Page 1

BC2816

Auckland City for Peace Toolkit A practical guide for Local Boards and communities on being a City for Peace


“The Auckland Council recognises its role of stewardship for present and future generations and hereby declares Auckland to be a City for Peace. Auckland Council is dedicated to the promotion of nuclear free zones and a culture of peace based on social, economic and environmental justice, tolerance and non-violence1.� Opening statement of the Auckland City for Peace Declaration.

1

City for Peace Declaration. Auckland Council, December 2011.


Contents Message Introduction Peace through education Peace in the family Supporting and engaging our young people Connected, inclusive communities Human rights and social justice Honouring the Treaty Respecting the environment Peace, heritage and the arts Our peace calendar Key contacts and contributors Appendix


Message


Message from the Mayor I am delighted to present to you the Auckland City for Peace Toolkit. Auckland is proud to be a ‘City for Peace’ valuing inclusion, diversity, social equity and tolerance. Being a City for Peace contributes to our aspiration of becoming the most liveable city in the world. The Auckland Council will continue to advocate for peace, make a stand against war, respect human rights, preserve justice and promote safety in the community. I have also committed to be a ‘Mayor for Peace’ to reinforce our dedication to the principles of peace. Someone who is a great inspiration to me, Mahatma Gandhi, said you must be the change you wish to see in the world. This is a resource that gives Aucklanders the tools to do just that. It embodies Auckland’s vision as a city for peace. It illustrates the positive initiatives undertaken by peace champions, then localises them so communities can celebrate and experience the ideals of peace at grassroots level. This toolkit provides an easy to understand menu of creative and meaningful activities that different groups and sectors can do throughout the year. The peace toolkit would not exist without the perseverance and leadership of the Peace Foundation and the Auckland Peace City Committee. Thank you for your unrelenting passion and for bringing stakeholders together to make this happen. Auckland Council looks forward to working with all parties to undertake the initiatives included in the toolkit so we can build a peaceful, secure and safe Auckland.

Nga mihi. Len Brown Mayor of Auckland


Message from the Peace Foundation The publication of the Auckland City for Peace Toolkit: A practical guide for Local Boards and

Brown’s commitment to recognising its role of stewardship for present and future generations and its promotion of a culture of peace based on social, economic and environmental justice, tolerance and non-violence. The Peace Foundation is pleased to partner with Auckland Council for this publication. It is a practical and relevant resource on peace initiatives offered by a broad range of individuals and organisations. It is intended as a living resource that Local Boards can continue to develop by engaging their communities.

Our gratitude is expressed for the work of Claire Speedy for the great effort in researching and writing this publication. We acknowledge the contributions of the Auckland Peace City Committee and the many participants in the consultation process that have offered ideas to make the publication a rich resource. Special thanks to Yvonne Duncan and Caroline Ongleo for following up on the gaps, and liaison with Auckland Council. Our appreciation to our Auckland Council counterparts Joel Umali and Jan Zeigler-Peri for the persistence in making this publication and the partnership possible. We also thank Lee Major and Merran Spath for their contribution to make this toolkit a reality.

John Hinchcliff, MA(Hons), PhD, HonD, CNZM President The Peace Foundation


Introduction


1

Refer: http://www.peacefoundation.org.nz/index.php?pageID=73 Refer: http://www.voxy.co.nz/national/council-declares-north-shore-city-peace-city/5/31161 and http://theflea.co.nz/index.php/2009/11/25/council-declares-north-shore-a-peace-city 2


o

o


o


Peace through education From the City for Peace Declaration:

promotion of a culture of peace, justice and non-violence through education Actively delivering programmes and supporting education for the development of peace, inter-cultural

Responding to the recommendation in the 2002 United Nations Study on Disarmament and NonProliferation Education that ‘municipal leaders working with citizen groups are encouraged to establish peace cities’, thus supporting New Zealand’s role in the international community to actively pursue the abolition of nuclear weapons.


Peace in the family From the City for Peace Declaration: Acknowledging that peace is created through the thoughts, actions and policies of individuals, families,

Committed to protecting and enhancing the safety, security and wellbeing of all people both present and future – living in and visiting Auckland.


Supporting and engaging our young people From the City for Peace Declaration: Committed to protecting and enhancing the safety, security and wellbeing of all people- both present and future – living in and visiting Auckland Acknowledging that peace is created through the thoughts, actions and policies of individuals, families,


Aucklanders and young Aucklanders share what peace means to them and their community The following are views of the public who participated in the "Peace Flower Decorating Growing a Peace Tree Initiative" held on 9 June 2012 at Aotea Square. “Give a voice to the children and think about what you (Auckland) want to leave the next generation.” “A peace city is a place with opportunities, where you’re not worried. Community is a very peaceful place with families and friends around, kids playing, pets playing with children and food, water available at any time.” “Auckland being a peace city is a great start for peace. Give the children a chance to say what they want! Peace.”

Highlighted initiatives Paper peace crane activity Japanese paper cranes have become a well known symbol of the movement for a world without nuclear weapons. Every year thousands of students across the globe fold paper cranes to honour the children who died in the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. Based on a Japanese legend, whoever folds 1000 cranes will be granted a wish. Origami paper peace cranes can be made at schools and libraries. As an initial activity, teachers or library staff can read the story of Sadako, a victim of the Hiroshima bomb who started to make paper cranes but didn’t reach her target of 1000 cranes as she died from radiation poisoning. The school or library can target 1000 cranes as part of the Japanese legend. To start the activity, every child should get coloured papers to make the paper cranes. The paper cranes


can be taken home or collected and strung together to make a ceiling display. Instructions on how to make paper cranes can be downloaded from www.icanw.org or from YouTube.

Approximate cost

Low to no cost. If special origami paper is unavailable or too expensive, recycled magazines can also be used for this as long as the pages are cut into exact squares.

Timing and duration

Extremely flexible – can be organised at any time of year, and can last from an hour to several weeks depending on the format of the activity.

Level of complexity

Low complexity.

Ownership

Anyone can run this activity – although Soka Gakkai International New Zealand (SGINZ) and Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom Aotearoa New Zealand (WILPF) have some expertise in this area and would be pleased to advise if assistance is needed. Contact: SGINZ Soka Gakkai International New Zealand Culture Centre, 40 Eaglehurst Rd, Ellerslie, Auckland 1060 PO Box 11968, Ellerslie, Auckland 1542 Phone: +64 (9) 525 1829 Email: info@sginz.org Web: http://www.sginz.org/ Or Ruth Coombes or Joan MacDonald Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom Aotearoa New Zealand (WILPF) Email: ruth.calliope@gmail.com; joanmac@pl.net


Web: http://www.converge.org.nz/pma/wilpf/ Potential for local board and community involvement or partnership

High potential for involvement of community and local board. Can be run as a stand alone activity, or alternatively as an add on activity for all ages in conjunction with other peace focused celebrations. Due to the low complexity and low cost of this event, schools, community groups and libraries might also consider variations of this as part of other events happening locally.

Reach and target audience

All ages, but very popular with young people.

Can this initiative be transferred across cultures?

Yes. It’s a very visual activity so appeals to a diversity of people.

Building a culture of peace for the children of the world An exhibit that brings together the ideas of thousands of people and organisations dedicated to finding a path to lasting peace. We hope that you will leave with renewed confidence that a culture of peace is possible – and a necessity for life on earth. Everything that is needed to build a culture of peace already exists in each of our hearts. As explained in the United Nations definition, a Culture of Peace is “a set of values, attitudes, modes of behaviour and ways of life that reject violence and prevent conflicts by tackling their root causes to solve problems through dialogue and negotiation among individuals, groups and nations.” Visit http://www.sgi usa.org/newsandevents/exhibitions/cultureofpeace.php for more information. Approximate cost

Free of charge: subject to availability.

Timing and duration

It is an exhibition, so it is dependent on exhibit times.

Level of complexity

Low complexity.

Ownership

Soka Gakkai International New Zealand (SGINZ) Contact: Hui Ling Tan, Ian Gordon, Deba Biswas or Donny Mukerji Soka Gakkai International New Zealand Culture Centre 40 Eaglehurst Rd, Ellerslie, Auckland 1060 PO Box 11968, Ellerslie, Auckland 1542 Phone: +64 (9) 525 1829 Email: info@sginz.org Web: www.sginz.org

Potential for local board and community involvement or partnership Reach and target audience

There is high potential for collaboration and partnership, such as a jointly organised exhibition, or promotion of this exhibit in conjunction with other locally run peace initiatives. General public, students.


Can this initiative be transferred across cultures?

Yes.

The voice of the children One People One Planet is an Auckland based Charitable Trust which has as its focus the provision of a platform for the bringing together of our youngest citizens: to empower them to collaborate in the development of a national and a growing global community oriented towards peace and a sustainably fairer, more just and caring world. The children’s desires and ideas frame our endeavours. Peace Pals, as the children have chosen to call themselves, work together to design projects and ideas with which they can collaboratively develop a voice. Peace Pals are encouraged to take the platform and speak. This has created memorable occasions, such as Peace Pals’ Alida Newman’s (13 years) and George Shirtcliffe’s (12 years) presentations to Auckland Council during the debate for Auckland to become a peace city, and their presentation on Aotea Square to celebrate Auckland becoming a peace city.

Alida and George speak as Peace Pals at Auckland Peace City celebrations.


WeyMouth Intermediate Peace Pals and their challenge to Mayor Brown, for Auckland to become a Peace City, December 2012. Also showing , a collaborative project which will be presented at the United Nations on Peace Day. The project leaders – Kaiapoi School, Canterbury – welcome all additions. Approximate cost

Low to moderate cost depending on the scale of delivery, type of activity and range of stakeholders.

Timing and duration

Flexible.

Level of complexity

Medium complexity.

Ownership

One People One Planet. All enquiries are welcome. For more information, and further details on the many child initiated projects that are in place, contact: Vivienne Wright One People One Planet 14/145 Howe Street, Freemans Bay, Auckland 1011 Email: 1people1planet@clear.net.nz Web: www.onepeopleoneplanet.org

Potential for local board and community involvement or partnership

One People One Planet works through schools and with groups of children (at this stage, predominantly aged between five and 12) on a platform designed for and created by and with the children. We are unique in that we are child driven and child focused. There is no adult political or ideological agenda. Potential for local board and community involvement through partnership and collaboration is high.


Reach and target audience

Children aged between five and 12 years.

Can this initiative be transferred across cultures?

Yes.

Wriggle and Rhyme, story times and children’s holiday programmes Wriggle and Rhyme (an active movement and pre literacy programme for 0 to 2 year olds) is run every week by nearly every library in the network – it attracts many Pacific, migrant and refugee participants, frequently a child brought along by a grandparent. Other programmes attended by Pacific peoples, migrants and refugees include story times for pre school children, school visits, after school homework programmes, school holiday and summer reading programmes, computer based learning and all the open to all activities taking place in a library. Approximate cost

Free.

Timing and duration

Run weekly across Auckland’s libraries.

Level of complexity

Low complexity.

Ownership

Auckland Libraries Contact: Abigael Vogt, Multicultural Service Development Team Leader Auckland Libraries, Private Bag 92300, Auckland 1142 Phone: +64 (9) 301 0101 Email: Abigael.Vogt@aucklandcouncil.govt.nz Web: http://www.aucklandlibraries.govt.nz

Potential for local board and community involvement or partnership Reach and target audience

There is the opportunity to engage targeted communities in specific activities, and to promote to each local area.

Can this initiative be transferred across cultures?

Yes.

Children and families from diverse backgrounds.

iChoose iChoose is an innovative anti bullying project that combines education and entertainment to provide a vital anti violence message to high school students. The three part iChoose production takes approximately one class period to complete. After viewing the ‘Victory Over Violence (VOV) Exhibition’ – whose major themes include Gandhi’s explication of


the relationship between passive and physical violence; the need for each person to take responsibility for violence in their environment; and the value of dialogue – students watch the 20 minute iChoose mini musical in their school theatre or auditorium. The program concludes with cast and crewmembers facilitating small group discussions with the students about the ideas with which they’ve just been presented. “By comparing the challenges modern teenagers face with the struggles of internationally recognised peacemakers, iChoose helps young people understand the value of choosing non violent solutions,” says ICAP co president Herbie Hancock. “Furthermore, by guiding students to choose thoughts, words and actions that promote hope and dignity for themselves and others, iChoose encourages today’s teenagers to continue the legacy of international leaders for peace.” Approximate cost

Free to schools.

Timing and duration

Two weeks (one week rehearsal, one week of performances).

Level of complexity

High level of complexity

Ownership

ICAP (International Committee of Artists for Peace) through Soka Gakkai International New Zealand Contact: Joycelyn Foo, National Co ordinator for Public Affairs PO Box 8077, The Terrace, Wellington 6143. Phone: +64 04 499 4420 Email: joycelyn.foo@sginz.org

Potential for local board and community involvement or partnership Reach and target audience Can this initiative be transferred across cultures?

Web: www.sginz.org Local boards can refer or sponsor iChoose to their schools.

Students, youths and high schools. Yes. The iChoose performers are from different ethnicities. The script is also adopted to include local stories and flavor.

Workshops, lectures and professional development supporting peace, early childhood education and social justice in Aotearoa

OMEP Auckland Chapter works primarily with the wider early childhood sector, which includes families and other stakeholders such as members of early childhood tertiary institutions, owners, managers, teachers and students in the wider Auckland region. OMEP also works with other organisations to support and promote social justice and quality early childhood education for all children, e.g. Action for Children and Youth Aotearoa, and has members attending the Human Rights Network meetings.


OMEP runs a wide variety of workshops, lectures, information opportunities, writes submissions and responses to government and council proposals to support peace, early childhood education and social justice within Aotearoa New Zealand and other countries through our international organisation. OMEP also publishes research and articles in early childhood journals and supports other opportunities for promoting peace initiatives. OMEP is also involved with fundraising for humanitarian emergencies in the Pacific such as the Australian bush fires, Samoan Tsunami, and the Christchurch and Japan earthquakes. Approximate cost

Low cost. OMEP’s professional development opportunities are kept to a minimal cost. Members free, non members currently $10. Current membership is $45 per year.

Timing and duration

Often evening workshops for a two hour period. The committee meets monthly to organise events with submissions requiring additional meetings.

Level of complexity

Medium complexity. OMEP’s role is education and advocacy for children. The initiatives may be one off or on going depending on interest. Meetings are held in a variety of venues catering for up to 120 people per evening and held between five and eight times a year.

Ownership

OMEP is the World Organisation for Early Childhood Education. OMEP’s Auckland Chapter Committee is responsible to our members who pay a subscription while under the umbrella of OMEP Aotearoa New Zealand National Executive. Workshops are open to all interested people. Contact: Julie Teach Email: julied.teach@xtra.co.nz Web: http://www.omepaotearoa.org.nz/

Potential for local board and community involvement or partnership

OMEP endeavours to link with like minded organisations and has representation on a number of related boards throughout Aotearoa New Zealand. OMEP welcomes engagement and involvement from the local board and local communities.

Reach and target audience

Anyone in the community interested in young children and their families, and in particular the Auckland early childhood education community.

Can this initiative be transferred across cultures?

Yes. OMEP has held evenings with focus on M ori, Pasifika, and refugee perspectives. OMEP also hosts visitors from overseas and has had an overseas exchange, including funding visitors from the Pacific to attend an early childhood conference in Aotearoa.


Peace flag making and decorating initiative

This peace activity involves local students (years 1 to 6, aged between five and 10) in the local community decorating peace flags showing peace doves. This activity is especially appropriate for public events where a Peace City presence is desirable to introduce people to the idea of what a Peace City is and providing information materials on peace groups, projects and ideas. It is best to prepare the flags in advance so children can focus on colouring the peace dove image on the day of the event. This idea can also be developed into a workshop and adapted for use in schools as outlined below. This is an adult led, student participation creative activity that guides the students to think about what peace means to them, their families and the community at large in the first place. This is followed by a discussion on what peace means and then the students translate their own thoughts onto the flags, which they take home. This activity can take place at local libraries and community centres, both after school and during school holidays.

Approximate cost

The cost of $200 would cater for 20 students.

Timing and duration

The peace flag resource activity pack should be ordered from The Peace Foundation. The time frame required for delivery is 10 working days. The duration of this individual activity would depend on the facilitation. It could take an afternoon or could incorporate other peace activities, e.g. the peace heritage walk, to create a more comprehensive peace programme that could be carried out over two to four days.

Level of complexity

Low complexity. This could be facilitated by one person.

Ownership

The Peace Foundation. Contact: Caroline Ongleo The Peace Foundation PO Box 8055, Symonds Street, Auckland 1150.


Phone: +64 (9) 373 2379 Email: peace@peacefoundation.org.nz Web: www.peace.net.nz Potential for local board and community involvement or partnership

This is a Peace Foundation initiative, coordinated in conjunction with Auckland Libraries, community centres and the local boards in the different areas across the Auckland region. Once the libraries, local boards and community centres have facilitated this activity, it could become an on going programme run as part of a holiday programme.

Reach and target audience

This peace flag activity has a tiered target audience. First, the libraries and community groups would need to get engaged. Then the target would change and be focused on schools to promote the activity. Finally, parents of students between the ages of five and 10 would participate in the local community activity during holidays and after school programmes.

Can this initiative be transferred across cultures?

The peace flag activity is very inclusive and not culturally specific. As this activity is about ‘doing’ it can be facilitated with limited discussion and so it is easy to transfer to other languages. This potentially allows for the activity to be available to every sector of the Auckland community.

Cool Schools Peer Mediators’ Big Day Out

Peer mediators from primary schools within a region or district gather to get inspiration from ex peer mediators (tertiary students or members of Peace Ambassadors Aotearoa) who have become successful in applying and developing their conflict management and leadership skills learnt from the Cool Schools Peer Mediation Programme. Peer mediators also deliver presentations on how they make a positive difference in their homes, schools and communities. There is also a group workshop activity on ‘successes, challenges and problem solving’, cooperative games, and peace banner exhibits. Peer mediators go home with goodie bags which can contain school supplies, health foods and Peace Foundation resources.


Approximate cost

Timing and duration

The cost of $500 covers handouts and morning tea for about 60 individuals, representing eight to 10 schools. Items for goodie bags can be solicited from local corporate or business organisations. Participants bring their own food for lunch. Announcement of the Cool Schools Peer Mediators’ Big Day Out should be made at least six months in advance. The session lasts for five hours, from 8.30am to 1.30pm.

Level of complexity

Medium complexity depending on the number of participants attending.

Ownership

The Peace Foundation will lead this initiative. Contact: Christina Barruel The Peace Foundation PO Box 8055, Symonds Street, Auckland 1150. Phone: +64 (9) 373 2379 Email: peace@peacefoundation.org.nz Web: www.peace.net.nz

Potential for local board and community involvement or partnership

A local school implementing the Cool Schools Peer Mediation Programme can host the Peer Mediators’ Big Day Out. Local boards can support this initiative in line with their plans for achieving safe and inclusive communities, specifically protecting and promoting the interests and wellbeing of children and young people.

Reach and target audience Can this initiative be transferred across cultures?

Cool Schools peer mediators and co ordinators This initiative can be transferred across cultures, or in schools with high ethnic mix.

Peace flower decorating – growing a peace tree initiative


This peace activity involves local students (years 6 to 10, aged between nine and 14) in the local community embellishing and creating messages on peace flowers (circular blooms). These circular blooms are then displayed on an artificial ‘tree’ in a public place, with each bloom making a creative and thought provoking local focal point to foster and continue to raise awareness of peace. This is an adult led, student participation creative activity that guides the students to think about what peace means to them, their families and the community at large in the first place. This is followed by a discussion on what peace means and then the students translate their own thoughts onto the flowers. These could then be displayed for the community to read and admire. This activity is suited to the classroom and can also be adapted for public events and community facilities.

Approximate cost

The cost of $1000 covers the installation of the tree frame and the supply of flowers and leaves (depending on duration) to decorate over a period of time. This activity has two levels. Level 1 is a temporary installation for a specified duration and level 2 is an on going project that develops over time.

Timing and duration

The peace flower resource components should be ordered from the Peace Foundation. The time frame required for delivery would depend on the planned initiative. This activity can be on going within a community centre, library, school or mall, with the seasons included so that the peace flowers may exist over the spring period then change into leaves for the winter period.

Level of complexity

The level of complexity varies depending on the level of tree and peace flower project. One variation is low complexity, simple to implement as a one off activity with limited supplies requested and


on going support. The second variation is of medium complexity, with The Peace Foundation as the lead partner working with local boards, local businesses, schools or the council itself to manage and facilitate supplies and on going maintenance. Ownership

The Peace Foundation Contact: Caroline Ongleo The Peace Foundation PO Box 8055, Symonds Street, Auckland 1150 Phone: +64 (9) 373 2379 Email: peace@peacefoundation.org.nz Web: www.peace.net.nz

Potential for local board and community involvement or partnership

This initiative is coordinated in conjunction with schools, Auckland Libraries, community groups and the local boards in the different areas across the Auckland region. Once the libraries, local boards and community centres have initiated this activity, it could become an on going programme run within the community.

Reach and target audience

This activity has a tiered target audience. First, the libraries and community groups would need to get engaged, with the goal of building awareness of peace issues and the City for Peace Declaration. Once awareness has been raised, the activity could be extended to local community groups and residents.

Can this initiative be transferred across cultures?

The peace flower activity is very inclusive and not culturally specific. As this activity is about ‘doing’ and appreciating, it can be facilitated with limited discussion and so it is easy to transfer to other languages.

National Schools' Peace Week Schools' Peace Week is a national week designed to help schools educate students and the community about peace issues, e.g. disarmament, nuclear abolition, bullying, etc. Peace week activities can be easily incorporated into the classroom in a variety of informative and enjoyable ways. Schools can use their creativity to get students excited about a project for peace. The following are some general activities schools can do: peace week banner, peace week assembly presentation, wear white for peace day, peace bracelets, face painting, peace passports, create a peace garden, host a school wide peace song or art competition. At the community level, schools can lead a peace march, create a peace mural or wall painting, facilitate a community clean up for peace or fundraise for peace.


Approximate cost

From $100 to $500 per school depending on the nature of activities. For activities like a song or art competition, there should be prizes to give away. Prizes could also be solicited from local businesses or corporations.

Timing and duration

Every first week of August covering Hiroshima Day (6 August) Nagasaki Day and International Day of Indigenous Peoples (9 August).

Level of complexity

Medium to high level of complexity depending on the nature of activities and the breadth of stakeholders in any given year.

Ownership

Both local schools and The Peace Foundation can lead this initiative. Contact: Caroline Ongleo or Christina Barruel The Peace Foundation PO Box 8055, Symonds Street, Auckland 1150. Phone: +64 (9) 373 2379 Email: peace@peacefoundation.org.nz Web: www.peace.net.nz

Potential for local board and community involvement or partnership

All primary and secondary schools can participate in Schools' Peace Week. Students can do classroom, school wide or community activities to promote peace. Local boards can support this initiative in line with their plan on achieving safe communities, specifically protecting and promoting the interest of children and youth.

Reach and target audience Can this initiative be transferred across cultures?

Primary and secondary schools. This initiative can be transferred across cultures.

Secondary Schools’ Peace Symposium


The Secondary Schools’ Peace Symposium is forum for a group of invited secondary schools who gather at a chosen venue to discuss and share peace ideas and initiatives within their school communities.

Approximate cost

Timing and duration

The cost of $5000 covers facilitation, communications, catering, prizes, and guest speakers’ expenses. The planning stage of the symposium is up to six months. The symposium event takes place over the course of a school day, from 9am to 3pm.

Level of complexity

High complexity.

Ownership: Potential for local board and community involvement or partnership

The Secondary Schools’ Peace Symposium is an annual event run by The Peace Foundation. With the history and level of experience in this event, ownership falls to the Peace Foundation; however, the event could be community driven or initiated by the local board in partnership with and under the guidance of The Peace Foundation. Contact: The Peace Foundation PO Box 8055, Symonds Street, Auckland 1150 Phone: +64 (9) 373 2379 Email: peace@peacefoundation.org.nz Web: www.peace.net.nz

Reach and target audience

Secondary school students in the Auckland region and teacher coordinators, often the guidance counsellor from the school. Indirectly, a school’s participation in the symposium should result in a ripple effect, with ideas and discussions about peace filtering back to the wider school community.

Can this initiative be transferred across cultures?

This initiative can be transferred across cultures.


Ideas bank Groups and local boards could: ensure outdoor areas for play and recreation for young children in all subdivisions are integrated into all regional planning policies and practices promote workshops and activities which educate our young people about text and cyber bullying so that they are safe online establish a scheme for youth to access and use community centres and local council owned facilities and venues. This will support and empower them to organise youth gatherings, events and exhibitions for peace related activities and initiatives encourage people in your community to connect with their neighbours to develop a sense of support and reduced isolation promote a culture of non violent communication by encouraging wider engagement with mediation and the learning of mediation skills. This might include the development and support of a Youth Ambassador network in your local area introduce and encourage children to play co operative games – start with some that already exist, like co operative board games and role play games, and encourage children to use their imagination and invent others tailor activities towards ethnic and refugee youth integration and empowerment. For example, initiatives which support African youth integration, tertiary readiness and transition from high school to university and from university to the work force.


Connected inclusive communities From the City for Peace Declaration: Committed to protecting and enhancing the safety, security and wellbeing of all people – both present and future – living in and visiting Auckland Embracing the diverse backgrounds of all people and encouraging their participation in society regardless of age, gender, abilities, ethnicity, income, culture, politics, sexuality or faith

Acknowledging that peace is created through the thoughts, actions and policies of individuals,


Human rights and social justice From the City for Peace Declaration: Committed to social, economic and environmental justice and acknowledging that peace cannot exist without justice Actively delivering programmes and supporting education for the development of peace, inter-cultural

Accepting a responsibility to assist those who have settled in Auckland due to war and other violations of human rights and to assist those who are living in poverty.


Honouring the Treaty From the City for Peace Declaration: Acknowledging and promoting understanding of the unique relationships between the original inhabitants (mana whenua) and those who have settled more recently in Auckland (tau iwi) and the place of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) in our city.


Respecting the environment From the City for Peace Declaration: Encouraging all people to treat the environment (taiao) with respect and exercising the principles of guardianship (kaitiakitanga ) whilst practising full consultation with affected parties in regards effects to the environment in order to ensure quality of earth, air, water and the protection of aesthetic and heritage values and other treasures (taonga).


Peace, heritage and the arts From the City for Peace Declaration:

promotion of a culture of peace, justice and non-violence through education Acknowledging that peace is created through the thoughts, actions and policies local and central government Encouraging all people to treat the environment (taiao) with respect and exercising the principles of guardianship (kaitiakitanga) whilst practising full consultation with affected parties in regards effects to the environment in order to ensure quality of earth, air, water and the protection of aesthetic and heritage values and other treasures (taonga) Responding to the recommendation in the 2002 United Nations Study on Disarmament and NonProliferation Education that ‘municipal leaders working with citizen groups are encouraged to establish peace cities’, thus supporting New Zealand’s role in the international community to actively pursue the abolition of nuclear weapons.


Peace calendar


Contacts and contributors


josephn@arms-mrc.org.nz


Appendix


City for Peace Declaration Auckland a City for Peace The Auckland Council recognises its role of stewardship for present and future generations and hereby declares Auckland to be a City for Peace. Auckland Council is dedicated to the promotion of nuclear free zones and a culture of peace based on social, economic and environmental justice, tolerance and non-violence Acknowledging and promoting understanding of the unique relationships between the original inhabitants (mana whenua) and those who have settled more recently in Auckland (tau iwi) and the place of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) in our city Committed to social, economic and environmental justice and acknowledging that peace cannot exist without justice Recognising our responsibility to create and maintain a culture of peace as an integral and ongoing function of good governance Acknowledging that peace is created through the thoughts, actions and policies of individuals, families, communities, wh nau, h pu, iwi, businesses, schools, local and central government Committed to protecting and enhancing the safety, security and wellbeing of all people- both present and future - living in and visiting Auckland Affirming that the wellbeing of all people is advanced by non-violent conflict resolution and the promotion of a culture of peace, justice and non-violence through education Embracing the diverse backgrounds of all people and encouraging their participation in society regardless of age, gender, abilities, ethnicity, income, culture, politics, sexuality or faith Actively delivering programmes and supporting education for the development of peace, intercultural awareness, tolerance, economic justice, human rights and conflict resolution Accepting a responsibility to assist those who have settled in Auckland due to war and other violations of human rights and to assist those who are living in poverty Encouraging all people to treat the environment (taiao) with respect and exercising the principles of guardianship (kaitiakitanga ) whilst practising full consultation with affected parties in regards effects to the environment in order to ensure quality of earth, air, water and the protection of aesthetic and heritage values and other treasures (taonga) Recognising that our city s actions have a significant impact on the people and environment of our whole nation Responding to the recommendation in the 2002 United Nations Study on Disarmament and Non-Proliferation Education that 'municipal leaders working with citizen groups are encouraged to establish peace cities', thus supporting New Zealand's role in the international community to actively pursue the abolition of nuclear weapons

Adopted by Auckland Council on 15 December 2011.


He Tokonga Maung rongo T one Nui T maki Makaurau - he t one maung rongo He aro n te Kaunihera o T maki Makaurau ki t na noho kaitiaki m ng whakatupuranga o in ianei heke iho, kua poua e ia a T maki hei T one Maung rongo. Kua here hoki te Kaunihera i a ia ki te haut i t na noho rohe karihi kore me te whai tikanga hohou rongo i takea mai i runga i te tika o ng kaupapa -iwi, ohaoha, taiao, ng kau tuku me te riri-kore. Te whakaae me te toko m ramatanga m te noho motuhake a te iwi mana whenua me tauiwi i T maki Makaurau, me te whai w hi o te Tiriti o Waitangi i t t tou t one nui nei. Te here p mau ki te kaupapa -iwi, ohaoha, taiao i takea mai i runga i te tika me te m hio e kore e hou te rongo, ki te kore te tika. Te m hio tonu m t tou rawa e hanga, e tiaki tonu ng tikanga hohou rongo hei w hanga t turu e whai tikanga tonu ai te pai o na mahi whakahaere. Te whakaae ko te takenga mai o te rongo e pup ake ana i te whakaaro, i ng mahi me ng kaupapa a te hunga takitahi, -wh nau, h pori, hap , iwi, kaipakihi, ng kura me ng mana k wanatanga -rohe, -motu hoki. Te here p mau ki te rai me te whakarahi i te noho pai, huru me te ora o ng iwi katoa in ianei, a muri ake noa - te hunga k inga, haere manuhiri mai r nei ki T maki Makaurau. Te whakapono e piki te ora o te iwi katoa m te hohou i te raru i runga i te riri-kore me te haut tikanga e hou i te rongo, te tika me te riri-kore, ina tika te ako. Te tauawhi i ng tini rerek tanga o te katoa me te whakahau hoki kia whai w hi r tou puta noa i te iwi wh nui ahakoa te taipakeke, t ne /wahine r nei, na pukenga, ira whakaheke, tokonga oranga, tikanga -iwi, h kakatanga, whakapono r nei. Te mahi nui ki te whakat kaupapa me te tautoko mahi ako e piki ai te maung rongo, te mataara ki ng tikanga iwi k , ng kau tuku, tika ohaoha, tikanga tangata me te hohou riri. Te mau ki te whina i te hunga kua whakak inga mai ki T maki Makaurau n te whiu a te riri me r atu p hinga tika tangata, me te whina hoki i te hunga e noho p hara ana. Te whakahau i te katoa kia manawap ki te taiao, kia ki na m t pono kaitiakitanga, me te k whiri tonu me te hunga te whaip nga e whai take ana ki ng rukenga o te taiao e tika ai te tiaki pai i te hua o te one, te hau, te wai, na rerehua me na ritenga tuku iho, tae atu ki tahi taonga. Te m hio tonu ka p kia e ng mahi i t t tou t one nui nei te katoa atu o te motu. Hei whakautu i te Arom tai a te Runanga o ng Whenua o te Ao 2002 m te whakaako i te Muru me te Aukati Mahi Tuku Pah , i k ra, t r ng mana t one te mahi tahi me na ake r p -iwi ki te whakahau kia t he t one nui e mau ai te rongo , e tautokotia ai t Aotearoa tokonga i te ao wh nui tonu ki te whai i te murunga o ng tao karihi.


I taunakihia e te Kaunihera o T maki Makaurau, Tihema 2011


Please provide ISBN Number

Auckland City for Peace Toolkit  

A practical guide for local boards and communities on being a city for peace

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you