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Whiting Petroleum Corporation

Drilling operations on the Bartleson 44-30H in Sanish field, Mountrail County, Drilling the Rohde Sanish Field, Mountrail ND ND. The well was 14-6XH fractureCross-Unit stimulatedWell in 29instages and completed in County, the Bakken IP: 3,293 BOE/D with an initial flow rate of 2,594 BOE.

Current Corporate Information July 2011

Drilling operations on the Hagey 12-13H in Sanish field, Mountrail County, ND. The well was fracture stimulated in 22 stages and completed in the Bakken with an initial flow rate of 2,264 BOE/d.


Forward-Looking Statement Disclosure, Non-GAAP Measures This presentation includes forward-looking statements that the Company believes to be forwardlooking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. All statements other than statements of historical fact included in this presentation are forward-looking statements. These forward looking statements are subject to risks, uncertainties, assumptions and other factors, many of which are beyond the control of the Company. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements include the Company’s business strategy, financial strategy, oil and natural gas prices, production, reserves and resources, impacts from the global recession and tight credit markets, the impacts of state and federal laws, the impacts of hedging on our results of operations, level of success in exploitation, exploration, development and production activities, uncertainty regarding the Company’s future operating results and plans, objectives, expectations and intentions and other factors described in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2010 and Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2011. In addition, Whiting’s production forecasts and expectations for future periods are dependent upon many assumptions, including estimates of production decline rates from existing wells and the undertaking and outcome of future drilling activity, which may be affected by significant commodity price declines or drilling cost increases. In this presentation, we refer to Adjusted Net Income and Discretionary Cash Flow, which are nonGAAP measures that the Company believes are helpful in evaluating the performance of its business. A reconciliation of Adjusted Net Income and Discretionary Cash Flow to the relevant GAAP measures can be found at the end of the presentation. 1


Reserve and Resource Information Whiting uses in this presentation the terms proved, probable and possible reserves. Proved reserves are reserves which, by analysis of geoscience and engineering data, can be estimated with reasonable certainty to be economically producible from a given date forward from known reservoirs under existing economic conditions, operating methods and government regulations prior to the time at which contracts providing the right to operate expire, unless evidence indicates that renewal is reasonably certain. Probable reserves are reserves that are less certain to be recovered than proved reserves but which, together with proved reserves, are as likely as not to be recovered. Possible reserves are reserves that are less certain to be recovered than probable reserves. Estimates of probable and possible reserves which may potentially be recoverable through additional drilling or recovery techniques are by nature more uncertain than estimates of proved reserves and accordingly are subject to substantially greater risk of not actually being realized by the Company. Whiting uses in this presentation the term “total resources,� which consists of contingent and prospective resources, which SEC rules prohibit in filings of U.S. registrants. Contingent resources are resources that are potentially recoverable but not yet considered mature enough for commercial development due to technological or business hurdles. For contingent resources to move into the reserves category, the key conditions, or contingencies, that prevented commercial development must be clarified and removed. Prospective resources are estimated volumes associated with undiscovered accumulations. These represent quantities of petroleum which are estimated to be potentially recoverable from oil and gas deposits identified on the basis of indirect evidence but which have not yet been drilled. This class represents a higher risk than contingent resources since the risk of discovery is also added. For prospective resources to become classified as contingent resources, hydrocarbons must be discovered, the accumulations must be further evaluated and an estimate of quantities that would be recoverable under appropriate development projects prepared. Estimates of resources are by nature more uncertain than reserves and accordingly are subject to substantially greater risk of not actually being realized by the Company.

2


Company Overview

Drilling the Hutchins Stock Association #1096 in North Ward Estes Field, Whitingâ€&#x;s EOR project in Winkler County, Texas.

Market Capitalization1

$6.6 B

Long-term Debt2

$980.0 MM

Shares Outstanding

117.4 MM

Debt/Total Cap2

27.8%

Proved reserves3 % Oil

304.9 MMBOE 83%

RP ratio4

12.9 years

Q1 2011 Production

66.0 MBOE/d

1

Assumes a $56.91 share price (closing price as of June 30, 2011) on 117,368,706 common shares outstanding as of March 31, 2011.

2

As of March 31, 2011. Please refer to Slide #52 for details.

3

Whiting reserves at December 31, 2010 based on independent engineering.

4

R/P ratio based on year-end 2010 proved reserves and 2010 production.

3


Our Formula for Success

New Rockies exploration areas (Bakken and Three Forks in Williston Basin and Niobrara in DJ Basin)

Other horizontal oil prospects (Permian Basin)

Opportunistically Monetize Some PDP Reserves

Long-lived properties

Predictable performance

High PDP content

Multi-zone potential

Permian Basin – North Ward Estes field

Anadarko Basin – Postle field

Williston Basin – Bakken in Sanish and Parshall field areas and Three Forks in Lewis & Clark prospect

Piceance Basin - Boies Ranch / Jimmy Gulch areas

Uintah Basin – Flat Rock Field

4


Adjusted Net Income and Discretionary Cash Flow for the Three Months Ended March 31, 2011 and 2010 (1)(2) Three Months Ended 3/31/11

3/31/10

Net Income

$ 19.1

$ 81.2

Adjusted Net Income

$ 99.7

$ 62.3

Adjusted Earnings Per Basic Share

$ 0.85

$ 0.61

Adjusted Earnings Per Diluted Share

$ 0.84

$ 0.57

Discretionary Cash Flow

$ 284.1

$ 214.6

(In millions, except per share data)

(1)

Please refer to slide #57 for a Reconciliation of Net Income Available to Common Shareholders to Adjusted Net Income Available to Common Shareholders.

(2)

Please refer to slide #58 for a Reconciliation of Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities to Discretionary Cash Flow. All share and per share amounts have been retroactively restated for the 2010 period to reflect the Companyâ€&#x;s two-for-one stock split in February 2011.

(3)

5


Consistently Strong Margins Consistently Delivering Strong EBITDA Margins (1) $80.14/Bbl $5.04/Mcf

$70.34/BOE

$69.06

Whiting Realized Prices(1) $/BOE

$61.48 $53.57 $50.52 $44.70

$45.01

$35.23 $27.50

(1) Includes hedging adjustments.

6


Platform for Continued Growth Average Daily Production

Proved Reserves (12/31/2010) 3% 14% 3%

40%

40%

Rocky Mountains Gulf Coast Michigan    

Permian Basin Mid-Continent

304.9 MMBOE (12/31/2010) 83% Oil / 17% Natural Gas 71% Developed / 29% Undeveloped 1,328,665 Net Acres (43% Developed) $5.0 Billion PV10% (pre-tax) at SEC NYMEX prices of $79.43/Bbl and $4.38/Mcf

At December 31, 2010, Whiting Had a 12.9 Year R/P Ratio (1) Supported by a Strong Portfolio of Development Opportunities (1)

R/P ratio based on year-end 2010 proved reserves and 2010 production.

7


Map of Operations Q1 2011 66.0 MBOE/d 4%

ROCKY MOUNTAINS 39.3 MBOE/D

4% 13%

MICHIGAN 2.8 MBOE/D

MID-CONTINENT 8.8 MBOE/D

60%

19%

Michigan

Gulf Coast

Mid-Continent

Permian Basin

Rocky Mountains PERMIAN 12.4 MBOE/D

Proved Reserves at December 31, 2010 (1)

Core Area Permian Basin Rocky Mountains Mid-Continent Gulf Coast Michigan

Oil (2) (MMBbl) 115.6 94.5 38.2 3.2 2.8

Total

254.3 (2)

Gas Total (Bcf) (MMBOE) 47.9 123.6 162.8 121.6 19.9 41.5 36.9 9.4 36.0 8.8 303.5

304.9

Pre-Tax PV10%

Q1 2011 Average Daily Net

Oil % 94% 78% 92% 34% 32%

Value (1) (in millions) $1,471.5 $2,425.5 $955.2 $113.3 $78.9

Production (MBOE/d) 12.4 39.3 8.8 2.7 2.8

83%

$5,044.4

66.0

Oil includes natural gas liquids

GULF COAST 2.7 MBOE/D (1)

Based on 12-month average prices of $79.43/Bbl and $4.38/Mcf in accordance with SEC requirements. Our pre-tax PV10 values do not purport to present the fair value of our oil and natural gas reserves.

8


Whiting a Top Oil Producer in Three States

NORTH DAKOTA (1)

OKLAHOMA (2)

#2 13,705,737 Barrels in 2010

#3 Total Barrels: 3,089,028

(1)

(2)

(3)

TEXAS

(3)

#17 Total Barrels: 3,888,017

Whiting was the second largest oil producer, according to the North Dakota Industrial Commission, for the year ended December 31, 2010, during which Whitingâ€&#x;s gross operated production totaled 13,705,737 barrels of oil. According to Whiting production records and the Oklahoma Corporation Commission Top 100 Oil Producers Report for the year 2009. According to the Railroad Commission of Texas for the year 2010.

9


Whiting Total Reserves and Resources at Dec. 31, 2010 MMBNGL 13 1 4 12

Oil & NGL MMBO 147 3 28 76

BCF 204 13 3 83

MMBOE 181 5 29 90

224

30

254

303

305

Total Probable (1) (3)

50

15

65

212

100

16%

Total Possible (1) (4)

146

37

183

205

217

35%

Total 3P Reserves

420

82

502

720

622

100.0%

Resource Potential (5)

228

27

255

711

374

MMBO 134 2 24 64

PDP PBP PNP PUD Total Proved

(1)

(2) (3) (4)

(5)

(1) (2)

% of Total 3P MMBOE 29% 1% 5% 14%

Proved, Probable and Possible Reserves based on independent engineering by Cawley Gillespie & Associates, Inc. at December 31, 2010. Based on 12-month average prices of $79.43/Bbl and $4.38/Mcf in accordance with SEC requirements. Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.” All volumes shown are unrisked. Future capital expenditures for total Proved Reserves are estimated at $1,492MM. Future capital expenditures for total Probable Reserves are estimated at $1,500MM. Future capital expenditures for total Possible Reserves are estimated at $2,036MM. Whiting has internally estimated its unrisked Total Resource potential using year-end 2010 SEC pricing of $79.43/Bbl and $4.38/Mcf held flat. Future capital expenditures associated with Resources are estimated at $5,089MM. Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.” All volumes shown are unrisked.

10


Major Fields with Probable and Possible Reserves at December 31, 2010 (1) (2)

Region Permian

Field North Ward Estes

MMBOE

Capex MM$

$ Per BOE

130

1,199

9.22

75

968

12.91

32

398

12.44

237

2,565

10.82

(Additional phases and larger CO2 slug sizes)

Rockies

Various Fields and Prospects

(Bakken and Three Forks Development)

Rockies

Sulphur Creek

(225 20- and 10-acre wells)

Total (75% of 317 MMBOE)

(1)

Based on independent engineering by Cawley Gillespie & Associates, Inc. at December 31, 2010. Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.� All volumes shown are unrisked.

(2)

Based on 12-month average prices of $79.43/Bbl and $4.38/Mcf in accordance with SEC requirements.

11


Whiting Total Resource Potential at Dec. 31, 2010(1)(2)(3) - Using SEC Prices of $79.43/Bbl and $4.38/Mcf Held Flat

MMBO Williston Basin Bakken & Three Forks

Oil & NGL Nat. Gas MMBNGL MMBO BCF

MMBOE

PV10, MM$

127

11

138

70

149

$ 1,670

37

0

37

65

48

$ 1,040

38

0

38

24

42

$

853

1

10

11

139

34

$

20

25

6

31

413

101

$

655

228

27

255

711

374

$ 4,238

(Continued exploration in ND & MT)

Big Tex – TX (Wolfcamp and Bone Spring exploration)

Redtail – CO (Niobrara exploration)

Sulphur Creek – CO (4) Other Areas – (CO, MI, ND, TX, UT and WY)

Total Resource Potential

(1)

(2) (3)

(4)

Whiting has internally estimated its unrisked Total Resource potential. PV10 values were based on SEC NYMEX price assumptions of $79.43/Bbl and $4.38/Mcf. Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.” All volumes shown are unrisked. Our pre-tax PV10 values do not purport to present the fair value of our oil and natural gas reserves. Future capital expenditures for Total Resources are estimated at $5,089MM. Estimated future capital expenditures associated with these areas are as follows: Williston Basin $2,370MM; Big Tex $652MM; Redtail $638MM; Sulphur Creek $355MM; Other Areas $1,074MM. Whiting estimates continued development will occur at NYMEX prices of approximately $6.00 per Mcf.

12


Whiting Total Reserves at December 31, 2010 - with Breakout of % Bakken / Three Forks and EOR MMBOE

BAK & 3FKS (MMBOE)

PDP PBP PNP PUD

181 5 29 90

49 0 0 25

Total Proved (1)

305

Total Probable (1)

BAK & 3FKS %

EOR (MMBOE)

EOR %

27% 2% 0% 28%

65 0 27 41

36% 0% 93% 46%

74

24%

133

44%

100

6

6%

41

41%

Total Possible (1)

217

69

32%

110

51%

Total 3P Reserves

622

149

24%

284

46%

Williston Basin BAK & 3FKS – ND & MT 149 Big Tex – TX 48 Redtail Niobrara – CO 42 Sulphur Creek – CO 34 Other Areas – CO, MI, ND, TX, UT & WY 101

149 -----

100% -----

Total Resource Potential

149

40%

Resource Potential (2)

374

(1)

The Proved, Probable and Possible reserve estimates shown are based on independent engineering by Cawley, Gillespie & Associates, Inc. at December 31, 2010 using SEC NYMEX prices of $79.43/Bbl and $4.38/Mcf. Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.” All volumes shown are unrisked.

(2)

Whiting has internally estimated its “Total Resource” potential at SEC NYMEX prices of $79.43/Bbl and $4.38/Mcf. Please see Slide #2 for the definition of “Total Resource.” All volumes shown are unrisked.

13


Whiting Pre-Tax PV10 Values at December 31, 2010 (1) - Using $79.43/Bbl and $4.38/Mcf Held Flat

OIL & NGL Nat. Gas MMBO MMBNGL MMBO BCF MMBOE PDP

134

13

147

204

181

PBP

2

1

3

13

5

PNP

24

4

28

3

29

$ 423

PUD

64

12

76

83

90

$ 861

224

30

254

303

305

50

15

65

212

100

$ 546

146

37

183

205

217

$1,869

420

82

502

720

622

Total Proved Total Probable Total Possible Total 3P Reserves

(1)

PV10, MM$ $3,718 $

42

$5,044

Reserve estimates shown are based on independent engineering by Cawley, Gillespie & Associates, Inc. at December 31, 2010 using SEC NYMEX price assumptions of $79.43/Bbl and $4.38/Mcf. Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.” All volumes shown are unrisked. Our pre-tax PV10 values do not purport to present the fair value of our oil and natural gas reserves.

14


Finding Costs (in Thousands) 2004

Proved Acquisitions Unproved Acquisitions Development Cost Exploration Cost Change in Future Dvlp. Cost Total

$ $ $ $ $ $

2005

525,563 4,401 74,476 9,739 150,538 764,717

$ 906,208 $ 16,124 $ 215,162 $ 22,532 $ 692,229 $ 1,852,255

52,288 114,715 71,407

Development Reserves Development – Oil (MBbls) Development – Gas (MMcf) Total Development (MBOE)

5,175 29,133 10,031

Revisions Reserve Revisions – Oil (MBbls) Reserve Revisions – Gas (MMcf) Total Reserve Revisions (MBOE)

( 853 ) ( 9,862 ) ( 2,497 )

Acquisition Reserves Acquisition – Oil (MBbls) Acquisition – Gas (MMcf) Total Acquisition (MBOE)

Cost Per BOE to Acquire Cost Per BOE to Develop All-In Finding Cost Per BOE

$ $ $

7.36 31.74 9.69

$ $ $

2006

29,778 38,628 408,828 81,877 267,685 826,796

$ 8,128 $ 13,598 $ 506,057 $ 56,741 $ 10,048 $ 594,572

115,737 101,082 132,584

670 4,009 1,338

691 691

1,956 21,068 5,467

4,125 19,362 7,352

950 ( 45,322 ) ( 6,604 )

2,053 ( 57,780 ) ( 7,577 )

6.83 14.09

$ $ $ $ $ $

2007

$ $ $

22.25 742.74

$ $ $

2008

2010

Seven-Year Total/Avg (2004 – 2010)

$ 78,800 $ 12,872 $ 436,721 $ 50,970 $ 423,541 $ 1,002,904

$ 22,763 $ 155,472 $ 723,687 $ 114,012 $ 86,203 $ 1,102,137

$ 1,865,296 $ 339,936 $ 3,279,547 $ 378,492 $ 1,425,611 $ 7,288,882

513 90,329 15,568

3,177 4,155 3,870

505 1,526 759

173,581 315,816 226,217

10,973 40,936 17,796

20,395 57,093 29,911

25,115 41,969 32,109

29,434 23,135 33,290

97,173 232,696 135,956

392 8,079 1,739

( 20,851 ) ( 74,689 ) ( 33,299 )

33,566 ( 62,618 ) 23,130

19,799 ( 618) 19,695

35,056 ( 242,810 ) ( 5,413 )

11.76 30.02 29.40

$ 294,056 $ 98,841 $ 914,616 $ 42,621 $ ( 204,633) $1,145,501

2009

$ $ $

18.89 94.05

$ $ $

Unrisked Probable and Possible Reserves – BOE Probable and Possible Cap-Ex All-In Rate with Future Dvlp. Cost and Prob. & Poss.

20.36 16.73 16.97

$ $ $

29.99 20.37 20.51

$ $ $

8.25 41.55 20.43

317,215 $ 3,536,055 $ 16.06

15


Key Development Areas for 2011 ($ in millions) Northern Rockies Sanish Parshall Lewis & Clark

Sanish Field Net Wells 54

Existing Properties

Capex $352

2011 Capital Projects

Lewis & Clark Net Wells 30

Capex $278

2011 Exploration & Development Budget $1.35 B

Central Rockies Net Wells 9

Capex $52

Land 8% $110MM

Flat Rock

Postle

EOR Projects

Other (1) 6% $75MM

Bakken/Three Forks Hydrocarbon System 52% $707MM

Permian 7% $92MM

Capex $314

North Ward Estes

Permian Region Net Wells 46

EOR 23% $314MM

Capex $92

(1) Comprised primarily of exploration salaries, lease delay rentals, seismic and other exploration and development.

Central Rockies 4% $52MM

16 16


2011 Exploration and Development Budget Estimated Gross and Net Wells in 2011 EST. 2011 CAPEX (In MM) NORTHERN ROCKIES Sanish Field Parshall Field Lewis & Clark Area Other (Hidden Bench, Starbuck, MO Breaks, Cassandra & Big Island) SUBTOTAL EOR PROJECTS North Ward Estes Postle SUBTOTAL PERMIAN BASIN Big Tex Other Permian SUBTOTAL CENTRAL ROCKIES Redtail Prospect Other Central Rockies SUBTOTAL GULF COAST Various MICHIGAN PDC Expl. & Dvlp. OTHER, EXPLORATION OTHER, NON-OPERATED EXPL. EXPENSE (1) LAND GRAND TOTAL

(1)

PLANNED WELLS Gross Net 54 2 30 14

$ 707

95 11 51 23 180

100

$ 201 $ 113 $ 314

----

----

$ $ $

89 3 92

23 23 46

23 23 46

$ $ $

35 17 52

6 4 10

6 3 9

$

2

1

1

$ 5 $ 11 $ 17 $ 40 $ 110 $1,350

1 ----238

1 ----157

$ 352 $ 12 $ 278 $ 65

Comprised primarily of exploration salaries, lease delay rentals and seismic activities .

17


2010 vs. 2011 Capital Expenditures by Reserve Category 2010 – $978 MM Actual

2011 – $1,350 MM Budget 20%

16%

8% 37% 23%

25%

49% 22% Proved CO2 Recovery Projects (Proved) Non-Proved Land

18


Whiting Developed & Undeveloped Acreage by Core Area

19


Williston and Alberta Basins Regional Map Paleogeography – Late Mississippian (source: Ron Blakey, Universtiy of N. Arizona)

Conventional Bakken Play (Anticlines, Fault Traps – Gravity Segregation)

Area of Bakken Depostion

Bakken Immature

Williston Basin

Unconventional Bakken Play (Continuous Phase Reservoir – All Oil)

20


Bakken Oil Generation and Drilling Activity (Source: IHS Energy, Horizontal Bakken Wells Drilled as of 2000)

Hydrogen Bakken Horizontal Drilling Activity Index Since 2000

Increasing Maturity

Cooked

Immature

21


All Whiting Prospect Areas in Bakken/Three Forks Hydrocarbon System at May 31, 2011(1)

CASSANDRA SANISH

STARBUCK

MISSOURI BREAKS TARPON

HIDDEN BENCH

WHITING BAKKEN PROSPECTS WOGC Lease Areas

BIG ISLAND

2011 Planned Wells 0

15

30

Miles

05-31-2011

(1) (2)

Whitingâ€&#x;s total acreage cost in 678M net acres is approximately $281 million, or $415 per net acre. Includes August 2011 closing of 48,540 gross and 24,500 net acres.

Sanish / Parshall - Bakken and Three Forks Objectives - 229 producing wells in Sanish - 127 producing wells in Parshall - 99 Wells in 2010, 106 in 2011 - $364MM capex in 2011 Lewis & Clark - Three Forks Objective - Control 164 1,280-acre spacing units - 12 Wells in 2010, 51 in 2011 - $278MM capex in 2011 Hidden Bench / Tarpon - Middle Bakken "C" Objective - Control 15 1,280-acre spacing units - 12 Wells in 2011, $35MM capex in 2011 Starbuck - Middle Bakken Objective - Control 75 1,280-acre spacing units - 2 Wells in 2011, $13MM capex in 2011 Missouri Breaks - Bakken and Three Forks Objectives - Control 35 1,280-acre spacing units - 2 Wells in 2011, $10MM capex in 2011 Cassandra - Middle Bakken Objective - Control 9 1,280-acre apcing units - 2 Wells in 2010, 2 in 2011 - $6MM capex in 2011

Gross Acres 180,689

Net Acres 84,278

387,325

255,634

64,176

37,594

110,326

88,534

67,700 (2)

41,778 (2)

28,776

13,846

Big Island - Multiple Objectives - Control 64 1,280-acre spacing units - 1 well in 2011, $4MM capex in 2011

160,727

117,669

Subtotals

985,607

635,467

Other ND & Montana

94,294

38,781

1,093,901

678,248

22


At Sanish Field Bakken / Three Forks Hydrocarbon System Sanish Bay 42-12H IP: 2,638 BOE/D

Whiting Braaflat 11-11H IP: 2,997 BOE/D

EOG Van Hook 1-13H IP: 1,661 BOE/D

Hess Corp. St. Andes 151-89-2413H-1 TA

23 23


Sanish and Parshall Fields Recent and Notable Wells Units in which WLL Owns an Interest

17-mile 6” & 10” Residue Gas/NGL Line to WBIGas sales to Midwest markets Began in late August „08

17-mile 8” Crude Oil Line To Enbridge – Initial oil sales To Midwest markets began In early December „09

PARSHALL FIELD As of 04-15-11 Parshall Field Outline

127

Current Producers Potential Operated Bakken Locations Non-Interest Wells 72,420 Gross Acres 18,025 Net Acres

Behr 11-34H (Bakken) Compl. 6-20-08 10-stage frac Cum. Prod. @ 3/31/2011: 680,190 BO 398,709 Mcf

NEW WELL Ness 42-31 WH (Bakken Wing Well) IP: 1,529 BOE/d on 3-16-11 22-stage frac

Robinson Lake Gas Plant

SANISH FIELD As of 04-15-11 Sanish Field Outline

229 24 10 7 95 183

Current Producers Currently Completing Currently Drilling Remaining Operated Bakken Infill Locations Other Potential Operated Bakken Locations Potential Operated Three Forks Locations

Non-Interest Wells Refer to Slide #19 for more details. 108,269 Gross Acres 66,253 Net Acres

NEW WELL Smith 14-29XH (Cross Unit) IP: 2,028 BOE/d on 4-2-11 40-stage sliding sleeve frac

24


Six Month Cumulative Production by Operator for Bakken Wells Drilled Since January 2009 Source: IHS Energy, Inc., January, 2011

25


Sanish Field Bakken Drainage Area Micro Seismic recorded during fracture stimulation of the Holmberg 44-24H 24-Stage Frac / IP: 2,558 BOE/D on April 13, 2010

Toe of Lateral

1280 Acres

• Well developed NE-trending natural fractures indicated in some locations. • Lateral frac wings average 750‟ on either side of the wellbore. • This is consistent with our other fracs and planned spacing pattern for full field development.

Heel of Lateral

26


Sanish Field Development Pattern Bakken Wing Well Configuration

Three Forks Well Configuration

Bakken Cross-Unit Well Configuration

Combined Bakken (Wing Well) & Three Forks Configuration

Bakken Three Forks

27


Fully Developed Bakken and Three Forks Horizontal Wells in Sanish Field Area

(1)

Represents an increase of 163 gross wells from the previous estimate of 382. Well counts and well plans will vary based upon continued evaluation. Drilling, WOC

Completed

Planned/ Potential

Total

Middle Bakken

2

130

7

139

Cross-Unit Middle Bakken

3

13

14

30

Wing - Middle Bakken

2

0

81

83

Three Forks

16

18

183

217

Total Operated

23

161

285

469

Non-Op Bakken

7

63

0

70

Non-Op Three Forks

1

5

0

6

Three Forks Non-Op Wells

Grand Total

31

229

285

545(1)

Sanish Field Outline

Parshall Field Outline

Bakken

As of April 15, 2011

28


IP, 30- and 60- day Average Production Rates for Whiting Operated Wells in Sanish Field in 2011 WI%

NRI%

Completion Date

IP (BOE/d) 24-hr Test

Average 1st 30 Days (BOE/d)

1) LACEY 14-1XH

64%

51%

4/22/2011

2,451

962

2) FOREMAN 21-4TFH

37%

30%

4/18/2011

798

3) BREHM 21-4H

37%

30%

4/17/2011

991

493

4) STATE 12-32H

40%

32%

4/10/2011

2,247

741

5) ROBERT PATTEN 44-3TFH

93%

75%

4/5/2011

440

6) HOLLINGER 11-14TFH

47%

38%

4/4/2011

596

7) HOLLINGER 21-14TFH

47%

38%

3/31/2011

1,232

514

8) SMITH 14-29XH

43%

35%

3/30/2011

2,028

779

668

9) GUINN TRUST 1-13TFH

41%

33%

3/24/2011

1,254

491

395

10) HOOVER 14-1XH

27%

22%

3/20/2011

2,212

731

594

11) WARDEN 43-9TFH

30%

24%

3/17/2011

715

12) NESS 42-31WH

78%

64%

3/14/2011

1,529

13) SCOTT MEIERS 12-17TFH

87%

71%

3/13/2011

1,087

14) ARNDT 14-5XH

28%

23%

3/7/2011

1,416

15) DEAL 43-28TFH

72%

58%

3/4/2011

920

16) BARLOW 14-6XH

75%

61%

2/28/2011

17) OJA 14-27XH 18) NIEMITALO 31-15XH

65%

53%

52%

19) BARTLESON 21-3H

Well Name

Average 1st 60 Days (BOE/d)

Average 1st 90 Days (BOE/d)

543 700

598

527

1,182

511

511

447

2/18/2011

2,072

558

42%

2/15/2011

2,905

843

685

50%

41%

2/13/2011

1,235

552

455

20) HEIPLE 14-3XH 21) B. ROGGENBUCK 24-25H 22) SIKES STATE 43-16H

63% 73% 100%

52% 59% 81%

2/9/2011 1/22/2011 1/19/2011

2,080 2,072 3,385

1,163 698 1,291

865 567 1,052

776 515 893

23) BREHM 12-7H

50%

41%

1/14/2011

987

439

342

351

24) MILLER 44-11H 25) NESS 21-3H

76% 50%

62% 41%

1/8/2011 1/4/2011

1,447 1,730

343 690

546

486

57%

48%

1,560

686

607

571

Averages

29


Typical Bakken Production Profiles Sanish Field (1) (2) Production Profiles in Oil Equivalents Bakken - Sanish EUR - 950 MBOE, CAPEX $5.5MM Nymex oil price/Bbl

$70

$80

$90

ROI

6.1:1

7.3:1

8.4:1

IRR (%)

395%

676%

1,138%

Equivalent Daily Production BOE/D

10,000

Payout (Yrs.)

0.64

0.55

0.48

PV(10) $MM

16.053

19.93

23.807

$70

$80

$90

ROI

2.4:1

2.9:1

3.5:1

IRR (%)

56%

91%

133%

Payout (Yrs.)

1.6

1.1

0.9

PV(10) $MM

4.061

5.959

7.861

EUR - 450 MBOE , CAPEX $5.5MM

1,000

Nymex oil price/Bbl

EUR - 950 MBOE

100 EUR - 450 MBOE

10 0

12

24

36

48

60

72

84

96

108 120

132

144

156

168

180

Months On Production (1)

Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.” All volumes shown are un-risked. Our pre-tax PV10 values do not purport to present the fair value of our oil and natural gas reserves.

(2)

EURs, ROIs, IRRs and PV10 values will vary well to well. Whiting holds an average WI of 60% and an average NRI of 50% in its operated Bakken wells in Sanish field.

30


Typical Three Forks Production Profile Sanish Field (1) (2) Production Profile in Oil Equivalents Three Forks - Sanish

Equivalent Daily Production BOE/D

1,000

EUR - 400 MBOE , CAPEX $5.5 MM Nymex oil price/Bbl

$70

$80

$90

ROI

2.2:1

2.7:1

3.2:1

IRR (%)

40%

63%

92%

Payout (Yrs.)

2.1

1.5

1.2

PV(10) $MM

3.130

4.846

6.566

100 EUR - 400 MBOE

10 0

12

24

36

48

60

72

84

96

108

120

132

144

156

168

180

Months On Production

(1)

Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.” All volumes shown are un-risked. Our pre-tax PV10 values do not purport to present the fair value of our oil and natural gas reserves.

(2)

EURs, ROIs, IRRs and PV10 values will vary well to well. Whiting holds an average WI of 60% and an average NRI of 50% in its operated Three Forks wells in Sanish field.

31


Williston Basin Off-Take Expansion Existing Pipelines Proposed Pipelines

All Volumes Barrels per Day

TransCanada Keystone XL

Existing Capacity

2011 Additions

2012 Additions

Enbridge

185,000

25,000 Q2

145,000 Q4

Bridger / Belle Fourche

120,000

30,000 Q3

50,000 Q1

2013 Additions

Total 355,000

100,000 Q1

300,000

Tesoro /Mandan

60,000

60,000

EOG (rail)

60,000

60,000

Plains

50,000 Q4

50,000

Hess (rail)

60,000 Q1

60,000

COLT (rail)

27,000 Q4

27,000

Quintana Total

425,000

82,000

305,000

100,000 Q1

100,000

200,000

1,012,000

32


Lewis & Clark Area – 250 Units / 500 Potential Locations General Outline Bicentennial Field Upper Bakken Shale Developed in 1980‟s Ellison Creek 11-1TFH 265 BOE/D

Mosser 11-27TFH IP: 122 BOE/d

Dry Creek 11-13 TFH IP: 906 BOE/D

ECONOMICS Well Cost: $6.5 MM per well EUR: 350 to 500 MBOE

Teddy 21-24 TFH IP: 875 BOE/D

Odermann 41-31TFH IP: 702 BOE/D

Breuni 28-1TFH IP: 473 BOE/D

Billings, Golden Valley and Stark Cos., ND

Obrigewitch 21-17TFH 1,198 BOE/D from 2 frac stages

As of 4-15-2011

Hecker 21-18TFH IP: 3,612 BOE/D from 22 of 30 frac stages

Completing

ACREAGE Whiting has assembled 373,213 gross (251,768 net) acres in our Lewis & Clark prospect area in the southwestern Williston Basin

This acreage position would allow up to 250 possible 1,280-acre spacing units within the prospective area: • Average WI of 65% • Average NRI of 52% • Well by well WI and NRI will vary based on ownership in each spacing unit

Federal 32-4H 7,686‟ Lateral

Active Drilling Locations

OBJECTIVE Upper Three Forks along pinch-out of the overlying Bakken Shale

Deitz 21-17 TFH IP: 1,007 BOE/D

DRILLING PROGRAM 5 rigs currently active in the area. Plans are to ramp this to 9 rigs by third quarter 2011. Planned budget for the area is $278 MM FEDERAL 32-4H IP: 1,970 BOE/D. Avg during first 30, 60 and 90 days was 695 BOE/D, 531 BOE/D and 447 BOE/D. Currently 9 wells are waiting on completion.

33 33


Production History of Federal 32-4TFH Well at Lewis & Clark (1) (2) (3) Gross Production @ 4/15/11: 179 BOE/D

1200

1000

600

400

200

Apr-11

Mar-11

Feb-11

Jan-11

Dec-10

Nov-10

Oct-10

Sep-10

Aug-10

Jul-10

Jun-10

May-10

Apr-10

Mar-10

Feb-10

Jan-10

0 Dec-09

BOE/d

800

(1)

The graph above reflects production from November 23, 2009 through April 15, 2011.

(2)

The Federal 32-4TFH was completed in the Three Forks formation on 11/23/09 flowing 1,970 BOE/D. Total monthly production from all Whiting-operated wells in North Dakota is reported to the North Dakota Industrial Commission (NDIC) at approximately the end of the following month. The NDIC included only 8 days of production from the Federal 32-4TFH in November 2009. Thus, the NDIC reported total production in the first six months for the Federal 32-4TFH to be 51,000 BOE during a 159-day period. NOTE: Production in the first six months (181 days) totaled 66,300 BOE. Through 4/15/2011 cum prod 127,293 BOE.

(3)

34


IP, 30-, 60- and 90-day Average Production Rates for Whiting Operated Wells in Lewis & Clark Field WI

NRI

Test Date

IP (BOE/d) 24-hr Test

1) OBRIGEWITCH 21-17TFH (1)

96%

77%

4/18/2011

1,189

2) TEDDY 21-24TFH

63%

50%

4/1/2011

875

3) 4) 5) 6) 7) 8)

56% 98% 64% 77% 44% 48%

45% 78% 51% 61% 35% 38%

3/27/2011 3/16/2011 3/11/2011 3/4/2011 3/1/2011 2/27/2011

906 1,007 122 3,612 473 702

603 555 73 1,504 260 323

75 1,307

9) MANN 21-18TFH 10) TEDDY 44-30TFH

66% 88%

55% 70%

12/21/2010 11/17/2010

870 1,874

425 766

321 412

268 412

11) TEDDY 44-13TFH (2)

81%

65%

11/12/2010

381

187

169

195

12) ELLISON CREEK 11-1TFH (3) 13) FROEHLICH 44-9TFH 14) KUBAS 11-13TFH 15) FEDERAL 32-4HBKCE 16) MOI 22-15H 17) BUCKHORN RANCH 31-16H

63% 90% 91% 84% 91% 91%

51% 72% 73% 70% 79% 78%

9/28/2010 9/18/2010 9/13/2010 11/25/2009 3/1/2009 12/24/2008

608 2,090 1,953 1,970 339 552

343 1,049 711 695 210 311

326 819 530 531 200 267

299 698 457 447 175 252

76%

62%

1,148

534

453

356

Well Name

DRY CREEK 11-13TFH DIETZ 21-17TFH MOSSER 11-27 HECKER 21-18TFH BRUENI 28-1H ODERMANN 41-31TFH

Averages

(1) (2) (3)

Average 1st 30 Days (BOE/d)

Currently producing from an estimated 2 frac stages. Fracture stimulated into water-bearing zone. Whiting plans to modify frac design. Partially pressure depleted by 1980sâ€&#x; Upper Bakken Shale well.

Average 1st 60 Days (BOE/d)

Average 1st 90 Days (BOE/d)

484

35


All Whiting Lease Areas in Bakken / Three Forks Hydrocarbon System at May 31, 2011

A‟

CASSANDRA

9 STARBUCK 8

TARPON

MISSOURI BREAKS

HIDDEN BENCH

7

LEWIS 6 & CLARK

54 BIG ISLAND

3 2 1

SANISH & PARSHALL

Sanish / Parshall - Bakken and Three Forks Objectives - 229 producing wells in Sanish - 127 producing wells in Parshall - 99 Wells in 2010, 106 in 2011 - $364MM capex in 2011 Lewis & Clark - Three Forks Objective - Control 164 1,280-acre spacing units - 12 Wells in 2010, 51 in 2011 - $278MM capex in 2011 Hidden Bench / Tarpon - Middle Bakken "C" Objective - Control 15 1,280-acre spacing units - 12 Wells in 2011, $35MM capex in 2011 Starbuck - Middle Bakken Objective - Control 75 1,280-acre spacing units - 2 Wells in 2011, $13MM capex in 2011 Missouri Breaks - Bakken and Three Forks Objectives - Control 35 1,280-acre spacing units - 2 Wells in 2011, $10MM capex in 2011 Cassandra - Middle Bakken Objective - Control 9 1,280-acre apcing units - 2 Wells in 2010, 2 in 2011 - $6MM capex in 2011 Big Island - Multiple Objectives - Control 64 1,280-acre spacing units - 1 well in 2011, $4MM capex in 2011 Subtotals Other ND & Montana

A (1) Whiting‟s total acreage cost in 580M net acres (522M + 58M net acres of other Williston Basin acreage), is approximately $141 million, or $243 per net acre.

(1)

Gross Acres Net Acres 180,689 84,278

387,325 255,634

64,176 37,594

110,326 88,534

67,700 41,778

(1)

28,776 13,846

160,727 117,669

985,607 635,467 94,294 38,781 1,093,901 678,248

Includes August 2011 closing of 48,540 gross and 24,500 net acres.

36


Whiting Drilling Objectives in the Western Williston Basin -- Shooting for the “Sweet Spots” A

A‟

37


Redtail Niobrara Prospect Weld County, Colorado

OBJECTIVE Niobrara Shale

Redtail 75,701 Net Acres

ACREAGE Whiting has assembled 103,880 gross (75,701 net) acres in our Redtail prospect in the northeastern portion of the DJ Basin

• Average WI of 73% • Average NRI of 61% • Well by well WI and NRI will vary based on ownership in each spacing unit COMPLETED WELL COST Horizontal: $4 to $5 MM DRILLING PROGRAM One rig currently active in the area. One well drilled in 2010 and 6 wells planned for 2011. Planned budget in 2011 is $35 MM

38


Big Tex Prospect Pecos, Reeves and Ward Counties, Texas OBJECTIVE Wolfcamp and Bone Spring ACREAGE Whiting has assembled 111,665 gross (83,303 net) acres in our Big Tex prospect in the Delaware Basin: • Average WI of 75% • Average NRI of 56% • Well by well WI and NRI will vary based on ownership in each spacing unit COMPLETED WELL COST Vertical: $2 MM Horizontal: $4.5 MM DRILLING PROGRAM 3 rigs currently active in the area. Recently kicked off a 4 well horizontal drilling program. Plan to drill 23 wells in 2011. Planned budget for the prospect in 2011 is $89 MM

39


Flat Rock Field Uintah County, Utah 

22,029 gross acres (11,454 net)

22.9 MMcfe of daily net production as of June 26, 2011 

13 wells in the Entrada formation (11,500 feet)

25 wells in the Wasatch and Dakota formations

FLAT ROCK FIELD AREA As of 04-15-2011 WLL - locations

WLL – Entrada producers

NEW UTE Tribal 3-25-14-19 Comp. 11-10 in Entrada IP: 6.5 MMcf/d

UTE Tribal 1-25-14-19 Compl. 06-10 in Entrada IP: 12.1 MMcf/d 63‟ of net pay

WLL – Other zone producers

UTE Tribal 3-30-14-20 Compl. 05-10 in Entrada IP: 4.8 MMcf/d

Entrada gas well showing initial Rate (MMCFPD) as reported to Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining.

WLL - Operated WLL – 100% WI - operated

UTE Tribal 11-30-14-20 Compl. 2-10 in Dakota IP: 6.8 MMcf/d

Source: Utah Oil and Gas Commission as of September 1, 2008

Up to 100 feet of net pay

46 additional drilling locations (2 P1, 1P2 and 43 P3)

In November 2010, Whiting completed the Ute Tribal 3-25-14-19 well in the Entrada formation flowing at a restricted rate of 6.5 MMcf/d

In December 2010, Whiting completed the Ute Tribal 5-25-14-19 well in the Entrada formation flowing 10.5 MMcf/d and the Ute Tribal 13-25-14-19 well in the Entrada formation flowing 8.0 MMcf/d

Whiting has a five-year gas sales contract covering 10 MMcf of gas per day at a flat fixed-price of $5.50 per Mcf at the wellhead. In 2011 and in Q1 2012, an additional 9 MMcf of daily gas volumes are under contract at a weighted average flat fixedprice of $5.15 per Mcf at the wellhead. (Please refer to slide #54.)

1 MILE

NEW UTE Tribal 13-25-14-19 Comp. 12-10 in Entrada IP: 8.0 MMcf/d

22,029 Gross Acres 11,454 Net Acres -Initial production rates for Other Entrada Producers are from the Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining. Whiting Petroleum Corporation is not The operator of the Other Entrada Producers. Whiting Petroleum Corporation cannot provide Any assurance that its planned wells will have Results similar to the Other Entrada Producers.

UTE Tribal 15-30-14-20 Compl. 1-09 in Entrada IP: 9.3 MMcf/d

49 square miles of 3-D seismic support

QEP - producers

WLL – < 100% WI – non-op (WI 37.5% - 50%)

NEW UTE Tribal 5-25-14-19 Comp. 12-10 in Entrada IP: 10.5 MMcf/d

Other Entrada producers

3.0

UTE Tribal 1-30-14-20 Compl. 11-08 in Entrada IP: 4.6 MMcf/d

95% of current production is from the Entrada formation

40


EOR Projects - Postle and North Ward Estes Fields

Whiting

Postle N. Ward Estes

Total Whiting

% Postle N. Ward Estes

12/31/10 Proved Reserves Oil – MMBbl Gas – Bcf Total – MMBOE % Crude Oil

130 276 177

124 27 (1) 128

254 304 305

74%

96%

83%

49.4

16.6

66.0

49% 9% (1) 42%

Q1 2011 Production Total – MBOE/d (1)

25%

Includes Ancillary Properties

MID-CONTINENT McElmo Dome

Headquarters

Bravo Dome

Field Office

Whiting Properties

PERMIAN

DENVER CITY

North Ward Estes & Ancillary Fields Postle Field CO2 Pipeline

41


EOR Projects - Net Production Forecasts (1) Postle Field 3P Unrisked Net Production Forecast (2) Production Rate Mboe/d

12

130 - 140 MMcf/d Current CO2 Injection

10 8

P1 + P2 (no P3)

6

Proved

4 2 0

Jun „05

Mar „11

2011

2020

Magnitude and timing of results could vary.

North Ward Estes 3P Unrisked Net Production Forecast (3) Production Rate Mboe/d

30

240 - 260 MMcf/d Current CO2 Injection

25 20

P1 + P2 + P3

15

P1 + P2

10

0

(1) (2) (3)

Proved

5 Jun „05

Mar „11

2011

2020

Based on independent engineering by Cawley, Gillespie & Associates, Inc. at December 31, 2010. Includes ancillary fields. Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.” All volumes shown are unrisked. Production forecasts based on assumptions in December 31, 2010 reserve report. After 2020, Postle field proved reserve production is expected to decline at 8% - 11% year over year. Production forecasts based on assumptions in December 31, 2010 reserve report. After 2020, North Ward Estes field proved reserve production is expected to decline at 5% - 7% year over year.

42


Total Postle, North Ward Estes and Ancillary Properties Fully Developed Costs Per BOE Net (MM$) Acquisition Purchase Price (effective 7/1/05) Remaining Proved at 12/31/10 – Capex / Reserves Six Months 2005 – Capex / Production

Reserves or Production (Net MMBOE)

$ 802 800 (1)

128.3

55

1.9

2006 – Capex / Production

243

4.4

2007 – Capex / Production

283

4.2

2008 – Capex / Production

326

4.6

2009 – Capex / Production

165

5.3

2010 – Capex / Production

213

6.3

2006 – 2010 Divestments – Sales Price

(27)

--

2009 Acquisitions – Purchase Price

66

--

(1) (2) (3)

Total Actual Plus Proved at 12/31/10 – Capex / Reserves

2,926 (1)

155.0 (1) (2)

Probable and Possible at 12/31/10 – Capex / Reserves

1,450 (1) (4)

142.9 (1) (2)

Total Actual Plus All Reserve Cats. – Capex / Reserves (1)

(2)

(3) (4)

Acq. and Dev. Cost ($/BOE)

$4,376 (1)

297.9 (1) (2)

$18.88 (1) $14.69 (1)

Based on 12-month average prices of $79.43/Bbl and $4.38/Mcf in accordance with SEC requirements. Based on independent engineering by Cawley Gillespie & Associates, Inc. at December 31, 2010. Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.” All volumes shown are unrisked. The estimated proved reserves at acquisition in June 2005 were 122.3 MMBOE. Includes $45 million for Ancillary Properties.

43


Development Plans – Postle Field Texas County, Oklahoma Total 2011 - 2015 Remaining Capital Expenditures (in millions, net) CapEx Drilling, Completion, Workovers & Dry Trail Gas Plant CO2 Purchases

$285 11

Total:

$ 296

Completed 157 Wells (2005 – 2010) Remaining 16 Wells (2011 – 2012)

24,225 Net Acres

44


Postle Quarterly Average Net BOE/D Production

Postle Field

Q1 11 CO2 Injection 130 MMcfd

Q1 11 Net Prod: 8,455 BOE/D

9600 8600 7600 6600 5600 4600 Mar-07 Jun-07 Sep-07 Dec-07 Mar-08 Jun-08 Sep-08 Dec-08 Mar-09 Jun-09 Sep-09 Dec-09 Mar-10 Jun-10 Sep-10 Dec-10 Mar-11

Net boe/d

10600

Date 45


Development Plans – North Ward Estes Field Ward and Winkler Counties, Texas Project Timing and Net Reserves CO2 Project

Injection Start Date

Base: Primary, WF & CO2

33

Other Proved

P2

P3

Total

12

1

64

110

Phase 1

2007 - 2008

0 (2)

3

4

2

9

Phase 2

2009 - 2010

0 (2)

6

4

4

14

Phase 3

2010 - 2014

0

22

8

8

38

Phase 4

2011

0

3

1

1

5

Phase 5

2012 - 13

0

3

9

8

20

Phase 6

2015

0

10

4

3

17

Phase 7

2016

0

0

0

6

6

Phase 8

2016

0

0

0

3

3

Totals

33

59

31

99

222

(MMBOE)

58,000 Net Acres

PVPD

(1)

(1) Based on independent engineering at Dec. 31, 2010. Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.” All volumes shown are unrisked. (2) Response moved to Base.

46


Development Plans – North Ward Estes Field Ward and Winkler Counties, Texas CO2 Project

Injection Start Date

Phase 1

2007 - 2008

Phase 2

2009 - 2010

Phase 3

2010 - 2014

Phase 4

2011

Total 2011 - 2040 Remaining Capital Expenditures (1) (In Millions)

CapEx (2)

Drilling, Completion, Workovers & Gas Plant Costs CO2 Purchases

58,000 Net Acres

Phase 5

2012 – 2013

Phase 6

2015

Phase 7

2016

Phase 8

2016

Total

$

526 1,383

$1,909

(1)

Based on independent engineering at Dec. 31, 2010.

(2)

Consists of CapEx for Proved, Probable and Possible reserves. Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.”

47


North Ward Estes Quarterly Average Net BOE/D Production

8800 8200 7600 7000 6400 5800 5200 4600

Q1 11 CO2 Injection: 250 MMcf/d

Q1 11 Net Prod: 8,120 BOE/D

Commencement of CO2 injection in Pilot in May 2007 at 2 MMcf/d CO2 injection reaches 100 MMcf/d in Jan. 2008, Phase I

(1) CO2 injection initiated in Phase III in Dec. 2010 CO2 injection initiated in Phase II in March 2009 Note: Declines due to lack of offset injection support in Northern Infill area. Waterflood activation now in progress.

Mar-07 Jun-07 Sep-07 Dec-07 Mar-08 Jun-08 Sep-08 Dec-08 Mar-09 Jun-09 Sep-09 Dec-09 Mar-10 Jun-10 Sep-10 Dec-10 Mar-11

Net boe/d

North Ward Estes Field

Date (1)

Production decline was due to scaling problems that have been subsequently resolved with mechanical and chemical treatments.

48


Whiting Estimated Oil Recovery Type Curve from CO2 Flood - North Ward Estes (1)

(1)

Whiting currently estimates a 15% recovery factor in arriving at its total for proved, probable and possible reserve potential. The Company is conducting tests to ascertain if additional oil may be recoverable.

49


Whiting Estimated Oil Recovery Type Curve from CO2 Flood - North Ward Estes (1)

P1 + P2

P1

(P3) (P2) (P1)

(1)

Whiting currently estimates a 15% recovery factor in arriving at its total for proved, probable and possible reserve potential. The Company is conducting tests to ascertain if additional oil may be recoverable.

50


Production Growth (in BOE/D) Net Production from Bakken, Postle and N. Ward Estes 30,000

25,000

20,000

15,000

10,000

5,000

Q1 10

Q2 10

Q3 10

Q4 10

Q1 11

Bakken

21,690

25,890

27,385

28,020

26,010

Postle / N.W.E. Total

16,800 38,490

17,250 43,140

16,785 44,170

16,475 44,495

16,575 42,585 (Represents 65% of total company production)

51


Total Capitalization ($ in thousands) March 31, 2011

Cash and Cash Equivalents

$

5,026

Dec. 31, 2010

$

18,952

Long-Term Debt: Credit Agreement Senior Subordinated Notes Total Long-Term Debt

$ 380,000 600,000 $ 980,000

$ 200,000 600,000 $ 800,000

Stockholdersâ&#x20AC;&#x; Equity Total Capitalization Total Debt / Total Capitalization

2,542,745 $3,522,745 27.8%

2,531,315 $3,331,315 24.0%

52


Disciplined Hedging Strategy (1) ď ľ

Utilize hedges to manage exposure against potential commodity price declines while maintaining pricing upside

ď ľ

Employ mix of contracts weighted toward the short-term Existing Crude Oil Hedge Positions Hedge Period 2011 Q2 Q3 Q4 2012 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2013 Q1 Q2 Q3 Oct Nov

(1)

Hedged Volumes (Bbls per Month)

Hedge Price Weighted Average Range ($/Bbl)

As a Percentage of Mar. 2011 Oil Production

Existing Natural Gas Hedge Positions Hedged Volumes (MMBtu per Month)

Weighted Average Hedge Price Range ($/MMBtu)

As a Percentage of March 2011 Gas Production

904,696 904,479 904,255

$61.01 - $98.32 $61.01 - $98.31 $61.00 - $98.31

54.0% 53.9% 53.9%

36,954 35,855 34,554

$6.00 - $13.05 $6.00 - $13.65 $7.00 - $14.25

1.6% 1.6% 1.5%

659,054 658,850 658,650 658,477

$59.93 $59.93 $59.93 $59.92

- $106.28 - $106.27 - $106.26 - $106.26

39.3% 39.3% 39.3% 39.3%

33,381 32,477 31,502 30,640

$7.00 - $15.55 $6.00 - $13.60 $6.00 - $14.45 $7.00 - $13.40

1.5% 1.4% 1.4% 1.3%

290,000 290,000 290,000 290,000 190,000

$47.67 $47.67 $47.67 $47.67 $47.22

- $90.21 - $90.21 - $90.21 - $90.21 - $85.06

17.3% 17.3% 17.3% 17.3% 11.3%

As of April 21, 2011.

53


Fixed-Price Marketing Contracts

Existing Natural Gas Marketing Contracts Period

Contracted Volumes Weighted Average Contracted Price As a Percentage of (Mcf per Month) ($/Mcf) March 2011 Gas Production

Q2 2011 Q3 2011 Q4 2011

778,914 772,460 772,460

$5.31 $5.30 $5.30

34.2% 33.9% 33.9%

Q1 2012 Q2 2012 Q3 2012 Q4 2012

577,127 461,460 465,794 398,667

$5.30 $5.41 $5.41 $5.46

25.3% 20.3% 20.5% 17.5%

Q1 2013 Q2 2013 Q3 2013 Q4 2013

360,000 364,000 368,000 368,000

$5.47 $5.47 $5.47 $5.47

15.8% 16.0% 16.2% 16.2%

Q1 2014 Q2 2014 Q3 2014 Q4 2014

330,000 333,667 337,333 337,333

$5.49 $5.49 $5.49 $5.49

14.5% 14.7% 14.8% 14.8%

54


In Summary 

Geographically diversified, longlived reserve base

Five core regions; 12.9 (1) year R/P

Grown proved reserves 325% from 71.7 MMBOE at Nov. 2003 IPO to 304.9 MMBOE at 12/31/10

Multi-year inventory of development, exploitation and exploration projects to drive organic production growth going forward

Grown production 300% from 17.0 MBOE/D at Nov. 2003 IPO to 67.9 MBOE/D in Q4 2010

Drilling inventory as of 12/31/10 of more than 1,300 gross operated wells based on 3P reserves and over 1,500 additional gross operated wells based on resource potential

Additional exploration potential in the Rockies, Permian Basin and Gulf Coast

Significant organic growth potential from drilling programs

Continued moderate risk organic growth potential from Postle and North Ward Estes fields

Other exploration includes horizontal oil prospects (Williston and Permian Basin)

Disciplined acquirer with strong record of accretive acquisitions

16 acquisitions in 2004 – 2010; 230.9 MMBOE at $8.23 per BOE average acquisition cost

Commitment to financial strength

Total Debt to Cap of 27.8% as of March 31, 2011

Proven management and technical team

Average 28 years of experience

(1)

R/P ratio based on year-end 2010 proved reserves and total 2010 production.

55


Outstanding Bonds and Credit Agreement Ratings Current Amount Price Outstanding Moody‟s / S&P

Coupon / Description

Maturity

7.00% / Sr. Sub. – NC

02/01/2014

$250.0 mil.

Ba3 / BB

106.500

6.50% / Sr. Sub. – NC4

10/01/2018

$350.0 mil.

Ba3 / BB

103.500

Bond Finance Covenant: Ratio of pre-tax earnings to fixed charges (interest expense) must be greater than 2:1. It was 12.03:1 at 03/31/11.

Restricted Payments Basket: Approximately $1.9 billion.

Bank Credit Agreement size is $1.1 billion, under which $380 million was drawn as of 03/31/11. Interest rate is currently 1.98% (LIBOR + 1.75%). Redetermination date is 11/1/11.

Bank Credit Agreement Covenants: Total debt to EBITDAX at 03/31/11 was 0.91:1 (must be less than 4.25:1) Working capital at 03/31/11 was 2.25:1 (must be greater than 1:1)

56


Adjusted Net Income (1) (In Thousands) Reconciliation of Net Income (Loss) Available to Common Shareholders to Adjusted Net Income (Loss) Available to Common Shareholders Three Months Ended Mar. 31, 2011 2010 Net Income (Loss) Available to Common Shareholders….... $ Adjustments Net of Tax: Amortization of Deferred Gain on Sale…………….……. Impairment Expense………………………………………... Unrealized Derivative (Gains) Losses……………………

19,144

Adjusted Net Income (Loss) (1)…………………………………. $

99,668

Adjusted Earnings (Loss) Available to Common Shareholders per Share, Basic (2)..…………………………... $ Adjusted Earnings (Loss) Available to Common Shareholders per Share, Diluted (2)…………………………… $

(1)

(2)

$ 81,220

(2,121) 4,812 77,833

(2,343) 2,409 (18,945) $ 62,341

0.85

$

0.61

0.84

$

0.57

Adjusted Net Income (Loss) Available to Common Shareholders is a non-GAAP financial measure. Management believes it provides useful information to investors for analysis of Whiting’s fundamental business on a recurring basis. In addition, management believes that Adjusted Net Income (Loss) Available to Common Shareholders is widely used by professional research analysts and others in valuation, comparison, and investment recommendations of companies in the oil and gas exploration and production industry, and many investors use the published research of industry research analysts in making investment decisions. Adjusted Net Income Available for Common Shareholders should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for net income, income from operations, net cash provided by operating activities or other income, cash flow or liquidity measures under GAAP and may not be comparable to other similarly titled measures of other companies. All per share amounts have been retroactively restated for the 2010 period to reflect the Company’s two-for-one stock split in February 2011.

57


Discretionary Cash Flow (1) Reconciliation of Net Cash Provided by Operating Activities to Discretionary Cash Flow (In Thousands) Three Months Ended Mar. 31, 2011 2010 Net cash provided by operating activities…..... Exploration………………………………………..... Exploratory dry hole costs………………………. Changes in working capital…………….……….. Preferred stock dividends paid…………………. Discretionary cash flow (1)…..……………...

(1)

$ 214,055 14,599 ( 2,902) 58,598 ( 270) $ 284,080

$ 196,547 9,063 ( 2,010) 16,345 ( 5,391) $ 214,554

Discretionary cash flow is computed as net income plus exploration and impairment costs, depreciation, depletion and amortization, deferred income taxes, noncash interest costs, losses on early extinguishment of debt, non-cash compensation plan charges, non-cash losses on mark-to-market derivatives and other noncurrent items, less the gain on sale of properties, amortization of deferred gain on sale, non-cash gains on mark-to-market derivatives, and preferred stock dividends paid, not including preferred stock conversion inducements. The non-GAAP measure of discretionary cash flow is presented because management believes it provides useful information to investors for analysis of the Company’s ability to internally fund acquisitions, exploration and development. Discretionary cash flow should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for net income, income from operations, net cash provided by operating activities or other income, cash flow or liquidity measures under GAAP and may not be comparable to other similarly titled measures of other companies.

58


Whiting Provides Answers to Recent Investor and Analyst Questions (1)(2) Bakken and Three Forks Reservoir and Geology Q1 – What is the estimated oil in place per 1,280-acre spacing unit for Sanish (Bakken)? A1 – It varies across the field and is difficult to calculate in this complex reservoir. We estimate that there are approximately 16-23 MMBOE per 1,280-acre unit. We hold interests in 105 1,280-acre units and 21 640-acre units in the Sanish field. Q2 – What is the ultimate recovery for Sanish (Bakken)? A2 – We estimate the expected recovery to be between 8% and 12% of the original oil in place (OOIP). Note that we are drilling at least 3 wells on each 1,280-acre (2 sections) unit. Q3 – What is the estimated oil in place per 1,280-acre spacing unit for Sanish (Three Forks)? A3 – We have less geologic and reservoir data on the Three Forks since we are very early in the development. OOIP will vary across the field and is difficult to calculate in this complex reservoir. We estimate there to be 12 to 16 MMBOE per 1,280-acre spacing unit. Q4 – What is the ultimate recovery for Sanish (Three Forks)? A4 – We estimate the expected recovery to be between 7% and 10% of OOIP. Again, we plan to drill at least 3 wells per 1,280-acre (2 sections) unit. Q5 – How does the geology compare across your project areas in terms of porosity, thickness, and pressure gradients? Sanish, Lewis & Clark, McKenzie/Williams Counties. A5 – In each project area it varies to some extent as you can see on our slide titled “Middle Bakken Induced Fractures” where the Middle Bakken exists over Sanish but pinches out and is almost non-existent over at Parshall. Permeability varies both in the matrix and due to the intensity of natural fracturing. Comparing prospect area to prospect area, there are wide variations in the geology. For example, the Middle Bakken has pinched out and does not exist at Lewis & Clark. (1)

The answers above include forward-looking statements that the Company believes to be forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Please refer to “Forward-Looking Statement Disclosure” on slide #1 of this presentation.

(2)

Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.” All volumes shown are unrisked.

59


(Continued) Whiting Provides Answers to Recent Investor and Analyst Questions (1) Bakken and Three Forks Reservoir and Geology (Continued) Q6 – What led you to the Lewis & Clark extension? A6 – Regional mapping; taking what we learned at Sanish and Parshall and applying that to other parts of the basin. Q7 – How does the Three Forks play vary between the Sanish and Lewis & Clark areas? A7 – They are geologically very similar. The Three Forks may be slightly tighter at Lewis & Clark. Q8 – Is the Sanish Sand required to make a productive well in the extensional Lewis & Clark area?

A8 – No, we had very little Sanish Sand in the Federal 32-4H. Q9 – Are there any specific catalysts that would encourage you to step up drilling activity in the Lewis & Clark area? A9 – Based on our results to date, we are stepping up activity at Lewis & Clark. We plan to increase the number of drilling rigs there from 6 to 11 in 2011. Periodically during the year, several of these 11 rigs will be moved to our Bakken / Three Forks exploratory prospects, such as Hidden Bench, Cassandra, Big Island and Starbuck.

Q10 – Are the Scallion Limestone and Lodgepole formations valid resource targets? A10 – Yes, in various parts of the basin.

(1)

The answers above include forward-looking statements that the Company believes to be forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Please refer to “Forward-Looking Statement Disclosure” on slide #1 of this presentation.

60


(Continued) Whiting Provides Answers to Recent Investor and Analyst Questions (1) Bakken Well Design and Completion Q11 – Why sliding sleeve versus perf and plug? A11 – It is mechanically simpler, less moving parts. We can complete wells through the winter. On a sliding sleeve job, we can pump continuously and complete the fracture stimulation in about 24 hours. Q12 – At Sanish, where should the horizontal well be landed within the Middle Bakken target zone to achieve the best production? A12 – See slide titled “Bakken / Three Forks Hydrocarbon System.” It is our opinion that it is in the “B” zone of the Middle Bakken. Q13 – Does the azimuth of the lateral well matter in meeting stimulation and reservoir drainage objectives? A13 – Yes, we believe you need to drill in a direction that is approximately perpendicular to the maximum principal stress. This is 55 degrees northeast. See our slide titled “Fully Developed Bakken and Three Forks Horizontal Wells in Sanish Field Area.” Q14 – Do the natural fractures impact fracture initiation? A14 – Probably, we see slightly lower fracturing pressure on the east side of Sanish field where we know the natural fracturing intensity is higher. Q15 – How might your completions vary by area and what are the geologic factors that drive your approach? A15 – If the rock is tighter and contains fewer natural fractures, we will pump more stages. Q16 – Why white sand vs. ceramics in the Sanish field? A16 – Our engineering evaluation indicates that we do not need ceramics to maintain open fractures in Sanish. Q17 – A few industry studies suggest that using ceramic proppants can increase EUR. Have you tested this and what are your thoughts on this matter? A17 – Ceramic proppant is about 5 times the cost of sand and it comes down to a cost/benefit evaluation. Our evaluations indicate that sand is providing very good results, but we continue to evaluate the available data. (1)

The answers above include forward-looking statements that the Company believes to be forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Please refer to “Forward-Looking Statement Disclosure” on slide #1 of this presentation.

61


(Continued) Whiting Provides Answers to Recent Investor and Analyst Questions (1)(2) Bakken and Other Development Planning and Well Costs Q18 – How many un-drilled locations at year-end 2010 were included in your reserve report for each of the following areas: Sanish (Bakken); Sanish (Three Forks); and Lewis & Clark (Three Forks)? A18 – Sanish (Bakken): 82 locations in PUD, 9 locations in Probable, 34 locations in Possible for a total 3P of 125 locations; Sanish (Three Forks): 21 PUD, 0 well locations in Probable, 168 locations in Possible for a total 3P of 189 locations; Lewis & Clark (Three Forks): 23 PUD, 35 well locations in Probable, 25 locations in Possible for a total 3P of 83. Q19 – Can you provide some detail on the 3P and Resource drilling inventory as of December 31, 2010? A19 –

ESTIMATED TOTAL 3P LOCATIONS Area Sanish Field Area

Gross

ESTIMATED TOTAL RESOURCE LOCATIONS

Net

314

174

Parshall Field Area

98

Lewis & Clark Other Northern Rockies

Area

(2)

Net

Williston Basin

94

44

21

Sanish Field Area

57

28

83

41

Lewis & Clark

582

190

35

21

Hidden Bench Prospect

79

15

Sulphur Creek Field

254

174

132

69

Other Central Rockies

124

83

Cassandra Prospect

41

9

Mid-Continent

189

165

Big Island Prospect

158

83

Gulf Coast

125

75

Big Tex Prospect

295

245

Permian

1,039

384

Redtail Niobrara Prospect

351

213

Total

2,261

1,138

Sulphur Creek

277

148

Other Areas

369

270

2,435

1,314

Starbuck Prospect

Total (1)

Gross

The answers above include forward-looking statements that the Company believes to be forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Please refer to “Forward-Looking Statement Disclosure” on slide #1 of this presentation. Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.”

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(Continued) Whiting Provides Answers to Recent Investor and Analyst Questions (1) Bakken Development Planning and Well Costs (Continued) Q20 – What type of pressures are you experiencing on drilling and completion costs? A20 – As the rig count continues to increase in North Dakota, we have implemented longer term service agreements to manage the rising cost. Our frac costs have continued to rise on a relative basis as we increase the size of our frac designs to include more frac stages. The majority of the drilling rigs we have in North Dakota are on 12-month contracts and, in some cases, we have tied the day rate to NYMEX oil prices. These factors have helped keep the drilling economics in line with our expectations, although drilling day rates and services are starting to rise with increased demand. Q21 – What are your current spud to total depth and spud to spud times? How much more efficiency is possible? A21 – Across our program, for winter/spring 2010-11, spud to TD was averaging 22.2 days. Spud to spud average was 40.5 days. We have drilled four wells spud to TD in 15 days or less. For these wells, spud to rig release was about 25 days. At Sanish, for 70 wells spud from January 1 through December 31, 2010, our average spud to TD was 21.1 days. Our spud to spud is averaging 40.4 days. We think there are still efficiencies to be gained and that we can eliminate another 2 to 3 days out of the process. Q22 – How long does it take to complete a well and what types of efficiencies are possible with multi-pad drilling? A22 – We have our wells completed within about three weeks of rig release with slightly longer times during severe winter conditions. We build the battery during that time period. Consequently, once the well is frac‟d we can go down the sales line with the production. As we continue to investigate drilling and completion methods to minimize surface impact, multi-well pad drilling continues to be an option. While you can save on rig moves and location cost with multi-well pads, you delay production from the first well drilled until you finish drilling all of the wells on the pad. Pad drilling also results in mechanical issues due to more complicated well designs.

(1)

The answers above include forward-looking statements that the Company believes to be forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Please refer to “Forward-Looking Statement Disclosure” on slide #1 of this presentation.

63


(Continued) Whiting Provides Answers to Recent Investor and Analyst Questions (1) Bakken Development Planning and Well Costs (Continued) Q23 – At present, Whiting is planning 3 Middle Bakken wells per 1,280-acre spacing unit. Are you planning to conduct any further testing beyond that to examine drainage patterns? A23 – Yes, we have an active reservoir surveillance program going on in the field. We collect pressure data, monitor production and monitor offset wells when we perform fracture stimulations. We have also installed a permanent micro seismic array in the field to monitor and map every frac we perform across the entire field. Q24 – With your expertise in EOR, is the Middle Bakken prospective for CO2 flooding and when might you consider testing that, if so? A24 – We have evaluated this option. The initial issue is CO2. There is not a source with sufficient capacity in the Williston Basin. However, man made CO2 projects are being designed and may be available in 2-4 years. Natural fractures may make the CO2 move through the reservoir so fast that it makes a CO2 project risky. In summary, it is unlikely. Q25 – What type of primary/secondary recovery could be expected? A25 – Primary recovery 8% - 12%, secondary recovery currently questionable.

(1)

The answers above include forward-looking statements that the Company believes to be forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Please refer to “Forward-Looking Statement Disclosure” on slide #1 of this presentation.

64


(Continued) Whiting Provides Answers to Recent Investor and Analyst Questions (1) Bakken Well Productivity Q26 – Could you review how you measure 24-hour and 30-day IP rates? A26 – After the frac job, we let the well sit for approximately 3 days to allow the gel to break down and the sand to keep the fractures open. We bring the well back at a fairly aggressive rate to ensure we get the balls off seat and get the entire horizontal lateral producing. After about 48 hours of flow back, we initiate the IP test and put the well on a 40/64ths choke and monitor the production for a 24-hour period. Production is measured by strapping the production tanks that are on location. We measure and internally report our production for every well we operate on a daily basis (company wide). The 30-day rate is just that, what the well averages over the first 30 days of production, excluding downtime. Q27 – How strong of an indicator is the 30-day rate on EUR? A27 – The 30-day average rate is an early indicator but additional production history is much more important. Average producing rates over 60 and 90 days and especially over the first six months are much more indicative. Q28 – What are the important milestones when attempting to measure a well‟s potential deliverability (30-day rates, well performance when on pump)? A28 – All of the above are indicators but 60 day, 90 day and six months average rates are perhaps better for early on scoping as these data start to define the hyperbolic curve the well may follow. Tubing pressure is also a good indicator as well as cumulative production at the time the well goes on pump.

(1)

The answers above include forward-looking statements that the Company believes to be forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Please refer to “Forward-Looking Statement Disclosure” on slide #1 of this presentation.

65


(Continued) Whiting Provides Answers to Recent Investor and Analyst Questions (1)(2) Portfolio/EOR Q29 – In the 2010 year-end reserve report, what assumptions were made for North Ward Estes recovery (Proved, 2P and 3P) and for Postle (Proved, 2P and 3P)? A29 – Estimated remaining reserves at North Ward Estes are based on section by section geologic and reservoir engineering analysis and vary throughout the field depending on reservoir quality and our development plans. In general, the resulting EUR‟s indicate tertiary recoveries of 5-6% in the Proved category, up to 7-8% in the Probable category and up to 15% in the Possible category. Our estimated remaining reserves at Postle are also based on detailed geologic and engineering analysis on an injection pattern level and vary throughout the field. In general, the resulting EUR‟s indicate tertiary recoveries of 12-16% or more, all in the proved category due to the mature state of development for most of the Postle field. Q30 – In terms of portfolio management, what are the key drivers behind your capital allocation process? The returns in the Bakken are different than EOR, but EOR is a bit more resilient through the cycles. A30 – You are correct. Generally, drilling provides higher IRR‟s and EOR projects have a greater assurance of reserve additions. We are fortunate to have a mixture of both in Whiting‟s inventory of projects. Drilling projects begin to decline after drilling activity peaks. EOR projects begin to incline about a year after project installation and commencement of H2O and CO2 injection. After production peaks on an EOR project production can plateau and remain relatively flat for several years before beginning to decline. This is caused by the pressure maintenance of the H2O and CO2. This plateau production may provide cash flow for many years to fund additional exploration and development drilling projects for the company.

Q31 – What is your capital for all non-Bakken and non-EOR projects? A31 – See our slide titled “2011 Exploration and Development Budget.” The projects on that list not related to our Bakken, Three Forks and EOR projects total $329MM. Please note that this total includes an estimated $110MM in Land costs and $40MM in Exploration expense. (1)

The answers above include forward-looking statements that the Company believes to be forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Please refer to “Forward-Looking Statement Disclosure” on slide #1 of this presentation.

(2)

Please refer to Slide #2 for disclosures regarding “Reserve and Resource Information.” All volumes shown are unrisked.

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July 2011A Corporate Presentation