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Angelus Hut Tracks and Routes ISSUE SPECIFIC ADVISORY GROUP REPORT

PREPARED BY THE NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL


New Zealand Mountain Safety Council Level 1 Harbour City Centre, 29 Brandon Street | Wellington 6011 info@mountainsafety.org.nz mountainsafety.org.nz All images copyright Mountain Safety Council 2021 Cover photo: Angelus Hut, Nathan Watson

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Angelus Hut Tracks and Routes | Issue Specific Advisory Group Report


Contents Introduction

3

Insights

4

Destination focus

6

Took longer than expected

7

Unprepared for weather conditions and/or terrain

8

Participant Journey

10

Current Solutions

11

Proposed Solutions

12

1. Integrated Marketing Campaign

14

2. Notifications to booked users

15

3. Digital track advisory

16

4. Integrated journey signage

17

5. Paid Hut Wardens

18

6. Consistent National Safety Messaging

19

Agreed Actions

21

Left: Nathan Watson

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Introduction Angelus Hut is perched high on the Travers Range between Lakes Rotoiti and Rotoroa in Nelson Lakes National Park. Situated on the edge of a small alpine tarn, Lake Rotomaninitua/Lake Angelus, it is one of the most popular huts in the park with overnight visitation increasing in the past five years to approximately 5,000 per year. There are several ways a tramper can reach the hut. The most iconic route is via Pinchgut Track and Robert Ridge. Other alternatives include following Speargrass Track and Speargrass Creek Route, which provides the shelter of the bush for much of the journey, and Cascade Track which climbs steeply from the Travers Valley on the eastern side. Some walkers choose to complete a circuit involving different tracks either side of a night at Angelus Hut. The Mountain Safety Council (MSC) has identified access to Angelus Hut, most notably via Robert Ridge, as a hotspot for tramping incidents in New Zealand. Over a period of nine years (2010 – 2019) there were 51 people involved in search and rescues (SAR) and two fatalities (2018 and 2019). This represents an incident rate of approximately 1 in 700 trampers requiring SAR assistance. This is considerably higher than the rate of 1 in 3,639 across New Zealand for the same nine-year period. As a result, MSC, DOC and NZ Police formed an Issue Specific Advisory Group to develop and propose a number of prevention solutions which will improve the safety of trampers heading to Angelus Hut. This report contains the proposed solutions which the Advisory Group has suggested, after working through a facilitated design-thinking process. Following a review of the provisional report, MSC and DOC met to discuss each of the proposed solutions in detail and agree on the next steps towards implementation. The agreed actions for each of the proposed solutions are provided as a summary at the end of this report. Left: Nathan Watson Below Map: LINZ

k

c Tra ss ra g ar

e

Sp

t er

ge

Rid

b Ro

NELSON

BLENHEIM

WESTPORT Angelus Hut

ST ARNAUD

Angelus Hut Nelson Lakes National Park

Cascade Tr ack

Angelus Hut Tracks and Routes | Issue Specific Advisory Group Report


Insights The Advisory Group looked at all search and rescues and fatalities recorded between July 2010 and June 2019. NZer vs International Visitor incidents by season

» I ncidents most commonly occur during Summer and Autumn. 17

» T  he majority of incidents (60%) occur along Robert Ridge.

5

Speargrass and Cascade Tracks have 14% and 8% respectively, and Angelus Hut has around 18%. » I nternational visitors were involved in 65% of the incidents.

Nearly all were aged between 18 and 34. These typically occurred in Autumn and Spring. New Zealanders were involved in 35%, which typically occurred in Summer. Most were over the age of 35. International visitors involved in SAR were most commonly from Israel (15) with the remainder being split across multiple countries with no significant cluster. For eight people, their nationality was recorded as unknown.

12

8

3

3 2 1

» 5  5% of people involved were female, with 29% male and the

Spring

remainder unknown.

Summer

Autumn

International Visitor

New Zealander

Winter

» T  he most common grouping was female international visitors

from Israel aged between 18 and 24, making up 20% of all incidents.

Demographics of trampers involved in incidents

2

International Visitor - Unknown

3

International Visitor - Men International Visitor - Women

15

New Zealander - Unknown New Zealander - Men 2 New Zealander - Women 5

5

4

1 1

3

3

2

2 1 0-17

1 18-24

25-34

35-49

50-64

1 65+

Not recorded

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Through further analysis of this data, the Advisory Group identified that the vast majority of preventable incidents included one or more of the following causes: destination focus, taking longer than expected, and being unprepared for weather conditions and/or advanced terrain. Other additional causes were also identified, however these typically occurred in conjunction with one of these main causes. Each proposed solution is designed to address one of more of these issues.

Loic Lassueur

Angelus Hut Tracks and Routes | Issue Specific Advisory Group Report


CAUSATION FACTOR 1:

NZer vs International Visitor incidents by season where destination focus was a causation factor

Destination focus

12

As this factor is rather subjective, this cause was only attributed to cases where it was clear that the individual or group involved continued to press on towards the goal of reaching Angelus Hut, despite clear signs that they should have turned back or altered their plans to stay at an alternative hut.

7

1 2

Spring

Summer International Visitor

2

Autumn

Winter

New Zealander

Involving 47% of all SAR and fatalities, the Advisory Group were surprised at how frequently this factor was present. Interestingly, very few incidents involving New Zealanders had this causal factor. The largest group was female International Visitors aged 18-24.

Demographics of trampers involved in incidents where destination focus was a causation factor

2

1 13

International Visitor - Unknown International Visitor - Men International Visitor - Women New Zealander - Women

4

2 1 18-24

25-34

35-49

1 50-64

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CAUSATION FACTOR 2:

Took longer than expected

NZer vs International Visitor incidents by season where taking longer than expected was a causation factor

The second most common causation factor was groups who had taken longer to get to Angelus Hut than they expected. This was present in 39% of all search and rescues.

9 4

4 2

Again, international visitors aged 18-24 were the most predominant group, accounting for half of the incidents where taking longer than expected was a causal factor.

1

Summer

International Visitor

Demographics of trampers involved in incidents where taking longer than expected was a causation

10

International Visitor New Zealander

4 1 2

2 1

0-17

18-24

25-34

Autumn

35-49

50-64

Angelus Hut Tracks and Routes | Issue Specific Advisory Group Report

Winter New Zealander


Above: Loic Lassueur

CAUSATION FACTOR 3:

Unprepared for weather conditions and/or terrain

NZer vs International Visitor incidents by season where being unprepared for conditions was a causation factor

7

The third most common cause of incidents was trampers who were unprepared for the weather conditions they experienced and/or the terrain.

4 1 1

Spring

This was attributed to 27% of the incidents, but potentially could be attributed to others if further information about what happened was available. The weather conditions they were unprepared for commonly included cold temperatures, strong to gale-force winds, snow and low visibility. Terrain issues included deep snow, ice, unstable rock, and river crossings.

1

Summer

Autumn

International Visitor

New Zealander

Winter

Those involved in these incidents were almost solely international visitors and occurred during spring and autumn.

NZer vs International Visitor incidents by season where being unprepared for conditions was a causation factor 10 International Visitor 6

6

New Zealander

1 18-24

25-34

35-49

50-64

1 Not known

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Angelus Hut Tracks and Routes | Issue Specific Advisory Group Report


Participant Journey When considering the effectiveness and potential reach of the proposed solutions, the Advisory Group did so within the context of a typical participant journey sequence. This journey was identified as having five stages for the purposes of this work. Briefly, the five stages are:

Dream The participant becomes interested in Angelus Hut or one of the access tracks, and considers tramping there sometime in the future. This stage is usually well before any effort is made to establish a plan to go.

Plan The participant goes through the process of making the ‘Dream’ a reality by learning more about Angelus Hut and the surrounding area (e.g. different tracks to walk, how to get there, what to take, where to stay).

Prepare The participant makes final preparations for the tramp, hopefully checking the weather forecast and packing their pack.

Experience The participant travels to the start of the track, completes the tramp (experiencing the scenery, terrain, risks and weather) then heads home.

Share The participant shares their experience with others. This sharing can influence the ‘Dream’ and ‘Plan’ stages for future participants. Sharing may take on many different forms including word of mouth with friends and family, written information through blogs or social media and sharing imagery and videos through social media platforms.

Left: Bevan Smith

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Current Solutions The Advisory Group would be remiss not to consider that there are existing interventions and information sources which already play a role in informing participants and reducing incidents.

National campaigns These interventions are not specific to Angelus Hut, however, are safety messages which attempt to reduce commonly occurring incidents and are focused on influencing trampers during the planning phase. They are relevant to the key causal factors which the advisory group are attempting to suppress.

LAND SAFETY CODE CAMPAIGN The Land Safety Code is a joint initiative of DOC, MSC, NZ Police, LandSAR, RCC, NZSAR and MetService which exists to provide simple messaging to those planning and participating in land-based outdoor recreation. The messages are shared by all organisations involved via digital, print and social media.

MSC CAMPAIGNS MSC runs campaigns targeting specific messages to specific audiences such as hunters, trampers, back country skiers and mountaineers. The 2020-21 summer campaign focused on prompting trampers to have a backup plan and not to get sucked into the threat of ‘destination focus’. It also focused on ensuring trampers have the necessary equipment for their tramp, including considering what they may need in poor weather or an emergency situation.

Left: Bevan Smith

Angelus Hut Tracks and Routes | Issue Specific Advisory Group Report


Interventions specific to Angelus Hut These interventions have been aligned to the participant journey and arranged according to when the participant most commonly interacts with this. These interventions already exist.

PLAN

PREPARE

EXPERIENCE

DOC website

Weather forecasts and weather

This provides a good amount of information on the tracks to the hut with a clear description of the options, times involved and risks which are present. Recent improvements include information for those intending to go between May and October where additional winter risks exist.

model data for the National Park, and specifically Angelus Hut, provided by MetService and NIWA.

CamperMate ontrack notifications

Robert Ridge video Produced by MSC and available on the DOC website and YouTube. With a strong search engine SEO rating, this is the top result when searching for Angelus Hut or Robert Ridge on YouTube.

DOC booking system As well as providing pre-trip information through the booking confirmation, this also makes it possible for DOC to communicate with visitors when weather warnings are issued.

DOC Visitor Centres such as Nelson and Wellington provide faceto-face opportunities for trampers to discuss the area during the trip planning stage.

As well as the information on the track, MSC and CamperMate have recently added a feature which provides offline notifications to users of the app when CamperMate track they reach certain locations along the information track. These notifications are sent at the Developed through a partnership carpark, Mt Robert, Julius Summit and between MSC and CamperMate, this along Speargrass Creek Route. They specifically targets users of the app, who historically are mostly international prompt users to reflect on how they are doing along the way, and to consider visitors who use the app to find walks of interest (among many other things). whether they still have enough daylight to get to the hut, or to consider turning This provides information on the track back if the weather isn’t great. and also includes the Robert Ridge video.

Signage at Mt Robert carpark, Relax Shelter and Speargrass Hut

DOC Nelson Lakes Visitor Centre Trampers will frequently head into the visitor centre in St Arnaud to chat with DOC staff about current conditions and the forecast weather.

Comprehensive information is provided on a large panel at the Mt Robert carpark. Temporary information has been posted in Relax Shelter and Speargrass Hut with the intention being for permanent signage to be installed in future.

DOC brochure on tracks to Angelus Hut MSC’s Plan My Walk app

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Proposed Solutions Given that there are many interventions already in place which interact at various stages along the participant journey, the Advisory Group’s Proposed Solutions identify opportunities to build upon existing interventions. In some cases, the suggested solution already exists elsewhere in New Zealand. Other solutions are new but build on existing resources and have the potential to be rolled out nationwide.

Left: Bevan Smith

Angelus Hut Tracks and Routes | Issue Specific Advisory Group Report


1. Integrated Marketing Campaign

What is the proposed solution? The objective of an integrated marketing campaign is to encourage a behaviour change from single-minded destination focus to one where trampers think about alternative options and have an agreed Plan B before embarking on a trip. The Advisory Group suggests a national ‘Plan B’ campaign led by Mountain Safety Council. Alternatively, this could be a specific intervention for Angelus Hut. The campaign and/or the intervention approach would have the same objective: To change attitude and behaviour by focusing on the experience rather than a specific goal, and would introduce other options into the decision set. The ‘Plan B’ campaign aims to get people who are planning a trip to Angelus Hut to consider alternatives and prepare for this in the event the weather is unsuitable to tackle Robert Ridge. Specific suggestions for alternatives include Sylvester Hut and Lake Daniell. It would use positive messaging about ensuring a good/ better experience, offer support on how to understand the weather conditions and guide trampers on how to make the Plan B call. It could:

» Be used as a case study for marketing students » Include building suggested algorithm options on website » Involve corporate partners (mandate) » Involve Tourism NZ influencers partnerships WHAT ISSUES DOES THIS SOLUTION AIM TO SUPPRESS? » Destination focus » Took longer than expected » Unprepared for weather conditions » Unprepared for advanced terrain WHY WILL THIS REDUCE INCIDENTS?

By changing attitude and behaviour, trampers will selfmoderate to have a better experience (better weather at destination, less pain/suffering/cold/hunger). WHAT STAGE/S OF THE PARTICIPANT JOURNEY DOES THIS APPLY TO?

HOW EASY IS THIS TO IMPLEMENT? EASY

MED

HARD

» Be a multi-phased solution working at strategic level (nationwide) and reflected in local solutions/actions » Be a publicity orientated campaign (more cost effective) » Use expertise from the Advisory Group

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Above: Nathan Watson

2. Notifications to booked users

What is the proposed solution? From 30 November 2020, Angelus Hut moved to a yearround hut booking system. This provides an opportunity to contact all users who have made a booking. This is beneficial as previously the winter period did not require bookings other than for Queen’s Birthday weekend. This solution proposes sending emails to those booked up to one week prior to their booking. The content of the email would include an area-specific weather forecast, the recommended gear list, the Angelus/Robert Ridge video, information about the ability to change or cancel bookings and alternative options to consider in poor weather. If the weather is appalling or dangerous, a separate email/ text focusing on that should be sent.

WHY WILL THIS REDUCE INCIDENTS?

It directly targets those about to enter the area. It is potentially the last chance to educate/inform or raise potential dangers before they begin to travel and commit fully to the trip. WHAT STAGE/S OF THE PARTICIPANT JOURNEY DOES THIS APPLY TO?

HOW EASY IS THIS TO IMPLEMENT? EASY

MED

WHAT ISSUES DOES THIS SOLUTION AIM TO SUPPRESS? » Destination focus » Unprepared for weather conditions » Unprepared for advanced terrain

Angelus Hut Tracks and Routes | Issue Specific Advisory Group Report

HARD


3. Digital track advisory

What is the proposed solution? DOC uses a Bad Weather Advisory (BWA) for the Tongariro Alpine Crossing which operates on a traffic light system. In reasonable weather a green tick is used, which states “Todays weather is suitable for the Tongariro Alpine Crossing”. In bad weather, a red X appears alongside the statement: “Due to poor weather, hiking the Tongariro Alpine Crossing is not recommended today”. The advisory is applied if any of the following parameters are exceeded at 12 pm or 6 pm for the weather forecast at Red Crater is for: » wind speed of 65 km per hour or greater » wind speed of 50 km per hour or greater, and precipitation of 10 mm or more

The Advisory could be communicated through portable signs which would be erected or removed depending on the circumstances. Alternatively, a digital sign could be developed which could be updated remotely from the Visitor Centre. The advisory should also be communicated through other channels such as at the Nelson Lakes Visitor Centre, on DOCs websites, with NIWA forecast for Nelson Lakes and in MSC’s Plan My Walk app. The Advisory would also be emailed to those booked to stay at Angelus Hut on dates forecast to have a red or amber rating. WHAT ISSUES DOES THIS SOLUTION AIM TO SUPPRESS? » Destination focus

» wind chill of minus 10 degrees Celsius or colder

» Took longer than expected

» wind chill of 0 degrees Celsius or colder with any amount of precipitation

» Unprepared for weather conditions

» precipitation of 13 mm or greater.

WHY WILL THIS REDUCE INCIDENTS?

The advisory group proposes that something similar could be introduced for Angelus.

This should reduce the number of people doing the trip in unfavourable conditions and will reduce incidents related to being uninformed about forecast weather conditions.

» Red would be triggered by snow and strong/gale force winds, or significant avalanche danger. » Amber may be triggered by significant ground snow where ice axe and crampons would be required, or in conditions with strong winds. » Green would exist in other conditions with a reminder to ensure you have plenty of daylight available.

WHAT STAGE/S OF THE PARTICIPANT JOURNEY DOES THIS APPLY TO?

HOW EASY IS THIS TO IMPLEMENT? EASY

MED

HARD

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Above: Nathan Watson

4. Integrated journey signage

What is the proposed solution? Although there is existing signage at the start of the track and at places along the journey, the Advisory Group suggest that an integrated approach to signage is taken which provides simple, clear information at critical decision points along the journey. This may involve an entrance “funnel” to the track, progress signs along the way, and further information in shelters and huts. The entrance funnel would aim to give the walker a clear understanding of how long the journey is likely to take, what the terrain is like at various sections and should aid final decision-making about which route to take given consideration of the current and forecast conditions. This could also include a digital track advisory which would be triggered by forecast weather and ground conditions. Progress signage would be placed at key decision points with the aim of conveying a simple message which relates to the decisions needed to be made or information to be considered at that point. This message may relate to the track being about to get more difficult, advise of limited opportunity to turn back, and advise the length of time required to make it to the hut. This could also contain an elevation profile with “You are here” indicated. These signs will exist specifically to reduce destination focus and to assist decision making to turn around or change plans in bad weather or if there is not sufficient daylight remaining. Information in huts and shelters should also be created which reinforce the message that turning back is always an option. Wording should be clear, communicating the reasons why someone should turn back, e.g. a sign in Relax Shelter may say “If wind is strong here, it will be far worse higher up the ridge. Turn back to Mt Robert carpark, or head across to Bushline Hut.” The group discussed some communications approaches, such as the use of informal, discussion-based wording, however this would be best

decided during the project phase if this solution is chosen. Dr Shelagh Ferguson has offered that her under-grad students at the University of Otago could use this as a case study for suggestion communications approaches. This solution already exists on the Tongariro Alpine Crossing. It may be worth undertaking research to determine whether this has been successful. Certainly a reduction in search and rescue incidents has occurred since this was installed, however several other interventions were also introduced in the same period and so this solution alone cannot be given as the only factor which may have reduced incident numbers. WHAT ISSUES DOES THIS SOLUTION AIM TO SUPPRESS? » Destination focus » Took longer than expected » Unprepared for weather conditions » Unprepared for advanced terrain WHY WILL THIS REDUCE INCIDENTS?

This will aid in decision making along the journey, by prompting trampers to consider the conditions, environment and track/terrain at key decision points. WHAT STAGE/S OF THE PARTICIPANT JOURNEY DOES THIS APPLY TO?

HOW EASY IS THIS TO IMPLEMENT? EASY

MED

Angelus Hut Tracks and Routes | Issue Specific Advisory Group Report

HARD


5. Paid Hut Wardens

What is the proposed solution? Currently DOC utilises volunteer hut wardens during the summer and other busy periods, but generally only over weekends. They are given training in what is expected of them, however as this is a volunteer role, there are many volunteers, all of varying degrees of competence, making regular training challenging. Therefore this is kept to a minimum and simply focused on the essential functions of the role.

WHY WILL THIS REDUCE INCIDENTS?

The Advisory Group suggest that if a paid warden was to be employed for the duration of the “busy season” then more could be expected of them. This warden will be trained specifically for the area and will have a clear understanding of the processes should an incident occur. They could also be tasked in search and rescue responses and be involved in wider SAR training.

They will also be able to provide consistent and reliable information about the conditions at the hut and in the vicinity to the Visitor Centre staff, who can pass this onto trampers planning to head up to the hut. This will reduce inconsistencies in response and provide a faster reaction time should an emergency arise that needs to be actioned immediately.

From a prevention angle, paid hut wardens will be able to assess the weather and support trampers to stay an additional night if severe conditions are likely. They would also be a reliable source for the DOC Visitor Centre of current conditions, including snow depth in winter, providing a valuable source of information for trampers intending to make their way towards Angelus Hut.

Training will be consistent and, in cases of emergency, the knowledge will be there to deal with situations. Training will cover emergency communications (PLB, radios) and weather advisory. They will know what to do in an overdue person situation and be clued up on the trends of ‘problem areas’.

WHAT ISSUES DOES THIS SOLUTION AIM TO SUPPRESS?

This will aid in influencing trampers decisions by assessing the weather the night before and ease the trampers mind that it is okay to stay put to ensure safety and with this consistent messaging it will aid with the ‘destination focused’ stigma. If trampers find themselves in severe weather, then they don’t depart.

WHAT STAGE/S OF THE PARTICIPANT JOURNEY DOES THIS APPLY TO?

» Destination focus » Unprepared for weather conditions » Unprepared for advanced terrain

HOW EASY IS THIS TO IMPLEMENT?

Easy to implement, but costs need to be factored in. EASY

MED

HARD

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6. Consistent National Safety Messaging What is the proposed solution? A consistent national approach to messaging, shared and disseminated by all agencies. This approach should be based on evidence which suggests the most effective ways to get safety messages across. MSC (with DOC, MetService, LandSAR, MaritimeNZ, NZ Police, NZSAR, Auckland Council) have recently launched the “Land Safety Code” which replaces the older Outdoor Safety Code. https://mountainsafety.org.nz/land-safety-code/ https://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/know-before-you-go/land-safety-code/ For this to be successful, all agencies involved will need to incorporate this messaging into their communications. This solution suggests that this messaging needs to be shared by as many agencies as possible. WHAT ISSUES DOES THIS SOLUTION AIM TO SUPPRESS? » Destination focus » Took longer than expected » Unprepared for weather conditions » Unprepared for advanced terrain WHY WILL THIS REDUCE INCIDENTS?

Consistent messaging Reinforces messages Following incidents, the messages can again be reinforced. WHAT STAGE/S OF THE PARTICIPANT JOURNEY DOES THIS APPLY TO?

HOW EASY IS THIS TO IMPLEMENT? EASY

MED

HARD

Right: Bevan Smith

Angelus Hut Tracks and Routes | Issue Specific Advisory Group Report


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Agreed Actions Following the distribution of the provisional report to DOC, a meeting was held between DOC and MSC in June 2021 to discuss each of the proposed solutions and to determine whether to proceed with developing an implementation plan. A summary of the agreed position on each proposed solution is outlined below. Timeframes for each initiative vary, and in some cases must align to programmes of work beyond these recommendations. Therefore, specific dates are yet to be set for most initiatives and each project will work to a unique schedule. 1. Integrated Marketing Campaign   ‘Plan B’ is a key message that needs to be applied within existing messaging channels such as DOC Visitor Centres, websites (not just DOC’s), Plan My Walk, pamphlets etc. This message will be integrated into various stages of the user journey. This concept applies nationally but can be applied to local site-specific messaging. This does not warrant a local campaign (in the Nelson Lakes area). The problem is too specific, and the mechanisms to target locally are too narrow. A marketing campaign requires on-going investment, as once the campaign ends the messaging ends. For these reasons, a marketing campaign is not the best solution, but the objective of the proposed solution can be met through enhancing existing messaging channels and site-specific information. Action: This initiative has relevance across New Zealand, not just in Nelson Lakes National Park. Rather than a defined campaign, this will be implemented through improvement to existing messaging throughout the country to include ‘have a plan B’ messages. The next step is to develop an implementation plan.

2. Notifications to booked users    Notifying booked users of forecast weather and any significant hazards provides a demonstrated value to trampers, as does the provision of other safety information. This proposed initiative is an opportunity for the DOC booking system and use of notifications to be developed further. For this solution to be implemented, DOC and MSC agree that an internal DOC process needs to be developed which results in notifications being sent when certain parameters are met. Action: This initiative has relevance across New Zealand. In addition to being locally applied, DOC and MSC will look to establish this approach so that the benefits can be shared nationally. The next step is to bring the relevant people across DOC together to workshop how the process should function and to use this to develop an implementation plan.

Angelus Hut Tracks and Routes | Issue Specific Advisory Group Report


Above: Bevan Smith

3. Digital track advisory    This solution has merit across any high-risk site. A process with clear guidelines will need to be established to select which sites are appropriate for this intervention. Site-specific weather thresholds will need to be established, which may be unique to each location and season. It will also need to identify the most appropriate channels to use to proactively communicate to users.  Action: This initiative also has relevance across New Zealand. The next step is to establish guidelines to select which sites are appropriate for this type of intervention. 

4. Integrated journey signage    Prevention messaging works best when it convinces behaviour change before a trip is commenced, however there are times when this doesn’t occur in time, and so signage at decision points can be an effective last line of defence. This solution, which prompts trampers to consider the conditions, environment and track/terrain at key decision points along their journey, is an opportunity to communicate with trampers in a timely way. Action: As of June 2021, draft signs have been designed for the various access tracks to Angelus Hut. These are on track to be installed in the 2021-22 financial year.

5. Paid hut wardens   The existing hut warden programme in NLNP is of a very high standard, with further enhancements having been applied following learnings from the most recent tramping fatality. Quality training and induction of hut wardens is the most critical aspect. Further enhancements to national hut warden training and induction may be beneficial. In some specific locations, a paid hut warden may be warranted. Developing clear guidance and a process to determine this is needed. Action: No further action required locally. The next step is to develop nationally consistent guidance and a process to determine where paid hut wardens are needed.

6. Consistent national safety messaging   MSC, along with other partners such as DOC, MetService, LandSAR, MaritimeNZ, NZ Police, NZSAR, Auckland Council are now consistently reinforcing the key messages in the new Land Safety Code. https://mountainsafety.org.nz/land-safety-code https://www.doc.govt.nz/parks-and-recreation/know-before-you-go/land-safety-code/ Action: No further action required as the Land Safety Code now provides an agreed basic standard for key safety messages.

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