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Key Club International | CNH District | Region 3 | Division 30 South | Oxford Academy Key Club Volume 18, Issue 4


TABLE 2 4 6 8 9 10 14 15 16 18 19

OF

Table of Contents + Division/Club Updates President’s Corner Editor’s Note

Key Events This Month by Vina Nguyen How To: Bake Sale by Brittney Le

2

July DCM: Beach Boomba by Tracy Vu, Mai-vy Truong, Tobi Yao & Pauline Doan Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast by Amber Sun OA Volunteer Day by Timmy Bui Cookie Lab by Natalie Melendez & Jennifer Vo Club Difficulties by Emily Sunaryo A Bee-zy Day

CON 20 21 22 24 26

EID

Serv

Awar

Aug

Cont


NTENTS Festival by Brianna Ong

vice in Schools by Leo Hernandez

rds

gust Calendar

tact Us!

DIVISION UPDATES AUGUST DCM: MOVIE NIGHT X BLANKET MAKING SATURDAY, AUGUST 25TH @ BUENA PARK HIGH SCHOOL 3PM - 6PM ARE YOU READY FOR AUGUST DCM?!? MEMBERS WILL BE WATCHING MULAN WHILE MAKING BLANKETS FOR THE ORGANIZATION YANA. YANA PROVIDES CARE PACKAGES TO CANCER PATIENTS, AND PART OF IT ARE HANDMADE BLANKETS! MEMBERS WILL BE ABLE TO COME IN THEIR PAJAMAS/COMFIEST CLOTHES, SO THAT EVERYONE CAN GET COMFY DURING THE MOVIE! COME OUT TO NOT ONLY BOND WITH BOTH D30S AND D30N MEMBERS, BUT TO HELP OUT OUR COMMUNITY AS WELL! MEMBERS WILL ALSO RECEIVE 2 HOURS OF SERVICE! YOU'LL BE ABLE TO CAPTURE THE MOMENTS WITH D30S'S POLAROID FUNDRAISER. $2 FOR 1 POLAROID. RSVP: https://tinyurl.com/ybyh7xv8

CLUB UPDATES DIVISION MERCH PAY BY AUGUST 29 TO VINA NGUYEN (@ VINATRAMNGUYEN@GMAIL.COM) YOU CAN NOW MAKE PRE-ORDERS FOR THE DIVISION MERCHANDISE INCLUDING T-SHIRTS, FANNY PACKS, LANYARDS, DRAWSTRINGS, AND HATS! DIVISION MERCHANDIZE CAN BE WORN AT DCMS, SERVICE EVENTS, AND FALL RALLY SOUTH (DIVISION SHIRTS ARE REQUIRED FOR FRS). THE FIRST SET OF PRE-ORDERS WON’T BE ARRIVING UNTIL LATE AUGUST OR EARLY SEPTEMBER.

SEE EMAILS FOR LINKS, PRICES & ADDITIONAL INFO

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VINA NGUYEN PRESIDENT 4


Hey Sunshines!

H

ope your first two weeks of school have been exciting! For me, my first day of school as senior was definitely an exciting, nerve-racking, and nostalgic one. Something about seeing the many parents of underclassmen and junior high students made me feel reminiscent of my first day as a 7th grader at Oxford. I remember the nervous feelings and my first time wearing khaki pants and a grey polo. Simply walking on campus was an intimidating task. Would I get lost? Where would I belong in this huge campus of 2000 students (the campus was huge to a 7th grader like me at the time)? Flash forward five years later: senior me wearing khaki pants and a grey polo to my last first day of school. To think that five years has already passed is unimaginable sometimes. For freshmen and sophomores, school returning means managing and adjusting to AP classes for the first time. For juniors, you’ve already adjusted to AP classes and this year will be an important and difficult year with even more AP’s. For some, junior year will be a breeze, but for others, it may be the toughest year of high school. It is the year where you scramble to take all your standardized tests and wish for blessings from College Board. Lastly, for seniors, it will be our last for most things in high school. Our last first day of school. Our last rallys. Our last dances. Our last moments to enjoy each other's company before we leave high school. Yet for now, in the midst of all these events is College Application Season. It’ll be both stressful and exciting, but I know that we could do this and pull through no matter how hard it gets. Afterall, senior year is the last year of our high school career and that means we’ve got to finish the race strong. On another note, here are some important club updates:

I am proud to be serving such an amazing and active organization. In June, OAKC served almost 700 hours and this month, OAKC served 609 hours. I am not only amazed by the numbers, but also by how involved our members have been throughout summer.

The annual School Supplies Drive is coming right around the corner and we are partnering with the organization Each One Teach One to donate school supplies! This year, it will be from Monday, August 20 until Friday, August 31. Each cluster will be given a box designated for school supply donations. With each donation having different amount of points, the cluster that earns the greatest amount of points will win a prize!

Club Rush is also coming up very soon and will be from September 4-7. Make sure to drop by Key Club’s booth to learn more about our organization and maybe even ask us “How do you feel?”. Make sure to take pictures with our Key Club officers (in all black) roaming the quad and doing our cheers!

Get busy suns!

Sun-cerely, Vina

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GRACE NGUYEN BULLETIN EDITOR 6


Hey Key-Clubbers!

W

elcome back to school! I know a lot of us (including me) didn’t want summer to end. It’s only been three days, so I hope you all aren’t extremely stressed out. Personally, I had a lot of headaches on the first day of school. Who would have thought three schedule changes in one day was even possible? At least I got the

classes I wanted in the end. For all those who feel like they’re already going through finals week, keep up the great work. Stay strong and don’t let the stress ruin your school year. (Don’t forget this coming week is spirit week!!!) My “Editor’s Note” this month is going to be shorter than last month’s. Vina already did an

excellent job telling us about upcoming events this month, so there’s no need for me to make repeats. (See President’s Corner on page 4 and 5.) I’ll make my announcements as short as possible.

August DCM is coming up! It’ll take place on Saturday, August 25th from 3pm to 6pm at Buena Park High School. (Just in case you need the address: 8833 Academy Dr, Buena Park, CA 90621) This month’s theme is Movie Night x Blanket Making. We’ll be joining D30N in making blankets for YANA, an organization. We’ll also be watching Mulan, as we work on the blankets. 2 hours of service will be given to all attendees, and I did say in the previous newsletters that I can give rides if needed. This time, I won’t be able to give rides TO the DCM, but I can give rides HOME (as long as you live decently close). So if you need a ride home, feel free to contact me. And also, I know not a lot of you come out to the HOPE Distribution, but I simply want to quickly talk about an amazing, elderly couple who has impacted so many people’s lives through their kindness and dedication. This amazing couple has always been in charge of the pizza section, where I volunteer at. Over the year, I got to know both of them personally. It wasn’t until last week when I learned one of them became ill and will not be returning to HOPE Distribution until complete recovery. For now, all we can do is hope for the best. At the moment, we are also in dire need of volunteers for the pizza/breadstick section. Without our amazing couple, we cannot distribute the pizzas and breadsticks properly. So, if you are able to lend us a helping hand this week, please come out. It will be greatly appreciated.

That’s all for this month. And like I said above, if you have time, please come out to the August DCM and the HOPE Distribution.

Your New-BEE Bulletin Editor, Grace Nguyen

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VINA NGUYEN | PRESIDENT

I

n terms of service, July, similar to June, was strong and members were more involved. Though Key Club provided members with numerous events this month, here are the KEY events this month: Beach Boomba, OA Volunteer Day, and Bake

Sales.

One of the biggest Region events, Beach Boomba, occurred in the past month, in which members of Region 3 got to gather together for a fun day in the sun. This is one of the DCM’s that high attendance and throughout the day, members got to participate in activities such as beach volleyball, sponge race, tug-a-war, and watermelon eating contest. Our region was able to fundraise for the Pediatric Trauma Program through pie-ing the LTG’s— an especially popular way to fundraise! Next came OA Volunteer Day, which was also a huge event for OA Key Clubbers, because it was local and convenient. It occurred right at our school and members were able to help refine the school before school comes back in session. Though it was a hot, sunny day, many members still came out to clean and refurnish the school as it currently undergoes construction. Lastly, Division 30 South and our very own home club held successful Bake Sales this month. Members were able to involve themselves with this fundraiser for the Pediatric Trauma Program through donating baked goods and/or volunteering for various shifts. As an incentive, members were given service hours for their time and dedication. As a

result of these Bake Sales, both the division and our club were able to fundraise more for PTP. With less than 4 months left until FRS, our home club is working hard to reach our goal of raising $850 for PTP! Overall, members were more involved with Key Club this summer, especially in reaching their goal of obtaining a senior graduation stole (100 service hours) or medal (200 service hours)!

If you have any questions about the graduation stole

or medal, feel free to ask any board officer! 8


HOW TO: BAKE SALE BRITTNEY LE | TREASURER

I

n an attempt to make money for the Pediatric Trauma Program in time for Fall Rally South, there's only one thing to do when you're unable to spend money: bake sales. Thus being, Oxford Academy Key Club hosts monthly bake sale in order to raise money for both the club and our preferred charities.

As per usual, the bake sale was held at Ralphs in Cerritos, just off the 91 freeway at Carmenita St. and a short fifteen minute ride from Oxford Academy. Typically though, our bake sales are held on Saturdays, but this time we wanted to test the success of Sunday bake sales. From this experience, we learned that Sundays usually have less shoppers than Saturday, but a lot of them nonetheless. To prepare for this fundraiser, I called up over 20 stores to find a location to host a bake sale, to which, I was unfortunately told no to, due to store policies against soliciting. Fortunately, we always can rely on the Ralphs in Cerritos to have bake sales, even on short notice! After confirming a location, I then inform Vina, our Key Club President, and create a spreadsheet to provide Key Clubbers with even more volunteering opportunities. Volunteers are able to either help out and sell baked goods throughout the day or they can bake desserts for us to sell! Either way, volunteers are the back bones of our bake sales. After all that is done comes the actual bake sale. Volunteers arrive at the grocery store in the morning, around 10 AM, to help set up the table and put out the goodies. Then, for the following six hours, we attempt to sell the baked goods to passing shoppers. Many times, the shoppers simply donate money, passing on the baked goods, which is just as favored as them purchasing the goods. However, it's also very nice seeing them, especially children, buy and enjoy our home baked desserts! Personally, bake sales are honestly one of my favorite fundraisers, as it gives me the opportunity to bake and earn big money! They're also the best thing we've got, as it's the summertime, and we can't spend money or we won't get reimbursed. It's a wonderful feeling to see all the little kids' faces light up at the sight of cupcakes and to witness how many good, selfless people there are in the world to be donating to our cause.

Bake sales can

also be really fun to volunteer at, or you can practice your baking skills, so be sure to volunteer for next month's bake sale!

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TRACY VU| VICE PRESIDENT OF SPECIAL PROJECTS

T

his year’s Beach Boomba was my second time going to this annual event. I was excited to see what is in

planned this year and experiencing it for the first time as a member from outside the Division Leadership Team. At the event, we had many fun ice breakers with other divisions in Region 3 and I even made some new friends there! From there on, we played many more ice breakers and mini games. After lunch, we had tug of war, sponge relay and even a volleyball tournament. I was quite surprised at the spirit and devotion these members had while competing in

these games. I highly recommend members to come out to the event. Rain or

shine, it’s a great chance to make friends with new key clubbers and bond with the entire region before school starts!

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T

MAI-VY TRUONG | SECRETARY his month, our DCM was the annual Beach Boomba. Personally, I’ve always enjoyed this event very much, because it’s a great social where to get to interact with so many members from all around the region. There were so many fun activities to participate in, and all the LTGs made sure

everyone was having fun. I know they all put a lot of work and time into making these events successful, and I’m so grateful and I think we’re so blessed to have such hardworking and well-rounded people leading us. Out of all the activities we did that day, which included a volleyball match, games of tug of war, various icebreakers, and pie-ing our LTGs, my two favorite activities would have to be the Riff Off icebreaker and pieing the LTGs. Riff Offs are always fun and a great icebreaker, as you can never go wrong with screaming random songs at the top of your lungs with the most spirited and enthusiastic people around you. As for pie-ing, this year, we used shaving cream instead of the usual whipped

cream, which I thought was a little odd. Even though I didn’t pie anyone myself, I still had lots of fun watching other people smack plates of shaving cream into the LTGs’ faces and watching them sputter and spit out all the continuous plates of cream hitting their faces. All in all, it was a really fun day.

I would definitely recommend all the new or previously inactive members to attend this event next year. It’s such a great opportunity to interact with members from other schools, and you also get to spend the day at the beach. Can’t wait for next year!

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JULY DCM: BEACH BOOMBA (CONT.)

TOBI YAO | HISTORIAN

I

first started attending Key Club events during the summer before my freshman year, and I clearly remember Beach Boomba to be my first event. For a new key clubber, it’s quite overwhelming to see such a large number of people gathered from all over the region, especially since I thought Key Club was just a volunteering organization. I could

compare my experience this year from last year and it’s amazing to see how many relationships I’ve formed with other Key Clubbers.

I definitely recommend attending

as it’s a great way to get to know other people from all around the region. Beach Boomba provides plenty of bonding games and opportunities to meet new people; even if you are shy and find it difficult to approach new people like me, it’s impossible to go home without meeting someone new. Some of these activities included playing Indian Chief and Soulmate. These games are commonly played at division events or even just small socials between a couple of clubs. However, it’s a completely different experience when there is a much larger amount of people. Indian Chief especially is much more interactive and it is more difficult for the people in the center to find out who is leading the dance moves. Everyone who attended also wrote their name and Instagram on a clothespin. We were given the clothespin of another Key Club member and were encouraged to find them and learn something about them. My partner for this activity ended up being someone who was also from Division 30 South, however, many people had to find someone who wasn’t from their division. You never know if you’ll just follow them on Instagram or if you’ll see that Key Clubber later on at other region or maybe even district events. Different divisions were also selling merchandise such as t-shirts, tank tops, key chains, or hats. Every year, the divisions also have a volleyball tournament. Those who do not want to take part can also opt to watch the games or participate in the sponge relays and tug of war. Although the wind was blowing hard and

making it difficult for the game to run smoothly, everyone had fun cheering on their division. Towards the end of the day, members were given the opportunity to pie their LTG in the face for a dollar. The money that was raised would go to PTP. We finished up the region event with a quick beach cleanup.

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JULY DCM: BEACH BOOMBA (CONT.)

PAULINE DOAN | HISTORIAN

B

each Boomba was the best event to signal the end of summer and act as a fresh slap in the face to remind everyone that school is indeed coming. To be quite frank, I didn’t know what to expect. My initial thoughts were “Oh, this is a bit weird, going to the beach at 10 in the morning” and “What are we going

to do with so many people roaming around?” I was a little concerned due to the fact that the number of attendees was so large someone was bound to sip out unnoticed. Along with the fact that I don’t really like the beach. But all of my concerns were put at ease as soon as I arrived. It was pleasantly surprising to see Key Clubbers from Region 3, decked out in their Division’s colors, all huddled together, forming a mini rainbow illusion. I absolutely adore seeing other Divisions’ mascots and their merch, so this gathering completely made my day. As for the event itself, it went by in a flash. To start, as everyone signed in they wrote their name, division, and social media handle on a clothespin which were eventually put into a large bag. The clothespins were then distributed, and everyone had to go find the person they randomly selected. It proved to be quite a difficult task, since everyone blended in together and no one could really differentiate one another. Nevertheless, it was entertaining to hear shouts from across the beach trying to find a specific person.

Something really interesting, though, was how the partner I had knew my cousin! They go to the same school and are apparently relatively close friends. Another activity that I thoroughly enjoyed was the mini riff off. Essentially, you divide into separate teams and according to a certain word or topic everyone in your group has to sing the same song that matches with the category. I love Pitch Perfect, so this game was the cherry on top!

All in all, Beach Boomba was an entertaining event that brought me a lot closer to the Key Clubbers in Region 3.

I didn’t

get to meet as many people as I wanted to, but there’s always FRS! I did put my historian skills to the max, though. Taking 200+ pictures is quite straining, but it’s all worth it to capture all the beautiful moments we create and share with one another.

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Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast

AMBER SUN | VICE PRESIDENT OF MEMBER RELATIONS

T

his event was my first time attending a Cypress Community Center Pancake Breakfast, and, needless to say, it was extremely fun - but that’s to be expected of every Kiwanis pancake breakfasts and all Key Club events in general. This time, however, marked the one day in

history I was excited to wake up before 11am. The Cypress Community Center Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast took place in a large room connected to the rest of the festival. Volunteers assisted with setting up, running the pancake and sausage makers, and serving customers. Many of the customers came fresh out of a marathon, so it was nice the smiles on their faces after they received food despite having no leftover energy inside. There was also a live band, so the dining room was lively and busy. When the rush died down, some volunteers went outside to visit the other booths. A booth gave free popcorn and cotton candy, and many booths had money raffles. The festival was huge and very packed, as the booths

were spaced closely to each other, making maneuvering out of the festival pretty difficult.

However, this experience was one I’m definitely grateful for, and I’m extremely glad I had a chance to volunteer at it before I graduate.

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I

volunteer day

TIMMY BUI | HISTORIAN

was so surprised at the amount of people that came

to volunteer— over a hundred students and parents combined!

And so many of the students were 7th graders, which was cool

because I got to see their hard work already at a young age. It was a hot and

tiring day, yet the school provided plenty of cold water, pizza, and even music from a speaker (music taste was okay). All of the staff and custodians were really nice and I actually got to know more on a first-name basis.

TABLE CLEANING With 9 other people, I helped move all of the lunch tables outside from one side of the quad to the other. Then, we cleaned them with soap, water, and sponges; we did it three times over to make it a lot cleaner.

LOCKER CLEANING

We opened all of the outdoor lockers and cleaned them out again by picking out the trash. Then, we used hoses to wash them, especially the ones with webs or dirt in them.

BOOK SORTING

This part took the majority of my day. In the English building, we sorted all of the

literature books and novels into separate boxes, shelves, and tables. Sure, sounds like a simple task, but there were just so many books! And we also had to move bookshelves and computer monitors around to get the job done. In total, there were probably more than 20 people for this task which took several hours.

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COOK NATALIE MELENDEZ | PUBLICIST

T

his month I had the pleasure of volunteering at The Cookie Lab program at the Thomas House Family Shelter, and it’s safe to say I had an amazing time.

I was excited to combine my love of baking with volunteering, and The

Cookie Lab did not disappoint. I met a handful of kids who would go on to attend all 4 meetings due to their newfound love for the program, and I even learned a few things myself about the science behind baking. However, getting to bond with the kids and getting to watch them learn while having fun was the best part. I would watch as they all actively participated in the conversations and came up with their own ideas. They all left everyday having learned something new and with a greater understanding of how science can be applied in everyday life. And everyday I would leave with a rewarding feel because I had played a role in that new understanding of the world. But, that’s not to say I didn’t also enjoy watching the kids bake! Many of them had not made anything from scratch before and watching them to knead dough for pizza and make their own solar ovens was definitely very entertaining; especially when they added their own touch with decorations.

I truly did have an

amazing time at The Cookie Lab. It was a new experience and a lot of fun; I would definitely volunteer again.

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KIE LAB

M

JENNIFER VO | PUBLICIST y newsletter articles are beginning to sound like a public diary and guess what everyone: I have the biggest platonic friend crush on Varsha and Lisa.

I seriously can’t fathom the amount of time and effort they put into

making the Cookie Lab into a reality. Every day they would carry in a huge box of supplies and ingredients that they had bought themselves. They’d bring their lesson plans and pre-measured ingredients all deliberately mapped out. But most impressively, they were always incredibly patient and kind to the kids and volunteers. I mean, you try teaching a second grader about the pH scale. It’s not easy. But other than being bedazzled by these two amazing founding women, I was able to take in a whole new experience. The Cookie Lab was like the cool, adequately funded class I never had. The kids were so immersed in making pizzas and lava lamps that they would forget that we were actually teaching them chemistry. I couldn’t believe I was explaining what a carbohydrate was to a nine-year-old when I didn’t learn about it myself until freshman year. By the end of the program, they had learned so much and I couldn’t be prouder. Listening to a kid show off his project and tell his dad about all things he learned is pretty beautiful. Is this how elementary school teachers feel?

I’m starting to understand why they would commit their entire careers to teaching children about the world.

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EMILY SUNARYO | PROJECT CHAIR

F

or this month article, I wanted to talk about a difficult time that came up during the beginning stages of this term. I had encountered trouble with things outside of Key Club, and it had greatly affected how I had worked. I was often side tracked by other responsibilities and things going on at home

that I didn't put as much effort into my work as I should have. An example of this is my conflicting schedules with my SAT prep, and summer tennis camps that had not allowed me to volunteer and go to any events this summer, which is one thing that I greatly regret and hope to change before the end of the year. I had also not been able to attend many of the DCM’s due to poor scheduling and last minute family plans I was not aware of till it was too late. I also have been so occupied with family problems that I had not been able to be fully committed in finding new events that I had left a majority of the work to Brianna, my fellow project chair. This is something I am working hard to fix before the start of the school year, as I realize that it will only get harder from this moment. I will work hard in making sure I meet deadlines in order to keep the club the best that it can be.

This term so far has taught me that I

need to work harder in maintaining my time and prioritizing, which will be valuable assets as I go into junior year.

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A Bee-zy Day GRACE NGUYEN | BULLETIN EDITOR

S

aturday July 21st was one of the busiest days of my summer. I’ve never spent over 10 hours for Key Club other than the time I volunteered at OA Fest. Even since then, I promised myself that I would never take on such a challenge again. Little did I know that I was going to spend 13 hours (basically my whole day),

attending three Key Club events. The first event I attended was the HOPE Distribution which started at 7 in the morning. Like always, I helped at the pizza station, sorting and passing out pizzas to low income families. Usually, HOPE ends at 10, but because I had another event that started at 10, I left early. The second event was the July DCM: Beach Boomba at Huntington State Beach. Through this event, we were able to bond with all the Key Clubbers in Region 3 through activities and competitions. The best part was playing in the water during the last 15 minutes of the DCM. Although I’m not a big fan of the beach, I had fun since one of my best buddies came

along. To be honest, I wasn’t planning on playing in the water since I had another event afterwards, but I quickly changed my mind after I saw my buddy having fun without me. It wasn’t an event to miss! The only thing I regret was not putting sunscreen on my feet, so I got serious burns when I got home. ;_; Beach Boomba ended at around 3 pm, so as soon as our LTG official declared the DCM over, I rushed over to Concert on the Green, which started at 4. I was chairing the event that Saturday, so I tried by best to not be late. Luckily, I came right on time and went straight to the refreshment booth. For the next 4 hours, I helped other volunteers run the drinks

station. By the time I got home, I was sore, tired, and sunburnt. Even so, I enjoyed myself, and that’s all that matters. Next year, I’m especially looking forward to all the events summer will throw at me.

If you have spare time on your Saturdays, you should definitely come out to HOPE, Beach Boomba, and Concert on the Green next year!

I’m not saying that you should attend all of them in one day

(because that takes serious dedication, which I don’t have), but you all should trying to attend each at least once in your summer! Trust me, it’s worth it!

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BRIANNA ONG | PROJECT CHAIR

T

his year’s Eid Festival was held on June 16th and 17th at La Palma Park. It was the sixth annual Eid Festival held for the Anaheim community. Both days

were filled with activities, as volunteers were assigned to various tasks from 12 noon to ten o’clock at night on both Saturday and Sunday. Volunteers

from Oxford Academy Key Club had the opportunity to hand out tickets to festival attendees at the gates. We also helped in the game area for kids where many different activities were set up earlier, such as an inflatable super slide, bounce houses, attractions similar to Disneyland’s Mad Tea Party teacup ride, and even a mobile 5D simulator ride. When volunteers arrived at noon, they received yellow shirts in order to make it easier for Eid Festival staff to spot them and ask them to carry out tasks. On Saturday, I started my shift by helping out at the area for kids with Natalie. We made sure that the kids would be safe when having fun at the festival. Natalie and I then continued volunteering by picking up trash in the park. Volunteers were constantly on trash duty, since it was our responsibility to keep the park clean so that it would be ready to use for other events after the Eid Festival. Sunday started with volunteers handing out tickets to people arriving at the gates from 12 noon to about two o’clock in the afternoon. We were then assigned different tasks, occasionally having to communicate with vendors and staff to ensure that the area was clean and safe.

I enjoyed my time volunteering at this particular event, the Eid Festival, because not only were we helping our community, but I met amazing people. On Saturday night while at the event, I got to know the other volunteers who helped at the Eid Festival every year. They were all kind and very welcoming, and I want to go back to the Eid Festival next year so I can see them again and hopefully meet new volunteers. The following day, I met people from Arizona and had the chance to talk to them and have fun with them. The Eid Festival was an amazing event that I definitely would volunteer for next year!

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in LEO HERNANDEZ | HISTORIAN

A

s the 2018-2019 school year draws ever nearer, visions of beginning new classes and starting school anew dance in the heads of Kiwanis members across the nation. As a student, I am no stranger to these school year premonitions. While I watch department stores fill their stock shelves with

back-to-school supplies, however, I cannot help but feel remorse for the more than

16 million American children living in extreme poverty, who cannot afford these basic school supplies (According to the Kids in Need Foundation). Because of this fact, I feel as though it is the responsibility of Key Clubbers throughout the nation to help children receive the education they deserve through helping them receive essential supplies such as pencils, pens, and paper. For this reason, I’ve taken the liberty of compiling a list of organization through which Key Clubbers can volunteer, and donate, to ensure the education of these millions of children. Firstly, the aforementioned Kids in Need Foundation helps children in “the most chal-

lenged communities throughout the country”, by donating school supplies to the children living in these communities. The KINF receives donations from any individual or group, so long the products donated adhere to their donation guidelines, which can be found on their website. Furthermore, if you know any children in need, KINF is happy to donate school supplies to them, so long as you do so through a school social worker. As one of the largest donating groups in the country, KINF is one of the major groups you should consider when helping impoverished children get an education. Another prominent donation organization for impoverished school children is School on Wheels, who is coincidentally celebrating their 25th anniversary this year. School on Wheels is an organization which uses trailers to educate homeless children. Similar to KINF, this organization accepts donations of both service and goods to help complete their mission in education impoverished and homeless children. All information can be found on their website, schoolonwheels.org . Despite only having listed 2 major organizations, much service can be done within the district to help children within our own communities afford school supplies. In conclusion, providing a good education to these students in need is an amazing way

to show devotion to you community come school season.

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Congratulations to Jennifer Vo (Sophomore) and Giang

Nguyen (Sophomore) who have earned the most points through attending various Key Club social and service events this quarter. As an incentive, we have awarded them with club merchandise! And YOU can be the next SHINING SUN by attending many events. For more information, feel free to contact us and ask questions!

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At July DCM, Oxford Academy was recognized as the 2nd

Shining Club of the Month as well as the club with the most funds raised this month!

Congrats to Giang

Nguyen (Sophomore) for his

dedication as July's member of the month! 23


SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

NOTE:

This calendar does not exhibit ALL events happening this month. Additional events may be added further on in the month.

5

6

7

WEDNE 1

8

First Day o

12

13

14

15

20

21

22

Bolsa Chica State Beach Clean Up

19

Back to Sch

26

27

28

29

Payment for D Merchandise

24


ESDAY

THURSDAY 2

FRIDAY 3

SATURDAY 4 HOPE Food Dis. Concert on the Green

9

10

11 Wet ‘n Wild 5K

of School

16

17

18 HOPE Food Dis.

23

24

25 August DCM

hool Night

30

31

Division Due

25


Got a question? VINA NGUYEN PRESIDENT

vinatramnguyen@gmail.com (714) 332-9567

EMILY SUNARYO PROJECT CHAIR

bremily248@gmail.com (562) 278-6837

LEO HERNANDEZ HISTORIAN

leoahdez@gmail.com (714) 726-4901

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AMBER SUN VICE PRESIDENT OF MEMBER RELATIONS

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August 2018 Newsletter  
August 2018 Newsletter  
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