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The public seems pleased with management of parks under the CRD’s watch, such as Gonzales News, Page A3 Hill in Oak Bay.

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Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Layton remembered as a bridge builder NDP leader’s final words showed optimism Kyle Slavin

on his deathbed. “You have every reason to be optimistic, determined, and focused on the Hours after news spread of Jack Lay- future,” he wrote. “All my life I have ton’s death Monday morning, Greater worked to make things better. Hope Victoria MPs were effusive with compli- and optimism have defined my political career, and I continue to be hopeful ments for the former NDP leader. Visionary, courageous, inspiring, and optimistic about Canada.” Savoie, MP for Victoria, says hope boundlessly optimistic and doggedly determined were how Denise Savoie and optimism defined Layton, both as and Randall Garrison remember the a politician and a friend. “Jack was a bridge builder, man they both credit for and I saw that within the getting them into federal party and across Canada,” politics. she said. “But Jack always “I feel like I’ve lost a friend said that what he was buildand a leader, and I sense that ing was a movement – it was Canadians feel sad, too,” a collective effort. I hope we Savoie said in a tearful intercan carry on that vision view Monday morning. “He because that’s what he left was a guy who spoke from us, his legacy.” the heart, and that always Saanich-Gulf Islands MP came through.” Elizabeth May, leader of Layton, who was 61, the Green party, released a stepped down as the New statement saying: “Jack will Democratic leader last Jack Layton always be remembered for month after revealing he was battling a second bout of cancer. his unfailing love of Canada and his The official opposition leader was frail dedication to this country and its citiand gaunt during an appearance July zens.” Layton spent nearly three decades 25, after fighting off prostate cancer in politics, first as a city councillor in last year. He led his party to a surprise show- Toronto and then federally with the ing in the May 2 election, as the NDP NDP. Even in his final words, Layton’s won 103 seats across the country, up stalwart optimism and steadfast direcfrom 37 in the prior election. “It was that dogged determinism he tion for his party and country didn’t had that ‘this could be done, you just waiver. “Love is better than anger. Hope is had to work at it,’ that was so inspiring to me,” said Garrison, MP for Esquimalt- better than fear. Optimism is better Juan de Fuca. “It’s that inspiration and than despair. So let us be loving, hopeboundless optimism of his – and I think ful and optimistic. And we’ll change that’s what a lot of people responded the world.” kslavin@saanichnews.com to.” Shortly after his death, the NDP released a statement their leader PLEASE SEE: reportedly wrote to Canadians while Our View, Page A8

News staff

OAK

BAY

tomf@vreb.bc.ca

Don Denton/News staff

Community Association of Oak Bay volunteer Jill Croft, left, and Oak Bay Coun. Pam Copley show off a draft copy of Oak Bay’s new green map at Willows Beach. The resource will be available to the public in the new year.

Public drives map project Ryan Flaherty News staff

G

reater Victoria has one. Metchosin, Highlands, heck, even James Bay has one. Now Oak Bay will have one too. It’s called a community green map, and it’s taken more than five years to produce. “It started out at Windsor Park on a pingpong table,” said Jill Croft, who spearheaded the map project. “We spread out a blank map of Oak Bay with a number of post-its and we spoke to people as they walked past, asking them what they like about their community.” And now, after all this time, the map is almost complete.

Green mapping was first conceived in New York City as a way to connect tourists, newcomers and native New Yorkers who had an interest in sustainability, to the natural areas and culturally significant spots that made their city unique. The Green Apple Map, as it was called, was so well received that an entire system of mapmaking was created which would enable people in communities around the world to design their own maps. Each map uses a universal set of icons, but has a unique look which emphasizes different aspects of a given community. PLEASE SEE: Green map, Page A10

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OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, August 24, 2011 OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, August 24, 2011

External body to review VGH case of stillborn infant

Visitors to Gonzales Hill Regional Park can find this view overlooking Gonzales Bay. Gonzales Hill is the CRD’s only regional park in Oak Bay.

Report will be released to public Sam Van Schie News staff

Photo courtesy CRD Parks

Implied support for parks plan Public consultation yields little but positive comments for strategy Ryan Flaherty News staff

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. That appears to be the message coming from the public when it comes to the Capital Regional District’s management of regional parks and trails. The CRD recently released a draft copy of its 10-year Regional Parks Strategic Plan. Judging by the response – or lack thereof – that came during the report’s public consultation phase, people appear satisfied with the direction being taken. The document, prepared with the help of a volunteer Citizen Advisory Panel, re-emphasizes many of the key principles of the CRD’s last strategic plan, also known as the Master Plan, which was created in 2000. “The majority of the public felt that Regional Parks is on the right path and nature protection and conserving biodiversity should be Regional Parks’ top priority,” panel chair Dave Chater wrote in the plan’s foreword.

The level of participation in the plan’s public consultation phase appears to reinforce Chater’s statement. Despite providing numerous opportunities for members of the public to have their say on important parks issues, the response was modest at best. “I would say that the response we got from people is ‘we’re on the right track’ and to keep moving forward,” said Jeff Ward, Regional Parks’ manager of planning, conservation and development. “The citizen advisory panel was there to read what the community was saying, and I think that’s what they said.” Support for the current parks mandate is one of several key points in the draft plan. It also emphasizes the need to protect the environment while still providing people with adequate recreational opportunities. “We recognize that these lands have many different qualities about them,” Ward said. “They supply an area for fish (and) salmon-bearing

streams, provide a home for wildlife, even help sequester carbon and reduce greenhouse gases. “But they’re also good for the health of people.” The plan also focuses on making full use of existing parkland over the next five years. With a land acquisition fund that’s fully committed at the moment, it’s time to open new parks and manage the existing ones, Ward said. Another major principle guiding the strategic plan is that ‘nature needs half.’ The concept proposes that half of the region’s land and water base should eventually be protected. Currently, about 20 per cent of the CRD is protected. The regional parks office hopes to bring that number up to 50 per cent by the end of this century. The draft plan was received by the CRD at its Aug. 10 board meeting and in all likelihood, it will be approved alongside a supplementary financial plan early next year. editor@oakbaynews.com

CRD seeking information on deer damage In response to growing concerns over the urban deer population in Greater Victoria, the Capital Regional District is collecting data to determine how much of a nuisance they pose. Discussions between the province and the CRD about a regional deer management strategy have gone slowly, but CRD staff have begun the

process of information gathering in order to have as much knowledge of the situation as possible. The issue was renewed last week when Oak Bay Coun. John Herbert expressed his frustration at the lack of progress that had been made. According to Bob Lapham, general manager of the CRD’s planning, transportation and protective services

committee, ICBC, local conservation officers and police are all being consulted to figure out how much damage deer are causing. Oak Bay residents are encouraged to email Lapham at deermanagement @crd.bc.ca to share their experiences with the animals and give the CRD a more complete picture. editor@oakbaynews.com

An independent, external review into the case of an infant death during childbirth at Victoria General Hospital has been commissioned by the Vancouver Island Health Authority. Unlike VIHA’s routine internal investigation, which concluded last week and was shared only with hospital staff and the patient involved, the external review will be made public. VIHA acting chief medical officer Dr. Martin Wale said the review was called to help restore public confidence in maternity care at VGH. “It’s really tragic and we’re deeply sorry to the family for their loss,” he said. “We expect to be held accountable for what happened. If recommendations come back with things we could have done better, we’ll change our procedures.” Details of the case were made public by an anesthetist at the hospital, Sue Ferreira. She said the mother required an emergency caesarian section, but the procedure was delayed because the one general anesthetist in the hospital was busy with another surgery. An anesthetist administers the epidural or spinal anesthetic before a C-section begins and monitors the mother’s pain throughout the procedure. Wale said the national standard for how long it should take an anesthetist to reach a patient in an emergency is 30 minutes. He said in this case, from the time the doctor called for a C-section to when the anesthetist arrived at the hospital was 10 minutes. Another 15 minutes elapsed before the pro-

cedure could begin. During that time the child died inside its mother, and it was delivered as a stillborn. Erna Turrie, the grandmother of the woman who lost the baby, told media that she blames the doctors for not calling in the anesthetist sooner. Ferreira said if there had been a dedicated obstetrical anesthetist working in maternity, the C-section could have started sooner.

“If recommendations come back with things we could have done better, we’ll change our procedures.” – Dr. Martin Wale

VIHA tried to hire a second anesthetist in 2009, but none would work for the $348,000 salary offered, which is the maximum allowed rate set by the province and the B.C. medical association. Wale said he’s confident that staff at VGH are providing the best maternal care they can under the circumstances. “The vast majority of births have a positive outcome,” he said. “We’re not working with limitless resources, but if there’s a way we could be doing better with what we do have, I expect this external review will shine a bright light on that.” Wale could not say at press time who would undertake the review. VIHA was working with the B.C. Ministry of Health and the B.C. Patient Safety and Quality Council to find a suitable reviewer. The review is expected to be completed by early September. news@goldstreamgazette.com

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Wednesday, August August 24, 24, 2011 2011-- OAK Wednesday, OAK BAY BAY NEWS NEWS

Options discussed for nuisance projects

Enterprising student Isaac Streight, 15, saws a board in half for easy hauling. Streight, an Oak Bay High student, struck a deal with a homeowner on Irving Road who is undertaking home renovations. Streight will get rid of the discarded lumber, which he plans to recycle. Instead of paying fees to the dump the material elsewhere, the owner plans to pay Streight a portion of the money that is saved.

Oak Bay council hears solutions for dealing with future construction work

Ryan Flaherty/News staff

Ryan Flaherty News staff

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Oak Bay council is a step closer to solving the problem of construction projects dragging on in the municipality. The issue has been in council’s sights for more than a year, largely due to a pair of properties that have drawn complaints from neighbours regarding unsightliness and after-hours noise. Four options for dealing with unintentional longterm projects in the future were outlined in a staff report presented to councillors last week. While they sounded happy with the progress being made – a previous report on the same subject was rejected as being not detailed enough – some were concerned the alternatives weren’t sufficient to solve the problem. “I still don’t know if we’re pushing this hard enough,” said Coun. John Herbert. “None of (the recommendations) say, ‘These guys are really serious and they’re going to do something.’” Of the four options detailed in the report, two were recommended by staff. The first involves amending Oak Bay’s noise bylaw. Once unfinished projects reach the twoyear mark, construction noise would only be allowed between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., instead of the typical hours of 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Though the amendment wouldn’t necessarily have a direct impact on the project’s completion, the disruption to neighbours would be reduced. A second solution would give the municipality ability to file a notice against the title on the land where the owner has not met the deadline – after two years, for example – for having a final inspection passed on the work. The ‘section 57’ notice, as it is known, would essentially serve as a warning flag to lending institutions and potential buyers that there is unfinished work on the property. Herbert suggested attaching a project-specific set of conditions to new building permits issued after two years, attaching hard targets and deadlines that could be evaluated by municipal staff. Both Herbert and Coun. Tara Ney asked to see more information before council votes on whether to accept the recommendations. “We don’t want a heavy-handed bylaw to deal with a couple of projects,” Ney said. Municipal staff will prepare an expanded report detailing the criteria that would determine to which projects the recommendations would apply. That report is expected in September. editor@oakbaynews.com

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www.oakbaynews.com • A5 www.oakbaynews.com • A5

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, August 24, 2011 OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Race organizers hope for rebound Oak Bay Half Marathon lost $15,000 this year Ryan Flaherty News staff

The Oak Bay Half Marathon will be back for an eighth year in 2012, but not before facing increased scrutiny from Oak Bay council over the race’s bottom line. The event lost $15,000 this year, due to such factors as terrible race-day weather and a serious accident involving a key committee member, organizer Dave Milne explained to Oak Bay councillors last week. He was applying to host the 2012 race on May 13. Compounding those factors was the fact Milne took a new approach to the race budget which didn’t pan out. “If you look at the race as a business, we did too much advertising, we pushed too much, we hired too many staff, and in the end we didn’t sell enough,” he said. Milne, who owns Victoria’s two Peninsula Runners stores, covered the losses with his own money. Although the race is a nonprofit event, it still needs to be

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

A soggy McGregor Abbott nears the finish line for the 2011 Oak Bay Half Marathon in May. Poor weather hampered the turnout for the race. sustainable to continue supporting charities such as the Help Fill a Dream Foundation, Kidsport and the B.C. Cancer Agency, Milne explained. While the municipality has no financial stake in the event, the race’s financial statement raised a few eyebrows among councillors – a typo showed a $19 bill for duct tape as a $1,900 expense, for example. “Because it’s called the Oak

Bay Half Marathon, and it has Oak Bay’s name associated with it, I wanted to ensure that it represents the community well,” said Coun. Hazel Braithwaite. Gaining approval for the race at last week’s meeting was important, Milne said, since he plans to apply to B.C. Athletics to have the race’s five-kilometre event designated as the provincial championship for that distance. Receiving it enabled him to confirm the race dates in time for B.C. Athletics’ application deadline. While the rest of council were confident enough in Milne’s assurances of financial recovery, Braithwaite voted against approving the race’s return, saying she hadn’t had adequate time to get a full explanation for the losses prior to the meeting. Milne is hopeful the race will continue to grow and that increased attendance will help dig it, and himself, out of the financial hole. “I would like to see 1,250 people in the half marathon and 400 people finish the 5K,” he said. “Hopefully there will be over 100 teams in the relay. If we do see those numbers next year, then (the losses) we’re talking about this year will be null and void.” editor@oakbaynews.com

POLICE CONSTABLE The Oak Bay Police Board Invites applications for Constable with a minimum of 2 (two) years current Police experience within the Province of B.C. Submit resume package to the

Chief Constable, Oak Bay Police Dept., 1703 Monterey Ave. Victoria, B.C. V8R 5V6 Closing date: September 7, 2011 The Oak Bay Police Dept. is committed to employment equity and encourage applications from qualified women and men including Aboriginal peoples and visible minorities.

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This summer could be a scorcher.

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Wednesday, Wednesday,August August24, 24,2011 2011 - OAK BAY NEWS

CBC seeks businesses for new reality series Startups need not apply for The Big Decision Canadian television stars might soon roll into a town near you as producers of CBC’s latest reality television show search for business owners to feature in a spin-off of the popular Dragons’ Den series. Dragons will visit established businesses across the country in need of some help, coach the owners, and make The Big Decision -- as the show is called -- on whether or not to invest their money in further developing each business. “Instead of (entrepreneurs) coming into the den and doing more of an elevator pitch, we’re actually going to be travelling to the communities to learn more about the businesses,” said Katie Cumby, associate producer for The Big Decision. The other big difference from Dragons’ Den: “These are more established companies, companies that were making more money – or at least were during their peak,”

“… We’re actually going to be travelling to the communities to learn more about the businesses.”

– Katie Cumby producer, The Big Decision

Cumby said. To apply, companies must have been in operation for at least three years, have more than five employees, and gross an average of $500,000 per year. A large part of the show involves an investor from Dragons’ Den deciding how they can improve each business, rolling up their sleeves and giving advice to the owners. “We’re interested in businesses that can’t fail – for personal reasons or reasons of the community,” she added. nnorth@saanichnews.com

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Erin McCracken News staff

Nathalie Garcia doesn’t make a habit of inviting strangers to stay at her Saanich home. But thanks to a network of mutual friends and a bevy of messages sent over Facebook, the Colas family had a place to stay earlier this month in their unusual year-long trip around the world. “It’s the craziest thing,” Garcia said of the unique network that brought the Colas to her doorstep. Since leaving their life behind in Paris, France in July, Frédéric, his wife Estelle and their eightyear-old daughter Héloïse have

been travelling through Canada and the United States on the first leg of their global journey. They are billeting with people they know through friends and family, and through their Facebook page and campaign, We Like the World. “Yesterday we didn’t know Nathalie and today we feel we are like friends,” Estelle said while touring HMCS Regina at CFB Esquimalt, where Garcia is a military officer. “The people we meet matter more than the places and the monuments we see,” Frédéric said. He and Estelle are on sabbatical from their careers, and they are home-schooling their daughter while they are on the road. For every family that hosts them along the way, the Colas contribute $50 to the construction of an elementary school in

Burkina Faso, in Africa, where they plan to visit at the end of their tour next June. It’s the kind of journey that’s not suited for everyone. “I don’t think I could do it,” said Garcia’s 12-year-old daughter, Michelle. “I’d get homesick.” The Colas plan to make several more stops in Canada and the United States. Next they make their way to South America, Asia, Europe and Africa on a quest to inspire the people they meet, provide African children with much-needed educational opportunities and travel the world in a unique way. “I feel very happy and proud to do it,” said Estelle. “It’s once in a lifetime that we can do that.” Follow the travels of the Colas by visiting www.facebook.com/ weliketheworld. emccracken@vicnews.com

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www.oakbaynews.com • A7 www.oakbaynews.com • A7

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, August 24, 2011  OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, August 24, 2011

Loan defaults could hurt future students Province pulls student loan cash from some private colleges Natalie North News staff

Privately-run post-secondary institutions have been warned: if students don’t pay back loans, future students could lose access to government loan funding. Last week, StudentAid B.C. stripped 13 schools of their official designation and left students attending those institutions faced with funding their education independently. Since 2006, post-secondary institutions that have default rates – the percentage of student-loan borrowers with payments in default – above 28 per cent for four or more consecutive years are subject to a designation review by StudentAid B.C. Designations are revoked for a minimum of two years.

Redheaded cyclist sought in assault case Saanich police are looking for a man with a “distinct appearance” after an attempted sexual assault at Gyro Park Aug. 17. A female victim in her early 20s was near the washrooms at the Cadboro Bayarea park when she was approached by a man on a bike at 2:30 p.m. He engaged her in conversation for about 10 minutes, then, without warning, grabbed her wrists and pulled her to the ground. The suspect attempted to put his hands down the woman’s pants, but the victim managed to push her assailant away and run to safety. Police searched the area but did not locate the man. He is described as having red hair and an albino-like complexion. He’s about 5’8” tall, 150 pounds. He was wearing a white T-shirt, faded blue jeans and black slip-on boots. He carried a dark-coloured backpack. He told the woman his name was Ryan. He rode an orange bike and wore an orange helmet. Anyone with information or who may have witnessed the incident is asked to call 250-475-4321 or Crime Stoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

No schools in Greater Victoria were affected by the recent crackdown. The closest was Sprott-Shaw Community College’s Duncan campus, with a default rate of 38 per cent in 2010. John Predyk, vice-president of operations for Sprott-Shaw Community College, confirmed the majority of their students are funded through student loans. He calls the decision a disappointment and one that will affect students with the most barriers to education. “By closing campuses in those communities, they’re limiting prospective students’ access to education they might not otherwise be able to get through the public system,” Predyk said. The decision to pull publicly-funded student loans is intended to protect students from unreasonable financial risk and serve the best interests of the public, wrote Minister of Advanced Education, Naomi Yamaoto, in a statement to the News. “It is important to note

By the numbers The per cent of borrowers in Victoria who haven’t paid loans in 150 days or more: ■ University of Victoria 4.2 ■ Camosun College 11.6 ■ Aveda Institute 13.8 ■ Academy of Learning 17.2 ■ University Canada West Academies 18.8 ■ University Canada West 20.0 ■ Sprott-Shaw Community College 30.8

that in such circumstances, an institution does have the right to appeal the decision, or, after two years, can work with the ministry to request that the decision be reconsidered,” she wrote, adding that the loss of funding should not directly impact a school’s ability to operate. Sprott-Shaw has been in talks with the ministry to ensure that student funding

stays available for students attending the Victoria campus, which has been above the 28-percent default standard for the last four years. While under review, the ministry has asked schools to have a plan in place to ensure that default rates stay as low as possible. For Victoria, this includes limiting or restricting programs that have a high rate of default, as well as limiting access to students who have a higher unmet financial need on student loan applications, and a traditionally higher rate of default. “At the end of the day it’s the student’s decision whether or not to pay their student loan,” Predyk said. “You’re penalizing other prospective students for the actions of students who may have come to school four years ago.” nnorth@saanichnews.com

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Strange actions prompt citizen’s alert A driver flagged down Oak Bay police officers last week to alert them of some strange behaviour. Just after 9 p.m. on Aug. 15, the driver told officers of a woman dressed in white and wearing a hospital bracelet who was acting erratically at Fort Street and Foul Bay Road. The officers found her on Foul Bay at Goldsmith Street. When they approached her, she repeatedly shouted, “Don’t take me back there,” then fell to the ground in the fetal position. The officers arrested her under the Mental Health Act and took the woman to the Archie Courtnall Centre at Royal Jubilee Hospital.

‘Mooning’ incident frightens mother Oak Bay police are searching for another suspect in this month’s second indecent

POLICE NEWS IN BRIEF

exposure incident. The mother of a 10-year-old girl called police Aug. 15 to report that a man had pulled down his shorts, revealing his rear-end to the girl. The suspect was on a bike at the time. The girl was also riding her bike, in the 500-block of Monterey Ave. The suspect is a man about 30 years old, with stubble on his face. He wore a bike helmet, sunglasses and blue or black shorts. The girl wasn’t able to describe the man’s bike. Anyone with information is asked to call police, at 250-5922424.

Vision Matters

Two houses broken into A pair of break-ins to houses in Oak Bay has police reminding residents to call the police department when they are on holiday, so officers can patrol the area. A house in the 2300-block of Foul Bay Rd. was broken into on Thursday (Aug. 18) and another in the 1100-block of Beach Dr. on Sunday (Aug. 21). In the first, witnesses helped police find four suspects, against whom charges are being considered. In the second, a laptop was stolen when a kitchen window was accessed. There are no suspects identified in the latter case. Before going on holidays, residents can contact police at 250-592-2424 to step up foot and bike patrols in their area. ecardone@vicnews.com

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A8 • www.oakbaynews.com www.oakbaynews.com

OAKBAYNEWS

EDITORIAL

Wednesday, Wednesday,August August24, 24,2011 2011 -- OAK BAY NEWS

Penny Sakamoto Group Publisher Kevin Laird Editorial Director Don Descoteau Editor Oliver Sommer Advertising Director

The Oak Bay News is published by Black Press Ltd. | 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C. V8W 1E4 | Phone: 250-598-4123 • Fax: 250-386-2624 • Web: www.oakbaynews.com

OUR VIEW

Layton inspired with his battles The loss of Jack Layton at 61 to cancer early Monday morning struck many of us as we turned on the news, came to work and went about our workaday lives. That’s what the federal NDP leader would have wanted us to do: keep moving forward, continue working toward something. There no doubt will be discussions about Layton’s place in Canada’s history, and the implications of the NDP’s comprehensive defeat of the Bloc in Quebec earlier this year. For now, what we know for sure is that we have lost an important Canadian far too soon. He was the rare politician who belonged to all of us, which is clear as soon as the discussion moves beyond politics. At a time when our federal government is distancing itself from the people, Layton did his best to get closer to people. During his stops in the Capital Region – and he came here a lot, it seemed, for an Ontario politician – he was never surrounded by bodyguards or an entourage. He wanted to engage with people, hear them and not simply speak at them. To put Jack Layton in the same leadership category as a Pierre Trudeau, John Diefenbaker or Mackenzie King is conjecture at best. Layton never had the chance to reach those heights. His party has never come close to victory in a federal election, and that will be reflected in how Layton is treated in the history books. But let’s not forget that in the last election, he was consistently the leader most trusted by Canadians in opinion polls. That says something about not only his charisma, but his leadership style and the way he connected with the public. He also was the first leader of the NDP to help the party earn the status of Official Opposition. Layton was known as a fighter, always willing to step up – whether it was against a majority government or the very illness that took his life. Above all, no matter how you voted, Layton reminded all of us that politicians can find success by taking the high road. By doing so, he also gave many Canadians a renewed hope that democracy is still alive in this country and worth fighting for. What do you think? Give us your comments by e-mail: editor@oakbaynews.com or fax 250-386-2624. All letters must have a name and a telephone number for verification. The Oak Bay News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

Power export plan is still alive tics to compare the $124-per-megaHe would never quite admit it, watt hour average cost for deliverbut former premier Gordon Camping independent power with the bell’s push for self-sufficiency in lowest end of the spot market for clean electricity has always looked electricity, which currently swings to me like a long-term strategy to wildly from around $4 to export hydroelectric more than $50. power. In fact the report puts It still looks that way. the average price paid B.C.’s spring and summer for IPP power at $63.85. runoff match perfectly Compare that with the with peak air-conditioner projected cost of $87 to season in California. $95 for power from Site C, But the recent review of the proposed third dam on B.C. Hydro operations the Peace River that will discusses how the prosbe B.C. Hydo-owned and pects for exports have operated. changed since CampThe $124 figure includes bell’s 2007 energy plan. Tom Fletcher other costs, notably The government B.C. Views extending the electricity instructed B.C. Hydro grid to connect IPPs. to wean itself off power Horgan claims to favour wind or imports by 2016, even in drought run-of-river for remote areas with years, and obtain new capacity no other clean energy option, but mostly from outside sources with apparently is against hooking them net zero greenhouse gas emissions. up to the grid. (Further evidence Nuclear plants were formally ruled that current NDP energy policy is out. The review of B.C. Hydro by three nonsense: Horgan opposes Site C based on an assumption of little or top bureaucrats acknowledges govno growth in mines, mills or other ernment directions have “placed industries such as liquefied natupressure on B.C. Hydro to increase ral gas, which an NDP government their energy supply through would be a good bet to deliver. increased long-term agreements He’s against smart meters for the with independent power producers same reason he’s against the HST – (IPPs).” Cue the doomsayers. Independent power production is because it looks like a popular pose right now.) enemy No. 1 for B.C. Hydro unions. When it comes to electricity Their champion, NDP energy critic exports, the important point is not John Horgan, was immediately out what power sells for today, but with a grossly distorted version of what it will be worth a decade from the report. He cherry-picked statis-

now. And that depends on whether clean energy can command a premium price, and whether coal and other fossil fuel sources have a carbon price imposed on them. Conventional wisdom right now is that carbon taxes and cap and trade programs are, if not dead, at least dormant in North America. Climate change has fallen off the front page as the U.S. and Europe grapple with economic troubles. So I was surprised to find that this month Powerex, B.C. Hydro’s electricity trading company, wrote to the California Air Resources Board asking for clarification of the state’s proposed changes to its greenhouse gas reporting and cap and trade rules. California wants to prevent suppliers from engaging in “resource shuffling,” where a supplier such as B.C. might import coal power from Alberta for its own use, while selling supposedly clean power for export. Considering that restriction, B.C.’s self-sufficiency rule starts to make more sense. If B.C. is not importing power, its supply must be clean. Also, a metaanalysis on climate effects came out last week in the journal Science, detailing world-wide species migration due to warming. Clean energy sales to California are a long way off, but it would be a mistake to reject the possibility. Tom Fletcher is legislative reporter and columnist for Black Press and BCLocalnews.com tfletcher@blackpress.ca

‘The important point is not what power sells for today…’


www.oakbaynews.com www.oakbaynews.com •• A9 A9

OAK OAK BAY BAY NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday,August August24, 24,2011 2011

Don Denton/News staff

Calm-water kayakers A pair of kayakers paddle between the shore and rocks as they pass through McNeill Bay on a hot sunny August afternoon last week.

LETTERS Green campus moniker a joke Re: Seven-storey parkade plan for UVic hits a wall, (News, Aug. 17) Why does the University of Victoria insist on destroying the landscape with new building projects? The latest, a seven-storey parking garage on campus, has been proposed without public consultation, as were the planned high-rise dorm buildings on the Queenswood property in Saanich. Both projects are revenueproducing, something that UVic seems more keen to achieve than to provide an education. Destruction of trees and green spaces seems to be de rigeur for this administration and having the gall to be known as a green campus is a joke. Bernard W.J. Scripps Oak Bay

Kudos to politicians who ignore big industry Re: Green Party gets lost in static (B.C. Views, Aug. 3) After reading Tom Fletcher’s attack on Elizabeth May and Jane Sterk, I’m grateful that we have those leaders who have the courage to question why we should accept the wireless industry’s word that wireless technology is safe. Yet, Fletcher doesn’t have a problem with this. He expects us to accept his opinion that “… after many years of study, the evidence that

cellphones and such devices cause illness remains at precisely zero.” Zero? This sounds like when the tobacco industry said years ago that there is no correlation between cancer and tobacco smoke. Has Fletcher ever heard of George Carlo, an epidemiologist and medical scientist who from 1993 to 1999 headed the first telecommunications industrybacked studies into the dangers of cellphone use? His work revealed preventable health hazards associated with cellphone use. Angered by his findings, they now do everything to discredit him. The prudent thing to do is to exercise caution, rather than waiting until harm from cellphones becomes evident. Thank goodness people like Elizabeth May and Jane Sterk are willing to stand up and speak openly as politicians and not wholeheartedly accept the word of the industry. Peter Dixon Saanich

Columnist’s attack on Greens misguided I was appalled by Tom Fletcher’s accusatory column in the Oak Bay News on Aug. 3 (Green Party gets lost in static). His attack on the Green Party opposition to smart meters is absurd. Instead of repeating reassuring phrases of safety from B.C. Hydro, he needs to do some substantial homework and educate himself on

research by medical biochemists. At least read the report on smart meters by Magda Havas. She is an adviser for the International Commission for Electromagnetic Safety and has been doing research in this area for 20 years. Her name and those of May and Sterk will get into the annals of Canadian history, not Fletcher’s. T. Lielupe Oak Bay

Deer management money could be better used I am shocked by the article that Oak Bay Council is considering spending up to $250,000 to get rid of the deer in Oak Bay. What an unbelievable waste of money. The deer are not the problem. It is homeowners who are too anal about their gardens. We are fortunate to live in such an amazing part of the world. Our gardens and forests will always be home to wildlife such as deer. Concerned homeowners need watch what others are doing – putting up new fangled things called fences. Other clever homeowners are using fishing line strung between trees and shrubs as an almost invisible deterrent. What is it about the deer? Do they rummage through our recycling bins looking for returnable bottles? Do they sleep in our parks? Do they ask for money along the avenue? Oh, wait a moment – that’s the homeless, who could do so much

more with $250,000 if council does the right thing and puts the money where it is better used. Y.B. Douglas Oak Bay

Return of ‘royal’ pleases ex-sailor Re: ‘Royal’ restored to military names (News, Aug. 19) I was delighted to note the return of the proper title to our Navy. I was a member for more than 38 years and suffered through the grinding years of unification which was seemingly ordered to gratify the ambitions of a failed politician who wanted to be prime minister. I have a friend who told me that he was present when our prime minister at the time, Lester Pearson, said that if one more senior officer spoke out publicly against the outlandish concept, he would cancel the whole boondoggle. It is indeed sad when traditions and customs are unceremoniously dumped for spurious reasons. Let time change some things slowly as our society evolves but think carefully of unsuspected consequences. There will be some who quibble at the restoration of the “royal” but what do they think about the 138 royal organizations (according to Wikipedia) which exist or have existed in Canada? Bet some of them even golf or go yachting at a “royal” club. W. A. Hughes Victoria

Letters to the Editor The News welcomes your opinions and comments. Letters to the editor should discuss issues and stories that have been covered in the pages of the News. To put readers on equal footing, and to be sure that all opinions are heard, please keep letters to less than 300 words. The News reserves the right to edit letters for style, legality, length and taste. The News will not print anonymous letters. Please enclose your phone number for verification of your letter’s authenticity or to discuss using your letter as a guest column. Phone numbers are not printed. Send your letters to: ■ Mail: Letters to the Editor, Oak Bay News, 818 Broughton St., Victoria, B.C., V8W 1E4 ■ Fax: 386-2624 ■ E-mail: editor@ oakbaynews.com


www.oakbaynews.com A10 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, Wednesday,August August24, 24,2011 2011 - OAK BAY NEWS

Green map unconventional Continued from Page A1

Calgary’s green map has no roads, for example, instead highlighting cycling routes throughout the city. Meanwhile, the Metchosin map would be right at home in an art gallery, with its colourful illustrations of local features. Oak Bay’s green map, according to Croft, is “somewhere in between.”

Despite the flexibility of design that green mapping allows, it was still important to make sure the end product was accurate. For that reason, cartographer Ken Josephson was brought on board. Josephson has been working on green maps for 12 years, and was able to use his experience to help Oak Bay residents compile a list of things they wanted to include on

the map. “Traditional cartography is driven by government and business, and represents their world view,” Josephson said. “Community mapping has a bottom-up approach. Every community is different and what they choose to map is different.” Making those decisions together, he says, is what really strengthens

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Image courtesy Community Association of Oak Bay

Detail from Oak Bay Community Green Map shows various points of local interest. communities. “If you start to focus on your assets, it’s

more affirming.” The Community Association of Oak Bay

is tangible proof of how the creation of a green map can make a

community stronger. It was essentially formed as a result of the green map process, Croft says. Oak Bay Coun. Pam Copley has been involved in the project since the beginning. Initially, it was difficult to sell the idea to council as a good financial investment, she said. But with the map almost ready, she hopes they recognize the role it can play in bringing the community together. “I think there is some room for council to be supporting it,” she said. “Not only as it comes into its first production, but down the road. I see this as a living document – it’s not locked in time forever ... It will probably change over time, and each printing will require further support.” The community association has received money for the project from the Kiwanis and Rotary Clubs, and the Victoria Foundation, among others. They’ve even approached the Victoria Real Estate Board, which sees the maps as a useful tool for realtors to use when talking up Oak Bay to potential buyers. The community association plans to print an initial run of 6,000 maps in early 2012 and put them in places like the Willows Beach Tea Room, municipal hall and other spots where people gather. It’s a far cry from that ping-pong table, Croft said. “Just to see how far we’ve come, it’s really beautiful.” editor@oakbaynews.com


www.oakbaynews.com • A11 www.oakbaynews.com • A11

OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, August 24, 2011 OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, August 24, 2011 

Firefighters give big to pediatric research Edward Hill For her first breaths of life, Lucy Hannah had a hole in her lung. Wade McReynolds weighed two pounds when he saw the light of day as a preemie at 29 weeks. Victoria General Hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit became home to their parents. A year or a few years later, these kids and dozens of others run and play at the 27th annual NICU reunion at the hospital, as parents swap stories and give hugs to medical staff who saved their children’s lives. About 500 newborns per year go through the NICU. “It was really hard at the time. The doctors and nurses were so helpful, they gave such good care,” said Katie Hannah, mother of one-year-old Lucy and her twin Emma. The girls were 33-week preemies. “Nurses and moms really bond when you’re in there. It’s an intense time. When I see them I give them a big hug, and the doctors too.” Nicole and Trevor McReynolds help twoyear-old Wade blow bubbles at the outdoor party, and recalled a lot of tough hours and days at the NICU. Nicole’s water broke at 23 weeks and she had to lie still for six weeks before her son was born. “They said the chances of him surviving and without problems was not good at all. But there’s nothing wrong with him,” Nicole said. “He’s as healthy as anything. He’s a real little miracle.” These stories of survival and strength of the smallest patients highlighted the importance of a long-term gift announced recently – professional firefighters in Greater Victoria are donating $25,000 per year for the next 10 years to VGH pediatric care. Saanich, Victoria, Oak Bay and Esquimalt fire departments, under the Professional Firefighters of Greater Victoria Foundation, will direct their fundraising cash to the Victoria Hospitals Foundation, which in turn will direct it to equipment in the NICU and pediatric unit. “Sustainable funding is different for us. Pledging $250,000 over 10 years allows us to do planning around that. It’s fantastic,” said Starr McMichael, chair of the Victoria Hospitals Foundation. “It’s money well-spent on saving the lives of

ventilators eventually need replacing. To donate to the Victoria Hospitals Foundation, please go to www. victoriahf.ca. editor@oakbaynews.com

The donation isn’t yet earmarked for anything specific. Pediatric cardiologist Dr. Brian Sinclair said the unit’s greatest challenge is the capital cost of new equipment – incubators, vital sign monitors and

News staff

Edward Hill/News staff

farm fresh. dirt cheap.™

Esquimalt firefighters Andrew Zado, left, and Chris Carragher crouch with Quinn Tyrrell, 2, who spent four months in Victoria General Hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit. the tiniest people.” Saanich firefighter Jared Barker said aiming for $25,000 per year comes on the backs of firefighters who have established strong fundraising networks and events. “We sat around and got an idea of what each department is capable of doing. The advantage

we have as firefighters is that we have no hidden costs. This is done as volunteer work,” Barker said. The VGH pediatric unit delivers 2,700 babies per year and all hospital births in Greater Victoria. Ninety per cent of injured and sick children on Vancouver Island are treated at VGH.

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A12 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, Wednesday,August August24, 24,2011 2011 -- OAK OAK BAY BAY NEWS NEWS

Author Liz Astill: A Little Off Course

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Author Bruce Fraser: On Potato Mountain: A Chilcotin Mystery

Join author Liz Astill in a reading from her latest book, A Little Off Course. It’s a collection of reflections and experiences written while she underwent treatment for breast cancer. Sept. 24, 2 to 3:30 p.m. Oak Bay Branch

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Join retired lawyer, rancher and author Bruce Fraser in a reading from his novel On Potato Mountain: A Chilcotin Mystery. Sept. 29, 7-8:30 p.m. Oak Bay Branch

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www.oakbaynews.com •• A13 A13 www.oakbaynews.com

OAK BAY BAY NEWS NEWS -- Wednesday, Wednesday,August August24, 24,2011 2011  OAK

THE ARTS

Buddha sculpture offers different take Dallas V. Duobaitis’ “Buddha of Dissonance” will be featured at the Ministry of Casual Living, 1442 Haultain St., Saturday, Aug. 27 from 6 to 10 p.m. It will be on display until Sept. 2.

Anarchists unite at literary feast in Fernwood Family-friendly event welcomes newcomers to explore movement

Allan Antliff, who is helping to organize the Victoria Anarchist Book Fair and Festival of Anarchy, sits in his home surrounded by books and posters from previous years’ events.

Erin McCracken News staff

Victoria resident Allan Antliff won’t have to travel far to satisfy his specialized literary appetite. Others, however, will soon travel to Victoria from throughout North America for the sixth annual Victoria Anarchist Book Fair and Festival of Anarchy. “It will be larger than ever this year,” said Antliff, a member of the Victoria Anarchist Book Fair Collective. The two-day literary and cultural showcase drew 2,000 people last year. The festival will feature a series of events, culminating with the book fair on Sept. 10 and 11. Anarchists are people “who believe we can do better than we’re doing now in the world,” according to Antliff, an art history

Sharon Tiffin/ News staff

professor at the University of Victoria. The movement is about embracing radical change “to reorganize society to make it more equitable, more economically sustainable and peaceful,” he said. “The anarchist’s desire is to address these

things constructively.” Antliff acknowledged that many anarchists and sympathizers are stereotyped as violent activists. “(But) that isn’t the case at all. Anarchism is a very constructive movement.” Some people devote themselves

to organic farming, community development, housing co-operatives or volunteering, he said. “When you tally it up, it doesn’t add up to madness or mayhem.” The free book fair will feature 20 different workshops on sustainable farming, workplace rights, surveillance issues and animal liberation, among other topics. There will also be book and information tables and readings on themes such as radical theory, history and practice. The growing popularity of the fair is a sign the anarchist community is thriving in Greater Victoria. Black Raven Records, for example, sells punk and metal music within the anarchist genre, and Camas Books & Infoshop is a not-for-profit anarchist literary resource. “I would say there are hundreds of sympathizers (in Greater Victoria) who support anarchist projects,” Antliff said. The family-friendly book fair is open to anarchists and non-anarchists. There will be children’s activities, and free child-minding. “It’s an event for everyone,” Antliff said. “In fact, we’re looking for

people to attend who aren’t familiar with anarchism.” For details or to volunteer, visit victoriaanarchistbookfair.ca. emccracken@vicnews.com

Chaos know? ■ UVic’s online anarchist archives launch: Sept. 7 at 2 p.m., McPherson Library, 3800 Finnerty Rd. ■ Free film screening: Capitalism is the Crisis, Sept. 9 at 7:30 p.m., Camas Books & Infoshop, 2590 Quadra St. ■ All-ages punk rock show: Featuring headliner, Iskra. Sept. 10 at 7:30 p.m. Fernwood Community Association building, 1923 Fernwood Rd. Tix $4. ■ Book fair: Sept. 10, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sept. 11 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fernwood Community Centre, 1240 Gladstone Ave.


A14 A14 •• www.oakbaynews.com www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, August 24, 2011 - OAK BAY NEWS Wednesday, August 24, 2011 - OAK BAY NEWS

Beginner dance classes ignite passion for salsa

FUTURE SHOP - CORRECTION NOTICE NEWSPAPER RETRACTION FOR THE FUTURE SHOP AUGUST 19 AND 26 CORPORATE FLYER Please note that the 32” LG LV3400 Series LED HDTV (WebID: 10176357) advertised on the front cover of the August 19 flyer and the back cover of the August 26 flyer has 720p resolution, NOT 1080p, as previously advertised. We sincerely apologize for any inconvenience this may have caused our valued customers

Erin McCracken

and said, ‘Hey, I dance salsa in Victoria,’ everybody would introduce you to all the people there and make sure you felt at home.” Beginners are welcome Tuesdays at 6 p.m. or Thursdays at 9 p.m. at Cafe Casablanca, 2524 Bridge St. A 10-week performance training class for dancers of all abilities begins Wednesday, Sept. 21 at Club Phoenix, 2122A Government St. At the end of the course, there will be auditions for the dance company’s touring performance groups. For details, please visit www. CalienteDance.com, call 250-881-6141 or email calientedance@gmail.com. emccracken@vicnews.com

News staff

Christina Morrison couldn’t make it easier for people wanting to learn how to cut a rug. No experience and no partner are necessary when students come to her looking to take their first tentative steps in salsa dancing, considered a creative and social workout. “The people that go tend to be just really great,” said Morrison, instructor and director of Victoria-based Salsa Caliente Dance Company. “It feels like a family. If you went to a club anywhere else in the world and walked into their beginner class

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Legacy reopens Artist Richard Hunt stands with his painting “Malahat & The Cowichan Valley,” part of an exhibit called Convergence/Divergence Landscape and Identity on the West Coast, on now at the University of Victoria’s newly renovated Legacy Art Gallery, 630 Yates St.

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A16 • www.oakbaynews.com www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, Wednesday,August August24, 24,2011 2011 - OAK BAY NEWS

Ferry traffic down as tourists go south B.C. Ferries CEO Hahn deflects blame away from rising fares Tom Fletcher Black Press

Tourists are lining up at U.S. border crossings instead of heading to B.C.’s favourite coastal getaways, and summer traffic on B.C. Ferries is down about four per cent as a result. B.C. Ferries is running its full summer schedule of sailings and CEO David Hahn estimates the lighter traffic means the corporation will probably take a loss of about $20 million on the year. But Hahn rejects the suggestion that rising ferry fares are keeping people away, because Statistics Canada figures show U.S. visits have slumped across Canada while traffic south has soared. “The strength of the Canadian dollar, the price of fuel, has driven Canadians across the board, not just in B.C., down into the United States … it’s a reverse of what happened in 2003 and 2004,” Hahn told CKNW radio last Thursday. “I guarantee the people with the big motorhomes in Alberta are thinking twice about coming west. They’re going south because they

Passengers on a B.C. Ferries vessel do their best to spy a pod of whales on the Tsawwassen-Swartz Bay route. can buy a lot more fuel for a lot less money down in the States.” In 2001, a vehicle with two passengers cost about $50 to travel from the B.C. mainland to Vancouver Island. That’s up to about $75 today, with proportionally larger increases on smaller routes. Hahn said the corporation’s fuel costs have tripled to $120 million

a year since was appointed CEO in 2003. Foot passenger traffic on the ferries is up as travellers occasionally find sailing waits for walk-on passengers. Transportation Minister Blair Lekstrom put a cap on ferry fare increases this spring, one of several moves billed as part of Pre-

Take Us With You! Read your Community Newspaper cover to cover — anywhere! Now available in an easy to read, downloadable and printable format.

GO TO: vicnews.com oakbaynews.com saanichnews.com goldstreamgazette.com Click on Link (on the right) or Scroll down to the bottom Instant access to our complete paper! Click on eEdition (paper icon) Editorial, Ads, Classifieds, Photos INCLUDES Archive of Past Issues & Special Supplements

mier Christy Clark’s “families first” agenda. Fare increases of up to eight per cent on northern and smaller routes were capped at 4.15 per cent while the B.C. Ferry Commissioner reviews rates and makes recommendations to the government by early 2012. Hahn noted that vehicle travel

Tom Fletcher/Black Press

to the U.S. is up across Canada, and airport figures are showing the same trend. Vancouver airport traffic peaked in 2008 with more than 17 million passengers, but the facility has not recovered completely from the U.S.-led economic crisis, even in the Olympic year of 2010. tfletcher@blackpress.com

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OAK BAY NEWS - Wednesday, August 24, 2011



SPORTS

www.oakbaynews.com • A17

Gardening

New McNeill Half-marathon

Don Denton/News staff

Coach Rocky Vitale runs through the technical approach during practice with the Victoria Mariners AAA team at Lambrick Park. The M’s are hosting the Western Canadian midget championship beginning Thursday (Aug. 25).

Best of west coming to Lambrick Mariners host midget-AAA Western championship Travis Paterson News staff

Five of Canada’s best midget-AAA baseball teams are at Lambrick Park this week for the Western Canadian Championships. The tournament is hosted by the returning champion Victoria Mariners who won last year’s provincial and Western Canadian titles. As the Mariners prepare to enter the round robin schedule beginning Thursday (Aug. 25), coach Rocky Vitale emphasized the quality of midget-AAA baseball, which is the top level for 16- to 18-year-olds in the rest of the country. “A lot of people don’t realize there’s no Premier Baseball League (as there is in B.C.) in the rest of Canada. The teams we are up against are

SPORTS NEWS IN BRIEF

Canadian rowers master waters of Elk Lake

Rowers from across Canada descended on Elk Lake on Friday, Saturday and Sunday (Aug. 19 to 21) for the Canadian Masters Rowing Championships. The Victoria City Rowing Club hosted the championships at the Elk Lake rowing centre at Elk Lake’s Eagle Beach. The regatta featured 119 heats of singles, doubles, quads and eight-person crews, men’s, women’s and mixed, from novice levels to experienced.

the best from their province.” But the Mariners didn’t have the kind of season Vitale would’ve liked. They finished fourth in the regular season, an OK finish that could have been better if not for a dozen games rained out during the brutal June and July weather. The games were never re-played. In the playoffs the Mariners were edged from the B.C. final four after an 8-7 loss to Ridge Meadows. “The lost games I’d like to have back, more for experience than anything. This group hasn’t been together for long,” Vitale said. “The group that won it last year played together for ten years.” Five players from last year’s championship team returned this year while five others graduated to the premier Mariners. Four of the returnees – catcher Gare Kopsar, outfielder Dylan Anderson and infielders Lucas Lapinski and Matt Bridge – were part of Team

B.C. that went 1-4 at the Canadian Midget Championships in Regina, Aug. 18-22. Also returning is Shawn Brand, who pitched the winning game over the Saskatoon Cubs in last year’s Western final. “You need to get lucky in the Westerns and we can still do that but, we’ll need to find some pitching in a hurry.” And the key to maximizing the team’s pitching strengths, added Vitale, is strategizing around the rules for pitchers. “You almost need a science degree to get through it.” To win, the Mariners could play up to six games in four days. If a pitcher throws 30 pitches in a game he has to sit one day. It jumps to three days for 50 pitches and any pitcher who throws 100 or more in a game is done for the tourney. “You hope you win the first three or four and get a mean-nothing game to get the pitchers some rest.” sports@vicnews.com

It’s new to Oak Bay but the McNeill Bay Half-marathon on Sept. 11 isn’t new to Island runners. The 21-kilometre race falls on the second Sunday of September, the weekend formerly reserved for the Land’s End half-marathon. “This race was really established 17 years ago but we’re giving it a little CPR and bringing it back to life,” said co-organizer Phil Nicholls. The proprietor of Island Runner in Fairfield and former Royal Victoria Marathon winner has sponsored the race since its early days and moved in this year to help co-organize the event with others including Oak Bay High, where the race will start and finish. The course mostly tracks along Beach Drive. “The Land’s End picked up the end-of-summer lull and was known as the last tune-up for the (GoodLife Fitness Victoria Marathon). “It once had quite a lot of numbers, so we’re chasing it back the other way now,” Nicholls said. “It’s potential is unlimited with the popularity of half-marathons.” The race also boasts the commitment of two of Canada’s most elite distance runners withVictoria marathon record holder Steve Osadiuk (two hours, 16 minutes) and Dylan Wykes, who ran a 2:12 in California last year. Prizes will be distributed to the winners of each age group. Visit www.islandrunner. ca to register. sports@vicnews.com

Vikes end strong at Universiade games

Gordon Head product and University of Victoria Vikes soccer player Shayla Behrens helped Team Canada’s women’s soccer team to fifth overall at the 2011 World Universiade (University) summer games in Schenzen, China. The team ended the games with a 1-0 defeat of Russia. It matches Canada’s fifth-place finishes in 2005 (Turkey) and 1993 (Buffalo). Vikes highlights from the Universiade include swimmer Hilary Caldwell’s (London, Ont.) winning a silver medal in the women’s 200-metre backstroke. Ten UVic athletes attended the Universiade games. The next Universiade summer games are in 2013 in Kazan, Russia.

Sharon Tiffin/News staff

Gorge Rowing Club’s Julian Paine and Majic Fountain finished fourth in the men’s E double of the Canadian Masters Rowing Regatta at Elk Lake on Sunday. The event brought hundreds of rowers from across Canada to Saanich and Victoria for the weekend competition.


A22 • www.vicnews.com

A18 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday,August August24, 24,2011 2011 -- OAK VICTORIA NEWS Wednesday, BAY NEWS

Vic youth paddlers among best in B.C.

Please donate what you can at any register

Mario Bartel/Black Press

MASTER OF EDUCATION With your M.Ed. in Leadership, or M.Ed. in Leadership and School Counselling, you’ll be ready to step into a school counsellor or other leadership position in public or private schools. This program is offered in local BC communities. Apply now for fall programs. Learn more at: www.CityU.edu/Canada or call 1.800.663.7466. Learn more at an info session:

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Elias del Valle of the Victoria Youth Paddling Club drives for the finish line in the midget men’s K1 500m race at the B.C. canoe and kayak championships, Saturday at Burnaby Lake.

Sports stats Tennis Results from the City of Victoria Island Open tennis tournament at Lambrick Park, Aug. 9-14 Legend: F = Finals; Q = Qualifier; SF = Semifinals; QF = Quarterfinals; CF = Consolation final; RR = Round Robin; d = defeated. Rank No. in (brackets). Men’s 3.0 Singles F Aaron Diemer d. Joel Boon 6-0; 6-0 SF Joel Boon d. Levent Batur 6-2; 7-6 SF Aaron Diemer d. Brian Hartz 6-0; 6-0 Q Brian Hartz d. Connor Larmour 6-1; 6-0 CF Levent Batur d. Connor Larmour Men’s 3.5 Singles F Aaron Diemer d. Daniel Diemer 7-5Ret (quit) SF Daniel Diemer d. (2) Bill Bradley 7-5; 6-4 SF Aaron Diemer d. Maxim Krassovski 6-1; 6-2 Q (2) Bill Bradley d. Jordon Sipos 6-3; 4-6; 6-2 Men’s 4.0 Singles F Shea Johnson d. Jesal Shah 3-6; 6-2; 7-5 SF Jesal Shah d. (4) Dani Arguello 7-5; 6-1 SF Shea Johnson d. Faress Barraquias 7-6; 6-4 Q Jesal Shah d. (2) Brian Yee 6-4; 6-1 Men’s 4.5 Singles F (2) Shane Iadarola d. Nick O'Callaghan 6-3; 3-6; 6-4 SF (2) Shane Iadarola d. Mark Stoffels 6-2; 6-1 SF Nick O'Callaghan d. Joe Quadri 6-1; 6-4 Q (2) Shane Iadarola d. Brendan Braybrook 6-4; 6-2 Men’s 5.0 Singles F (1) Roy Hobbs d. Wesley Bertsch 6-1; 6-3 SF Wesley Bertsch d. (3) Hannes Blum Wo (inj) SF (1) Roy Hobbs d. (4) Kieran Bertsch 2-6; 6-1; 6-3 Q Wesley Bertsch d. Oliver Bellomi 6-4; 7-6 Women’s 3.0 Singles RR Sara Gans d. Cindy Stephenson 6-2; 6-3

RR Holly Hodgson d. Lynn Zdan 7-5; 6-2 RR Sara Gans d. Lynn Zdan 6-3; 6-3 RR Cindy Stephenson d. Holly Hodgson 3-6; 6-3; 7-6 Women’s 3.5 Singles F Rachel Dewhurst d. (1) Cheryl Garrett 6-2; 6-1 SF Rachel Dewhurst d. (2) Catherine Johnston 6-4; 6-3 SF (1) Cheryl Garrett d. Sarah Dunbar 6-3; 6-1 Q (2) Catherine Johnston d. Sherri Andrews 6-0; 6-2 Women’s 4.0 Singles F (2) Karen Taber d. Lizette Greyling 4-6; 6-3; 6-1 SF (2) Karen Taber d. Carola Daffner 6-4; 6-2 SF Lizette Greyling d. (1) Leona Hutchinson 6-2; 6-2 Q (2) Karen Taber d. Penny Goldrick 7-6; 6-4 Women’s 4.5 Singles F (1) Tatiana Petrova d. Charise Collins 6-2; 6-3 SF Charise Collins d. Karen Beacom 6-2; 0-6; 7-6 SF (1) Tatiana Petrova d. Lizette Greyling 6-7; 6-2 Ret (ill) Q Karen Beacom d. (2) Leona Hutchinson 6-1; 6-3 Women’s 5.0 Singles RR Lucy Fairbotham d. Tatiana Petrova 6-1; 7-5 RR Harjit Gosal d. Tracey Frank 6-3; 6-4 RR Tracey Frank d. Tatiana Petrova 6-1; 6-3 RR Harjit Gosal d. Lucy Fairbotham 6-1; 6-0 Men’s3.5 Doubles F Bradley/Sipos d. Krassovski/ Varabei 6-0; 7-5 SF Krassovski/Varabei d. Hobbs/ Moisson 6-3; 3-6; 7-6 SF Bradley/Sipos d. Chan/Larson Q Bradley/Sipos d. Boon/Hartz 6-1; 6-1 Men’s 4.5 Doubles F (1) Iadarola/King d. (2) Brachat/ Wanbon 6-3; 6-3 SF (2) Brachat/Wanbon d. Antonacci/Stoffels 6-4; 6-3 SF (1) Iadarola/King d. Arguello/ Bonab 6-2; 6-2 Q (2) Brachat/Wanbon d. Collins/ Collins

Men’s 5.0 Doubles F (1) Bertsch/Hobbs d. (2) Bertsch/Taylor 6-1; 6-2 SF (2) Bertsch/Taylor d. Blum/ Yung 7-5; 5-7; 6-1 SF (1) Bertsch/Hobbs d. Fung/Fung Wo (inj) Q Blum/Yung d. Cameron/Lusignan 6-2; 6-0 Women’s 3.5 Doubles F Trottier/Wooster d. Radisavljevic/Radisavljevic 6-3; 6-0 SF Trottier/Wooster d. Barbon/ Ford 3-6; 6-4; 7-6 SF Radisavljevic/Radisavljevic d. (1) Garrett/Gronow 6-3; 6-1 Q Barbon/Ford d. (2) Hobbs/Zdan 7-5; 6-3 Women’s 4.5 Doubles F Clarke/Taber d. Diacu/O'Brien 6-1; 6-2 SF Clarke/Taber d. Daffner/Leong 6-1; 6-3 SF Diacu/O'Brien d. Collins/Collins 6-3; 6-3 Q Daffner/Leong d. Barbon/Terrell 7-5; 6-4 Boys’ 18 Singles F (1) Harman Gosal d. Ian Howland 6-0; 6-0 SF Ian Howland d. Adam Hobbs SF (1) Harman Gosal d. Didier Vincent Q Adam Hobbs d. (2) Scott Bocking Wd (inj) Consolation: CQ Nyles Moisson d. Luke Ishisaki Boys’ 14 Singles RR Nolin Collins d. Beckett Chung 5-7; 6-3; 6-2 RR Ryan Howland d. Beckett Chung 6-3; 6-2 RR Ryan Howland d. Nolin Collins 6-4; 6-0 Girls’ 18 Singles RR Zoe Hopkins d. Georgia Tomsett RR Nina Radisavljevic d. Georgia Tomsett 6-0; 6-1 RR Nina Radisavljevic d. Zoe Hopkins 6-3; 6-3 Girls’ 14 Singles RR Saige Collins d. Rachel Bocking RR Mateya Radisavljevic d. Saige Collins 6-2; 6-0

Lawn bowling Bowls South Island Simmons Women’s Triples at Victoria Lawn Bowling Club Aug. 9-10 A Winners: Betty Walker & Louise Mason & Jennifer Letkeman, Oak Bay LBC A Runners up: Pat Thomas & Sandy Coupe & Mary Lou Richards, Oak Bay LBC

Elias del Valle was one of many successful Victoria Youth Paddling Club athletes competing at the B.C. canoe and kayak championships in Burnaby, Aug. 13 and 14. On the first day del Valle finished third in the midget men’s K1 (solo) 1,000-metre behind VYPC teammates Patrick Dann and Eric Fast. Dann, Fast and del Valle also finished first, second and third in the midget K1 500 m and Dann narrowly edged del Valle to win the 200 m sprint, with Fast coming third. Dann and del Valle also paired for two second-place finishes in the K2 500 m and K2 1,000 m. See full results at www.canoekayakbc.ca. sports@vicnews.com B Winners: Linda Cowie & Helen Kempster & Kay Alexander, Oak Bay LBC B Runners up: Rosemary Waldie & Neva Hawkes & Merle Edmonds, Vic West LBC C Winners: Heather Davies & Linda McClung & Mary Sullivan, Lakehill LBC C Runners up: Jo Ann Allan & Debra Whitman & Marie Earthy, Victoria LBC

Sports calendar Baseball Midget-AAA Western Canadian Ch a.m. pionships hosted by Victoria Mariners at Lambrick Park, Aug. 25 to 29

Thurs., Aug. 25: 2:30 p.m. B.C. vs. Victoria; 6 p.m. Team banquet and tournament social, Lambrick Park secondary. Fri., Aug. 26: 8:30 a.m. Victoria vs. Alberta; 11:30 a.m. Manitoba vs. B.C.; 2:30 p.m. Alberta vs. Saskatchewan; 5 p.m. opening ceremonies; 6 p.m. home run derby, two players from each team. Sat., Aug. 27: 8:30 a.m. Saskatchewan vs. Manitoba 11:30 a.m.; B.C. vs. Alberta 2:30 p.m.; Victoria vs. Saskatchewan; 5:30 p.m. Alberta vs. Manitoba. Sun., Aug. 28: 8:30 a.m. Saskatachewan vs. B.C.; 11:30 a.m. Manitoba vs. Victoria. Sun., Aug. 28: Doubleknockout playoffs at 2:30 p.m. 2nd vs. 1st; 5:30 p.m. if necessary. Mon., Aug. 29: Rain day if needed.


Oak Aug 24, 201124, 2011 OAK Bay BAY News NEWS Wed, - Wednesday, August

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COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

$EADLINES

COMING EVENTS

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CALL FOR ENTRIES 9TH ANNUAL Kitty Coleman Woodland Artisan Festival. Fine Art and Quality Crafts Juried Show. Presented in a spectacular outdoor setting SEPT 3,4 & 5 Applications for Artisans are available at woodlandgardens.ca or phone 250-338-6901

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PERSONAL SERVICES

PERSONAL SERVICES

PERSONAL SERVICES

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

HELP WANTED

ART/MUSIC/DANCING

FINANCIAL SERVICES

PHOTOGRAPHY/VIDEO

Dynamic Rail Services has an immediate opening for a Track Maintenance Foreman working out of our Vernon, BC office. The successful applicant will have a minimum of 5 years experience working on all aspects of track work and have experience as a Track Foreman. Please submit resumes including education, training and references to info@khawk.ca.

POTTERY LESSONS. Learn the basics in 6 easy sessions. Call (250)383-5446.

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877987-1420. www.pioneerwest.com

DIGITAL PHOTO retouch, editing, add/remove objects/people. Tribute posters, home movies to CD/DVD. 250-4753332. www.cwpics.com

IF YOU own a home or real estate, ALPINE CREDITS will lend you money: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s That Simple. Your Credit / Age / Income is not an issue. 1-800-5872161.

BUILDING SUPPLIES

MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HOCKEY teams wanted. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re an established club looking to play against new adult teams from Victoria this winter. Willing to swap ice times with other fun-first teams in the region. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a mature club with a mix of old-timers and younger recreational players. If you have a TEAM with available ice, call Jim at 250-213-8050. No individual players please.

300 Ebooks Worth $7.49Each NOW FREE! $2,247 Value! NO Strings, NO Tricks, NO Gimmicks! www.ebookdivision.com/300/richardbennett BE YOUR own boss with Great Canadian Dollar Store. New franchise opportunities in your area. Call 1-877-3880123 ext. 229 or visit our website: www.dollarstores.com today. Coke & Candy Vending Route. Local Hi-Traffic Locations. Earn $40K+ per year. Fast & Safe Investment Return. Secure Your Future- Be the Boss! Factory Direct Pricing 1-888-579-0892 Must Sell HOME BASED BUSINESS We need serious and motivated people for expanding health & wellness industry. High speed internet and phone essential. Free online training. www.project4wellness.coml LIVE & WORK on a New Zealand, Australian or European farm! AgriVenture Global offers rural placement opportunities for young adults ages 18-30. www.agriventure.com 1-888-598-4415.com.

PERSONALS

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

DATING SERVICE. LongTerm/Short-Term Relationships, Free to Try!!! 1-877297-9883. Live intimate conversation, Call: #4011 or 1888-534-6984. Live adult 1on1 Call: 1-866-311-9640 or #4010. Meet Local Single Ladies. 1-877-804-5381. (18+).

MEDICAL OFFICE Trainees needed! Hospitals & Dr.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s need medical office & medical admin staff. No experience? Need training? Career training & job placement available. 1888-748-4126. WANT A career in the medical industry? Medical Office & Admin. Staff are needed now! No experience? Need training? Career Training & Job Placement Available! 1-888-7780459

INFORMATION DOWNTOWN VICTORIAparking available, 800 block of Broughton St. $225/month. Call 250-381-3633, local 247.

HOT GUYS! HOT CHAT! HOT FUN! Try Free! Call 250220-3334 or 800-777-8000. www.interactivemale.com LOOKING for a wonderful Catholic/Christian single man, ages 48-57 for friendship/relationship/life long commitment who understands the value of the Lord intertwined in our relationship. Drop me a line so we can meet for coffee at: free2love1two1@yahoo.com Photo upon request. Thank you.

Dry Bulk Owner Operators Required for work in Fort St. John. Excellent revenue up to $50,000/month! Call Ron: 1-250-263-1682 or E-mail Resume: Ron@bulksolutions.ca

LOST AND FOUND

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

FOUND: AUG. 12th, ladies bracelet, new Cineplex Odeon Theatre in Langford. Call Debbie to id, (250)478-3598.

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Housing available. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (877)818-0783

FOUND: SHORT haired male neutered tabby (black/white), Florence Lake/Bear Mnt area. Call (250)383-3220. LOST: MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Seico watch at Durance Lake boat launch. Call 250-382-6365.

TRAVEL GETAWAYS

DRIVERS/COURIER/ TRUCKING

Courses Starting Now!

Get certiďŹ ed in 13 weeks 12160 - 88th Ave Sry. BC

1.888.546.2886

Visit: www.lovecars.ca

ASK YOURSELF, what is your TIMESHARE worth? We will find a buyer/renter for CA$H. NO GIMMICKS- JUST RESULTS! www.BuyATimeshare.com (888)879-7165

ONLINE, ACCREDITED, web design training, administered by the Canadian Society for Social Development. Learn web design from the comfort of your home! Apply today at www.ibde.ca PROFESSIONAL COUNSELLOR Training Course Online. Read student comments. No student loan needed. Personal development. Employment assistance included. Text materials provided. MSW instructor. Register at: www.collegemhc.com

TRAVEL

HELP WANTED

Bring the family! Sizzling Summe Spcials at Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Beach! New Smyrna Beach, FL. See it all t: www.nsbfla.com/bonjour or call 1-800-214-0166

PROFESSIONAL LIVE-IN couple w/customer service and marketing skills to manage midsize motels Comox Valley. Hotel/Motel exp. Salary/accommodation provided. Resume srsa60@yahoo.com. Fax 604-515-9773. Ph: 604760-5972

LONG BEACH - Ucluelet Deluxe waterfront cabin, sleeps 6, BBQ. Fall special. 2 nights $239 / 3 nights $299. Pets Okay. Rick 604-306-0891

TIMESHARE

YOUR COMMUNITY, YOUR CLASSIFIEDS Call 250.388.3535

We are still hiring - Dozer & excavator operators required by a busy Alberta oilfield construction company. We require operators that are experienced and preference will be given to operators that have constructed oilfield roads and drilling locations. You will be provided with motels and restaurant meals. Competitive wages, bonus and transportation daily to and from job sites. Our work is in the vicinity of Edson, Alberta. Call 780-723-5051.

HEALTH PRODUCTS BERGAMONTE - The Natural Way to Improve Your Glucose, Cholesterol & Cardiovascular Health! Call today to find out how to get a free bottle with your order! 888-470-5390

FINANCIAL SERVICES

M O N E Y P ROV I D E R . C O M $500 Loan and +. No Credit Refused. Fast, Easy, 100% Secure. 1-877-776-1660.

METAL ROOFING & siding sales. Seconds avail. Custom roof Flashings. 250-544-3106.

FREE ITEMS FREE. 2 apt. size freezers, work great. (250)995-2007

FRIENDLY FRANK NEED CASH TODAY? â&#x153;&#x201C; Do you Own a Car? â&#x153;&#x201C; Borrow up to $20000.00 â&#x153;&#x201C; No Credit Checks! â&#x153;&#x201C; Cash same day, local ofďŹ ce www.REALCARCASH.com 250-244-1560 1.877.304.7344

TRADES, TECHNICAL COAL MOUNTAIN Fabricators are hiring experienced ticketed welders in Tumbler Ridge. Shift is 7 on 7 off (12hr days). Journeyman rate is $35/hr with benefits. Accommodations negotiable. If interested in joining a dynamic team in a fast paced environment please send resumes to: coalmountainfab@gmail.com or ph: 250-242-9353.

Looking for a NEW job? www.bcjobnetwork.com

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

Required: Journeyman Parts Person for Western Star Truck Dealership in Williams Lake Competitive wage and benefit package. Email nwejr@jamesws.com or mail to James Western Star Sterling Ltd. 50 Rose Street, Williams Lake BC V2G 4G5 Absolutely no phone calls. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

learn how you can turn income tax

into income H&R Blockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tax Training School is a hands-on course offering high quality training from our knowledgeable instructors. Learn how to prepare your taxes, and how you could make extra money preparing them for others.* Imagine a seasonal full or part-time job that works to your schedule, allowing you the freedom to enjoy life both in and out of the ofďŹ ce.

12 JAM & Jelly canning jars w/lids, $3. Call 250-595-3070. BMX SANLTION 11â&#x20AC;? frame, $70. Leg splint, 24â&#x20AC;? $20. Goalie pad $9. 250-508-9008. BRASS MAGAZINE/phone table, glass top, w/wheels, European, $30. (250)479-0700.

EDUCATION/TRADE SCHOOLS

We Believe in You. Small$MBTT4J[FTtMonthly Intakes Qualified*OTUSVDUPSTt Latest Software Financial OptionstFree Lifetime Refreshers No8BJUJOH-JTUTtCareer Fairs Job1MBDFNFOU"TTJTUBODFt4LJMMT Warranty }Practical Nursing }Health Care Assistant (Formerly Resident Care Attendant)

}Early Childhood Education }Community Support Worker }Medical Office }Legal Secretary }Business }Social Services }Assisted Living

Get In. Get Out. Get Working.

Register online at hrblock.ca or call 1-877-32BLOCK (322-5625) for details. Classes start mid-Sept.

Call Our VICTORIA Campus:

(250) * Enrolment restrictions may apply. Enrolment in, or completion of, the H&R Block Tax Training School is neither an offer nor a guarantee of employment. This course is not intended for, nor open to any persons who are either currently employed by or seeking employment with any professional tax preparation company or organization other than H&R Block. Š 2011 H&R Block Canada, Inc.

384-8121

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Wednesday, August Wed, Aug 24, 24,2011 2011,- OAK OakBAY Bay NEWS News

MERCHANDISE FOR SALE

REAL ESTATE

RENTALS

TRANSPORTATION

FRIENDLY FRANK

HOUSES FOR SALE

APARTMENT/CONDO

AUTO FINANCING

CHILD’S WAGON, has telescopic tow handle, excellent cod., $20. (778)433-6170.

FREE CASH back with $0 down at Auto Credit Fast. Need a vehicle? Good or Bad credit call Stephanie 1-877-792-0599 www.autocreditfast.ca. DLN 30309. Free Delivery.

LARGE STURDY adjustable office chair, (Grey), mint condition, $40. Call 250-544-0416.

ARBUTUS, CYPRESS, fir, hardwoods. Seasoned. Call 250-661-7391. SEASONED FIREWOOD Vancouver Island’s largest firewood producer offers firewood legally obtained during forest restoration, large cords, fast delivery. Help restore your forest, Burndrywood.com or 1877-902-WOOD.

FURNITURE ESTATE FURNITURE Sale: DayBed w/Trundle, 2 Mattresses, Bedding Pkge. Complete #349., King-Size Solid Pine Hdbrd., 2 Night Tables, ChiroPractic Mattress Set w/Roller Frame Complete $499., Mahogany Wash Stand w/Mirror, Bowl & Pitcher $349., Wicker Trunk $99., Oak Pedestal table, leaf, 4 chairs $299. Wooden Rocking Chair $199.; Back to School Sale Now! BUY & SAVE 9818 4th St., Sidney. buyandsave.ca

HEAVY DUTY MACHINERY SAWMILLS FROM only $3997. Make money & save money with your own bandmill - Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-5666899 Ext:400OT.

MISCELLANEOUS FOR SALE

DO-IT-YOURSELF STEEL buildings Priced to Clear Make an Offer! Ask About Free Delivery, most areas! Call for Quick Quote and Free Brochure - 1-800-668-5111 ext. 170. RED ENVELOPE- Unique & Personalized Gifts for All Your Friends & Family! Starting at $19.95. Visit www.redenvelope.com/Jewel for an extra 20% off or Call 1-888-473-5407 STEEL BUILDING sale... “”Rock bottom prices”” 25x40x12 $7350. 30x60x15 $12,700. 35x70x16 $15,990. 40x80x16 $20,990. 47x100x18 $25,800. 60x140x20 $50,600. End walls included, doors optional. Pioneer Steel Manufacturers Direct 1-800-668-5422.

CASH PAID FOR ALL VEHICLES in

all conditions in all locations

250-885-1427

Call us first & last, we pay the highest fair price for all dead & dying vehicles. Don’t get pimped, junked or otherwise chumped!

WE BUY HOUSES Damaged House? Pretty House? Moving? Divorcing? Estate Sale? We will Buy your House Quick Cash & Private. Mortgage Too High and House won’t sell? Can’t make payments? We will Lease Your House, Make your Payments and Buy it Later!

ISLAND AUTO Body & Paint, 25 yrs. 1210 Stelly’s X Road. 250-881-4862.

BEATERS UNDER $1000

Call: 1-250-616-9053

www.webuyhomesbc.com

MORTGAGES Mortgage Help! Beat bank rates for purchases and refinances, immediate debt consolidation, foreclosure relief, and equity loans. Free, fast, friendly, private consultations. Call 1888-685-6181 www.mountaincitymortgage.ca

RECREATIONAL PROPERTY RARE OPPORTUNITY: waterfront property on beautiful Jim Lake, 0.83-acre with 360 sq ft insulated cabin, located near Green Lake/Watch Lake. Rare privacy, only three lots on the lake, good fishing for rainbows to 10 lbs, nice swimming, surrounded by crown land. Great trails for hiking, ATV and snowmobile. Seasonal 10-km back road access in 4x4 or pick-up. FSBO. $230,000. 250-395-0599. (Please see bchomesforsale.com/70mile/frank.)

RENTALS APARTMENT/CONDO

MALAHAT 1 & 2 BdrmsPanoramic views. Serene & secure. All amenities on-site, firewood. $700-$1200 inclusive. Monthly/Weekly. Pets ok with refs. 25 min commute to downtown Victoria. Must have references. 250-478-9231. THETIS LAKE ESTATES large 1 bdrm or can be 2 bdrm suite, all utils+ cable/high speed internet, laundry, garbage, private parking, close to all amenities, quiet rural setting. Refs, small pet ok. $1050./$1250 250-220-4718, 250-812-4894.

DUPLEXES/4PLEXES BRIGHT 1 BR, 1.5 BA suite in Oak Bay, 5 appls, on 2 levels, patio, private yard, carport. Email pt@uniserve.com or (250)510-0312, Avail. Sept 1, on 1 yr lease, N/S, no pets

SUITES, LOWER SAANICH: FURNISHED large 1 bdrm suite. NP/NS. Avail. Sept. 1. Ref’s req’d $900/mo inclusive. Call 250-721-0281, 250-858-0807.

REAL ESTATE

SIDNEY. LRG 1 bdrm, acreage, hot tub. W/D, cat ok, N/S. $850+ util. 250-858-6511

ACREAGE

VIEW ROYAL- 2 bdrms, shared laundry. N/S. 1 small pet ok. $1100 inclds hydro/water. Call (250)658-4735. SENIORS ONLY - Cubbon Apartments and Wetherby Apartments for Seniors - 55+ only please. We currently have a selection of 1 and 2 bedroom suites in our seniors only rental buildings in Victoria, B.C. Rents range from $800 for a 1 bedroom to $1100 and up for a 2 bedroom. Please call the following staff for information: Cubbon- 1035 North Park Street - 250-383-1162 and/or Wetherby Apartments - 3205 Wetherby Road - 250-598-1650

2002 HONDA Civic EX. 4-door, 5-speed, sport package, silver with grey interior. One owner, all service records avail. Power windows/locks, air. 111,000 km. $8500. 250884-2295.

$50-$1000 CASH

INTERURBAN, 2BDRM +den, new bathroom. Country setting. Wood stove, W/D, large yard. $1,500. (250)727-6855.

QUADRA/MACKENZIE: 3 bdrms, $1400+ utils, sun deck, laundry incld, street prkg. Avail immed, 250-516-5556.

Remember no number can occur more than once in any row, column or box.

For scrap vehicle FREE Tow away

858-5865 TRUCKS & VANS 2007 DODGE Dakota, silver, 41,000kms, auto, a/c, cruise. $15,500. Call 250-884-6998.

MARINE BOATS 27 FT. Maxum Cruiser, 330HP gas Mercruiser. Complete overhaul 2011. Sleeps 4, full galley, head, shower, A/C, dinghy with new Yamaha, new GPS, new VHR. Spare propeller. $29,000. 250-3845240.

SELL YOUR CAR... FAST!

WEST BURNSIDE- 1 or 2 bdrm, $750. or $950. completely furnished. W/D, D/W, F/P, privy entrance. inclds all utils. (250)361-1379.

SUITES, UPPER

To solve a Sudoku puzzle, every number 1 to 9 must appear in: • Each of the nine vertical columns • Each of the nine horizontal rows • Each of the nine 3 x 3 boxes

1995 BMW 325i, lowering kit, new paint, custom wheels, new rubber, rear spoiler, $5500. Call 250-213-3180.

2005 TOYOTA Prius Hybrid. $2500. (250)514-4535.

FAIRFIELD- FULLY furn rm in lrg 1/2 duplex, close to bus, shopping, ocean, village, quiet person. Refs. $525 mo Avail Sept or Oct 1. (250)388-7600.

BOOKS WANTED. I Buy Books. Small or large quantities. (250)595-1728, lve msg

1993 TOYOTA Camry, good condition, $2400 obo. Call 250-380-9474.

HOMES FOR RENT

ROOMS FOR RENT

BOOKS BOOKS & antique paper collectibles. Qualified appraisers. House calls for large libraries. Haunted Bookshop (Est. 1947)250-656-8805

CARS 1990 DODGE Shadow, 144,000 K, reliable and well maint, $900obo. 250-478-8869

BRENTWOOD. BRAND new 3-bdrm + den Executive home. Quiet area, close to water, easily maintained lot. $2500. + utils /mo. Ref’s req’d. (250)652-6729.

WHY RENT when you can own? 0% down; $1600/mo. Call 250-360-1929 Binab Strasser - Re/Max Alliance.

MISCELLANEOUS WANTED

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE bcclassified.com

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

HOMES WANTED

ANTIQUES, BOOKS, collectibles, furniture, china, jewellery. Estates/private libraries purchased. Galleon Books & Antiques, 250-655-0700

82.8 ACRES, 300’ lakefront, S Cariboo. Beautiful, pastoral, private, rural setting. Borders crown land. Adjacent 80+ acre parcel available. www.bchomesforsale.com/ view/lonebutte/ann/

AUTO SERVICES

Today’s Solution

CAN’T GET Up Your Stairs? Acorn Stairlifts can help. Call Acorn Stairlifts now! Mention this ad and get 10% off your new Stairlift! Call 1-866-9815991.

WANT A vehicle but stressed about your credit? Christmas in August, $500 cash back. We fund your future not your past. All credit situations accepted. www.creditdrivers.ca 1-888-593-6095.

with a classified ad Call 310.3535

bcclassifieds.com Watch for our Auto Section

InMotion At the Speedway Reader’s Rides Driver Ed Tips By the Water

IIn your community i newspapers

AR N

FUEL/FIREWOOD

THIS HOME HAS IT ALL! This 16 year old custom built 3600 sqft, 3 storey home features 4 bdrms, 4 baths, fabulous kitchen, roomy living room, natural gas fireplace, master bdrm with 4 pce ensuite. Great rec room (31x14) in finished basement. Completely finished 40x57 deluxe shop with separate bath. Property is 2.26 gorgeous, well kept acres. Visit www.albernihomes4u.ca for more information on this “one of a kind” property. Asking $649,000 RE/MAX Mid Island Realty Port Alberni, B.C. John Stilinovic 250-724-4725 Toll Free 1-877-723-5660

LE

PELLET STOVE, needs a part, $95 obo. Call 250-6526407.

INSTANT AUTO credit We can finance your auto loan in minutes, you Drive Home Now or we deliver to BC & Alberta www.DriveHomeNow.com

KIDS

NEW, 2 sets of king size sheets, $20 each. Call 250656-6197.

Sudoku

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SERVICE DIRECTORY

OAK Bay BAY News NEWS Wed, - Wednesday, August Oak Aug 24, 201124, 2011

www.oakbaynews.com A21 www.oakbaynews.com •A21



#OMPLETEåGUIDEåTOåPROFESSIONALåSERVICESåINåYOURåCOMMUNITY

www.bcclassified.com HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

250.388.3535

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HAULING AND SALVAGE

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

HOME/BUSINESS SERVICES

ACCOUNTING/TAX/ BOOKKEEPING

ELECTRICAL

GARDENING

MOVING & STORAGE

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS

ACCOUNTING Vida Samimi

EXPERIENCED ELECTRICIAN. Reasonable rates. 250744-6884. Licence #22202. KENDRA’S ELECTRICAL Co. #86952. No Job too Small. Kendra, 250-415-7991.

YARD CLEANUPS, Big Jobs or small, we do it all. Weekly or monthly visits. Call (250)885-8513.

2 BURLEY MEN MOVING. $85/hr for 2 men (no before or after travel time charges on local moves. Please call Scott or Joshua, (250)686-6507.

SHORELINE ROOFING. Reroofing specialist. WCB/BBB member. Quality & satisfaction guaranteed. 250-413-7967. shorelineroofing@shaw.ca

GUTTERS & DOWNSPOUTS

EXCAVATING & DRAINAGE

DIAMOND DAVE Gutter cleaning, gutter guard, power washing, roof de-mossing. Call 250-889-5794.

DIAMOND MOVING. 1 ton 2 ton, 5 ton. Prices starting at $75/hr. 250-220-0734.

Certified General Accountant Bookkeeping, Audit, Payroll, HST. Set up & Training. E-File

TAX

250-477-4601 PENNIE’$ BOOKKEEPING Services for small business. Simply/Quickbooks. No time to get that paperwork done? We do data-entry, GST, payroll, year-end prep, and training. 250-661-1237

CARPENTRY ABSOLUTELY THE BEST! New, reno’s, historical, decks, driveways, etc. WCB/Member of BBB. John, 250-658-2656.

CARPET INSTALLATION MALTA FLOORING Installation. Carpets, laminates, hardwood, lino. BBB 250-388-0278

CLEANING SERVICES ABSOLUTELY CLEAN. Husband & wife team. Power Washing. (250)380-2526. MALTA HOUSECLEANING. BBB. Best rates. Residential/Comm. 250-388-0278

COMPUTER SERVICES A HOME COMPUTER Coach. Senior friendly. Computer lessons, maintenance and problem solving. Des, 250-6569363, 250-727-5519.

CONCRETE & PLACING RBC CONCRETE Finishing. All types of concrete work. No job too small. Seniors discount. Call 250-386-7007.

CONTRACTORS ABSOLUTELY THE BEST! New, reno’s, historical, decks, driveways, etc. WCB/Member of BBB. John, 250-658-2656. CARPENTRY, DRYWALL, kitch/bath, wood floor, tiles, plumbing, renos 250-213-6877

BUBBA’S HAULING. Mini excavator & bob cat services. Call 250-478-8858.

FENCING ALL TYPES of fencing, repairs. Reliable, on-time. Free estimates. Call 250-888-8637. MALTA FENCING & DECKS. BBB member. Best rates. (250)388-0278.

FURNITURE REFINISHING FURNITURE REFINISHING. Specializing in small items, end-tables, coffee tables, chairs. Free pick-up & delivery. References available. 250-475-1462. U-NEEK SEATS. Hand cane, Danish weave, sea grass. UK Trained. Fran, 250-382-8602.

GARDENING 250-208-8535 WOODCHUCK: specializing in Lawn (Sod & Seed), Landscaping, Tree & Stump, Hedges, Blackberry, Ivy removal, Yard Cleanup, 23 yrs exp. WCB. AURICLE LAWNS- Hedge, beds, irrigation, commer, strata. 25 yrs. Insured. 882-3129. DPM SERVICES: Lawns, clean-ups, tree pruning, hedging, landscaping & gutters. 15 yrs exp. Call 250-883-8141. J.ENG LANDSCAPING Co. Custom landscaping design. Rock gardens, water features, pavers. Jan, 250-881-5680. LANDSCAPE CONTRACTORcustom design install, gardens, lawns & patios, irrigation & fences. Call 250-858-3564. MAINTENANCE, RENO’S, creative design installation. Ponds to patios, res. and comm. Call (250)474-4373 glenwoodgardenworks.com

GUTTER CLEANING, repairs, de-mossing. Windows, power washing. 250-478-6323.

AT&T ELECTRIC. Renovations. Residential & Commercial. Knob & tube replacement. #26125. (250)744-4550.

PAINTING

GUTTER CLEANING. Repairs, Maintenance, Gutterguard, Leaf traps. Grand Xterior Cleaning Services. WCB Insured. Call 250-380-7778.

A PROFESSIONAL WOMAN painter. Karen Bales Painting & Wallcoverings. Over 22 yrs exp. Free est. 250-514-5220.

PERIMETER EXTERIORS. Gutter cleaning, repairs, upgrades, roof demossing. WCB, Free est. 250-881-2440. CITY HAUL- a lot of junk won’t fit in your trunk, you’re in luck I own a truck. 250-891-2489.

HANDYPERSONS Aroundthehouse.ca ALL, Repairs & Renovations Ben 250-884-6603 ACTIVE HANDYMAN Reno’s, drywall, decks, fencing, pwrwash, gutters, triming, yrd work, etc. Sen disc. 595-3327. AL’S AVAILABLE to update your home. Kitchens, baths, basements, etc. Licensed & Insured. Al 250-415-1397. ★ REPAIRS/RENOS. Painting, plumbing, electrical, etc. Free estimates. Call 250-217-8666.

CLEAN-UP SPECIAL. You load bins, size 12 yard $100 plus dump fee or we do it all. Call 250-361-6164. FAMILY MAN Hauling. Prompt, Courteous. Call Chris for all your hauling needs. 250-386-1119.

HOME IMPROVEMENTS

BLAINE’S PAINTING- Quality workmanship. $20 hr, 20 yrs exp. Blaine, 250-580-2602.

ABSOLUTELY THE BEST! New, reno’s, historical, decks, driveways, etc. WCB/Member of BBB. John, 250-658-2656.

NORM’S PAINTING. Quality work. Reasonable, Reliable. Refs. 25 yr exp. 250-478-0347

IFIX HANDYMAN Services. Household repairs and renovations. Free estimates. Call Denis at 250-634-8086 or email: denisifix@gmail.com MALTA DRAIN Tiles. Replace and Repair. BBB member, best rates. (250)388-0278. MALTA HOUSE Renos & Repairs. BBB member. Best rates. (250)388-0278. M&S OXFORD Home/Commercial Reno’s & Painting. Patio’s, Decks, Sheds, Hardwood and Trim. 25 yrs exp. Quality Guar. 250-213-5204.

PLUMBING

MALTA BLOWN insulation & batting. Removal. Best rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

FELIX PLUMBING. Over 35 years experience. Reasonable rates. Call 250-514-2376.

HAULING AND SALVAGE

MALTA DRYWALL & Painting. Residential/Commercial. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

FREE ESTIMATES. Reasonable. Reliable. No job too small. Call 250-388-5544.

MASONRY & BRICKWORK

KERRY’S GAS & PLUMBING SERVICESRepair, maintenance & install. 250-360-7663.

C.B.S. MASONRY Brick, Stone, Concrete, Paving, Chimneys, Sidewalks, Patios Repair. Renew. Replace “Quality is our Guarantee” Free Estimate & Competitive Prices. Charlie 294-9942, 5899942 Licensed Insured & WCB MORDECHAI Stone Masonry Office: 250-999-3175 Cell: 250-891-7537.

✭BUBBA’’S HAULING✭ Honest & on time. Demolition, construction clean-ups, small load deliveries (sand, gravel, topsoil, mulch), garden waste removal, mini excavator, bob cat service.(250)478-8858.

THE STUCCOMAN. Chimney repair work. Free estimates, 20 year warr/guarantee. Senior discount. (250)391-9851. WESTSHORE STONEWORKS Custom Stonework. Patios & Walkways. (250)857-7442.

SUNDECKS

SOUTH ISLAND Painting Co. Int/ext, 20 yrs exp, ref’s, quality and satisfaction guaranteed. Call (250)580-4841.

INSULATION

250-217-0062 GARDEN CITY GREEN Hauling & Recycle ◆Yard & Garden debris ◆Construction Clean-ups ◆Full House Clean-ups ◆Basements & Attics ◆Furniture, Appliances ◆Free Estimates

RE-STUCCO & HARDY Plank/Painting Specialist. 50 years experience. Free estimates. Dan, 250-391-9851.

PAINTER. YOU want the right price, top quality? 28 years exp. Call Ray (250)383-0038

SENIOR HANDYMAN Household repairs. Will assist do-it yourselfers. Fred, 250888-5345.

MALTA HANDYMAN. BBB member. Best rates. (250)3880278.

STUCCO/SIDING PATCHES, ADDITIONS, restucco, renos, chimney, waterproofing. Bob, 250-642-5178.

OLD TIMER. Quality old fashioned service. Great rates. Excellent references. Call Al at 250-474-6924, 250-888-7187.

EXPERIENCED JOURNEYMAN Plumber. Renos, New Construction & Service. Fair rates. Insured. Reliable, friendly. Great references. Call Mike at KNA (250)880-0104.

REDSEAL JOURNEYMAN Carpenter. Simple hourly rate. (250)886-1596.

ELECTRICAL

MALTA MOVING. Best Rates. BBB Member. Residential/ Commercial. (250)388-0278.

RUBBISH REMOVAL MALTA GARDEN & Rubbish Removal. Best Rates. BBB member. (250)388-0278.

PLASTERING PATCHES,Drywall, skimming, old world texturing, coves, fireplaces. Bob, 250-642-5178.

PRESSURE WASHING DRIVEWAYS, WALKWAYS, Decks, etc. Reasonable rates. 250-744-8588, Norm.

ROOFING & SKYLIGHTS FOUR 12 ROOFING Licensed insured. BBB member. Re-roof new construction. 250-2167923. www.four12roofing.com

TELEPHONE SERVICES A FREE telephone service Get Your First Month Free. Bad Credit, Don’t Sweat It. No Deposits. No Credit Checks. Call Freedom Phone Lines Today Toll-Free 1-866-884-7464.

TILING A1. SHAWN The Tile GuyRes/ Comm/ Custom/ Renos. 250-686-6046

TREE SERVICES LOCAL TREE CO. 30 yrs exp. Bucket truck, chipper. We buy logs. Insured. (250)883-2911.

WINDOW CLEANING DAVE’S WINDOW Cleaning. Windows, Gutters, Sweeping Roofs, Pressure Washing, Roof Demossing. Call 250361-6190. GLEAMING WINDOWS & Gutters+De-moss, Pwr Wash. Brian, 250-514-7079. WCB.

ALL YOU NEED IN PRINT AND ONLINE www.bcclassified.com

Give them power. Give them confidence. Give them control.

GIVE THEM A PAPER ROUTE! A paper route is about so much more than money. These days kids want and need so many things. With a paper route they not only earn the money to buy those things, they also gain a new respect for themselves. They discover a new sense of confidence, power and control by having their very own job, making their own money and paying for their own games, phones and time with friends. All it takes is an hour or so after school Wednesday and Friday. And even better... there are no collections required.

It’s so easy to get started… call

250-360-0817


A22 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, August 24, 2011 - OAK

Following a decision from the Canadian Radiotelevision and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), many local Canadian television stations broadcasting over the air will switch to digital by August 31, 2011. If you are using:

À la suite d’une décision du Conseil de la radiodiffusion et des télécommunications canadiennes (CRTC), de nombreuses stations de télévision locales canadiennes qui diffusent par ondes hertziennes passeront au numérique d’ici le 31 août 2011. Si vous utilisez :

CABLE OR INTERNET TV NOTHING WILL CHANGE

CÂBLE OU TÉLÉ INTERNET RIEN NE CHANGERA POUR VOUS

SATELLITE NOTHING WILL CHANGE

SATELLITE RIEN NE CHANGERA POUR VOUS

ANTENNA MAY CHANGE TO DIGITAL

For more information, visit www.digitaltv.gc.ca or call 1-855-388-5050.

ANTENNES EXTÉRIEURES OU OREILLES DE LAPIN VOUS POURRIEZ DEVOIR PASSER AU NUMÉRIQUE

Pour plus d’information, visitez le www.telenumerique.gc.ca ou appelez-nous au 1-855-886-5050.

BAY NEWS


A24 • www.oakbaynews.com

Wednesday, August 24, 2011 - OAK

NEW!

LOCAL

MADE IN VICTORIA DAKSHA’S GOURMET SPICES

BAY NEWS

NEW!

NATURE’S PATH

Granola Bars

Curry Mixes

3 New Flavours

Assorted 20 g

Prices in effect August 23-29

www.peppers-foods.com

Locally llll owned d & operated t d

PRODUCE

FULL SERVICE DELI

BC N GROW

NEW ZEALAND

BC

GE MAPLE LODGE

MEXICAN

Asparagus Natural Granny Smith Nectarines 56 86 Chicken 1 2 Apples Breast

96

BC N GROW

¢

2 Flav.

4

76

$2.12 kg

LOCAL

Chocolate Milk

5

650 g

MEAT AT

46

4L

Reg. 2% Asst.

2

Frying Chicken

236

ISLANDD FRESH WHOLE RAISE

Cut Up Chicken

246

346

3 Var.

2

296

+ dep 12 x 500 ml

per lb 7.63 kg

620 g

ay Same Dry Delive

250-477-6513

Mon-Fri Excluding Holidays

3

2/

9 lb Bag

Snapper Fillets

26

All Var.

per 100 g

+ dep 1.89 L Asst.

WOOLWICH

Artichoke Chevrai Unripened & Orzo Salad Soft Goat Cheese

126

per 100 g

2

4

4 Pack

26

Aluminum Foil

396

4L

Bathroom Tissue 96 Double 12 Roll

1 kg

ALCAN

Ice Cream

CASCASES

675 390g g

475 ml

Hashbrowns

56

526

OFF 375 ml

266

5

113 g

FREYBE

Rustic Baguette

236

386

Asst.

MONTE CRISTO

European Wieners

126

each

100 g

Barbecue Sauce

1

96 Asst. 455 mL Squeeze

NATURAL & ORGANIC N

McCAINS

ISLAND FARMS

Asst.

25% KRAFT

700

per 100 g

KRAFT

Miracle Whip

Charcoal Briquets

Sprouted Apple Crisp Grains Bread Tarts

96

360-400 g

Olives

DURAFLAME

OVER THE TOP

OROWEAT

676 UNICO

PureLife Water

Asst.

FRESH

BAKERY

17.5 g Asst.

MOTT’S

Ground Beef

136

per lb 2.56 kg

Cracker Barrel Cheese Slices

NESTLE

per 100 g

per lb 5.42 kg

66¢

ARBUTUS RIDGE FARMS

KRAFT

Clamato Cocktail

IND WE GR WN EXTRA LEAN O R U O

per lb 5.20 kg

ISLAND FARMS

LOCAL

GROCERIES ER

46

ISLANDD FRESH WHOLE RAISE

116

per lb 1.68 kg

Yogurt

Wild Spring Salmon Fillets Pin Bone Removed

Roma Tomatoes

DAIRY D AIRY LOCAL ISLAND FARMS

Greek Yogurt

GLANFORD GREENHOUSE

Potatoes ¢

1

76

per lb 6.31 kg

B.C. YUKON GOLD

lb

LOCAL THE GREEK GODS

26

per lb 3.44 kg

12” x 100’

SIMPLY NATURAL

Organic Salad Dressing

1

Asstorted 354 ml

96

COMPLIMENTS

HEINZ

Organic Wild Flower Honey

Organic Ketchup

476

750 ml

250-477-6513 • 3829 Cadboro Bay Rd. • www.peppers-foods.com We reserve the right to limit quantities. Some restrictions may apply on certain promotions.

546

500 g

Hours Mon-Fri: 8 am–9 pm Sat: 8 am–7:30 pm Sun: 8 am–7:30 pm


August 24 2011 Oak Bay News