Upper School Handbook

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Upper School Choices Courses starting from September 2022



Welcome to Oakham’s Upper School. Selecting your courses for Upper School study is an exciting time; it is an opportunity to delve deeper into the subjects you enjoy and to explore new ones. We hope that this booklet gives you a taste of the options available to you in the Upper School at Oakham and that it provides a springboard for further thought and discussion. When making your programme and subject choices, you should consider all the options carefully and make sure that you do not discount something without fully examining the details. Do you want to study the IB Diploma, or take stand-alone qualifications? A-level or BTEC? Familiar subjects or new ones? To answer these questions you will need to think about your skills and interests, as well as any future aspirations you might have. Researching university or apprenticeship options will help to shape your thinking and give you a good sense of where the next two years will lead.

Your Upper School career will be challenging but hugely enjoyable and rewarding, and getting your subject combinations right is vital to making this a success. Take the time to read this booklet, talk to your teachers, your parents and current Upper School students, and do not be afraid to ask questions: there is nothing too big or too small to be considered. And most of all, think about what you want from the final stretch of your School years – there is so much to look forward to. We look forward to seeing you and working with you in the Upper School.

Mrs M Fairley, Head of Upper School mjf@oakham.rutland.sch.uk 1


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IB Diploma or Stand-alone Qualifications? IBDP: The Ready Made Package IB students select six subjects, three at Higher (specialist) Level and three at Standard Level. These subjects must include: 

Maths (three different options available)

English Literature (two options available)

A foreign language (options also include Latin & Greek, and Italian and Spanish ab initio – from scratch)

A Humanity or Social Science

A Science (options also include DT, Environmental Systems, and Sports Science

IBDP students also have two lessons a week in critical thinking (Theory of Knowledge), write a mini-dissertation in the subject of their choice (the Extended Essay), and are expected to engage in creative, active and service-based activities throughout their time in the Upper School. The Diploma is awarded points out of 45, with each subject being awarded up to 7 points and a maximum of 3 points being awarded for Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay combined. Universities that ask for AAA at A-level generally ask for around 36 points from the Diploma; those asking for BBB at A-level generally ask for around 32 points from the Diploma.

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A-level & BTEC: The Build Your Own Students on the stand-alone qualifications programme select four subjects for initial study, usually narrowing their choices down to three subjects during their Form 6 year. The exception to this is those who select BTEC Sports Science, which is a double qualification and so is taught in 12 lessons a week as opposed to 6. There are no set combination requirements for stand-alone qualifications but students are encouraged to think carefully about how subjects might contrast with and complement each other. A-levels are linear courses with exams being taken at the end of Form 7. They are awarded A*–G and universities will usually ask for three grades, sometimes subject to certain grades in specific subjects.

BTECs offer continual assessment, with modules of teaching leading up to a piece of coursework or exam throughout the two-year course. They are awarded D* (Distinction *) – P (Pass), with two grades being awarded for the BTEC in Sports Science. Although it is possible to pass these courses without engaging in anything beyond the classroom, our expectation is that all students will take part in creative, active and service-based activities throughout their time in the Upper School. Students on the stand-alone qualifications programme are also offered the opportunity to take an Extended Project Qualification (EPQ).


ART & DESIGN FACT FILE A-level exam details:

Coursework is a personal investigation developed over a year.

IBDP (H+SL)

The art room is a space where students have the freedom to develop and express ideas creatively through a range of materials and approaches. With the opportunity to specialise in Textile Design, Fine Art or 3 Dimensional Design there is a breadth of approaches to art making available, supporting different creative voices.

IB exam details:

The Art and Design course encourages both critical and creative thinking. It supports students to interpret the world around them and consider their connection to it. By looking closely at the work of others it encourages reflection and deepens an understanding in their own artistic practice.

Three components, which are all coursework: an exhibition, the process portfolio and a comparative study.

Developing a personal body of practical work through experimentation and research is central to the course. An open, reflective approach to making art is important as well as a willingness to explore new methods. Expected entry requirements:

A-level course content:

Head of Department: Ms E Brass

Developing a personal body of practical work through experimentation and research.

GCSE grade 6 in Art and Design (in any Art discipline).

erb@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Future possibilities:

You can’t use up creativity. The more you use the more you have . Maya Angelou

Anything requiring creative thinking: fashion/textile design, architecture, film, game art, animation, illustration, interior design, graphic design, TV, photography, curation, art history, art marketing and advertising.

Externally Set Assignment which includes a preparatory study period and 15 hours of sustained study.

IB course content: Exploring the work of others. Developing a personal body of work. Curating an exhibition.

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A-LEVEL (Eduqas)


BIOLOGY FACT FILE A-level exam details:

Three papers, with questions ranging from 1 to 9 marks. No coursework. IB exam details: Three papers, with questions ranging from 1 to 8 marks. One piece of coursework (a practical investigation). A-level course content: Molecules and Biochemistry, Cells, Tissues, Organs and Systems, Ecosystems.

HL only: Further details on the above and Plant Science.

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IBDP (H+SL)

Biology is the scientific study of living things; it helps us to understand the world in which we live and reminds us about our interconnectedness with other living things. It is a dynamic subject, as new discoveries about the living world are made every day. This is exciting and important given the central role that Biology plays in all our lives, and more than ever the science of Biology is at the forefront of human concerns as we tackle medical issues, the challenges raised by advances in genetic technology, or the effects of a rapidly changing environment. You should have a logical approach to problem solving, a questioning and critical mind, be able to make careful observations, form a hypothesis, and draw conclusions based on data. Expected entry requirements: Head of Department: Dr P Ingles pji@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

IB course content: Molecules and Biochemistry, Cells, Tissues, Organs and Systems, Ecosystems.

A-LEVEL (Edexcel)

DNA neither cares nor knows. DNA just is. And we dance to its music. Richard Dawkins

GCSE grade 66 in Dual Award Combined Science, with a 7 in the Biology paper, or 7 in GCSE Biology. GCSE grade 6 in Maths and English also useful.

Future possibilities: Wide career opportunities ranging from agriculture to medicine, sport science to zoology. Also a natural partner to Chemistry, Physics, Psychology, Sports Science, Geography and Maths.


BUSINESS FACT FILE A-level exam details: 3 x 2hr papers with a range of questions from 4 to 20 marks. BTEC exam details: 1 x 2hr paper in May of Form 6 with calculations and written answers. 1 x 2hr + 1 x 3hr paper in January of Form 7 completing a marketing strategy plan on the computer. 2 x units of coursework. IB exam details: 2 x 2hr15min papers with a range of questions from 2 marks to 20 marks. One piece of coursework. Course content: All of our courses cover the same key topics including Finance, Business Ownership, Marketing, Human Resources, Production. 6

A-LEVEL (Edexcel)

IBDP (HL)

BTEC

Studying Business will bring a whole new dimension of understanding to your experiences as a consumer. We learn about how and why a business operates the way it does. We break down the actions of owners, managers, customers and even pressure groups like Green Peace, analysing the impact of these on elements such as employee motivation, sales and profit. Lessons are interactive, including the use of videos, group work and application to real businesses such as Tesla, Amazon and Ikea. We are passionate about the world of business and we hope to recruit like-minded students who are already reading the business news or want to start. Skills required are excellent time management and organisation, as well as a willingness to try. Expected entry requirements:

Head of Department: Mrs S Donlevy sdy@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

GCSE grade 6 in English Language and/or Humanities; GCSE grade 5 in Maths. Future possibilities:

I'm convinced that about half of what separates successful entrepreneurs from the non-successful ones is pure perseverance. Steve Jobs

A wide range of doors from running your own company, a related subject or stepping into a degree apprenticeship with a high profile company such as Unilever.


CHEMISTRY

A-LEVEL (OCR A)

IBDP (H+SL)

FACT FILE A-level exam details: Three papers, with questions ranging from multiple choice to 6-mark extended response. No coursework. IB exam details: Three papers for HL and for SL, with a range of multiple choice, short and extended response questions. One piece of practical coursework with a written investigation. A-level course content: Inorganic, Organic, Analytical and Physical chemistry with calculations, structure and bonding.

Interested in the future of green energy? Wondering how medicines get synthesised? Considering why the ozone layer is crucial? If you’ve found yourself in previous Chemistry lessons pondering why the periodic table is the shape it is, how alkenes actually react, why transition metals are coloured or why temperature makes so much difference, then Upper School Chemistry could be the place for you. In answering these questions you’re bound to find that it opens up ever more areas to explore, and this investigation –both theoretical and practical – is what Chemistry is all about. Chemistry is a subject for students curious about the world around them, utilising and developing your skills of communication, calculation and reasoning, abstract visualisation, precision and problem solving. Expected entry requirements:

Head of Department: Mrs J Griffiths jeg@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

IB course content: Inorganic, Organic, Analytical and Physical chemistry with calculations, structure and bonding and an applied topic. 7

Chance favours the prepared mind. Louis Pasteur

GCSE grade 7 in Chemistry or 77 in Dual Award Combined Science. GCSE grade 6 in Maths. Future possibilities: Any science-related areas such as Chemistry, Biochemistry, Chemical engineering, or clinical courses such as Medicine, Dentistry or Veterinary.


CLASSICAL CIVILISATION FACT FILE A-level exam details: Three papers: one on epic, one on ancient theatre and one on Roman politics. No coursework. A-level course content: Epic: study of extracts from the Odyssey and Aeneid. Theatre: study of Sophocles’ Oedipus the King, Euripides’ Bacchae, and Aristophanes’ Frogs.

Classical Civilisation involves the study of the ancient world. Everything is studied in translation and no language work is involved. We read some of the greatest works of literature ever written, including the Odyssey, about Odysseus’ journey home from Troy, and Oedipus the King (in which he unwittingly marries his mother and murders his father), as well as studying the period of violence when Rome nearly succumbed to Julius Caesar’s plans to be sole ruler – only to be stabbed by his friends. The three modules are taught by three different teachers across the two years.

Head of Department: Dr W Leveritt wgl@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Politics: study of the late Roman Republic.

Expected entry requirements: GCSE grade 6 in English Literature and/ or a Humanities subject. Future possibilities:

Nothing is as old as today’s newspaper, but Homer is new and fresh this morning. Charles Péguy 8

A-LEVEL (OCR)

Classical Civilisation takes in a wide range of different material – the study of literature, of History, of Politics, of Art – and so can contribute to a number of options for further study at university.


COMPUTER SCIENCE FACT FILE A-level exam details:

Two papers; one programming coursework project. IB exam details: One paper for the core theme; and one paper for the optional module. One piece of coursework.

A-level course content: Processor fundamentals; security privacy and data integrity; data modelling; algorithms & programming. IB course content: Computational thinking; problemsolving; networks; computer organisation.

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A-LEVEL (OCR)

IBDP (SL)

We stand on the brink of a technological transformation, known as the Fourth Industrial Revolution, that will fundamentally alter the way we live, work and relate to one another. We do not yet know just how it will unfold, but one thing is clear: an understanding of the fundamentals of computers and the ability to read and write code is becoming increasingly important for every aspect of our lives. Computer Science permeates every industry and for this reason it successfully combines with many other disciplines, such as Business Management and Economics as a pathway into Data Science, or Physics as a pathway into science and engineering. Whatever your interest, an understanding of Computer Science principles and core skills seems a valuable investment given the technological changes afoot in society. Head of Department: Mr M Crofts mdc@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Expected entry requirements: GCSE grade 6 in Maths. Future possibilities:

Everybody should learn to program a computer because it teaches you how to think. Steve Jobs

Computer Science industries, such as software engineering, artificial intelligence, app and game development; but also other disciplines such as science, engineering, astronomy, and security.


CRITICAL & CONTEXTUAL STUDIES FACT FILE A-level exam details: Coursework is a personal investigation developed over a year. Externally Set Assignment which is includes a preparatory study period and 15 hours of sustained study. A-level course content: Learning how to write about art, using research to support understanding, with a focus on curation, the art market, galleries and museums.

A-LEVEL (OCR)

The emphasis is on learning about and writing about art, building a confidence to find your own voice when talking about visual imagery, with a focus on curation, the art market, galleries and museums. The course helps students to gain confidence looking and talking about art and considering: What is art? What is ’good’ art and who decides? Whose voice is missing from the world of art? What does art say about a culture and about the past? Considering the curation of exhibitions is central to the course and developing projects that allow students to design their own fictional shows pursuing their own interests. Students use research to understand selected artworks and to build a rationale for their exhibitions, considering innovative ways to engage audiences. A creative mind is a vital quality, with an enthusiasm for exploring the world of art and considering our connection to it. Expected entry requirements: Head of Department: Ms E Brass erb@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

GCSE grade 6 in English, Art and/or a Humanities subject. Future possibilities:

Art is not what you see, but what you make others see. Edgar Degas 10

Anything requiring creative thinking: art history, film, galleries and museums, art marketing and advertising, anthropology, fashion design, film, photography, architecture, TV, fashion design, interior design.


DESIGN & TECHONOLOGY FACT FILE A-level exam details: Two papers with questions ranging from 2 to 16 marks. 50% coursework. IB exam details: Three papers for HL, two papers for SL, with questions ranging from 1 to 9 marks. 40% coursework. A-level course content: Product analysis, material properties and applications, commercial manufacture, design history, sustainability, health and safety, technological advancements. IB course content: Product analysis, material properties and applications, commercial manufacture, modelling strategies and classic design. HL only: user-centred design, innovation and markets. 11

A-LEVEL (AQA)

IBDP (H+SL)

Design and Technology is an inspiring, rigorous, and practical subject that will enable you to develop the skills to successfully design and make products that solve real problems, that consider potential market opportunities and the needs of others. You will acquire a broad range of subject knowledge to include the responsibility of the designer, ergonomics, material properties, commercial manufacturing processes and strategies, historical design and technological influences and learn how to use the latest generation of design applications and manufacturing processes. You will learn the creative and practical expertise needed to complete everyday tasks with confidence and to participate successfully in an ever-changing technological world. Expected entry requirements:

Head of Department: Mr T Weston tcw@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Good design is making something intelligible and memorable. Great design is making something memorable and meaningful. Dieter Rams

GCSE grade 6 in DT, although it is possible to study Design and Technology with no previous experience. Future possibilities: Anything requiring design thinking and problem solving: product design, engineering, industrial design, architecture, etc.


DRAMA & THEATRE FACT FILE A-level exam details:

One paper with 3 sections, each worth 40 marks. Two practical components which are accompanied by written portfolios. IB exam details: There is no written exam; just a range of coursework-style tasks. A-level course content: Theatre Workshop (textual reinterpretation); Text in Action (scripted and devised); Text in performance (written exam). IB course content: Director’s Notebook, Collaborative Project, Research Presentation. HL only: Solo Project.

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A-LEVEL (Eduqas)

IBDP (H+SL)

A keen and driving interest in theatre is the most important pre-requisite to study this subject at a higher level, and our aim is to explore the transformative power of theatre; to find out as Augusto Boal put it, “who we are and to discover who we could become” and, thereby, “help us build our future, rather than just waiting for it”. During the two years you will create pieces of theatre, see an eclectic range of live productions, re-interpret existing texts, plan your own productions, perform and/or design performances, and most importantly, find and develop your own ‘voice’. As you are educated, so will you be moved, excited, and even infuriated by the things you learn and discover about yourself, your culture and about the sense of what it is to be a human being. Expected entry requirements:

Head of Department: Mrs G Norell

GCSE grade 6 in Drama and English Literature or a Humanities subject.

gn@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Future possibilities:

All the world’s a stage. William Shakespeare

Theatre acting, design, producing or directing, TV and film. Students also go on to study Law, Medicine, Journalism: the confidence to use your voice, enhanced presentation skills and development of emotional intelligence benefits everyone.


FACT FILE A-level exam details: 3 papers with questions worth 2 to 25 marks and multiple choice questions. No Coursework. IB exam details: HL 3 papers with questions ranging from 2 to 15 marks, with some calculations. SL 2 papers with questions ranging from 2 to 15 marks. 3 x 800-word commentaries on real world application of economic theory. IB and A-level course content: Microeconomics The Market, Elasticity, Market Failure and Government Interventions. Behavioural Economics (A-level and HL).

ECONOMICS

Macroeconomics

Objectives: Economic Growth, Inflation, Unemployment, Redistributing Income and Wealth. Monetary, Fiscal and Supply Side Policy. International Trade and Development. Financial Economics (A-level only). 13

IBDP (H+SL)

Economics seeks to maximise wellbeing across society. It covers issues such as how governments can act to make the planet more sustainable. How can we solve the problem of pollution? How to encourage healthier diets and how to redistribute income and wealth, making society more equal. This involves rich to poor or groups with protected characteristics. Why do men earn more than women? We consider the cost of living crisis and the consequences of a pandemic to the welfare of individuals and groups in different countries. What does the government do to improve our living standards? Traditional economic theory assumes rationality but Behavioural Economics shows that decisions are not made logically. How are people being manipulated? We will consider the costs and benefits of Brexit and how the banking sector is now regulated. Cryptocurrency – is it a legitimate form of money?

Theory of the Firm (A-level and HL). Labour Markets (A-level).

A-LEVEL (AQA)

Recommended entry requirements:

Head of Department: Paul Nutter pn@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

What is the one thing that matters most to most voters? ‘It’s the Economy, Stupid!’ James Carville

GCSE grade 6 in Maths and English Language. Future possibilities:

Studying Economics provides you with skills and ways of thinking that you can apply to a wide range of problems: the ability to present reasoned, written arguments and justify judgements, bridging the Sciences and Humanities. Possible career paths include: finance, politics, history, business, NGOs, geography and psychology.


ENGLISH LITERATURE FACT FILE A-level exam details:

Three papers: one each on drama, poetry and prose. One coursework essay worth 20%. IB exam details: Two papers for both SL and HL. Individual Oral for both SL & HL, with additional coursework essay for HL. A-level course content: Post-2000 works of poetry, and works of a named poet. Modern and heritage drama texts, pre1900 and modern prose. Student choice text in coursework. IB course content: Students study nine texts at SL, and 13 at HL, from across different continents and times.

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A-LEVEL (Edexcel)

IBDP (H+SL)

In English lessons we celebrate the power of the text to develop our understanding of different ideas, experiences, histories, and, ultimately, ourselves. From the powerful works of Shakespeare to the arresting modernity of freshly published poetry, texts studied in English are diverse, complex and compelling. Acknowledging that the Latin root of the word ‘text’ is ‘woven’, we analyse the text as a construct, unpicking its threads, examining its writer’s methods, and exploring its heritage. Lessons are full of academic debate as students share their interpretations and ideas. A love of reading and an enthusiasm for a good story are essential qualities in any prospective student, while an enjoyment of academic discussion and debate would also prove beneficial. Expected entry requirements:

Head of Department: Mrs H Jones hej@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Language is the blood of the soul into which thoughts run and out of which they grow. Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr

GCSE grade 6 in English Language and English Literature. Future possibilities: This qualification is highly relevant for any career that requires communication or expression: law, medicine, journalism, business, teaching, PR.


ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS & SOCIETIES FACT FILE IB exam details:

2 papers Paper 1: Resource paper – case study. Paper 2: Compulsory short answers and two structured essay questions. One piece of coursework.

IB course content: Foundations of Environmental Systems Human, water, soil, and atmospheric systems

IBDP (SL)

This course is multidisciplinary. Case studies and knowledge from other IB subjects can be applied to all areas of the course. An interest in the natural environment and humanity’s impact on it is needed to get the most from ESS. Individual and group research tasks and practical work are commonplace to investigate and create innovative reports and understand the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies. The wide variety of topics make ESS suitable for anyone with an interest in the environment. An active role in discussion and small group work is needed to get the most from the course. Head of Department: Mrs S Healey smh@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Ecosystems

Expected entry requirements: GCSE grade 55 in Dual Award Combined Science or 5 in Biology.

Pollution and Resources Climate change and Energy security Biodiversity and Conservation.

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We can now destroy or we can cherish—the choice is ours. David Attenborough

Future possibilities: Environmental sciences/management. biogeography, international relations, environmental engineering, environmental law.


FRENCH FACT FILE A-level exam details:

Listening, reading and translation; Essay on literary text and film; Speaking exam. IB exam details: Written paper; Speaking (HL based on literature and SL on a picture); Listening and reading comprehension.

A-LEVEL (AQA)

IBDP (H+SL)

Through the study of languages, cultures, and ideas and issues of global significance students develop international mindedness. In our increasingly multicultural world, the acquisition of one or more languages to a good level is an extremely desirable addition to your skill base and one which will enhance career prospects and widen your opportunities, now perhaps more than ever. France is a major global economy and political centre at the heart of continental Europe. French is widely spoken beyond Europe and is one of the core EU languages. Following on from GCSE, any of the courses is approachable.

A-level course content: Social issues and trends; political and artistic culture; literary texts and films; individual research project. IB course content: The course is centred on five themes: identities, experiences, human ingenuity, social organisation and sharing the planet.

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Expected entry requirements:

Head of Department: Mr E Milner

GCSE grade 6 in French.

ejm@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Future possibilities:

Avoir une autre langue, c’est posséder une deuxième âme. Charlemagne

French is a highly flexible subject and can lead to careers in many walks of life such as graduate careers in business and management, law, journalism, the military, the Civil Service, and teaching. It is also a good choice for joint honours courses at university.


GEOGRAPHY

A-LEVEL (CAIE)

IBDP (HL+SL)

FACT FILE A-level exam details: Four papers with questions ranging from 2 to 20 marks. No coursework. IB exam details: Two papers for SL, three papers for HL, with questions ranging from 2 to 16 marks. One piece of coursework. A-level course content: Physical Geography (e.g. Atmosphere, Tectonics, Global Hazards); Human Geography (e.g. Population, Migration, Development).

Studying Geography will enable you to make connections between natural, social, economic, political and technological systems, and make well-informed judgements about environments and have an understanding of sustainable development and global climate. You will also develop meaningful and transferable skills including literacy, numeracy, ICT and enquiry, as well as visual skills through interpreting maps, graphs, diagrams and satellite images. Geographers have a good knowledge of the wider world and a genuine interest in economic, political, social and environmental issues. They are competent at writing essays, completing research projects on their own initiative; and are skilled in information retrieval and data analysis. Head of Department: Mr H Collison hac@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

IB course content:

Population, Resource Consumption, Global Climate, Hazards and Urban Environments. HL only: Sport and Tourism, Global Risks, Globalisation and Development. 17

Expected entry requirements: GCSE grade 6 in Geography, Maths and English Language. Future possibilities:

Geography is the subject which holds the key to our future. Michael Palin

Students will acquire a wide variety of skills useful in a vast array of directly and indirectly related careers from environmental consultancy, to the Foreign Office, business and finance.


GERMAN FACT FILE A-level exam details:

Listening, reading and translation; Essay on literary text and film; Speaking exam. IB exam details: Written paper; Speaking (HL based on literature and SL on a picture); Listening and reading comprehension. A-level course content: Social issues and trends; political and artistic culture; literary texts and films; individual research project. IB course content: The course is centred on five themes: identities, experiences, human ingenuity, social organisation and sharing the planet.

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A-LEVEL (AQA)

IBDP (H+SL)

Through the study of languages, cultures, and ideas and issues of global significance students develop international mindedness. In our increasingly multicultural world, the acquisition of one or more languages to a good level is an extremely desirable addition to your skill base and one which will enhance career prospects and widen your opportunities, now perhaps more than ever. Germany is at the heart of European culture. This wide-ranging and stimulating course develops language and research skills and heightens awareness of the world’s cultural and social diversity. Visits to plays, films and lectures are arranged to complement the topics covered in the programme. Those studying German have the opportunity to visit Berlin and to apply for study scholarships sponsored by the German government. Expected entry requirements: GCSE grade 6 in German.

Head of Department: Mrs P Sykes pjs@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Man kann einen Menschen nichts lehren, man kann ihm nur helfen, es in sich selbst zu entdecken. Galileo Galilei

Future possibilities: German is a highly flexible subject and can lead to careers in many walks of life such as graduate careers in business and management, law, journalism, the military, the Civil Service, and teaching.


GERMAN A— LANG & LIT FACT FILE IB exam details:

Paper 1: analysis of two unseen non-fictional texts. Paper 2: a question on literature. One piece of coursework + Individual Oral exam. HL only: Essay. IB course content: A range of classic and modern German and international literature; non-fictional texts, including Axel Hacke, Yuval Noah Harari and cartoons.

IBDP (HL)

The course aims to engage pupils with a range of texts, in a variety of media and forms, from different periods, styles, and cultures. Together we explore how authors use language to convey their message and work on skills of interpretation, analysis and evaluation. Through a wide range of activities, pupils develop skills in listening, speaking, reading, writing, and presenting. Our works help the understanding of relationships between texts and a variety of perspectives, cultural contexts, and local and global issues, as well as creating an appreciation of how they contribute to diverse responses and open up multiple meanings. The choice of texts, from Schiller, Fontane and Andersch to Hosseini and Greene aim to foster a lifelong interest in and Expected entry requirements: enjoyment of language and literature. This is a course for native speakers of German only.

Head of Department: Mrs P Sykes

Deutsch in der Mittelstufe

pjs@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

MYP German Language A. Future possibilities:

Nicht da wo ich meinen Wohnsitz habe, bin ich daheim, sondern da, wo ich verstanden werde. Christian Morgenstern 19

Language and literature degree; Journalism, Law, any Humanities subject, complements Sciences, etc.


CLASSICAL GREEK FACT FILE A-level exam details:

Four papers: an unseen translation, a verse literature paper, a prose literature paper and prose composition (English to Greek). No coursework. IB exam details: HL: unseen translation paper (with dictionary), literature paper on extracts from Latin authors, and a research dossier. SL: unseen translation paper (with dictionary), literature paper on extracts from Latin authors (reduced from HL allocation), and a research dossier. A-level and IB course content: The study of literary extracts and honing of linguistic ability.

IBDP (H+SL)

Greek is a demanding GCSE: the advantage of this is that the step up to A-level and IB is relatively smooth. Much of the grammar is already covered. The set texts are longer but the literary technique is essentially similar to that at GCSE; what is more, after Gratin the pace feels almost leisurely. Teaching is split between three teachers and the course content divided between them. The IB research dossier is in no way onerous and provides an opportunity for you to pursue an interest beyond the syllabus. Greek leads naturally to further study at university as part of a Classics degree but also combines well with English, History, Philosophy Expected entry requirements: and modern languages and also often appeals to GCSE grade 6 Greek. scientists. Law courses also look favourably on Classical languages at Upper School level. Head of Department: Dr W Leveritt wgl@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

πόνου τοι χωρὶς οὐδὲν εὐτυχεῖ. Nothing succeeds without toil.

Sophocles 20

A-LEVEL (OCR)

Future possibilities: Law, Foreign Office, GCHQ, Civil Service, the City – this qualification speaks to a person capable of critical and careful, logical thinking.


HISTORY FACT FILE A-level exam details: Two papers: essays marked out of 25 and source evaluations marked out of 30. Paper 3 requires a piece of coursework (NEA) which contributes 20% of the qualification. IB exam details: Three papers for HL and two papers for SL. Essays marked out of 15. Shorter source questions. IA (CW) of 2200 words. A-level course content: Paper 1: Russia 1855–1964 Paper 2: Britain 1951–2007 NEA (CW) Abolition of Slavery in the British Empire 1730-1838. IB course content: Paper 1: Rights & Protest (US Civil Rights & Apartheid in SA) Paper 2: Cold War & Authoritarian States (Germany and Cuba) Paper 3 (HL only) - The Americas. 21

A-LEVEL (AQA)

IBDP (H+SL)

Both the A-level and IB courses focus on historical controversies and provide students with the opportunity to engage in debate and develop their own lines of enquiry. They also encourage students to develop highly refined critical thinking skills and to interpret and master complex terminology and to appreciate that forms of language and communication must be understood in their historical context. Similarly, the courses demand that students develop an in-depth understanding of the cultural values of the societies they study. Whilst there is a significant focus on causation, students will also have the opportunity to consider the more challenging concepts of historical significance, and change and continuity. Ultimately, our studies allow us to understand fully the global issues we face today. Head of Department: Mr J Roberts jnjr@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Expected entry requirements: GCSE grade 6 in History. Future possibilities:

The disadvantage of people not understanding the past is that they do not understand the present. G.K. Chesterton

Any profession that requires critical thinking and the ability to approach a problem from a range of perspectives: armed services, business management; Civil Service, education, journalism, law, management consultancy, marketing, NGOs, political consultancy.


ITALIAN (AB INITIO) FACT FILE IB exam details: Written paper; Speaking; Listening and reading comprehension. IB course content:

The course is centred on five themes: identities, experiences, human ingenuity, social organisation and sharing the planet.

IBDP (SL)

Italian is the most studied language in the world for culture and pleasure. Italy has given the world so much and is renowned for its contribution to: science, literature, music, sport, philosophy, international cuisine, design, fashion, architecture; the automotive industry, film and much, much more. Italian ab initio is an exciting opportunity to learn a new language (no previous experience required). The topics covered will provide you with opportunities to explore the language as well as to develop intercultural understanding, receptive, productive and interactive skills. By the time you finish the course you will be able to use Italian in a number of real life situations. Head of Department: Mr R Breag

Expected entry requirements:

rsb@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

GCSE grade 6 in any foreign language. Future possibilities:

A different language is a different vision of life. Federico Fellini 22

From art dealer to diplomat, from consultant to banker, from fashion designer to chef, historian or archaeologist, the list is endless.


LATIN FACT FILE A-level exam details: Four papers: unseen translation, verse literature paper, prose literature paper, and prose composition (English to Latin). No coursework. IB exam details: HL: unseen translation paper (with dictionary), literature paper on extracts from Latin authors, and a research dossier. SL: unseen translation paper (with dictionary), literature paper on extracts from Latin authors (reduced from HL allocation), and a research dossier. A-level and IB course content:

A-LEVEL (OCR)

Latin is a demanding GCSE: the advantage of this is that the step up to A-level and IB is relatively smooth. The grammar is already covered; the literary passages are longer but the technique is essentially similar to that at GCSE. Teaching is split between three teachers and the course content divided between them. The IB research dossier is in no way onerous and provides an opportunity for you to pursue an interest beyond the syllabus. Latin leads naturally to further study at university as part of a Classics degree but also combines well with English, History, Philosophy and modern languages. The logical and ordered structure of Latin means it also appeals to scientists and mathematicians. Expected entry requirements: GCSE grade 6 in Latin.

Head of Department: Dr W Leveritt wgl@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

The study of literary extracts and honing of linguistic ability.

Labor omnia vincit.

Labour conquers everything.

Virgil 23

IBDP (H+SL)

Future possibilities: Law, Foreign Office, GCHQ, Civil Service, the City – this qualification speaks to a person capable of critical and careful, logical thinking.


MATHEMATICS FACT FILE A-level exam details: Three papers, two pure and one applied. No coursework. IB exam details: Two papers for SL, three papers for SL. One piece of coursework. A-level course content:

A-LEVEL (EDEXCEL)

IBDP (H+SL)

Maths allows you to hone your ability to solve mathematical problems as well as abstract and scientific ones too. These problem-solving skills can then be applied to many different areas of your life. You’ll also learn how to analyse patterns, structures and problems, which will in turn, help you to develop a critical eye. Your logical abilities will be developed so that you will have the tools needed to tackle a number of diverse areas. As technology continues to advance, so too does Mathematics, increasing its essential role in both everyday and corporate life. New mathematical theories are being discovered and developed every day, enabling inventions and scientific discoveries to continue to flourish.

Pure Maths; Statistics; Mechanics. IB course content: Pure Maths; Statistics.

Head of Department: Mrs W Singhal ws@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Just because we can’t find a solution doesn't mean there isn’t one. Andrew Wiles 24

Expected entry requirements: GCSE grade 8 in Maths. Grade 9 is recommended for Further Maths and HL Maths. Future possibilities: Anything requiring mathematical/ numerical skills and interpretation of statistical results.


MUSIC FACT FILE A-level exam details:

Performing (35% or 25%) Assessed by a visiting examiner 10-12 mins, or 6-8 mins (ABRSM Grade 6 standard is ideal).

Composing (25% or 35%) Coursework, 2 pieces (4-6 mins) or 3 pieces (8-10 mins).

Music is a very well-regarded academic subject, often valued highly by universities and future employers alike. It offers pupils the opportunity to build on their performing skills, develop their compositional potential, and extend their ability to appraise a wide range of great music through their studies. Exploring connections between the three disciplines of performing, composing and appraising/listening helps inspire creative ideas, develop evaluative and written skills, and contextualise the music that we perform.

Appraising/Listening (40%) Exam-based, focusing on set work analysis, contextual understanding, unprepared listening with & without a score, and comparison questions.

Lessons offer the opportunity to study set works in detail, develop critical listening skills and contextual understanding, explore a wide range of compositional styles, alongside rewarding performance skills in the final assessment.

A-level course content:

Head of Department: Mr P Davis pd@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

The Western Classical Tradition (The Development of the Symphony).

Musical Theatre (6 top composers). Into the Twentieth Century (new music pathways from 1895-1935)

Composition & Performance work. 25

A-LEVEL (Eduqas)

Expected entry requirements: GCSE grade 6 in Music, but other strong instrumentalists/singers may be considered.

Future possibilities:

Music can name the unnameable and communicate the unknowable. Leonard Bernstein

Whilst working as a professional musician/teacher is an obvious pathway, graduate recruiters love the transferable skills of those who have studied Music.


PHILOSOPHY FACT FILE A-level exam details:

Two papers, with questions ranging from 3 to 25 marks. No coursework. IB exam details: Three papers for HL, two papers for SL, with essays ranging from 10 to 25 marks.

One piece of coursework.

A-LEVEL (AQA)

IBDP (H+SL)

Philosophy —literally, ‘the love of wisdom’— studies what is means to be a human being and explores life’s fundamental yet undecided questions: What is knowledge? How do we attain knowledge? What is a successful human life? What makes an action right or wrong? What is the mind? Is the mind distinct from the body? What is politics? How should we be governed? What is ‘God’? Philosophy lessons focus on opportunities for discussion underpinned by a thorough understanding of the ideas of past and present philosophers. Attention to detail, a logical and creative mind, and an enthusiasm for the questions under consideration are essential qualities for the budding Philosophy student

A-level course content: What can we know? How can we know it? What is the good life? What is the mind? What is God? IB course content: A study of Plato’s Republic; What is ‘human being’? How should we be governed? HL only: What is the ‘good’ life? What is ‘doing philosophy’?

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Head of Department: Mrs K Brett kb1@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

The unexamined life is not worth living. Socrates

Expected entry requirements: GCSE grade 6 in English Literature and/or a Humanities subject. GCSE grade 6 in Maths. Future possibilities: Anything requiring critical analysis and problem-solving skills; law; finance; journalism; NGOs, etc.


PHYSICS FACT FILE A-level exam details:

Three papers. Continuous coursework. IB exam details: 3 papers for H/SL, with fewer questions for SL. One piece of coursework. A-level course content: Forces, energy, particles. These 3 key areas are then used in applied topics e.g., waves, thermal, astro, nuclear. IB course content: Forces, energy, particles. These 3 key areas are then used in applied topics e.g., waves, thermal, astro, nuclear.

27

A-LEVEL (OCR)

IBDP (HL+SL)

Physics is the study of nature. We are trying to work out what the rules are that make our universe work the way it does. And the main clues to these rules are based upon observation of the world around us. This endeavour makes Physics the fundamental science—it underpins all other pure and applied sciences as well as most areas of engineering and medicine. ‘How’ and ‘why’ are important questions for the Physicist – knowing that something happens is not good enough. Physics explores such questions as “Why is the sky blue?”; “What makes the sun shine and what will happen when the sun dies?”; “What is matter made of?”; “How do forces push and pull?”; “How did the universe begin and will it ever end?” Head of Department: Dr J Chilton jac@oakham.rutland.sch.uk Expected entry requirements:

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool. Richard P Feynman

GCSE grade 7 in Maths and Physics. Future possibilities: Any area of science, technology or mathematics. Including engineering, design, architecture, medicine.


POLITICS FACT FILE A-level exam details:

Three papers, with questions ranging from 12 to 30 marks. No coursework. IB exam details: Two papers for HL /SL, source and essay paper. One piece of coursework for SL and two for HL including oral presentations. A-level course content: UK Politics & Core Political Ideas; UK Government; Global Politics. IB course content: Power; Peace and Conflict; Human Rights.

A-LEVEL (Edexcel)

Politics is the study of power: how power is used and abused by our leaders, how power is distributed, and how decisions by those in power affect our lives. Politics is ultimately about people, but most political decisions are made by a branch of government whose roles and powers are determined by a set of rules. We live in a complex world with significant challenges, including global terrorism, poverty, economic instability, failing states, and environmental degradation. These challenges require global co-operation if they are to be resolved. Politics classes are collaborative and engaging, allowing students to explore different political systems and to debate and discuss them with others. The course develops skills of analysis, evaluation, and both oral and written communication, all of which are invaluable in today’s employment market. Head of Department: Mr L Ward law@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

Expected entry requirements:

Politics is too serious a matter to be left to the politicians.

Future possibilities:

Charles de Gaulle 28

IBDP (HL+SL)

GCSE grade 6 in English and/or a Humanities subject. Anything requiring critical thinking and an open mind: Civil Service, law, journalism, marketing, NGOs, etc.


PSYCHOLOGY FACT FILE A-level exam details:

Three papers, with questions ranging from 1 to 16 marks. No coursework. IB exam details: Two papers for SL, three for HL with questions ranging from 9 to 22 marks.

One piece of coursework.

A-LEVEL (AQA)

IBDP (H+SL)

Have you ever observed someone, questioned what they’re thinking and why they have behaved in that way? This natural curiosity and critical thought will help you thrive in Psychology and enable you to understand human and animal behaviour – a vital skill in any area of life. Through discussion and immersive learning, students will explore the scientific study of human behaviour and the mind. This includes the intricate relationship between internal factors, such as memory, emotion and thought, and external influences, such as culture, parents and the media.

A-level course content: Why do we obey? Can we trust our memory? How much influence do our parents have on our adult behaviour?

Head of Department: Miss C Findlay

Expected entry requirements:

ccf@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

GCSE grade 6 English Language, Mathematics and Biology.

IB course content:

How do our biology, cognition and sociocultural experiences shape behaviour? Is animal testing necessary?

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A failure is not always a mistake; it may simply be the best one can do under the circumstances. The real mistake is to stop trying. B F Skinner

Future possibilities: Any careers that involve humans or animals. clinical / medicine, forensics, law, business, sports and education.


RELIGION & PHILOSOPHY FACT FILE A-level exam details: Three 2 hour papers, each with three 40-mark essays. No coursework. A-level course content: Philosophy of Religion: questions about God and human interactions with the divine. Ethics: questions about right and wrong, theoretical and applied. Developments in Islamic Thought: questions about what it means to be a Muslim in the 21st Century.

Religion & Philosophy (also known as Religious Studies) will immerse you in a range of fascinating, contemporary questions which deepen our understanding of the world around us, including: Is the world designed or is it the product of chance? Is ‘the greatest good for the greatest number’ a good approach to decision making? Should euthanasia be legalised? As humans, do we have the capability to discuss ‘God’? You will also complete an in-depth study of the world’s fastest growing religion: Islam. The skills gained in Religion & Philosophy are broad and applicable to a range of university courses and careers. In choosing Religion & Philosophy you will gain the ability to structure an argument and present your ideas coherently; you will improve your debating skills; and you will think Expected entry requirements: critically and evaluatively. Head of Department: Mrs K Brett kb1@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

My Lord, increase me in knowledge. Qur’an 20:114 30

A-LEVEL (OCR)

GCSE grade 6 in English Literature and/or a Humanities subject.

Future possibilities: Anything requiring critical thinking, e.g. law, civil service, education, NHS, finance, publishing, journalism, charity sector, etc.


SPANISH FACT FILE A-level exam details:

Listening, reading and translation; Essay on literary text and film. Speaking exam. IB exam details: Written paper; Speaking (HL based on literature and SL on a photographic image); Listening and reading comprehension. A-level course content: Social issues and trends; political and artistic culture; literary texts and films; individual research project.

A-LEVEL (AQA)

IBDP (H+SL)

Through the study of languages, cultures, ideas and issues of global significance students develop international mindedness. To be a key player in the international arena, the acquisition of one or more languages to a good level is an extremely desirable addition to your skill set and one which will enhance career prospects and widen your opportunities more than ever before. Spanish is a major global force. It is the second most widely spoken language in the world and opens up whole continents to the speaker. It is the official language of 20 countries and widely spoken in the USA. Following on from GCSE, any of the courses are approachable.

Head of Department: Mr C Pauls

Expected entry requirements:

cmp@oakham.rutland.sch.uk

GCSE grade 6 in Spanish GCSE.

IB course content: The course is centred on five themes: identities, experiences, human ingenuity, social organisation and sharing the planet.

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Future possibilities:

Hablar otro idioma es como convertirse en otra persona. Haruki Murakami

Spanish is a highly flexible subject and can lead to careers in many walks of life, such as graduate careers in business and management, law, journalism, the military, the Civil Service, and teaching.


SPORTS SCIENCE

A-LEVEL (OCR)

IBDP (SL)

BTEC

FACT FILE A-level exam details: 3 exam papers; 1 oral assessment; 1 practical sport assessment. IB exam details: 3 exam papers including a multiple choice, data and long answer question papers. BTEC exam details: 3 external exams, taken in January of Form 6, June of Form 6 and January of Form 7.

5 internal assignment-based units, some with presentations over the two-year course. A-level course content: Physiology, sports psychology and sociocultural studies IB course content: Sports physiology and the effect of exercise on the body. Sports psychology and biomechanics. BTEC course content: Physiology, sports psychology, socio-cultural studies, sports fitness testing, coaching for performance. 32

All of our Sports Science courses encourage pupils to immerse themselves in the world of sports and PE. The courses develop theoretical knowledge and understanding of the physiological and psychological states that affect sport performance, as well as delving into the ethical and social considerations, past and present, that influence participation on physical activity and sport. Each course develops learners’ factual understanding, as well as allowing them to question their own ethical and social standing on current issues in sport.

Sports Science lessons are centred around factual content, research and practical application.

Head of Department: Mrs H Cannie

Expected entry requirements: GCSE grade 6 in PE, although it is possible to study Sports Science with no previous experience. GCSE grade 6 in Biology for A-level and IB. Future possibilities:

Sport has the power to change the world. Nelson Mandela

Sports Science, physiotherapy, PE teacher, sports psychology, sports coaching, sports management, sports development, strength and conditioning.


Notes


To find out more about life in Oakham's Upper School, follow us online: oakham.rutland.sch.uk OakhamSch oakhamschool Registered Charity No 1131425 Company Limited by Guarantee Registered in England and Wales No 6924216. The information in this publication is correct at the time of printing. Changes may be made for educational or other reasons.