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#MakeItHomeNZ

Scaling Success MEASURING THE IMPACT OF TRAMPING SAFETY VIDEOS

PREPARED BY THE NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL


“I found the video the single most valuable resource in gaining information about the walk and what to do to be prepared. Videos such as this should be standard for any major or backcountry tracks so trampers can be well informed about what they can expect.” – RESEARCH PARTICIPANT

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series


Contents Introduction

5

Insights 6-9 Partnerships 10-13 Promotion and Engagement

14-15

Measuring Impact

18-33

Where to from here?

35

Thank you and acknowledgments

35

New Zealand Mountain Safety Council Level 1 Harbour City Centre, 29 Brandon Street | Wellington 6011 info@mountainsafety.org.nz mountainsafety.org.nz All images copyright Mountain Safety Council 2018 Cover photo: LoĂŻc Lassueur, Travers Saddle, Nelson Lakes National Park Inside cover photo: Bevan Smith, Kepler Track, Fiordland National Park

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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4

Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

Above: LoĂŻc Lassueur, Milford Track, Fiordland National Park


Introducing our tramping video project During 2017/2018 the NZ Mountain Safety Council (MSC) developed a series of track-specific tramping videos. The purpose of the video series was to provide a specific planning resource that could be used in the ‘active tripplanning’ phase of trip preparations. The videos aimed to provide highly engaging content utilising techniques such as animations, 3D mapping and drone footage. Each video focuses on content relevant to that track. They cover topics such as the terrain, key weather factors to consider, walking times, key decision making points, common risks and hazards as well as any specific skills required to safely navigate a particular section/s of the track. Ultimately the videos aim to help trampers make it home safely.

You can use the camera on your phone to watch the videos online. Open camera and hold over this QR code, tap the link. Or visit www.bitly.com/AlpTramp

This publication provides a detailed account of the video-based prevention initiative. It has been developed specifically to showcase the key elements which were critical to the success of this video series. Most notably, the impact research which was conducted over the summer of 2018/2019 provides clear evidence that the video series has had a significant positive impact on user behaviour. While the impact research may be the key success measure of this prevention initiative there are many factors that contributed to this outcome. The success of this initiative provides a blueprint for future prevention tactics.

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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Insights

Above: LoĂŻc Lassueur Aoraki/Mt Cook National Park

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series


Evidence-based decision making During 2017 the MSC team was working on an insights project focussed on the activity of tramping. Combining both incident (safety) data and participation data, the project used 1 eight different data sources . The results produced the most comprehensive dataset of tramping safety incidents available in New Zealand.

As MSC explored these track-specific incidents in greater detail several factors become apparent:

The project was guided by an insights roadmap; a list of key questions that MSC sought answers to. A simple example of these questions was ‘How many trampers are involved in a Search and Rescue (SAR) each day/month/year?’. The project had over 150 research questions with some requiring highly complex coding, analysis and statistical modelling.

2. I n almost all situations safety incidents were concentrated to specific sections of a track. For example, on the Milford Track the vast majority of Search and Rescues occur between Pompolona Lodge and Dumpling Hut. This is the alpine section over MacKinnon Pass. While this may not be a surprise given the nature of the terrain, typical weather and arduous nature of the ascent/descent, it does highlight the fact that it is this section of the multi-day walk where more people are experiencing safety incidents.

In total, the findings numbered into the hundreds of Excel sheets, each focussed on answering one of the insight roadmap questions. This project eventually resulted in the publication of A Walk in the Park? which is available on the MSC website.

A Walk in the Park? contains approximately 10% of the wider project findings. The remaining findings are used internally by MSC for its prevention work, and are made available to partner organisations to support their evidence-based decision making. Through this insights project it became clear there were a number of key tramping tracks in which higher numbers of safety incidents were occurring.

You can use the camera on your phone to read A Walk in the Park?’ online. Open camera and hold over this QR code, tap the link. Or visit www.bitly.com/awitp

1. T  he majority of safety incidents were believed to be entirely preventable (we had specifically removed the small number of medical events). E.g. Heart attacks

3. One reasonably common factor amongst the top tracks (especially in terms of Search and Rescue events) was the theme around the ‘alpine section’ of the walk. For example, Poukirikiri/Travers Saddle includes reasonably straightforward valley travel either side of an alpine saddle (pass) crossing. It’s on this section that most safety incidents occur. By the time MSC’s business planning was in full swing around May 2017 the concept of an ‘Alpine Tramping Video Series’ had begun to take shape. It was clear to MSC that there were a number of tracks which could feature in an initial series, and that these videos could utilise both our newly developed track level insights and local expert knowledge to craft highly specific content. After securing funding via the MSC’s major funder, the New Zealand Lottery Grants Board, work began on making the series a reality.

1. A  CC Injury Claims, NZ Police Category 1 SAR, Rescue Co-ordination Centre Category 2 SAR, Coronial Services Unit Fatalities, Sport NZ Active NZ Participation Survey, Department of Conservation participation; track counters and booking data, Auckland Council participation and visitation data and MBIE International Visitor Survey.

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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Why these tracks? A number of factors were used to finalise the 12 tracks that feature in the series, the primary one being to focus on tracks that have the highest number of safety incidents. The list on the following page features each of the 12 tracks and their ranking on a national list of tracks by tramping Search and Rescue count over a seven-year period between 2010 to 2017. In addition to the Search and Rescue numbers we also considered tramping fatalities and, where known, the location of moderate to severe injuries. While some of the tracks featured in the series are lower down the Search and Rescue list they were included for other reasons. Two examples of this were Waiau Pass and Gertrude Saddle. Waiau Pass serves as the first true test of a South Island alpine pass for walkers completing the Te Araroa Trail. While there’s no evidence that these walkers are at a higher risk than others, or that they account for more safety incidents, the feeling was that with the increasing popularity of the Te Araroa Trail it would be wise to have this resource available for anyone who intends giving this section a go in the future. Gertrude Saddle Route has experienced a significant increase in popularity in recent years, partially attributed to user-generated visitor (domestic and international) promotion via social media platforms like Instagram. Its ranking on the list changes considerably when we added in the two fatalities which occurred during 2016 and 2017 (a further fatality occurred in April 2018 after we had already filmed the video but before the video was released). RANK OF TRACKS BASED ON TRAMPING SEARCH AND RESCUE EVENTS (2010-17) Tongariro Alpine Crossing

1st

Milford Track

2nd

Mt Taranaki Summit Route

3rd

Ben Lomond Track

5th equal

Routeburn Track

5th equal

Mueller Hut Route/ Sealy Tarns

8th

Poukirikiri Travers Sabine Circuit

9th

Robert Ridge Route/Angelus Hut

10th

Kepler Track 19th Gertrude Saddle Route

20th

Waiau Pass 22nd Cascade Saddle Route

Left: Bevan Smith, Routeburn Track, Fiordland National Park

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

Outside the top 30 for SAR but a known fatality hotspot


TONGARIRO ALPINE CROSSING

MT TARANAKI SUMMIT ROUTE

POUKIRIKIRI/TRAVERS SADDLE

ROBERT RIDGE ROUTE Used for research

WAIAU PASS

MUELLER HUT ROUTE Used for research

ROUTEBURN TRACK Used for research

CASCADE SADDLE TRACK

BEN LOMOND TRACK

GERTRUDE SADDLE

MILFORD TRACK

KEPLER TRACK Below: Bevan Smith, Cascade Saddle Route, Mt. Aspiring National Park

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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Partnerships

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

Above: Bevan Smith, Ben Lomond, Queenstown-Lakes District


“Your videos are fantastic and provide essential and easy to digest information for tourists and less experienced trampers. Please continue making them and hopefully more people will be better prepared for the wilderness!” – RESEARCH PARTICIPANT

We didn’t want to do this alone Involving partners was a key contributing factor to the success of this series. As each of the 12 tracks were managed by the Department of Conservation (DOC) it was essential that they were onboard early. DOC was a major supporter throughout the entire project. Critically, their regional operations staff were heavily involved as ‘local experts’ helping to shape and contextualise the video content. In addition, DOC waived all concession fees, approved helicopter access and allowed for drone filming in otherwise highly restricted areas. For two of the locations, Tongariro Alpine Crossing and Mt Taranaki Summit Route, local iwi were also significant contributors and great enablers of these videos. While the videos focussed on safety, it was important to also include elements of cultural expectations and we were pleased to be able to focus on these points, most notably around protocols associated with not standing on the summit and the importance of specific features like Emerald Lakes. Six other Mountain Safety Council member organisations also played critical roles. MetService, NZ Police, NZ Alpine Club, NZ Outdoor Instructors Association, NZ Mountain Guides Association and LandSAR all contributed time and expertise through the content development phases and post-production video reviews. Like DOC and iwi, their networks of members were essential in engaging ‘local experts’. Further partners were involved at other stages throughout the project, notably Litmus Marketing for their masterful data analytics and statistical work, Research NZ for their ability to develop and deliver a very successful research project, and Quite Nice Films, who were with us every step of the journey through rain, hail and sunshine in the hills and countless hours of editing work. The success of the series is in large part due to the magic they delivered.

Top to bottom: Photos by Bevan Smith - Kepler Track, Milford Track, Cascade Saddle, Milford Track.

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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Content development There were two primary elements which ensured the successful development of each video’s unique content: track level insights (data) and local expert knowledge. The importance of both elements working symbiotically cannot be overstated. At every key stage of the content development local experts (and partners) were involved. Content development for the videos followed a five-step process. Pre-script planning > script writing > storyboards > filming > post-production.

Above: Behind the scenes and screenshots from the Tramping Video Series

VIDEO PRODUCTION

LOCAL EXPERT KNOWLEDGE

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

TRACK INSIGHTS (DATA)


“As a mountain tramping lover, I am so happy to see these series of videos!!! That’s what I really would love to check before I go tramping. You are really doing a great job! Please make more videos, for example, Dusky Track, Rees- Dart Track, Tongariro.” – RESEARCH PARTICIPANT PRE-SCRIPT PLANNING This step provided the initial opportunity for each of the local experts to contribute their knowledge. This knowledge was considered alongside the track-level insights MSC had developed. A detailed document covering the key points for each video was developed through these conversations and this was used to draft the scripts and storyboards. SCRIPTING & STORYBOARDS The pre-script documents were then used to create a draft script, this was the content that would feature in the voice-over dialogue. With a draft script in place an initial storyboard could be developed. These storyboards allowed those reviewing the content to see the visual style and features such as animations and maps alongside the content. The storyboards were a pivotal tool that needed to be in place before filming began. FILMING From mid December 2017 to late March 2018, MSC undertook seven dedicated filming trips covering all 12 video locations. Each filming trip had three or four people, with each person playing a role of some description. The team had to carry a lot of gear between them and other than a couple of the day-trip videos, usually had between 20-30kg gear each. Most of this weight was attributed to the vast quantity of camera equipment and accessories. With no power supply for up to four days of filming a lot of batteries were required to keep the two cameras and drone operational. POSTPRODUCTION With so many videos involved, postproduction was a complex process. Between March and September 2018 editing of the 12 videos took place. The local experts and partners who had contributed to the earlier content development were once again involved in reviewing and providing feedback. 3D mapping (where available) was added into the videos after filming as we felt this provided a more effective way of displaying information than just using a 2D topographical map. Animations were added after the bulk of the footage had been selected and placed and this became a key feature of the series as it supported the engaging content and helped to convey key information.

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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Promotion and Engagement

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

Above: Bevan Smith, Cascade Saddle Route, Mt Aspiring National Park


99% Positive reactions on Youtube

Reaching the participants Over several weeks during October 2018, 9 of the 12 videos were released. Each video was initially promoted via the MSC Facebook Page and supported by many of the partners sharing the content to their own pages and audiences. Additionally, the videos were uploaded to the MSC YouTube channel which gave partners the ability to embed the videos into their own websites.

REACH METRICS OCTOBER 2018 TO 31 AUGUST 2019

DOC was a key channel for reaching people in the active trip planning phase and each of the videos was embedded on their relevant website pages.

FACEBOOK VIDEO VIEWS

712,576

TOTAL FACEBOOK REACH

2,300+ FACEBOOK SHARES

Three videos; Robert Ridge Route, Mueller Hut Route and Routeburn Track were withheld from public release so MSC and Research NZ could conduct impact research.

6,000+ FACEBOOK LIKES

The following metrics are counted from when each of the videos were released, therefore they represent a slightly different length of time for each video. They also include the three videos that weren’t released until after the impact research (April 2019) so the metrics underrepresent a true reflection of the series popularity.

YOUTUBE METRICS PER VIDEO

252,314

3,500+ FACEBOOK COMMENTS 198,697 YOUTUBE VIEWS

TOTAL VIEWS

TOTAL EXTERNAL VIEWS

AVERAGE VIEW LENGTH (OF TOTAL)

% THAT WATCHED UNTIL THE END

Tongariro Alpine Crossing

44,070

21,061

57.3%

27.5%

Mt Taranaki Summit Route

21,346

8,989

58.4%

26.0%

Robert Ridge Track*

2,646

978

59.6%

35.3%

Poukirikiri/Travers Saddle

6,268

2,190

60.1%

31.2%

Waiau Pass

5,348

863

56.0%

33.0%

Mueller Hut Route*

4,204

1,700

60.8%

26.9%

Cascade Saddle

12,300

3,223

54.9%

24.9%

Gertrude Saddle Route

16,796

7,984

55.3%

8.6%

Routeburn Track*

9,323

5,048

62.4%

26.8%

Ben Lomond

17,974

9,524

55.1%

24.9%

Milford Track

35,491

17,492

59.4%

27.6%

Kepler Track

28,226

15,798

61.4%

22.0%

*Released April 2019 N.B. External views include: DOC Website, other partner websites, media/PR.

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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What did they have to say? – QUOTES FROM RESEARCH PARTICIPANTS

‘What a great resource! Nice job DOC. If I was attempting a more challenging walk here again I would search for a similar video.’

‘Impressed with the quality and clarity of the information - hope there are ways we can encourage more people to watch them, as they seem effective at [conveying] a lot of important messages in an accessible way.’

‘[I] Shared the video on a blog so more people can benefit from it, and to support more videos like this being produced. Can’t beat seeing real footage of the conditions you might come across, e.g. climbing rocks, using at least three points of contact.’

‘The content and production quality are outstanding. Please come over to Australia to train Australian National Parks on how to do [this] well.’

‘Definitely a good idea! It’s hard to make out some of the more finer details of the walk when just looking at the standard DOC PDF pamphlets of the walks.’

‘Great idea and very informative - should be compulsory viewing for anyone attempting these tracks.’

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

Above: Loïc Lassueur, Queenstown-Lakes District


‘I think they’re fantastic, generally. I’m not the target audience (I don’t think - lots of mountaineering experience, sub-alpine and alpine tramping for years, now starting to do overnighters with my kids...) but they WERE really good for getting the kids [ready].’

‘I think they are a valuable resource, I am an experienced hiker and trailer runner and have lived in NZ for a while but still found them very useful and helpful for planning my hike. Especially since I was traveling with someone less fit than I.’ ‘I will buy wet weather rain pants. Was going to try and get by with shorts.’

‘I really enjoy how informative and helpful the information in the videos is, especially for more dangerous walks with potential safety hazards. Thanks DOC!’

‘In my opinion, these videos are very helpful for a person who is new to the region or even to the activity. It informs them of the important aspects of the track and help them make decisions on what to carry with them and what to expect on the track.’

‘It’s extremely helpful to give an idea about what to expect when you are not in New Zealand country, to make preparation efforts appropriate.’

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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Measuring Impact

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

Above: LoĂŻc Lassueur, Lake Angelus, Nelson Lakes National Park


“In my 35 plus years’ experience, I have never ever seen behavioural results as strong as these that can be attributed to one single initiative. There is no doubt, the videos have had a significant positive impact on trampers’ safety-related behaviour.” – EMANUEL KALAFATELIS, DIRECTOR RESEARCH NZ AND FELLOW OF THE RESEARCH ASSOCIATION OF NEW ZEALAND (RANZ)

Research objectives and methodology We knew this project was unlike anything we had attempted before, and that this would require some form of dedicated research to determine the video’s impacts. To answer ‘How will we know the videos have been a success?’ MSC turned to Research NZ for their expertise. Through mid-2018 the details of this project were developed and the decision to delay the public release of three videos was made. This would allow Research NZ to conduct a comprehensive, controlled, research methodology without participants seeing the video in a public environment.

Research participants were recruited via a co-branded email invitation. The email encouraged lead bookers to register for the research and then to share the research registration with other members of their walking party (the DOC booking system only captures lead booker contact details, so we had to request lead bookers to share with others). After participants had registered for the research, they were randomly divided into either a ‘Test’ or ‘Control’ Group. The Test Group were exposed to the video prior to their walk, whereas the Control Group were not. Both groups saw the video after their walk. Both groups completed a survey seven days prior to their walk and seven days after their walk ended.

The research objectives were aligned to the purpose of the videos. Specifically, the research set out to measure:

Participation in the research project was incentivised. Six prize packs were available through a random draw, available to all participants who completed the full research programme. Each of the winners were randomly selected and received their prizes in May 2019.

»» Were the videos increasing awareness and knowledge? »» Were the videos increasing trip preparedness? »» Were the videos enabling more effective decision making? To achieve this the research utilised a randomised control experimental survey design. This methodology required that no participants had seen the videos outside of the research. By selecting the Routeburn Track, Mueller Hut Route and Robert Ridge Route Research NZ was able to access booking contact details for the relevant track huts, over the 2018/19 summer booking season. DOC supplied those contact details as a key project partner, through a secure and confidential portal, only accessible by the Research NZ team.

An additional 278 trampers completed the pre-walk survey but did not finish the post-walk survey. Their results have not been included in the findings. Total N=924

Test Group N=466

Control Group N=458

RESEARCH PROCESS REGISTRATION

CONTACT DETAILS VIA DOC

SURVEY 1

SURVEY 2

CONTROL GROUP

CONTROL GROUP

ALL POTENTIAL RESPONDENTS

TRAMP TEST GROUP

TEST GROUP

* Watched the video NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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“I understand more about where to make decisions about the walk. Will listen carefully to the info available at the St Arnaud DOC office. Will be more prepared to turn back if weather is not good.” – RESEARCH PARTICIPANT

Research findings context 47% 41%

6%

5% BEGINNER

INTERMEDIATE ADVANCED

Walkers could self-select their tramping experience and ability. They were grouped into four categories. There was very little difference across the three tracks or between the Test and Control Groups.

EXPERT

Most people were completing the walk for the first time, there was very little difference across the three tracks or between the Test and Control Groups.

84% Were doing their walk for the first time

New Zealander

There was a reasonably even spread between International Visitors and New Zealanders. This was a self-selection question based on identifying your home country.

46% Home country of Test and Control Group Respondents

54%

International Visitor

Total Respondents N=924

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series


“You’re doing a great job. The video helped us a lot to re-plan everything. Keep doing what you’re doing and I think people will take it more seriously and will be much more safety conscious.” – RESEARCH PARTICIPANT

Almost finished

42% Middle stage

26% 25% Early stage

Finished

6%

95% Watched the video right to the end

When asked what stage of planning their trip they were in, most responded they were somewhere between the middle stage and finished, with the highest category somewhere in-between those two stages. This question was answered approximately seven days prior to their trip starting and reflects the fact that most people were still in a period of ‘active preparation’.

When the Test Group were shown the video as part of the research almost all people watched the whole video to the end. Only 5% skipped some parts of the video. The ability to ‘fast forward’ parts of the video was consciously left enabled so we could measure how many people watched the whole thing. A very small number of those who skipped sections was due to internet issues.

Neutral Not enjoyable

4% Overall, 95% of all trampers stated they found their walk enjoyable. Only 1% didn’t enjoy their trip.

67%

25% 41%

Response to how they enjoyed their walk

95% Enjoyed their walk

Total Respondents N=924

Test Group N=466 NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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“I will make sure to write down the information about the important decision points and the left turn in the saddle that can be easy to miss.” – RESEARCH PARTICIPANT

Did they learn anything? Having watched the video prior to departing, some participants felt more, or less, prepared.

Less prepared

6%

About the same

54%

40%

Felt more prepared

95%

Learned something new

SPECIFICALLY....

15%

18%

Increased knowledge of hazards along the track

Increased overall understanding of the track

85%

82% Yes

Test Group N=466

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22%

Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

Yes

Places to make key decisions

78% Yes


“I was a bit surprised at the average summer temperatures quoted and might take an extra layer of clothing.” – RESEARCH PARTICIPANT

Would it change their behaviour?

76%

85%

of Test Group respondents said they would make changes to their plans as a result of the video

of International Visitor Test Group respondents said they would make changes to their plans as a result of the video

What changes would the Test Group respondents make in their planning after watching the video?

41%

Check the weather forecast ahead of walking

34%

Speak to a DOC staff member

28%

Research where key decisions may be made

26%

Plan the right food and water Research hazards

24%

Visit MSC website or social media

24%

Check have right equipment

23%

Research alternative routes for if weather turns bad

23% 20%

Check safety equipment

15%

Visit DOC website or social media page Leave outdoor intentions Change departure time to earlier Talk to others with experience

14% 13% 12%

Make none of the above changes

Test Group N=466

24%

International Visitor Test Group N=256

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“Will watch this video again with the whole group and will check in at the DOC centre in Mt Cook before starting walk.” – RESEARCH PARTICIPANT

Did people talk about the video?

89%

Of Test Group talked about the advice in the video

SPECIFICALLY....

59%

Talked about the advice before the walk

Test Group N=369 (they had to be part of a walking group)

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

6%

Talked about the advice on the walk

24%

Talked about the advice before and during the walk


“I’ll take poles for walking and definitely wear hiking boots, I was potentially going to wear trail trainers.’’ – RESEARCH PARTICIPANT

Net Promoter Score Net Promoter Score is a method used to gauge the loyalty of a customer to a brand or product. In this case it represents the research participants likelihood to recommend the videos to another person.

43

The Test Group respondents gave the videos a Net Promoter Score of 43. This is an incredibly high score.

Net Promoter Score (NPS)

48% gave the videos a rating of 10. The NPS is calculated by taking the Promoters (57%) and subtracting the Detractors (14%) to leave a score of 43. 48%

17% 11% 6% 2% 0

DON’T KNOW

2%

1%

1%

1%

1

2

3

4

NOT AT ALL LIKELY

DETRACTORS 14%

5

NEUTRAL

9%

3% 6

7

8 PASSIVE 28%

9

10

EXTREMELY LIKELY

PROMOTERS 57%

Test Group N=466

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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“They’re a fantastic resource - please continue to produce them!?” – RESEARCH PARTICIPANT

How did they make them feel?

Test Group N=466

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

74%

MORE INFORMED

74%

EXCITED

28%

CONFIDENT

23%

NERVOUS

15%

INTRIGUED

3%

FEARFUL

1%

CONFUSED

3%

NONE OF THESE

0%

DISINTERESTED


84%

Of Test Group respondents rated the videos as interesting and engaging

Above: LoĂŻc Lassueur, Lake Constance, Nelson Lakes National Park

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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“Brilliant idea to have a series of videos - they distil critical information into a few minutes. I’d spent time researching the Mueller Hut Route online and while all the necessary information is available, video format is much easier to digest.” – RESEARCH PARTICIPANT

Comparing the groups after their walks Comparisons between the Test Group, who saw the video prior to their trip, and the Control Group, who never saw the video before their trip, reveals further success.

After walking the tracks, both groups were asked if the video was valuable for the planning process

54%

87%

57%

32% 30%

Of the Control Group rated the video as valuable for planning future walks

10% 9% 1%

0%

3%

1%

2

1

NOT VALUABLE AT ALL

3

4

5

VERY VALUABLE

After walking the tracks, both groups were asked if they would look for similar videos for future walks

55% 55%

78%

Of the Control Group would be likely to search for similar videos when planning future walks

21% 23% 15% 4%

Test Group N=466

4%

1

NOT AT ALL LIKELY

Control Group N=458

28

Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

5% 2

10%

6% 3

4

5

VERY LIKELY


“I think they are very helpful and I would definitely watch one again prior to a walk. More informative than YouTube videos as the terrain/course shots are clear and easy to understand.” – RESEARCH PARTICIPANT

How was their experience? Comparing the two groups based on their expectations of how challenging each walk would be shows the difference watching the video made. Overall, the Test Group found their trips less challenging than they expected and the Control Group found their trips more challenging than expected. Remember, the only difference between these two groups was the exposure to the video prior to their walk (Test Group).

TEST GROUP

CONTROL GOUP

Less challenging than I expected

22%

16%

About the level I expected

65%

61%

More challenging than I expected

13%

23%

Test Group N=466

Control Group N=458

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“Very valuable video! It made a big difference to my knowledge and confidence while tramping. I had previously walked down Robert Ridge about 30 years ago, so I thought I knew enough, but the video provided a timely reminder for me and allowed me to inform my group (who were first timers).” – RESEARCH PARTICIPANT

What did they experience? Overall, the most common safety-related involvement was ‘getting cold/wet/hungry and fatigued’; experienced by 12% of the Control Group and 7% of the Test Group. Across the ten other factors there was no difference in the two groups. Only 3% of both groups suffered a physical injury, that’s about 27 of the 924 people. Both Test and Control Groups were asked if they experienced any of the following on their walk:

7% Got cold/wet/hungry and fatigued

12% 6%

Difficulty in attempting to cross a section of the track

9% 6%

Needed to turn around/ change your plans

6% 4%

Underprepared for the conditions

Suffered a phyisical injury (sprain/fracture)

5% 3% 3%

Overdue and/or out in the dark when you didn’t expect to

74%

Of the Test Group did not experience any safetyrelated incidents

2% 1%

Got left behind/separated from your group

2% 2%

Experience an equipment failure

1% 2%

Suffered a medical event (allergy/sting/illness)

1% 1%

No mobile phone coverage and needed to make an emergency call

0% 0%

Lost and unsure of where you are and what to do

0% 0%

Test Group N=466

Control Group N=458

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

67%

Of the Control Group did not experience any safetyrelated incidents


“These videos are great and will save lives. Most importantly, show people the real range of conditions, including things like, winter versus summer, the length of time a hiker can expect to be climbing a very steep slope, as this will motivate people to [be more prepared].”

What would they do differently?

– RESEARCH PARTICIPANT

Even after their walk, keeping in mind the low involvement in safety-related issues and very high enjoyment factor, more than half (51%) of the Control Group respondents stated they would have made changes to their planning had they seen the video pre-walk.

Research where key decisions may be made

20%

Research hazards

20% 16%

Research alternative routes for if weather turns bad

12%

Visit MSC website or social media Change departure time to earlier

7%

Speak to a DOC staff member

7%

Check safety equipment

7% 6%

Check the weather forecast ahead of walking Leave outdoor intentions

5%

Plan the right food and water

5%

Visit DOC website or social media page Would have done something else Make none of the above changes

51%

Of Control Group respondents would have made changes

3% 2% 49%

Control Group N=458

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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95%

Of Test Group respondents found the changes they made because of the videos were useful

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

Above: LoĂŻc Lassueur, Travers Saddle, Nelson Lakes National Park


76%

90%

Said they would make changes to their plans

A measurable change in behaviour was recorded across 8 different behavioural factors Despite the clear success of the videos, the most significant outcome was confirmation that the videos were creating measurable behaviour change. Using a special analytical test called ‘pair-wise comparison’ we can examine the results of each and every respondent, rather than just looking at them as part of a big group. Specifically, this allows us to measure what the Test Group said they would do after watching the video, and then compare that to what they actually did do. As previously showcased earlier in the findings, 76% of the Test Group said they’d make changes to their plans after watching the video. An incredible 90% of them actually followed through on those changes.

Of them actually made these changes

Said they would...

of them actually did do it

41%

Check the weather

92%

34%

Speak to DOC Staff

84%

28%

Research key decision making points

67%

26%

Plan right food and water needed

82%

24%

Research hazards along the track

65%

24%

Visit MSC Website or social media

42%

23%

Check equipment, clothing, footwear

88%

23%

Research alternative routes if weather turned poor

43%

Test Group N=466

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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Where to from here?

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

Above: Bevan Smith, Routeburn Track, Fiordland National Park


We will continue to develop video resources with our partners The evidence is clear: these videos are working. Based on the success of series one, MSC has committed to producing more prevention focussed video content of this nature. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS None of this would have been possible without the support of many key partners, thank you. Direct project funder: Lottery Grants Board Insights funders: Lottery Grants Board Sport NZ Project Partners: Department of Conservation MetService New Zealand NZ Police NZ Alpine Club NZ Outdoor Instructors Association NZ Mountain Guides Association LandSAR Te Korowai o Ngāruahine Trust Ngāti Hikairo Ki Tongariro Filming & Production Quite Nice Films Impact Research Research NZ Data Analysis & Statistics Litmus Marketing

Ngāti Hikairo Ki Tongariro

NZ MOUNTAIN SAFETY COUNCIL | 2019

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#MakeItHomeNZ

mountainsafety.org.nz

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Scaling Success | Tramping Video Series

Profile for New Zealand Mountain Safety Council

Scaling Success - Measuring the Impact of Tramping safety Videos 2019  

During 2017/2018 the NZ Mountain Safety Council (MSC) developed a series of track-specific tramping videos. The purpose of the video serie...

Scaling Success - Measuring the Impact of Tramping safety Videos 2019  

During 2017/2018 the NZ Mountain Safety Council (MSC) developed a series of track-specific tramping videos. The purpose of the video serie...