Focus magazine number 69, April 2020

Page 1

April 2020 | Issue 69

WWII 75 Years Kākāriki - New Zealand Parakeets Te Riu-a-Māui - Zealandia Native Daphne Moths


Contents Diurnal delights............................................................................... 3 Bird watchers................................................................................4-5 Recent stamp issues...................................................................6-7 New Zealand’s World War Two................................................8-9 Staff profile: Lynette Townsend................................................. 10 Upcoming stamp issues.............................................................. 11 Latest stamps from Niue & Tokelau........................................ 12 Upcoming stamps from Niue & Tokelau................................ 13 Recent coin issues.................................................................. 14-15 The New Zealand continent....................................................... 16 International stamps.............................................................. 17-19

Cover image: WWII 75 Years: Peace celebration in Wellington, August 1945 Focus is produced by New Zealand Post's Stamps and Coins team and brings you news and background information on stamps, coins and other products. To subscribe to Focus and join the New Zealand Post mailing list, please tick the appropriate box when you complete the order form in this issue, or contact the Collectables and Solutions Centre: FreePost No.1 New Zealand Post Collectables and Solutions Centre Private Bag 3001 Whanganui 4541 New Zealand Ph: +64 6 349 1234 You can find out more about our stamps, coins and other products and order online at: nzpost.co.nz/stamps nzcoins.co.nz nzpost.co.nz/personalisedstamps

I write this, of course, during a time of acute uncertainty. At New Zealand Post, the Stamps and Coins team is in the business of exploring national identities - whether through commemorations of past events, celebrations of present achievements, or highlighting our natural treasures. As New Zealand lives differently for a while during the COVID-19 pandemic and observes its shocking impacts on many parts of the world, we are certain to remember this as an extraordinary part of our history. The impacts of travel restrictions imposed by New Zealand in the past few weeks were felt immediately by the philatelic community after its effect on the NZ2020 FIAP International Stamp Exhibition. After international participants were prevented from attending only one week prior, further announcements had exponential effects on the weekend’s proceedings. After the years of effort put in by the organising committee, I was truly sorry to see the show so significantly impeded. At New Zealand Post safety comes first, and I was pleased to see the organisers take all necessary precautions in the face of real disappointment. In February, we were proud to celebrate some of New Zealand’s little-known day-flying moths. Various species can be found all over the country, from the coastline to the highest peaks. See if you can spot one the next time you venture outside, if only to your garden. In March, we took a look at some more winged animals - our native parakeets. These beautiful, green forest birds are at risk, but a population in Wellington is flourishing thanks to one brilliant organisation’s effort to control pests. The issue scheduled for April commemorates the 75th anniversary of the end of the Second World War. New Zealanders endured six years of hardship, and I don’t think it could be timelier than now to reflect on our national sense of resilience. The stamps explore elements of the war through historical photographs, and historian Steven Loveridge delves into these themes in a miniature sheet booklet. This issue will be available for purchase as soon as possible - at the time of publication, this date is to be determined. In the coin space, we recently commemorated a discovery a century in the making with a sell-out set of silver proof coins. Geologists are advocating for the acknowledgement of Te Riu-a-Māui/Zealandia. This sunken land mass incorporates the islands of New Zealand and New Caledonia into what could become recognised as the eighth continent of the world. Finally, we are delighted to welcome our newest team member, Lynette Townsend. Our new Programme and Content Manager is passionate about New Zealand history. I hope you enjoy this issue of Focus. Meanwhile, be safe, stay in touch with loved ones, and take care.

From here you can also subscribe to our email updates on the latest stamp, coin and other products on offer from New Zealand Post. You can also view a list of all philatelic clubs and societies and their contact details.

Antony Harris Head of Stamps and Coins

This issue of Focus has been printed on Neo Satin paper from B&F Papers. B&F Papers is committed to being an environmentally responsible company with Forest Stewardship Council® and Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification.

The finished products may differ from those illustrated in this newsletter.

Focus may not illustrate all stamp, coin and collectable products that are featured in this issue or that appear in the order form.

Artwork and articles from Focus may not be extracted for reprinting without prior permission from New Zealand Post's Stamps and Collectables Business. For more information and to request permission, please contact the Design Co-ordinator, Stamps and Collectables Business, Private Bag 39990, Wellington Mail Centre, Lower Hutt 5045.

ISSN 1177-729X (Print) ISSN 2703-4569 (Online) 2

Kia ora, welcome!

Please note:

nzpost.co.nz/stamps


There are an estimated 2,000 insect species categorised as moths or butterflies in New Zealand. Of these species, over 90 per cent are unique to our country, including the 35 daphne moths in the genus Notoreas.

Focus issue 69 - April 2020

Diurnal delights Butterflies and moths both belong to a group of insects called Lepidoptera. Many people will be familiar with their lifecycles - adults lay their eggs on plants or other surfaces, larvae hatch from the eggs, and the larvae grow and metamorphose from pupae into adults. Most adults live no longer than a week, and spend those days focused on reproduction. During this time they play a role in their surrounding ecosystem, transferring pollen from plant to plant as they feed on nectar. New Zealand’s moths and butterflies are found in all habitats across the country, increasing in prevalence in the southern regions, where their preferred open habitats are more plentiful. A common moth myth is that they are solely nocturnal - there are many exceptions, including New Zealand’s daphne moths. These colourful, day-flying species have wingspans 18 to 26 millimetres, characterised by their constantly vibrating, neatly patterned wings when they are active on sunny days. They are often seen sunbathing on bare surfaces, feeding on nectar and carefully laying their eggs on the right plant during periods of bright sunshine. Of the 35 daphne moth species, 20 have been formally described and named, including three new species described in recent years. An active research programme is classifying the other possible new species, and it is inevitable that further species will be discovered given New Zealand’s, particularly the South Island’s, wealth of potential habitat – from its long and varied coastline to the multitude of alpine areas with different geological histories. Daphne moths are excellent botanists. Their caterpillars feed on the foliage of just one family of plant, which includes the two New Zealand genera of daphne – Pimelea and Kelleria – while the adults take nectar from the sweet-smelling flowers of their hostplants. Together with their daphne hostplants, they are often numerous in naturally open habitats, from the coastline – sand dunes, gravel beaches and rocky headlands – to inland short-tussock grasslands and a range of open habitats above the treeline, such as alpine grassland, herbfields, cushionfields and snowbanks. With a few species found as high as 2,000 metres above sea level, daphne moths really do define New Zealand’s dynamic topography, coastline and geological features, and epitomise our picturesque and varied landscapes. Nine of the daphne moths are threatened with extinction and are listed as such by the Department of Conservation. Several of the daphne moth species threatened with extinction are the subject of Department of Conservation programmes and active management. Native Daphne Moths stamps and collectables were issued on 5 February 2020. Stamps, miniature sheets and presentation packs are available for order now.

3


Bird watchers Charged with the extraordinary goal of restoring a Wellington valley to its pre-human state, Zealandia – Te Māra a Tāne is the world’s first fully fenced ecosanctuary. In the past 20 years it has become home to numerous species of New Zealand’s native birds, including the small green parakeets known as kākāriki. Ellen Irwin is Lead Ranger Conservation at Zealandia, and is passionate about her work on this ambitious conservation project and how it supports Wellington’s bird (manu) populations to thrive. What’s involved with your work at the ecosanctuary? Zealandia’s vision is to restore the sanctuary to as close to pre-human condition as is now possible. This involves two main components: the removal of pests and reintroduction of native flora and fauna, including returning threatened species to the mainland. Those on the Conservation team spend much of our time monitoring the native species in the sanctuary and working to ensure the valley remains free of mammalian predators. This means that every day is different – I could be monitoring kākāriki nest boxes, checking a trap line and doing some data analysis on the computer all in the same day! Tell us about the kākāriki at Zealandia. Kākāriki were introduced to Zealandia in 2010 and since then have flourished – the birds can be seen, or more often heard, all over the valley. To help monitor the population, we have nearly 100 nest boxes throughout the valley that we check regularly during breeding season. Unlike many other birds in Zealandia, kākāriki have an incredibly long breeding season, sometimes stretching from August to May or even June. During that time, they can have up to three nests of around four to six chicks each! Excitingly, kākāriki are now spreading out from Zealandia into many Wellington suburbs, such as Karori and Wilton and even Khandallah. They are very vulnerable to predation because they often feed on the ground, and they nest in cavities where there are no escape routes should predators enter the nest. Thankfully, there are many organisations and groups doing amazing trapping work around Wellington, making the suburbs safer for native manu like kākāriki. What makes New Zealand’s birdlife special? New Zealand’s birdlife is incredibly special and unique - for one, many of our manu are endemic, which means they are found nowhere else in the world! A big part of what makes the birds here so remarkable is that they evolved without mammalian predators, which means that many of them have unusual adaptations. For example the kiwi, which is flightless and nocturnal, and freezes when it encounters threats, is camouflaged from predators hunting it from the air. Unfortunately, many of these adaptations also mean that our species are very vulnerable to predation by introduced mammals like rats and stoats.

What impacts has Zealandia had on Wellington’s bird populations? Zealandia has brought back bird species that had been extinct from the Wellington region, sometimes for more than 100 years. In addition, Zealandia has provided a safe haven for birds that were present prior to the sanctuary (e.g. tūī and kererū) in lower numbers. Because of both Zealandia and the incredible restoration efforts of many groups and organisations in the region, Wellington is one of the few cities in the world with increasing biodiversity! How can Kiwis and visitors help to protect New Zealand’s native animals? Kiwis can make their backyard safe havens for native species by trapping mammalian predators and planting native plant and tree species in their gardens to provide food and shelter for birds, lizards, and insects. They can also join local conservation groups – there are so many groups all over New Zealand doing amazing restoration work! Everyone can help protect New Zealand’s flora and fauna, whether you live here or are visiting, by taking care of the environment - e.g. not littering, leaving no trace in parks and reserves, and respecting the wildlife’s space. If there were one thing you’d like people to take away from a visit to a place like Zealandia, what would it be? Zealandia is a project that is community inspired and driven, and it has had a huge impact on Wellington’s biodiversity. I hope people come away feeling inspired and empowered to think about the kind of positive change they can make in their own communities, and shoot for the Moon. Kākāriki - New Zealand Parakeets stamps and collectables were issued on 4 March 2020 and are available for order now.

Image: Red-crowned parakeet 4

nzpost.co.nz/stamps


Focus issue 69 - April 2020

$1.30 Yellow-crowned parakeet By feeding mainly on invertebrates, flowers and seeds in the canopy of beech and podocarp forests, and by nesting high up in trees, Cyanoramphus auriceps have been more resistant to the threat of mammalian predators than other species. $1.30 Orange-fronted parakeet Because they feed on invertebrates, flowers and seeds in the lower levels of the forest, Cyanoramphus malherbi are very vulnerable to predators, so remain one of New Zealand’s most threatened birds.

$2.60 Red-crowned parakeet Cyanoramphus novaezelandiae have largely disappeared from the New Zealand mainland, but flourish on many islands from the subtropical Kermadec Islands to the subantarctic Auckland Islands, and many offshore islands of Aotearoa. $3.30 Forbes’ parakeet In the distant past, the ancestors of yellow-crowned parakeets reached the Chatham Islands, and slowly changed sufficiently to be recognised as a distinct species, Cyanoramphus forbesi.

$4.00 Antipodes Island parakeet Although they can fly, Cyanoramphus unicolor prefer to walk and climb through vegetation. Unusually, they feed on fat from seabird carcasses, on broken eggs, and can occasionally kill small seabirds.

5


Recent stamp issues Christmas 2019

Featuring native New Zealand flora and fauna alongside the traditional Nativity story, these stamps include illustrations of New Zealand native fern fronds and koru, pōhutukawa, harakeke, tī kouka and karaka. A beautiful kererū, or New Zealand wood pigeon, makes an appearance on the miniature sheet and first day cover. These stamps were issued in both gummed and self-adhesive formats. Date of issue: 6 November 2019 Designer: Donna McKenna, Wellington, New Zealand Printer: Southern Colour Print by offset lithography Withdrawal date: 5 November 2020

Royal Visit 2019

On 17 November 2019, Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales and heir to the throne of New Zealand, began a six-day tour of Aotearoa with his wife, Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall. A stamp sheet that included seven images of key moments from the early days of the tour, and was made available while the couple was still in New Zealand. Date of issue: 22 November 2019 Designer: Hannah Fortune, New Zealand Post, Wellington, New Zealand Printer: Collectables and Solutions Centre, New Zealand Post, Whanganui, New Zealand Withdrawal date: 21 November 2020

2020 Year of the Rat In 2020, the Chinese New Year was celebrated on 25 January, bringing in the Year of the Rat. The Chinese zodiac is a repeating cycle of 12 years, with each year being represented by an animal sign. The rat ranks first in the zodiac, preceding the cow, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, sheep, monkey, rooster, dog and pig. Date of issue: 4 December 2019 Designer: Asiaworks, Auckland, New Zealand Printer: Australia Post Withdrawal date: 3 December 2020

Native Daphne Moths From the coast to the highest mountains, and from Stewart Island in the south to the Far North, Aotearoa New Zealand is home to 35 recognised species of daphne moth in the genus Notoreas, all with discrete distributions within New Zealand. Date of issue: 5 February 2020 Designer: Stephen Fuller, Wellington, New Zealand Printer: Southern Colour Print by offset lithography Withdrawal date: 4 February 2021

6

nzpost.co.nz/stamps


Kākāriki are small, moss-green-coloured parrots with a few blue flight feathers and long tails. Each species is diagnostically different, often with bright red or yellow feathering on the forehead and crown, near the eye and on the side of the rump. Like the majority of New Zealand’s native birds, they are threatened by introduced mammalian predators.

Focus issue 69 - April 2020

Kākāriki - New Zealand Parakeets

Date of issue: 4 March 2020 Designer: Tim Garman, Whanganui, New Zealand Printer: Southern Colour Print by offset lithography Withdrawal date: 3 March 2021

NZ2020 FIAP International Stamp Exhibition New Zealand Post created four unique miniature sheets for this event, along with a range of special products available exclusively at the exhibition. Scheduled to take place on 19-22 March, the event was unable to welcome international participants due to border restrictions put in place in response to COVID-19. Further restrictions rolled out during the week reduced the number of visitors, and the final two days were cut short as the government announced sweeping measures to reduce contact between people in New Zealand. Date of issue: 19-22 March 2020 Designer: Alan Hollows, New Zealand Post, Wellington, New Zealand Printer: Southern Colour Print by offset lithography Withdrawal date: 18-21 March 2021

WWII 75 Years

World War Two spanned nearly six years, and during that time New Zealanders lived through immense hardship, suffering and change. Through these challenging years they connected, worked together, rallied as citizens and solved problems both abroad on the battlefields and on home soil. During the war advancements in medicine, trade and manufacturing occurred worldwide - changes that we still benefit from today. The year 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the end of World War Two. Date of issue: 1 April 2020 Designer: Nicky Dyer, Wellington, New Zealand Printer: Southern Colour Print by offset lithography Withdrawal date: 31 March 2021

7


New Zealand’s World War Two The year 2020 marks the 75th anniversary of the end of World War Two. A cataclysmic event, the war was fought out in territories, seas, and skies across the face of the Earth and touched most of humanity. Notably, it would prove to be the most lethal conflict ever waged, killing some 70 million. The war spanned nearly six years, and during that time New Zealanders lived through immense hardship, suffering and change. Through these challenging years they connected, worked together, rallied as citizens and solved problems both abroad on the battlefields and on home soil. With this stamp issue, New Zealand Post reflects on the war years through 15 key themes and events. Each stamp provides a window into the past and a glimpse of the lives of the New Zealanders who endured World War Two.

8

nzpost.co.nz/stamps


$1.30 American servicemen in Wellington American servicemen with New Zealand women at Oriental Bay, Wellington, c. 1942.

$1.30 HMS Achilles In Auckland, crowds turned out to welcome HMS Achilles, returning to New Zealand after the Battle of the River Plate.

$1.30 Merchant Marine Merchant seamen pose on the Union Steam Ship Company’s Kaiwarra in Auckland, December 1940, while loading Royal New Zealand Air Force planes for delivery to Fiji.

$1.30 Fighter pilots New Zealand fighter pilots beside a Supermarine Spitfire in England, 15 July 1942. A single-seat fighter, the Spitfire established a formidable record during the Battle of Britain. It remains an iconic aircraft. $1.30 Retreat from Crete An injured soldier assisted off a ship in Alexandria, Egypt, after the evacuation from Crete.

$1.30 Bomber Command Members of 75 (NZ) Squadron at RAF Feltwell, England. They are passing a Wellington (Mk I), a four-crew, medium bomber that served as one of Bomber Command’s principal bombers in the early years of the war. $1.30 Air raid drill in Auckland Pupils and teachers at Devonport School entering air raid shelters during a drill, April 1942.

$1.30 28th (Māori) Battalion Members of the 28th (Māori) Battalion driving through the Italian town of Sora, 3 June 1944. They are (from left): Kiwi Cribb, David McClutchie, Whiwhi Winiata, Repoma Thompson and Dick Huata.

$1.30 Home Guard Members of the Home Guard training in Waikato. Lacking uniforms, they have been issued with identifying armbands.

$1.30 Women’s War Service Auxillary Women from the Auxiliary Army Corp worked on a wide range of war-critical jobs as part of the defence effort at home.

$1.30 Monte Cassino Gordon Reid of the 4th Armoured Brigade in the ruins of Cassino, 18 May 1944. He is operating communication equipment and sits beside a Sherman tank.

$1.30 Railway Construction in Africa Men of the New Zealand Railway Construction Company laying track to be used to supply British forces in the North African desert, c. October 1941.

$1.30 Peace Celebration in Wellington A Wellington crowd on VJ (Victory over Japan) Day, 15 August 1945, celebrating the end of the war.

$1.30 At rest in the Pacific Members of the 3rd Division at ease at Vella Lavella, located in the Solomon Islands, c. 1944.

WWII 75 Years stamps were scheduled to issue on 1 April. Due to the COVID-19 lockdown, at the time of publication the deferred release date was to be determined. A silver proof coin is scheduled to be issued in May.

Focus issue 69 - April 2020

$1.30 Mobilising the nation A soldier is met by a group of children in Wellington after his return from the Middle East on a hospital ship.

9


Staff profile: Lynette Townsend Lynette joined the Stamps and Coins team in late 2019, bringing with her a wealth of experience in and enthusiasm for history and curation. What is your professional background? I have worked as a historian and history curator for the past 20 years. After studying cultural anthropology and New Zealand history, I became interested in working in the museum sector, and did an MA in museum and heritage studies. A key focus of my work was telling cultural and historical stories through objects and images in museums. I worked for many years at Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa, curating exhibitions and building the history collection. My next position was at the Ministry for Culture and Heritage where I was a historian developing audio-visual content. A common thread throughout my work has been a passion for telling historical New Zealand stories, especially those lesser-known and invisible ones. It’s something I would like to continue to do in the development of collectable stamps and coins, alongside celebrating some of our major much-loved and well-known events and people of course. What areas of New Zealand’s history have interested you in your career? I’ve had a long-standing interest in exploring background invisible histories. My MA thesis and many of my publications have focused on the history of New Zealand childhood, and I’ve done a lot of work focusing on different New Zealand cultural communities and LGBTIQ+ histories, as well as women’s history. A key project while at the Ministry for Culture and Heritage was Suffrage 125. As part of the research and publishing team, I created an online exhibition for the NZHistory website named Women, the Vote and Activism. Here I juxtaposed historical stories about women’s suffrage and 1970s’ women’s liberation, with women activists today – telling their stories through videos. What challenges are there in putting together the New Zealand Post stamps and coins programme?

collecting stamps and coins, also that there is an opportunity to reach new people. I’m excited about working with all our stakeholders, community groups, designers and artists. I’m a real people person and happiest when working collaboratively with creative, passionate people.

I greatly enjoy working with the New Zealand Post team who have heaps and heaps of ideas for stamps and coins. I also get lots of great ideas from the community, organisations and groups throughout New Zealand. One of the biggest challenges I face is navigating a plethera of great ideas – knowing we can’t develop them all.

What have you learned about the philatelic and numismatic worlds?

I’m really enjoying the challenge of curating the programme and thematically grouping our work into streams that we will grow and develop each year. These themes include a body of work that focuses on the environment and endangered animals, Māori stories, historical events, artists and a new strand that explores diverse cultural experiences in New Zealand, for example Diwali.

I’m really keen to hear people’s ideas for stamp and coin releases and create a programme that has a little something for everyone. I would like the programme to excite and satisfy our long-standing loyal collectors and perhaps add a little something new and unexpected as well.

What excites you about managing the programme?

I love a good dinner party with dear friends, so they would need to be there with me. But if I could invite anyone else it would be Ricky Gervais for his humour and provocative conversation, the Dalai Lama for his spiritual leadership and Nina Simone – I absolutely love her voice.

It’s a wonderful opportunity to reflect on who and what it is that makes up New Zealand today, and then present it in a tiny format that’s completely new to me. I’m so excited about the fact that our products reach so many people, those already 10

Photo by Zoe Rae

I’ve met a few collectors and can see that they are an extremely passionate group. I would very much like to meet more and hope to get along to some of the exhibitions and clubs as soon as I can.

Who are your ultimate dinner party guests?

nzpost.co.nz/stamps


2020 Scenic Definitives - Issue date: 3 June 2020 In 2020 a $4.00 stamp will be issued to accommodate an increase in the price of domestic oversized letters. This year’s Scenic Definitives issue also includes a new $10 stamp.

Focus issue 69 - April 2020

Upcoming stamp issues $4.00 Island Bay, Wellington - Island Bay sits on the south coast of Wellington, New Zealand’s capital city. Since the creation of the 854-hectare Taputeranga Marine Reserve in 2006, local marine life populations have blossomed. The bay’s sheltered island, Tapu Te Ranga Motu, was once a battle refuge for Māori. The area later became populated by European fishing communities. On clear days, the South Island’s Kaikōura Ranges are visible from parts of the coast. $10.00 Aoraki Mount Cook - Te Waka-o-Aoraki is an early name for the South Island of New Zealand. According to local legend, the island is an overturned canoe and the rugged peaks of the Southern Alps are Aoraki and his three brothers, turned to stone by the south wind. Aoraki Mount Cook, New Zealand’s highest mountain, was the training ground of Mount Everest pioneer Sir Edmund Hillary. Its 19 peaks offer some of the best mountaineering landscapes in New Zealand, and the entire park offers a base for accessible alpine activities. Date of issue: 3 June 2020 Designer: New Zealand Post, Wellington, New Zealand Printer: Southern Colour Print, Dunedin

Ngā Hau e Whā - The Four Winds - Issue date: 3 June 2020 Each year, for Matariki, New Zealand Post produces a set of collectable items, representative of a significant Māori art form, story, myth or legend. Matariki 2020 will focus on ‘Ngā Hau e Whā’, the Four Winds. This is a Māori concept underpinned by an ideology of embracing and protecting people from all four corners of the earth. It’s about people coming together and unification something that occurs during Matariki when people unite to celebrate the New Year and spend time with family and loved ones. Date of issue: 3 June 2020 Designer: Dave Burke, Tauranga, New Zealand Printer: Southern Colour Print, Dunedin

11


Latest stamps from Niue & Tokelau Niue Queen Victoria 200 Years

This set of stamps celebrates the 200th anniversary of the birth of Niue’s first British monarch, Queen Victoria. Featuring four portraits from through her life, the stamps are decorated with roses and hibiscus flowers. Date of issue: 16 October 2019 Designer: Hannah Fortune, New Zealand Post, Wellington, New Zealand Printer: Collectables and Solutions Centre, New Zealand Post, Whanganui, New Zealand Withdrawal date: 15 October 2020

Niue Christmas 2019

Christianity is a key element of life for Niueans, and locals celebrate Christmas just as those in many other countries do – by spending time with loved ones, sharing food and gifts, and reflecting on the traditional Christmas story. In the Christmas 2019 stamp issue for Niue, the Nativity scene was created out of paper and coloured pencils. Date of issue: 4 December 2019 Designer: Hannah Fortune, New Zealand Post, Wellington, New Zealand Printer: Collectables and Solutions Centre, New Zealand Post, Whanganui, New Zealand Withdrawal date: 3 December 2020

Tokelau Queen Victoria 200 Years

This set of stamps celebrates the 200th anniversary of the birth of Tokelau’s first British monarch, Queen Victoria. The stamps feature four black-and-white images of the Queen through the years. Date of issue: 16 October 2019 Designer: Saint Andrew Matautia, New Zealand Post, Wellington, New Zealand Printer: Collectables and Solutions Centre, New Zealand Post, Whanganui, New Zealand Withdrawal date: 15 October 2020

Tokelau Christmas 2019

As the majority of Tokelau’s inhabitants are practising Christians, Christmas is an essential festival on the atolls. This element of Tokelauan culture is reflected in its national badge – a tuluma (fishing box) that bears a white cross, and an inscription that reads ‘Tokelau mo te Atua’ (Tokelau for God). Tokelau’s 2019 Christmas issue features tuluma in their various forms, embellished with a whimsical Christmas sparkle. Date of issue: 4 December 2019 Designer: Hannah Fortune, New Zealand Post, Wellington, New Zealand Printer: Collectables and Solutions Centre, New Zealand Post, Whanganui, New Zealand Withdrawal date: 3 December 2020 12

nzpost.co.nz/stamps


Niuean Weaving

Focus issue 69 - April 2020

Upcoming stamps from Niue & Tokelau Weaving intricately crafted objects is a skill that has been passed down for centuries by Niuean women. Each object becomes a unique treasure created through a combination of materials, techniques and the singular skills of the weaver. This stamp issue highlights the ingenuity and artistry of Niuean women weavers by focusing on the beautiful detail of four objects, providing a glimpse into the rich variety of items created through weaving. These special objects are housed at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.

Tokelauan Weaving

Weaving is an art practice that has existed for centuries in Tokelau. Woven items range from everyday functional items to those created for special occasions. Popular items include baskets, hats, fans and fine mats. Each type of woven object can take many forms, or incorporate different techniques and materials. These stamps highlight the artistry and skill of Tokelauan women weavers by focusing on the beautiful detail of four objects from the collection at the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.

Lunar prize draw Congratulations to the winners of our 2020 Chinese New Year prize draw for one of three 2020 Year of the Rat limited-edition, gold-plated medallions: Mr D Grant Mr N Yu Edward Pogorzelski Winners were selected at random from those who purchased the Lunar Series 12 Year Miniature Sheet Pack between 18 January and 1 February. 13


Recent coin issues 2020 Kiwi Before human settlement of New Zealand, rowi were widespread throughout the northern South Island and into the southern North Island, as far north as Hawkes Bay. There is now only one natural population of about 600 rowi, which resides in Ōkārito forest and surrounds in the South Island. The koru on the coin represent the five kiwi species found in Aotearoa. Date of issue: August 2019 Designer: Andrew Matautia, New Zealand Post, Wellington, New Zealand Mint: BH Mayer’s Kunstrpägeanstalt GmbH Worldwide mintage: ¼oz gold proof coin: 300 1oz silver proof coin with colour printing: 2,500 1oz silver specimen coin with black nickel plating: 7,500 5oz silver specimen coin with black nickel plating: 300

2019 All Blacks

In 2019 a 1oz silver specimen coin was released to celebrate New Zealand’s iconic rugby team as they stepped up to fight for their chance to take their third consecutive Rugby World Cup. The design featured kaitiaki, or guardians, protecting the legacy of the silver fern. It was 135 years since the fern first appeared on the breast of a New Zealand rugby jersey; since then, nearly 1,200 All Blacks have worn this now-famous icon. Date of issue: October 2019 Designer: Dave Burke, Tauranga, New Zealand Mint: BH Mayer’s Kunstprägeanstalt GmbH Worldwide mintage: 1,500

2020 New Zealand Annual Coin: Chatham Island Crested Penguin In 2019 an international team of researchers extracted mitochondrial DNA from subfossil bones discovered in sand dunes on the Chatham Islands. This research confirmed that until a few centuries ago a unique crested penguin species, Eudyptes warhami, existed on the Chatham Islands. Crested penguins of the genus Eudyptes are black and white with yellow crests and red bills and eyes. Date of issue: February 2020 Designer: Dave Burke, Tauranga, New Zealand Mint: BH Mayer’s Kunstprägeanstalt GmbH Worldwide mintage: 750

2020 New Zealand Proof Currency Set The 2020 New Zealand Proof Currency Set includes proof versions of New Zealand’s 10-cent, 20-cent, 50-cent, one dollar and two dollar circulating coins. These currency coins celebrate Aotearoa’s unique culture, history and landscape. This year’s set features a 1oz version of the 2020 New Zealand Annual Coin: Chatham Island Crested Penguin. Date of issue: February 2020 Annual coin designer: Dave Burke, Tauranga, New Zealand Annual coin mint: BH Mayer’s Kunstprägeanstalt GmbH Currency coin mint: Royal Dutch Mint Worldwide mintage: 750

14

nzpost.co.nz/stamps


Māui rāua ko Irawaru - Māui and the First Dog Māui is a Polynesian demi-god credited with many great feats of discovery, bravery and trickery. Various oral histories include similar stories that help us to trace cultural connections between the islands of the Pacific. In New Zealand it is told that the quick-tempered demi-god was the creator of the first dog. This coin issue is the fourth in a series depicting the feats of Māui.

Focus issue 69 - April 2020

Recent coin issues

Date of issue: February 2020 Designer: David Hakaraia, Wellington, New Zealand Mint: BH Mayer’s Kunstprägeanstalt GmbH Worldwide mintage: Set of 2 x ½oz gold proof coins: 150 Set of 2 x 1oz silver proof coins: 400

International coins Did you know New Zealand Post offers a selection of international coins? Small quantities are made available directly to our customers in this expanding product range. Keep an eye out for more coins on the website at coins.nzpost.co.nz.

15


The New Zealand continent Te Ika-a-Māui and Te Waipounamu - New Zealand’s main islands – have long been recognised for their distinctive forms. Polynesian oral histories describe a powerful demi-god catching a great fish (the North Island) from his canoe (the South Island). Captain James Cook mapped the islands of Aotearoa on his first visit in 1769-70. Unknown to many, much of New Zealand’s landmass lies hidden offshore. The geology team at GNS Science tells us more. First of all, what is the definition of a continent?

What is the meaning of the name Te Riu-a-Māui?

The standard dictionary definition of a content is ‘one of Earth’s large continuous landmasses’. But, from a geological point of view this is a narrow and incomplete way to look at continents. All of Earth’s major landmasses are surrounded by submarine continental shelves. To geologists these shelves are also parts of continents. They have the same kinds of rock and when sea levels are low during ice ages, the shelves become land.

Riu conveys a picture of a basin or hull (e.g. of a canoe) that encloses many things and holds them together. Te Riu-a-Māui literally means the entire hills, valleys and plains of Māui - the great Polynesian ancestor and explorer of the Pacific Ocean. The name was recommended by Associate Professor Mānuka Hēnare of the University of Auckland. It’s a very appropriate name for the Pacific’s continent.

Tell us about the discovery of the New Zealand continent. Te Riu-a-Māui/Zealandia was discovered progressively in more than a century of research and marine expeditions. The wide continental shelves around New Zealand and New Caledonia were shown on maps in the early 1900s. Since the 1990s, more and more continental rocks such as granite and greywacke have been sampled from submarine Te Riu-a-Māui/ Zealandia. In the past decade we have finally gathered enough evidence and confidence to draw sharp lines around Te Riu-a-Māui/Zealandia’s limits and put it on the map.

Why is it important to GNS Science that Te Riu-a-Māui/ Zealandia gains global recognition? Te Riu-a-Māui/Zealandia is five million square kilometres in area. That’s two thirds the area of Australia. Putting Earth’s eighth continent on a world map simply conveys a more accurate picture of what’s here in our corner of the planet. In terms of submarine geology, knowing there’s a continent out there is important background information for natural resources and natural hazards. A knowledge of the changing latitude, climate and land area of Te Riu-a-Māui/Zealandia provides a useful backdrop for biologists to study the origins of our native flora and fauna. It is also important for all New Zealanders to understand that they live on a continent and that the country does not end at the beach. If we want to manage our environment, at a minimum we need to understand its extent and shape. Where can people learn more about New Zealand’s geology? There are lots of books and online resources. For a start, try www.gns.cri.nz/Home/Learning and gsnz.org.nz.

Te Riu-a-Māui - Zealandia was a sold-out set of two 1oz silver proof coins issued in February 2020. It has a maximum worldwide mintage of 400 sets. 16

nzpost.co.nz/stamps


Focus issue 69 - April 2020

International stamps Hong Kong The Guangdon-Hong Kong-Macao Greater Bay Area Sheetlet Date of issue: 26 September 2019

First day cover with gummed souvenir sheetv affixed $5.10 Stamp sheetlet with one gummed stamp. $2.60

Set of four gummed stamps $4.10

First day cover with gummed sheetlet affixed $3.60

Hong Kong Hiking Trails Series No.2 MacLehose Trail First day cover with stamp sheetlet affixed. $3.60

Date of issue: 24 October 2019

Hong Kong 70th Anniversary of the Founding of the People’s Republic of China Date of issue: 1 October 2019

Stamp sheetlet with one gummed stamp $2.60

Gummed souvenir sheet $4.10

Set of ten gummed stamps. $5.20

Gummed souvenir sheet $2.40

First day cover with ten gummed stamps affixed $6.20

First day cover with four gummed stamps affixed $5.10

First day cover with gummed souvenir sheet affixed. $6.20

17


Hong Kong Old Master Q

Hong Kong Year of the Rat

Date of issue: 5 December 2019

Date of issue: 11 January 2020

Stamp sheetlet with $10 gummed stamp $2.50

Set of four gummed stamps $4.00

Stamp sheetlet with $20 gummed stamp $5.00 $10 gummed stamp sheetlet $2.50

Set of eight gummed stamps $4.00

First day cover with gummed $10 sheetlet affixed $3.50

First day cover with gummed $20 sheetlet affixed $6.00

First day cover with eight gummed stamps affixed $5.00

18

$50 gummed silk sheetlet $12.70

First day cover with four gummed stamps affixed $5.00

Prestige first day cover with four gummed stamps affixed. $6.60

Prestige first day cover with $10 stamp sheetlet affixed $5.20 nzpost.co.nz/stamps


Pitcairn Echinoderms Date of issue: 23 October 2019

Focus issue 69 - April 2020

Pitcairn Island

First day cover with $10 stamp sheetlet affixed $3.50

Prestige first day cover with $50 stamp sheetlet affixed $15.30

Set of four gummed stamps. $11.40

First day cover with $50 stamp sheetlet affixed $13.70

First day cover with four gummed stamps affixed $13.40

Hong Kong Lunar New Year Animals Pig and Rat Date of issue: 19 July 2019

Angels Over Pitcairn Date of issue: 4 December 2019

$100 gummed stamp sheetlet $25.30

Set of three gummed stamps $8.80

First day cover with $100 stamp sheetlet affixed $26.30

Prestige first day cover with $100 stamp sheetlet affixed $28.00

First day cover with three gummed stamps affixed $10.80

19


2oz silver proof coin Worldwide mintage: 750

Commemorating the 75th anniversary of the end of World War Two