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Inspiration, Information & Resources for Music Teachers

Term 2, 2014

IN THIS ISSUE //

Facing the Music with Ease KICK OUT THE BETA BLOCKERS AND FIND THE INNER STILLNESS Jann McMichael experienced Alexander Teacher of 15 years explains how distress that often overtakes musicians can change from a lifetime of gloom, with the right lessons!

DO YOU HEAR WHAT I HEAR? The Sequel: Putting on your Musical Makeup.

THE CHORAL SCORE: 2B OR NOT? by David Squire, Schoir Ltd.

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www.kbbmusic.co.nz


With so many destinations around the world; use Tour Time’s expertise to arrange your Music Tour. Be exposed, inspired and motivated by the international music scene - Like Never Before!

2015 FESTIVAL OPTIONS: Asia • April: Vietnam International Choir Competition - Hoi An, Vietnam • July: Orientale Concentus - Singapore Europe • April: 15th Budapest International Choral Competition - Budapest, Hungary • April: 13th Venezia in Musica Choir Festival - Caorle and Venice, Italy • June: Rome International Choral Festival - Rome, Italy • June: Mozart Choral Festival - Salzburg, Austria • June: International Anton Bruckner Choir Competition - Linz, Austria • June: Sound of Music 50th Anniversary Choral Festival - Salzburg, Austria • July: European Choir Games - Magdeburg, Germany • July: Johannes Brahms Festival - Wernigerode, Germany • July: 6th Musica Sacra a Roma International Choir Festival - Rome, Italy • July: Summa Cum Laude Youth Music Festival - Vienna, Austria USA • March/April: Percy Grainger Wind Band Festival - Chicago, Illinois, USA • June: West Coast Youth Orchestra Festival - Los Angeles, California, USA Canada • July: Kathaumixw Choral Festival - British Columbia, Canada 2016 Festival options available upon request

These are just a few of the exciting Festivals available For more information on Music Tours Like Never Before contact Tour Time

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KBB Music Festival 2014

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KBB

Registration: Online registration will open soon. Afterword I chanced upon my Anthology of Music Criticism compiled by Norman Demuth (1947, London: Eyre & Spottiswoode). Here’s a short piece on the Pastoral Symphony by Beethoven written in June 1823:

MUSIC August, 2014

FESTIVAL Welcome to the first KBB Music Festival message in Random Notes for 2014 and here are the details for this year’s event:

Venue: Because of renovations, the Holy Trinity Cathedral is unavailable this year and so we are moving to the North Shore for our sessions. The venues for the 2014 Festival will be: Westlake Boys High School for Concert Bands and Symphony Orchestras and Westlake Girls High School for Chamber Orchestras and Big Bands. The Gala Concerts will be held in the Westlake Boys High School Auditorium. Dates: The dates for the KBB Music Festival at 4th – 10th August, with Gala Concerts on Sunday August 10th. Please note that there will be no sessions or workshops on Saturday 9th August to avoid the many inevitable clashes with sports teams in the lead-up to tournament week.

Opinions are much divided concerning the merits of the Pastoral Symphony of Beethoven, though very few venture to deny that it is much too long. The andante alone is upward of a quarter of an hour in performance, and being a series of repetitions, might be subjected to abridgement without any violation of justice, either to the composer or his hearers. In saying this, we do not mean to undervalue the work, but range ourselves on the side of those who think it abounds in traits of singular genius, and in beautiful effects; though we certainly never heard it through without rejoicing, on account of its prolixity [length or tediousness], at its termination. (p. 152). For those of you who direct a big band, take solace in this comment made by saxophonist Phil Wilson about bandleader Woody Herman:

“Nobody does what Woody does as well as he does. If we could only figure out what it is he does” Trevor Thwaites

Special Extras: The exciting news is that this year we will have both an Honours Symphony Orchestra and an Honours Concert Band. The workshop and Concert for these groups will be held on the afternoon of Friday 8th August at Westlake Boys High School.

Chairperson KBB Music Festival Committee

Random Notes is a free magazine for music teachers and educators in New Zealand published by KBB Music.

KBB Music Education Ph 0800 775 226 ext 205 school@kbbmusic.co.nz

KBB Music Botany Shop 42, Botany Town Centre, Auckland Ph 09 271-2642

Enquiries should be sent to: KBB Music, PO Box 9788, Newmarket, Auckland 1149. Freephone: 0800 775 226 | info@kbbmusic.co.nz

KBB Music Epsom 377 Manukau Road, Epsom, Auckland Ph 09 630-2577

KBB Music Wellington 40 Cuba Street, Te Aro, Wellington Ph 04 472-2526

www.kbbmusic.co.nz www.facebook.com/kbbmusicltd

KBB Music Takapuna 122 Anzac Street, Takapuna, Auckland Ph 09 489-4131

KBB Music Christchurch Shop 5/1-5 Amyes Road, Hornby, Christchurch Ph 03 344-0366

Cover Photo: Miranda Adams, Photographer: Adrian Malloch

Musical Instrument Specialists since 1888

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KBB Music Festival

4th - 10th


Tech Tips: Notes from the Repairs Department All musical instruments require on-going maintenance at home, between our recommended yearly servicing. Below are some guidelines to help you keep your instrument in good condition. If you would like further information about caring for your instruments, please feel free to call or e-mail the KBB Music Repair Department.

Gentle Reminders: 1. Your instrument should either be in your hands, on an appropriate stand, such as Hercules stands, or inside its case, with the latches closed. 2. Never leave your instrument on a chair, table, or bed. 3. Don’t leave your instrument’s case where pets may be able to get to them. 4. All instruments should stay out of direct sunlight, as it can affect the finish and natural materials. 5. Keep small debris, such as paperclips, trash, coins, etc., out of your instrument’s case. 6. Keep small accessories, such as cork grease, reeds, etc., in the accessories compartment or in a bag. 7. No instrument should be stored in an attic, garage, shed, or car. 8. Instruments should never be stored in a damp area. 9. Vacuum your instrument’s case on occasion.

Brass: These instruments should have some daily attention, as well as monthly attention. Valves, rotors, and trombone hand-slides should be lubricated regularly. Trombone hand-slides should be wiped off and swabbed before applying more lubrication. Your instrument should be wiped off after each time it is handled. Brass-wind instruments should be bathed at home every 1-2 months. This involves disassembling your instrument and wash-

ing it with lukewarm water and mild dish soap. If you cannot pull out one or more of the slides, valves, or rotors, then DON’T bathe your instrument, as it needs professional attention. Please ask us for further details about how to bathe your brass instrument as home! WOODWINDS: Unlike brass instruments, woodwinds should NEVER be submerged or bathed! Doing so can destroy the pads and cause rust and mould to develop. Woodwinds should be wiped down with a microfiber cloth and swabbed out after each time it is played. For clarinets & double reeds Hodge Silk Swabs dropped in from the top / skinny end of each section of your instrument works. Gauze on a cleaning rod works well for flutes and piccolos. Tiger Rag Swabs dropped in from the bell are good for cleaning the bore of saxophones. All swabs should be kept outside of the instrument’s case until they are fully dry. When wiping down your instrument, be sure to stay clear of the pads. An accidental rub on a pad could end its life. For clarinets and saxophones, remove excess cork grease as it appears on the tenons and/or neck.

Orchestral Strings: Some stringed instruments are quite finicky about temperature and humidity changes. Try to maintain an even environment for your stringed instruments by keeping them out of cars, attics, and sheds. If your instrument does need to change environment, such as practicing inside with air conditioning to performance outside, allow it to acclimatize to the new environment, outside of its case, for an hour or so before playing. All rosin should be removed from the body, bow stick, and strings after playing. Rosin build-up can affect the life of the strings and the finish of the instrument. Always avoid touching the bow hair, as the oil will collect dirt and reduce the hair’s grip on the strings. While they may not show any visible signs of wear, strings and bow hair need to be replaced regularly, depending on how much an instrument is played. The strings may need to be replaced every 6-12 months and the bow hair about every 12-18 months.

KBB Repairs Department - feel free to call or e-mail / 0800 775 226 EXT 207 / repairs@kbbmusic.co.nz 2


Contents & Events

MUSICAL

Freephone 0800 775 226 May

MANY HEARTS, ONE VOICE CONCERT // 17 MAY This collaborative concert brings together over twenty different musical groups from around Southland for an epic performance in Stadium Southland to celebrate Arts Month.

Events Calender

MEMOS

MENZA NATIONAL PD DAY // 16 MAY See www.menza.co.nz for what is happening in your area

NZ CONCERT BANDS FESTIVAL // 31 MAY – 1 JUNE Baradene College, Auckland

June

Term 2, 2014

THE ROYAL NEW ZEALAND NAVY BAND LIVE // 27 JUNE Friday June 27 12:05pm Victoria Theatre, Devonport, Auckland The RNZ Navy Bands newest lunchtime concert series showcasing the top soloists and small ensembles such as brass quintet, percussion ensemble, saxophone quartet and woodwind ensembles. Each concert also features a solo work from a leading player in the band.

July

August

NZ BRASS BANDS NATIONAL CONTEST // 29-13 JULY Invercargill

KBB MUSIC FESTIVAL // 4-8 AUGUST Westlake Boys High School & Westlake Girls High School www.kbbmusicfestival.co.nz or www.kbbmusic.co.nz for details

September

Contents & Events

CHRISTCHURCH JAZZQUEST // 2-3 AUGUST Christchurch TAUPO BIG MUSIC DAY // 26 SEPTEMBER Taupo Big Music Day – Thursday 26th September @ Taupo School of Music Combined School Orchestra for 8-18 years old. A one-day event culminating to a late afternoon concert. No cost to participants. For more information and music contact Taupo School of Music.

October

CHRISTCHURCH BIG BAND FESTIVAL // 25-27 OCTOBER Christchurch

More information @ www.kbbmusic.co.nz

CON-

TRCC ITM CONFERENCES // 1-8 OCTOBER Auckland 1-2 Oct // Hamilton 2-3 Oct // Wellington 6-7 Oct // Christchurch 7-8 Oct

Articles

DO YOU HEAR WHAT I HEAR? (p. 4-5) The Sequel: Putting on your Musical Makeup FACING THE MUSIC WITH EASE (p. 8-9) Kick out the Beta Blockers and find the Inner Stillness!

In this issue...

CHORAL BRIEFS: THE CHORAL SCORE - 2B OR NOT? (p. 12-15) By David Squire, Schoir Ltd

TENTS

KBB CITATION PRESENTATION (p. 18-19) Handy Hints for Secondary School Teachers MENZA DEVELOPMENT DAY (p. 20) Back by popular demand!

Specials

TERM 2 KBB MUSIC SPECIALS (p. 10-11, p.17 & p. 18-19) Lots of great Special scattered through this issue!

Musical Instrument Specialists since 1888

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RANDOM NOTES // TERM 2 2014

DO YOU HEAR WHAT I HEAR?

The Sequel: Putting on your Musical Makeup RICHARD FLOYD // Richard Floyd is presently in his 51st year of active involvement as a conductor, music educator and administrator. He has enjoyed a distinguished and highly successful career at virtually every level of wind band performance from beginning band programs through high school and university wind ensembles as well as adult community bands. At present, Floyd serves as State Director of Music at the University of Texas in Austin where he coordinates all facets of secondary school music competition for some 3500 performing organizations throughout the state. He also holds the post of Musical Director and Conductor of the Austin Symphonic Band, which is viewed to be one of the premier adult concert bands in America.

The brief for this clinic was: The title “Musical Makeup” references the reality that actors exaggerate their Makeup when on stage to project the emotions of their character. As conductors we must apply Musical Makeup to achieve convincing, artistic results. Excerpts combined with references to Pablo Casals’ philosophy of interpretation will be used to underscore musical insights. Joining Richard Floyd on stage was the Michigan State University Wind Symphony, conducted by Dr. Kevin Sedatole. This band had presented a stunning concert at the MidWest Clinic the previous evening to a capacity 2000 audience. Richard Floyd opened his address with the statement. “We as Musical Directors get obsessed with unadorned technical accuracy. We rehearse and play what we see and as a result we are less likely to embrace the musical quality of the score.” The art of interpretation is not to play what is written – Pablo Casals

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There are no musical notations that represent feelings – Sir David Whitwell The challenge for a musician, as for an actor, is to match the expression with the deeper meaning of the text, to be in tune with its underlying essence. – Ruth Waterman The printed notation is not music... It is nothing more than code – Richard Floyd. He also quoted Pablo Casals in saying “The written note is like a straitjacket, whereas music, like life itself is constant movement, continuous spontaneity, free from any restrictions. There are so many excellent instrumentalists who are completely obsessed by the printed note, whereas it has a very limited power to express what the music actually means. He claimed, Despite the surprisingly widespread belief that all a player need do is to ‘play the notes’, this very concept is nonsensical, for, as soon as notes are sounded, they have a full complement of attributes: intensity, attack, dynamic level (loudness), warmth, character, direction, length, speed and so on. So if we assert

that we are merely ‘letting the music play itself ’, it can only mean that we are forfeiting a conscious choice of attributes, allowing habitual, automatic ways of playing to overlay and strangle the voice of the composer. “If this statement is true, then we must begin to consider the musical message of the score from the very beginning and determine what expressive qualities are there.” When looking at a new score we sometimes get so concerned with the technical aspects of the work, that we never stop and think what the musical message is that the composer imagined or dreamed would become a reality in performance. The ear can’t hear what the mind can’t imagine or dream. What the performer can imagine or dream a particular score will become, is what that performer is going to strive for. Richard Floyd talked about an experience he had recently when working with a University concert band in Florida. In one of the sections of the music he asked the band members to try


Do You Hear What I Hear?

and describe, in non-musical terms, the expressive qualities they thought the music was attempting to portray. The word “Awe” was suggested by one of the band members and when they played that section again, he promised the audience present at the clinic, that it was a different piece. “We had made a musical human connection to how they played it rather than a mechanical objective connection to how they played it originally” He gave the following suggestions to consider: From the beginning, ponder the expressive qualities either evident or implied in the score. Search for words that capture the mood of the music. Is it playful, somber, intense, sad, happy, restless, celebratory, tragic, regal, majestic, noble, gloomy, mysterious, joyful, lovely, tender, angry or..? Consider: Is this piece a fantasy with free and fluid rhythm? Is it a march with a strict regular beat? Is it a dance with its own personal lilt? Or simply ask the question. “Is the music singing or dancing?” Seek an emotional connection from the very beginning but be open to change and evolution. Does the music tell a story? Even when performing non programmatic music use your, and the band members,

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imagination to create a story. “Tell a story” Seek an emotional connection to the music right from the beginning. Once imagination kicks in, the music becomes a human experience rather than an objective and mechanical experience. “There is no musical notation that represents “feelings” they give us instructions, its code! But it’s really and truly not about feelings.” Approach the written score in the same fashion you would approach a written text. At this stage in the clinic, Richard Floyd highlighted a well-known Shakespearian quote. “A Horse! A Horse! My Kingdom for a Horse!” He asked the audience to participate, by reading the quote out loud but emphasizing different words or by changing the exclamation marks to question marks. He clearly showed how the quote could be interpreted or imagined in at least 4 different ways. He concluded this section by saying: “So! You don’t think anything about putting meaning and inflection into words but then when we pick up a score, notes are like straitjackets, we analyse the spots objectively but all of a sudden we tend to lose emotional connection”. Putting on your “Musical Makeup” When we apply our Musical Makeup, in very simplistic terms there are only really three ways we can do this:

1. 2. 3.

Louder or softer Heavier or Lighter Longer or shorter

but!! of course, there are millions of variations and combinations of those three main applications. What we do have to do is to make sure that we connect with the audience when we apply our make- up. All are meaningless until perceived by the listener. “Uniformity of sustained volume breeds monotony. Remember that the human ear is insensitive to anything less that 25% difference of energy. Science and Music.” – Sir James Jeans. First And Foremost. Find The Musical Line “When the technical problems of finger dexterity have been solved, it is too late to add musicality, phrasing and musical expressing. That is why I never practice mechanically. If we work mechanically, we run the risk of changing the very nature of the music.” – Daniel Barenboim Live for the line. – Frederick Fennell Line is much more than melody. Seek a continuity of feeling. Consider the melodic curve and look for musical destinations. In general terms, white notes sustain the line and black notes connect the line. (...)

Musical Instrument Specialists since 1888

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RANDOM NOTES // TERM 2 2014 With rare exception there will always be dynamic inflections not marked in the score.

On Ritards – Never too slow too soon. Proportion is essential. Articulation = Instrumental Diction.

Essential Truths

Rests musts be viewed as energy filled silence. They are an essential part of the music.

Beauty exists in curves… Soft shapes. In general music is an endless succession of rainbows. All music has a heart beat. We must find it. Thoughts on Repetition Repetition… Yes! Duplication… no! In general, repeated notes or a repeated design must not be equal. A repeated single note or phrase is similar to the repetition of words or phrases in speech. They can’t remain the same.

Accompaniment – the sounds in which a theme is clothed. “If you take nothing else from our time together this morning, it is the fact that it is possible, from the very beginning of working on a musical score, to make musical connections. Even if it is a bit out of tune! Even if it is below tempo, go ahead and start putting music into the process so that the ensemble start to realize that this is a part of what it takes to make music special. It’s not just the notes, it’s not just the rhythm.

Thoughts on Rubato One must feel a certain logic… not a disorderly fantasy. There has to be an awareness of proportion.

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At this point the Michigan State University Wind Symphony were used to perform seven different works. At first the band played a section from the work in a very generic manner. Then they stopped and

talked about adding musical makeup. The discussion was in order to determine the appropriate makeup and why it was deemed important for that section. Probably the most effective part of this demonstration was when they performed the gorgeous and sensitive 2nd movement from Three Ayres from Gloucester by Hugh M Stuart. During this work, Richard Floyd demonstrated finding the line and finding the principal direction of the music. This work was a very good example of a previous quote, “White notes sustain the line and black notes connect the line.” Richard Floyd summed up his clinic by making the following observations: “There is no reason to play in tune unless it enhances the music. There is no reason to introduce style unless it enhances the musical content of the work at hand. It is crucial that we make musical decisions firsts and then, and only then, make pedagogical decisions that serve to enrich the musical content.”


RANDOM NOTES // TERM 2 2014

FACING THE MUSIC WITH EASE

Kick out the Beta Blockers and find the Inner Stillness! JANN MCMICHAEL // Jann McMichael experienced Alexander Teacher of 15 years explains how distress that often overtakes musicians can change from a lifetime of gloom, with the right lessons!

TOP TIP 1 // It is not what you do but how you do what you do in your day that impacts your whole musical life! “As a youngster when I was learning to play the piano, it didn’t take me long to realise that I was not going to be able to keep it up. Even in my young days I was experiencing shoulder pain. How I was playing (I much later found) was the culprit. And then to add insult to injury, I came to the (wrong) conclusion that in order to have more ease, I needed to avoid playing altogether. This seemed the only way out. Yet, had I known how to address it effectively then, I would have avoided the long downward slide to numbing back and eventually, all over pain (and all its nasty trimmings) that made living every day so much harder. It all stubbornly resisted conventional treatments and exercises”.

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As musicians and teachers you know how anxiety builds on itself through unsolved chronic aches, financial/career/time pressures, postural dilemmas; and life turns to custard! When music is the soul food yet sitting or standing long periods, the shoulders and neck get tight and achy, the back hurts; when you sit up straight or ‘hold’ yourself upright, flexible inner stillness is not easy to maintain. Needless muscle strain is used to hold the skeleton. True inner quiet is effortless. Holding is an effort. This is why you may feel a longing to collapse in relief ! “I recently worked with a young man while he played a keyboard and sang. I noticed that he was tense before he started. Once I would have pulled myself into knots while instructing him, but since studying Alexander Technique I am able to observe my inner sensing

wisdom and so avoid these knots. As a result, I could give him the best of my easy self and stay optimally energetic for way longer”. What is inner wisdom? Does it bring about an easier way to live? To play music? Inner sensing wisdom is an internal knowing which enables you to free unwanted tightness all over your body, maintaining the true reliability of the organisation.

TOP TIP 2 // Instead of shifting or shrugging tension by stretching your body, set it off on the inside through stillness. Let the strain ease its own way down your body to the floor; while at the same time giving rise to your torso, letting it ease and widen upwards like air in a balloon. All the while, the postural muscles do the work the way they were meant to as your frame resets itself and the tension leaves. No ‘exercises’ or special positions need to be held, as your easy tallness and breathing realign… it does itself ! Re-connecting with ones own innate authentic wisdom is returning to the natural flow of life which we all have; all a part of our natural musician within… of harmony, rhythm and tune. HELPFUL HINTS before you start: Preferably, sit on a level chair; feet firm on the floor, your hands rest easy and quiet in your lap. Mentally send the heels into the floor, giving equal weight to both your left and right feet. With your head poised on the top of your spine, make sure you release excess tension towards your hips and down to your feet. Give your hips time to soften onto the seat. Now you are ready to start playing!


Facing The Music with Ease

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Jann McMichael’s techniques in practice

Patrick Maddams, Managing Director, London’s Royal Academy of Music says; “The Alexander Technique can be sustaining; it is something that if learned well, can be carried along with you for the rest of your life. It gives you confidence to be who you are when you are up in front of an audience.” Jann says “Alexander Technique is the only lesson where nothing is learned; but where the learning is unlearning”! Looking for an Alexander teacher go to: www.alexandertechnique.org.nz, or email jann@alexandertechnique.co.nz. Teachers in the main centres throughout New Zealand!

Musical Instrument Specialists since 1888

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RANDOM NOTES // TERM 2 2014 B&S LUBRASS 701225 Rotary Valve Oil

B&S LUBRASS 701215 Piston Valve Oil

TALIS TTB 355L Bb TROMBONE Intermediate Model Clear lacquer finish with nickel trim Key of Bb 8” Bell; .500” Bore Nickel silver outer slide tubes Includes B&S 6 1/2AL mouthpiece and lightweight blue softshell case with backpack strap.

RRP $1,095

TERM 2 SPECIAL

740

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TALIS 175L EUPHONIUM The Talis 175 Euphonium comes standard with a yellow brass bell and body, stainless steel pistons in the 3+1 valve set-up, corrosion safe gold brass lead pipe. 15.5mm/0.61’ Bore, 300mm/11.81’ bell. Includes case. 3 year extended warranty. 7-day trials available.

RRP $2,495

TERM 2 SPECIAL

1,850

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16

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TERM 2 SPECIAL

HOYER 801L Bb/F DOUBLE FRENCH HORN 3B ball joints, nickel-silver inner/outer slides, 310mm bell, 11.9mm bore, goldbrass leadpipe, engraved valve caps, fixed bell, clear lacquered brass body and bell. Includes mouthpiece and VMM9081 case.

TERM 2 SPECIAL

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MAJESTIC M6543H DELUXE MARIMBA 4 1/3 Oct Rosewood Bars

MAJESTIC TIMPANI Majestic Harmonic Fibreglass 32 inch

Specials

MAJESTIC TIMPANI Majestic Harmonic Fibreglass 23 inch.

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TERM 2 SPECIAL

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3,895

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ADAMS SOLOIST XYLOPHONE XS2HV35 3.5 Oct. F4-C8 Honduras Rosewood 38 5 MM Octave Tuned.

7,495

$

MAJESTIC M6543P DELUXE MARIMBA 4 1/3 Octave Prolon Bars.

MAJESTIC TIMPANI Harmonic Copper 29 inch.

MAJESTIC TIMPANI Harmonic Copper 26 inch.

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CLEARANCE! MAJESTIC TIMPANI GIG BAGS Gig bag for Majestic timpani sizes: 26, 28, 29 one of each only!

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www.kbbmusic.co.nz

TERM 2 SPECIAL

200

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Term 2 Specials

Freephone 0800 775 226 JUPITER FLUTE JFL313S PRODIGY Curved Headjoint. Airmold Case JKC09. Specially designed for younger children, this lightweight flute is played in exactly the same way as a standard student flute.

PEARL FLUTE PF505E Pearl Flutes PF505 E flute - Preferred Series, silver plated head, body and footjoint and keys, offset G, E thomann key, closed holes, French pointed keys, C foot.

JUPITER JCL637N CLARINET 440 Pitch with Case JKC33CA. Jupiter has successfully produced the JCL-637 JCL-637, clarinet, made of ABS resin but with the sound quality of wood.

ANTIGUA CLS1 CLARINET FLUTE SOLID BASE STAND

RRP $21

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RICO CORK GREASE

RRP $1,095

TERM 2 SPECIAL

RRP $970

849

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TERM 2 SPECIAL

TERM 2 SPECIAL

750

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CASIO CTK1250 KEYBOARD 61-note casio keyboard- non touch response

BACH VO1885 1.6oz Valve Oil

RRP $2.99

TERM 2 SPECIAL

RRP $8.95

2

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MEDELI M15 KEYBOARD Cheapest touch response keyboard around!!

Specials

MEDELI MC49 KEYBOARD 49-note keyboard to fit small spaces and needs.

775

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15

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RRP $249

TERM 2 SPECIAL

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TERM 2 SPECIAL

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CASIO WK220 KEYBOARD ARRANGER 76-notes but for a 61-note price EDU price only.

CASIO LK240 KEYBOARD Lighted keys for students to follow.

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TERM 2 SPECIAL

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CASIO PX750 PRIVIA DIGITAL STAGE PIANO 88-note digital piano with 3 pedal system at best price!

1,399

$

229

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CASIO CDP120 DIGITAL PIANO 88-note Digital Piano- EDU price only. Includes Stand.

RRP $799

EDU PRICE

$

499

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TERM 2 SPECIAL

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ROLAND HP505 DIGITAL HOME PIANO 88-note cabinet style piano at clearance price - floor stock only.

ROLAND F20 DIGITAL PIANO 88-note digital piano with Roland action and quality. Includes Stand.

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TERM 2 SPECIAL

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Musical Instrument Specialists since 1888

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Choral Briefs: The Choral Score - 2B or Not? by David Squire, Schoir Ltd Over the past few months it has been interesting to read some of the discussion on Musicnet, the online forum for New Zealand music teachers. Every so often someone makes a comment about the NCEA requirement that students must present a composition with a clearly notated score, and debate ensues as to whether or not this is a reasonable expectation. I found one of the responses quite pertinent, with the writer essentially stating that we have a responsibility as music educators to ensure our students are musically literate. This occurs both in the classroom and the rehearsal room – after all, practical music making is the reason the theory/aural/history exists at all, so tying them all together as often as possible presents the music teacher with the ideal platform to approach music from an integrated perspective. As choir directors, we know that there’s often a mix of average-tocapable music readers in the choir, and probably at least as many non-readers. I have seen instances where almost all music is taught to the choir by rote, which is all well and good if you only have a few simple works to perform. However, I wonder whether we are doing a disservice to our students by taking this approach. As an example, all the singers in the New Zealand Youth Choir need to be capable of sight singing, and for many of them this begins in their school choirs. I have several students in my school choirs who cannot read music fluently, or even at all. However, I always insist that every singer brings their music and a 2B pencil to all rehearsals. I start each year explaining that they need to keep referring to their scores while learning the music, even if it looks like hieroglyphics at first. They get a quick explanation of “notes go up = sing higher; notes have lots of lines = sing faster” etc, during which everyone has a good laugh and they all relax a little. And then we’re off. One thing I have learned is that you need to teach young singers how to mark the score. There are several ways to do this, and no standard method, but I encourage them to use some of the more common – remembering that markings need to be efficient: fast to write down, unambiguous to read while singing, and taking up a small amount of space on the page so as not to distract from the task at hand. Let’s take the national anthem, which might be presented in a published version that looks something like Example A (right) Using this as a guide, and preparing the score in advance for the singers, I will know that I should explain the following:

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CLEAR This is where a note is shortened, usually to enable the phrase to make sense musically, to enable the lyrics to make sense grammatically, or for a breath. It can be written in a number of ways (including changing the written note to a new one and adding a rest, or putting a vertical line through any tied note that is to be shortened/removed), but I usually encourage students to mark it with two angled parallel lines like a caesura \\ with the rest which makes the correct shortening of the note written above. It is also possible to use a breath mark ‘ instead, where you know the singers will automatically shorten by the correct duration in order to breathe. TEXT LIFT Not necessarily a gap big enough for a breath, but designed to separate two words for musical or (usually) lyrical sense purposes. Usually indicated by a vertical line between the two words. This is particularly useful if you want to avoid elision between two words that shouldn’t be, and therefore a glottal onset needs to occur between them (e.g. “your ear” will sound like a different part of the body without the glottal in between!). CARRY ON This is where no breath or gap in between phrases is to be taken, so you end up with one legato phrase. This is usually indicated by ‘N.B.’ (i.e. no breath) on a score, or better still a slur underneath the text to indicate that the words are to all practical purposes ‘connected’. Some publishers use a dotted slur in such a way, often connecting the notes rather than the text (but this doesn’t always work, as it can look like a tie if the notes are the same pitch). SYLLABLE & WORD STRESS This is not so important in a work that they know, but can be very useful when they are singing in unfamiliar languages where the syllable and word stress is not automatic. Either a tenuto line to the corresponding note or underlining the important word/ syllable should suffice. VOWEL PLACEMENT In order to avoid the common Kiwi-English mangling of diphthongs, you may give the singers some guidance as to how you would like the vowels to sound. The easiest way with secondary school singers of limited experience is to get them to write a vowel sound that they can relate to underneath the word.

) ... (


Published Score

EXAMPLE A


Altered Score EXAMPLE B


In English, it is always surprising how many ‘ah’ vowel sounds there are in words which don’t look at all like ‘ah’ words – think “I like my house” – not an a in sight, but all of those words have a predominant ‘ah’ vowel. The other way is to get them to write in the IPA (international phonetic alphabet) symbol for the sound you want (but they will need to know what these mean first). This works particularly well for the closed and open e and o found in Italian (e versus Ɛ; o versus Ɔ). DYNAMICS This could be as simple as a forte mark, or a messa di voce, or something more subtle (e.g. “sopranos need to back off here so the alto line can be heard”). I almost always use Italian terms, as this is still the international language of music instructions. ‘MOOD’ MARKINGS Again, use Italian where commonly standardised (e.g. agitato, tenuto, legato, staccato), or English where not as familiar (e.g. feathery, sincere, distant – Percy Grainger had a fascinating set of terms like these, which can be found all over his scores!). This should include the correct symbols for articulation. The more you use them, the more the singers will adopt them! TEMPO CHANGES I tell my students that every Italian word on the page means “watch the conductor” (but I also tell them not to write that in an ABRSM theory exam…). Therefore a pair of spectacles on the music at that point might be a good reminder, or perhaps just the word ‘WATCH!’ or ‘CAREFUL!’ (the latter is particularly good if something unusual is about to happen in terms of pitch/rhythm). INTERVAL RELATIONSHIPS Where there are unexpected entries, the singers might draw an arrow from a previous note in their own or another part to show where that note is in relation to what is coming up (this is also really useful for getting them to listen across the choir rather than just to their own line). The next step would be to see how their note fits in with the rest of the harmony. Don’t be afraid to ask the music students in the choir “What is this chord? What inversion is it? So what is the alto note in relation to this chord? Therefore, what do the altos need to do to keep that chord in tune?” It’s the usual thing in teaching – challenge them and they often surprise you with the depth of their understanding! Therefore, if we take all these aspects and apply them to the score (and assuming they have been living under a rock and don’t know the piece), we might tell the singers to mark this, in relation to the English verse: 1. 2. 3.

All parts, bar 1: mezzo-forte; clear beat 4 by a quaver. All parts, bar 2: carry on between “feet” and “in”. Basses, bar 3: make sure the octave leap is part of the line and not ‘sticking’ out just because it is high.

4.

All parts, bar 4: clear beat 4 by a quaver (SAT: listen for the bass movement here). 5. All parts, bars 6 and 8: clear beat 4 by a quaver. 6. All parts, bar 9: forte. 7. All parts, bar 10: carry on between “star” and “from”. 8. All parts, bar 12: clear beat 4 by a quaver (SAB: listen for the tenor movement here). 9. All parts, bar 14: arrow through the fermata (i.e. maintain strong tone, even though breath may be running out). ST: listen for the alto and bass movement here. 10. All parts, bar 15: fortissimo; ritenuto on the last two beats of this bar to the end. 11. All parts, bar 16: reminder that the word is “ZEA-land” (not “zea-LAND”, even though that’s what the music will lead you to do!).

Assuming they all mark this correctly, and the singers add their own as necessary, the score of a soprano might look like Example B (left). These are just the basic ones – there could well be more that are added as you go along. You will notice that these directions are essentially there to create ‘ensemble’ and lyrical sense, rather than anything specifically ‘musical’ as such. However, that would be the next step of the process – making something musically meaningful out of the ‘tool’ that is the notated score. By the way, don’t feel like you’re being too pedantic about insisting that they apply all the score changes – it’s rather pointless if they don’t! Get them to mark the score lots! I tell mine that it is better to feel a little stupid and mark the score now, than make a mistake later and prove it beyond doubt… Finally, you may wonder why I insist on a 2B pencil and not the much more common HB, which I can’t bear even seeing in a rehearsal. The reason for this is that softer B pencils (as opposed to harder H pencils) are darker and therefore you don’t need to press as hard in order to write legibly. Since markings on choral scores are interpretive rather than permanent, they should, in principle, be erased before the score is handed in, so a 2B pencil makes this job much easier. It’s an old joke in my rehearsals, but “2B or not 2B: that is the question…” © 2014, Schoir Ltd. David Squire is music director of the New Zealand Youth Choir as well as several Auckland secondary school choirs and an orchestra. Formerly a HOD music, he is now a freelance itinerant teacher based at Westlake Girls & Boys High Schools, Kristin School, Long Bay College and Orewa College. A conducting mentor for the New Zealand Choral Federation Association of Choral Directors, he is available nationwide for choir workshops and conductor training. Contact him at schoirltd@gmail.com or check out his website: www.davidsquire.co.nz

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RANDOM NOTES // TERM 2 2014

KBB CITATION PRESENTATION KBB Music Citation for John Elmsly The Composers Association of New Zealand held their “Composing Now” conference at the University of Auckland over the weekend April 12-13, at which many composers shared their thoughts and approaches to composing, to new music, and to contemporary practice, and the Karlheinz Company presented a richly diverse concert of music by living NZ composers, all of whom were present. In the final gathering at the conference’s conclusion, CANZ celebrated its 40th birthday, and there were presentations of awards to Chris Gendall (CANZ Trust Fund Award) and to John Elmsly (KBB/CANZ Citation for Services to New Zealand Music). KBB’s General Manager Andrew Chamberlain and CANZ President Glenda Keam presented the KBB/CANZ Citation to John, and Eve de Castro-Robinson spoke of the many ways in which John has contributed to the contemporary composition scene in Auckland and New Zealand particularly through the thirty years that he has been teaching and leading at the University. John’s earlier musical training included piano lessons and composition in Wellington, and he graduated from Victoria University of Wellington in both mathematics and music. His composition teachers there included David Farquhar and Douglas Lilburn, who introduced him to electronic music. In the late 1970s he studied in Belgium with such luminaries as Henri Pousseur and Frederic Rzewski, winning prizes and having new electronic works broadcast by the National Radio of Belgium. He was Mozart Fellow at the University of Otago in Dunedin in 1981, spent the following two years teaching music in London, and in 1984 he was appointed lecturer in composition at the School of Music at the University of Auckland. Since 1984 John has continued to mentor and guide student composers attending the University, where he is now Associate Professor, Director of the Karlheinz Company, Director of the Electronic Music Studios and Head of Composition. He also spent many years serving on the committee of the Composers Association, of which he

16

www.kbbmusic.co.nz

was President for three years and a committee member for many more, and has frequently been a mentor at the Nelson Composers Workshop held by CANZ each July. John has been closely and actively aligned with the Asian Composers League, of which CANZ is a member, and he has maintained a significant profile as a composer and teacher of both electroacoustic and instrumental composition throughout the past three decades while based in Auckland. His work ‘Gestauqua’ for brass quintet and tape was the NZ representative work at the International Rostrum of Composers held in Paris in 1990, and he won the Philip Neill Memorial Prize (University of Otago) in 1992. Through his networks with the composers of the AsiaPacific region, John has brought music to NZ from many nations, which he has shared through performances with the Karlheinz Company and on Radio NZ National, and he has taken our music to many other countries in the region. CANZ is thrilled that KBB Music continues to recognise and support this Citation each year, providing the opportunity for us to say ‘thank you’ to the individuals and organisations that keep our new music-making thriving and vibrant.

Andrew Chamberlain presents John Elmsly with the 2014 KBB CANZ Citation for Services to NZ Music.


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MENZA Professional Development Day Back by Popular Demand Back by popular demand, the MENZA Board, with support from KBB is pleased to be presenting its third national Professional Development Day on Friday 16 May. This year workshops will be held in Auckland, Hamilton, Hawkes Bay, Wellington, Nelson, Christchurch, Dunedin and Invercargill. Please note Invercargill will be running its PD Day on Saturday 10 May. This day provides a great opportunity for both specialist and generalist teachers to experience some quality professional development where there will be new ideas and new resources that will have practical application for music educators in early childhood centres, primary and secondary schools. Each centre has a different programme of workshops using local presenters-some will be held over half a day, some over

the full day so check out your region’s page on the MENZA website (www.menza.co.nz) to see what is being offered. The MENZA PD Days also provide a great opportunity for teachers to network with others, share ideas and discuss issues relevant to their sector. It’s easy to register and the cost of these workshops is very reasonable. There is a great opportunity for teachers who are not yet members to pay the full price and get free MENZA membership. So check out the website to see what’s happening in your region and get your registration in. It will be a great day with lots of valuable music learning guaranteed.

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20


N O I T N E T AT S R E H C A TE

HOOK, LINE AND SING-A-LONG

30 MAY 2014

12 NOON

Singing brings people together – and on May 30th, schools from all over New Zealand will be singing songs that our youth have written about our corner of the world. This year our theme song is “Islands,” co-written by Maxine Vaihu (St Mary’s College), Julia Tu’unga (Auckland Girls Grammar) and Meleseini Puletau (Selwyn College) all formerly of St Pius X Primary, Glen Innes. Music Education New Zealand Aotearoa (MENZA), along with the New Zealand Music Commission, invite you to come together with the rest of the country to sing! Bring music into your classrooms and communities by making music together on May 30th with your own special event. Register your school’s event on the website, hooklineandsingalong.com so we can hear of your plans. This year we are also offering a signed version of the winning song which would be a great resource for NZ Sign Language week (12-18 May) and a really valuable webinar presented by Maria Winder working with children at East Tamaki School demonstrating the teaching of the song. All the resources you need to teach and perform this song are available on the MENZA website www.menza.co.nz A great song written by our young songwriters-let’s join together to sing it on May 30th. Celia Stewart - Chairperson, Music Education New Zealand Aotearoa


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Random Notes - Term 2, 2014  

Inspiration, Information & Resources for Music Teachers

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