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June 24, 2011 Ms. Wanda Wilson Executive Director Oakland Planning & Development Corp. 235 Atwood Street Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Subject: Oakland 2025 Community Plan

Dear Wanda, Thank you for considering our qualifications and proposal to assist the Oakland community in developing a vision for the neighborhood. It’s exciting to start a project that already has a great foundation. The involvement of the community and its professional capacity will allow our services to be focused on deeper problem solving and implementation strategies. We have organized an experienced team anchored by a group of planners known for its work on the community plans of Central Northside, Lawrenceville, The Hill, Homewood, and most recently, Polish Hill. OUR TEAM Core Planning Team Our locally based team of Pfaffmann + Associates (Carl Bergamini, Jeff Slack and myself) and Studio for Spatial Practice (Christine Brill and Jon Kline) is supplemented by two firms quite familiar with Pittsburgh: Todd Poole of 4ward Planning for economic planning and Mike Morehouse of Fitzgerald & Halliday for transportation planning. Both Todd and Mike are currently involved in Pittsburgh projects and are also able to bring nationally recognized benchmark work to Pittsburgh. Our team roles are illustrated on the accompanying chart. Project Leadership Christine Brill and I will provide the strategic direction as principals in charge. Christine and I have worked together for many years and bring complementary approaches to our work. Christine will lead the community outreach components of the charrette and work closely with OPDC to integrate her creative “outside the box” approaches to the charrette. A Flexible, Deep Team All five planners (Christine, Carl, Jeff, Jon and me) will be hands-on charrette team leaders. We can shift from our team leadership to support as needed for each of the focus areas, whether they are thematic or geographic. This will allow for a compact highly efficient team with experienced planners and practioners leading each area of exploration. Project management Carl Bergamini, RA, AICP will be our project manager and provide the day-to-day organizational management of the team. He is well known in each community he has worked for his quiet commitment and thorough approach to planning project management.


Graphics & Illustrations Jon and Carl will play an important role in developing the graphic approaches. Christine and Jon may use interactive models and hands-on exercises that engage stakeholders in memorable ways. We have created a team of planners that is multitalented and experienced with thinking, drawing and managing on the fly. Implementation Working regularly with developers and capital projects for non-profits, I will lead the implementation planning efforts, provide strategic direction for the team on the work product and coordinate with the economic team. I will also lead the implementation components of the plan. Transportation Planning To lead the transportation planning element of the project, Michael Morehouse, P.E. of the firm Fitzgerald & Halliday, Inc. (FHI), has been included on our team. Mike has over 18 years of experience in multi-modal transportation planning and engineering. Mike is an active member of the National Complete Streets Coalition. A valuable asset to the project in Oakland, Mike has a track record of successful public workshop experience. He is currently working in Pittsburgh on both the East Liberty TRID Study and the MOVEPGH project. For MOVEPGH, he is responsible for the transportation needs assessment city-wide and will have access to data that may be useful for a rapid understanding of conditions in Oakland. He will also be involved with numerous public workshops for both projects. Involvement with these parallel assignments is highly beneficial to the Oakland project because the team will be able to take advantage of the most current information available and leverage the resources of these concurrent-planning initiatives. Economic Planning 4ward Planning will participate in one charrette planning meeting, a two-day portion of the charrette and a follow-up public forum. They will provide “real time” analysis of ideas, in terms of market and economic conditions, during the community charrette and consult with break out teams as needed. More detail about the economic analysis tasks and deliverables can be found at the end of this proposal. Based on the alternative and preferred plan concepts developed for Oakland, 4ward Planning will create an Excel based land-use build-out model (based on models it currently uses for such exercises), which accounts for all existing and prospective land-uses (based on permitted massing, bulk and parking requirements), public facilities, and general infrastructure. Once developed, the build-out model will be able to identify land-uses by building units (e.g., apartments, condos, townhouses) and square footages (retail and office/flex). Todd Poole will meet with local business owners, developers and landowners as part of our roundtable discussions on the Oakland real estate and business marketplace. Todd’s special expertise in the economic development impact of amenities such as parks and open space will tie well with existing and proposed efforts for Oakland. His analysis of the New York City Highline Park’s economic impact provides new ways to advocate for quality of life improvements to our neighborhoods. Landscape & Open Space Planning Christine Brill will lead landscape, green infrastructure and open space discussions and also focus on the strategies for youth and families in Oakland. Working with OPDC’s partners such as Tree Pittsburgh, Gtech and Western PA Conservancy, Christine will integrate a “Greenprint” Strategy to develop ideas that can be implemented. Since the Oakland Core is also likely to focus on this through Innovation Oakland and its Smart Streets project, we will focus on the residential neighborhoods and their relationship to the business core, in the spirit of Elm Street approaches.


OUR APPROACH Pfaffmann + Associates (P+A) and Studio for Spatial Practice (SfSP) will provide an integrated team approach that includes economic planners 4ward Planning and transportation planners Fitzgerald & Halliday. Our approach is differentiated by a passion for personal, grass roots community engagement and a willingness to try new ways to accomplish this. We are highly tuned to the culture and demographics of a place and recognize that one size and type of charrette process may not fit all. We will work to build from your substantial start on the fifty-five dialogue sessions that took place throughout South, Central, West and North Oakland. OPDC’s capacity to facilitate and develop outreach is a key a part of the way we will organize our team. The diverse stakeholders that have been engaged already are impressive. The diversity in age, race, and socio-economic background will result in a variety of themes as already shown in the conversations held to date. Our team is composed of experienced planning professionals that are attuned to Pittsburgh’s neighborhoods and to each of the identified thematic areas, whether it is streetscapes, housing or development issues. As architects who have actually implemented components of community plans, we are able to make sure that the vision for 2025 is both inspiring and achievable. We have designed the housing, transit and streetscape components of many community plans and know how to navigate the agencies that are the key to success. Christine will work closely with you to develop user-focused strategies for the charrette and interaction with the community using models, “walk-shops” and other hands-on approaches. Carl will develop an effective website and social media outlets with you to allow access to information and ideas and to encourage dialogue. I will work with you to explore the idea of a “developer workshop” to encourage these stakeholders, increase awareness and ensure that development hot spots are well understood and planned. Jeff will explore the role of heritage and culture including the arts in the neighborhoods. Our projects are diverse, yet pertinent. For instance, we have implemented a streetscape lighting project for the Northside; we are consulting on the design of the Highland Avenue Bridge; and we have completed design of innovative green infill housing in East Liberty. As preservation planning professionals, we also bring a deep understanding of the technology and economics of heritage preservation. We are LEED certified and have executed four recent LEED projects, including the Hill District Library, that have engaged the community in thinking about sustainability. We are Tree tenders and understand the urban landscape. We work with large developers and understand the challenges of places, like the Oakland Portal, and how they need to fit well within a dense neighborhood. We can imagine a thematic organization built from the following (we developed a similar approach to our work on the Central Northside and include an example of the “placemats” that resulted from the charrettes for each of the focus areas). • • • • • •

Transportation & Safety Housing Quality & Development Youth, Family & Elderly Services Neighborhood Diversity & Heritage and Culture Neighborhood Greening and Infrastructure Urban Design & Zoning Standards


Coordination with Other Consultants We will also connect with our peers working on the Plan Pittsburgh Team and the Innovative Oakland/Smart Streets Project. We are excited by the unique opportunity to collaborate with the ARUP team as well as the Plan Pittsburgh Consultants and staff. In summary, our approach will be designed in collaboration with OPDC staff and stakeholders. We will do this through: • Neighborhood and user-focused design and process • Understanding the cultural geography of Oakland • Collaboration with Plan Pittsburgh consultants • Connecting to surrounding communities and to the core (Innovative Oakland/Smart Streets) University of Pittsburgh Students We would also like to propose that students from planning and sustainability programs in the neighborhood (Pitt Architectural Studies Program and Mascaro Center for Sustainable Innovation, for example) be recruited to assist the professional team. We have found that this approach can be rewarding and build new relationships between “town and gown.” We are not counting on this in our labor but are excited about considering it. We have talked to program leaders at the Architectural Studies Program about this and they are very enthusiastic and look forward to talking to OPDC.

SUPPORT FROM OPDC The capacity of OPDC to support the charrette process is a great opportunity to allow our team to focus more time on design problems and develop more effective graphic and written work. We would like to see the OPDC designate a project manger who would work directly with Carl and Christine to develop the charrette “road map.” From a fee/time point of view you can see that our fee reflects that the organizing and physical set up responsibilities will lie with OPDC. From experience, this allows our team to provide advice and apply its creativity without the need to deal with the often time-consuming aspects of finding an appropriate venue, doing special community outreach, etc. For example, in almost all our communities, we had to spend time just having meetings to bring people to the table when there were internal disputes. There will be times when we as “outsiders” can be helpful and we would expect to assist you if needed. A word on physical charrette space: As architects we like to practice what we preach. Good design helps people be more productive and focused. We would challenge OPDC to find a space that can be the “home base” for the project and charrette team. All of us live in the East End and we can imagine an old/unrented storefront as a great place to allow extensive interaction and conduct charrettes. At the same time, we have also found that strategically rotating meeting locations can be useful where the residents/stakeholders can be more successfully engaged. You know your community well and we will work with you to design a charrette work plan that is custom fit for Oakland. Our goal is to immerse ourselves in Oakland, blurring the lines between consultant and client wherever possible. For example, we have often taken the time to bicycle, walk and bring friends to our clients’ neighborhoods and hang out for coffee on a Saturday morning. This let’s us discover issues or opportunities that might be missed in a more distant consultant relationship.


TIMELINE We have reviewed the overall time frame for the project and it appears to be appropriate for the project scope and expectations. We do know from experience that there are periods of the year when it is difficult to organize charrettes that require such sustained commitment from stakeholders. The holiday season can reduce participation between Thanksgiving and New Years. Likewise, the academic calendar suggests that the fall is ideal to include institutional and academic stakeholders. This simple timeline captures our initial thinking on the question of when to conduct the charrette process: July 2011 Project Start/Project Team Meeting July 25, 2011 August 2011 Complete the Road Map and Charrette Schedule Charrette Planning and Logistics Meeting (late August) August/September 2011 Pre-charrette economic and demographic research. While the weather is good, we propose a series of pre-charrette Stakeholder “Walkshop” Meetings. We have found these to be very popular and effective leading up to charrettes. November 2011 Multi-day Charrette We have nicknamed November as “Charrette Month” in our conceptual schedule because we think that the scale and multiplicity of issues will require something that may span over the entire month rather than just a few days. We recommend completing all of this process before Thanksgiving to avoid holiday conflicts. If for some reason this does not work, we are prepared to begin in January and still meet your completion schedule. We believe that the nature of Pittsburgh’s dense, highly developed neighborhoods requires some adjustments to the National Charrette Institute process. It is a great framework for success, but we expect to work with you to make adjustments to the approach in some areas. Public Open House with “Placemat” summaries. Placemats are compact (tabloid format), accessible summaries that are working graphic summaries of the charrette process. The Public open space will provide digital and printed summaries of the charrette and provisions for input and commentary organized thematically and geographically. Presentation Development Dry Run with Staff of OPDC We will conduct a dry run presentation with the project team and OPDC staff in preparation for the final public meeting. Final Public Meeting The Public Meeting will summarize the outcomes distribute and post summaries and provide for any additional input or Q&A. A discussion about implementation and development partnerships will be included. January 2012 Two training sessions for stakeholders and public officials are anticipated. We will create a frequently asked questions document collaboratively with OPDC to assist “evangelists” for the 2025 Plan. March 2012 Document Production will completed no later than May 15, 2012


RELEVANT PROJECTS We have included project summaries for relevant recent projects. Many of our full reports are available on our website in PDF form (www.pfaffmann.com). If you would like to borrow hard copies we would be glad to provide them. • • • • •

Central Northside Plan Hill District Greenprint Lawrenceville Plan Homewood Polish Hill

REFERENCES Attached are our references for community planning projects. We encourage you to contact them for more information.

BUDGET Attached is a detailed budget based on the scope of services and our proposed approach. Our outside consultants (economic and transportation) are broken out separately. The P+A/SfSP collaboration is approximately a 50/50 split, not including administrative and intern hours which are about 5% of the total. We will detail this further if you require. We use a blended rate of $100/hour with some rates higher and some lower. We have found this to be a reasonably accurate way to estimate cost. Our consultants have included their travel and expenses in their fee. We have set up an allowance for our expenses, which would be primarily printing and plotting for the charrette and final report binders; we expect them to cost about $500 a set (we typically organize it into three parts: An executive summary (“Placemats”), a primary report binder, and a tabloid binder for the drawings. A CD is produced with low and high-resolution copies.

DELIVERABLES You can expect a complete set of deliverables in hard copy and electronic form. To reduce printing and environmental/paper costs we do try to limit our sets of final binders to six. We assume that community outreach flyers and agendas will be designed, printed and distributed by OPDC. We will provide graphic handouts in PDF for printing by you. • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Detailed Project “Road Map” project schedule Final Charrette Plan following NCI principles Project web page and flyer describing the process* Stakeholder master list* Meeting notes* Charrette photography* Charrette base drawings and 3D Models (as needed) Concept “Placemats” possibly organized by neighborhood Powerpoint presentations (3: intro, charrette, and final) Enabling documents (proposed code changes, etc.) Economic analysis and critique Training workbook Resource binder (collected data, GIS) * suggested for OPDC


We look forward to meeting with you and discussing our proposal in more detail. We are very excited at the opportunity to work with the Oakland community. You can expect a passionate and savvy team that will provide the support you need to build the 2025 vision for Oakland. If you need any additional information please do not hesitate to contact us. Sincerely,

for the Pfaffmann + Associates/Studio for Spatial Practice team Robert S. Pfaffmann, AIA, AICP Christine Brill, AIA Jon Kline Carl Bergamini, RA, AICP Jeff Slack, AICP


PLANNING FOR A COMPLEX NEIGHBORHOOD OF MULTIPLE COMMUNITIES

Melwood

Schenley Farms

North Oakland

University of Pittsburgh Carnegie Mellon UPMC

Carlow Civic Center

Oakland Square

Technology Center Fifth & Forbes

Schenley Park South Oakland


ORGANIZING THE COMMUNITY PLANNING PROCESS AROUND A MULTI-DAY DESIGN CHARRETTE

Base Data Research & Analysis

DESIGN CHARRETTE

Organization, Education, Vision

Alternative Concept Development

Preferred Plan Synthesis

Public Meeting #2 Public Meeting #1

Plan Development

Public Meeting #3 Public Open House

Intermediate Stakeholder Reviews Initial Stakeholder Reviews Primary Stakeholder Meetings

Final Public Meeting

Final Plan & Implementation Strategy


Oakland 2025 Vision Plan 24-Jun-11 Task

Fee Detail Sheet Pfaffmann/SfSP Budget (blend rate $100/hr)

hours

1.0 Research & Prep (August-October) 1.1 Project Assessment PM Team Meeting Process Road Map Charrette Schedule PM Follow Up subtotal

8 16 16 8 48

$ $ $ $ $

800 1,600 1,600 800 4,800

subtotal

40 40 24 104

$ $ $ $

4,000 4,000 2,400 10,400

8 $

800

1.2 Pre Charrette Research & Analysis Data Base Research Proj Objectives & Measures Pre Charrette Brief 1.3 Charrette Logistics Meeting Planning Mngmt subtotal 1.0 Research & Prep Subtotal

160

$

16,000

subtotal

24 8 24 56

$ $ $ $

2,400 800 2,400 5,600

subtotal

80 20 24 124

$ $ $ $

8,000 2,000 2,400 12,400

subtotal

40 24 30 94

$ $ $ $

4,000 2,400 3,000 9,400

subtotal

40 $ 40 $

4,000 4,000

subtotal

16 $

2,400

2.0 Charrette Month (November 2011) 2.1 Organization Education & Vision Primary Stakeholder Mtgs Developers Workshop Public Meeting #1 2.2 Alt Concepts Development Concepts Development Initial Stakeholder Reviews Public Meeting #2 2.3 Preferred Plan Synthesis Preferred Plan Synthesis Intermediate Stakeholder Reviews Public Open House 2.4 Plan Development Plan Development Refinement 2.5 Presentation

2.0 Charrette Subtotal

330

$

33,800

$ $ $ $ $ $

2,400 3,000 2,400 3,600 1,600 13,000

Economic Consultant (Todd Poole 4ward Planning; Assume 1 trip to PGH) Data Anaysis & Prep Charrette Particpation Summary of implementation economics Travel (Todd Poole one trip- Pittsburgh PM cover other mtgs) Economic Subtotal

$ $ $ $ $

7,000 6,000 5,000 1,000 19,000

Transportation Consultant (Fitzgerald & Haliday) Assume 2 trips to PGH Data Anaysis & Prep Charrette Particpation Summary of Transportation concepts & Implementation strategies Travel (two trips) Transportation Subtotal

$ $ $ $ $

4,000 5,000 4,500 1,500 15,000

GIS Demographic Data Files for Oakland (PNCIS) Gradic

$

1,000

Expenses Printing & Plotting for Meetings and Charrette (owner provides space and support services)

$

2,500

3.0 Plan Implementation (January 2012) Document Reviews & Revs Final Public Meeting Enabling Documents Document Production Education & Training

24 30 24 36 16 130

3.0 Plan Implementation Subtotal

Project Fee Total

620

100,300


P F A F F M A N N + A S S O C I AT E S Introduction Pfaffmann + Associates, founded in 1996, specializes in thoughtful, appropriate solutions to clients’ needs in the areas of architecture, urban and regional planning, preservation, and workplace design. The firm combines distinguished design with collaborative skills and the ability to lead multidisciplinary teams in order to mediate the complex social, economic and civic factors that are typically encountered in design and planning projects. A commitment to sustainability and sensitivity to natural and historic contexts distinguishes our work. At the same time, Pfaffmann + Associates consistently produces solutions that achieve design excellence within tight budgets. Awards and Staff Since its founding, the firm has consistently received recognition for its work, including two Silver Medals, the highest honor conferred by the American Institute of Architects, Pittsburgh Chapter and three Pennsylvania Historic Preservation Awards. The firm employs a diverse staff, including three AICP planners, whose skills include community planning, urban and regional design, historic preservation, LEED certification, site development, waterfront planning, building and zoning code compliance, project feasibility analysis, lighting and streetscape design, and technical systems integration. Urban and Regional Planning The heart of good planning is community participation and collaboration. Pfaffmann + Associates offers unique facilitation and leadership skills that help varied community interests reach agreement in ways that are sensitive to both political and economic realities. Planning Studies. From downtown development to neighborhood planning, Pfaffmann + Associates helps envision spaces to live, work and play for both public and private clients. Recent projects include community plans for Polish Hill (ongoing), the Central Northside, Lawrenceville and Lanark Street; the Strip District Produce Terminal study; Elm Street Neighborhood Planning for five Pittsburgh neighborhoods; and the Northside Development Planning Initiative. Project Feasibility Analysis. P+A emphasizes a sustainable approach to solving problems that combine the built environment and economic viability. Recent projects include the historic Garden Theatre Block; Farmers Market Planning for Pittsburgh’s Market Square; East End Citiparks market relocation; and the South Side Market House Feasibility Study. Environmental Design. From historic interpretation to waterfront access, Pfaffmann + Associates brings special expertise to planning parks, recreation corridors and other elements of the natural and urban environment. Recent projects include the Point State Park Master Plan; Friends of the Riverfront Access Points; and the Lawrenceville Riverfront Access Plan. Design Codes and Guidelines. P+A provides clear, appropriate and flexible guidelines for short- and long-term planning for zoning and building codes. Recent projects include Sewickley Business District Design Guidelines and Zoning Changes; lighting plans for Northside business districts; Vacant Upper Floors Study; and the City of Pittsburgh’s Urban Lighting Standards. Corridor Planning and Streetscape Design. Recognizing neighborhoods as key units in community development, Pfaffmann + Associates sees the potential in transit routes as important civic spaces and neighborhood centers. Recent projects include Broadway Avenue Streetscape Improvements in Stowe Township, the Bakery Row Vision Plan and the Oakland Western Portal Study. Historic Preservation Planning. P+A brings strong commitment to the reuse of historically significant buildings. Recent projects include the Oakland Civic Center Conservation Study; restoration of the terra cotta facade of the Allegheny Observatory; and historic structure reports for August Wilson’s childhood home and the Rachel Carson Homestead.


CARL BERGAMINI, RA, AICP Carl Bergamini actively leads many of the urban and regional design projects for Pfaffmann + Associates. He began his career at Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, where he helped develop the master plan for Virginia Point Park at the confluence of the Ohio and Big Sandy Rivers in West Virginia. Carl joined Pfaffmann + Associates in 2001 to further develop the firm’s skills in planning and feasibility studies. A brief hiatus in 2003 took him to the Chicago firm of Ross Barney + Jankowski to work on plans for the Chicago Riverfront. At Pfaffmann + Associates, Carl’s projects have included community master plans for numerous neighborhoods including Lawrenceville, the Central Northside, Fineview and currently Polish Hill. He has worked to develop market feasibility studies in East Liberty, the South Side and the Strip District and has also worked on gateway development proposals in Oakland and East Allegheny. He recently led the design of a new library in Bridgeville, and is currently working on the design and construction of a new plaza and streetscape improvements at Highmark’s Fifth Avenue Place building, and the new Gateway Station Plaza and subway station in Downtown Pittsburgh. Carl is passionate about community process and place-making, and believes that everyday ordinary acts of architecture and landscape design are key tools to help bring people together to effect positive change. An avid urban hiker and photographer, he is interested in how art, landscape and technology can be used as tools in this endeavor. Deeply committed to working in Pittsburgh, he is interested in making this unique city more livable and creative. EDUCATION Yale University School of Architecture, Masters of Architecture, 1998 University of Pennsylvania, Bachelor of Arts, Design of Environment, 1993 PROFESSIONAL REGISTRATION Architecture: Pennsylvania


JEFF SLACK, AICP Jeff Slack is an accomplished planner and creative designer distinguished by the ability to teach creatively. Jeff joined Pfaffmann + Associates in 2006 to manage the firm’s preservation planning projects. He regularly employs a comprehensive approach to planning and has successfully managed design guidelines and zoning modifications for the Borough of Sewickley, a comprehensive preservation assessment of the Garden Theatre Block, and a preservation plan and historic structure report for August Wilson’s Childhood Home. He is currently managing the second phase of the restoration of the Allegheny Observatory of the University of Pittsburgh. Prior to joining P+A, Jeff developed and implemented a reconnaissance survey of historic resources in Binghamton—the largest survey of its kind at that time in New York State. As a designer in Arlington, Virginia, he initiated and managed a public art program and also created a year-round juried community exhibition program. Upon moving back to Pittsburgh, Jeff immersed himself in the local art community and advised private and corporate clients at Concept Art Gallery with art selection and display. Jeff possesses extensive knowledge of Pittsburgh’s historic and cultural resources. He played a lead role in the conception and design of the National Building Museum’s 1992 Honor Exhibition, Making It Work: Pittsburgh Defines a City. His skills at translating information into creative formats for varied audiences can also be seen in the design of City of Magnificent Distances, an interactive historic preservation walking tour for the Library of Congress, and in Mapping Change, Charting the Future: A Cartographic History of Washington’s Urban Design, which he curated for the National Endowment for the Arts Design Access Program. Benjamin Forgey, architecture critic for The Washington Post praised the latter declaring, “This exhibition is incredibly rich in information. Plus it’s fun.” Jeff’s passion to share his knowledge of preservation planning can be seen in two impressive undergraduate courses he developed—the first preservation fieldwork course at the University of Pittsburgh and a pro bono course on the Hill District at Duquesne University. Jeff routinely challenges himself and engages the community outside of work. He has testified regularly before local review boards about planning issues and has served for three years on the board of Preservation Pittsburgh. EDUCATION / CERTIFICATIONS Cornell University, Master of Arts in Historic Preservation Planning, 2004 Westminster College, Bachelor of Arts in History, Minor in Secondary Education, 1987 Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission Cultural Resources Essentials Certificate, 2010 National Park Service, Historic Preservation Professional Qualifications Standards, CFR Part 61


P F A F F M A N N + A S S O C I AT E S Introduction Pfaffmann + Associates, founded in 1996, specializes in thoughtful, appropriate solutions to clients’ needs in the areas of architecture, urban and regional planning, preservation, and workplace design. The firm combines distinguished design with collaborative skills and the ability to lead multidisciplinary teams in order to mediate the complex social, economic and civic factors that are typically encountered in design and planning projects. A commitment to sustainability and sensitivity to natural and historic contexts distinguishes our work. At the same time, Pfaffmann + Associates consistently produces solutions that achieve design excellence within tight budgets. Awards and Staff Since its founding, the firm has consistently received recognition for its work, including two Silver Medals, the highest honor conferred by the American Institute of Architects, Pittsburgh Chapter and three Pennsylvania Historic Preservation Awards. The firm employs a diverse staff, including three AICP planners, whose skills include community planning, urban and regional design, historic preservation, LEED certification, site development, waterfront planning, building and zoning code compliance, project feasibility analysis, lighting and streetscape design, and technical systems integration. Urban and Regional Planning The heart of good planning is community participation and collaboration. Pfaffmann + Associates offers unique facilitation and leadership skills that help varied community interests reach agreement in ways that are sensitive to both political and economic realities. Planning Studies. From downtown development to neighborhood planning, Pfaffmann + Associates helps envision spaces to live, work and play for both public and private clients. Recent projects include community plans for Polish Hill (ongoing), the Central Northside, Lawrenceville and Lanark Street; the Strip District Produce Terminal study; Elm Street Neighborhood Planning for five Pittsburgh neighborhoods; and the Northside Development Planning Initiative. Project Feasibility Analysis. P+A emphasizes a sustainable approach to solving problems that combine the built environment and economic viability. Recent projects include the historic Garden Theatre Block; Farmers Market Planning for Pittsburgh’s Market Square; East End Citiparks market relocation; and the South Side Market House Feasibility Study. Environmental Design. From historic interpretation to waterfront access, Pfaffmann + Associates brings special expertise to planning parks, recreation corridors and other elements of the natural and urban environment. Recent projects include the Point State Park Master Plan; Friends of the Riverfront Access Points; and the Lawrenceville Riverfront Access Plan. Design Codes and Guidelines. P+A provides clear, appropriate and flexible guidelines for short- and long-term planning for zoning and building codes. Recent projects include Sewickley Business District Design Guidelines and Zoning Changes; lighting plans for Northside business districts; Vacant Upper Floors Study; and the City of Pittsburgh’s Urban Lighting Standards. Corridor Planning and Streetscape Design. Recognizing neighborhoods as key units in community development, Pfaffmann + Associates sees the potential in transit routes as important civic spaces and neighborhood centers. Recent projects include Broadway Avenue Streetscape Improvements in Stowe Township, the Bakery Row Vision Plan and the Oakland Western Portal Study. Historic Preservation Planning. P+A brings strong commitment to the reuse of historically significant buildings. Recent projects include the Oakland Civic Center Conservation Study; restoration of the terra cotta facade of the Allegheny Observatory; and historic structure reports for August Wilson’s childhood home and the Rachel Carson Homestead.


STRIP MARKET

EAST LIBERTY MARKETHOUSE

GATEWAY STATION

SMITHFIELD/LIBERTY

STRIP DISTRICT PORTALS

MILLVALE

GATEWAY STATION

NORTHSIDE LIGHTING

RIVERLOFTS

GARDEN BLOCK

HIGHLAND AVENUE BRIDGE

PROTOTYPE INFILL HOUSING

LAWRENCEVILLE

BAKERY ROW

HIGHLAND AVE. BRIDGE PORTAL

POINT STATE PARK 31ST BRIDGE

Visions Creating place at a wide range of scales and circumstances gives us the capacity to develop ideas that challenge conventional thinking. Our planning, urban design and lighting work is a reямВection of our ability to develop ideas that intepret the goals and values of our clients in new ways.

PFAFFMANN+ASSOCIATES


ROBERT S. PFAFFMANN, AIA, AICP, Principal Rob Pfaffmann’s comprehensive planning and design expertise is intertwined with Pittsburgh’s historic fabric, rivers and technological leadership. It is not uncommon for his work to integrate and interpret seemingly disparate issues of history and technology. Key visioning studies include Strip District Entry Portals, the Oakland Western Gateway Study, Bakery Row Vision Plan, Millvale Gateway and Riverfront Plan, and a unique vision for floating, live-work River Lofts. Urban design and identity-creation projects include City of Pittsburgh Lighting Standards; Northside Business Lighting; Mount Washington Stair Tower; Elm Street Planning; and community master plans for numerous Pittsburgh-area neighborhoods, including Lawrenceville, Central Northside, and currently for Polish Hill. Rob’s dual work expertise in architecture and planning also includes building and zoning codes, design guidelines and transportation infrastructure projects. For over 25 years he has led a wide range of award-winning architecture, preservation and urban design projects. After graduating from Syracuse University, Rob worked for the University Planning Office, where he met Peter Bohlin. At Bohlin Cywinski Jackson in Pittsburgh, Rob led key urban projects, including Carnegie Mellon’s Software Engineering Institute, The Intelligent Workplace, Washington's Landing and the Heinz History Center. After founding Pfaffmann + Associates in 1996 to focus on Pittsburgh more fully, Rob continued his design leadership with award-winning projects like the Ft. Duquesne & Sixth Garage, ALCOA & NOVA Corporate Centers, Meadowcroft Rockshelter and the Homewood and Hill District Branches of the Carnegie Library. Recent green-design projects include the Carnegie Mellon Café, Powdermill Nature Reserve, The Hill Library and East Liberty “Prototype Houses.” EDUCATION / CERTIFICATIONS Syracuse University, Bachelor of Architecture, 1979 National Park Service, Historic Preservation Professional Qualifications Standards, CFR Part 61 PROFESSIONAL REGISTRATION Architecture: Pennsylvania, New York Planning: American Planning Association AICP certified. LEADERSHIP & BOARDS Rachel Carson Homestead, Reuse the Igloo!, Preservation Pittsburgh, Preservation Pennsylvania, August Wilson Home, Friends of the Riverfronts, AIA Pittsburgh, Vacant Upper Floors Loan Fund, August Wilson Center Building Committee, Community Design Center Board. TEACHING & LECTURES Carnegie Mellon Systems Integration Studios, Adjunct Professor; Old Buildings in a New Economy for PHMC; Brownfields/Blue Edges; The Pittsburgh Palette for APA; A Civic Renewal, for DOCOMOMO Rotterdam

History

Technology

Context

Environment


studio for spatial practice

Firm Profile

Studio for Spatial Practice is an innovative, award-winning Pittsburgh-based design and planning firm specializing in projects that transform the public realm through architecture, urban design, landscape, art and research. We have provided quality service to public, non-profit and private sector clients in the Pittsburgh region since 2008. We create contemporary designs that respond to local context, history, ecology, market reality and public desire. Working collaboratively with clients and communities, our unique process utilizes graphic communication to understand and analyze complex urban situations, explore possible scenarios, propose creative design solutions, and ultimately build clear design narratives that communicate with broad audiences. We also help clients and community groups identify partners and resources that will enable projects to move forward. In all of our work, we view community engagement, capacity-building and effective communication as integral parts of the place-making process. We utilize a range of analysis and visualization tools from GIS data mapping to digital and physical 3-dimensional models and renderings in order to make the design decision making process as clear as possible for our clients. For public projects our process is designed to be as transparent as possible, enabling a diverse range of community partners to weigh options, build consensus and take leadership in creating a vision for the future. Trained in architecture, landscape architecture and fine art, principals Christine Brill and Jonathan Kline offer a unique trans-disciplinary approach, integrating urban design and community planning, architecture and landscape, communication design and fine art. Studio for Spatial Practice’s work ranges from developing transportation planning resources, to planning new and existing neighborhoods, to designing streetscape interventions, new urban public spaces and parks. We also have experience in building renovations, master planning, exhibit design, infrastructure design and new building construction. Our work has won numerous awards and has been exhibited internationally. Prior to founding Studio for Spatial Practice, principals Brill and Kline also worked on neighborhood development and building projects throughout Pittsburgh and across the country with other Pittsburgh based practices. We are currently working on two transit-oriented development plans for Pittsburgh. The Bridging the Busway project will leverage an existing rapid transit stop as a generator for neighborhood revitalization in the distressed Pittsburgh community of Homewood. We are also working in nearby East Liberty on a plan to maximize transit-oriented development potential through the creation of a Transit Reinvestment District. SfSP recently completed a Ten-Year Housing Strategy for the Mount Washington Community Development Corporation. Our Hill District Greenprint project with Hood Design focused on reimagining the role of Landscape in Pittsburgh’s Hill District and was exhibited in the 2010 Venice Biennale Architettura. A majority woman-owned business, Studio for Spatial Practice is a WBE-designated firm in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.


studio for spatial practice

Christine Brill, AIA

Christine Brill is a founding Principal of Studio for Spatial Practice, a Pittsburgh-based firm specializing in architecture and urban design projects. As a design professional, educator and community activist, she views public participation and context-based research as integral parts of the place-making process. Christine studied architecture at Carnegie Mellon University and at ITESM in Querétaro, México. She also completed a Master of Landscape Architecture at the Pennsylvania State University, focusing on Community and Urban Design. Prior to founding her own firm, Brill worked at Pfaffmann + Associates, in Pittsburgh, where she worked on a wide range of projects including: improvements to riverfront trails and access point, neighborhood master-planning, building renovations, exhibit and furniture design, as well as new office construction. Christine also worked at Perkins Eastman Architects, and interned with Skidmore Owings & Merrill and Kliment & Halsband Architects in New York City, her hometown. Christine has been involved in numerous community-serving activities in Pittsburgh. An active participant of the Lawrenceville Tree Tender group, she is currently co-designing a Tree Park for the neighborhood’s 10th Ward. In 2000, she cofounded the GroundZero Action Network, an arts and planning collective in Pittsburgh that facilitated the development of projects that foster creativity, urban culture and democracy. In addition to professional practice, Christine is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Architecture where she has taught 1st- and 3rd-year architecture students. As a professor, she emphasizes the creative integration of landscape and architecture design. While at Penn State, Christine taught 2nd- and 3rd-year landscape architecture design studios. Christine also has acted as project manager for urban design research work at Carnegie Mellon’s Remaking Cities Institute.

Selected Studio fSP Projects/Clients: Homewood and North Point Breeze: a Transit-Oriented Planning Study; Pittsburgh, PA, Team Lead; For: Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh East Liberty Transit Reinvestment District Planning Study; Pittsburgh, PA, with GSP; For: City of Pittsburgh Department of City Planning MWCDC’s Ten-Year Housing Plan for Mount Washington and Duquesne Heights; Pittsburgh, PA with Urban Partners; For: Mount Washington Community Development Corporation Hill District Greenprint; Pittsburgh, PA; Pittsburgh, with Hood Design & ARUP; For: Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy & Find the Rivers! Lower Lawrenceville Planning Study; Pittsburgh, PA; For: Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh West Pittsburgh Plan: An 8-Neighborhood Study, Pittsburgh, PA, with Jackson/Clark Partners; For: City of Pittsburgh Weed & Seed Program Education: Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA; Master of Landscape Architecture, focus in Community & Urban Design, 2007 Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA; Bachelor of Architecture, with honors, 1999 ITESM, Querétaro, México; Study Abroad, 1998


studio for spatial practice

Christine Brill, AIA

Fellowships: Institute for the Arts & Humanities Graduate Student Summer Residency, State College, PA, 2006, Awarded by The Pennsylvania State University to support focused thesis research Graduate Fellowship, State College, PA, 2005, Awarded by The Pennsylvania State University, 2005 to support graduate-level study in Landscape Architecture Professional Registration: Architect, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Professional Experience: Studio for Spatial Practice, 2007 to Present, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Independent Consulting for the Community Design Center of Pittsburgh Pfaffmann + Associates PC, 2000 - 2005, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Perkins Eastman Architects, 1998 - 2000, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Skidmore Owings & Merrill, summer 1995 &1996, New York, New York Kliment & Halsband Architects, 1993 -1994, New York, New York Academic Appointments: Carnegie Mellon University, Adjunct Assistant Professor, 2007 to Present Carnegie Mellon University, Research Associate, Remaking Cities Institute, 2009 to present The Pennsylvania State University, Design Studio Instructor, 2006-2007 Carnegie Mellon University/Carnegie Museum, Architecture Camp Instructor, 2005 Carnegie Mellon University, Architecture for Kids Instructor, 1999-2002 Professional Affiliations: American Institute of Architects Member, Contextual Design Advisory Board, City of Pittsburgh Department of City Planning Member, Association for Community Design Certified Tree Tender for the City of Pittsburgh Shade Tree Commission Exhibitions: Workshopping: An American Model of Architectural Practice, 2010, U.S. Pavilion for La Biennale di Venezia, Biennale Architettura 2010, Venice Italy, curated by Michael Rooks & Jonathan D. Solomon Groundworks: Environmental Collaboration in Contemporary Art, 2004, Regina Gouger Miller Gallery, Pittsburgh, PA, group exhibition, curated by Grant Kester Knotweed at the Skinnybuilding, 2004, Pittsburgh, PA. Installation Commissions: Looking for Braddock’s Fields, Braddock, PA, 2004. A month-long artist residency in an urban laboratory, working with community leaders and residents An Ecological History of Pittsburgh, Outdoor Sculpture – Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Dinomite Days, 2003. National City Bank Plaza, Pittsburgh, PA, sponsored by National City Bank Selected Presentations: Looking for Braddock’s Fields. Presentation at the Association for Community Design Conference. July 2006, Los Angeles, CA Looking for Braddock’s Fields. Groundworks Artists’ Symposium: Environmental Collaboration in Contemporary Art. 2005, Pittsburgh, PA


studio for spatial practice

Jonathan Kline

Jonathan Kline is a founding Principal of Studio for Spatial Practice, a Pittsburgh-based firm specializing in architecture and urban design projects. As a design professional, educator, artist and community activist, he views public participation, artistic innovation and context-based research as integral parts of the placemaking process. Jonathan studied architecture at Carnegie Mellon University and at the EPFL in Lausanne, Switzerland. He also completed a Master of Fine Arts at the Pennsylvania State University, focusing on Drawing and Painting. Prior to founding his own firm, Kline worked at Urban Design Associates, and as an independent urban design consultant in Pittsburgh. At UDA he worked on a wide range of projects including neighborhood and HOPE VI master-planning in Pittsburgh, Minneapolis, Charlotte, St Louis, Asheville, and Bussy St. Georges, France, as well as urban design and park plans for Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and New York City. In addition to practice Jonathan has taught graduate and undergraduate studios and electives in community and urban design as an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Architecture since 2002. His studio courses focus on participatory community design, urban systems and the creation of urban design guidelines with an emphasis on sustainable urbanism. Jonathan is also currently a Research Fellow with Carnegie Mellon’s Remaking Cities Institute, working on projects to revitalize the Pittsburgh region. In 2004 he was an Associate Fellow at the STUDIO for Creative Inquiry acting as Planning Director for 3 Rivers 2nd Nature, an artist-led five year interdisciplinary research project focused on measuring and advocating for the health of the rivers and streams of Allegheny County. Jonathan also explores his interest in contemporary space and culture as a practicing artist using paintings, installations and community based projects. His work has been exhibited in Pennsylvania and New York. In 2000, he cofounded the GroundZero Action Network (GZAN), an arts and planning collective in Pittsburgh that facilitated the development of projects that foster creativity, urban culture and democracy.

Selected Studio fSP Projects/Clients: Homewood and North Point Breeze: a Transit-Oriented Planning Study; Pittsburgh, PA, Team Lead; For: Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh East Liberty Transit Reinvestment District Planning Study; Pittsburgh, PA, with GSP; For: City of Pittsburgh Department of City Planning MWCDC’s Ten-Year Housing Plan for Mount Washington and Duquesne Heights; Pittsburgh, PA with Urban Partners; For: Mount Washington Community Development Corporation Hill District Greenprint; Pittsburgh, PA; Pittsburgh, with Hood Design & ARUP; For: Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy & Find the Rivers! Lower Lawrenceville Planning Study; Pittsburgh, PA; For: Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh West Pittsburgh Plan: An 8-Neighborhood Study, Pittsburgh, PA, with Jackson/Clark Partners; For: City of Pittsburgh Weed & Seed Program Education: Pennsylvania State University, State College, PA; Master of Fine Arts in Painting and Drawing, 2007 Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA; Bachelor of Architecture, with honors, 1998 EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland; Study Abroad, 1996 -1997


studio for spatial practice

Jonathan Kline

Fellowships: Research Fellow, Remaking Cities Institute, Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh PA 2007-2008, Awarded for research in urban design Graduate Fellowship, State College, PA, 2005, Awarded by The Pennsylvania State University, 2005 to support graduate-level study in visual arts Associate Research Fellow, STUDIO for Creative Inquiry, Pittsburgh PA 2007-2008, Awarded for research with 3 Rivers 2nd Nature in planning and landscape ecology Professional Experience: Studio for Spatial Practice, 2007 to Present, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Independent Consultant, 2002 - 2007, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Urban Design Associates, 1998 - 2002, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Academic Appointments: Carnegie Mellon University, Adjunct Assistant Professor, 2002 to Present The Pennsylvania State University, Drawing Instructor, 2006 - 2007 Professional Affiliations: Member, Planning and Design Committee, Riverlife Member, Association for Community Design Founding Member, Lawrenceville Stakeholders Selected Exhibitions: Workshopping: An American Model of Architectural Practice, 2010, U.S. Pavilion for La Biennale di Venezia, Biennale Architettura 2010, Venice Italy, curated by Michael Rooks & Jonathan D. Solomon Displacement, 2007, chashama Gallery, New York, NY, group exhibition, curated by John Bowman Spaces of the Multitude, 2007, Zoller Gallery, University Park, PA, solo exhibition Equipoise: Couples Exhibition, 2006, Artists Upstairs Gallery, Pittsburgh, PA, group exhibition, curated by Erin O’Neil Groundworks: Environmental Collaboration in Contemporary Art, 2004, Regina Gouger Miller Gallery, Pittsburgh, PA, group exhibition, curated by Grant Kester Commissions: Looking for Braddock’s Fields, Braddock, PA, 2004. A month-long artist residency in an urban laboratory, working with community leaders and residents An Ecological History of Pittsburgh, Outdoor Sculpture – Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Dinomite Days, 2003. National City Bank Plaza, Pittsburgh, PA, sponsored by National City Bank Selected Presentations: Looking for Braddock’s Fields. Presentation at the Association for Community Design Conference. July 2006, Los Angeles, CA The Urban Laboratory. Presentation with Anne-Marie Lubenau at the Association for Community Design Annual Conference, June 5 - 7, 2006, Los Angeles, CA Looking for Braddock’s Fields. Groundworks Artists’ Symposium: Environmental Collaboration in Contemporary Art. 2005, Pittsburgh, PA


REFERENCES Anne-Marie Lubenau Former President and CEO Community Design Center of Pittsburgh 412.352.5251 Anne Marie has overseen many of our projects including the Central Northside Plan Craig Dunham* The Rubinoff Company 30 Isabella Street, 2nd Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 412.231.1000 *Formerly Associate Vice President, Carnegie Museums & CDCP Board Member Rob Stephany, Executive Director The Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh 200 Ross Street Pittsburgh, PA 15219-2016 412.255.6566 Formerly oversaw our work for Bakery Row Vision Plan for East Liberty Development and Shadyside Action Coalition Tom Hardy Palo Alto Partners 600 Waterfront Drive Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.874.7351 Project Manager for Central Northside Civic Council Terry Doloughty, President Polish Hill Civic Association 3060 Brereton Street Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412.310.8190 President for Polish Hill Civic Association

PFAFFMANN + ASSOCIATES


CLIENT QUOTES & REVIEWS Pfaffmann + Associates’ public participation process for the Hill District Library was very sensitive to context, site and neighborhood concerns. This helped us get the results we wanted for the facility, respond to community needs and establish civic ownership of the library. One user exclaimed, “I feel like I helped to design this!” —Jane Dayton, former Assistant Director, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

A level of inquiry that rarely happens and is even more rarely implemented. Understanding the historical nature to that level of detail is admirable. Even given the limited information we were provided, it was a joy to admire. By being so thorough and pragmatic, they have created a very sustainable strategy by allowing this wonderful old campus to be maintained. It is a wonderful celebration of the art of building and construction craftsmanship. —AIA Jury comments on Oakland Civic Center Conservation Study

The work of Pfaffmann + Associates always impresses me with its quality of design from concept to detailing, the commitment to patiently realizing memorable projects in complex situations, and its achievement of balance between program, sustainability and design— whether it be new buildings or planning projects. —Craig Dunham, The Rubinoff Company

Pfaffmann + Associates makes creative use of green technology while addressing rigorous program demands. They have proven themselves good listeners with a shared passion for preservation and history. —Betty Arenth, Senior Vice President, Senator John Heinz History Center

A piece of art in the city. Sculptural. This project shows that parking garages have a legitimate form of their own and don't have to necessarily look like or imitate other building types. This structure sets up its own identity on the streetscape. The project is expedient— but very, very effective. —AIA Jury comments on Fort Duquesne & Sixth Parking Garage Renovation

The challenges associated with designing a public facility at the Meadowcroft Rockshelter were many—not the least of which were a steeply-sloped site halfway up a rock cliff; a sensitive and highly significant prehistoric archaeological site; and the desire to minimally impact the biologically diverse area that had changed little since the site was first used by prehistoric people. Balance was the key to success. Pfaffmann + Associates had a firm grasp on this from the start and helped us achieve what we wanted. —Dave Scofield, Director, Meadowcroft Rock Shelter

PFAFFMANN + ASSOCIATES


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Partial recommendations from a neighborhood working group

Housing opportunity areas

Hillside housing prototypes

Transportation connections

Community meetings, working groups, charrettes

Working closely with community stakeholders through a series of charrettes, Pfaffmann + Associates developed a comprehensive community master plan for the Central Northside that respected and anticipated the neighborhood's diverse demographics and geography. With significant input from neighborhood working groups, numerous community meetings and GIS mapping, P+A developed recommendations to improve opportunities for yourth, arts and culture; green transportation; streetscape and safety issues; lighting strategies; street grid and traffic concerns; housing opportunities, economic development; and a vison for the neighborhood's historic Garden Theatre Block.

PFAFFMANN + ASSOCIATES


LAWRENCEVILLE COMMUNITY PLAN

Pfaffmann + Associates worked with the Lawrenceville Corporation, Lawrenceville United and the Lawrenceville Stakeholders to develop a comprehensive neighborhood community plan. An extemsive series of community meetings was conducted to help identify general guidelines for neighborhood improvements and specific areas within the larger neighborhood for more detailed design study and recommendations. The resulting planning document was then used to help leverage funds for specific projects.

PFAFFMANN + ASSOCIATES

RELEVANT EXPERIENCE


POLISH HILL COMMUNITY PLAN

Set for completion in September 2011, the Polish Hill Community Plan is a comprehensive master plan that focuses on ecology, the arts and community building. After a series of micro-events to discuss the future of the neighborhood, the project included a day-long workshop organized around transportation, open space and housing, and social space. Working with a highly motivated and innovative steering committee, Pfaffmann + Associates developed strategies to support housing in the neighborhood, improve Polish Hillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gateways, and bridge some of the gaps that currently exist within the community by preserving culture and connecting the neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s generations.

PFAFFMANN + ASSOCIATES


studio for spatial practice

Framework

Lower Lawrenceville Planning Study U R B A N D E S IG N & C O M M U N IT Y P L A N N IN G

Expand the riverfront park and connect to the city trail system Expand and consolidate the residential neighborhood below Butler St.

Create new street connections to ease traffic and encourage development

Redevelop the Arsenal Terminal with a mix of uses to connect Central and Lower Lawrenceville

Create public parking to support the growth of the retail district Strengthen the Butler business district through the addition of new businesses, buildings and streetscape improvements

Reinforce riverfront connections on key streets

Redevelop Doughboy Square with a mix of uses

Team: Studio for Spatial Practice Client: Urban Redevelopment Authority of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh PA 2008 Studio fSP led a community planning process for the Lower Lawrenceville neighborhood of Pittsburgh. The plan is focused on guiding the revitalization of the existing mixed-use retail corridor through a combination of development guidelines, infrastructure recommendations and streetscape and open space improvements. The project also explored reconnecting the neighborhood to the Allegheny river. For the project Studio fSP led a public process to analyze, explore options and make recommendations for the district. Since the planning was done, new businesses have continued to open in the district, plans are underway for new mixed-use development at Doughboy Square, a small park space has been constructed, and recommendations from the plan have been incorporated into long term policy documents for the future of the Allegheny Riverfront.


studio for spatial practice

Hill District Greenprint U R B A N D E S IG N & L A N D S C A P E A R C H IT E C T U R E

Woods

Village

Projects

Team: Hood Design, Studio for Spatial Practice & Arup Client: Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy & Find the Rivers!

Sugartop Watergarden and Overlook

Pittsburgh PA 2009-10 Herron Avenue Run

Addison Terrace Gardens and Trails

Coal Seam Trail (CS) Coal Seam Park and Stairs

Memory Lane Overlook Village Street Conveyance and Public Space Cliffside Park

Coal Seam Park and Stairs

Martin Luther King Field and Wetlands

The Hill District Greenprint is both a landscape based urban design framework and a set of specific landscape interventions for Pittsburgh’s Hill District. At the neighborhood scale the Greenprint reimagines the Hill as a village surrounded by woods as means of both reconnecting the neighborhood to its ecological context, and of repositioning the community after severe disinvestment and depopulation. The project proposes a series of public space interventions to organize and beautify the neighborhood’s open space by reinforcing pedestrian connections, creating new plazas, gardens and trails, and addressing stormwater management issues. The project is intended to strengthen the Hill’s relationship to the larger social and ecological context repositioning it for the 21st Century. The Parks Conservancy is currently working to move forward key landscape projects from the plan, and the Greenprint is being incorporated in the Hill District Master Plan.


studio for spatial practice

Bridging the Busway U R B A N D E S IG N & C O M M U N IT Y P L A N N IN G

Homeowners vs. Vacant Units

Open Space Context & Connectivity

Conceptual Design of New Mixed-Use

Design Workshop using 3-D Model

Team: Studio for Spatial Practice, Urban Partners,

Emerging Framework

Evolve, Jackson/Clark Partners, Cosmos Technologies Housing Stabilization Efforts

Client: Pittsburgh Urban Redevelopment Authority Pittsburgh PA 2010-11 (ongoing)

New Mixed use on Homewood

Faison & New Housing

Busway Edge Trail

New Mixed Use & Housing

Bridging the Busway is a strategic development plan for the Homewood and Point Breeze North neighborhoods of Pittsburgh. The plan recommends using transitoriented development as a tool for stabilizing and reinvigorating Homewood and rebuilding the market in the community by strengthening its connections to the more stable neighborhoods to the south. Underway now, the design process has employed a series of focus groups, design workshops and larger public meetings to develop and test both strategic planning recommendations for the larger community, and specific design recommendations for key development sites. The process has emphasized leveraging key existing physical, cultural and institutional assets in Homewood as a means to reestablish the neighborhood as destination and a residential community of choice.


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About 4ward Planning LLC Economic & Real Estate Analysis for Sustainable Land Use Outcomes Conventional land use planning has often emphasized the economic benefits of prospective development projects at the expense of the host communities’ social, environmental and fiscal interests. While development projects may, ultimately, prove financially profitable to their sponsors, there is less certainty regarding the project’s impacts on local housing markets, air and water quality, employment markets, municipal operating and capital budgets and access to basic necessities (primary medical services, childcare and full-service grocery stores). 4ward Planning was established to assist local governments and developers achieve sustainable development outcomes through responsible, future-based planning. Our approach, founded in socioeconomic analysis, seeks the optimum development or redevelopment program based on best case outcomes within the social, environmental, fiscal and economic systems (the “4” in 4ward Planning) of a host community and its surrounding area. While we incorporate conventional economic and market analysis techniques within our assignments, we go a step further to examine the variables often overlooked by traditional approaches to market evaluation. Our added value to our clients is in identifying critical factors and issues (e.g., ratio of median income to median home prices and rental rates; licensed childcare facilities per 1000 workers, etc.) that, if left unaddressed or minimized, could cause longer term threats to the vibrancy of local and regional markets. 4ward Planning looks ahead to improve today's land-use investment decisions. We provide services to the public, private and non-profit sectors and focus in the following practice areas:

Development Advisory Services Project Sustainability Analysis Greyfield Redevelopment Analysis Park & Trail Economic Analysis Economic & Fiscal Impact Analysis

4WARD PLANNING LLC Economic & Real Estate Analysis for Sustainable Land Use Outcomes™ NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA PITTSBURGH ATLANTA www.LandUseImpacts.com


CANAL DISTRICT MASTER PLAN Jeffersonville, IN PROJECT TYPE: Master Planning Services CLIENT: Cooper Carry SERVICES: Demographic, Real Estate, and Fiscal Impact Analysis 4ward Planning is working in support of a larger master planning team led by Cooper Carry Architecture and Urban Design to develop a master plan for a 180-acre land parcel in Jeffersonville, Indiana (across the Ohio River from Lousiville, Kentucky). The city of Jeffersonville is in the process of developing a man-made canal to assist with stormwater management. This effort is the genesis for creating a master plan for a new, mixed-use residential, retail, and entertainment district. 4ward Planning is providing a demographic, real estate, and fiscal impact analysis in support of this effort.

4WARD PLANNING LLC Economic & Real Estate Analysis for Sustainable Land Use Outcomesâ&#x201E;˘ NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA PITTSBURGH ATLANTA www.LandUseImpacts.com


HEIDELBERG, CARNEGIE AND SCOTT TOWNSHIP COMPREHENSIVE PLAN Pittsburgh Metro, PA PROJECT TYPE: Comprehensive Plan CLIENT: Heidelberg, Carnegie and Scott Township SERVICES: Market Analysis, Economic Development Advisory Serving on a team with Pashek Associates, 4ward Planning is currently engaged by these three municipalities to provide demographic and market analysis services in support of a multi-municipal comprehensive plan. Other services provided include a housing analysis and economic development advisory assistance. After a significant public outreach effort, 4ward Planning will compile a series of strategies to improve the economic outlook for the area and attract new businesses compatible with the local labor force. This work, along with strategies devised by other team members, will provide the three municipalities with an implementable plan for future growth and an updated zoning ordinance as well.

4WARD PLANNING LLC Economic & Real Estate Analysis for Sustainable Land Use Outcomesâ&#x201E;˘ NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA PITTSBURGH ATLANTA www.LandUseImpacts.com


HUNTING PARK WEST INDUSTRIAL AREA STUDY Philadelphia, PA PROJECT TYPE: Redevelopment Strategy CLIENT: Philadelphia City Planning Commission SERVICES: Market Analysis, Fiscal Impact Analysis, Feasibility Analysis 4ward Planning served as a sub-consultant to Wallace, Roberts and Todd to provide socio-economic, real estate and financial analysis in support of sustainably repositioning an approximate 400 acre former industrial area in north Philadelphia. Tasks carried out in support of this effort included socio-economic analysis, real estate market analysis covering residential and commercial uses, a highest and best use analysis of the former Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute building and a fiscal impact study, pertaining to proposed uses.

4WARD PLANNING LLC Economic & Real Estate Analysis for Sustainable Land Use Outcomesâ&#x201E;˘ NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA PITTSBURGH ATLANTA www.LandUseImpacts.com


PITTSBURGH WEST BUSWAY TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT PLAN Pittsburgh, PA PROJECT TYPE: Transit-Oriented Development Planning CLIENT: Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission SERVICES: Market Analysis 4ward Planning, serving as a sub-consultant to URS, Inc., performed a market analysis along the West Busway bus rapid transit (BRT) line in support of determining transit-oriented development opportunities at various stops. Analysis of local and regional socio-economic trends, real estate market metrics and interviews with area real estate professionals underpinned the study.

4WARD PLANNING LLC Economic & Real Estate Analysis for Sustainable Land Use Outcomesâ&#x201E;˘ NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA PITTSBURGH ATLANTA www.LandUseImpacts.com


EDUCATION BA, Economics BA, Environmental Studies Certificate, Chinese Studies University of Pittsburgh PAPERS Large Farms and Small Businesses: The difficult path toward development in rural China. University of Pittsburgh, 2009, produced in cooperation with Fudan University, and Lexia International, Shanghai, China.

Adam Nelson â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Analyst Adam Nelson is an analyst for 4ward Planning. He is responsible for collecting and synthesizing demographic, industrial, real estate, and other data for a variety of land use projects. Adam is also responsible for designing new programs and analytical methods to estimate carbon dioxide emissions and other environmental factors related to sustainable development. Prior to joining 4ward Planning, Adam received a Bachelor of Philosophy Honors Degree from the University of Pittsburgh, as well as dual degrees in Economics and Environmental Studies. In addition, Adam completed an undergraduate thesis on the economics of land trading in rural China, under guidance from Dr. Dong Guoli, professor of sociology at Shanghai University and visiting professor at Harvard University. In 2009, Adam received a grant from a Pittsburgh foundation and began a non-profit program called Obscure Games Pittsburgh, which organizes weekly pick-up games for adults. Obscure Games also creates and promotes special game events, including the upcoming Steel City Games Fest, a three-day festival of games planned for August 2010. As the Director of Obscure Games Pittsburgh, Adam is responsible for managing the group's website, www.obscuregamespgh.com, organizing and promoting events, writing press releases and working with media, as well as creating new games. In the summer of 2008, Adam worked with the production company RoadTrip Nation to produce a documentary film chronicling a journey made from Philadelphia, PA, to Atlanta, GA, on bicycle. The documentary was featured on PBS television and has become part of RoadTrip Nation's Indie Roadtrip series, available online at http://roadtripnation.com/roadtrips/media.php?roadtrip_id=210

APPLICABLE PROJECT EXPERIENCE Western Edge Redevelopment Area Hoboken, NJ CLIENT: City of Hoboken 4ward Planning is in the process of assisting the City of Hoboken with evaluating the market feasibility and associated fiscal and facility needs impacts of its Western Edge Redevelopment Planning Area. After touring the study area, 4ward Planning will perform a background socioeconomic, and labor and industry trends analysis within and outside of the City of Hoboken. 4ward Planning will profile residential, retail, and office/flex real estate trends within Hoboken and the northern New Jersey market, and extrapolation the percentage of this unmet demand that could potentially be captured within the Western Edge Redevelopment Area. The team will create an Excel based land-use buildout model to examine alternative buildout scenarios for the Western Edge Redevelopment Area. 4ward Planning will then conduct fiscal impact analysis use and impact model to evaluate the fiscal impacts and public facility needs associated with each build-out scenario.

4WARD PLANNING LLC

ECONOMIC AND REAL ESTATE ANALYSIS FOR SUSTAINABLE LAND USE OUTCOMES


Franklin County Comprehensive Plan Franklin County, PA CLIENT: Franklin County Planning Commission As part of a team that includes Environmental Planning & Design and Parsons Brinckerhoff, 4ward Planning is currently engaged by Franklin County to complete a comprehensive plan for this rural county in south central Pennsylvania. Services will include a thorough demographic analysis, a study of housing trends in the area, and an economic analysis of the leading industries in the county. This analysis will identify the key industrial, agricultural, commercial, and retail-based land activity that contributes to the local economy. Underutilized industrial and commercial areas will be identified and specific new uses will be proposed. A fiscal impact model will also be developed to understand the impact of various land use scenarios and will enable the County and the planning sub-regions to better â&#x20AC;&#x153;balanceâ&#x20AC;? the type, quantity and location of future development. Garwood Transit-Oriented Development Study Garwood, NJ CLIENT: NJ Transit 4ward Planning is currently serving as a sub-consultant to Looney Ricks Kiss to provide market analysis and fiscal impact analysis services for an underperforming NJ Transit rail stop location. Goals of the study are to determine those uses and strategies that will best help to revitalize the immediate area surrounding the station. A collaborative revitalization plan will serve as a roadmap to develop future uses and potential station upgrades. Pittsburgh West Busway Transit-Oriented Development Plan Pittsburgh, PA CLIENT: Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission 4ward Planning, serving as a sub-consultant to URS, Inc., performed a market analysis along the West Busway bus rapid transit (BRT) line in support of determining transit-oriented development opportunities at various stops. Analysis of local and regional socio-economic trends, real estate market metrics and interviews with area real estate professionals underpinned the study. Hunting Park West Industrial Area Study Philadelphia, PA CLIENT: The Philadelphia City Planning Commission 4ward Planning completed a study providing socio-economic, real estate and financial analysis in support of sustainably repositioning an approximate 400-acre former industrial area in north Philadelphia. Tasks carried out in support of this effort included socio-economic analysis, real estate market analysis covering residential and commercial uses, a highest and best use analysis of the former Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute building and a fiscal impact study pertaining to proposed uses. Canal District Mater Plan Jeffersonville, IN CLIENT: Cooper Cary 4ward Planning is working in support of a larger master planning team led by Cooper Carry Architecture and Urban Design to develop a master plan for a 180-acre land parcel in Jeffersonville, Indiana (across the Ohio River from Lousiville, Kentucky). The city of Jeffersonville is in the process of developing a man-made canal to assist with stormwater management. This effort is the genesis for creating a master plan for a new, mixed-use residential, retail, and entertainment district. 4ward Planning is providing a demographic, real estate, and fiscal impact analysis in support of this effort. 4WARD PLANNING LLC

ECONOMIC AND REAL ESTATE ANALYSIS FOR SUSTAINABLE LAND USE OUTCOMES


4WARD PLANNING LLC

ECONOMIC AND REAL ESTATE ANALYSIS FOR SUSTAINABLE LAND USE OUTCOMES


EDUCATION Master of City and Regional Planning Rutgers University

Mark J. Bolen – Senior Analyst

BA, Economics and Sociology University of Miami

Mark Bolen is a senior analyst with 4ward Planning. His professional interests include sustainable land use planning, environmental economics, and fiscal impact analysis.

AFFILIATIONS LEED GA Urban Land Institute

SELECTED PAPERS Defining and Reimagining Nature: Implications for Planning and Sustainable Development May 2010 Electricity Consumption in Commercial Buildings: Factors That Contribute to Increased Energy Efficiency May 2010 Economic Benefits of Parks and Open Space: An Examination of Access in Northern New Jersey November 2009 Harrisburg and the Rust Belt: Opportunities and Challenges for a Green Future June 2009 Comparative Life Cycle Cost Analysis of Energy-Efficient Homes in Atlantic Highlands, New Jersey December 2008

Prior to joining the firm, Mark worked as a research assistant for the Rutgers Center for Green Building, one of the principal interdisciplinary centers for green building excellence in the Northeast. During his tenure, Mark worked closely on a variety of projects, including the forthcoming NJ State Green Building Manual and the NJ Green Home Remodeling Guidelines. He contributed to several analyses and written reports for case study buildings. He also designed and created a life cycle cost tool for the public domain that evaluates the cost-effectiveness of green building strategies compared to conventional alternatives. Mark earned a B.A. in Economics and Sociology from the University of Miami, graduating cum laude and with honors; he completed his M.C.R.P. with a focus in environmental and physical planning from the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University. He is a LEED Green Associate and member of the Urban Land Institute. APPLICABLE PROJECT EXPERIENCE Western Edge Redevelopment Area Hoboken, NJ CLIENT: City of Hoboken 4ward Planning is in the process of assisting the City of Hoboken with evaluating the market feasibility and associated fiscal and facility needs impacts of its Western Edge Redevelopment Planning Area. After touring the study area, 4ward Planning will perform a background socioeconomic, and labor and industry trends analysis within and outside of the City of Hoboken. 4ward Planning will profile residential, retail, and office/flex real estate trends within Hoboken and the northern New Jersey market, and extrapolation the percentage of this unmet demand that could potentially be captured within the Western Edge Redevelopment Area. The team will create an Excel based land-use buildout model to examine alternative buildout scenarios for the Western Edge Redevelopment Area. 4ward Planning will then conduct fiscal impact analysis use and impact model to evaluate the fiscal impacts and public facility needs associated with each build-out scenario. Franklin County Comprehensive Plan Franklin County, PA CLIENT: Franklin County Planning Commission As part of a team that includes Environmental Planning & Design and Parsons Brinckerhoff, 4ward Planning is currently engaged by Franklin County to complete a comprehensive plan for this rural county in south central Pennsylvania. Services will include a thorough demographic analysis, a study of housing trends in the area, and an economic analysis of the leading industries in the county. This analysis will identify the key industrial, agricultural, commercial, and retail-based land activity that contributes to the local economy. Underutilized industrial and commercial areas will be identified and specific new uses will be proposed. A fiscal impact model will also be developed to understand the impact of various land use scenarios and will enable the County and the planning sub-regions to better “balance” the type, quantity and location of future development.

4WARD PLANNING LLC

ECONOMIC AND REAL ESTATE ANALYSIS FOR SUSTAINABLE LAND USE OUTCOMES


Garwood Transit-Oriented Development Study Garwood, NJ CLIENT: NJ Transit 4ward Planning is currently serving as a sub-consultant to Looney Ricks Kiss to provide market analysis and fiscal impact analysis services for an underperforming NJ Transit rail stop location. Goals of the study are to determine those uses and strategies that will best help to revitalize the immediate area surrounding the station. A collaborative revitalization plan will serve as a roadmap to develop future uses and potential station upgrades. Pittsburgh West Busway Transit-Oriented Development Plan Pittsburgh, PA CLIENT: Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission 4ward Planning, serving as a sub-consultant to URS, Inc., performed a market analysis along the West Busway bus rapid transit (BRT) line in support of determining transit-oriented development opportunities at various stops. Analysis of local and regional socio-economic trends, real estate market metrics and interviews with area real estate professionals underpinned the study. Hunting Park West Industrial Area Study Philadelphia, PA CLIENT: The Philadelphia City Planning Commission 4ward Planning completed a study providing socio-economic, real estate and financial analysis in support of sustainably repositioning an approximate 400-acre former industrial area in north Philadelphia. Tasks carried out in support of this effort included socio-economic analysis, real estate market analysis covering residential and commercial uses, a highest and best use analysis of the former Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute building and a fiscal impact study pertaining to proposed uses. Canal District Mater Plan Jeffersonville, IN CLIENT: Cooper Cary 4ward Planning is working in support of a larger master planning team led by Cooper Carry Architecture and Urban Design to develop a master plan for a 180-acre land parcel in Jeffersonville, Indiana (across the Ohio River from Lousiville, Kentucky). The city of Jeffersonville is in the process of developing a man-made canal to assist with stormwater management. This effort is the genesis for creating a master plan for a new, mixed-use residential, retail, and entertainment district. 4ward Planning is providing a demographic, real estate, and fiscal impact analysis in support of this effort.

4WARD PLANNING LLC

ECONOMIC AND REAL ESTATE ANALYSIS FOR SUSTAINABLE LAND USE OUTCOMES


EDUCATION Master of Public Administration Rutgers University BA, Political Science and Economics Rutgers University Economic Development Finance Professional (EDFP) National Development Council

AFFILIATIONS Urban Land Institute City Parks Alliance American Planning Association Reconnecting America/Center for Transit Oriented Development New Jersey Main Street Program

PRESENTATIONS Smart Growth Development Issues, Seton Hall Law School, 2004 Striking the Perfect Balance 2007 APA Convention, Philadelphia Measuring Success 2007 National Brownfields Association Conference, NYU Law School Sustainability, More Than “Green” 2008 New Jersey Future Conference An Economic Path Less Travelled 2009 Trail Town Conference Schuylkill River National Heritage Area Sustainably Repositioning Greyfield Sites 2009 Pennsylvania Planning Association Conference, Valley Forge, PA Road to Recovery: Planning, Real Estate and Economic Development Opportunities Society for Marketing Professionals, 2009, Edison, NJ This is Your Moment Keynote Speaker Laurel Highlands Trail Summit 2011, Latrobe, PA

Todd J. Poole – Managing Principal Todd Poole is president, founder and managing principal of 4ward Planning LLC. Before establishing 4ward Planning, Todd served as Director of Economic Planning for EDAW’s U.S. operations – one of the largest land use consulting firms in the world. Todd and his team supported a variety of public and private land use projects with economic, fiscal and policy analysis. In this capacity, Todd managed or co-managed a variety of large land use planning projects, including the multi-billion dollar redevelopment planning effort for Fort Monmouth, New Jersey and a mixed-use retail development project within the Pocono Mountain region, Todd has more than 18 years of extensive urban redevelopment, large scale land reuse, community development, market analysis and public policy experience, as both a private sector consultant and a public sector practitioner. As a public sector executive, Todd served as Deputy Executive Director/CFO for the Camden Redevelopment Agency, coordinating one of the largest redevelopment efforts in the country. His work in Camden included development of land assembly strategies, strategic planning, negotiating more than $250 million of public/private partnership agreements, structuring public financing and incentive packages, and administering development projects for the Agency’s portfolio. Todd also established the Lakewood Development Corporation in Lakewood, New Jersey, serving as its first executive director. In this role, he administered the Lakewood Urban Enterprise Zone program (inclusive of loan program creation and administration) and the Lakewood Industrial Commission, where he oversaw land sales within one of the largest industrial parks in the northeast. Todd earned a B.A. in Political Science and Economics from Rutgers University, and an M.P.A. with a focus in finance from Rutgers Graduate School, Newark. He is certified as an Economic Development Finance Professional (EDFP) by the National Development Council, and has presented on small businesses loan programs to the New Jersey Main Street organization. Todd is a member of the Urban Land Institute and the American Planning Association. APPLICABLE PROJECT EXPERIENCE Western Edge Redevelopment Area Hoboken, NJ CLIENT: City of Hoboken 4ward Planning is in the process of assisting the City of Hoboken with evaluating the market feasibility and associated fiscal and facility needs impacts of its Western Edge Redevelopment Planning Area. After touring the study area, 4ward Planning will perform a background socioeconomic, and labor and industry trends analysis within and outside of the City of Hoboken. 4ward Planning will profile residential, retail, and office/flex real estate trends within Hoboken and the northern New Jersey market, and extrapolation the percentage of this unmet demand that could potentially be captured within the Western Edge Redevelopment Area. The team will create an Excel based land-use buildout model to examine alternative buildout scenarios for the Western Edge Redevelopment Area. 4ward Planning will then conduct fiscal impact analysis use and impact model to evaluate the fiscal impacts and public facility needs associated with each build-out scenario.

4WARD PLANNING LLC

ECONOMIC AND REAL ESTATE ANALYSIS FOR SUSTAINABLE LAND USE OUTCOMES


Franklin County Comprehensive Plan Franklin County, PA CLIENT: Franklin County Planning Commission As part of a team that includes Environmental Planning & Design and Parsons Brinckerhoff, 4ward Planning is currently engaged by Franklin County to complete a comprehensive plan for this rural county in south central Pennsylvania. Services will include a thorough demographic analysis, a study of housing trends in the area, and an economic analysis of the leading industries in the county. This analysis will identify the key industrial, agricultural, commercial, and retail-based land activity that contributes to the local economy. Underutilized industrial and commercial areas will be identified and specific new uses will be proposed. A fiscal impact model will also be developed to understand the impact of various land use scenarios and will enable the County and the planning sub-regions to better â&#x20AC;&#x153;balanceâ&#x20AC;? the type, quantity and location of future development. Garwood Transit-Oriented Development Study Garwood, NJ CLIENT: NJ Transit 4ward Planning is currently serving as a sub-consultant to Looney Ricks Kiss to provide market analysis and fiscal impact analysis services for an underperforming NJ Transit rail stop location. Goals of the study are to determine those uses and strategies that will best help to revitalize the immediate area surrounding the station. A collaborative revitalization plan will serve as a roadmap to develop future uses and potential station upgrades. Pittsburgh West Busway Transit-Oriented Development Plan Pittsburgh, PA CLIENT: Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission 4ward Planning, serving as a sub-consultant to URS, Inc., performed a market analysis along the West Busway bus rapid transit (BRT) line in support of determining transit-oriented development opportunities at various stops. Analysis of local and regional socio-economic trends, real estate market metrics and interviews with area real estate professionals underpinned the study. Hunting Park West Industrial Area Study Philadelphia, PA CLIENT: The Philadelphia City Planning Commission 4ward Planning completed a study providing socio-economic, real estate and financial analysis in support of sustainably repositioning an approximate 400-acre former industrial area in north Philadelphia. Tasks carried out in support of this effort included socio-economic analysis, real estate market analysis covering residential and commercial uses, a highest and best use analysis of the former Eastern Pennsylvania Psychiatric Institute building and a fiscal impact study pertaining to proposed uses. Canal District Mater Plan Jeffersonville, IN CLIENT: Cooper Cary 4ward Planning is working in support of a larger master planning team led by Cooper Carry Architecture and Urban Design to develop a master plan for a 180-acre land parcel in Jeffersonville, Indiana (across the Ohio River from Lousiville, Kentucky). The city of Jeffersonville is in the process of developing a man-made canal to assist with stormwater management. This effort is the genesis for creating a master plan for a new, mixed-use residential, retail, and entertainment district. 4ward Planning is providing a demographic, real estate, and fiscal impact analysis in support of this effort.

4WARD PLANNING LLC

ECONOMIC AND REAL ESTATE ANALYSIS FOR SUSTAINABLE LAND USE OUTCOMES


WESTERN EDGE REDEVLOPMENT AREA Hoboken, NJ PROJECT TYPE: Revitalization Strategy CLIENT: City of Hoboken SERVICES: Market and Fiscal Impact Analysis 4ward Planning is in the process of assisting the City of Hoboken with evaluating the market feasibility and associated fiscal and facility needs impacts of its Western Edge Redevelopment Planning Area. After touring the study area, 4ward Planning will perform a background socioeconomic, and labor and industry trends analysis within and outside of the City of Hoboken. 4ward Planning will profile residential, retail, and office/flex real estate trends within Hoboken and the northern New Jersey market, and extrapolation the percentage of this unmet demand that could potentially be captured within the Western Edge Redevelopment Area. The team will create an Excel based land-use buildout model to examine alternative build-out scenarios for the Western Edge Redevelopment Area. 4ward Planning will then conduct fiscal impact analysis use and impact model to evaluate the fiscal impacts and public facility needs associated with each build-out scenario.

4WARD PLANNING LLC Economic & Real Estate Analysis for Sustainable Land Use Outcomesâ&#x201E;˘ NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA PITTSBURGH ATLANTA www.LandUseImpacts.com


overview FHI

Fitzgerald & Halliday, Inc. Hartford, CT 06106

Transportation Planning • Environmental Planning • Cultural Resource Services • Public Involvement • Community & Site Planning • GIS/Technical Services

Fitzgerald & Halliday, Inc. (FHI) is a full-service planning consulting firm, providing services to public and private sector clients since 1987. FHI brings experienced planning perspectives to projects of all sizes. Staff specialists include planners, engineers, environmental scientists, and cultural resource specialists with expertise in natural resources, historic resources, community planning, transportation, public involvement, GIS, and other support fields. Strong knowledge of the planning process, value-added GIS, innovative presentation techniques, and strong quality assurance augment the high quality of our products as shown by our strong track record of repeat clients both as prime and as team member. FHI is certified as a disadvantaged business enterprise (DBE) in over 25 states.

Transportation Planning

FHI’s transportation expertise encompasses a broad range of modes, including street and highways, local bus, bus rapid transit (BRT), rail, pedestrian and bicycle facilities, airports, and freight movement systems. Our transportation services vary from long-range area-wide multimodal planning and demand estimation to corridor planning studies and localized traffic operations analyses. Specific expertise at the transportation-land use interface includes access management, station area, and traffic calming plans and crafting land use and zoning regulations to support these purposes. Our transportation analyses are enhanced by our capabilities in GIS, database development, and transportation surveys.

Environmental Planning

FHI’s environmental services encompass environmental impact documentation, permitting and regulatory compliance, watershed studies, stormwater and sewer system studies, and a variety of other planning studies. FHI staff have the expertise to evaluate the wide range of issues required by National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and similar state acts, as well as specialized evaluations required for project implementation, such as wetland delineation, Section 106 historical resource documentation, and biological assessments. Our permitting experience includes national, state and local permit applications relating to wetland/water resources and coastal resources, floodplains, stormwater, dredging, and many others. Ecological studies include wetland descriptions, wetland function-value assessments, habitat assessments, wetland mitigation planning, and studies pertaining to threatened and endangered species. Integral to our work are knowledge of pertinent regulations, early and continuous coordination with the regulatory community, and active public outreach, when appropriate, to include stakeholders in the project process.

Cultural Resource Services FHI’s architectural historians have broad expertise in undertaking cultural resource investigations for factfinding or regulatory compliance purposes. FHI’s capabilities include historic inventories and National Register assessments, agency coordination, Section 106 documentation (National Historic Preservation Act), and historic mitigation documents including Historic American Buildings Survey (HABS), Historic American Engineering Record (HAER), and state level documentation of historic properties. Our cultural resource experts integrate their work into environmental impact evaluations, cultural landscape studies, and expert testimony. We prepare articles and booklets on historic sites for popular consumption and can adapt them for posting on the world-wide web. FHI also has extensive experience overseeing the conduct of archaeological surveys, providing an integrated approach to managing above and belowground resources on a project-wide basis.


overview FHI

continued...

Transportation Planning • Environmental Planning • Cultural Resource Services • Public Involvement • Community & Site Planning • GIS/Technical Services

Public Involvement Services

Community and Site Planning

FHI is a proponent of building consensus through energetic and comprehensive community involvement. Our approach to public involvement is an inclusive program that brings the stakeholders into the project planning process and allows a two-way exchange of information. We work with the client and community to disseminate information, build consensus, and mold a successful outcome. Listening is essential to consensus building, giving both proponents and critics the opportunity to raise and resolve issues. We use a wide range of tools for public involvement, including: public meetings and partnering sessions, group meetings and workshops, focus groups, newsletters and bulletins, multimedia displays and presentations, posters and graphics, interactive project websites, and others. In many cases, attention to the little things and a commitment to being responsive can make the difference between a successful result and a “mighthave-been.”

FHI staff apply a wide range of inter-disciplinary skills necessary for community and site planning studies, drawing upon our capabilities in land use and zoning, transportation system planning, natural resource assessment, historic evaluation, environmental impact analysis, and environmental compliance. We have applied our expertise toward opportunity and constraint analyses, private development projects, municipal plans of development and conservation, watershed studies, emergency evacuation studies, open space planning, smart growth initiatives, and expert testimony on planning and zoning issues. Our resourceful staff conduct research, undertake field investigations, engage in effective public involvement, and prepare appropriate planning documentation tailored to project goals.

Technical Services FHI adds value to every planning project through application of the latest technologies in geographic information systems (GIS), website development, and database design. FHI utilizes GIS software to map project resources, conduct visual d assessments, and to perform a range of spatial analyses to enhance planning studies at all scales and in many disciplines. We have expertise in designing and establishing interactive websites to communicate project information on large state and regional projects. FHI staff create and adapt databases for a variety of purposes, such as to catalogue and analyze survey results, catalogue public involvement comments, inventory historic resources with links to GIS software, track project commitments, and develop contact lists for public outreach programs. We also use state-of-the-art software to produce innovative and comprehensible graphics, and to prepare multimedia presentations.

Fitzgerald & Halliday, Inc. 72 Cedar Street Hartford, CT 06106 860-247-7200 www.fhiplan.com

FHI - New Jersey Kristen Ahlfeld 309 Danville Drive Williamstown, NJ 08094 201-377-2325

FHI - Oregon Ms. Linda Perelli Wright 63275 Eastview Drive Bend, Oregon 541-633-7873


New Haven Complete Streets Planning New Haven, Connecticut

Description

Fitzgerald & Halliday, Inc. (FHI) is assisting the City of New Haven with the development of a Complete Streets Design Manual that will guide the development of future road projects. The City is focused on changing the way they deal with street design, and prioritizing pedestrians, bicyclists, and transit where appropriate. The effort is aimed at developing a more balanced transportation system in a city that is already experiencing high levels of nonautomobile usage. FHI is working with a 9-member panel to develop policy, guidelines, and a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;toolboxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; of applications that city staff, planners and engineers can use when approaching projects that affect the city streets. The Manual will also serve as a reference for the public to understand the process of selecting appropriate street design treatments and where and when they might be applicable.

Client

City of New Haven, CT Michael J. Piscitelli 200 Orange Street, Ground Floor New Haven, CT 06510 (203) 946-8067

FITZGERALD & HALLIDAY, INC.


I-587 Kingston Intersection Study KinJston, New York

Description

Fitzgerald & Halliday, Inc. (FHI) was hired by the Ulster County Transportation Council to achieve a consensus among stakeholders and the public on a preferred intersection improvement alternative for the intersection of I-587 with Albany Avenue/Broadway. As with other truncated expressways around the nation, I-587â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s abrupt transition from a high speed, limited access facility to a downtown commercial and residential setting creates a number of problems, including: high speeds, heavy volumes, deteriorated property values, unsafe bicycle and pedestrian conditions, recurrent congestion, accidents, poor economic development potential, and diminished community character. FHI designed an outreach process that was highly inclusive, transparent, cost effective, and respectful of peoplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; time. A three-day planning workshop was held to bring together transportation professionals, urban planners, project stakeholders, and the public to develop innovative solutions for this complex intersection. The result was the development of a roundabout concept for the intersection, along with a broader recommendation to create additional transportation network to handle future growth.

Client

Ulster County Transportation Council Dennis Doyle 244 Fair Street Kingston, New York 12402-1800 (845) 340-3340 ddoy@co.ulster.ny.us

FITZGERALD & HALLIDAY, INC.


Norwalk Connectivity Plan Norwalk, Connecticut

Description

Fitzgerald and Halliday, Inc. assisted the City of Norwalk Redevelopment Agency with the development of a Connectivity Plan that creates a comprehensive vision for the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transportation infrastructure in the vicinity of several active and proposed downtown developments. The Norwalk Connectivity Plan will serve as an important component of the City of Norwalkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Downtown land development planning process. This plan will ensure that multi-modal linkages are created to unify separate developments into a successful urban fabric that not only accommodates all modes of             circulation. Connectivity in Norwalkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Downtown will improve access to goods and services needed by area residents and workers. Improved connectivity will also reduce automobile dependence, increase the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s potential as a regional destination, and enhance economic development within Norwalkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Downtown. To achieve these synergies and address existing physical and visual barriers, improvements are needed to the downtownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s infrastructure, transportation, and urban design. The outcome of the study will be a report that serves to inform readers on the importance of planning Downtown Norwalk in a way that promotes not only sustainability, but growth into the future. With limited road capacity and developable land available, Norwalk is at a point in time when a clear vision for the future is needed.

Client

City of Norwalk, Connecticut Munro Johnson 125 East Avenue Norwalk, Connecticut 06856 (203) 874-7810 x 6783 mjohnson@norwalkct.org FITZGERALD & HALLIDAY, INC.


Fitzgerald & Halliday, Inc. Innovative Planning – Better Communities

Michael L. Morehouse, P.E. Senior Project Manager Overview Mr. Morehouse is a Senior Project Manager with 18 years of experience in multimodal transportation planning. His technical specialties include strategic transportation planning, highway and interchange feasibility studies, transit planning studies, corridor studies, bicycle/pedestrian planning, traffic calming, traffic engineering, economic analysis, and community planning. Mr. Morehouse has completed a wide variety of transportation planning and engineering studies including large-scale corridor and area-wide studies, corridor development plans, congestion management plans, urban circulation studies and traffic calming plans. Transportation Planning Mr. Morehouse has managed some of the largest multi-modal and multidisciplinary transportation planning studies in the Northeast. From Major Investment Studies to Environmental Impact Studies, Mike has extensive experience dealing with complex technical issues while developing visionary and consensus-based solutions to each project. Mike has a thorough understanding of the relationships between land use and transportation, and is an advocate for sustainable transportation systems. With a broad background that includes travel demand modeling and GIS analysis, Mike has both technical proficiency and broad-based planning and decision-making skills to deliver reasonable and implementable solutions to transportation projects.

Education: - B.S. Civil Engineering, University of Connecticut, 1993 Professional Registrations - Registered Professional Engineer – Connecticut 1999 Professional Affiliations - National Complete Streets Coalition Speakers’ Bureau - Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE) - Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals - University of Connecticut CE Advisory Board - ACEC Government Affairs Committee Years Experience - 3 Years with firm

Traffic Engineering Mr. Morehouse has extensive background in traffic engineering analysis and design. Mike has analyzed a variety of transportation facilities including signalized and unsignalized arterial corridors, downtown networks, highway mainlines and ramps, rail grade crossings, toll plazas and bicycle/pedestrian facilities. He has also prepared numerous traffic impact assessments and peer reviews for municipalities and private developers. Mike offers a comprehensive perspective of traffic engineering as it relates to livable communities. This perspective values the relationship between vehicular mobility and place making. Public Involvement Mr. Morehouse specializes in bringing diverse interest groups together to address issues in consensus building efforts. His work has included identifying stakeholders, orchestrating and moderating public or stakeholders meetings, charrettes and public workshops, newsletters, leadership of stakeholder groups, and project websites, as well as a variety of other public outreach applications. Recent Project Experience Kingston, NY Intersection Study Mr. Morehouse is serving as Project Manager on a study to solve the challenges of reduced mobility, positioning the community for future economic growth, improving neighborhood cohesiveness, and strengthening opportunities for non-motorized travel for the intersection of I-587 with Albany Avenue/Broadway in Kingston, NY. This study is ultimately about developing solutions that offer sustainability – in mobility, for the economy, and for the


Fitzgerald & Halliday, Inc. Innovative Planning â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Better Communities

community. An outreach process has been designed to be highly inclusive, transparent, cost effective, and respectful of peoplesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; time. A three-day planning workshop will be held to bring together transportation professionals, urban planners, project stakeholders, and the public to develop innovative solutions for this complex intersection. New Haven Complete Streets Design Manual Mr. Morehouse provided transportation consulting services to the City of New Haven and the Complete Streets Steering Committee on the development of a Complete Streets Design Manual. This document provides technical guidance on the building, rebuilding, repair and rehabilitation of city streets with the intent of balancing the needs of all users. It is guided by a set of principals appropriate for an evolving understanding of the importance of streets to the social and economic fabric of a community. Norwalk Connectivity Study The study area for this plan is two miles long and comprised of five districts: Wall Street, West Avenue, Heritage Park, Reed/Putnam, and SoNo. Taken as a whole this area will herein be referred to as Downtown Norwalk. The Downtown Norwalk area is anchored by two historic downtown districts - Wall Street Area to the north and SoNo to the south â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which are connected by a span of West Avenue about a mile and half long. Recently completed, new, and prospective large-scale development along this mile and a half section of West Avenue will meaningfully transform the character of the area, making it both more urban, and, under the aegis of this plan, a more unified and cohesive Downtown. Mr. Morehouse is responsible for leading the transportation aspects of this study, including a review of a circulator transit system, parking strategies, traffic and roadway enhancements, and bicycle and pedestrian opportunities. Route 7 Transportation and Land Use Study The purpose of the Route 7 Corridor Study is to develop a pro-active plan to address current and long-range travel needs and community quality of life issues along Route 7 in southwestern Connecticut and to build on opportunities to enhance them. The study recognizes and considers the regional significance of the Route 7 corridor as it traverses numerous communities and links them physically, socially, and economically. Route 7 is an indispensable asset, but it also presents challenges for this region of Connecticut. Mr. Morehouse is managing the transportation assessment for this study. East Liberty, Pittsburgh, PA TRID This project focuses on the synthesis of a number of ongoing and proposed development projects and planning efforts under a Livable Communities and Transit Oriented Development framework, to achieve a master plan that fully engages and leverages the potential of the East Liberty Busway Station. FHI is involved in the transportation planning aspect of the project. MOVEPGH This project includes three distinct but interrelated efforts: development of a Multi-Modal Transportation Plan, a Bicycle/Pedestrian Plan Update, and Development of a Street Design Manual. In order for the City of Pittsburgh to achieve a world class transportation network that responds to the broad goals the City has for improving quality of life, all investments must work in concert. Road diets projects identified for the transportation plan may create opportunities for bike implementation. New lane width guidelines developed for the street design manual may make wider sidewalks possible in areas of need. These three efforts will utilize a common public and stakeholder outreach framework to achieve a holistic process to the public. FHI is involved with the initial transportation needs assessment of the project and will be involved with several multi-day planning workshops held throughout the project.

Michael L. Morehouse

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Fitzgerald & Halliday, Inc. Innovative Planning – Better Communities

Norwalk Parking Study The Urban Corridor Parking Plan will explore how to strategically locate and manage Norwalk’s downtown public parking supply while accounting for current and future parking demands of the corridor, and other connectivity goals. This project will examine the assumed 8,000-space demand estimated by proposed development plans, both in light of new market realities and best practices in the parking industry. And it will produce a plan for a comprehensive, unified, and coordinated system of downtown parking in Norwalk that facilitates circulation, serves Norwalk’s economic development agenda, and links to the City’s downtown Connectivity goals. Additional Project experience • New England High Speed Rail Environmental Review Document 2030 • VCOG Route 67 and 42 Corridor Study • Greenwich Safety Study (2010-Ongoing) • I-84 Viaduct Alternatives Study • Northern New Jersey Metro Mobility Study • Waterbury-New Canaan Branch Line Study • Stamford, CT Light Rail Feasibility Study • Northern Tier Expressway Route 11 Corridor Study, NY • Route 404 Corridor Study, NY • Main Street South Corridor Management Plan, Southbury, CT • Route 34 Municipal Development Plan, New Haven • Washington Depot Master Plan, CT • Route 34 Development Strategy, New Haven • Greenwich Bicycle Master Plan, CT • Ithaca Six Point Transportation Plan, NY • I-84/Route 8 Interchange Needs and Deficiencies Study, CT • I-84 West of Waterbury Needs and Deficiencies Study, CT • Hartford West Major Investment Study, CT • SWRPA Congestion Mitigation Study 2020, CT • West Side Access Interchange Feasibility Study • Gateway Community College Traffic Impact Study, New Haven, CT • Downtown New Haven Two-Way Street Conversion Study, CT • Town of Westfield, NJ Traffic Calming • Bath Route 1 Feasibility Study, ME • Route 85 Context Sensitive Design, CT • Cove Road Improvement Study, CT • Strawberry Hill Traffic Calming, Norwalk, CT • SCRCOG Regional Transit Study, CT • Sevier County BRT Study, TN • Griffin Line BRT Feasibility Study, CT • New Haven-Hartford-Springfield Commuter Rail Environmental Assessment • CT Electronic Toll and Congestion Pricing Study • Grand Parkway Market Valuation Study, Houston, TX • Atlantic Beach Traffic and Revenue Study, NY • Minnesota Congestion Pricing Study • NJ Turnpike ETC Feasibility Study

Michael L. Morehouse

rev 06/25/10


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