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September 2021

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Solid and stable Paving the way in forestry roading

Managing hand-arm vibration risk


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contents SEPTEMBER 2021

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FOREST TALK Chinese log demand still strong, for now...; Government says it won’t limit timber exports; Port build-ups highlight concerns; Ports to continue loading under COVID Level 4; Cancel coal but think twice about oil, say stakeholders; Afforestation report raises questions; New head for Te Uru Rākau; Ban on methyl bromide aboard ships; On pride and passion; Resurgence of interest in mechanised planting; Academic scholarship for forestry student; Tough trio. SHAW’S WIRE ROPES IRON TEST Times have been tough for KFT Logging after crew boss, William ‘Hoot’ Knowles, died suddenly during a wood chopping tournament in Australia two

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years ago. But they’re a resilient lot over in Gisborne. Instead of selling up, Hoot’s wife Sharon was determined to keep the crew going and, together with eldest son, Steven, and a core of loyal employees, they got things back on track. Now they have added a brand new Hitachi ZX290L-5G loader/ shoveller into the mix. 34

BREAKING OUT When the lease on their Upper Moutere hop farm came to an end, Marlene Taylor said, “Good, now we can buy a house”. Her husband Bob disagreed, “No, we can buy a bulldozer”. That first bulldozer was a brand new, bright yellow Fiat Allis AD14 and was a big investment for

the Taylors at the time. It was 1971 and Taylors Contracting was born. 44

WORKER WELLNESS Though there are obvious potential dangers working in forestry, there are also hidden threats. Vibration from tools and machines is one of them. Learn about hand-arm vibration syndrome and what you can do to prevent it.

DEPARTMENTS 2 editorial 46 fica 48 top spot 53 new iron 58 classifieds

September 2021 | NZ LOGGER 1


from the editor

Solid and stable Paving the way in forestry roading

Managing hand-arm vibration risk

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September 2021

KFT Logging’s Sharon Knowles and son, Steven, with their new Hitachi ZX290L-5G loader/ shoveller.

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TOOLS ARE DOWN, MACHINES STAND STILL AND OUR FORESTS are eerily quiet as COVID Level 4 lockdown swiftly takes hold of the industry. The settings for this Alert Level 4 are very similar to those of last year, which means forestry is still not an essential service. The hope is that by the time you pick up this magazine, industry will be up and running again but with the Delta variant making its way swiftly through Auckland, and now on to Wellington, predictions for next week or the week after are anyone’s guess. ‘Communicate, communicate, communicate’ is the message from FICA. For now, this is a three-day lockdown, and in the Auckland/Coromandel areas a little longer with a ‘more intense, more thorough appproach to see ourselves out of this situation’. Since it is out of our hands, make the most of this time with your family. Sleep late, hug your kids in the morning and tuck them into bed at night. And get some well-earned rest, ready for the bush to welcome you back with open arms. What will we come back to? Well, as you’ll see in our Forest Talk pages, demand for logs from China is still strong but the winter slowdown is upon us, and woodlot owners and contractors are being more cautious. On the plus side, the Government is taking note of the warning bells signalled by the recent port build-ups, allowing ports to continue loading ships during the COVID Level 4 lockdown with the associated positive knock-on effect down the forestry supply chain. Also in this issue, you’ll find a forestry roading legacy left by roading legend, Bob Taylor. Half a century after he bought his first bulldozer, Taylors Contracting is thriving, specialising in forestry infrastructure construction and maintenance, earthmoving, civil engineering construction, and quarry services throughout the South Island. And no one will deny that a hard day’s work takes a toll on our bodies. When you pick up a chainsaw or any other power tool, hand-arm vibration doesn’t immediately come to mind, but by the time numbing, tingling or lack of strength show-up, it may be too late. We hope our Worker Wellness article this month reminds you to take care of your body and be aware of risks and how to manage them. It’s the only body you’re going to get. Until next time, stay safe.

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forest talk

Chinese log demand still strong, for now... THE MINISTRY FOR PRIMARY INDUSTRIES (MPI) MOST RECENT report prior to the latest COVID-19 Delta variant outbreak, predicts log exports will reach $3.6 billion in the year ending June 2021, led by demand from China raising prices and incentivising harvesting. This is an increase of 25.5% compared to the previous year, following four consecutive quarters of growth. This strong demand has pushed log export prices near the record levels observed in 2018-19. The strong demand for logs has been driven by increased construction activity and further supported by supply constraints such as the ban on Australian logs, and a reduction in global shipping capacity. New Zealand remains the largest supplier of softwood logs to China followed by Germany, Russia, the US, Uruguay, and the Czech Republic. China’s log imports from most countries have been growing, including New Zealand, and accounted for 83.3% of New Zealand’s total volume of log exports in the year ended March 2021. Log export revenue is forecast to reach $3.8 billion in the year ending June 2022, on the back of continued strong demand as China ramps up infrastructure projects. But Chinese buyers are finally pushing back on the prices being asked for by NZ exporters. The outlook for log prices is expected to decline slightly due to increased supply from other countries. In-market prices have eased after peaking at about USD194 per JASm3. The value of a log delivered to China is now about USD10 lower than this, and further downwards price pressure is expected. European and South American foresters anticipate increased log shipments to China, which is likely to put downward pressure on New Zealand log prices. It’s not clear whether Russia’s proposed log export ban in early 2022 will be a complete or phased-in ban, but nevertheless, the ban is expected to partly offset the impact of increased supply into China and support New Zealand log demand and prices in the medium-term. The annual slowdown during the winter months (China’s hot summer), as well as an oversupply caused by the high prices from earlier this year will also influence the softening of the demand for logs in China. The closure of some of China’s mills has further eroded short-term demand for logs. The strength of the domestic

market, combined with the challenges and cost of getting product to export markets, may mean more home-grown timber stays on NZ shores. Added to this, forestry owners, particularly wood lots, are more reluctant to harvest with prices undetermined and the usual winter slowdown. There are hopes that prices will start to rise again around springtime, leading to more harvesting and renewed work for contractors. However, the influence of the new COVID remains to be seen. As New Zealand’s second largest log export market, accounting for 8.0% of total log exports, demand for logs from South Korea slowed over the past few years as economic growth has weakened, says MPI. In addition, importers are forced to compete on price with Chinese importers, so while volumes have decreased, the value of exports has remained relatively steady, as rising Chinese demand has lifted prices. Export volumes to South Korea are expected to remain low as Australian logs are being rerouted following China’s ban on them, placing further downward pressure on demand for New Zealand logs. India’s demand for New Zealand logs plunged due to the COVID-19 pandemic and is yet to rebound. Export volumes are down 69.5% in the year ended March 2021 compared to last year. India now accounts for only 2.0% of total log exports. Demand from India is expected to remain subdued for the rest of the calendar year, as COVID-19 cases remain high. In addition, Australian logs have been redirected to India after China banned them, putting pressure on this market. Over the medium-term, demand from India is expected to increase as the pandemic wanes and conditions improve there. NZL

Government says it won’t limit timber exports MATERIALS SHORTAGES, LABOUR shortages, supply delays and increased costs are now all part of the everyday experience of those in the building industry. The postlockdown housing market boom has seen house prices skyrocket, with the lack of supply cited as one of the main reasons. Government has backtracked on its cited intention to put limits on timber exports as one option to protect domestic supply, with Minister for Building and Construction, Poto Williams, recently saying Government would

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not be interfering in timber exports. Just as well, with word from the industry strong on delays: • Merchant shelves are almost empty of timber framing, plywood and engineered timber beams. Concrete can take weeks to arrive. Window joinery takes months. • Imported items have even longer delays due to shipping, container supply and transport hold ups. Claddings can now take 18 weeks if you are lucky enough to get your order in on time.

• Some major contractors will not quote for work involving structural steel due to the uncertainty of supply and pricing. Prices can change within the day, up or down by 20%. • With design, planning, and consenting, there are delays. Council staff are overloaded and seldom meet their 20 day processing targets. Even bookings for a building inspection can be weeks out. • Electrical components and whiteware can also be months out, if even available.


forest talk

Not surprising then that Minister Williams had received advice that some suppliers were already increasing structural timber production over the next six months, reducing exports, and moving stock from the South Island to the North Island where demand was higher. “This government has already signalled our intention for building products to be the subject of a market study by the Commerce Commission.” In March, Carter Holt Harvey stopped supplying wood products to major retailers. Carter Holt, the country’s largest producer of structural timber, said at the time there had been “short-term industry-wide” supply issues. Julien Leys, chief executive of the Building Industry Federation, says the structural timber shortage is the worst in living memory. COVID-19 related shipping delays disrupting imports, declining relations between Australia and China, less domestic sawmill production (and local sawmill shut-downs), big domestic demand, more structural timber exports and strong export demand in general, have all contributed to the shortage, which he says is likely to continue for at least another year.

Solutions from industry players include increasing output, bringing back timber from export markets to supply locally and managing supply with careful movement of stock. Supply constraints are expected to be tight into the new year. These shortages are not a domestic issue, as increased demand for building materials is occurring globally. Suggestions to Government to facilitate the building industry’s growth and meet housing

demands include: • Allow in more skilled immigrants. • Provide incentives for companies to set up local manufacturing of building products. • Establish a system whereby sufficient logs remain in New Zealand for the local market at a reasonable price. • Allow councils to be more flexible during consenting. • Allow insured builders and designers to self-certify their work. NZL

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forest talk

Port build-ups highlight concerns IN RECENT MONTHS, THERE HAS BEEN MOUNTING PRESSURE on the entire forestry supply chain, with strong export demand causing build-ups at major New Zealand ports. While the immediate crisis appears to be subsiding, the Forestry Industry Contractors Association (FICA) says the situation is far from over and the sector needs to work together to find solutions in the event of a further build-up of the recent pressures. That build-up may well be here in the form of the arrival of the COVID-19 Delta variant on our shores, though the article below bodes well. “I don’t think we have ever tried to deliver the volume of wood that we are, and we are finding out our infrastructure just can’t cope,” says FICA CEO, Prue Younger. During the recent crisis, the growing number of ships waiting to dock at multiple ports across New Zealand were a visible indication of the building supply chain pressure. Starting with Gisborne, build-ups reportedly spread to Tauranga and Napier. In the case of Gisborne, delays were compounded by infrastructure upgrades to add a second berth and weather conditions. With port storage full, logging contractors have had to keep jobs on site, with volume backing up on forestry jobs. Of course this has a knock-on effect on creditors and overdrafts. Then there’s cash flow, keeping workers employed and machines working. The diversion to other ports was putting pressure on them. A spokesperson for Napier Port says they were aware of delays but were not facing a backlog of vessels. “Infrastructure across the New Zealand supply chain is increasingly under pressure and this has been compounded by the COVID-19-related global shipping issues. “At Napier Port we are investing to support the industry with the addition of six wharf, mobile harbour cranes and debarking which will support future requirements of the forestry industry as volumes increase.” Ms Younger says it’s not only ports that were affected; the entire forestry supply chain has been under pressure for some time.

Napier Port. “The delays are evident everywhere, from slow deliveries of imported gear such as personal protective equipment (PPE) and vehicles, to harvesting, trucking and shipping backlogs. The entire supply chain is being stretched,” she says. “While pressure mounts, forestry contractors are caught in the crossfire. They’re not receiving any compensation, with lost revenue mounting, though the article below bodes well. Many are being stretched to the absolute limit financially.” Representing the Log Transport Safety Council, Warwick Wilshier adds, “Logs were transported around to other ports, but it feels like money is being wasted moving the problem around, when it could be used more productively and wisely supporting the industry.” He adds that this approach takes a lot of time and effort, and depends on a depleted workforce. “All our borders are closed, we’re not allowed to bring people in from overseas, we’re training as many as we can but we’re all struggling, which is not helping things; we’ve got trucks parked up. When you get really busy like this, you do get under pressure.” Ms Younger adds: “The issue is that as an industry we are lacking a coordinated strategy. We’re just reacting without a plan of response. It’s like the weather – sometimes it’s good and sometimes it’s bad, but if we know the forecast, we can make appropriate plans.” “We talk about the need for a pan-industry strategy, but we don’t have one. We need to be coordinated and work together to better manage our supply chain, so we don’t get pulled into this boom or bust mentality yet again,” she says. “There needs to be a change in the way contractors are subject to the peaks and troughs of the industry. There just needs to be the realisation that major decisions made at one end of the supply chain affect the other end, and there just needs to be greater respect for trying to maintain a workforce. NZL

Ports to continue loading under COVID Level 4 THE MINISTRY OF BUSINESS, INNOVATION AND EMPLOYMENT (MBIE) has given clearance for Eastland Port, and a number of other ports around New Zealand, to continue loading ships during the Level 4 COVID Lockdown. Eastland Group Chief Operating officer, Andrew Gaddum, says, “This means we will be bringing in wood from our off-site storage. This wood is already scaled and will go straight into Eastland Port so no checkpoint is required, keeping everyone separated. “The ability to continue to clear wood from the East Coast forestry supply chain ultimately helps everybody, particularly the harvesting crews and trucking companies, reducing shipping costs and ultimately getting our industry back on its feet.

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“We would not consider starting up any port operations unless we were 100% confident we can do so safely. “Although forestry crews will not be able to bring new logs in at this stage, we can clear space on our log yards, and prepare for the forestry industry to start up again under Level 3 without any delays. “All Eastland Port staff, ISO Limited and contractors have stringent COVID-19 protocols in place, and we follow all requirements set by the Ministry of Health, Health Protection staff and Maritime New Zealand. We maintain strict cleaning regimens and adhere to all PPE requirements, and frontline border workers are regularly tested. “We are working with the DHB to ensure the vaccination process runs seamlessly when we are given the greenlight to resume.” NZL


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forest talk

Cancel coal but think twice about oil, say stakeholders SOUTHLAND DISTRICT COUNCIL’S DECISION TO GRANT AN access arrangement to New Brighton Collieries Limited (NBCL), an overseas owned company, for coal exploration in the Ohai forestry area has raised concern. Environmental NGOs have written to the Council urging them to reverse the decision and decline the access arrangement sought by NBCL. It also puts forward an alternative vision for Southland, proposing a decline from coal and a move towards clean energy alternatives. The NGOs include: Forest & Bird Youth, Forest & Bird, Greenpeace Aotearoa, 350 Aotearoa, Generation Zero, WWF-New Zealand, Coal Action Network Aotearoa, School Strike 4 Climate NZ, and Parents for Climate Aotearoa. The letter states: “It is absolutely inappropriate for Aotearoa New Zealand to continue exploring for coal in the midst of a climate and ecological emergency. We strongly believe that Southland, and Aotearoa New Zealand as a whole, should undertake a just transition towards sustainable energy methods and away from fossil fuels, in a way which ensures that both people and nature benefit. “Mining is often touted as being an important part of the local Southland economy, including by Southland District Council officers. However, despite coal mines being a prominent feature of Southland’s landscape, the Ohai-Nightcaps area has a deprivation index of eight, where ten is the worst. The money from mining does not demonstrably help local people, and if NBCL is granted mining consent, an overseas- owned company will profit off the negative impact of mining. “Coal contributes directly to the climate crisis through creating emissions, as well as being responsible for furthering other emissionheavy parts of our society. Additionally, approving exploration for coal threatens Aotearoa’s endangered native species. SDC can and must show leadership by speeding up the transition away from coal rather than enabling a continued reliance. “We are calling on the Council to recognise the contribution that further coal exploration will have to intergenerational threats, and agree that young people deserve a future which is not threatened by sea level rise, biodiversity loss and extreme weather events. “Additionally, it is deeply worrying that the Council has refused to undertake genuine community consultation on the decision to approve NBCL’s access arrangement. The decision to allow further exploration has an immediate impact on community members’ lives, and they deserve the chance to have their voice heard. “We have known for decades that the coal industry does not have a place in a low-emissions, sustainable future, and we have

8 NZ LOGGER | September 2021

a responsibility to workers, their families and our communities in Southland to manage a decline from coal towards clean energy alternatives.” Fonterra exiting coal In a similar vein, as Minister for Energy and Resources, Dr Megan Woods, officially opened Fonterra’s wood pellet boiler at its Te Awamutu plant, the co-operative announced details for its next site to exit coal – Stirling cheese plant in Otago. Otago’s ‘fantastic little cheese plant’, will be coal-free and using wood biomass to fire the site by August next year. This will make Stirling Fonterra’s first 100% renewable thermal energy site, a significant step towards the co-op’s goal of getting out of coal altogether by 2037. By switching to wood biomass, the site’s annual emissions will reduce by 18,500 tonnes of CO2 – the equivalent of taking more than 7,000 cars off the road. Fonterra General Manager Operations Lower South Island, Richard Gray, says it’s another huge decarbonisation milestone for the co-op. “As well as the site being coal-free there are additional environmental benefits the new boiler will bring, including reduction in wastewater, noise, solid waste to landfill and air discharge emissions. “There are also economic benefits for the community – the installation will contribute more than $10 million into the region, along with supporting an estimated 10 jobs in the wood biomass industry. “Our Stirling site exports to customers in more than 10 countries, including Japan and South Korea.” Stirling is the third significant fuel switching project the co-op has undertaken in as many years. The conversion of Fonterra’s Te Awamutu site to wood pellets resulted in a 10% reduction in the co-op’s coal use, and at Brightwater at the top of the South Island, the team is co-firing wood biomass. These three projects, when combined with other energy efficiency work, will reduce the co-op’s emissions by 135,000 tonnes, the equivalent of taking close to 52,000 cars off the road. With this latest announcement, eight out of Fonterra’s 29 sites remain to be removed from using coal. Keep the oil flowing Meanwhile, on the back of the decision to shut down the oil refining operation at Marsden Point, Social Credit leader Chris Leitch is calling on Government to declare the Refinery a nationally strategic asset, and to compulsorily purchase all the shares from the private owners

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forest talk

and turn it back into a state-owned enterprise which continues to refine crude oil. A petition to this end states: “While we need to transition away from reliance on fossil fuels, the decision to shut down the refining operation at Marsden Point has been made by the shareholders purely in the interests of generating larger profits and not in the interests of New Zealand’s strategic fuel needs. “This decision means we will still be burning the same amount of fuel, but become even more reliant on imported products controlled by overseas-owned conglomerates. “The majority shareholders in the refining company are the oil companies who own refineries across Asia and who want to ensure those refineries run at full capacity to maximise their profits. “Approximately 600 jobs will be lost if the refining operation shuts down. With an economic loss of about 8% to the Northland economy many small businesses will close with further catastrophic job losses. “In the event of a natural disaster or a geopolitical conflict situation, the shipping routes to New Zealand could be cut off and the supply of fuel to major sectors of the New Zealand economy severely compromised.” “If the refinery was still in operation and crude oil was not able to be shipped to New Zealand for whatever reason, it could use New Zealand’s own oil supplies and at the very least keep all major essential transport, freight, air and defence operations going.” The sectors the petition cites as potentially being affected, include: • Agricultural machinery including forestry, farming and horticultural equipment. • The country’s trucking fleet that moves goods around New Zealand.

• Heavy construction machinery and infrastructure and road-building equipment. • Goods and passenger rail operations. • Air transport into and out of and around New Zealand, including all our air freight exports. • Helicopter rescue services. • Coastal shipping, inter-island ferries and shipping to the Pacific Islands. • New Zealand’s Army, Navy and Air Force, including rescue and disaster relief operations. • All fishing boats and pleasure boats, including short distance ferries. NZL

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forest talk

Afforestation report raises questions THE FOREST OWNERS ASSOCIATION (FOA) SAYS THE Beef+Lamb commissioned survey on forest planting rates is nowhere near robust nor detailed enough to draw a conclusion that the government should impose controls over the rate of forest planting. FOA President, Phil Taylor, says the report is a worthy contribution to the land use debate, but it raises more questions than it answers. “Government data is contradicting the report. Official figures clearly point to a decline in the area of the exotic plantation forest estate, and so new planting is not keeping pace with the land area going out of forestry,” he says. “The plantation forest estate has shrunk by 162,000 hectares in the past 18 years, mostly to dairy farms. There has always been changing land use. “Our concern on current figures, would be that the Climate Change Commission’s reliance on an expansion of the exotic forest area by another 380,000 hectares by 2035, to meet the 2050 greenhouse gas target, is going to fall well short. “On top of that, the Climate Change Commission anticipates there will need to be more use made of wood in construction, and its extensive utilisation in biofuels to replace fossil fuel. “That means any government restrictions on afforestation will risk New Zealand not meeting its carbon targets. By the time that shortfall becomes clear it will be too late to fix it.” The National Exotic Forest Description, which is published by the Ministry for Primary Industries, recorded a reduction in the net stocked area in the year to April 2020 of 31,347 hectares, after allowing for 19,000 hectares of new afforestation. The President of the Farm Forestry Association, Graham West, says farmers should be free to continue to make economic decisions on whether they want to use their own land to plant trees and on what land classes. A recent Ministry for the Environment study has shown that there is currently 313,000 hectares of plantation forests on farmland. “And that makes sense for farmers. The recent PwC report was clear that forestry stacked up very well as a land use and so forestry benefits the economies of local communities,” says Mr West. “There is between 7.5 and 10.4 million hectares of hill country farm land, and if a conversion of a mere 380,000 hectares is a threat, then the meat and wool industries have more serious issues to deal with than just a few profitable trees.” He adds that the report is actually positive about the integrated use of trees on farms and that land sales to forestry are giving

10 NZ LOGGER | September 2021

better capital gain, which allows movement up the farming ladder or retirement. BakerAg, the report’s author states: ‘If farmers already have experience with trees and forestry, or are confident of the support available in what may not be core business to date, then indicators are this will provide further confidence to consider investing in forestry as part of the land-use mix.” Phil Taylor says Beef+Lamb automatically assumes that farming will always be a better and more productive land use than forestry. “On the tougher hill country, Beef+Lamb is now demanding that even if livestock can barely survive on that land, tree planting should still be restricted.” Mr Taylor says the report shows that very little is known about the extent of carbon-only forest planting in recent times. “The Beef+Lamb report estimates this non-harvest forest planting is about 30% of the total planting. But nobody has any real idea at the moment. “If this carbon planting is on land which could be productive for timber or livestock then we would have concerns that the land should be used better. “After all, there’s at least a million hectares of land in New Zealand which is too remote or erosion-prone for farming or for production forestry and so is ideal to use for locking up carbon, but not useful for anything else.” He adds that it is important to realise that while forestry is hugely important in sequestering carbon produced by industrial emitters over the next three decades, trees do not offer a continuing longterm answer to greenhouse gas emissions through offsetting. “We have no issues with either Beef+Lamb or the Climate Change Commission in their same view that the only effective long-term response to the threat of climate change is to reduce those source emissions, wherever they come from. “And I’m sure also that the sort of argument over land-use is distracting from the task of achieving primary sector-wide goals, and in particular export targets across the sector in the next ten years, under the Fit for a Better World programme. “The government is counting on an extra $2.6 billion in extra earnings from forestry, leading an increase in the total sector export value of $44 billion. “Farmers who are expected to produce this extra value strongly demonstrated against regulations recently. They don’t need more restrictions.” NZL


forest talk

New head for Te Uru Rakau JASON WILSON HAS BEEN APPOINTED Deputy Director-General of Te Uru Rākau (New Zealand Forest Service) at the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI). As the current Director – Sector Investments within Te Uru Rākau, Jason leads the development of the Industry Transformation Plan for the forestry and wood processing sector, partnering with multiple Government agencies and stakeholders. The Forest Owners Association (FOA) says the appointment is “absolutely appropriate for the huge challenges and opportunities facing the forest industry in its key role of enabling New Zealand to meet both climate change and economic targets”. FOA President, Phil Taylor, says Mr Wilson’s current role of leading the Forest Industry Transformation Plan demonstrates the government appointment is “not a ‘business as usual’ selection, but is based on a sharp appreciation of the combination of imminent rapid economic growth of the forest industry, driven by climate change combating products on one hand, and the carbon sequestration ability of plantation forests on the other. “That said, our key industry role is to produce logs for processors here and overseas. We need to know we have Te Uru

Rākau watching out for our priorities and interests, to helping us communicate the virtues and possibilities of forestry to the public at large. Phil Taylor says he wants to pay tribute to the contribution made by the acting head of Te Uru Rākau Henry Weston: “In our Association dealings with Henry, we always found him to be an exceptionally able industry champion who got things done. I hope that he will be available to continue to make his valuable contributions to Te Uru Rākau and the industry.” Prior to joining MPI, Mr Wilson spent over 27 years in the commercial sector, holding various leadership roles in the forest and wood products industries largely in Australia. This included nine years in the leadership team of Carter Holt Harvey’s Australian business, where he led the corporate strategy for a cultural change programme across 2,500 employees. He then held three General Manager roles across a range of Australian commercial entities with larger scale and complexity, with the most notable being the ASX-listed company Brickworks, a building products manufacturer. Before making the decision to return to New Zealand in 2019, he was the Chief

Deputy Director-General of Te Uru Rākau, Jason Wilson. Operating Officer of Timberlink Australia, a forestry company that was part of a $5 billion investment fund, focussed on environmentally sustainable investments in the Asia-Pacific region and the USA. Mr Wilson’s broad-based networks and commercial exposure, particularly across the Trans-Tasman forestry environment, will be invaluable for Te Uru Rākau’s next phase of development. NZL

Ban on methyl bromide aboard ships A TOTAL BAN ON METHYL BROMIDE FUMIGATION ABOARD SHIPS in New Zealand is part of a comprehensive suite of new rules imposed by a decision-making Committee of the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA). Methyl bromide is a toxic and ozone-depleting substance, which India and China require to be used on logs they receive from New Zealand. It is a biosecurity tool, used internationally to kill pests. “The EPA’s role in regulating hazardous substances involves carefully balancing environmental, health, economic, and cultural factors,” says Dr Chris Hill, General Manager of the EPA’s Hazardous Substances group. “The decision released today sets a roadmap to full recapture of methyl bromide. It provides a clear and structured pathway for industry to reduce the amount of methyl bromide emitted. The decision recognises the benefits associated with methyl bromide use, while also protecting human health and the environment. “Ship hold fumigation will be banned from 1 January 2023. This rule change is significant as the amount of methyl bromide used is much higher than elsewhere, and it is not currently possible to recapture

12 NZ LOGGER | September 2021

methyl bromide during ship hold fumigation. Therefore, in this setting, the risks to human health and the environment outweigh the benefits.” Stepped increases will apply to the recapture of methyl bromide from containers and covered log stacks, starting from 1 January 2022. This phased approach will be more achievable than a single target, allowing the EPA to ensure that requirements are being met by industry at each stage. The decision also introduces much stricter accountability and reporting measures. Revoking the approval for methyl bromide (in other words banning it outright) was not in the scope of this reassessment, but the decision released today sets far more stringent controls on its use. While methyl bromide use is being phased out globally, in New Zealand its use increased by 66% between 2010 and 2019. We are currently out of step with most other countries which are turning away from this ozone-depleting substance. However, the combined controls imposed by this decision will result in methyl bromide emissions being reduced significantly over the next five years. The aim is also to disincentivise the use of this fumigant. NZL


forest talk

On pride and passion PRIDE AND PASSION IN FORESTRY WAS the theme for this year’s New Zealand Institute of Forestry (NZIF) conference held in Masterton. It certainly spoke to the resilience of the industry, with this being the third time the conference had been organised and ready to go, delayed by Coronavirus lockdowns each time, and narrowly missing the latest one. The conference was about communication and people, integrating forestry back into our communities, taking ownership of all the industry has achieved, bringing in the new generation and taking positive steps forward. Topics were wide and engaging, including how to get the industry noticed in the school system and the support that would require; the role of Future Foresters in continuing to provide information and incentives to school leavers; the very real challenges posed by climate change; the role of Government in the forestry industry; the benefits, and accompanying challenges, of the Emissions Trading Scheme for smaller forest owners; MPI’s intentions with the Forestry Advisers

Act; and a successful school’s programme run by the wood councils in the capable hands of CEO, Erica Kinder. Te Uru Rākau’s new head, Jason Wilson, tackled his vision for the organisation with just five days on the job behind him. Day 2 took a look at growing regional economies through natural capital and, finally, Professor Tim Payn tackled the myths and misconceptions we are up against as a forestry industry and how to combat and dispel them for a sometimes-gullible public. Forestry Minister, Stuart Nash, gave his two cents on ways to promote and enhance the sector at the conference dinner, where Paul Millen graciously took the Forester of the Year Award, and a number of student scholarships were given out. The academic section of the conference was followed by a selection of fascinating field trips with options to eye out Rewanui Forest Park, the recently upgraded rail-side log yard and the local sawmill among others. Somewhere in all that, this passionate bunch of organising volunteers fitted in

an inspiring Women in Forestry breakfast, highlighting the strong role women play in our industry while managing to keep most of those balls in the air. Watch this space for more on the NZIF conference. NZL

Southern North Island Wood Council CEO, Erica Kinder.


forest talk

(Photo: FCNSW)

Resurgence of interest in mechanised planting THERE IS CURRENTLY A RESURGENCE OF INTEREST BEING shown by forestry companies in Australasia in mechanised or automated operations for planting and silviculture. The economics is starting to stack up. The technology also goes some way to addressing the growing issue of labour shortages being faced by the industry over the planting season. Mechanised or machine planting is already successfully being used across Scandinavia and in South America. Operational trials have been undertaken in the central North Island of New Zealand and in NSW last planting season with more extensive plantings (both trials and commercial planting operations) being planned for this year. Early planting trial results Each of the main mechanised planting manufacturers; Sweden’s Bracke and Finland’s Risutec, as well as M-Planter, presented at ForestTECH 2020. Timberlands outlined trials using the M-Planter for ripping, mounding, fertilising and planting. Around 53ha of cutover in the central North Island had been planted with between 80 trees (cutover) and 200 trees per hour (in line rake without mounding) being planted. Forestry Corporation NSW also spoke on early trials that it, together with a local reafforestation contractor had undertaken in September 2020. Over 40ha in two compartments using the Risutec ASP-150 planting head and Komatsu excavator had been planted. It was the first time this equipment had been used in Australia. Initial results showed that the quality of the seedlings planted wasn’t as consistent as first hoped, but much of this was put down to limitations on the equipment and the site. Trials planned for this planting season were to be aimed at improving productivity (with modifications being made to the mechanised planting head) and some supplementary site preparation for planting second rotation sites.

first trial of applying a hydrogel at the time of planting by one CNI forestry contractor will also be discussed. The gel was applied at the beginning and end of the usual planting season to test options of extending planting using mechanised planting. FCNSW and Pentarch likewise are planning to extend their operational trials in NSW this year, both with pine and eucalyptus plantings. And internationally; from Europe, Stora Enso will be providing an insight into a new planting machine that’s being developed in Sweden; and Risutec will provide an update on GPS advancements that have recently been made with their planting heads showing seedling and mound locations, areas planted, planting densities and planting progress in real time. Aside from addressing the shortage of planters and increased labour costs, some of the advantages already being seen with mechanised planting using planting heads mounted on an excavator, are better soil cultivation (ripping and mounding) for the young trees and greater consistency in the quality of the tree planting. Fertiliser granules and hydrogel can also be integrated into the planting process, along with herbicides or insecticides if required. The case for mechanised planting on flatter terrain in New Zealand and Australia will form an integral part of this year’s ForestTECH 2021 event in Rotorua on 23-24 November. Full details of the programme for both days can now be viewed on the event website: www. foresttech.events/ft21 NZL

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Mechanised planting trials from 2021 One year on and results from more extensive commercial mechanised planting operations in both New Zealand and Australia will be presented as part of ForestTECH 2022. Lessons and results from two seasons of mechanised planting in Kinleith Forest will be given by Hancock Forest Management. Results of New Zealand’s

14 NZ LOGGER | September 2021

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forest talk

Academic scholarship for forestry student NORTHLAND STUDENT, CAMRYN STEWART, has received an academic scholarship from Waipu-based timber manufacturer, Northpine. In her fourth and final year of a Bachelor of Forestry Science at the University of Canterbury, Camryn says the financial grant from Northpine is a huge help to put towards her course fees and costs. “As a student you don’t really have a lot of money, and it is such a massive help financially. I am putting it towards my course fees and extra course costs like field trips,” she says. As a Northlander born-and-bred in Kaitaia, Camryn has spent some of her practical course work interning for another Northland company, Summit Forests, completing practical experience in plotting and helping with trials. After graduating from her Bachelor of Forestry Science, she hopes to work in forestry management or forestry marketing and supply chain operations. “The variety and flexibility of the forestry

industry appeals to me, and I enjoy being outdoors on the job,” she says. “I’m excited about the possibilities and what my future holds.” The scholarship was presented to the industry at the Northland Forestry Awards in September 2019 and was endorsed by the Northland Wood Council. Applicants can apply via the Northpine website. “I’m extra grateful to receive this support from a company in Northland. I extend my thanks to Northpine for their generosity,” says Camryn. Employing over 60 people, Northpine is a privately-owned timber manufacturer based at Waipu (Northland), with a distribution centre in Silverdale (Auckland). Northpine General Manager, Bruce Larsen, says supporting forestry students in their studies is part of the company’s commitment to the industry and fostering the next generation. “We’re committed to encouraging each

individual to achieve their full potential, and this extends to our next generation who are currently students,” he says. NZL

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forest talk

Tough trio WARATAH FORESTRY EQUIPMENT’S TRIO OF NEW RUGGED harvester heads – the H425, H425HD and H425X – are built for tough jobs. With a powerful control valve and four-roller feed arm geometry, each high-performance head is productive on wheeled or tracked carriers. “These models are built for durability and performance,” says Brent Fisher, product marketing manager for Waratah. “Among other

updates, new hose protection and servicing enhancements make them even better.” The standard H425 (1360kg), H425HD (1390kg) and hefty H425X (1426kg) each offer increased reliability with new feed motor hosing routings and new covers. For quick and easy servicing, each head features a new hinged valve cover and improved access to greasing points.

H425 Optimising performance, productivity and delimbing, the H425 is suited to large diameter regeneration harvesting. A powerful control valve and feed roller arm geometry ensure a solid grip and agile harvester head control for all diameter classes. For increased uptime and lower daily operating costs, the H425 offers improved hose routing from boom to harvester head and from the valve to feed motors, keeping hoses well protected from limbs and understory interference. The H425 offers optional saw motor sizes, standard (narrow stem) or buttress (wide stem) saw frames for challenging applications, and processing knives for picking stems from the ground or bunch piles.

H425HD Built to work on the toughest jobs, the H425HD features a heavyduty tilt frame, feed motors and guarding to provide even more durability. With a powerful control valve and a top saw option, the high-performance head offers great productivity, especially for wheeled carrier applications. For ease of maintenance, the H425HD now has easy filling of saw chain oil. Likewise, daily maintenance can be performed without changing the position of the harvester head. The valve block and grease points are also easily accessible. The H425HD offers optional saw motor sizes, standard (narrow stem) or buttress (wide stem) saw frames for challenging applications, and processing knives for picking stems from the ground or bunch piles.

H425X The H425X features an extreme duty main saw box with heavier steel plating, extra feed motor component guarding, heavy-duty tilt frame, hose protection and increased drive arm durability for demanding applications in mixed stand harvesting. Its four-roller feed arm geometry ensures rollers grip solidly in all diameters, improving responsiveness with strong tree-processing performance – especially in large timber. Purpose-built for tracked harvesters, the H425X offers options for many applications with multi-tree handling, an integrated top saw and processing knives for picking from piles or hardwood applications, and many feed wheel options to suit numerous applications. “The H425, H425HD and H425X are reliable heads for heavy-duty applications,” says Brent. “With each new head generation, we’re providing our customers with the solutions they need to maximise productivity and uptime.”

16 NZ LOGGER | September 2021

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Iron Test

KFT Logging’s Hitachi ZX290L-5G arrived from the factory partially set up for the forest.

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BACK ON TRACK Story & photos: John Ellegard

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The Hitachi ZX290L-5G displays good stability on steep ground.

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IMES HAVE BEEN TOUGH FOR KFT LOGGING AFTER crew boss, William ‘Hoot’ Knowles, died suddenly during a wood chopping tournament in Australia two years ago. But they’re a resilient lot over in Gisborne. Instead of selling up, Hoot’s wife Sharon was determined to keep the crew going and, together with eldest son, Steven, and a core of loyal employees, they got things back on track. It’s not been easy. Sharon had to sell some of their best gear, including a levelling harvester and key road building equipment, to keep the business afloat, since they weren’t able to hang onto their road lining contract. And then COVID hit. “It was really tough but we didn’t want to lose what we’d worked so hard to create,” says Sharon. The turning point came when son Steven, who had been running his own small forestry operation, pitched in to help. Through his connections with Logic Forest Solutions they secured a contract to harvest an 8,000-hectare woodlot behind Wairoa, an hour-and-a-half south of Gisborne, putting the team and their remaining equipment back to work. It’s here that NZ Logger met up with Sharon and the KFT crew to celebrate a milestone in the revitalisation of the business – the arrival of their brand new Hitachi ZX290L-5G loader/shoveller. The purchase marks what has been a fairly rapid revival, as KFT only started work on this site last December and the new Hitachi was delivered just five months later.

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Sharon explains that once they got into the job they realised the Hitachi ZX330 that is now doing the job of harvesting on the hill was too busy to do the shovelling as well – a task it was previously doing when the crew had a John Deere levelling harvester. “We definitely needed a shoveller and I discussed it with mum,” says Steven. “We did look at second-hand but thought ‘bugger it, there’s not much in it, we’ll just get a new one, better reliability’. We just wanted something simple. And these are partly set up for the forest and come with solid bits on them.” Although other brands were considered, the Hitachi decision made sense, based on their positive experience with previous and existing tracked equipment from the Japanese manufacturer, which also happens to own CablePrice. With the well-publicised changes in the CablePrice stable, there’s plenty of incentive for Hitachi to step up in the forestry segment in New Zealand. Hitachi has always had a strong presence in the local construction sector as well as a long history in the forestry industry in New Zealand, with the development of 30-tonne excavator base UH09 and UH053 feller bunchers in the late 1970s. The changes of the past 18 months have seen CablePrice refocus on the Hitachi ZXL-5G to spearhead the forestry range, boasting a number of factory-supplied features, such as high-and-wide undercarriages, SERIOUS POWER FORbooms BIG TIME LOGGERS heavy-duty track frames, reinforced and uprated performance. The 5-series first appeared in New Zealand back in 2012 and it’s largely

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Above left: KFT Logging wanted a simple and robust machine for shovelling and they’ve got that in the Hitachi ZX290L-5G. Above right: Iron Tester Tony Brightwell grabs onto a stump to help pull the Hitachi shoveller up the hill. been unchanged over that time apart from some minor upgrades, but CablePrice wants loggers to know that there are compelling reasons why they should be considered for today’s harvesting environment. “We have an opportunity to focus more on the one product rather than splitting our attention,” says Andrew Crane, National Product Manager – Equipment at CablePrice. “We are definitely pushing forward into forestry with the 5G, focused on working with the factory to develop the model for our market and also working closely with local engineers to build the machines to suit our customers’ applications and what they require in the finished product.” Three models

Andrew also points out that while there is a factory track under cover available as an option, most of the machines going into the forest here are fitted with a local under cover that provides much heavier duty protection. In addition to those three models, CablePrice is now offering the ZX300LC-5A with the larger horsepower 6HK1 engine, which Andrew reckons will appeal to contractors looking in the 30-tonne log loader market, although it doesn’t come on a factory high-and-wide base. Similarly, the ZX360LCH-5B is offered as a processor, featuring the Trias (three pump) hydraulic system delivering more than 800 litres per minute total flow. Andrew says “it performs extremely well too, allowing the operator to slew and multi-function while running a processor at the same time”, though it doesn’t have a factory highand-wide base either. All Hitachi tracked machines arriving in New Zealand come with the standard civil construction-style cab. If they are going into a logging crew, these are swapped for a reinforced forest cab from a local supplier, like the Active VMA cab we are currently inspecting on the KFT machine that operator, Liam Kake, has now brought down off the hill for us to inspect. We’ve always liked these cabs. They’re not only built strong, they’re also stylish, roomy and provide plenty of visibility for the operator. This one is no exception, with plenty of space behind the seat for storing gear and only a couple of slim bars across the front screen that hardly mask forward vision.

And that’s the reason NZ Logger has travelled to Wairoa, in order to reacquaint ourselves with the latest 5-series model and see how it matches up as a capable, productive forestry option. It’s been eight years since we last sat at the controls of a Hitachi tracked carrier, so the timing is well overdue. CablePrice offers three models aimed specifically at forestry customers; the ZX250L-5G and ZX290L-5G, which are both powered by the same 6.5-litre Isuzu 6-cylinder CC-6BG1T engine developing 132kW (177HP) of peak power; plus a ZX400L-5G that utilises the 7.8-litre Isuzu AA-6HK1X to produce 184kW (246HP) of peak power. Andrew goes on to say these Tier 2 direct fuel injection engines have proved to be well-suited to forestry applications, “being very durable and they can cope with variable fuel quality – we’ve got machines working in the forest from 2012 still on original engines. They don’t Professional finish The exterior and interior finish is excellent, with the installation of the have a lot of issues at big hours.” All three models come partially prepped for the forest from the seat and controls from the original cab looking very professional. An factory, including high-and-wide undercarriages beefed up with interesting addition to this machine is a white vinyl cover across the top stronger components such as rollers, track drives and track chains of the roof, which reflects the sun’s heat from the largely black-painted derived from the next size model. Thus, the 250 uses the track gear cab to help keep it cool in summer. The rest of the guarding package has a similar professional finish, from the 280, the 290 uses those from the 350 and the 400 benefits including the wrap-around ledge that provides a place for the operator from the 450’s. “The undercarriage components are all highly durable and there’s a to stand and clean the exterior glass. The Active VMA team has also 0% lot more tractive effort, which is increased on each model for working provided good access to the Isuzu engine through a decent sized topopening bonnet, along with bolt-on panels that can easily be removed on steep slopes,” says Andrew. is required. And in a nod to the latest technology, an “Each of the three models has a heavy-duty boomchain with increased if more access aining original pitch steel plate thickness ex-factory with the higher lift boom bracket for LED light bar is neatly incorporated into the roof, just above the front ocket wear screen. increased lift capacity.”

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Plenty of stability when slewing sideways on this hill.

Other nice touches include a slide-out drawer designed to fit under the cab floor, below the door. Access to pumps and other daily checks is facilitated by top hinged doors along the sides of the body that pivot up on hydraulic stays. A large storage space in the main body, next to the boom is capable of holding several containers of spare oil and hydraulics. A rear-facing camera is standard, but although Hitachi has missed a trick by not making an auto fan standard, the parallel arrangement of the radiators keeps the engine cool and allows the operator to easily check and clean dust and debris. But there’s no criticising the high-and-wide base and associated track gear. It’s very solid and well protected, which it needs to be when scurrying across slopes littered with lumps, stumps and branches. Behind the heavy-duty guards, the upgraded track motors deliver 298kN of tractive force, which is more than enough to propel the 290L-5G over this sort of terrain. Initially, I was surprised that only standard-size single grouser tracks had been spec’d, but guest Iron Tester, Tony Brightwell pointed out that

bigger tracks or even welded lugs would actually be a disadvantage on slippery slash. We’re all impressed with the 770mm ground clearance, which is better than on some purpose-built forest machines, though Tony is wondering how the extra height will affect stability when he puts it to work on the steep slope above us. We also like how the hydraulic hoses for the Ensign 1730 grapple are neatly carried along the back of the boom and arm and then plumbed through the rotator to keep them out of harm’s way. And while the piston that operates the arm is still placed on top, for digging rather than underslung for lifting, Steven and operator Liam say this layout doesn’t affect the shovelling performance. Tony touches on this in his Iron Test column on page 30. Another point of interest is that although the boom has been strengthened at the factory to cope with the lifting forces experienced in forestry, it’s not a straight design and still looks like a standard digging boom.

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Steven says they decided not to go for a longer, purpose-built straight boom and arm for stability reasons. The same thinking was behind the decision not to fit a live heel. “Let the falling machine do the hard yards and allow this machine to do its own work,” reckons Steven. “You’re putting extra weight out at the end, which we didn’t want and we don’t need a heel to make occasional tracks, we’ve got a bucket on a 16-tonner that is heaps quicker.”

Two factory-set modes Time to test how the new Hitachi shoveller copes with the slope that rises steeply from the skid site. It looked precarious when we first arrived and saw Liam working at an angle that looked well outside anyone’s comfort zone – in excess of 30-degrees and no tether to anchor it. Tony gets strapped in – surprisingly just a lap belt, not a full harness, considering the angle the machine will be operating on – and needs only a brief chat with Liam to

discuss the controls as he’s had plenty of Hitachi experience in the past. All the tracked machines in the KFT fleet have the Hitachi control pattern, which can only be changed through swapping a valve, unlike some of the latest purpose-built machines where it can be quickly switched over via the touch-screen in the cab. In that respect, Hitachi remains a bit oldschool. It retains a fully hydraulic operating system, instead of adopting the air-overhydraulics that purpose-built competitors

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Right: Quick grapple speed is one of the features of the Hitachi ZX290L-5G and Ensign 1730 combo. Main: A 6.3 tonne counterweight helps balance the Hitachi ZX290L-5G – and that camera on the tail is standard.

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EST EST 1909 1909 | TOCALL WWW.SHAWS.CO.NZ JONNY EDWARDS 021 944 894 THE THE SUPPLIER SUPPLIER NEW TO NEW ZEALAND ZEALAND HEAVY HEAVY INDUSTRY INDUSTRY September 2021 | NZ LOGGER 25


Far left: Roomy forest cab from Active VMA with the seating, controls and trim transferred over from the factory cab. Left: Those bars across the front screen make handy footrests when the cab is on a steep angle, especially without a full harness. Below: You need steady nerves and good machine control to work effectively on slopes like this. offer these days to facilitate greater use of electronic control functions. That means the operator only has the choice of two factory-set modes to change the hydraulic settings – Power and Eco – via a switch on a panel to the right of the seat. In contrast, the operator in some purpose-built competitors can make micro adjustments to the speed and sensitivity of each control function to infinitely vary the slew, lift and grapple. Tony has come from a levelling harvester that does offer those

infinite adjustments, so his take on the Hitachi will be interesting. For Liam, it hasn’t made any difference because it’s the same as the Hitachi 330 he was operating before the 290 arrived. “Yeah, the Eco and Power modes are pretty much as before,” he says. “When you are on the slope in Power mode you are pushing too much and your tracks start spinning. So I kind of let it craw itself and do its own thing, instead of trying to force it. Slew is awesome, the hold motor especially, it’s like it has its own braking system and

once you let go it stops pretty good. On some machines the boom will carry on with the momentum and that can be annoying.” Steven chips in: “Not having the ability to fine-tune the controls doesn’t really worry us – even our 909 was like that. You can play with them all day but there’s not much in it and you get used to how it works. And the electric-over hydraulics can be hard to get to work smoothly.” Hitachi does make use of modern electronics in other ways, such as the Global E-service GPS system fitted as standard, that

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EST EST 1909 1909 |TOCALL WWW.SHAWS.CO.NZ JONNY EDWARDS 021 944 894 THE THE SUPPLIER SUPPLIER NEW TO NEW ZEALAND ZEALAND HEAVY HEAVY INDUSTRY INDUSTRY 26 NZ LOGGER | September 2021

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Regular Hitachi ZX290L-5G operator, Liam Kake. enables remote monitoring of the machine’s performance, hydraulic oil temperatures, cooler temperatures and any alarms. CablePrice’s Andrew Crane says: “We can also go into the machine to make sure the pump pressures and engine rpm settings are all at the correct level before the machines are at optimum speed and performance. We’ve also got an hydraulic oil monitoring system so if there is any change in oil condition it sends an alarm through the GPS system, so instead of waiting for an oil sample we can measure that straight away.”

The high-and-wide base is factory standard on this model and provides more ground clearance than some purpose-builts. Such remote monitoring is essential for a machine that spends much of its life operating at acute angles. While the KFT 290 is mostly used for shovelling on the hill, Liam has done some loading on the flat and says “it’s good… lifts the trailer real easy. No sluggishness and no rocking. Grapple is responsive and fine control is good.” Firmly planted It’s equally stable on the slopes, he adds: “It’s real good, like you can hold a large stem right

out and swing round and you don’t feel it.” But the steepness of the hill can provide some interesting moments: “Working up there it’s touch and go in places, especially when your tracks dig in.” Tony is currently experiencing some of his ‘touch and go’ moments as he coaxes the Hitachi further up the slope to reach a bunch of stems that need to be shovelled down to where Rick Te Whiu in the Hitachi ZX400-5 is waiting to grab and run them through the Waratah 626 Bigwood. The rain has set in and it’s making the already dicey conditions even

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dicier, demanding all of Tony’s skills to keep the 290L-5G firmly planted on its tracks… even if they are sitting at a precarious angle. At one point, Tony uses the grapple to latch onto a stump to drag the Hitachi up the slope when the grousers have difficulty latching onto a firm surface. On reaching the downed

stems, he wastes no time grabbing two or three at a time, slewing them around and pushing them down the hill, making good use of the 10.3rpm slew speed. Occasionally, he is forced to test the full outstretched capabilities of the boom and arm to grab a stem on the limit of reach without having to reposition the machine – good job there’s 6.3 tonnes of counterweight on the back to maintain balance. Tony does well to make the most of the modest 9,150mm of reach before eventually running out of stems. So he’s forced to return to flat ground as another of the eight trucks that call each day on average, is being loaded by KFT’s only surviving purpose-built tracked machine, a John Deere 2154. As we huddle in the container out of the rain, both Sharon and Steven seem happy with

the way the whole operation is going, not just the new machine. Regardless of the weather, things are certainly brighter now. “It was tough at first, a few hurdles to get over but we’re getting there,” sums up Steven. “Shame we had to sell some of the newer gear, especially when you jump into the old girls and you’re ‘Ohhhhh, this is not much fun…’ “We’re very happy with the new 290, but we definitely want to get a tether machine and another leveller, especially with all the steep work that’s ahead. And I need to buy mum out and take the stress off her. I’m happy running it and mum can go on holiday.” Steven originally started with his father straight out of school before setting up his own business, but you sense that he’s happy to be back helping his mother make the most of the situation. He’s got some wise old heads around him, like skidder driver Alby Reedy and Rick Te Whiu. Sharon and Steven are fortunate to have retained their services. “I’ve been with these guys 10 years. I really wanted to hang around after Hoot went so I could help this lady here out,” nods Rick. It’s all about getting the business back on track for Sharon and Steven. And that’s exactly how CablePrice is viewing the role of Hitachi in the forest following its own upheavals. If our experience with the 5G series is anything to go by, that approach will certainly help. NZL

KFT Logging’s new Hitachi shoveller has plenty of lift.

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iron test: Tony Brightwell

A surprising performer A LOT OF CONTRACTORS SEEM TO GO for purpose-built gear these days, even for simple loading and shovelling jobs… but do you really need to go that far? This ZX290L-5G proved to me that you don’t. And I operate a purpose-built machine (an Eltec levelling harvester). What can a purpose-built shoveller do that this Hitachi can’t? It’s well set up and it costs a lot less, even with the local cab and guarding. The Japanese build good gear and with an Isuzu engine, it’s going to go forever. My dad had a pair of 270s that got to 30,000 hours. Never touched them, except oil changes when needed.

I really like this machine. It’s stable, has good power and I found it very comfortable and quite refined. It’s what you come to expect in a digger – they’ve done a nice job transferring the nice original things from the factory cab. The stand-out feature for me is the highand-wide, and it seems to have a lot more track power than other diggers of the same size that I’ve driven. At 30 tonnes, it’s getting up there but on the hill it was very stable, just sat there and didn’t rock. Even bringing the logs around you expect it to lift a track but it didn’t. Just as well it wasn’t fitted with a higher cab. I was more worried about sliding on

1

Iron Tester, Tony Brightwell. the greasy surface and ending up down on the pad. It seems to have plenty of control. I know most people prefer the Cat control layout but for me, it is the right-way and that’s how I would have set it up.

2 1: No auto reversing fan, so the operator needs to make regular checks to clean debris from the radiator. 2: Good access to the pumps and filters – note that all side doors are raised by hydraulics stays. 3: Handy sliding storage tray built into the bottom of the cab. 4: The Isuzu engine has been a reliable mainstay for many years. 5: This white vinyl sheet on top of the cab reflects the heat and is aimed at keeping the black cab cooler in summer.

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EST EST EST 1909 1909 1909

THE THE THE SUPPLIER SUPPLIER SUPPLIER TOTO NEW TO NEW NEW ZEALAND ZEALAND ZEALAND HEAVY HEAVY HEAVY INDUSTRY INDUSTRY INDUSTRY 30 NZ LOGGER | September 2021


IFICATION

SPEC S

HITACHI ZX 290L-5G SHOVEL LOGGER - SPECIFICATIONS ENGINE

GRAPPLE

6-cylinder, 6.5-litres, Isuzu CC-6BG1T common rail diesel, Tier 2, turbocharged & after-cooled 105mm x 125mm Bore / stroke 132kW (177hp) @ 2,150rpm Net power, SAE 637Nm @ 1,800rpm Torque

Ensign 1730 Model Rotation continuous 1,700mm Max clamp opening Capacity 0.47m2 Weight 1,180kg

HYDRAULICS

REFILL CAPACITIES (LITRES)

Main pumps Swing pump Swing torque Swing speed

Variable displacement piston type 2 x 236 L/min Axial piston type 90.5 kNm 10.3rpm

UNDERCARRIAGE Travel Tractive effort Max travel speed

2-speed travel motor for each track 298kN 4.1km/h (in high)

BOOM / ARM Model Hitachi 9,150mm Max reach

The machine answers the controls very nicely, feels just right. I did notice the grapple was faster than I expected. Not being able to fine-tune the speeds and sensitivity means you have to accept what’s available in the two modes. I had it in Eco first as I got used to it and then once I got up the hill I switched over to Power. There’s plenty of slew effort, because it was slewing uphill on a pretty

4

Fuel tank Hydraulic system

510 290

DIMENSIONS (MM) 10,420 Shipping length Width 3,390 3,760 Height (top of Active cab) 770 Ground clearance 5,010 Track length 600, with single grousers Track shoe width 3,140mm Tail swing radius Counterweight 6,300kg 32,400kg (with Active cab & guarding but no grapple) Operating weight

mean angle. There’s plenty of lift. I would have thought it would have struggled a bit with the weight of some trees, but it didn’t, so it’s got plenty of power. Overall, I found it very nice to drive. Smooth, no jerks in the hydraulics. Good vision, even with a couple of bars on the front screen, which I found a boon on the hills because you need something to put your feet on or you’ll slide out of the

seat. That begs the question of whether it should have a harness seat belt. However, the balance is fine, even on the angle I was working. Very quiet in the cab – I noted that Liam wears earmuffs but I don’t think they’re needed. Final verdict? One of the better diggers I’ve experienced. I’ve driven most brands and this one is up there. NZL

5

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Breaking Out

Diesel & dust

50 yEARS OF FORESTRY RO A

34 NZ LOGGER | September 2021


O ADING

Left: The Taylor family. From left: Bob, Marlene, Charlie and Matt (Arthur not present). Above: Bob Taylor on his Fiat Allis AD14 dozer, 1971.

Story: Hayley Leibowitz

W

HEN THE LEASE ON THEIR Upper Moutere hop farm came to an end, Marlene Taylor said, “Good, now we can buy a house”. Her husband Bob had other ideas: “No, we can buy a bulldozer”. That first bulldozer was a brand new, bright yellow Fiat Allis AD14 and was a big investment for the Taylors at the time. It was 1971 and Taylors Contracting was born. Fifty years on, what started out with one bulldozer operated by Bob, preparing land for planting trees for the New Zealand Forest Service (NZFS) and building forestry roads, has expanded to a company with over 170 staff and 140 machines, supplying services to the forestry and civil sectors across the South Island. Together with their three sons, Charlie, Matt and Arthur, the Taylors turned the one-man

forestry roading operation into one of the bestknown contracting companies in the Nelson Marlborough region. Bob was an innovator, always looking to improve things. He was the first contractor locally to utilise excavators in the forest and the first to modify and fabricate stronger buckets and attachments needed for the harsh conditions. He fitted rippers to the back of the excavator bucket, to turn them around so the digger driver could rip both ways, which had never been done before. Bob was also one of the first to use dump trucks in the forest for earthworks and twostaging logs. He took the bin off a dump truck and put logging bolsters on it, then he put a turntable bolster on and a long-poled trailer behind it. That rig was used over in the Marahau for some of the first full-stem logging

September 2021 | NZ LOGGER 35


Breaking Out

Bob’s log splitting knife attachment innovation.

done around the Nelson region. Bob also built the first ‘quick hitch’, an attachment on the end of the dipper arm of the excavator. Instead of having to manually pull out the two big pins which held the bucket on, the quick hitch incorporated a hydraulic ram which grabbed the pins. Other examples of his innovation were an oversized log splitter, used to split extra-large sized logs, and the purchase of an impact or square roller for deep compaction. This type of innovation was the foundation for the continuous improvement and investment philosophy the company still practices today, says CEO, Charlie: “Bob had some great sayings to point us in the right direction and keep us going. He was very practical and pragmatic. He would say things like: ‘two does not go into one’, ‘remember the Golden Rule – he who has got the gold makes the rules’, ‘chunk problems down and pick off one problem at a time’, ‘prepare and plan but get started’, ‘the job will evolve, don’t complicate or overthink it’, ‘have confidence in your skills’, ‘take ownership and pride in your work’, ‘if the customer does not want you back, you will sack yourself’, ‘we can do this’… And he was right.” Bob built a skilled and loyal team around him and supported others in the industry. When he died suddenly at the age of 57, Charlie and Matt stepped up and took over, and with Marlene’sguidinghandandtheirbrotherArthur’s

36 NZ LOGGER | September 2021

support, they built the company into what it is today. Bob taught Charlie and Matt their trade and they have led the business for the last 25 years. The company has grown into a multi-disciplined forestry and civil engineering construction company which has taken on many diverse and challenging projects over the years. Taylors Contracting now specialises in forestry infrastructure construction and maintenance, earthmoving, civil engineering construction, and quarry services throughout the South Island. Today, Taylors’ forestry work takes the company right across the Top of the South Island, from Murchison to the Wairau Valley and the Sounds, but most of their work is within a radius of 150km of Nelson. Approximately two million tonnes of timber is harvested annually from the Nelson area forests alone and Taylors provides the majority of engineering services in this area to ensure security of supply to these timber assets. To this end, Taylors owns and operates a modern and diverse fleet of earthmoving equipment. The company’s 52 excavators are all Hitachi, ranging in size from 1.7 tonne to 90 tonne. The bulldozer fleet consists of a Cat D9, three D8s, a D7, a D6, a Komatsu 275, four D155s, one D85 a D31 (that Bob swapped for an old excavator) two John Deere 850s, three

John Deere 700s, one Caterpillar and four John Deere 772 six-wheel drive multi-blade graders. Taylors also runs six truck and trailer units, supported by another 10 regular subcontractors. Other equipment includes loaders, rollers, watercarts, scrapers, dumpers, roadside mowers, hydroseeding and hay mulching and bark and mulch spreading tractor units. The company has several mobile crushers, two drill rigs, its own quarries and produces gravel externally. On a daily basis the forestry operation generally utilises 14 excavators, four bulldozers, two graders, eight gravel trucks, plus loaders, rollers and field support staff and management. Not just machines and dirt “Building a road involves considerably more than just machines and shifting dirt. There is a huge amount of thought and pre-planning required to make it happen,” says Charlie. “There is now an increasing tendency for forestry clients to bring their contractors in at the planning stage and a growing recognition that operational experience improves safety, reduces risk, gives better environmental outcomes, adds value, saves money and provides better outcomes for all parties involved.” A strong team is, of course, vital to this process. Bob and Charlie employed Mike Fahey


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Breaking Out

Left: Forestry Division Manager, Mike Fahey, 2006. Centre: Bob Taylor on a 16B dozer. Bottom: The Taylors Contracting team: Dan Lane, Nathan Price, Mike Fahey, Paul Davies, Marc Nightingale, Matt Neilson, Allan Frew, Ben Catley, Wayne Alekna, Danny Park, Mark Newth, Corinna Downing, Evan Pickering, Ben Bonis, Charlie Thomson, John Brunsden, Dean Robinson, Paul Blanchet, Noel Friend, Peter Ross, Vaughan Toa, Willy Ching and Willy Rashleigh. Absent: Jeff Boyes, Joe Clarke, Kevin Carter, Phil Johnson and Richie Marshall. (Photo: Steve Hussey) Opposite top: D8 skid construction in the Rai Valley. Opposite centre: The UH061 forestry excavator. Opposite bottom: The company’s UH071 excavator at work.

38 NZ LOGGER | September 2021

in 1998 to take on the role of Forestry Division Manager. The team back then consisted of around half a dozen operators. Mike, together with Danny Park (who has also been working with Taylors since 1998), Charlie Thomson and Corrina Downing, now lead a team of around 35 staff and sub-contractors. “I had a good rapport with Bob and the Taylor boys,” Mike says. “I have a lot of respect for them. Bob was a real genuine bloke and a master roadbuilder. If you had a problem and things were tricky, you could go to Bob, and he would come out and share his knowledge. As a young manager it was good to have that support around you. “Charlie and Matt are excellent to work for. They have inherited Bob and Marlene’s great work ethic; they lead from the front and never ask anyone to do something they would not do themselves. They are both very capable men, have tremendous vision and have a great capacity to take on new challenges, handle pressure and get the job done. “They have gone above and beyond for their staff when they have been in need over the years. The COVID-19 pandemic has been an example of this generosity where all staff were paid, and they have kept us all going at considerable cost to the company.” The majority of the forestry team are longserving, highly skilled operators. This includes people like Ben Bonis, Willie Rashleigh, Dean Robinson, John Brunsden, Wayne Alekna, Dan Lane and Mark Newth to name a few. This skill level is borne out by the fact that in the last two Top of the South Forestry awards, Taylors operators have taken the Individual Roading Excellence award. Peter Ross, who


is Taylors’ grader driver extraordinaire, won in 2019 with John Brunsden as runner up and Marc Nightingale, a highly experienced excavator operator, won in 2021. Project perfect Taylors has literally delivered thousands of kilometres of forestry and rural roads across the Top of the South over the years, even returning and operating in forests for the second and third rotation that Bob and his trusty bulldozer had roaded and land-prepped as the trees have matured, setting up the infrastructure for the next part of the growth cycle. “There are a couple of Taylor Roads and even a Bob Taylor Road named after the company’s efforts. I do not think there is a Marlene Road, but I think we will have to rectify that,” says Mike. Taylors is currently providing engineering support services for approximately 25 logging crews across the region. “There are outstanding people in the forestry industry across our region, who quietly and humbly work, hidden away in our rural backdrop every day, working smart to deliver quality sustainable products for our clients and their customers. The Taylors team are some of those people, good people with good skills operating modern, well-maintained equipment,” Mike adds. One of the first jobs Mike managed for Taylors was the Boundary Road spiral in the Waimea Forest. “It is fair to say that in those days there was some resistance to early contractor involvement in the planning process. Carter Holt Harvey (CHH) had good people but part of the success of any project is bringing together the right people with experience, good ideas and skills. Nobody has a mortgage on good ideas,” he says. The initial processing site was positioned between the left and right branches of the Wairoa River and there were environmental issues. Bob came up with a plan to upgrade Boundary Road and put a couple of spirals in the middle to get the logging trucks up to the top of the hill. There was resistance from one of the local planners, so Bob and Mike went up and did the field survey for free and got the grade to the top of the hill. There were some tricky areas and they had to price it and convince the management team that they could do it. “Bob knew we could, and so did I,” Mike says. After they got the road built, one of the CHH managers commented that Bob’s plan had led to significant safety and environmental improvement, saving millions of dollars by not having to two-stage the volume to the bottom of the hill and providing better security of supply.

September 2021 | NZ LOGGER 39


Breaking Out

Above: Cyclone clean-up at Marahau. (Photo: John Brunsden) Below: Pigeon Valley fire clean-up, 2019. (Photo: Dan Lane)

Other key projects over the years have included: • The Cedar Creek Stub Road, comprising six switch back corners stacked on top of each other to access volume between sections of native forest. • The Brook Waimarama Sanctuary Predator Fence bench – 14km of access track for the construction of the pest-proof fence. • The 2018 Tropical Cyclone Gita storm event response and clean-up at Marahau and Riwaka. • The 2019 Pigeon Valley wildfire. Taylors fitted into the Fire and Emergency NZ (FENZ) structure, supporting their team with complimentary earthmoving and machinery management skills to help fight the fire. “This was a 24-hour seven-day-a-week operation involving hundreds of people. FENZ was a very professional team to work with,” says Mike. • The construction last year of the new 4.5km long Sturgeon Road for Tasman Pine Forest in the Lee Forest, to avoid access issues across private land. The job was completed on time, within budget and to the required standard. The good and the bad “Bob used to say that earthmoving is not an exact science, and you never know what you’re going to find until you dig. That is what keeps Taylors employees coming back each day and what makes it so interesting,” comments Charlie. The terrain in the Nelson Marlborough region is steep with long slopes and the harvesters and earthmovers of this region are specialists in dealing with the challenges the topography poses. The landscape is always changing, whether through natural processes, disasters or man-made modification and dealing with earth science is what Taylors does. This includes an interest in rocks and dirt, dealing with soil structures that are millions of years old, and respecting the land and the landforms they work with. “A lot of our guys can look at rock and read the way the grain is running or how hard it is,” says Mike. “Bob was a master at this. He could see the most efficient way to shift dirt, where to start, and how to set a job up efficiently. Bob had really good skills and Charlie and Matt have got these abilities as well. They’re very talented and innovative earthmovers.” And it helps that they have good relationships with the local councils and communities they work in. Mike says: “We are part of these communities; we live here, earn our living here, we hunt the hills, fish the rivers and sea, tramp and bike in the forests... we are committed

40 NZ LOGGER | September 2021


The Terex CBI 6800CT horizontal grinder in action. (Photo: Dan Lane)

to the region and want our activities to be sustainable”. Environmental standards have improved significantly in the last 50 years and the great thing is they will improve even more in the next 50, he adds. “Soil conservation and water quality protection has always been a high priority for Taylors Forestry clients, Iwi, private landowners, the communities who use and play in our environment and for Taylors as earthmoving contractors. The importance and sensitivity of the landscape and fresh water is recognised by the team, and measures to avoid and mitigate the effects of each job are put in place. We comply with applicable environmental legislation, national standards and best practice.” These values have come under further scrutiny since the recent introduction of the two sets of National Environmental Standards for Fresh Water and Plantation Forestry (NESPF).

Mike comments, “Improving environmental controls is a growth area for our business and fits very well with our values and where the future is going. It is good work and makes a big difference. It’s all about doing a quality job, sustainable land use and mitigating our impacts. With the introduction of the new standards, we are upskilling our people on new methods and techniques to meet the intent and objectives of the legislation. Through knowledge sharing, investment and training, Taylors actively involves employees in environmental initiatives, encouraging them to take ownership and accountability for the impact of their actions and encouraging proactive environmental management.” In 2019, Taylors won the Environmental Excellence Award at the Top of the South Forestry Awards. A recent acquisition furthers this aim – a big Terex CBI 6800CT horizontal grinder, effectively

a giant mulcher which takes material in at one end, grinds it up and spits it out the other. The grinder is used for mulching woody biowaste into useful products such as biofuel for boilers, mulch for landscaping, material for soil stabilisation and bedding or feeding pad material for livestock husbandry. “The grinder can be easily transported to jobs around the region. Being self-propelled it can be readily moved around sites to where the work is. Several of our clients are trialling options to turn residue wood products and forestry slash into sustainable and renewable energy sources, which has the added benefit of further reducing onsite and potential offsite impacts and this machine is ideal for this process. Land conversion operations can also benefit from the grinder’s ability to deal with trees and shelterbelts, such as in urban subdivisions and rural land use change,” Charlie explains.


Breaking Out Safe and sound towards the future Working with big iron, safety has always played an important role in the work undertaken by Taylors. There have been no serious long term, lost-time injuries to the Forestry team in over 25 years of operations. “To foster positive safety outcomes, Taylors leverages everyone’s expertise to identify and help manage hazards. We make sure everyone understands they are empowered and are expected to stop a task if there is a safety risk, which is reflected in the company tagline, ‘Return Home Uninjured Unharmed Everyday’,” says Charlie. “Outwardly the appearance of safety paraphernalia has changed over the years as times have changed, but the philosophy of building effective safety into the job has been consistent. Taylors is using technologies such as paperless forms, GPS and more recently QR codes to help make things easier these days.” Feedback from staff on these technologies is interesting, with some reporting that prior to introducing GPS they were habitual speeders on the road. With the introduction of vehicle GPS they have changed their ways and now find this behaviour translated to the way they drive their personal vehicles. Fuel burn, tyre wear and vehicle damage is also reduced, saving costs and repairs, Charlie adds. Taylors also has a strong focus on wellbeing and ensuring that work has an overall positive influence on everyone’s life. “As part of this we encourage everyone to think of their role as having two aspects, the first is their primary function and the second is improving their job and work environment. Taylors was accredited to ISO 45001 earlier this year and this reflects our progressive approach and commitment to making health and safety part of everyone’s job,” he says. Mike says he feels privileged to have been part of the Taylors team for the last 23 years: “We have been part of a sustainable supply chain which has created a lot of value for our clients, communities, and the country in general. Through our working careers we have experienced trees being planted, harvested and replanted. There are tremendously talented and committed people in the forestry and engineering industries; they work smart and think laterally. The business has continued to grow and improve, and we have had a lot of fun along the way. Forestry and Taylors Contracting has a very bright future.” Charlie agrees: “There have been great advancements in Health and Safety and Environmental Standards in the last 50 years and the pace of improvement has picked up, particularly in the last 10 years. Machinery and technology keep improving. The reliability and

42 NZ LOGGER | September 2021

efficiency of each new generation of machinery is exciting. Improving work methods, improving environmental controls, utilising leftover wood residues and biofuels, and working smarter to reduce our impacts are where the growth opportunities are. We continue to invest in our people, equipment, systems, and work methods to ensure a sustainable future as we look forward to the next 50 years in business. We pride ourselves on long term, sustainable, win-win relationships.” On the forestry industry, he adds: “Forestry is a great industry to be involved in. In this region it is amazing how we all know each other. At the recent 2021 Top of the South Forestry awards night, company CEOs were talking with contractors and their staff. There are not many industries where people at all levels, from forest management companies to field staff, know each other and converse. “Forestry is also a sector where you get multi generations of staff working in the same industry. People who love the land and pass their passion on to other members of

T

their family. Taylors Contracting has many staff members with close relatives working alongside them in forestry and across other divisions in the company. Mike is just one example of this, with two nephews now working for Taylors.” Mike still loves being on a ridge at daybreak watching the sun come up, or going down after a hard day’s work, seeing the changing shapes and colours of the landscape. “I enjoy the challenge of creating something out of nothing and building infrastructure that stands the test of time,” he says, adding that he respects the talent, commitment and hard work of the people in the industry. “It is a great office and the air in the forest seems better, cleaner, and fresher. It’s a great place to work. Foresters and contractors are optimists. A person who plants a tree or invests in people and plant in the forestry industry looks 30 years into the future and creates something real, creates a living breathing asset, creates sustainable value,” he says. NZL

AYLORS HAS RELEASED A BOOK IN CELEBRATION OF ITS 50-YEAR ANNIVERSARY. The book, The Taylors Way, was written by Author Carol Dawber, well known for her other history books on the area, and dedicated to Bob Taylor, and all those who have been part of the company’s journey. The book starts with 19-year-old John Taylor, who emigrated from England to Nelson aboard the Emma Colvin in 1856, and who was the great grandfather of Bob Taylor – the founder of Taylors Contracting. The book then moves through the years to the current day, sharing stories from family members, past and present employees and fellow contractors. This is a well-researched story, with the smell of diesel and dust in the air. Copies of the book will be available for purchase from Taylors Contracting Head Office.


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Worker Wellness

MANAGING HAND ARM VIBRATION RISK

T

HOUGH THERE ARE PLENTY OF obvious potential dangers working in forestry, there are also hidden threats. Vibration from tools and machines is one of them. If workers regularly and frequently use hand-held power tools and machines, especially for long periods of time, these vibrations can be transmitted into the hands and arms causing permanent harm. The result can be the development of hand-arm vibration syndrome (HAVS) or carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Symptoms of HAVS and CTS

Practical chainsaw training at the Waikato Institute of Technology.

SYMPTOMS OF HAVS AND CTS

Symptoms include numbing, tingling, lack of feeling, pain and change in colour and strength (see graphic below). The symptoms can come and go, but with continued exposure to handarm vibration (HAV), they can become prolonged or permanent. This can happen after only a few months of exposure, but in most cases it will take a few years. As a result, workers could experience pain, distress and disturbed sleep. HAV can also make existing hand injuries or other illnesses worse. People who are exposed to noise and vibration at the same time are more likely to lose their hearing than people who are exposed to noise alone. If the symptoms are ignored, the damage can become permanent and disabling. As a result, workers may not be able to do simple tasks like opening jars or using a phone. They may have to stop working with vibrating equipment if

they can no longer safely handle tools and machines. Factors affecting HAV exposure level Different power tools and machines produce different amounts of vibration. Power tools and machines that are older or not well-maintained usually vibrate more. The use of power tools and machines – typically high vibration ones – is linked to HAVS and CTS. These include using hand-held or hand-guided tools like: • chainsaws, • jackhammers/demolition hammers/ demolition breakers, • hammer drills, • jigsaws, • sanders, • hand-held grinders, • weed whackers/line trimmers, • powered sanders, • pneumatic drills, • powered lawn mowers. As well as in forestry, HAVS and CTS are seen in professions such as metal working, demolition, road repair, construction, heavy engineering and foundries. There are many factors that can influence the effects of exposure to HAV. These include: • the condition of the power tool/machine, • the vibration intensity, • the duration of exposure (time/day, frequency), • the temperature the work is being carried out in, • operator technique (for example, how hard the worker grips the power tool/machine), • operator health and medical history (including if they smoke).

• • • •

To work out the risk, think about: the power tool/machine, how the work is organised, the task, the workers.

The recommended maximum daily amount of HAV that workers should not exceed is eight hours. Control measures should be put in place if workers are exposed to an eight hour average or more.

44 NZ LOGGER | September 2021


Role of the power tool/machine • What is the vibration level of the power tool/machine? – See the manufacturer’s user manual or specification. • Is the power tool/machine regularly maintained? – There is greater vibration when power tools and machines are not well maintained. – Blunt tools mean tasks take longer, meaning more exposure to vibration. • Is it a heavy hand-held power tool/ machine? – Tighter grip is needed for heavier power tools and machines. Gripping too tightly increases the chances of developing HAVS or CTS. • Does a large area of the hand contact the power tool/machine? – The larger the areas of contact, the more vibration workers are exposed to. • Does it have a well-insulated handle? – Poorly insulated handles mean workers are exposed to more vibration. Influence of the task • Is the power tool/machine the right one for the task? – Using the wrong power tool/machine can mean work takes longer, increasing exposure to vibration. – Using over-powered tools exposes workers to higher levels of vibration. • What is the vibration level for the task and how long does the task take? – See the manufacturer’s user manual or specification for vibration data. The higher the vibration, the greater the risk. • What is the hardness of the material the power tool/machine will contact (for example, is it concrete, is it wood, is it soft soil)? – The harder the material, the more vibration. • Does the task involve workers lifting power tools overhead or other awkward postures? – Tighter grip is needed for awkward postures. Gripping too tightly increases the chances of developing HAVS or CTS. How the work is organised • How long are workers exposed to the vibration? – How many hours within the shift involve operating the power tool/machinery? – How often do workers take breaks? – How long are they exposed to high levels of HAV versus lower levels? – How often do they operate the power

tool/machine? Every day? – The longer workers are exposed to vibration, the more chance of developing HAVS or CTS. • Is the work in cold environments? – Cold increases the chances of developing HAVS or CTS. The workers themselves • Do workers always use the right power tool/machine for the job? – Using the wrong power tool/machine can mean work takes longer, increasing exposure to vibration. • Have they been trained how to properly use the power tool/machine? Do they have poor technique (awkward postures) or grip the power tool/machine more tightly than needed? – Gripping more tightly than needed increases the chances of developing HAVS or CTS. • Are they being exposed to HAV above the recommended levels? • Have workers previously reported symptoms of HAVS or CTS? Have you checked recently if there are any early signs? • Do they smoke? – Smoking decreases blood circulation and increases the chance of HAVS. • How is their general health? – Medical conditions such as diabetes and arthritis, and injuries such as frostbite increase the chances of developing HAVS or CTS. Managing health and safety risks from HAV? First try to eliminate a risk so far as is reasonably practicable. If it is not reasonably

possible to eliminate the risk, it must be minimised so far as is reasonably practicable. To manage the risks from HAV, you could: • reduce the amount of vibration workers are exposed to, • reduce the time workers are exposed to vibration (over each shift, over the time they work). The hierarchy of control measures (pictured above) can help to work out the most effective control measures to use. Control measures should remain effective, and be fit-for-purpose, suitable for the nature and duration of the work, and used correctly. Regularly monitor and review control measures to confirm that the measures are effective. Immediately investigate, and review control measures when: • the control measure does not control the risk, or • a new hazard or risk is identified, or • workers report symptoms of HAVS and CTS, or • exposure monitoring or health monitoring results show workers are being harmed or at risk from HAV, or • there will be a change in the workplace or work (for example, new equipment, new or changed work processes, increased workload, extended hours or additional/changed shifts), or • workers or their representatives indicate a review is necessary or request it. Use the results of these reviews to continually improve the management of health risks. NZL

September 2021 | NZ LOGGER 45


FOREST INDUSTRY CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION

www.fica.org.nz

11

HERE WE GO AGAIN, BOOM/BUST? Prue Younger, CEO Message

It has come to pass that the forest sector has been working away quietly on the back end of high market prices but that seems to have shown a few cracks in the last few months, albeit infrastructure pressure points and ports for many reasons being an indicator with fleets of ships anchored off shore around the country. So what is happening out there? The best place I have found to get on the ground information is the accountants that day in, day out are at the coal face of the industry, so I called on our Business Partner Blackburne to say it as it is currently. Thanks in advance Mark Blackburne for your honest words of just how it is...

After a good run for most in the industry post lockdown the pendulum, as always happens, is now swinging strongly into downturn. How long no one knows, but this is already negatively impacting many contractors. As an industry we have all been here before, it hurts, and will shake out some weaker contractors. There are a well-established range of planning measures to assist survival. These are usefully summarised on the FICA website under 'COVID-19 Support Documents' in the 'news' section. https://www.fica.org.nz/industry-reports

My even briefer summary is, be honest and realistic with yourself about the prospects and act quickly. Experience shows that contractors are generally optimists which in many ways is a great characteristic, but the "she'll be right" doesn't cut it at these times. So if things aren't working for you at the moment be honest with yourself as to what you can do to change - going with the flow, downhill, is not a survival strategy. The accepted definition of insanity "continuing to do the same thing while expecting a different result" always applies. Of course contractors are often frustrated in that much of what significantly impacts them is outside their control. As well as the obvious availability of work, a significant factor always affecting contractor viability is uplift. This has been a signifi­ cant feature in recent times with increasing supply chain pressures now combining with formal restrictions on targets. Our experience is that ongoing 80-90% of production for any contractor is hard, but may be able to be managed over the short term, but for weaker contractors, especially those with high debt levels, will quickly create dire outcomes.

The meaning of the title above is to highlight that not only are we now facing the 'normal' downturn and associated issues, on top of this is a sustained across-the-board level of input cost increases that we have not faced since the high inflation times of the 1980s, so will be unknown to many.

We are having daily discussions with suppliers/contractors on these issues e.g. just this week we saw, a 13.8% increase from one oil supplier, 25% increase in steel prices, insurance assessor advising repair costs over the last 12 months up 35% per claim. Plus regular increases in machine costs (that's when you can obtain and don't have to wait 6-12 months!). And so it goes on.

Of course the obvious are wage costs. This not only reflects government-imposed statutory increases (minimum wage/sick leave/public holidays, and other lesser-known 'add-ons' ), but, combined with the shortage of skilled labour in the industry means that wage rates have escalated well in excess of normal 'inflation'. All of these increases reduce margin. We are seeing increasing examples where contractors performing at or near

46 NZ LOGGER | September 2021

target levels are finding cash surplus required to meet finance and other commitments is diminishing. While decreases in targets are clear and obvious, cumulative cost increases are more subtle and can lead to "a death by a thousand cuts" scenario sneaking up on contractors.

Our regular costing work undertaken for contractors is highlighting that much work priced on historical rates is well under-costed and not reflecting real inputs now required. Both contractors and forest owners have an historic comfort level around what a rate is expected to be and in many cases this is now not reflecting reality.

So this current downturn (hopefully temporary) has a potential double whammy in that, on top of the normal reduction in volumes, the industry is also having to manage a level of real cost increases not seen for many years.

Regrettably there are no easy answers, market cycles are what they are. The purpose of these comments is to highlight the need to take prompt action, both in terms of reviewing rates and also looking at the toolbox of planning measures referred to at the start of this article. And sooner rather than later - head in the sand does not work at these times. Mark Blackburne Blackburne Group - Chartered Accountants Phone: (07) 376 0092 Ext 821 www.blackburnegroup.co.nz I will end with the overview of the project in a break out box:

National Forestry Contract Model Project For many years, supply chain factors have consistently been recognised as a critical, but hard to influence factor in forestry workplace wellbeing, health and safety.

We appreciate that while the dynamics are often different between the Corporate and smaller scale operations, one fact remains... the relationship between Forest Owner/Managers and Contractors is critical to industry success and a strong culture between these partners is essential. While FICA produced Summary Contract Guidelines in 2019 to highlight key areas for improvement for contractors and their arrangements with forest growers, the opportunity for a model contract or template to be developed was recognised as a means of directly influencing health and safety outcomes and industry partnerships. As a result, several industry stakeholders have come together to advance the development of a model contract/template to improve business performance and work conditions. WorkSafe has agreed with this thinking and provided funding to support the design of a model contract. It is an exciting time ahead for the industry and this project will create meaningful and transformational change and advancement in professionalism. We are looking forward to keeping you posted across this project over the coming months.

;Z).rue--


top spot

Safety/performance/quality

Harvesting Period 2 Results 2021 AND BEFORE WE KNOW IT, THE SECOND period of harvesting results are here! It’s really pleasing to see that, despite all the distractions that may occur, these folk continue to exemplify the professionalism that makes this industry what it is. Our top performing crews really are nailing the fact that, while silviculture or harvesting may be the activity being undertaken, we really are in the business of people management. Getting the best out of them is reflected through crew culture and performance. Getting the best out of people on the ground also relies on an honest, stable and trusting relationship between forest owners/managers and the folk on the coal face. So, congratulations to all those who participated and have been recognised in the Period 2 results.

Our ongoing thanks to Rayonier/Matariki Forests, Wenita Forest Products, Port Blakely, Crown Forestry, CMH Logging, Hauraki and Moehau Logging, Thomassen Logging, Te Waa Logging, Inta-Wood Forestry, Otautau Contractors, Heslip Forest Contracting, Waikato Forestry Services, Makerikeri Silviculture, XMen Forestry, Central Forestry Services, Mangoihe Logging, Kohurau Contracting, Dennis E Hayes Logging, Ernslaw

Sponsors – they don’t have to do this but they choose to! Awesome companies, awesome people and awesome support! They back you and your workmates to succeed as professionals, so why wouldn’t you support them? They believe in what we do and what you do. So, a big ongoing thank you to our Strategic Partners – STIHL and NZ Logger and sponsor SWAZI. The best way to keep our industry working is to get out and support those businesses that support New Zealand. Participating Companies This competition wouldn’t be what it is without our participating companies. We understand the commitment it takes from them to be part of Top Spot and value their ongoing support and feedback.

48 NZ LOGGER | September 2021

George Hinana – Lahar Log 4.

One, Blue Wood Logging, Mike Hurring Logging, McCallum Harvesting, Whisker Logging, Kaha Logging, Lahar Logging, Dempsey Logging, Moutere Logging, JBD Harvesting, McDougall Logging, Forest View Logging, Kimberley Logging, Dewes Logging, Manaia Logging, Storm Logging, Eastside Logging, Veal Forestry, McHoull Forestry, Pride Forestry, Bay Pine, Penetito Forestry, FM Silviculture, Forest View Forestry, Wayne Cummings, Rodco Forestry, Johnson Forestry, Pro Forest Services, Eastside Logging. Into safety? Into performance? Into quality? Contact Shane Perrett on 0274 781 908, 07 3483037 or at primefm@xtra.co.nz.


top spot

Safety/performance/quality

FUNCTION

CREW

ESTATE

PARTICIPANT

TASK

PLACING

BOC

Lahar Log 4

Ernslaw One Bulls

Harlem Hawira

Breaking Out Cable

1st

BOC

Lahar Log 4

Ernslaw One Bulls

Andre McDonnall

Breaking Out Cable

2nd

BOC

Dewes Log 3

Ernslaw One Gisborne

Tahi Hiroki

Breaking Out Cable

3rd

BOC

Dewes Log 3

Ernslaw One Gisborne

Ebony Tuari

Breaking Out Cable

4th

GBE

CMH 61

Port Blakely

Scott Mason

Forwarder

1st

GBE

Forest Pro Log 1

Ernslaw One Gisborne

Nick Reid

Forwarder

2nd

GBE

JDH Log 16

Ernslaw One Bulls

Chris Steele

Ground Base Extraction

1st=

GBE

Whisker Log 3

Ernslaw One Bulls

Mike Jeffrees

Ground Base Extraction

1st=

GBE

Whisker Log 2

Ernslaw One Bulls

James Dear

Ground Base Extraction

3rd

GBE

Kaha Harvesting

Ernslaw One Bulls

Richard Carmichael

Shovel Logging

1st

GBE

Forest Pro Log 1

Ernslaw One Gisborne

Freedom Stevens

Shovel Logging

2nd

GBE

Onward Logging 12

Ernslaw One Gisborne

BJ Sidney

Shovel Logging

3rd

MFP

Whisker Log 2

Ernslaw One Bulls

Colin Wroe

Mechanised Felling

1st=

MFP

Mangoihe 5

PF Olsen

Kris Trevena

Mechanised Felling

1st=

MFP

Moutere Log 7

Ernslaw One Bulls

Maxwell Horton

Mechanised Felling

3rd

MFP

Whisker Log 3

Ernslaw One Bulls

Chet Swan

Mechanised Felling and Processing

1st

MFP

Dempsey Log 8

Ernslaw One Bulls

Anthony Dempsey

Mechanised Felling and Processing

2nd

MFP

CMH 61

Port Blakely

Mike Murray

Mechanised Felling and Processing

3rd

MFP

Kaha Harvesting

Ernslaw One Bulls

Phillip Hansen

Mechanised Processing

1st=

MFP

Moutere Log 7

Ernslaw One Bulls

Pou Anderson

Mechanised Processing

1st=

MFP

Whisker Log 2

Ernslaw One Bulls

Kit Bradley

Mechanised Processing

1st=

MFP

Mangoihe GB

PF Olsen

Brad Atkinson

Mechanised Processing

1st=

MOL

Lahar Log 4

Ernslaw One Bulls

Lindon Blake

Machine Operation on the Landing

1st=

MOL

Dewes Log 3

Ernslaw One Gisborne

William Saddlier

Machine Operation on the Landing

1st=

MOL

JDH Log 16

Ernslaw One Bulls

Jamie Mitchell

Machine Operation on the Landing

3rd

MTF

Kaha Harvesting

Ernslaw One Bulls

Chris Winter

Manual Tree Felling

1st

MTF

Mangoihe 5

PF Olsen

Jack Kristiansen

Manual Tree Felling

2nd

MTF

Kaha Harvesting

Ernslaw One Bulls

Paneta Wiari

Manual Tree Felling

3rd

Pole

Lahar Log 4

Ernslaw One Bulls

Simon Katene

Poleman and/or Spotter

1st

Pole

Roxburgh Contracting 2

Wenita Forest Products

Peter Murray

Poleman and/or Spotter

2nd

Pole

Eastside Logging 16

Ernslaw One Gisborne

Prince Taingaere

Poleman and/or Spotter

3rd

Skid

Lahar Log 4

Ernslaw One Bulls

George Hinana

QC/ Retrim/ Log Making

1st

Skid

Onward Logging 12

Ernslaw One Gisborne

Jesse Tidy

QC/ Retrim/ Log Making

2nd

Skid

Kaha Harvesting

Ernslaw One Bulls

Takarangi Metekingi

QC/ Retrim/ Log Making

3rd

Skid

Forest Pro Log 1

Ernslaw One Gisborne

Caitlin Markie

QC/ Retrim/ Log Making

4th

Yarder

Mangoihe 5

PF Olsen

Tim Paxton

Yarder

1st

Yarder

Dewes Log 3

Ernslaw One Gisborne

Quinton Collins

Yarder

2nd

Yarder

Lahare Log 4

Ernslaw One Bulls

Smiler Katene

Yarder

3rd

HARVESTING PERIOD 2 RESULTS September 2021 | NZ LOGGER 49


top spot

Safety/performance/quality

Brad Atkinson – Mangoihe GB.

From left: Richard Carmichael, Chris Winter, Takarangi Metekingi, Philip Hansen, Paneta Wiari – all of Kaha Harvesting.

Jamie Mitchell – JDH Log 16.

Kris Trevena – Mangoihe 5. 50 NZ LOGGER | September 2021

Smiler and Simon Katene – Lahar Log 4.

Tim Paxton – Mangoihe 5.


top spot

Safety/performance/quality

Pou Anderson – Moutere Log 7.

Scott Mason – CMH 61.

Maxwell Horton – Moutere Log 7.

Jack Kristiansen – Mangoihe 5.

Michael Murray – CMH 61.

Chris Steele – JDH Log 16.

Anthony Dempsey – Dempsey Log 8. September 2021 | NZ LOGGER 51


new iron

FIRST JOHN DEERE 959M FOR SOUTH ISLAND

ANOTHER SANY FOR STOKES

Shane Griffin Logging has taken delivery of the South Island’s first John Deere 959M tracked feller buncher, fitted with a Quadco QB4400, from Drummond & Etheridge.

Steven Stokes of Stokes Logging has added another Sany to his fleet. Delivered by Shaw’s, this SY415H is complete with full Ensign guarding package and a Duxson arm mod and installation of a refurbed 625c Waratah.

NEW JOHN DEERE FOR ROSEWARNE

CAT FOR CABLE LOGGING

A new John Deere 2656G swing machine is taking on shovelling and loading duties for Rosewarne Contractors – from steeper shovelling operations to loading out trucks. Pictured are Derek Rosewarne (left) and Dan Ball.

Geraldine-based Cable Logging has taken delivery of a purposebuilt Cat 538 forestry machine. Pictured are the two owners, Mike May and Tracy Burrows, along with operator, Britney Burrows, and Terra Cat South Canterburybased heavy diesel resident field service technician, Luke Loader. Both Mike and Tracy speak highly of Luke, and say that he was a key reason for the purchase of their new Cat which has been put to work in their South Canterbury operation.

September 2021 | NZ LOGGER 53


new iron

HYUNDAI FOR WEST COAST LOGGING

LOGMAX HEAD FOR SPARROW

Operator, Tony Carter, of West Coast Logging in Waingaro is loving the company’s new Hyundai FX3230G, fitted with Ensign 1730 grapple and single bar grousers. Owner, Clarry Iti, is a long-time supporter of the Porter Group with quite a few Hyundai’s in his forestry fleet.

Sparrow Logging in Southland recently took delivery of a Logmax 10000XT from Southstar Equipment. The new head was installed onto an existing Madill 2850C. Shannon is pictured running the new head at commissioning.

JOHN DEERE FOR BRAND LOGGING

DUXSON/JOHN DEERE COMBO FOR PATON

Brand Logging has taken delivery of a new John Deere 1910E forwarder for its Canterbury operations. The forwarder comes with Intelligent boom control (IBC), Bluetooth weigh scales and TimberMatic maps – the newest development in forest machine automation. Sold and supported by Drummond & Etheridge.

A Duxson GX181HD fitted onto a John Deere 2156G for Paton Logging, heading out to work.

54 NZ LOGGER | September 2021


new iron

NEW JOHN DEERE/WOODSMAN COMBO

ANOTHER HYUNDAI FOR FORRESTER LOGGING

This new John Deere 959MH with Woodsman 750 has joined Crew 045, working for Timberlands in Kaingaroa Forest. Owner, Russell Jensen is pictured with Russell Brown, Rachael Brown and operator, Eugene.

Porter Equipment Northland Territory Manager, Selwyn Tilly, recently delivered this Hyundai FX3230G to Iain and the boys at Forrester Logging in Kerikeri.

SATCO FOR BAY FOREST HARVESTING

ELTEC/WOODSMAN COMBO FOR NIGEL BRYANT

Bay Forest Harvesting has taken delivery of a new SATCO 630E. Dan is using the SAT630E to fall and shovel wood ready for extraction. Included with the SAT630E is the Logmaker SATCO control system. The system runs GPS maps, with the capability to log where each tree is harvested from and the butt diameter of each tree, to be downloaded.

Nelson’s Nigel Bryant Logging has taken delivery by Shaw’s of an Eltec FHL317L tilter fitted with a Woodsman Pro CFH1400 fixed head. This machine is taking care of all the felling duties for the company’s swing yarder operation.

September 2021 | NZ LOGGER 55


new iron

DUXSON/JOHN DEERE COMBO FOR HAHN LOGGING

SMH LOGGING GETS NEXT GEN CAT

Brian of Hahn Logging has taken delivery of a John Deere 2156G fitted with a Duxson GX181HD grapple. The machine was sold by Matt Mills of Drummond & Etheridge and fitted in Greymouth by Jason of Duxson Donaldson. The machine is working hard, alongside the company’s Duxson FX142 felling head.

This new Next Gen Cat 336 is a recent arrival for Shaun Erni from SMH Logging. The machine was guarded at PFS and is running a Woodsman 750 processor. Shaun says he is impressed with the powerful, smooth performance of the 336, plus the room and comfort of the operator cab. The big new Cat is working in the Foxton area and was sold by Mark Costello, Territory Account Manager for Terra Cat.

ANOTHER JOHN DEERE

SUMITOMO/WARATAH COMBO FOR DONALDSON MECHANICAL

Spud and Claire Paton have added to their John Deere Fleet with a new 2156G low cab to assist with shovel logging and loading duties. Pictured from left are Tai, Spud, Rorden, Shannon and Liam.

56 NZ LOGGER | September 2021

Near Malborough, Endurance Logging’s Hayden has taken delivery of a Sumitomo SH350TLFS fitted with a Waratah 624 by the team at Donaldson Mechanical. The machine was sold by Martin TalbotPrice of AB Equipment. Operator, Scott Gullery, says he is very happy.


new iron

JOHN DEERE/SATCO COMBO FOR JUDE BROLLY Jude Brolly’s new John Deere 959MH with SATCO 325E fell and trim ready to go on the tether in the Rotoehu Forest. All the crew got in for the photo shoot.

NEW FALL AND TRIM HARVESTER FOR M WELCH LOGGING M Welch Logging has taken delivery of a new 3L2 fall and trim harvester to take over the duties of falling, trimming, and stacking stems ready for extraction from an older SAT424H. Nick says he is loving all the new features the 3L2 with logmaker control system has to offer.

ELTEC/WOODSMAN COMBO FOR MCCALLUM

CAT DOZER FOR SPEIRS LOGGING

Tuatapere’s McCallum Harvesting has taken delivery by Shaw’s of an Eltec FHL317L tilter with a Woodsman Pro 1350c felling head. This machine is performing all the felling and shovelling duties.

Gisborne-based Speirs Logging has taken delivery of a new Cat D8T dozer. The machine has been put to work by owner, Blake Speirs, doing forestry roading in the company’s East Coast operations. A Cat C15 engine provides the horsepower to get the job done in the tough conditions, while the operator says the updated cab provides great all-round visibility and comfort. The machine was sold by Terra Cat Territory Account Manager, Heath Stewart.

September 2021 | NZ LOGGER 57


NZ LOGGER classified

STRONG & RELIABLE GRAPPLES STRONG && RELIABLE RELIABLE GRAPPLES GRAPPLES STRONG Made in NZ

Grapplesand andall allspares sparesinin Grapples stockwith withovernight overnightdelivery delivery stock

SERIES852 852and and864 864 MMSERIES STRONG&&RELIABLE RELIABLE STRONG GRAPPLES GRAPPLES

Knight Logging Ltd

• M SERIES 852 AND 864 – STRONG & RELIABLE GRAPPLES • GRAPPLES AND ALL SPARES IN STOCK WITH OVERNIGHT DELIVERY • PROVEN AFTER SALES SERVICE

ProvenAfter AfterSales Sales Proven Service Service

LG31252

ContactMarty MartyororBruce Bruce Contact Ph027 027324 3249091 9091 Ph 79Chambers ChambersStreet, Street,Tokoroa Tokoroa 79 enquiries@cdlloggrapples.co.nz enquiries@cdlloggrapples.co.nz

A DIVISION OF

Built to banish downtime. For heavy tyres, there’s no such thing as an easy job. That’s why the entire Nokian foresty tyre range is built to stand up to the harshest of conditions and heaviest of applications. To get the best from your gear, choose Nokian.

STAYS ON THE JOB. Tyres that mean business. Phone us on 0800 NOKIAN (0800 665 426) or email info@nokian.co.nz to find a dealer.

58 NZ LOGGER | September 2021


IN-FIELD HYDRAULIC HOSE EMERGENCY REPAIR KITS


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Tick boxes NZ TRUCK & DRIVER 1 year (11 issues) for $80 incl. GST NZ LOGGER 1 year (11 issues) for $70 incl. GST NZ TRUCKBODY & TRAILER 1 year (4 issues) for $30 incl. GST

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NZ LOGGER classified

PROTECT YOUR POLYCARBONATE WINDOWS

BEFORE

Polycarb windows are prone to scratching causing severe reduction in visibility for the operator creating health & safety issues.

AFTER

► Extend the life of the polycarbonate,

► Reduce need for screen replacement, only film when necessary

► Restore visibility for operator,

► Enable use of windscreen wipers

MOBILE SERVICE NATIONWIDE

CONTACT: SHANE 027 626 2231 extremewindowtints@xtra.co.nz

@ExtremeWindowTints Extreme_Window_Tints

LG31921

By applying our protective window film to your machine windows, you will:

September 2021 | NZ LOGGER 61


NZ LOGGER classified

Forestry Insurance Solutions LG23616

0800 55 54 53 info@stal.co.nz

www.sweeneytownsend.co.nz

Forestry Insurance Solutions

EXPOSE YOUR PRODUCT OR SERVICE Get the right exposure through NZ Logger magazine and capture the Forest industry buyers directly.

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LG31256

mobile. 021 925 600 phone. 09 571 3544

62 NZ LOGGER | September 2021


S 0

NZ LOGGER classified

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www.chains.co.nz ENGINEERED WITH EXPERIENCE... Clark Tracks from Scotland Single tracks Bogey Tracks 30.5x32 750/55-26.5 35.5x32 780/50-28.5

Trygg Ring Lug Chains from Norway are available from 16mm to 25mm 23.1x26 30.5x32 24.5x32 35.5x32 28Lx26

Chain Protection have been selling these brands of forestry Chains & Tracks for 20+years

LG30793

0

Chain Protection Services Ph: 03 338 1552 • E: chainpro@xtra. co.nz • www.chains.co.nz

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September 2021 | NZ LOGGER 63


NZ LOGGER classified

IN FORESTRY, IT’S THE SIMPLE THINGS

DONE WELL THAT REALLY WORK

ENQUIRE NOW Nick Andrews New Zealand Sales

027 548 7761 dcforestryequipment.com

Nort Mec 64 NZ LOGGER | September 2021


Sample photo

New Waratah 864 Grapple Heavy duty fleet and stack grapple.

Priced $59,000.00

Priced $105,000.00

Priced $20,000.00

Priced $150,000.00

Waratah 626 Used 626 - soon to be rebuilt POA

Under rebuild POA

Priced $50,000.00

Under rebuild POA

5% OFF

10% Delimb Covers OFF

Machine set of cylinder seal kits

Delimb Covers

Northland Mechanised logging services

Nelson Ryco 24/7

Dunedin Heavy Diesel support

Waratah Clothing

Southland Heavy Equipment Repair

10% OFF


Sx631 Video.pdf

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21/04/21

12:27 PM

IMPROVED FLEXIBILITY AND HIGHER BREAK LOADS. 23mm - 50 tonne | 19mm - 35 tonne

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NZ Logger September 2021  

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