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Contents Statement of Principles ........................................................................ 4 SECTION 1: Pregnancy ......................................................................... 5  Planning pregnancy ......................................................................................................... 5  Support from managers and colleagues ................................................................. 5  Leave during pregnancy ................................................................................................ 6  Legislation ........................................................................................................................... 6  Hazards ................................................................................................................................ 6  Car parking ......................................................................................................................... 7  Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers (CPCAs) ....................................... 7  SECTION 2: Preparation for Parental Leave .......................................... 8  Advice for staff .................................................................................................................. 8  Parental Leave options for academic staff ............................................................. 9  Advice for Managers ........................................................................................................ 9  Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers (CPCAs) ..................................... 10  SECTION 3: Parental Leave................................................................. 11  Unpaid Parental Leave.................................................................................................. 11  Paid Parental Leave ....................................................................................................... 12  University Paid Parental Leave.................................................................................. 12  Government Paid Parental Leave ............................................................................. 12  Paid Parental Leave payments .................................................................................. 12  Applications for Parental Leave ................................................................................ 12  University Paid Parental Leave.................................................................................. 13  Government Paid Parental Leave ............................................................................. 13  Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers (CPCAs) ..................................... 13  SECTION 4: During Parental Leave ..................................................... 14  Staying in touch while on leave................................................................................ 14  Accessing work email and the intranet from home computers.................... 14  Entitlement to benefits while on leave .................................................................. 14  Continuity of Service ..................................................................................................... 14  Working while on Parental Leave ............................................................................. 14  Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers (CPCAs) ..................................... 15  SECTION 5: Returning to work ........................................................... 16  Notice of Returning to work ....................................................................................... 16  Right to return to same or similar position .......................................................... 16  Fulltime vs part-time .................................................................................................... 16  The University of Auckland Merit Relative to Opportunity Policy ................ 17  Flexible Work Options – Statutory Provisions ..................................................... 17  Sick and domestic leave .............................................................................................. 17  Re-orientation to the workplace ............................................................................... 18  Parental leave and research ...................................................................................... 18  Advice on finding temporary replacement for staff.......................................... 18  Advice for managers ..................................................................................................... 18  Advice for staff ................................................................................................................ 18  Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers (CPCAs) ..................................... 19  SECTION 6: Working and caring for babies and children .................... 20  Breastfeeding, expression and storing milk ........................................................ 20  Early Childhood Education .......................................................................................... 22  Government Childcare assistance subsidies ........................................................ 23  Seminars and networking opportunities ............................................................... 23  Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers (CPCAs) ..................................... 24  SECTION 7: Frequently asked questions ............................................. 25 

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SECTION 8: Checklists ........................................................................ 28 Checklist for staff taking Parental Leave .............................................................. 28  Checklist for managers of staff taking Parental Leave .................................... 29  Contacts ............................................................................................. 30 

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Introduction The University of Auckland is committed to ensuring that the workplace accommodates the reasonable requirements of staff members’ work, life, family and carer responsibilities and supports employees to achieve a balance between these responsibilities. This includes developing measures that recognise the needs of staff combining parenting and a career so they are not disadvantaged either in their work conditions or career development. The University also extends this commitment to supporting colleagues and managers of those taking parental leave and combining parenting with a career so they can best manage change. This guide is designed to support a range of needs from:  pregnant staff  staff intending to take parental leave  parents returning to work after parental leave  caregivers and support people  partners and family members  colleagues  managers. It contains information about:  pregnancy  parental leave (paid and unpaid)  the parental leave period  returning to work including flexible work options  working and caring for babies and children support structures including advisers, seminars and networking opportunities It also provides answers to some commonly asked questions. 23 September 2011

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Statement of Principles The University of Auckland recognises both staff and the organisation benefit when staff can successfully balance work and parenting/caring responsibilities and understands that this can be achieved through effective employment policies and practice. The University is committed to supporting all staff in maintaining and developing their careers while carrying out their role as parents and carers and will endeavour to create an environment where such roles are recognised. The University is particularly committed to supporting women staff through pregnancy, taking parental leave and all aspects of returning to work. The University recognises that best practice in all these areas both ensures compliance with legislation and assists the University to retain skilled staff. Strategies to support staff in each of these areas are in accordance with the Strategic Plan, in which the University commits to: Values:  Providing equal opportunities for all who have the potential to succeed in a university of high international standing. Objective 13:  Recruit and retain a high-quality staff and student body that draws on the widest possible pool of talent. Initiatives to support staff during pregnancy, leave and returning to work are consistent with the University’s Equity Policy, Flexible Work Policy, and Work Life, Family and Carers Policy. Partners, family members, and friends will often be closely involved in pregnancy, leave and returning to work and may also need support. The University will assist managers to achieve information, training and professional development.

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SECTION 1: Pregnancy Pregnancy is a normal part of a woman’s life and should not be equated with ill health. It does, however, bring changes which may or may not impact on a woman’s ability to work in her usual manner. Most women continue to work through pregnancy with the length of time prior to taking leave, or hours of work, depending on individual circumstances. Partners, family members and friends will often be closely involved in a pregnancy and have varying needs for involvement and sharing of the experience.

Planning pregnancy The challenges of career advancement can sometimes make it difficult to decide the best time to have a baby, or to have another child. It may be necessary to make long - term plans for career breaks, researching what support is available, or, for example, how opportunities for research and study leave for academic staff can be fitted around pregnancy and child rearing. An employee undergoing fertility treatment may have special needs for support. Where pregnancy is not planned, issues around career advancement or work commitment may need additional discussion.

Support from managers and colleagues News of pregnancy is usually a time for celebration. As each woman’s experience is likely to differ, the woman concerned is the best source for advice on what support is needed or desired. There may also be cultural protocols that should be observed. The University is sensitive to the needs of staff and their families. It will support them in the form of granting leave, arranging flexible work hours or providing more suitable duties, taking into account the University’s needs. Support will be determined on a case by case basis. A partner, parent or family member may also appreciate recognition of their responsibilities through flexibility in their employment. The University has a Flexible Work Policy as staff may need temporary changes to hours of work or other conditions of employment during pregnancy. Women may need more frequent breaks or rest time. A list of available rest rooms is available at Rest Spaces across the University Equipment needs, such as a stool to sit on to give lectures, can also be accommodated by the department. The University is committed to creating an environment where the roles of parent and caregiver are recognised and respected. Providing appropriate gifts is an important way to celebrate a new birth. Again, the mother may be best person to provide advice, particularly where cultural protocols might be involved.

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Sometimes pregnancies don’t proceed as expected and additional medical attention may be required. If there is a miscarriage or still birth, then support from managers and colleagues will be needed both for the mother and for staff close to that person.

Leave during pregnancy Unpaid leave is available for mothers and their partner. This includes: 

Special Leave Before starting maternity leave, women are entitled to take up to 10 days’ unpaid Special Leave for reasons connected with the pregnancy e.g. antenatal classes or doctors’ appointments.

Partner’s/Paternity Leave Partners/fathers are eligible for unpaid leave of either one week (for a spouse/partner with six months’ eligible service), or two weeks (for a spouse/partner with 12 months’ eligible service). This can be taken within 21 days either side of the expected date of delivery or adoption.

Sick Leave This is covered in employment agreements. Although pregnancy is not regarded as an illness, women are entitled to sick leave for pregnancy related health conditions and other illnesses.

Legislation Several pieces of legislation relate to pregnancy. Under the Human Rights Act 1993 it is unlawful for an employer to discriminate against an employee or a job applicant because she is pregnant. The Employment Relations Act 2000 provides similar protection. The Parental Leave and Employment Protection Act 1987 and legislation relating to breast feeding are covered in Section 2.

Hazards Under Health and Safety Guidelines assessment of known reproductive hazards to men’s and women’s health should be carried out as a normal part of hazard identification, irrespective of the status of staff (and students). In certain areas of the University there will be substances which present a hazard through inhalation, and more rarely by ingestion, absorption or accidental injection (high pressure equipment or contaminated sharp objects). It is important that women working with hazardous substances advise their manager immediately on becoming pregnant so that appropriate safeguards can be put in place.

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Car parking The University provides a limited number of parking permits for staff with family responsibilities. They can be used by women in the later stages of pregnancy at some University car parks. They can be especially helpful for women who normally use public transport but need to drive to work in the last months. These are not allocated spaces. For further information see Parking for Staff with Family Responsibilities. If you have a University car park which you will not be using while on leave you can hand in your permit in to the Security Desk at 11 Wynyard Street with a note detailing your finish and return dates. Security will notify payroll to have your deductions stopped. You can pick your permit up on your return to work and Security will again notify payroll to resume deductions. For more information, visit Car parking

Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers (CPCAs) Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers are team of trained voluntary staff members who can provide support, advice, and information to University staff on:     

Working while pregnant. Seeking to take parental leave. Transition to work after parental leave. Combining parenting with a career at The University of Auckland. Managing staff balancing parenting and working at the University.

Further information (including CPCA contact details and profiles) is available at www.auckland.ac.nz/cpc

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SECTION 2: Preparation for Parental Leave Advice for staff Both men and women are entitled to apply for Parental Leave. There are a number of things to do before going on Parental Leave. 

Determine the amount of Parental Leave required The amount of time taken for Parental Leave will depend on many factors, both professional and domestic. You are encouraged to spend as much time as you need at home with your child.

Meet with your manager and/or Human Resources Discuss your Parental Leave and your long-term intentions with your Manager/and or Human Resources. Before going on leave, think about whether you plan to return to work after the child is born or adopted and on what basis – full-time or part-time. You will also need to talk with your manager about handing over your duties and responsibilities.

Apply for Parental Leave You must apply for Parental Leave at least 3 months prior to the expected date of delivery by filling in the Parental Leave Application Form and the IR880 form for Government Paid Leave (if applicable) and send these to Human Resources (see Section 4).

Early Childhood Education Centre enrolment Many centres have waiting lists and it is advisable to make arrangements as early as possible.

Flexible Work Arrangements You may wish to request Flexible Work Arrangements temporarily or for a longer period during your pregnancy. The policy is available on the web site Flexible Work Policy Temporary arrangements may not require a formal request, but forms are available Request Form Flexible Work Arrangements Flexible Work Policy Application Form

Alternative arrangements for salary deductions You need to make alternative payment arrangements for payments which are usually deducted from your salary e.g. Southern Cross Healthcare and superannuation.

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Parental Leave options for academic staff Consider if full-time leave is most appropriate for your circumstances. If you are an academic staff member who will not be taking lectures but will remain involved in supervising students, reading thesis drafts and examining, participating in departmental seminars and conducting research, then you should consider seeking approval for a fractional appointment. In these circumstances, even a 20 percent appointment would enable you to keep your work space and allow you access to staff car parking. Receiving a regular salary enables salary deductions for parking, medical insurance and superannuation to continue. Note: This does not apply to the period of Paid Parental Leave which should not involve paid employment.

Advice for Managers Discuss with employee Staff should discuss their plans with you. Discussions should include:  dates for finishing and returning to work.  managing responsibilities and duties before and during leave.  need for flexible work arrangements.  other support while pregnant.  appropriate levels of contact while the employee is on leave.  whether the employee is interested in part-time/temporary work while on leave. Work plans before leave Managers need to be aware in advance of the employee’s departure what work is to be completed before leave, accepting that in some circumstances the employee may need to leave earlier than initially predicted due to complications relating to pregnancy. Flexible Work Arrangements Staff may require informal flexible arrangements on certain days or for longer periods especially towards the end of their pregnancy. The Flexible Work Arrangements policy is available on the web site Flexible Work Arrangements . Temporary arrangements may not require a formal request. Forms for staff and managers are available Approval Form Flexible Work Arrangements Approval Form Flexible Work Arrangements. Coverage while on leave Depending on the length of time the employee is taking leave, work can be reallocated during this period, or a temporary replacement appointed. Discussions should include arrangements for handing over specific duties and responsibilities, whether to a temporary replacement or other staff. This can be an opportunity to consider secondments. It is important that an academic staff member’s teaching load is not condensed into their returning period.

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Returning to work Survey information has indicated that staff place a very high value on the support provided by managers to ease their transition back into work. It is recognised that supportive managers and colleagues will have far greater impact on the quality of working experience than other forms of formal assistance through policies. Welcoming a staff member back into the workplace is an important way of acknowledging their value. A re-orientation session should be arranged which could be a one-on-one or include several staff, if others have also returned from leave within the same period.

Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers (CPCAs) Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers are team of trained voluntary staff members who can provide support, advice, and information to University staff on:     

Working while pregnant. Seeking to take parental leave. Transition to work after parental leave. Combining parenting with a career at The University of Auckland. Managing staff balancing parenting and working at the University.

Further information (including CPCA contact details and profiles) is available at www.auckland.ac.nz/cpc

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SECTION 3: Parental Leave Parental Leave is the time off work to care for a newly born or adopted child under five years of age. Permanent full or part-time staff members who have been with their current employer six to 12 months (at an average of at least 10 hours a week) by the expected date of delivery of their baby are entitled to Parental Leave. Parental Leave is covered in both academic and general staff collective agreements. Click here to see: General Staff Collective Agreement January 2011 – June 2011 Academic Staff Collective Agreement 2009 - 2010 Parental Leave Policy There is both unpaid and paid parental leave.

Unpaid Parental Leave There are four types of unpaid leave covered by the Parental Leave and Employment Protection Act 1987:  Maternity Leave  Extended Leave  Special Leave  Partners/Paternity Leave Maternity Leave The legislation allows mothers to take Maternity Leave of up to 14 continuous weeks, which may start up to six weeks before the expected date of birth or adoption. Extended Leave Staff with 12 month’s continuous service are entitled to up to 52 continuous weeks' leave. Staff with less than one year’s service with the University may be granted up to 26 week’s leave. Special Leave Female staff are entitled to take up to 10 day’s unpaid Special Leave before they start maternity leave for reasons connected with the pregnancy e.g. antenatal classes or doctors’ appointments. Partners/Paternity Leave Partners/Fathers are eligible for unpaid leave of either one week (for a spouse/partner with six month’s eligible service), or two weeks (for a spouse/partner with 12 month’s eligible service). This can be taken within 21 days either side of the expected date of delivery or adoption. The above entitlements apply to all university staff. In addition, staff may be entitled to paid parental leave:

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Paid Parental Leave There are two types of paid parental leave and staff are eligible for both (see below) if they have completed the required service.  

University Paid Parental Leave Government Paid Parental leave

University Paid Parental Leave The University offers eligible staff up to nine week’s University Paid Parental Leave at the rate of pay they received prior to taking Parental Leave. This is normally taken at the time of childbirth/adoption and is available to both male and female staff. Staff are eligible if they:  Have completed one year’s continuous service, and  Are intending to return to work after taking Parental Leave. If both parents are employed by the University, either parent is eligible or it can be shared between two people. This may involve dividing the weeks between two people. Same sex couples are eligible for parental leave. Eligible staff may take their leave in blocks of one week or more within 52 weeks following the birth or adoption with the approval of their Manager/and or Human Resources. University Paid Parental Leave cannot be accrued after the first year and any such Leave remaining at the end of the 52 weeks will be forfeited.

Government Paid Parental Leave In addition to the University Paid Parental Leave, staff may be eligible to claim paid leave from the Government for up to 14 weeks, if they have:  completed six month’s service at the University, and  have worked an average of at least 10 hours per week. The maximum rate of payment for eligible staff is $441.62 per week gross (as at 7 April 2011). To find out more about the Government Paid Parental Leave, visit www.ers.govt.nz/parentalleave. In addition, a booklet ‘ Parental Leave – a guide for employees’ which includes a useful summary of paid and unpaid leave entitlements is available http://ers.govt.nz/publications/pdfs/PPL-employee.pdf

Paid Parental Leave payments You will receive your nine week’s Paid Parental Leave payment from the University in the same manner as your normal salary would be paid, in the usual fortnightly pay schedule, for 4.5 fortnights. The Government Paid Parental Leave is also paid fortnightly. Before starting Parental Leave and following lodging your application with IRD, IRD will tell you when your payments will begin and end, and confirm how much money you will receive. This money will be direct credited into your nominated bank account.

Applications for Parental Leave Applications for Parental Leave must be on the appropriate forms with appropriate notice.

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University Paid Parental Leave For University Paid Leave, staff need to complete the Application for Parental Leave form on the Human Resources website Parental Leave application form The form is also available at the end of this guide. The form(s) must be submitted to Human Resources three months before the date the staff member wishes to start Parental Leave and must be accompanied by a medical certificate signed by a medical practitioner or midwife certifying the expected date of delivery. In the case of adoption, notice must be given within 14 days of learning that a child will be placed during the next three months.

Government Paid Parental Leave For Government Paid Parental Leave you need to complete an IR880 application (available online at www.infoline.govt.nz) and send it to Human Resources. Please note, once you receive the completed form back from Human Resources you need to forward it to Inland Revenue as per the instructions on the form. If you are applying for both the University Leave and the Government Leave you need to complete both forms and send them to Human Resources.

Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers (CPCAs) Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers are team of trained voluntary staff members who can provide support, advice, and information to University staff on:     

Working while pregnant. Seeking to take parental leave. Transition to work after parental leave. Combining parenting with a career at The University of Auckland. Managing staff balancing parenting and working at the University.

Further information (including CPCA contact details and profiles) is available at www.auckland.ac.nz/cpc

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SECTION 4: During Parental Leave Staying in touch while on leave It is a good idea to discuss what kind of contact would be appropriate for a staff member while they are on Parental Leave. Options may include:  Obtaining access to University websites and email from home.  Asking a colleague to send pertinent information and/or to telephone regularly with updates on what is happening at the University.  Visiting with their child when appropriate.  Getting in touch with other University parents also on leave.

Accessing work email and the intranet from home computers Providing staff get authorisation from their line manager and their home computer complies with University security standards (see http://www.security.auckland.ac.nz/) staff can access email, the intranet and files through VPN. Staff should discuss access with their manager. Note: The University has a commitment to reducing the risk of Occupational Overuse Syndrome (OOS), so computers are expected to comply with all Health and Safety regulations for appropriate computer use.

Entitlement to benefits while on leave Southern Cross Healthcare Plan Contributions through the university group scheme can be maintained on the discounted premium received while on leave. Staff need to contact Southern Cross on 0800 800 181 and arrange to be invoiced for premiums. Superannuation schemes Staff participating in one of the contact payroll to discuss what Superannuation Fund) requires while on leave are optional Superannuation Scheme).

University’s superannuation schemes need to to do while on leave. The GSF (Government contributions while on leave. Contributions in the NZUSS (New Zealand University

KiwiSaver does not require contributions from staff on leave but you do need to contact the scheme provider to discuss this with them.

Continuity of Service While an employee is on Parental Leave their service is deemed continuous. For example, two years of employment plus one year of leave is equivalent to three years of service at the University. Benefits continue to be accrued while you are on leave. However, holiday pay is not accumulated while an employee is on unpaid leave and any Annual Leave owing prior to going on parental leave will be paid out at the rate it was earned.

Working while on Parental Leave Staff are encouraged to spend time with their family while on Parental Leave. However, some parents will be interested in temporary or casual work, particularly towards the end of parental leave. The University is interested in utilising the skills of staff wishing to work on this basis and has established a database to facilitate this.

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If you are interested in temporary or casual work, please advise Human Resources, who will contact you as appropriate. You will of course be able to decline any work offered.

Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers (CPCAs) Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers are team of trained voluntary staff members who can provide support, advice, and information to University staff on:     

Working while pregnant. Seeking to take parental leave. Transition to work after parental leave. Combining parenting with a career at The University of Auckland. Managing staff balancing parenting and working at the University.

Further information (including CPCA contact details and profiles) is available at www.auckland.ac.nz/cpc

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SECTION 5: Returning to work When returning to work after a period of Parental Leave there are a number of things to consider:  Giving notice of your return to work one month before the date.  Right to return to same or similar position.  The basis on which you want to return to work – full or part-time.  Flexible work options.  Re-orientation to your department/work area.  Arrangements for breastfeeding your child/expressing milk.  Childcare arrangements.

Notice of Returning to work Staff must provide the University with at least one month’s notice in writing that they are returning to work either on the expected date of return specified in the original application for Parental Leave or that they wish to request an earlier commencement date. To enable the University to plan appropriate staffing levels it would be helpful to provide as much notice as possible.

Right to return to same or similar position Staff returning to work after taking less than four week’s Parental Leave are entitled to resume work in the same or similar position unless the position is made redundant. Staff returning to work after taking more than four week’s Parental Leave are entitled to resume work in the same or similar position unless it is a key position which cannot be filled by a temporary replacement or it is made redundant. “Similar” is defined as having an equivalent salary and grading and involving responsibilities broadly comparable with those exercised in their previous position. Note: if a position is a key position and cannot be filled by a temporary replacement, you will be informed of this decision within 21 days of applying for Parental Leave and you have the right to challenge the decision (see section 36 and Part 7 of the Parental Leave and Employment Protection Act 1987).

Fulltime vs part-time Circumstances permitting, staff returning to work may be able to work reduced hours or part-time. This will be considered on a case-by-case basis by managers and Human Resources. Again, staff need to provide one month’s notice in writing but ideally as much as possible to be considered for part-time employment.

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The University of Auckland Merit Relative to Opportunity Policy The University of Auckland Merit Relative to Opportunity Policy and Guidelines are intended to support fair and equitable procedures for assessing staff performance relative to their opportunities. The Policy is particularity relevant to staff with:    

Carer responsibilities for children, elderly parents, or ill family members. Ill-health, impairment or medical conditions, whether temporary, episodic or permanent. Part-time or flexible working arrangements. Career interruptions and delays such as parental leave.

The University of Auckland Merit Relative to Opportunity Policy The University of Auckland Guidelines on Merit Relative to Opportunity

Flexible Work Options – Statutory Provisions Staff who care for others have the statutory right to request flexible working options such as hours, start/finish times, days of work or place of work. This includes options such as term-time working, job sharing and working from home. It could involve more varied activities such as taking a salary reduction and gaining an extra two or three weeks leave to spend with children during school holiday time. The University’s Flexible Work Policy encompasses both requests which relate to carer responsibilities within the Employment Relations Act 2000 Part 6AA, and broader needs for flexibility. Staff should use the application form below. Managers should use the approval form. Flexible Work Policy

The University of Auckland Flexible Work arrangements application form The University of Auckland Approval of Application for Flexible Work Form Staff are also welcome to make their request under the Employment Relations Act 2000 (Flexible Working Arrangements). Forms are available on the Department of Labour’s web site. www.dol.govt.nz/worklife/flexible Staff need to write to the University and include the following information:  the date and your name  that the request is made under the Employment Relations Amendment Act 2007 Part 6aa, Flexible Working Arrangements  the change you would like, whether it is permanent or temporary, and if temporary when it should end  how the change will help you provide care  any changes you think the employer would need to make to the workplace arrangements if your request was approved. The University is required to consider your request. If your request cannot be granted, it may be possible to reach a compromise.

Sick and domestic leave Parents or carers are often required to take leave to care for sick children. In most instances this can be taken as part of the parent or caregiver’s sick leave entitlement. Details of entitlements are contained in employment agreements.

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General Staff Collective Agreement January 2011 – June 2011 Academic Staff Collective Agreement 2009 - 2010

Re-orientation to the workplace Managers should provide induction for staff who have been away for three months or longer. This should include introductions to new staff who have been employed since the staff member has been on leave, information about new IT systems which may have been introduced, timetabling changes, and any new policies, and procedures. Depending on the length of leave, it may be appropriate to attend training at SODU or CAD to refresh skills. If “Welcome to the Faculty/Service Division” seminars are held for new staff, returning staff may appreciate an invitation to meet new staff from outside their department.

Parental leave and research Advice on procedures for research grants for staff on Parental Leave should be given on a case-by-case basis. Most will take leave into account. Some will require a variation of contract. As stated, Parental Leave is continuous service and therefore it will be taken into account when determining eligibility for research and study leave.

Advice on finding temporary replacement for staff. Some requests for temporary placements are easily implemented with minor re-organisation of tasks. Others, especially those for longer duration, require greater support and possibly temporary or partial staff replacement. Typical examples will include taking leave without pay, maternity leave or reducing hours on a temporary or permanent basis. Salary savings from these arrangements allow for replacement staff. The size of the department and the degree of specialisation is likely to determine the ease of finding replacements.

Advice for managers Managers should use best efforts and to act in good faith in seeking to accommodate and implement these requests. Temporary employment can provide benefits of career advancement for staff and allow for the contribution of new skills and perspectives to a department. Suggested strategies include:  Consultation with the staff member concerned and members of the department.  In house advertising especially if a graduate student may be able to take a temporary responsibility.  Secondment from another department.  Approaching retired staff or staff who have resigned to undertake carer responsibilities but may be interested in short term work.  External advertising (temporary replacements do not require advertising, but there may not candidates available in the department).  Approaching industry professionals who may be able to contribute to a course.

Advice for staff 

Requests should be made well in advance.

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  

Flexibility in duration can be helpful – sometimes it is easier to fill a longer than a shorter period. The staff member may be able to recommend a replacement but the final decision will be made by the manager. Some requests, such as for temporary replacement while unwell, may need to factor in a graduated transition back into the workforce.

Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers (CPCAs) Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers are team of trained voluntary staff members who can provide support, advice, and information to University staff on:     

Working while pregnant. Seeking to take parental leave. Transition to work after parental leave. Combining parenting with a career at The University of Auckland. Managing staff balancing parenting and working at the University.

Further information (including CPCA contact details and profiles) is available at www.auckland.ac.nz/cpc

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SECTION 6: Working and caring for babies and children Breastfeeding, expression and storing milk The University of Auckland recognises the importance and benefits of breastfeeding, and understands that many women will return to work while they continue to breastfeed. Support to continue breastfeeding can assist women’s transition back into the workforce following parental leave and aid retention of skilled staff. Other benefits can include reduced absenteeism because of improved babies’ health. Supportive environment One of the challenges for women returning to work and continuing to breastfeed and/or express milk is the workplace environment. Despite a large amount of knowledge about the importance of breastfeeding to the infant, the mother and the wider society, there are still examples of discomfort and sometimes discrimination. It is against New Zealand’s Human Rights Act 1993 to discriminate against breastfeeding mothers, and the Employment Relations Act 2000 provides for breaks and appropriate facilities for breastfeeding in the workplace. Managers and those in authority have a particular responsibility to ensure a supportive and safe environment. Breastfeeding breaks The University is committed to providing staff with flexibility and support to take breastfeeding breaks during their working day. Breastfeeding breaks may coincide with lunch and tea breaks. The duration and frequency for these breaks can be negotiated between the staff member and their manager or HoD as part of flexible working hours. Flexible work arrangements should be consistent with the University’s operational requirements and be mutually convenient for the employee and their department. They may also include provision for part-time or working from home. Common sense and flexibility by both parties should result in suitable solutions. Timing will include:  Time off for an employee to breastfeed or express milk.  Travelling time to a location to breastfeed or express milk. Whenever possible such breaks shall be treated as working time and remunerated accordingly. Arrangements may be subject to review as the babies’ feeding requirements change. Room/space The room should be lockable to allow privacy and security. Alternatively, suitable signage that can be placed on the door as needed. The room should have a:  comfortable chair or small couch  table  lockable cupboard or locker for storage  power point.

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If a room is not available, it may be possible to make temporary alterations to the staff member’s office or an empty office. These alterations could include:  A blind to cover glass doors/windows.  Suitable signage that can be placed on the door as needed.  Removing some furniture temporarily to allow adding a comfortable chair/small couch. In a few instances, it may be possible to screen off an area of the workplace, although this is unlikely to be suitable for expressing milk. Note: It is unacceptable to consider toilets or bathrooms for feeding or expressing milk. Appropriate spaces at the University of Auckland The Student Centre in Engineering has a room available to staff and students which can be locked and has bed, two comfortable chairs, storage cupboard, fridge, hand basin a fridge and power points. Fridges As breast milk is considered a food it may be possible to store expressed milk in appropriately labelled containers in a communal fridge. The Equity Office and Tertiary Education Union have mini-fridges for storing milk which can be borrowed and installed in women’s offices or any appropriate space where there is a power point. These fridges are small and easily transportable.

Enquiries about obtaining the fridges can be made to ms.freeman@auckland.ac.nz or teu@auckland.ac.nz . The Tamaki campus and the Faculty of Medical and Health Science also have fridges available.

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Advice and Information For further advice on University breastfeeding facilities, contact either Prue Toft Equity Office Ext 88316 Email p.toft@auckland.ac.nz Margaret Freeman Equity Office Ext 87855 Email ms.freeman@auckland.ac.nz Kerryn Patten Human Resources Ext 88940 Email k.patten@auckland.ac.nz Jane Adams Tertiary Education Union Ext 85169 Email teu@auckland.ac.nz Other information sources The La Leche League is an international organisation committed to assisting mothers to breastfeed through mother-to-mother support, education, information, and encouragement and to promote a better understanding of breastfeeding as an important element in the healthy development of the baby and mother. See http://www.lalecheleague.org.nz/ Women’s Health Action Trust (Auckland) For advice from a breastfeeding advocate and guidelines for breastfeeding in the workplace. See www.womens-health.org.nz The Right to Breastfeed Human Rights Commission http://www.hrc.co.nz

Early Childhood Education 1. The University of Auckland Early childhood education centres There are eight early childhood education (ECE) centres at the University:  Three on the City Campus.  Two at the Grafton Campus.  Two at the Epsom Campus.  One at the Tāmaki Campus.

At the City Campus there is a Te Kohanga Reo, and at the Epsom Campus there is a bilingual centre. All centres are staffed by qualified, experienced and caring people who provide a safe, nurturing environment and high standards of early childhood education. As a parent or caregiver, you’re welcome to visit, explore and ask questions about any of these facilities. We suggest that you phone the supervisor to arrange a suitable time for you both, as there are times of the day that are very busy in an early childhood centre. These facilities often have waiting lists. It is advisable to contact the centres as early as possible.

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For further information, including contact details, visit www.auckland.ac.nz/uoa/cs-early-childhood-centres Salary Sacrifice and ECE fees The University of Auckland has a voluntary Salary Sacrifice Arrangement (SSA) for staff who have children in any of the University-based Early Childhood Education (ECE) Centres Kōhanga reo and Kōhungahunga. This was a key recommendation in the report on the Strategic Review of ECE Centres and a recommendation of the Women Returning to Work Project, What is a Salary Sacrifice Arrangement? A SAA is an arrangement between the University and a staff member whereby the staff member agrees to reduce his/her base salary for future pay periods by a specified annual amount agreed in advance, and a University-based ECE Centre provides the staff member childcare services equivalent in value to the amount of the reduction in the staff member’s pay. Who is eligible? Any permanent staff member, or staff member who has a fixed term agreement of at least 12 months (whether part time or full time), who has a child attending one of the following University ECE Centres is eligible to apply for a SAA. For further information and a copy of the application form see https://www.staff.auckland.ac.nz/uoa/for/staff/admin_services/benefits/salarysacrificing-for-ece-fees.cfm Government Childcare assistance subsidies The governments working for families website provides information on additional subsidies that may be available to staff. www.workingforfamilies.govt.nz/

2. Alternative childcare options

These include private Early Childhood Education (ECE) centres or home based care. The Ministry of Education provides a website for parents which includes information related to how ECE works, types of ECE Services (including home based care) and choosing an Early Childhood Education Service www.minedu.govt.nz/Parents/EarlyYears.asp

3. Children on campus

The University seeks to support staff childcare responsibilities to enable them to participate fully in their work while recognising the University is essentially an adult environment in the operation of its core functions. The University has Guidelines for Children on Campus

Guidelines for Children on Campus

Seminars and networking opportunities Research informed seminars and networking opportunities for staff who are combining parenting and a career (including those considering becoming parents). Seminars are provided several times a year and are co-ordinated through the Equity Office. To find out when the next meeting is, or to add your name to our data base please contact either:

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Prue Toft Ext 88316 Email p.toft@auckland.ac.nz Margaret Freeman Equity Office Ext 87855 Email ms.freeman@auckland.ac.nz

Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers (CPCAs) Combining Parenting and a Career Advisers are team of trained voluntary staff members who can provide support, advice, and information to University staff on:     

Working while pregnant. Seeking to take parental leave. Transition to work after parental leave. Combining parenting with a career at The University of Auckland. Managing staff balancing parenting and working at the University.

Further information (including CPCA contact details and profiles) is available at www.auckland.ac.nz/cpc

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SECTION 7: Frequently asked questions I am on a fixed term agreement with the University. Am I eligible for Parental Leave? Please discuss your entitlement to Parental Leave with Human Resources as a number of factors need to be considered. I am a casual staff member with the University. Am I eligible for Parental Leave? In the majority of cases casual staff are not entitled to Parental Leave but you should discuss your situation with Human Resources. As a male, am I entitled to University Paid Parental Leave and how much? Yes, you are entitled to Parental Leave. If you have been with the University for a continuous period of one year you are entitled to take up to nine week’s paid Parental Leave. These nine weeks can be taken in blocks of one week or more over the full 52 week period. For example, you may choose to take three weeks off when your child is born or adopted, a further two weeks when they are three months old, three weeks off when they are six months old and the remaining week off when they are 11 months old. If you do not use this leave within the 12 months following the birth or adoption you will forfeit it. If your partner also works at the University one partner can have nine weeks paid leave or the nine weeks can be shared between two people. What happens if the birth is premature and I am still working? The commencement date of the Parental Leave is the first working day following your last day of work. The date when you are due to return to work is also moved forward a corresponding number of days. If you have less than 12 months’ service because the birth was premature, then you will still be entitled to Parental Leave. What happens if I decide to return to work before my University Paid Leave has finished? You will not be entitled to the remaining money outstanding. If you are asked to undertake work while on Parental Leave and you agree to do so, your Parental Leave will be extended by the appropriate amount of time. What happens to my Government Paid Leave if I return to work when my University Paid Leave has finished? There is a period of five weeks where your University Paid Parental Leave may have finished but you may still be receiving the Government Paid Parental Leave money. If you return to work during this period you will forfeit any outstanding money owed from the Government. Can the length of my Parental Leave be extended or reduced? You can apply to have your Parental Leave extended or reduced once, but not the amount of Paid Parental Leave you are entitled to. If returning to work earlier than planned you must apply in writing to the University one month before the date you wish to resume work. If returning to work later than planned you must apply in writing to the University one month before the original date you intended to resume work. Will my job be kept open for me?

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If you are returning to work after taking less than four week’s/ Parental Leave, you are entitled to resume work in the same or similar position unless the position is made redundant. If you return to work after taking more than four week’s Parental Leave, you are entitled to resume work in the same or similar position unless it is a key position which cannot be filled by a temporary replacement or it is made redundant. What happens if I decide not to return from Parental Leave? You may resign by providing the University with written notice as per the period stated in your employment agreement. Employment will be deemed to have ended when your Parental Leave period began. Please let the University know as soon as possible of your intentions so the appropriate planning can be done. If you have received the University Paid Parental Leave and decide not to return to work following parental leave, you will be expected to refund the total payment made by the University. What if I resign then decide I want to return to work after a few years? Under the Collective Agreements, a staff member who resigns to care for a preschool child can apply for preferential re-employment within four years of resignation, providing certain conditions are fulfilled. These conditions are as follows: • the absence does not exceed four years from the date of resignation or five years from the date of cessation of duties to take up Parental Leave; • the applicant must produce a birth certificate for the under school age child and • the applicant must sign a statutory declaration to the effect that the absence has been due to the care of an under school age child and paid employment has not been entered into for more than 15 hours per week or other income received during that absence. Can I take more than one period of Paid Parental Leave? There is no restriction on the number of Paid Parental Leave periods you can have from The University of Auckland. There is also no restriction on the number of pregnancies you can receive payment for on the Government Paid Parental Leave scheme. However, legislation specifies that you need to be at work for a full six months between the date you returned to work and the expected date of birth of the subsequent child. As a primary care-giver can I take up to 23 weeks paid leave? Yes, you can take the Government Paid Parental Leave and then when this leave finishes you can immediately take the University Paid Parental leave giving you a total of 23 weeks of continuous paid leave. Note: the Government Paid Parental Leave must be taken first. Also, if your partner has taken the University Paid Parental Leave you are eligible only for the Government Paid Parental Leave so you will only be entitled to 14 weeks leave. I have arranged to stop working and take my University Paid Parental Leave and Government Paid Parental Leave at 38 weeks, but I'm only 36 weeks and due to complications associated with my pregnancy my doctor/midwife/obstetrician has told me to stop working now. Does my paid leave begin now or when I am at 38 weeks? Pregnant female staff are entitled to take up to a total of up to 10 day’s special leave without pay for reasons connected with pregnancy. If you haven’t taken any of those 10 day’s special leave, your paid leave will begin when you are 38

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weeks, but you will not receive any pay or paid leave between weeks 36 and 38. You may wish to use some annual leave to bridge this gap.

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SECTION 8: Checklists Checklist for staff taking Parental Leave Date

Activity

1

Notify manager as early as is appropriate and decide on the length of leave.

2

Consider needs for flexible work arrangements and discuss with manager (application on HR Forms page).

3

Early as possible

Make booking in ECE Centre.

4

3 months before leave

Apply for Parental Leave either/both University and Government - Forms on HR web page fill in and send to HR.

5

3 months before leave

Consider if you need a special parking permit for staff with family responsibilities.

6

If an academic on a grant, check with HoD if a variation of contract may be required to extend end-date.

7

Discuss arrangements for hand-over and desired contact during leave including IT arrangements and availability for part-time work if appropriate.

8

Last month

Make arrangements regarding salary deductions – health insurance, superannuation etc.

9

Last month

If needed check that arrangements for breastfeeding are suitable.

10

Last day

Hand in parking permit.

Tick

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Checklist for managers of staff taking Parental Leave Date

Activity

1

Discuss leave plans with staff member and what an appropriate way of communicating plans to colleagues is.

2

Consider what support may be provided including flexible work arrangements.

3

3 months before leave

Tick

Sign off Parental Leave Application form(s).

4

Make arrangements for coverage during leave and hand-over e.g. there may be opportunities for a secondment.

5

If an academic on a grant, check if a variation of contract may be required to extend end-date.

6

Check that arrangements for breastfeeding are available if required.

7

Farewell for staff member.

8

If agreed by staff member, check that contact is being maintained during leave.

9

Prepare induction for return to work which may include updates on staffing, IT systems, new policies, and procedures. Depending on the length of leave, it may be appropriate to attend training at SODU or CAD to refresh skills.

10

Notify department of the staff member’s return date and welcome back.

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Contacts For further information Human Resources Phone: + 64 9 373 7599 ext 83000 Facsimile: + 64 9 373 7454 Email: askhr@auckland.ac.nz. Address Alfred Nathan House The University of Auckland 24 Princes Street, Auckland Postal Address Human Resources The University of Auckland Private Bag 90219 Auckland, New Zealand Equity Office Phone: +64 9 373 7599 ext 88316 Email: p.toft@auckland.ac.nz Address East Wing Clock Tower Bldg 119 Room 111 TEU Branch Organisers The Tertiary Education Union Phone: +64 9 373-7599 ext 85169 Email: TEU@auckland.ac.nz Address Commerce A Building 114 Level 1, Rooms 117 A & 117 B The University of Auckland Postal Address The Tertiary Education Union C/o Careers Centre Private Bag 92019, Auckland

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University of Auckland toolkit for combining parenting and a career  

This guide is designed to support a range of needs from: pregnant staff, staff intending to take parental leave, parents returning to work a...

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