t Growing and Changing words are ‘food’ and of different types of dog ‘walk’. Ask children for – how a pup and write a mini-profile grows into a dog Examine their two favourite words. on each. Consider dogs the differences and They might discuss changes that occur as in the wild eg dingo, in pairs and report to hyena, coyote, wolf. animals grow and change. the class their partner’s Do human babies grow chosen words. Extension t Think about dogs and change too? In that help us eg guide – See dogs, what ways? 1 Might a cat’s two favourite Activity Sheet sniffer/ tracker dogs, huskies, St Bernard dogs, words be ‘milk’ and ‘sleep’? Might a rabbit sheep dogs. In what PE ways do these dogs help choose ‘carrots and running’ or ‘lettuce and us? t Gymnastics – Movement. hopping’? (b) of communication t Dogs live in kennels, different types of movement Use the – animals can’t talk but discuss the names of mentioned pp16 – they can communicate, other animal homes 19 to encourage children how do they do this? and compile list eg to move as Lively did. Can animals and humans A rabbit lives in a burrow/hutch. Ask children to consider sometimes which movement they understand one another A fox lives in a den. preferred. eg ‘Lively gazed into her eyes’ (p43). A badger lives in a sett. t Movement – Create and develop games. (c) of presents – when A squirrel lives in a drey. With children working Jenny got Lively she said in groups ask them to – ‘this is the best present A hen lives in a hen-house/coo design a ‘Fun Obstacle ever’ (p15). Ask p. Course’ based on the children what present See Activity Sheet path Lively took pp17 they would most like 4. – 23. Children might to receive and to say why. t Taking care of pets ‘run round the marker/cone and the responsibilities three times’ or t Research and development involved. Lively was ‘roll over twice’, ‘dance not quite the well-behaved – Each child round the hoop’, ‘do or small group presents dog Jenny may have a tumble’. Following a (orally) information on wished for but she demonstration on how real, desired or imagined to continued to take care complete their obstacle pet. Information of him. Children could course, could be presented under discuss the responsibilities then take turns at completing groups might various headings eg involved in taking each other’s name, breed, appearance, care of a pet and the course and perhaps finish foods, likes/dislikes. work involved. Discuss with an Obstacle See Activity Sheet the ISPCA slogan ‘A Relay Race. 2. When children have Dog is for Life not for completed oral presentation, Christmas.’ Organise VISUAL ARTS a visit from a local vet information could or be compiled graphically a member of the ISPCA with photos/pictures, t Clay – Use clay to talk to the class and to develop the form and displayed. have a questions and of a answers session. dog, finish with surface texture to show the t Creative –Is Lively MATHS a good name for the dog’s coat. Children dog will discover themselves in this story? Can children t Numbers ordinal that it might be easiest think numbers 1 – 7 ‘when to model a dog sitting suitable names eg Silly/Trouble/ of other Jenny was 6 years old or lying down, as attaching Crazy. Each she had her sixth child or group chooses legs may be difficult birthday, when she was a pet and names their and they may fall off three years old she had easily. pet in the same way her _________ birthday’ eg my cat Crazy, my t Construction – dog etc. Lively wasn’t too happy Trouble, my pony Playful. in t Measures Time/Date Each group could his kennel, ask children – Read and discuss write a short piece telling to design a kennel day, date, and month. how pet earned which he may be happier Discuss children’s name. Draft, edit and in, using a shoe-box finally add an illustration birthdays in terms of or similar. Encourage the day, month and year. to class compilation of use of imagination to ‘Crazy Animal Stories’. t Data – Using the build a structure that children’s birthdays, would make Lively happy t Creative – Jenny a takes Lively to a School simple pictogram could – include a play area etc. be used to show the for Dogs. List a set of rules for a School for month in which children’s t Fabric and Fibre birthdays occur. Also Dogs eg ‘Paw up before - In groups, children can barking’, ‘No chewing children could do a class make different types survey on favourite bones in class’, ‘Dogs of dogs using scraps of must stand on their four pets and compile their material/wool and paper information in a simple legs at all times’. The to create the dog’s rules might be displayed pictogram or bar chart. coat. Focus on different colours to show t Shape – Lively slept different types of dogs – Dalmatian, golden in a circle, children retriever, sheep dog, terrier etc. Pay attention to colour and texture. Copyright The O’Brien Press Ltd. Notes by Anne O’Carroll.


Second Class/Year 3: Reading Level 6+

O’Brien Yellow Flag books are ideal for First & Second Class/Year 2 (P2) & Year 3 (P3)/Key Stage 1. These books are perfect for children who can read stories with chapters and slightly longer sentences. They capture the imagination of young readers with humour and illustrations which go beyond simply showing what is in the text, for a more complete reading experience. With fun and original titles in the O’Brien Flyers and Alfie Green series, these books are also ideal for reluctant readers.

D Double-trouble for Mad Grandad in the latest aadventure from award-winning Irish children’s aauthor and illustrator Oisín McGann

New

G Grandad has lost his car and Lenny is helping him look for it. But Grandad is acting strange . . . even stranger than it normal. And he thinks someone is following them. n LLenny has to figure out what’s wrong with Grandad. But that’s just the start of the problem. Because something is following ju tthem – and it’s definitely not friendly!

en Flyers lots more O’Bri r o f e i . n e i r .ob the Visit w w w ‘Ideal for confident readers who can takendon ent nday Indepe longer stor y’ Su challenge of a s a real sense of will give reader at th s rie se lly ‘A jo arian The School Libr achievement.’

ISBN: 978-1-84717-197-9 PRICE: €5.99/£4.99 FORMAT: Paperback/64 pages

TEACHING RESOURCES Activity Sheets We’ve got lots of teaching support materials for O’Brien Flyers and Mad Grandad books including over 45 Activity Sheets, available to download for FREE from www.obrien.ie/ActivitySheets Reading Programme The O’Brien Reading Programme has detailed classroom notes and helpful suggestions and ideas for working with Yellow Flag books: download for FREE from www.obrien.ie/ReadingProgramme SECOND C LASS

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by Conor McHale

JIGSAW S TEW

For over a month, a terrible snowstorm ISBN 0-86278-688-6 cottage. They have has kept Jack £4.33pb 64 pages run out of food MacAnoolie and and the resourceful his family trapped boots – these taste Mrs MacAnoolie in their small fine with a little has been forced salt, even if they the big pot and to boil all the family’s are a little chewy. eventually she uses up all the Everything and One day she makes furniture: all the anything is cooked a stew out of an bicycles, the books in old jigsaw and exception of Jack, and even the doorknobs. the result is very catches Jigsalgia. surprising. The They all turn into snow, across frozen entire family, jigsaws and fall lakes, braving with the to pieces. Jack the icy wind in the problem and trudges through an effort to rescue knows the cure, the deep his family. Doctor but Jack has spilled Carefully they Mulgrew recognises separate the members the box and the pieces have become of his family, then MacAnoolie reappear, jumbled together. assemble and inflate as does Molly and LANGUAGE piece end up? each one. Gradually, Rover the cat. But – ENGLISH Rover is without Mr and Mrs t Vocabulary his tail … so where t Creative: Mrs extension: did that jigsaw MacAnoolie boiled ingredients, chewable, e.g. resourceful, (with boots

a little salt) and delicious. Construction: furniture, ‘bicycles, t Vocabulary Zigzag Person. books, candlesticks of wind: blew, Cut coloured construction paper and doorknobs’ shook, whistled, rattled, gust, icy, into a large triangle. keep the family (p.10) to chilled to the bone. a face from pale alive. List other Cut out other adjectives ingredients she construction paper Suggest might have used. to replace the facial details. Fold and add Look around the word ‘icy’. two arms and classroom: t Language of think of at least two legs in rapid movement: accordion folds 10 objects which and attach them whoosh, shot would like a cannonball, complement each to the body. Add hands, shoes jumped aside, other when cooked rocketed past, and a hat. Decorate leapt, thundering stew. in a triangle with cut past, blinding speed, the body paper or crayons crash. t Colourful writing: t Creative: The or a mixture of both. man The wind ‘whistled the armpits of use a carrot instead who lost his nose had to under snowmen’ (p.7); t Construction: (pp. 42–44). Think ‘the icy wind Winter Forest. chewed on his vegetables and of other See Busy nose. It pinched commonly used Fingers 4, p.15. at his ears’ household (p.31). Write other objects to replace every facial feature. colourful phrases t Construction: sentences to describe Composite Animal. and t Creative: Snow different animals Discuss the effects of wind Posters. As Jack person’s face. and what parts sat surgery, he read on a really define that animal, e.g. Snow Weekly (p.46). in the a squirrel’s brush t Discussion: the posters on Look at or a donkey’s ‘Jack’s sister Molly the wall behind big ears. Draw a rough oblong him, and suggest was passing the time by calling alternative slogans. body shape and add features from him names’ (p.8). Or suggest slogans many animals to might you pass might promote How that make your the time if you own special design. ‘rain’ as a beneficial were trapped Add extras, such the weather and health remedy. by or scarves or hats, forced to spend as glasses a month to the animals indoors? What t Creative: Molly and name games do you them. said she couldn’t and your family/ friends play to anything ‘more think of pass the time? t Construction: daft’ than ‘a cat Would games differ if without a tail’ Wind Sock. Cover (pp. 63–64). Try you had no computer these surface of a sheet the entire to think of things television? and/or of paper with a that are even dafter and list these. watercolour wash and sprinkle with salt for texture. t Discussion: PHYSICAL Molly and Jack dry, turn it over EDUCATION When called one and glue on layers another names. t Movement: of thin tissue paper strips, Read what they Jack underwent said on pp. 8, c.6in longer than 10, 12, 19, 59, a risky and dangerous journey 60. Do of paper. Turn the sheet back over and in order to rescue meant these remarks you think Molly and Jack use a thin marker Mime that journey, his family. to outline and to be hurtful, or highlight shapes trudging through they just playing were created by the snow, teeth chattering. the thick watercolours or a game? Might these paper strips. Glue comments ever Show how Jack took paper into a cylinder and punch be considered his trousers off, hurtful or three holes in unkind? In what broke a branch top to hang. circumstances? off the tree Can sometimes be and tied them said by close friends things on, etc. or family m members which might not be said t Movement: Jack and the by aacquaintances? doctor put a lot of effort into t Discussion: inflating Molly Molly was the (pp. 55–59). first to be affected b by the ‘rare illness’. Mime this sequence in Why do you think pairs: th the first to change she was one child pumps into a jigsaw and the air and fall apart? t Discussion: the other gradually ‘Strange noises’ comes to came from be behind the doctor’s life. door (p.46). List str strange noises some VISUAL ARTS you have heard and say what cau caused them. Have you ever heard t Paint and colour: strange noi noises and not Jigsaw been able to identify Person. Draw the composite the words which them? Read describe the sounds picture, similar Can you invent to that on other onomatopoeic on p.47. p.49, of a few people describe strange desc words to sounds? know after a helping you t D of Jigsaw Discussion: Rover, Stew. What would the cat, had to to lif the get used life without a tail resulting person (p.62). If you were look your teacher/friend putting might use a mixture like? You /parent or guardian toget together, which of back piece might you women and children men, choose to leave out and why? to make your composite picture more interesting. t

O’BRIEN READING PROGRAMME ISBN 0-86278-688-6 Based © Copyright reserved. on Jigsaw Stew by Conor McHale The O’Brien Press Ltd www.obrien.ie


Second Class/Year 3: Reading Level 6+

Magic and adventure with New

ISBN: 978-1-84717-196-2 PRICE: €7.99/£6.99 FORMAT: Hardback/80 pages

The ninth book in this magical series for young readers sees Alfie braving the Ranting Rainforest in Arcania to find the legendary Chocolate Cosmos. It’s all in a days work for Alfie Green as he tries to save Budsville’s annual Chocolate Fair!

‘gorgeous books beautifully illustrated, perfect for 6–7 year-olds’ Sunday Independent

ABOUT THE AUTHOR JOE O’BRIEN is an award-winning gardener who lives in Ballyfermot in Dublin. He is the author of nine Alfie Green books as well as Little Croker, Féile Fever and Tiger Boots for older readers. He has appeared on RTÉ’s The Den and TV3’s Ireland AM and is a regular contributor to local radio shows.

TEACHING RESOURCES

There are lots of great teaching support materials for the Alfie Green series – check out these Activity Sheets and lots more at www.obrien.ie/schools - free to view and download! A BIT OF A ALFIE GREEN: MUDDLE

Gang. Alfie is and the Bee-Bottle pictures from Alfie picture to show has mixed up these boxes beside each Oh no! Someone numbers in the him out by writing very confused. Help in. they should go the order you think

ALFIE GR EEN: A STRANG NEW PL E ANT

Alfie has discovered many unus plants in Arcania. ual They are similar to often plants we have here our own world but in don’t be some of fooled – them have very stran character ge istics inde ed! Write a descriptio n of a new that Alfie plant has disco vered. Give name and it a explain what type it likes and of soil what kind condition of weather s it prefe rs. Explain any stran ge character the new plant has istics as well as describing what it looks like. your plan Will t be frien dly or dangerou s? Try to give as muc detail as you can h Use the box to the side to draw picture of what you a think the will look like and plant write your descriptio n in the box below forget to . Don’t give the new plan name. ta

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write a list of In your copybook a tour of Arcania. and mark and your class on the places you visit Alfie is taking you Keep a record of like to see and why. places you would and map above. your route on the your favourite place book. What was ns as you can visit in your copy your illustratio of many account as Write an by copybook and add will have to be drawn answer in your and every picture why? Write the Arcania in work do not because cameras r strange encounte you. and you will certainly a list of completely explored new animals? Make Arcania is still not plants and three found them on discover three new mark where you creatures. Can you . Don’t forget to Arcania. in your copybook time you are in find next you the anything see them again you and Alfie can the map so that O’Brien. Green books by Joe Based on the Alfie By Peter Heaney. Ltd www.obrien.ie The O’Brien Press © Copyright reserved.

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For details of all Yellow Flag books, visit www.obrien.ie/YellowFlag today


Title Here Third & Fourth Class/Year 4 & 5: Reading Level 8+

Mischief & Magic with ANNA THE WITCH books are ideal for a reading level of 8 years + as well as reluctant readers or older readers who may experience difficulty reading.

ISBN: 978-1-84717-129-0 PRICE: €6.99/£4.99 FORMAT: Paperback/112 pages

ISBN: 978-1-84717-108-5 PRICE: €6.99/£4.99 FORMAT: Paperback/112 pages

ISBN: 978-1-84717-130-6 PRICE: €6.99/£4.99 FORMAT: Paperback/96 pages

What if you were adopted by WITCHES?

A book of mischief & magic …

A WITCH in a Fix!

Anna the Witch is more interested in sleepovers, school friends and soccer than practising her magic. Then she meets Verbena Vile, a mad, bad and dangerous witch – and wishes she’d worked a bit harder on her spells!

Anna Kelly’s science teacher really gets on her nerves – but is that a good enough reason to turn her into a giant rat? With a big, angry rat on the loose, Anna soon realises she’s made a bad mistake.

When Anna Kelly moves into her new home, she’s so happy – a family of her own at last. But Anna soon discovers that her guardians are not quite what they seem …!

Anna can’t admit what she’s done, so no one can help her with her big, furry problem – or can they? Sometimes even witches need a little help from their friends!

Can Anna and Charlie the cat defeat the vile Verbena?

ABOUT THE AUTHOR MARIAN BRODERICK is also the author of The Lost Fairy in the Flyers series, as well as the acclaimed Wild Irish Women for adults. ACTIVITY 80

76Read pages

ACTIVITY

TEACHING RESOURCES

Activity Sheets O’Brien Press Red Flag books can be used in conjunction with over 50 Activity Sheets – all available to download FREE from www.obrien.ie

For details of all Red Flag books, visit www.obrien.ie/RedFlag today

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Title Here Third & Fourth Class/Year 4 & 5: Reading Level 8+

TEACHING RESOURCES

O’BRIEN PRESS READING PROGRAMME R Real Books for Primary Schools Fo many years, teachers have been using O’Brien Press books as the basis for class reading For material, and many others have approached us seeking advice on how best to introduce real m books to their pupils. b As A a result, we’ve produced a Reading Programme for Schools which offers detailed suggestions on how to use real books in the classroom in a cross-curricular and integrated s way. w Written by primary teachers, our Programme offers the teacher variety and choice. It puts YOU in charge and helps you to: • Select real books for your classroom • Plan oral work for language classes • Plan cross-curricular work • Develop interesting and worthwhile extension work based on class reading material Real Books for Primary Schools is a complete primary reading programme with detailed classroom notes on over 80 books, based on the requirements of the Primary School Curriculum. As well as a focus on English, Mathematics, SESE (including History, Geography and Science), Arts Education (Visual Arts, Music, Drama), Physical Education and SPHE, Oral language is given prime importance. All SPHE suggestions, and most SESE ideas, are language-based. Inspectors of the Department of Education encourage this approach in the classroom. The O’Brien Reading Programme features titles for all classes and is available FREE to download, or search online, at www.obrien.ie/ReadingProgramme

GRANNY’S TEETH – PANDA 10 by Brianóg Brady Dawson, illustrated by Michael Connor

THE BIG FIGHT – FLYER 3 by Frank Murphy, illustrated by Kieron Black

ISBN: 0-86278-570-7 • D5.50 pb • 64 pages

ISBN: 0-86278-451-4 • D5.50 pb • 64 pages

Danny Brown is very excited because his Granny is coming to stay. He helps his mum to tidy his room by hiding his football under the bed and then sits at the window to watch and wait. Later, she announces that they will celebrate her birthday the next day with a meal in Danny’s favourite restaurant. When he borrows Granny’s teeth from the glass on the bedroom shelf he only means to have some fun with them at school, but the teeth go missing and are thrown and kicked around the classroom before landing, damaged, in a puddle outside. Granny is cross, Mum is too, and as he eats mashed potatoes at home instead of the giant burger he had hoped for, he decides that he will never, ever, ever play such tricks again. A very funny tale, with the hint of more to come! LANGUAGE – ENGLISH

t Language of water: Wet, slippery, dipped, rinsed, dried. t Word-portraits: Granny’s hugs too tight, her perfume smelled awful; when cross, her arms were folded, her lips in a thin line. Create oral word-portraits around the class, other children guess who is being described. t Discussion: Favourite places to eat, favourite party foods. t Creative: Write a simple birthday party invitation to a friend or relation. t Creative: Finishing a story. ‘Granny’s boiled egg rolled off the tray and …’ t Creative: ‘Good Time Grub.’ Think of other suitable names for restaurants. SESE – SCIENCE

t Living things: Human life processes. Differences between milk teeth, permanent teeth, false teeth/dentures. Characteristics of different materials when wet and dry. Identify

the five senses. Explore sense of taste – why did Granny’s teeth taste strange? SPHE

t Myself: Becoming more independent and self-reliant, taking care of personal belongings, tidying own bedroom, picking up bathroom towels. t Discussing and exploring the effects of poor personal hygiene; practising effective dental care;

foods and drinks which are good for growing teeth. t Myself and others: Ways in which members of families can help, support and care for one another; respecting the belongings of others; practising care, consideration and good manners when dealing with others. Making mistakes and making amends, accepting the consequences of our actions. t How friends can influence personal actions and decisions: Impressing friends by mimicking, jeering, playing tricks. PHYSICAL EDUCATION

t Movement: Show excitement, turning around in a

rush, waving arms, smiling. t Mime activities: Granny searching high and low

for her teeth. Granny’s face without her teeth. Try to eat, drink, speak without teeth. t Game: Two children link arms and make a mouth shape with their arms. Others line up with three small beanbags each. Aim is to throw the food (beanbag) into the mouth as it opens and closes. Children take turns being the mouth. VISUAL ARTS

t Danny’s giant burger: Using a large piece of

paper, create the fillings for the burger, include all your favourites. t Peephole teeth: Sheet of card with hole cut out,

Queen Maeve of Connacht and her husband, Ailill of Leinster, were both extremely rich. They lived in a fine palace and wanted for nothing. But when Maeve realised that Ailill possessed a fine white bull that she could not match, she decided to acquire the only bull in Ireland which was better than his. Careless talk from her warriors, who revealed that she was prepared to fight in order to possess Daire’s brown bull, led to the invasion of Ulster by Queen Maeve and her army. Only Cúchulainn could defend the territory and honour of King Conor. In this retelling of an ancient Irish epic, we read of that most famous táin or cattle-raid, which features greed, friendship, bravery, honour and betrayal in a form readily accessible to the younger reader. LANGUAGE – ENGLISH

SPHE

t Language of battle: Twisting and turning, falling

and rising, limping, charging, shield, armour, warrior. t Discussion: Many died to satisfy Maeve’s greed,

but why did she really want the Great Brown Bull so badly? Discuss her rivalry with Ailill and the results of their boasting. t Discussion: The Morrigán was a shape-changer. Children think of other mythological creatures that have the power to change. Which shapes might the children adopt if they could? t Creative: Read the messages on pp.21, 25; write imaginative notices with similar content. t Story: Children read/listen to the story of Mac Datho’s Pig (pp.61–66, Celtic Way of Life) and discuss similarities with Táin Bó Cuailgne. t Story: Children listen to Cúchulainn, read by Gay Byrne on Boyne Valley Irish Legends. LANGUAGE – GAEILGE

t Logainmneacha agus ainmneacha eile: Áth Gabhla

from gabhal meaning fork of a river and áth meaning ford; Ardee from Baile Átha Fhirdhia, the town of Ferdia’s ford; Cúchulainn, the hound of Culann. t Cúchulainn was a godson of Lugh, the greatest of the gods, who gave his name to the festival of Lughnasa, or Lugh-assembly. See pp.73–78, Celtic Way of Life.

t Myself: Self-identity. Recognising and appreciating

the similarities and differences between people, talking about personal strengths and weaknesses with reference to Maeve and Ailill’s rivalry. t Myself and others: My friends and other people.

Identifying and exploring qualities and skills associated with friendship: Discussing the notion of honour and how the warriors insisted on keeping their word; the friendship, kinship, loyalties and strong bonds created by fosterage. SESE – HISTORY

t Myself and my family: Games in the past.

Exploring traditional non-formal games: Street games, local games, house games, Hallowe’en games, May Day games. See Ch. 7, Celtic Way of Life. t Myself and my family: Feasts and festivals in the

past. Exploring and discussing the origins and traditions of some common festivals. See Ch. 8, Celtic Way of Life. t Story: Listen to, discuss and retell Rúraíocht or

Red Branch myths and legends. VISUAL ARTS

t The Art of the Celts, Ch. 9, Celtic Way of Life. t Script: Ogham writing. See Celtic Way of Life,

p.71. Write some words in Ogham script. t Script: See Everything Irish, pp.28–29.

place hole over photo/magazine picture of teeth and mouth, children focus on copying exactly what they see through the peephole.

O’BRIEN READING PROGRAMME

O’BRIEN READING PROGRAMME

FOUR KIDS, THREE CATS, TWO COWS, ONE WITCH (MAYBE) by Siobhán Parkinson

ISBN: 978-0-86278-515-4 • 192 pages

Four children set off to explore nearby Lady Island. Beverley, organised and practical, prepares lists and persuades the dreamy Elizabeth to join her in an expedition to explore the island ‘hovering greenly out of the sea’, and reluctantly allows Elizabeth’s cousin, Gerard, to accompany them, if only to do the dirty work. But Beverley loses control of the adventure when Elizabeth uncharacteristically insists that local lad Kevin should join them. Together the four children and Gerard’s cat, Fat, set off on a journey which is ultimately one of self-discovery. Their instinctive feeling that they are not alone proves correct – when they meet the eccentric Dymphna they find, not only refuge from a storm, but elements of their personalities previously unrecognised. An Author’s Note points up the deeper resonances of the story, which operates on many levels. LANGUAGE – ENGLISH

t Vocabulary extension: Ambiguity, pedantry, complacently, protocol, undulating. t Colourful writing: E.g., ‘a splashy, squelchy paddle-walk’ (p.9), ‘beer-and-ham-smelling pub-cum-grocery’ (p.10), ‘a sheep, standing half-undressed … its coat-tails flapping’ (p.64), ‘butter-red and silken-streamy’ (p.85). t Descriptive writing: Human emotions ascribed to inanimate objects, e.g., ‘this island … looked lost, homeless, thrown-aside … it longed to be visited, as if it were lonely out there in the sea ’(p.9). t Language of story: E.g., ‘in all the best stories with picnics in them, they have condensed milk’ (p.19), ‘he had not read the right island books’ (p.53), ‘their spines … like bookends without any books between them …’ (p.80). t References to story: E.g., The Canterbury Tales (pp.99–100, 145, 168), Little Women (p.22), Alice in Wonderland (p.166), Goldilocks and the Three Bears (p.166). Explore. t Discussion: The four children and Dymphna each tell a story. Read Dymphna’s response to Gerard’s question on p.181 and analyse the five stories with this comment in mind. t Discussion: Gerard understood the significance of Dymphna’s comment that everyone tells their own story. ‘She didn’t give us the key to the code,’ he explained, ‘because that’s not how stories work. You have to work them out for yourself and make your own sense of them …’ (p.190). Discuss this explanation and say if it is significant that Gerard, alone of the four children, understood the meaning of story. What might this tell us about his personality and character? t Story: Read Ch.1of Juliet’s Story by William Trevor in which we are told that Juliet liked ‘listening to stories’ because ‘you had to give the people faces’. Would Juliet have understood or agreed with Gerard’s explanation? t Creative: Discuss the phrase ‘poetic licence’ (p.45). Write an accurate account of break-time at school. Rewrite, with a lot of poetic licence! t Creative: Diary entry. Imagine a day in the life of a village shopkeeper/witch/city-dweller/ farmer. Imagine if they swapped roles, what would each find strange about the other’s life? t Creative: Newspaper report. Write the

report you would give, live to camera, as you watch the four missing children return from the island. Write interview questions and replies. t Creative: Letter-writing. Dymphna writes to

her friend about her unexpected visitors. SESE – SCIENCE

t Plant and animal life: Using the detailed

descriptions on pp.9, 55–56, 63–66 and 78–79, record as many examples as possible. Use an encyclopædia or other reference books to locate information on coastal plant/animal life. t Environmental awareness and care: Beverley refused a white plastic bag (p.12), and she was also conscious of litter pollution (p.145). Contact Enfo at 17 St Andrew St, Dublin 2 (Tel: 01-679 3144), or www.enfo.ie for further information on packaging and plastic recycling. SESE – GEOGRAPHY

t Weather, climate and atmosphere:

Collecting weather lore, especially local traditions and knowledge. Read the description of the storm experienced by the children on the island (pp.153–165), study the Beaufort Scale and assess the wind-force of that storm. t Human environments: Discuss island formation and continental shifts (p.9) and list islands off the west coast of Ireland. Advantages and disadvantages of island life: Dymphna’s water supply was pumped directly from the well, she used a gas stove and her groceries had to be collected by boat (p.130). MUSIC

t Dymphna called both of her cats Pappageno,

the bird-catcher in Mozart’s The Magic Flute ‘… they both catch birds’ (p.156). Listen to the two arias Der Vogelfänger bin ich ja (Now tell me, did you ever see) and Ein Mädchen oder Weibchen (A girl, or a little wife) and discuss your reactions to the music. SPHE

t Myself: The story each child told revealed

much about their self-perceptions and experiences. Verbalising these self-perceptions may have helped both to clarify their own thoughts and alter the opinions of the listeners. Beverley’s initial opinion of Gerard was far from positive, yet she displayed ‘unexpected tenderness’ toward him later in the book (p.115). Discuss the possible reasons for Beverley’s change of heart.

O’BRIEN READING PROGRAMME

You can find lots of FREE teaching resources and classroom notes, as well as a full list of all titles featured in the Reading Programme for Schools, at www.obrien.ie/schools

The O’Brien Press was delighted to join together with Children’s Books Ireland in our second nationwide ‘Design A Cover’ Competition. With thousands of entries from children of all ages across the country, the standard of entries was very high. The winner was Sophie Courtney from County Dublin whose bold illustration and inspired concept for the title text is featured on the front cover of the new edition of The Lough Neagh Monster. Well done to everyone who took part!

ISBN: 978-0-86278-375-4 PRICE: €5.95/£4.99 FORMAT: Paperback/80 pages

Noblett, the Lough Neagh monster keeps himself to himself and bothers nobody. Then his wild cousin, Nessie the Lough Ness monster, arrives for a holiday and everybody knows the Lough Ness monster is a downright pest. Trouble follows for poor Noblett. Nessie scares people and steals things, and she thinks it’s fun. But then Nessie goes too far. She annoys Mr Livingston’s class in Ballymascullion Primary School, and they don’t like to be messed with. Nessie, you have been warned!

t Myself: Recognising some physical disabilities

and how they can affect people’s lives. Gerard had quite severe asthma attacks, which made him anxious. Contact the Asthma Society of Ireland, 15 Eden Quay, Dublin 1 (Tel: 01-878 8511 or Callsave 1850 445464) and learn what you can about asthma. Was Elizabeth right in saying ‘people with asthma shouldn’t have cats’ (p.21)? Beverley suffered from vertigo (pp.72–75) but Kevin showed understanding and helped her to deal with the attack. Find out what causes vertigo and how to cope with the condition. t Myself: Beverley believed that she ‘was just growing out of seaside holidays’ (p.7), she resented her parents who were ‘going through one of their sticky patches’ (p.8). Yet she ‘had a sudden longing for her parents’ when she realised that her independence had brought with it responsibilities (p.150). Read the Author’s Note (p.6). How is this story a rite of passage experienced by the four children? t Myself and others: Exploring and discussing families and homes and how they can vary in many ways. Gerard had found that there ‘were two sorts of people in the world … the ones who despised you because your mother wasn’t married, and the ones who bent over backwards to show you that they didn’t disapprove …’ (p.19). In his story, he tells of the ‘disgrace’ of being pregnant and unmarried (p.104). Discuss the families of the four children: Beverley’s parents were ‘squabbling’ (p.7), Elizabeth’s were ‘cool’ (p.26) and Kevin’s dad had left his first family to start ‘a new life … in England’ (p.191). Are there parallels between their stories and their actual family lives? Has the home-life of each child affected his/her self-confidence and/or self-identity. If so, how? t Myself and the wider world: Dymphna is regarded as an outsider by the community and we hear that ‘the locals kept well away from [the island]’ (p.29), though ‘there was no harm in her, some people said’ (p.32). Later, Dymphna explains that she is on the island ‘on sufferance’ (p.144). Suggest reasons for the local community avoiding Dymphna. Are these reasons based on fear or prejudice? How might Dymphna’s knowledge of herbal lore have been regarded in former times? Read what Kevin says (p.188) and say if such behaviour can ever be justified.


Fifth & Sixth Class/Year 6 & 7: Reading Level 10+

O’Brien Press Blue Flag books offer a wealth of fiction from award-winning authors with everything from adventure, fantasy and historical fiction to stories of love, friendship and family life. Many books have won awards and been translated into a wide range of foreign languages, a true testament to their quality and popularity.

From award-winning author AUBREY FLEGG A tense, dramatic story about the Flight of the Earls, based on true historical facts from the 1600s.

New

It is 1607 and Hugh O’Neill, the great Earl of Tyrone, once the most powerful man in Ireland, has lost the fight against the English at the Battle of Kinsale. Along with many Irish ruling families, the O’Neill’s must flee Ireland, leaving their lands and their people behind. The French boat must leave at high tide. But Hugh’s youngest son, Con, is missing. Con’s cousin Fion, and Fion’s companions, are charged with the task of finding him. But it is no easy search – there are dangers and threats everywhere in war torn Ireland, and they are hunted every step of the way. And, unknown to himself, Con is valuable ‘property’ for anyone seeking a worthwhile prisoner ...

ISBN 978-1-84717-202-0 ISBN: 978 1 84717 202 0 PRICE: €7.99/£6.99 FORMAT: Paperback/256 pages

Will the youngsters find Con and make it to the boat in Lough Swilly? The Great Hugh O’Neill is waiting and time is running out!

Free Teaching Guide available from www.obrien.ie

ABOUT THE AUTHOR AUBREY FLEGG was born in Dublin and his early childhood was spent in County Sligo. His first book, the award winning Katie’s War, was published in 1997. Wings Over Delft, the first book in the Louise trilogy, won the Bisto Book of the Year Award in 2004. He is also the author of The Rainbow Bridge, In the Claws of the Eagle and The Cinnamon Tree.

New

Dublin, 1913: a friendship forged in a city torn apart What happens when your best friend ought to be your enemy? Liam and Nora form an unlikely friendship when he lends her a helping hand during a music competition. Liam’s father, a mechanic, is a proud trade union member, while Nora’s father is a prosperous wine importer. When Jim Larkin takes on the might of the employers in 1913, resulting in strikes, riots and lockouts, Liam and Nora’s friendship is challenged and their loyalties torn. Caught up in events that they don’t fully understand, the two come face to face with hardship and danger, but also find humour and generosity as they set out on an adventure that may make or break their friendship, but will definitely change their lives forever.

ISBN: 978-1-84717-172-6 PRICE: €7.99/£6.99 FORMAT: Paperback/240 pages

An exciting, atmospheric and dramatic story about the Dublin 1913 Lockout vividly portrayed through the lives of two young friends from across the social divide. Free Teaching Guide available from www.obrien.ie

ABOUT THE AUTHOR BRIAN GALLAGHER is a full-time writer whose plays and short stories have been produced in Ireland, Britain and Canada. He is a scriptwriter for RTÉ television and is the author of four adult novels. This is his first book for young readers.


Fifth & Sixth Class/Year 6 & 7: Reading Level 10+

New from popular children’s author JOE O’BRIEN ‘Enjoy your football and you’ll always be a winner!’ The Crokes are doing well in the football league this season, but off the pitch things aren’t so good; Danny’s dad, the th Crokes’ coach, is having a hard time - he’s worried about his job, and his friends’ d daughter, Clara, is sick and needs an expensive operation. ‘a tale to But GAA is like one big family, and when Danny and the Crokes hear that hook even the most Clara C is the captain of her GAA team in Boston, they’re determined to reluctant young male reader’ raise r money for her. Despite some hitches along the way, like trouble Evening Echo with w Trinity, the girl he has his eye on, between training, school and a fundraising football marathon, Danny and the Crokes make this a season seas to remember! It’s all to play for in the third great adventure with young GAA player Danny Wilde and his team the Littlestown Crokes. Also by Joe O’Brien ‘O’Brien is good at conjuring up the atmosphere of the GAA and the importance that a club has in a local community. Will appeal to football mad boys and girls.’ Books Ireland

New

ISBN: 978-1-84717-209-9 PRICE: €7.99/£6.99 FORMAT: Paperback/208 pages

‘suitable for senior classes in primary schools and as usual, O’Brien Press have some downloadable resources available’ InTouch Magazine

ABOUT THE AUTHOR JOE O’BRIEN is an award-winning gardener who lives in Dublin. He is the author of Little Croker, Féile Fever and Tiger Boots, about the football adventures of GAA fan Danny Wilde, and the popular Alfie Green series for younger readers.

‘With three seconds remaining in the Super Bowl, it falls to the New York Giants’ place-kicker Shaun Reedy … He’s kicked it … but no, it’s gone left and wide …’

New

Peter, Davey, and the rest of the Dromtarry Under-11 Gaelic football team are busy training for the new season when a mysterious visitor arrives in town: Shaun Reedy, ex-American footballer, gets involved with the boys’ team – far away from the glamour, the money and the pressure that turned him off his own sport – and falls in love with GAA. When something happens in Dromtarry that changes all their lives, they discover that it’s having the guts to take a shot at goal – whatever the outcome – that matters!

ISBN: 978-1-84717-189-4 PRICE: €7.99/£6.99 FORMAT: Paperback/240 pages

ABOUT THE AUTHOR DAVE HANNIGAN is a successful sports writer in Ireland and in America. This is his first book for children. With lots of authentic match action and tips and ideas for playing and coaching, Kicking On is sure to capture the imagination of young GAA fans across the country. Féile Fever

173-3 pb

ISBN 978-1-84717-

Féile Fever

TEACHING RESOURCES

Teaching Guides, class activities, creative writing activites and more are available free to view and download from www.obrien.ie/schools

(Read pp 168-175)

By PETER HEANEY

RATIONALE

THEMES

second book featuring a Féile Fever is the with The story continues and Danny Wilde. adventures, challenges series of fresh Mick and Danny, his dad dilemmas for Crokes G.A.C. his friends at Littlestown Danny with success The story presents and in equal measure and dilemma sensitivity to respond with of challenges him in the best tradition and composure, G.A.A. sportsmanship. is for the action Although the context themes have a the sporting, distinctly a wide and will engage broad appeal audience of children.

and Todd become Although Danny join is reluctant to friends, Todd football. or play Gaelic Littlestown Crokes are taken on when the class That changes Park and the G.A.A. a visit to see Croke

They to the age group. and a direct relevance jealousy, resentment include rivalry, family break-up. of the story provides The sporting context issues and to discuss the to the opportunity alternative responses examine positive a safe and neutral them through

museum. to and quickly proves environment. Todd is converted, e.g. Crokes’ to Littlestown in a trusted forum; be the solution can Class discussion conflicting views and punch. lack of power Circle Time; where most to would be the for the Crokes be presented, It is now too late however, when appropriate. salvage the league, in at the asks then to step POINTS circumstance they have DISCUSSION host the Féile, and Todd last minute and Splinter Danny to restore both p (Read p45): the perfect opportunity Trinity and Lowry their reputation. are watching their pride and when Splinter are playing tennis, What belief for the Crokes as ‘eye candy’. Success and self the Féile describes them do the 1st round of he means? How restored during to the you think that do through be way to feel their girls might as they battle you think the that this? Do you think semi finals. described like the appears to desert way to describe it is a respectful At this point, fortune of Jonathan’s sister, a friend girls? and them. Trinity, Danny sees of both Todd p Rivalry 87 & 92): When catches the attentions impress her. p (Read pp distracted try to p Resentment Danny and both Trinity; he is completely on the her to the cinema, concentrate p Jealousy When Todd takes and unable to taunts has you think this to his provocative p Forgiveness Danny reacts game. Why do father. A be lying about is what might he p Gender awareness accusing him of happened and and the you Todd storms off What advice would row develops. thinking? and his him regain field a weakened SUMMARY Crokes have to give him to help in the final without G.A.C. has been disheartened team composure? of Littlestown Crokes to Trinity despite the efforts Todd has lied him. p (Read p 94): he promoted; however A they are Why do you think has one final twist. Mick and Jimmy, about his dad. their coaches, in the The story, however, to see you think it was an impression ride and a chance lied to her? Do unable to make wild horse back find these circumstances? allows Todd to wrong to lie in league. things differently, dad and Jonathan When Mick hears with both his own both Danny and p (Read p 128): reconciliation Even the skills them to Todd’s strange the punch for Danny describe a with Danny. cannot provide a full outburst, he made level. When Barry half display by behaviour and Todd’s his compete at this A tantalising second him all about Todd, forward breaks decision to tell now including Sweeny, the Croke’s this was either strength team, the Chapel passion, a collision with dad. Do you think and confirms the you collar bone in restores pride that the him? What do them even sportsmanship wise or fair of Hall’s goalie; weakeningin the league now said to Danny commitment and he could have prospects think their promoted. has further; Féile any confidence? humiliating. without breaking look bleak and provides a solution APPROACH Providence, however, talented the story deal Todd Bailey; a The themes supporting issues that have in the form of and a football player sensitive with a range of Australian Rules class in school. Teaching Guide new pupil to Danny’s

The themes include: success p Dealing with p Keeping secrets p Family break-up

1

Féile Fever

173-3 pb

By PETER HEANEY

Teaching Guide

AND

ISBN 978-1-84717-

JOE O’BRIEN

The Sports Page

JOE O’BRIEN

The Sunday papers have decided l Brief biographies to run a feature County Féile under of some of the story on the 14 important / key the team afternoon in Croabh final that is scheduled to take players on place that Chiaráin between l Assessment Chapel Hall. Littlestown Crokes of the manager’s and style of play and his decisions have how some of Since the match influenced games. has not yet been including Todd (For example, played and the be known until on the team) result will not the afternoon; they have decided l Interviews their reports on with any of the to concentrate each of the teams players / coaches in the final and each team’s chances You will need / parents try to assess of winning. an exciting headline and a picture. draw one to go They have asked (You could with your piece). you to help and have given you writing the feature A well-written the task of piece for Littlestown newspaper article always limited Crokes. Since always answers questions on a newspaper, space is (below) quickly the 5 x W & H you will have in the first few piece using no to write your sentences. more than 300 Before you start, words. make a list of You might like the 5 you think the to include: piece should answer x W & H questions that and then write answer as many l Brief match your piece to of them as you reports on the can. You can work group or semi-final groups for this activity. in small l Analysis matches. of the team’s strengths You can use the and weaknesses chart below to l Comparisons write all of the team’s performances think the readers would like answered. the questions that you the league and and form between the Féile. lot of questions You will probably so you have a the most interesting. will have to choose which you think are 5 x W & H questions POSSIBLE QUESTIONS WHO NOTES FOR ANSWERS

WHAT

WHEN

WHERE

WHY

HOW


Fifth & Sixth Class/Year 6 & 7: Reading Level 10+

From best-selling children’s author -XGL&XUWLQ :KDWGR\RXGRZKHQ\RXUOLIHWXUQVXSVLGHGRZQ" Rich, spoilt Eva Gordon likes luxurious, sophisticated things so when her parents cancel a holiday and get rid of their expensive car, she can’t understand why. But when Eva’s dad loses his job and she has to move house and change schools, she realises things have changed forever.

New

Eva is determined to hate her new life. But then a chance visit to a fortune teller gives her the idea that doing good may help her to turn things back the way they were. Eva (with the help of her best friend Victoria) starts to help everyone she can – whether they want it or not! And maybe being nice is helping Eva herself just as much ‌ ‘Ireland’s answer to Jacqueline Wilson.’ Irish Independent

ISBN: 978-1-84717-224-2 PRICE: â‚Ź7.99/ÂŁ6.99 FORMAT: Paperback/272 pages

Alice aand Megan are writing a cookbook. But Alice isn’t the ,QQRYDWLYH greatest cook ‌ so could it be a recipe for disaster? grea FRRNHU\ERRNIRU DJH Well, not with Megan’s help – as well as advice (whether W &RQWDLQVORWVRIJUHDW they want it or not!) from Megan’s Mum, their Home Ec. UHFLSHVZLWKKHOSIXOWLSV Teacher, and many more. DQGDGYLFH )XOOFRORXULOOXVWUDWLRQV A fun-ďŹ lled cookbook jam-packed with WKURXJKRXW (DV\WRXVHDQGORWVRI ea to follow recipes by best friends easy IXQ

Alice and Megan!

New

ISBN: 978-1-84717-215-0 PRICE: â‚Ź9.99/ÂŁ8.99 FORMAT: Paperback/160 pages

ABOUT THE AUTHOR JUDI CURTIN is a former teacher who grew up in Cork. She now lives in Limerick where she is married with three children. Judi is the best-selling author of seven books about best friends Alice and Megan: Alice Next Door, Alice Again, Don’t Ask Alice, Alice in the Middle, Bonjour Alice, Alice & Megan Forever and Alice to the Rescue as well as See If I Care, with Roisin Meaney. She is also the author of three novels for adults: Sorry, Walter!, From Claire to Here and Almost Perfect. Alice & Megan Forever was nominated for an Irish Book Award.


Fifth & Sixth Class/Year 6 & 7: Reading Level 10+

A story about living with a ghost, and the pain of letting go Things haven’t been easy for Jessie since her brother James – sports star and popular kid – died. Her mum and dad are lost in grief and she’s feeling isolated at school. When the popular girls on her dance team give her a hard time, she just can’t seem to remember the routines … More worrying is that Jessie can still see James and talk to him – or quarrel with him, more like! They always bickered when James was alive, so why change now? But James might turn out to be her unlikely saviour. Along with Alan, the dorky new boy, can he give Jessie the confidence to show the rest of the dance team what she’s got, and maybe help her and her parents on the road towards healing? Funny, sharp and poignant, this is an extraordinary new novel by a fantastic new Irish children’s author.

‘Dancing in the Dark is a compelling, deeply affecting read … Certainly one of the best Irish … novels I’ve read this year’ Sarah Webb

New

ISBN: 978-1-84717-185-6 PRICE: €7.99/£6.99 FFORMAT: Paperback/192 pages

ABOUT THE AUTHOR THOR P.R. PRENDERGAST was born in Dublin in 1964. He is the author of The Romanian Builder in the Bridges series. He works in Dublin as a teacher.

For more details on these and other great novels from O’Brien Press, visit www.obrien.ie/BlueFlag

TEACHING RESOURCES We’ve got hundreds of FREE teaching resources created specially for teachers by teachers to support O’Brien Press novels in the classroom. TEACHING GUIDES O’Brien Press Teaching Guides are invaluable classroom assets offering support to ‘guided reading’ in the classroom. They offer: • Overviews of the major themes addressed • Section summaries • Suggestions for development activities • Discussion points All O’Brien Press Teaching Guides are available FREE to download at www.obrien.ie/TeachingGuides WS, ONE WITCH (MAYBE) FOUR KIDS, THREE CATS, TWO CO ISBN: 978-0-86278-515-4 • 192 pages

ISBN: 0-86278-567-7

and persuades Beverley, organised and practical, prepares lists Four children set off to explore nearby Lady Island. the sea’, and to explore the island ‘hovering greenly out of the dreamy Elizabeth to join her in an expedition Beverley loses accompany them, if only to do the dirty work. But reluctantly allows Elizabeth’s cousin, Gerard, to insists that local lad Kevin should join them. Together control of the adventure when Elizabeth uncharacteristically Their instinctive journey which is ultimately one of self-discovery. the four children and Gerard’s cat, Fat, set off on a only refuge they meet the eccentric Dymphna they find, not feeling that they are not alone proves correct – when Note points up the deeper Author’s An unrecognised. previously from a storm, but elements of their personalities levels. resonances of the story, which operates on many

LANGUAGE – ENGLISH

t Vocabulary extension: Ambiguity, pedantry,

complacently, protocol, undulating. t Colourful writing: E.g., ‘a splashy, squelchy paddle-walk’ (p.9), ‘beer-and-ham-smelling pub-cum-grocery’ (p.10), ‘a sheep, standing half-undressed … its coat-tails flapping’ (p.64), ‘butter-red and silken-streamy’ (p.85). t Descriptive writing: Human emotions ascribed to inanimate objects, e.g., ‘this island … looked lost, homeless, thrown-aside … it longed to be visited, as if it were lonely out

Under the Hawthorn

descriptions on pp.9, 55–56, 63–66 and 78–79, record as many examples as possible. Use an encyclopædia or other reference books to locate information on coastal plant/animal life. t Environmental awareness and care: Beverley refused a white plastic bag (p.12), and she was also conscious of litter pollution (p.145). Contact Enfo at 17 St Andrew St, Dublin 2 (Tel: 01-679 3144), or www.enfo.ie for further information on packaging and plastic recycling.

condition. t Myself: Beverley believed that she ‘was just growing out of seaside holidays’ (p.7), she resented her parents who were ‘going through one of their sticky patches’ (p.8). Yet she ‘had a sudden longing for her parents’ when she realised that her independence had brought SESE – GEOGRAPHY with it responsibilities (p.150). Read the …’ (p.80). t Weather, climate and atmosphere: Author’s Note (p.6). How is this story a rite of Collecting weather lore, especially local t References to story: E.g., The Canterbury passage experienced by the four children? traditions and knowledge. Read the description Tales (pp.99–100, 145, 168), Little Women on t Myself and others: Exploring and discussing of the storm experienced by the children (p.22), Alice in Wonderland (p.166), Goldilocks families and homes and how they can vary in the island (pp.153–165), study the Beaufort and the Three Bears (p.166). Explore. many ways. Gerard had found that there ‘were Scale and assess the wind-force of that storm. t Discussion: The four children and Dymphna two sorts of people in the world … the ones t Human environments: Discuss island each tell a story. Read Dymphna’s response to who despised you because your mother wasn’t formation and continental shifts (p.9) and list Gerard’s question on p.181 and analyse the five who bent over backwards islands off the west coast of Ireland. Advantages married, and the ones stories with this comment in mind. to show you that they didn’t disapprove …’ and disadvantages of island life: Dymphna’s t Discussion: Gerard understood the (p.19). In his story, he tells of the ‘disgrace’ of water supply was pumped directly from the significance of Dymphna’s comment that being pregnant and unmarried (p.104). Discuss well, she used a gas stove and her groceries everyone tells their own story. ‘She didn’t give Beverley’ss the families of the four children: Beverley ed, ‘because had to be collected by boat (p.130). us the keyy to the code,’ he explained, parents were ‘squabbling’ (p.7), Elizabeth’s were to work h that’s not how stories work. You have MUSIC ‘cool’ (p.26) and Kevin’s dad had left his first our own your them out for yourself and make yo t Dymphna called both of her cats Pappageno, family to start ‘a new life … in England’ (p.191). (p 190). Discuss this Flute Magic The sense of them …’’ (p.190). tthe bird-catcher in Mozart’s Are there parallels between their stories and significannt that explanation and say if it is significant ‘… they both catch birds’ (p.156). Listen to the ‘… their actual family lives? Has the home-life of Gerard, alone of the four children,, understood ttwo arias Der Vogelfänger bin ich ja (Now tell each child affected his/her self-confidence and/or at might this tell us the meaning of story. What me, did you ever see) and Ein Mädchen oder m self-identity. If so, how? haracteer? about his personality and character? (A girl, or a little wife) and discuss W Weibchen the wider world: Dymphna is and Myself t William by Story ’s Juliet’s Ch.1of Read music. t Story: reactions to the y your regarded as an outsider by the community and uliet liked Juliet d that Ju Trevor in which we are told PHE S SPHE we hear that ‘the locals kept well away from h to give the ‘listening to stories’ becausee ‘you had t Myself: The story each child told revealed [the island]’ (p.29), though ‘there was no harm in nderstood or understood people faces’. Would Juliet have un much about their self-perceptions and her, some people said’ (p.32). Later, Dymphna nation? agreed with Gerard’s explanation? experiences. Verbalising these self-perceptions explains that she is on the island ‘on sufferance’ oetic licence’ ‘po rase ‘poetic t Creative: Discuss the phrase may have helped both to clarify their own (p.144). Suggest reasons for the local community ccount of break-time (p.45). Write an accurate account thoughts and alter the opinions of the listeners. avoiding Dymphna. Are these reasons based on oetic licence! po ot of poetic at school. Rewrite, with a lot Beverley’s initial opinion of Gerard was far fear or prejudice? How might Dymphna’s agine a day in the life t Creative: Diary entry. Imagine from positive, yet she displayed ‘unexpected knowledge of herbal lore have been regarded in h/city--dweller/ of a village shopkeeper/witch/city-dweller/ ter in the book aater tenderness’ toward him later former times? Read what Kevin says (p.188) and what ro roles, pped farmer. Imagine if they swapped (p.115). Discuss the possible reasons By for Irene Barber say if such behaviour can ever be justified. ut thee other’s life? would each find strange about Beverley’s change of heart. the W port. Write t Creative: Newspaper report.

KATIE’S WAR

Tree

AUBREY FLEGG

S H FA M I N E THE GREAT IRI

A Study

the Film Guide to the Novel and

Teaching Guide

IRENE BARBER

RATIONALE AND

Introduction

oral tradimyth and legend in the Across the centuries of of Ireland, the hawthorn tion, folk culture and literature with the supernatural. The tree has long been associated were said around which the fairies hawthorn was the shrub it has revels. In rural tradition to gather for their midnight or dig omen of ill luck to damage long been considered an past are instances in the recent up a hawthorn tree. There damagbeing realigned for fear of of roads and motorways ing an old hawthorn.

has used this powerful symbolism Marita Conlon-McKenna in the the Hawthorn Tree but also not only in the title Under of the in Ireland in the middle setting of her famine novel

nineteenth century. land and famine stalks the The potato crop has failed and Three children, Eily, Michael between 1845 and 1848. they to fend for themselves when Peggy O’Driscoll, are left has died parents. Their baby sister are separated from their hawthorn tree. In desperation, and is buried beneath the greatjourney in search of their they set out on a perilous adventure Their journey is full of aunts, their last resort. they reach their goal. and danger but eventually Hawthorn the Under good read, Apart from being a cracking and popular with both teachers Tree has proved to be and of a wide variety of social pupils alike in the exploration y Ireland. This Guide political issues in nineteenth-centur for provides good opportunities extends that inquiry and lanof integrated and graded pupils to undertake a range

guage and history activities. prothe Hawthorn Tree was The film treatment of Under Film Kilkenny-based Young Irish duced for Channel 4 by first investment in a training-led Makers. It is Channel 4’s controlled entirely by children. film production process is results and C4 Schools They achieved remarkable them. pleased to have backed in 4 Schools are interested The O’Brien Press and Channel them Study Guide. You can e-mail your comments on this website at: http://www.chan to Channel 4 Schools and click to the Forum section nel4.com/schools. Go Tree topic. on the Under the Hawthorn

and how they can affect people’s lives. Gerard had quite severe asthma attacks, which made him anxious. Contact the Asthma Society of Ireland, 15 Eden Quay, Dublin 1 (Tel: 01-878 8511 or Callsave 1850 445464) and learn what you can about asthma. Was Elizabeth right in saying ‘people with asthma shouldn’t have cats’ (p.21)? Beverley suffered from vertigo (pp.72–75) but Kevin showed understanding and helped her to deal with the attack. Find out what causes vertigo and how to cope with the

SESE – SCIENCE

t Plant and animal life: Using the detailed

there in the sea ’(p.9). t Language of story: E.g., ‘in all the best stories with picnics in them, they have condensed milk’ (p.19), ‘he had not read the right island books’ (p.53), ‘their spines … like bookends without any books between them

The O’Brien Reading Programme for Schools offers detailed suggestions on how to use real books in the classroom in a cross-curricular and integrated way. Written by primary teachers, it offers teachers variety and choice and helps to: • Select real books for your classroom • Plan oral work for language classes • Plan cross-curricular work • Develop interesting and worthwhile extension work based on class reading material The O’Brien Reading Programme is available FREE to download from www.obrien.ie/ReadingProgramme

t Myself: Recognising some physical disabilities

report you would give, live to camera, as you watch the four missing children return from the island. Write interview questions and replies. to t Creative: Letter-writing. Dymphna writes her friend about her unexpected visitors.

THEMES much drama, the conflict for the family is resolved. The characters move on and This novel has been selected for use in the senior classes of primary schools and in R A M Mthe E future looks brighter for all of them. O ’ B R I E N R E A D I N G P R O Gthe junior cycle of second-level schools, as it deals with the following themes: APPROACH Family responsibilities For the purposes of this exploration, the p Conflict book is divided into six units, each of p Death and destruction which contains suggested discussion points p First relationships and language-based activities. p Sibling rivalry p Journeying p Developing independence UNIT 1 p Growing and maturing UP THE REPUBLIC! p Love and loss p

CONTENTS

Before Viewing, The Great Drama Outline, Aims, 2 Famine 1845-1848 page EPISODE 1 – HUNGER Worksheets 1-7

Irish

page 3

EPISODE 2 – ON THEIR Worksheets 8-12

The novel, dealing as it does with the Irish Civil War, can be readily integrated with the primary school and Junior Certificate history programmes.

OWN page 11

EPISODE 3 – THE JOURNEY Worksheets 13-18 EPISODE 4 – THE SEARCH Worksheets 19-26

page 17

layout © The O’Brien Press

Ltd.

ISBN 0-86278-583-9

use. photocopied for classroom Worksheets only may be in any form may be reproduced or utilised No other part of this book photocopying, or mechanical, including or by any means, electronic storage and retrieval system recording or by any information from the publisher. without permission in writing The O’Brien Press Typesetting, layout, design: and Channel 4 Schools

Editing: The O’Brien Press

Katie O’Brien lives on a farm in Tipperary with her mother, father and brothers, Seamus (17) and Marty (13). Civil War is brewing following the signing of the Treaty. Katie’s father is still shell-shocked from his experiences in the First World War. Visitors arrive from Wales: Griffith Parry, who had fought alongside Father, and his son Dafydd. The Parrys are in Ireland to offer advice on the reopening of the slate mine on the O’Brien farm. Katie is attracted to a Free State soldier (pro-Treaty) she meets in Nenagh.

SUMMARY

page 24

The O’Brien Press Ltd. First published 1998 by Dublin 6, Ireland. 20 Victoria Road, Rathgar, +353 1 4922777 Tel. +353 1 4923333 Fax. website: http://www.obrien.ie e-mail: books@obrien.ie 4 Learning in association with Channel

Copyright for text, typesetting,

SUMMARY

Katie’s War is set in County Tipperary during the Irish Civil War. The central character Katie, a spirited teenager, has many worries and concerns. Her shell-shocked father is deeply traumatised by his experiences in the First World War. Her family is divided politically, some siding with Michael Collins and the Free Staters, others with de Valera and the Republicans who wish to continue the struggle in the hope of achieving a united Ireland. Her father’s efforts to reopen the slate quarry are jeopardised by the political unrest in the area. Katie’s own life, put on hold to nurse her father, now becomes more turbulent as she examines her relationships with Dafydd, the boy from Wales, and Kieran, the Free State soldier she meets in Nenagh town. Eventually, following

t

LANGUAGE – ENGLISH

Vocabulary extension: Trajectory, derision, enunciated, fundamentalist, belligerent, gregarious. t Descriptive writing: E.g., ‘Irish cynicism hacked through the mist like an ice-pick’ (p.39), ‘kicked-piglet laugh’ (p.49), ‘like goldfish in a sea of sharks’ (p.74), ‘no hippy worth her tie-dye’ (p.111). t Discussion: The author humorously

p p

p

1

plants and animals in different regions and environments. Khayssi warned the Shaws to be wary of scorpions and snakes (pp.34–35), identify plant and animal life indigenous to Africa and say how each species has adapted to prevailing conditions. SPHE

t Myself: Self-Identity. Recognising

and appreciating that each person is a unique individual and that this is expressed in many ways. Omar’s personal attitudes, SESE – GEOGRAPHY lifestyle, clothing and interests mark him t Human environments: People out from the and other rest of his community (pp.69, lands. Studying some of the aspects 126, 150). List of the some of the ways in which Omar environments and lives of people expresses his in Tunisia, individuality and explore some developing an increasing awareness of the factors of the which have contributed to his job to interdependence independence of people there and in coerce him into learning reams and maturity. of useless Ireland, learning to value and information … It was his duty respect the … to avoid t Myself: Taking care of my diversity of these people and body. Examine ingesting these worthless facts their lifestyles, with every the effects on community health developing a sense of belonging of dangerous breath in his body’ (p.44). In to national, teams, discuss toxins and chemicals, such as European and international communities. those found in Benny’s theory on education, above, and argue Omar’s shack (p.51) and on the Benny regarded the time spent ‘chemical heap’ the case from the opposing viewpoint. with Omar ‘as a (p.74). Examine the after-effects time of great learning’ (p.122). of some t Discussion: Compare Jessica’s He learned disasters, e.g., Bhopal, Chernobyl. much about local foods (pp.128–129, preconceptions about Tunisia 218), (p.17) with t Myself: Growing and changing. about poverty and lifestyle, homes Identifying Samir’s criticism of Europeans and (p.142). On and discussing the changes that settlements in the shanty towns are what have they based their assertions? (pp.54–55, experienced Is either 184, 186, in growing 206). For information on Tunisia, from child to adult: of them justified in their criticisms? Discuss the Increasing personal independence contact the Embassy of Tunisia and the need dangers of making assumptions in London, based on for individual space and privacy. Tel: 0044171 5848117. Discuss rumour and lack of information. Benny’s growing independence t Human environments: Trade and his desire t Discussion: and sion: Read carefully the humorous to choose his own friends. humo development issues. Exploring passages describing the international g trade issues ues t Myself: Safety and protection. school sc chool through the study of some major Discuss the (pp.40–49, 61–63, 190–194) world 190–194) and compare compare with various risks taken by Benny commodities: Where and how (e.g., drinking the Irish primary school the sch hool system, citing unclean water, the trips on the commodities are produced; environment mobylette, differences and similarities. simillarities. Imagine thatt leaving home without informing where they are produced; work anyone, Harmony and Bob arrive of people; sale arrrive in your classroom classro breaking and entering) and assess oo as and distribution in Ireland; terms the visiting teachers, describe of trade, fair desscribe the first day. implications of each. or unfair trade conditions. Coming to t Creative: ‘Omar d didn’t speak English,, only appreciate the inequalities between t Myself: Making decisions. When Benny the TV’ (p.70). Describe an ordinary day in sc developed and the developing chose to warn Omar (p.196), school s world. Benny he made a or at home butpb ISBN 978-0-86278-525-3 imagine imagine you are speakingg to a experienced a feeling of shame decision which had far-reaching as he sat in the effects on his stranger abroad, how w might you make yourself shanty town, he realised ‘that life and on the lives of others. yo o all the stuff he He believed that understood? Remember Rememb ber to ‘go for gist rather used to worry about was so he had made ‘the right decision’ raa ISBN 978-1-84717 stupid’ (p.210). (p.213). than accuracy’ (p.69),, then attempt -020-0 pb Read the description of Benny’s the same Discuss the choice he made and s first sight of analyse his conversation in Irish. Africa (p.20) and of the living reasons. conditions in the t Creative: ‘The little e motorcycle was being town (pp.206–220) and discuss t Myself and others: Myself b his growing and my family. Pat driven by a sheep! Thee sheep social awareness. looked as Shaw said that ‘people in families think about surprised as he was’ (p.56). (p p.56). Write the sheep’s each other the odd time’ (p.150). sh SESE – SCIENCE Discuss account of the meetingg with Benny. Benny’s relationship with Georgie t Plant and animal life: Variety and his t Creative: ‘Pity he ha and hadn’t adn’t one of those Milk eventual realisation of his love characteristics for of living his brother things. Exploring ways in Tray man-in-black card cards’ ds’ (p.56). Recount the (p.229). which plant and animal behaviour adventures experience is influenced experienced ed on the way to le leave by or adapts to environmental the calling-card. conditions; recognising that there is a great By Peter Heaney diversity of describes the ‘advantages and disadvantages of being a nineties parent’ (p.32), Jessica and Pat Shaw must use all the ‘parental tools’ at their disposal to correct Benny’s behaviour. Examine pp.18, 102, 167, 180 and discuss the effectiveness of their parenting.

treaty splitting us apart like a badly snagged turnip’ (p.19). To snag a turnip means to pull it up out of the ground and, with a sharp knife, to cut away the attached roots, soil and leaves, leaving the vegetable clean and ready for storage. To what extent did Mother’s prediction about the treaty come true? In what ways has the Treaty affected the course of Irish history?

ACTIVITIES

1. DIARY Write Katie’s diary entry describing her feelings about her father’s upset.

2. ANALYSIS List five reasons why Katie liked the soldier at the train station (pp.21–23 and 25–26).

3. WORD CARICATURE A caricature is a drawing which exaggerates someone’s characteristics to make them appear comic. Read p.24 and write a word caricature of Dafydd.

4. STORYBOARD Record Dafydd’s story in a series of cartoon pictures, writing short captions underneath each frame. (read pp.28–29)

5. BACK TO THE SOURCE

What was Katie’s nightmare? What do you think it meant? Why were the children getting an extra long summer holiday that year? Why do you think Katie’s father was so upset when he returned from the Great War? ‘We want them out of Ireland – all of Ireland – once and for all. I can see that

SESE – HISTORY

t Early peoples and ancient societies: African peoples, e.g., the Bedouin. Becoming familiar with some aspects of the lives of these peoples: Origins; homelands and migrations; food and farming; clothes; work and technologies; cultural and artistic achievements; languages, myths and stories; faiths, beliefs and religious practices and long-term contribution of these people. For information, contact the Embassy of Tunisia in London, Tel: 0044171 5848117.

t Discussion: ‘It was the teacher’s

Read pp.8–34. DISCUSSION POINTS p

BENNY AND OMAR

by Eoin Colfer

• D7.95 pb • 240 pages Life is good for Benny Shaw when he scores the winning goal in the Primary Schools’ but his world is turned upside-down County Hurling Final, when his parents inform him that his father’s work necessitates to Tunisia. Benny isn’t really a move sure where Tunisia is, but he knows that they don’t play hurling still, Wexford has reached the there. Worse All-Ireland Final and he’ll miss the great day in Croke Park! discipline of his old school, he Familiar with the has problems adjusting to his new one in Tunisia, run by Harmony who prefer to be thought of and Bob, as the students’ ‘buddies’ rather than as ‘fuddy-duddy grown-ups’. meets Omar, a local homeless Not until he orphan with a shared passion for ball games, does he begin new life. Omar has learned some to settle in to his English by watching satellite TV, and the two form a close survives adult disapproval and friendship which ultimately leads them into difficult and dangerous circumstances.

by Siobhán Parkinson

List the sources of information that the author used in order to research this novel. (See Acknowledgements and pp.190–192) Draft a list of possible sources of information you might access if you were to write a story set in your home town in the late 1960s.

THE SILVER NOTEB OOK

ENDA WYLEY

Teaching Guide

RATIONALE

A NREADING O’BRIEN D THEMES PROGRAMME important area of personal development The book examines the sensitive issues of that children can empathise loss and bereavement with, and may through the stories have experience of. The joyful and vibrant of Timothy and his mother. The time support Timothy gets from his mother, his framework delicately weaves both past friend Fleur, and his own strategies for and present into the narrative of Timothy’s coping with his feelings prevent the story hopes and frustrations, as he dreams of from becoming melancholy. meeting his father again. The book has been divided into three The pace of the story matches Timothy’s sections and the management of the growing impatience as he attempts to activities should offer the opportunity for decipher the significance group and whole class of each trace to discussion. his past. The content is suitable for upper primary classes and the themes are presented in a UNIT 1 sensitive s way that will engage children THE STORYTELLER irrespective i of their personal experience of them. t p p p p p p

Bereavement Loss Relationships Personal ambitions Friendships Fears

SUMMARY S

now changed for him. He uses the notebook to create a presence for his father through the stories that he writes. Timothy meets Fleur one day while enjoying the peace on the hillside. She is French and is staying with her grandfather who owns the Post Office. After this encounter they become friends. Fleur is enchanting, sophisticated and a perfect foil to Timothy’s reserve. She is to start at his school the following day and Timothy has a feeling that his life will not be the same again.

PAGES 11-62

DISCUSSION POINTS

p

SUMMARY Young Timothy Finn is a storyteller. He conjures words into magnificent stories. Everyone who hears these stories falls under their spell. Timothy loves the effect his stories have on people, especially his mother Julia. Julia is unsettled as she listens to Timothy create a story about the father he never knew. She thinks it will be good for him to begin school, where she hopes he will find distraction in the company of new friends and activities.

Read pp.23-24. Why do you think Timothy liked to make up stories about his father and himself and why do you think his mother wanted him to start school when she heard the stories? Do you think she was right? Read pp.40-43. When he heard about his father, Timothy was very upset. Do you think he dealt with his distress sensibly? Think of some other sensible ways to deal with distress. p Read pp.60. Timothy had seen computers before but he knew that his mother would never approve of one in Boat Cottage. Why do you think she disapproved? Do you think she was right? p

This is the story of Timothy Th Finn, for whom the past and present are woven together in a mysterious m tapestry. He lives by the sea wit his mother. with Timothy’s mother is secr secretive about the past and he is curious abo the mysterious about father he has never The story moves forward seen Armed with a creative seen. to Timothy’s eighth birthday. It’s imagination, a Christmas and among pas passion for storytelling, his presents is an unexpected and the enco encouragement of gift from his his best friend Fleur, father. It is a silver notebook. The gift Tim Timothy struggles to unravel these disturbs Timothy and devastates his myst mysteries and finally ACTIVITIES discover the truth mother. Julia realises that Timothy is ready about his past. abou to hear about his father and tells him of the 1. Bigger and louder circumstances surrounding his birth and APPROACH A PP Do this activity in small the disappearance of his father. Timothy groups The tthemes in the does not realise that Read pp.19-22.Tim story, coping with her explanation is othy uses his bereavement and berea incomplete. imagination to create loss, address an stories from ordinary Timothy needs time events. He does this to think but all has with ‘exaggeration’.

The Silver Notebook Th 1 Teaching Guide


Leabhair Gaeilge

GLAC Sraith leabhar do léitheoirí óga atá maisithe go hálainn. Bealach fíorspreagúil í an tsraith seo leis an nGaeilge a shaothrú sa seomra ranga. Ais iontach í freisin do thuismitheoirí ar mhaith leo léamh na Gaeilge a chur chun cinn sa bhaile. Age 6+: native speakers/Age 8+: others

PRICE: €5.95/£4.99 FORMAT: Paperback/64 pages

BILLEOGA SAOTHAIR

Billeoga Saothair bunaithe ar na leabhar Sos; Fíor nó Bréagach, Aimsigh na Difríochta, Deir Ó Grádaigh, Rabhlóga, … NACH

BÉILE (MÍ?)OIRIÚ 1. Roghnaigh béile

oiriúnach do na

carachtair. air

ach do na caracht

mí-oiriún 2. Roghnaigh béile

anraith anlann slisíní agus ispíní pióg úll agus uachtar úll taifí

prátaí brúite

uachtar reoite

sicín rósta

lasagne

ubh scrofa

cupán caife

toirtín sméara

torthaí sailéad

borgaire cupán tae

pizza

glasraí beirithe

brioscaí sceallóga

leite ceapaire cáise

a

stobhach uaineol

gloine bhainne

Ce

e rd ba io . s! fó lóg p ir bh h a . úla Ra cad ead all p m s ta o h go ío pi a P – .. n e g .. t a lá air pa c n-u o ta ar ph 10 – g air e Ab -uair n

air Ab

10

Cóipcheart © Cló

Uí Bhriain 2002.

www.obrien.ie


Leabhair Gaeilge

An enjoyable and practical way to learn the first essential words in Irish! Hide and Speak Irish goes further than most picture word books. It offers an effective and simple way to learn over 130 key Irish words following the tried-and-tested method of ‘look, cover and speak’. Using the two wipe-clean flaps at the back of the book to cover the words or the pictures, users can practise speaking or writing the words as many times as they want. Hide and Speak Irish is organised into 15 popular themes including farm, school, family, colours and food. About this book

Hide and Speak is a picture word book with a difference. It is ‘interactive’. Using special flaps and the tried-and-tested method of ‘look, cover and say’, it offers a simple but effective way for children to learn over 130 useful words in Irish.

How to use the flaps

Attached to the back cover are two wipe-clean flaps. Use these flaps to cover the words or pictures on the right-hand page of each theme. Here are some ideas for using the flaps to learn the words. 1. Look at the words and pictures. Say the words out loud a few times. The pictures help you with the meaning. 2. Cover the pictures with the left-hand flap. Try to remember what the words mean. Say them out loud.

3. Now lift the left-hand flap and cover the words with the right-hand flap. Use the pictures as a prompt and say the Irish words out loud. You can also try to write them. The surface of the flaps is wipe-clean, so if you use a water-based felt-tip pen or chinagraph pencil, you can rub them off with a soft cloth or tissue and start again.

Pronunciation guide

Under each key word is a simple guide. This is only a first step to correct pronunciation as it cannot be completely accurate. Read it as if it were standard English. If possible, ask an Irish-speaking person to say the words and sentences correctly for you to repeat them (see next paragraph).

Themed pictures and phrases

ISBN: 978-1-84717-147-4 PRICE: €7.99/£5.99 FORMAT: Paperback/32 pages with wipe-clean flaps

• • • • •

The ‘Hide and Speak’ system has been established as an effective language learning tool Wipe-clean flaps can be used over and over again Each section has nine key words and picture prompts Hide and Speak Irish also contains an easy to use pronunciation guide Engaging, humorous full-colour picture spreads illustrate each theme

‘a good introduction to the language for children or adult learners’ Evening Echo ‘practical, simple and more fun for kids than it sounds!’ Books Ireland

The lively pictures on the left-hand pages have scenes illustrating the key words. Under the pictures are easy phrases that contain these words and lots of other simple but useful language. These phrases also help with the meaning of the words. The key words are highlighted in bold type in both English and Irish. Use these phrases to build up your language from single words to simple sentences.

Word list At the back of the book is a complete list of all the key words in Irish and English. They are arranged in the themes and in Irish alphabetical order, so it is easy to check their English meanings.

15 popular themes including: On the Farm In the Classroom A Day at the Zoo Dressing Up At the Beach My Family At Home In the Countr y My Room And lots more!


Themes in O’Brien Press Books Why use O’Brien Books in your school? O’Brien books are real books. Written as fiction for young readers, many have won awards and more have been acclaimed by distinguished reviewers. Why themes? We recognise that teachers have been using our books for many years and this experience has informed our approach to using real books in the classroom. Now, in response to requests from teachers, we have listed below some of the many themes or subject areas dealt with in some of our most popular novels. The topics or themes suggested are just some of the many you will find in our books, and are intended only as a starting point or possible guide when selecting a class novel. General Books We have included some titles from our general book list where these are accessible and appropriate for use in schools. Why so few themes for Panda Cubs, Pandas or Flyers? As in-depth exploration of novels generally begins only in the middle and senior classes of primary school, we have not included many Panda Cubs, Panda, Flyer or SOS titles in the lists below. We take these books very seriously: the books in these series are often the first, and therefore arguably the most important, books the very young reader will read independently. Most of the books from these series have strong characters who, with (or despite!) help from family and friends, stretch the limits of their worlds and assert their own independence, often in a humorous and fresh way. We included titles from these series in the lists below only where we felt that a theme was particularly relevant.

ADV EN T UR E BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS

n Sailor Bear n The Secret of Kells PURPLE FLAG (READING AGE 5+)

n Lighthouse Joey n Muckeen and the UFO YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+)

n Alfie Green and the Bee Bottle Gang

n Alfie Green and the Chocolate Cosmos

n Alfie Green and the Conker King n Alfie Green and the Fly Trapper n Alfie Green & the Magical Gift n Alfie Green & the Snowdrop Queen n Alfie Green & the Supersonic Subway n Mad Grandad and the Kleptoes n Mad Grandad and the Mutant River n Mad Grandad’s Flying Saucer n Mad Grandad’s Robot Garden n Mad Grandad’s Wicked Pictures n Robots Don’t Cry RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+)

n Charlie Harte and His Two-wheeled Tiger n The Fight for Plover Hill n The Five Hundred n The Great Pig Escape n The Witch Apprentice n The Witch in the Woods BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n Across the Divide n The Battle for the Castle n Bike Hunt n Call of the Whales n The Castle in the Attic n Chill Factor

n Cyril’s Woodland Quest n Fugitives n In Deep Dark Wood n Four Kids, Three Cats, Two Cows, One Witch (maybe)

n The Island of Ghosts n Lockie and Dadge n Red Hugh n The Secret of Kells n The Shakespeare Stealer n Shakespeare’s Scribe n Swap n The Wish List

GREEN FLAG (READING AGE 12+)

n TruthSeeker

A N I MA L LI FE BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS)

n Granny MacGinty n What Are Friends For? n Whose Ears? n Whose Feet? n Wild Dublin PURPLE FLAG (READING AGE 5+)

n Katie’s Caterpillars n My Dog Lively n Where’s Murphy? ORANGE FLAG (READING AGE 4+)

n Cinders n The Timid Rabbit YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+)

n Alfie Green and a Sink Full of Frogs

n Blue, Where Are You? n The Hedgehog’s Prickly Problem RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+)

n Cá Bhfuil Murchú? n The Great Pig Escape n Mo Mhadra Beoga n An Rún Mór n Sky Wings

BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n Cyril’s Woodland Quest n Call of the Whales n Star Dancer

BOY/GIRL/TEEN RELATIONSHIPS BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n Benny and Babe n Bike Hunt n Blue Lavender Girl n Chill Factor n Copper Girl n Dark Secret n Don’t Even Think About It n Epic n Faraway Home n Four Kids, Three Cats, Two Cows, One Witch (maybe)

n Hazel Wood Girl n Johnny Coffin – School-Dazed n Katie’s War n My Nutty Neighbours n No Peace for Amelia n Out of Nowhere n Out of the Flames n Saga n Sisters ... no way! n See If I Care n Star Dancer n The Wish List GREEN FLAG (READING AGE 12+)

n The Chieftain’s Daughter n The Cinnamon Tree n Wings over Delft

BULLYING ORANGE FLAG (READING AGE 4+)

n Cinders n The Timid Rabbit

YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+)

n Robots Don’t Cry RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+)

n Adam’s Starling n Walter Speazlebud BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n Alice & Megan Forever n Benny and Babe n The Blue Horse n Bonjour Alice n Dancing in the Dark n Dark Secret n It Wasn’t Me n Just Joshua n Lockie and Dadge n The Moon King n Star Dancer n The Young Rebels

CULTURAL DIVER S I TY BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS)

n The Dreaming Tree n I Won’t Go to China n Olanna’s Big Day n The Romanian Builder RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+)

n Ice Dreams BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n Benny and Omar n Bill and Fred? n The Gods and Their Machines n A Horse Called El Dorado n Just Joshua GREEN FLAG (READING AGE 12+)

n The Cinnamon Tree GENERAL BOOKS

n Brown Morning


Themes in O’Brien Press Books D IF F E RE N CE , PRE JUD ICE , I NT OL E R AN CE BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS)

n It’s Called Dyslexia

YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+)

n Alfie Green & the Bee Bottle Gang

n Alfie Green & the Conker King n Alfie Green & the Fly Trapper n Alfie Green & the Magical Gift n Alfie Green & a Sink Full of

n Bill and Fred? (sisters) n The Blue Horse (parents/children)

n Call of the Whales (father/son) n The Castle in the Attic

(parents/child-minder) n Cherokee (grandfather) ORANGE FLAG (READING AGE 4+) Frogs n Chill Factor (father/son) n Emma says Oops! Alfie Green & the Supersonic n n Dancing in the Dark (parents, PURPLE FLAG (READING AGE 5+) Subway siblings) n The Little Black Sheep n Dark Secret (grandfather) RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+) n Snobby Cat n Don’t Ask Alice n The Eagle Tree n Strawberry Squirt (parents/children) n The Fight for Plover Hill YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+) Don’t Even Think About It n n The Great Pig Escape n Ed’s Funny Feet (parents) n The Leprechaun Who Wished He BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+) n Dream Invader (extended n Alice Next Door Wasn’t family/cousin) n Call of the Whales RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+) n Faraway Home (siblings) n The Celestial Child n Fields of Home (siblings) n Animals Don’t Have Ghosts n Cyril’s Woodland Quest n The Fight for Plover Hill n An t-Uan Beag Dubh n A Horse Called El Dorado (grandfather) BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+) n The Island of Ghosts n A Girl Called Blue (foster n 17 Martin Street n The Old Country family/adoption) n Across the Divide n Sky Wings The Harvest Tide Project n n Benny and Omar n Under Fragile Stone (uncle/siblings) n Bill and Fred? n A Horse Called El Dorado n The Blue Horse FA MI LY (parents/grandparents) n Cherokee R ELA TI O N S H I P S In Deep Dark Wood (siblings) n n Cyril’s Woodland Quest BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS) The Island of Ghosts (siblings) n n Dark Secret n Granny MacGinty (grandmother) n It Wasn’t Me (twins) n Eva’s Journey n Jimeen (parents) n Mr Bear’s Picnic n Faraway Home n Just Joshua (father/son) (father/children) n Four Kids, Three Cats, Two n Kate (parents, siblings) n Mr Bear to the Rescue Cows, One Witch (maybe) n Katie’s War (father/children) n A Girl Called Blue (father/daughter/family) n Mouse TV (parents/siblings) n The Guns of Easter n Little Croker (father/son) n Owl Babies (mother/children) n In the Claws of the Eagle n Lockie and Dadge (foster n The World is full of Babies! n The Island of Ghosts families) (parents) n It Wasn’t Me PURPLE FLAG (READING AGE 5+) n The Lost Island (father/son) n Just Joshua n Missing Sisters (sisters) n Kate n The Big Brother (siblings) n The Moon King (foster families) n Katie’s War n Helpful Hannah (grandmother) n Lockie and Dadge n Pageboy Danny (uncle, parents, n My Nasty Neighbours (parents) n My Nutty Neighbours (parents, n Missing Sisters grandparents, sister) siblings) n The Moon King YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+) n No Goodbye (parental n My Nasty Neighbours n Anna’s Secret Granny separation, father/siblings) n My Nutty Neighbours (grandfather) n The Old Country (grandmother) n The Old Country RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+) n Out of the Flames (fathers) n Out of the Flames n Adam’s Starling (grandfather) n Safe Harbour (grandfather) n Safe Harbour n Albert and the Magician n Sisters ... no way! (sisters, new n Sisters ... no way! (parents/sibling) families) n Star Dancer n Dear Me! (grandfather) n Star Dancer (mother/son) n Under Fragile Stone n Jimmy’s Leprechaun Trap n Survivors A True-Life Titanic n A Winter of Spies (grandfather) Story (siblings) GREEN FLAG (READING AGE 12+) n Juliet’s Story (grandmother) n Under Fragile Stone n The Chieftain’s Daughter BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+) (teens/parents, uncle) n The Cinnamon Tree n Under the Hawthorn Tree n Alice Again (parents, younger n TruthSeeker (siblings) siblings) n Wings Over Delft n Wildflower Girl (siblings) n Alice Next Door n In the Claws of the Eagle n A Winter of Spies (father) (parents/children) n The Young Rebels (father, aunt) n Amelia (parents) ENV IRON ME NT AL CA R E GREEN FLAG (READING AGE 12+) n The Battle for the Castle BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS) (parents/child-minder) n Wings over Delft (father) n Noah’s Ark n Benny and Babe GENERAL BOOKS n The Story of the Creation (grandfather/parents/children) n All Shining in the Spring n Wild Dublin n Benny & Omar (family/bereavement) (parents/children)

FANTASY, OTHER W ORLDS YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+)

n Alfie Green & the Chocolate Cosmos

n Alfie Green & the Magical Gift n Alfie Green & the Snowdrop Queen

n Alfie Green & the Supersonic Subway RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+)

n The Book of Curses n Diabolic Downloads n Éasca Péasca n The Witch Apprentice BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n The Battle for the Castle n The Castle in the Attic n Celtic Magic Tales n Celtic Tales of Enchantment n Dream Invader n Epic n Faery Nights/Oícheanta Sí n The Gods and Their Machines n The Harvest Tide Project n In Deep Dark Wood n The Old Country n Out of Nowhere n Saga n Under Fragile Stone n The Wish List

FRIENDSHIPS BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS)

n Bertie Rooster n Póga the Dragon n What Are Friends For? YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+)

n Alfie Green and the Bee Bottle Gang

n Alfie Green and the Conker King n Alfie Green and the Fly Trapper n The Leprechaun Who Wished He Wasn’t

n Robots Don’t Cry RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+)

n Dear Me! n The Witch in the Woods BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n Across the Divide n Alice Again n Alice and Megan Forever n Alice in the Middle n Alice Next Door n Alice to the Rescue n Amelia n Benny and Babe n Benny and Omar n Bill and Fred? n The Blue Horse n Bonjour Alice n Call of the Whales n Dark Secret n Don’t Even Think About It n Epic


Themes in O’Brien Press Books n Eva’s Journey n Faraway Home n Féile Fever n Four Kids, Three Cats, Two Cows, One Witch (maybe) n Fugitives n A Girl Called Blue n It Wasn’t Me n Johnny Coffin – School-Dazed n Just Joshua n Katie’s War n Kicking On n Little Croker n Lockie and Dadge n The Moon King n My Nutty Neighbours n No Peace for Amelia n Out of Nowhere n Out of the Flames n Saga n See If I Care n Star Dancer n The Shakespeare Stealer n Shakespeare’s Scribe n Six Haunted Hairdos n Swap n Tiger Boots n War Children n The Wish List n The Young Rebels GREEN FLAG (READING AGE 12+)

n The Cinnamon Tree n Wings Over Delft

H IS TORY BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS)

n The Secret of Kells n The Story of Ireland BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n 17 Martin Street (WW II in Ireland)

n Across the Divide (Dublin 1913) n Amelia (Suffragettes) n Brian Boru (Vikings in Ireland) n Celtic Magic Tales (Celtic Ireland)

n Celtic Tales of Enchantment (Celtic Ireland)

n Celtic Way of Life n The Easter Rising: A Guide to Dublin in 1916

n Faraway Home (WW II, Germany, Northern Ireland, Kindertransport) n Fugitives (Flights of the Earls) n The Guns of Easter (1916 Rising, WW I) n The Hunt for Diarmaid and Gráinne (Celtic Ireland) n Kate (1930s Dublin) n Katie’s War (Irish Civil War) n Pirate Queen n No Peace for Amelia (WW I, Easter Rising, 1916) n Red Hugh (English rule in Ireland, 16th century)

n Safe Harbour (WW II, London Blitz, Ireland) n The Shakespeare Stealer (Elizabethan England) n Shakespeare’s Scribe (Black Death, Elizabethan England) n Strongbow (Normans in Ireland) n Survivors (Titanic disaster) n The Táin (Celtic Ireland) n Under the Hawthorn Tree (Irish Famine) n War Children (Irish War of Independence, 1919-1921) n A Winter of Spies (Irish Civil War, 1922) n The Young Rebels (1916)

n Four Stupid Cupids n It Wasn’t Me n Jimeen n Johnny Coffin – School-Dazed n The Leprechaun’s Challenge n The Leprechaun’s Riddle n My Nasty Neighbours n My Nutty Neighbours n Seven Spiders Spinning n Sisters ... no way! n Six Haunted Hairdos n The Wish List

INFORMATION BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS)

n All About Gaelic Football n All About Hurling n In the Claws of the Eagle (WWII) n Fantastic Far-Flung Facts For GREEN FLAG (READING AGE 12+)

n The Chieftain’s Daughter (Celtic

Fun n It’s Called Dyslexia n The Story of Ireland

n Amelia (financial pressures, women’s rights)

n Bill and Fred? (sibling rivalry, positive elderly role models)

n The Blue Horse (ethnic minority) n Cherokee (parenting) n Chill Factor (life-threatening illness, genetic engineering)

n Cyril’s Woodland Quest (being orphaned)

n Dancing in the Dark (death of a sibling)

n Dark Secret (being an outsider) n Don’t Ask Alice (parental separation)

n Don’t Even Think About It (parental separation, disability)

n Epic (elitism, domination,

control of wealth/resources)

n Eva’s Journey (unemployment,

financial pressures, moving to a new school/area) BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+) n Faraway Home/17 Martin Street Anglia) n Alice & Megan’s Cookbook n Wings Over Delft (the (war, refugees) n Granuaile Chieftain, Pirate, Enlightenment, Holland) n A Girl Called Blue (being Trader GENERAL BOOKS orphaned) GENERAL BOOKS The Gods and Their Machines n n No Ordinary Women n Brendan the Navigator (politics, terrorism, domination) n Celtic Way of Life n The Harvest Tide Project H U MO U R n Exploring Newgrange (domination, control of PURPLE FLAG (READING AGE 5+) n Exploring the Book of Kells resources) n Pageboy Danny n Exploring the Spanish Armada n A Horse Called El Dorado BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS) n Exploring the World of Colmcille (guerrilla activity, domination) n Granny MacGinty n Saint Patrick: Ireland’s Patron n It Wasn’t Me (bullying) n Mouse TV Saint n Just Joshua (being an outsider) n O’Brien Pocket History of Ireland n Kate (poverty, religion) WHITE FLAG (ALL AGES) n O’Brien Pocket History of Irish n Katie’s War (mental illness) ¨ Beastly Jokes Saints n Lockie and Dadge (foster care, ¨ More Beastly Jokes n O’Brien Pocket History of Irish being outsiders) YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+) Traditional Music n Missing Sisters (being n Alfie Green and the Fly Trapper n O’Brien Pocket History of Irish orphaned) n Alfie Green and the Magical Gift Writers n The Moon King (foster care, n Alfie Green and a Sink Full of n Wild Dublin being different) Frogs n My Nasty Neighbours n The Leprechaun Who Wished He ISSUES (teen/parent relationships) Wasn’t n My Nutty Neighbours (being YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+) n The Lough Neagh Monster different, prejudice and n Alfie Green and a Sink Full of RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+) intolerance) Frogs (positive elderly role n Animals Don’t Have Ghosts n No Goodbye (parental model) n Boom Chicka Boom separation) n Blue, Where Are You? (Moving n Charlie Harte and His n No Peace for Amelia (pacifism) house) Two-wheeled Tiger n The Old Country (war, ethnicity) RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+) n Dear Me! n Out of the Flames (war, racism) n Adam’s Starling (financial n The Great Pig Escape n Safe Harbour (serious illness of pressures) n Jimmy’s Leprechaun Trap parent, war) n Charlie Harte and His n Leprechaun on the Loose n Saga (politics, anarchism, Two-wheeled Tiger n Walter Speazlebud exercise of power, domination, (unemployment) social order) BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+) n Dear Me! (illness of parent, n The Silver Notebook (absent n Alice Again moving to new area, new parent) n Alice Next Door school) n Sisters ... no way! (death of n Benny and Babe BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+) parent, new families) n Benny and Omar n Alice Again (parental separation) n Star Dancer (social n Bill and Fred? n Alice in the Middle (friendships) disadvantage) n Don’t Even Think About It n Alice Next Door (parental n Under Fragile Stone n Five Alien Elves separation) (domination, resources) n Four Kids, Three Cats, Two Cows, One Witch (maybe) Ireland)

n TruthSeeker (Viking Dublin, East


Themes in O’Brien Press Books n The Young Rebels (death of mother, bullying father, war) GREEN FLAG (READING AGE 12+)

n The Cinnamon Tree (landmines, disability, the Developing World) n In the Claws of the Eagle (war, prejudice and intolerance) n Wings Over Delft (class, science, art and religion)

MY TH AN D L E G E ND BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS)

n Best-loved Irish Legends n The Boyne Valley Book and Tape of Irish Legends n The O’Brien Book of Irish Fairy Tales & Legends PURPLE FLAG (READING AGE 5+)

n Finn’s Thumb n The Riddle n The Baby Giant YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+)

n The Big Fight n Here, There and Everywhere BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n Celtic Magic Tales n Celtic Tales of Enchantment n The Hunt for Diarmaid and Gráinne

n Faery Nights/Oícheanta Sí n Jimmy’s Leprechaun Trap n The Táin n The Secret of Kells GENERAL BOOKS

n Celtic Names for Children n Celtic Way of Life n Legendary Ireland

O T HE R PE OPL E & LA NDS BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS)

n The Dreaming Tree n I Won’t Go to China n Olanna’s Big Day n The Romanian Builder BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n Benny and Omar n Call of the Whales n The Cinnamon Tree n A Horse Called El Dorado n Ice Dreams n Just Joshua n The Old Country GREEN FLAG (READING AGE 12+)

n Al Capsella and the Watchdogs n The Heroic Life of Al Capsella n Friend of my Heart

PE RS O N AL CHAL L EN G E BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS)

n It’s Called Dyslexia n Póga the Dragon ORANGE FLAG (READING AGE 4+)

n Boo and Bear

n Bertie Rooster n Emma says Boo! n Emma says Oops! n Molly’s Night Out n The Timid Rabbit PURPLE FLAG (READING AGE 5+)

n Emma the Penguin YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+)

n Alfie Green and the Magical Gift n Barry’s New Bed n Ed’s Bed n Ed’s Funny Feet n Going Potty RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+)

n Adam’s Starling n Dear Me! BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n Alice Next Door n Amelia n The Battle for the Castle n Bill and Fred? n The Blue Horse n Blue Lavender Girl n Call of the Whales n The Castle in the Attic n Cherokee n Cyril’s Woodland Quest n Copper Girl n Dark Secret n Don’t Even Think About It n Epic n Eva’s Journey n Faraway Home n Four Kids, Three Cats, Two Cows, One Witch (maybe)

n A Girl Called Blue n The Guns of Easter n Hazel Wood Girl n A Horse Called El Dorado n Ice Dreams n In Deep Dark Wood n Just Joshua n Kate n Katie’s War n Kicking On n Little Croker n Lockie and Dadge n Missing Sisters n The Moon King n My Nasty Neighbours n My Nutty Neighbours n No Goodbye n No Peace for Amelia n Out of the Flames n Red Hugh n Safe Harbour n Saga n Sisters ... no way! n Star Dancer n Survivors n Under the Hawthorn Tree n War Children n A Winter of Spies

GREEN FLAG (READING AGE 12+)

n The Cinnamon Tree n TruthSeeker

n Wings Over Delft

POLITICS BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n Across the Divide n Epic n Fugitives n The Gods and Their Machines n The Harvest Tide Project n A Horse Called El Dorado n Out of Nowhere n Saga n Under Fragile Stone GREEN FLAG (READING AGE 12+)

GENERAL BOOKS

n Last Man Standing n Lansdowne Road n Munster Hurling Legends n Munster Rugby Giants n O’Brien Pocket History of Gaelic Sport

STORY, STORY TELLI N G YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+)

n Here, There and Everywhere RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+)

n Boom Chicka Boom n Juliet’s Story

n In the Claws of the Eagle (WWII) BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+) n The Chieftain’s Daughter n Faery Nights/Oícheanta Sí n Wings Over Delft n The Shakespeare Stealer GENERAL BOOKS n Shakespeare’s Scribe n Brown Morning n Four Kids, Three Cats, Two n Irish Writers Against War Cows, One Witch (maybe) n The Old Country

SCHOOL LIFE

BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS)

n It’s Called Dyslexia RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+)

n Adam’s Starling n Albert and the Magician n Dear Me! n Walter Speazlebud BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n Alice & Megan Forever n Alice Next Door n Bill and Fred? n The Blue Horse n The Castle in the Attic n Cherokee n Dancing in the Dark n Dark Secret n Don’t Even Think About It n Five Alien Elves n Four Stupid Cupids n The Island of Ghosts n It Wasn’t Me n Johnny Coffin – School-Dazed n Lockie and Dadge n My Nutty Neighbours n Seven Spiders Spinning n Six Haunted Hairdos n The Young Rebels

SPORT BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS)

n All About Gaelic Football n All About Hurling BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n The Battle for the Castle n Benny and Babe n Benny and Omar n Bill and Fred? n Féile Fever n Kicking On n Little Croker n Star Dancer n Tiger Boots

TRADITIONAL TA LES / NURSERY RHYM ES BLACK FLAG (PICTURE BOOKS)

n Best-loved Irish Legends n Little Piggies n Noah’s Ark n The O’Brien Book of Irish Fairy Tales & Legends

n The Story Of The Creation PURPLE FLAG (READING AGE 5+)

n Finn’s Thumb n The Henny Penny Tree n The Riddle YELLOW FLAG (READING AGE 6+)

n Here, There and Everywhere RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+)

n Boom Chicka Boom BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n Faery Nights/Oícheanta Sí n Sisters ... no way!

VISUAL & PERFORMANCE A R TS PURPLE FLAG (READING AGE 5+)

n Conor’s Concert n Conor’s Canvas RED FLAG (READING AGE 8+)

n Tommy the Theatre Cat BLUE FLAG (READING AGE 10+)

n Cherokee n Hazel Wood Girl n Kate n The Old Country GREEN FLAG (READING AGE 12+)

n In the Claws of the Eagle n Wings Over Delft GENERAL BOOKS

n Celtic Decorative Art n Decorative Dublin n O’Brien Pocket History of Irish Traditional Music


REAL BOOKS FOR SCHOOLS Using O’Brien flags to select books for your classroom As children start school at different ages under the various educational systems listed here, and also begin formal reading at different stages, this suggested guide to suitability for various ages differs for each system. REPUBLIC OF IRELAND

NORTHERN IRELAND &

ENGLAND & WALES

SCOTLAND

Picture books

Usable throughout the school (but especially Junior Infants)

Usable throughout the school (but especially Year 1 [P1])

Usable throughout the school (but especially Reception)

ORANGE FLAG

Senior Infants (also First Class)

Year 1 [P1]. Key Stage 1

Reception

First Class (also Senior Infants, Second Class)

Year 2 [P2]. Key Stage 1

Year 1. Key Stage 1

Second Class (also First Class, Third Class)

Year 3 [P3]. Key Stage 1

Reading level 6+

Year 2. Key Stage 1

RED FLAG

Third Class, Fourth Class

Year 4, Year 5 [P4, P5]. Key Stage 1 & Key Stage 2

Year 3, Year 4. Key Stage 1 & Key Stage 2

Fifth Class, Sixth Class

Reading level 10+

Year 6, Year 7 [P6, P7]. Key Stage 2

Year 5, Year 6. Key Stage 2

First Year, Second Year Reading level 12+ (second-level schools)

Year 8, Year 9, Year 10 (secondary Year 7, Year 8, Year 9 (secondary schools). Key Stage 3 schools). Key Stage 3

BLACK FLAG

Reading level 4+ PURPLE FLAG

Reading level 5+ YELLOW FLAG

Reading level 8+ BLUE FLAG

GREEN FLAG

This is a general guide to reading levels. It will help you to choose books to suit your pupils and their abilities.

Where Can I Find O’Brien Press Books? 1.

BOOKSHOPS AND SUPPLY CENTRES: O’Brien Press books are available in all good bookshops and school supply centres. If they do not hold a given title in stock, they will be delighted to order O’Brien Press books for you.

2.

THE INTERNET: All O’Brien Press books can be bought directly from our website www.obrien.ie. They are also available from online retailers such as www.thebookdepository.co.uk and www.amazon.co.uk as well as education sites such as www.schoolbooks.ie and www.schooldays.ie.

3.

BUYING DIRECTLY: Alternatively, orders can be placed by post, telephone, fax or e-mail: The O’Brien Press, 12 Terenure Road East, Rathgar, Dublin 6, Ireland Tel: +353 1 492 3333; Fax: +353 1 492 2777; E-mail: schools@obrien.ie Discounts: a discount of 10% and free postage is available on all class sets bought directly. Higher discounts are available for bigger orders.

4.

PUBLIC LIBRARIES: All public libraries should have O’Brien Press books. If they do not have a title you’re looking for, they can order it for you.

5.

SCHOOL LIBRARIES: Most school libraries will have many of our children’s books. (Remember, if you do not have a school library, you can use our guide to setting one up: see www.obrien.ie/SchoolLibrary)


O'Brien for Schools 2010