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MEMBER MAGAZINE NOVEMBER 2013 / V.40

BE INSPIRED, BE SUCCESSFUL, BELONG

Anna Glasgow - FNZIPP Finalist - Landscape Photographer of the Year 2013


Contents

NOVEMBER 2013

Executive Updates

Cover Images: © Anna Glasgow - FNZIPP Finalist - Landscape Photographer of the Year 2013

Contact NZ Institute of Professional Photography (NZIPP) PO Box 76176 Christchurch 8548 New Zealand W: www.nzipp.org.nz E: info@nzipp.org.nz M: +64 27 522 5570 We welcome your feedback and thoughts. If you have something to say, send it through to: marketing@nzipp.org.nz

PRO REPORT is a publication of the NZIPP © NZIPP 2013. All rights reserved.

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PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP

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Presidents Report

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Commercial Directors Report

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Portrait Directors Report

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Wedding Directors Report

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Honours Council Report

NZIPP News 16

Q Dates for 2014

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Welcome to New Members

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New Qualified Members

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NZIPP on Facebook

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Spider Awards Results

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Iris Award Books

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Starship Donation

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Ilford Diary


NOVEMBER 2013

Contents

Contents Regional Updates 21

Auckland/Northland Region

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Waikato/BOP Region

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Central Districts Region

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Wellington Region

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Otago/Southland Region

Photo Competitions 28

Canon EYEcon Awards

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The Loupe Awards

29

Kodak Gold Awards

Corporate Members 29

Thanks to our Corporate Members

PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP

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Executive Updates

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PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP

NOVEMBER 2013


NOVEMBER 2013

Presidents Report

Executive Updates

It’s the time of the year where we need to knuckle down and create a solid pathway towards what we wish to achieve in the coming year and beyond. This is also the case for the new look Board that now includes Russell Hamlet, as our new Portrait Director and Katherine Williams, as the new Wedding Director. Just over a week ago we had our first face to face meeting in Christchurch and reassessed our plan moving forward. It was an exciting time with lots of positive energy being shared by everyone. The first day was spent realigning our strategic plan and creating our mission statement so we could focus on the future direction for the Institute and it’s members. The new mission statement underpins everything we do from now on as the Institutes Board and help keep us all focused on the job at hand. Put simply, our plan is: “To champion, embrace and communicate excellence and professionalism in photography” For this to become a reality we also need our members to embrace this mission statement and to communicate to the photographic buying public the standards that we uphold. These are exciting times for the Institute and its future.

Mike Langford - NZIPP President Hon FNZIPP, GMNZIPP, Hon F AIPP, MAIPP

PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP

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Executive Updates

Commercial Directors Report

NOVEMBER 2013

Using licenses and terms and conditions (cont.) Last month I talked about how a photographer did not own copyright to their images in New Zealand unless they use the NZIPP or AIPA license form in tandem with the terms and condition form. (I print the terms and conditions on the reverse side of the license form) The terms and conditions form itself should always be submitted with your estimate. The brief that you receive from your client should give you an idea of what boxes to tick. Here is an example of one filled in for a hypothetical job brief

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PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP


NOVEMBER 2013

Executive Updates

The Job description wording can often be lifted form the brief. The license purpose is also something that the client will have indicated. The more boxes that are ticked in this area indicates how much usage the client intends to put the image to. License territory is where they wish to use it. License period is over what period of time and reproduction rights how many times they can reproduce the images. When you submit this to your client along with your estimate on the job you have established agreement on how your images can be used. This can become a negotiation on price, it you are going to drop your price on the job because the client says it is not in their budget make sure you take some usage away, for example cutting the license period down to two years. This creates an appreciation of value in your work. You will never loose a job by using the license, and you do not need to make a big thing of it. Educating your client on the reason why you use T & C’s is always a good start, make sure they realize that you are not trying to stop them using the images but just establishing how they want to use them as this is a consideration in your cost estimate. Many of the smaller jobs I do are any use in perpetuity, this does not mean that I have given up copyright on the image. Hope this helps, Oh and don’t forget to include the terms and condition form on the reverse side. If you have any questions email me or give me a call, I do not pretend to have all the answers but will do my best to help. A PDF of all these can be found here http://nzipp.org.nz/nzippweb/Default. aspx?tabid=153

Terry Wreford Hann NZIPP Commercial Director

PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP

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NOVEMBER 2013

Executive Updates

Portrait Directors Report

In the last couple of weeks I have had the privilege of sharing knowledge with some highly motivated people. In the first instance a small group in CHCH and in the latter an individual in her studio for a day. I love to share when I know it makes a difference and the people are receptive. As always it reminds me and them that it’s all about the basics. Working one on one was a first for me and the timing great, as this lovely woman sets out on specialising in portraiture. She was smart to seek information early, after all why spend years making blues when you can learn from others how to do it all effectively straight away. Together we just built the blocks. Before you even take a picture, important elements have to be in place. Identifying the look and feel of your images, your surrounding environment and how it will serve your style, and the level of perception of quality in your studio or meeting space with clients. Your systems need to be in place to optimise service for them and efficiency for you. When clients ring you should not need hardcopy to answer any query they may have. One-person operations as well need a data based software to store all relevant client info. It’s like an invisible staff member. When the phone goes fingertip information makes you look and feel like a pro. Remember everything is about us. Our quality of life, our happiness in what we do. To have both of these we need to run a good ship. Happy clients, happy us .If you have to work from home, do your level best to remove domesticity from your professional situation. If we are to command the prices necessary for a life in photography, professionalism is needed because as we know first impressions are very important. A coat of paint and the smell of coffee goes a long way! It sounds a bit pretentious but targeting clients who have the money to avail themselves of what you are offering, makes your life easier, and is a comfortable environment for them to participate in at a financial level. The point is when these people rock up to meet you does your environment reflect respect for them. This industry is very challenging now and it was gratifying to see young people and not so young honing what they do. It must be damn hard being on your own sometimes, just having enough personal drive to be proactive every day. If it wasn’t for my missus I’m sure I would be arse sitting more than I do now. Maybe buddying up with another operator in another part of the country would be a good idea as little motivator for each other. Compare notes and have weekly or monthly comps in turnover. That’s why we belong to such a motivated institute, to work together to get better. Don’t just rely on the few but share with each other in moving forward. Remember this. Know your product well. Believe in it, and understand how others see you and you will flourish. Summer is upon us and may your light be with you!

Russell Hamlet NZIPP Portrait Director

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PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP


NOVEMBER 2013

Executive Updates

Wedding Directors Report

The photographic industry has been filled with huge technological changes over the years, particularly over the last decade and the result of this has been fast paced business changes while we as an industry adapt to the changes that have been presented. More than ever before the photographic industry has seen splits in opinion between how we each believe things must be done to stay in business. Wind back the clock to 1900 I can only imagine the uproar amongst professional photographers when Eastman Kodak’s Box Brownie was released making photography accessible to the masses. The advertisements were everywhere telling the public “Any school boy or girl can make good pictures with a Brownie” Kodak stated “better results than the old way too”. So the professional photographers back in 1900 had to adapt their businesses to be profitable despite technological changes. Just as we must continue to do so today. In reality, there are no rules. You can conduct business how you wish too. It is your choice. But it is only by making smart choices that this will keep you in business, and ultimately keep you passionate about your business instead of being a slave to it. We all independently have to decide what is the best and smartest business model for our success. This must be from finding what resonates with you personally, plus getting your business head screwed on, and knowing your numbers. Despite the differences people choose, those who succeed in a photographic business generally have three things in common regardless of the model, awesome photography, outstanding professional service and pricing for profit.

Isaac & Amber de Reus

So, this month I chatted to a couple of Epic Storytellers. A couple who have a slick business model that’s embraced the technological changes over the last decade and run a highly successful wedding photography business in Auckland. We all know and love them….it’s Isaac & Amber de Reus from Perspectives. Can you encapsulate your business in one sentence? {Amber} Epic storytelling, we want to tell the story of our clients’ wedding day in the most epic way possible, in ways that will blow their mind. In your business what do you see as your most important products? {Isaac} Our most important product is our style and that is what we use to differentiate ourselves from every other photographer. And our physical product from that is digital images, which is what we deliver with every package. The way that our business model works is that we have our ‘happy price’ which is what we want to make from a wedding, and that is what we price wedding coverage at. Probably about half of our couples go on to get albums, so albums are still a really big part of our business model. But they are an addition…. {Amber} to our ‘happy price’ Everything from the ‘happy price’ on is a bonus. {Isaac} What it’s stemmed from was that we noticed there was a real perception that you have to sell an album with every package. We thought there’s a whole bunch of clients out there who have money to spend, for whom an album might not be a priority. And if we go down that track - we are isolating those clients, and all of a sudden we’re not the right photographer for them - because we don’t have an option where they can get what they want. PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP

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NOVEMBER 2013

Executive Updates

Wedding Directors Report Continued

So we decided, rather than leave money on the table and have people not book with us, that we would go down the route of booking them on our style. {Amber} And hopefully convince them that they do really need an album. Is including digital files with your coverage part of a business model you have taken right from the start, or have you evolved to get to that model? {Amber} It’s pretty much been our model all the way along. {Isaac} We’ve dabbled….. {Amber} But there has always been the option for our clients to just get digital files, from the word go. It’s always been an option to get an album - not something the client must do. What do you think are the major advantages of having a business that focuses on digital files is for you? {Isaac} Firstly, it keeps the costs down. You keep the costs of the album out of the equation. You also take out all the time cost of preparing / revising an album design. {Amber} Profit margins skyrocket. {Isaac} The other real advantage from our point of view is that it means that we’ve got something that they can purchase down the track. And we encourage our couples that if they can’t budget for an album at the start, then do it a year later. Because for a lot of them, just to pay for our coverage is more than they initially budgeted for photography in the first place. So having an option where they can pay solely for coverage, and then down the track they can do an album, splits it out. Their budget becomes “we’re spending this much on our wedding photography; and then in a years time, we’re spending this much on our wedding album”… rather than if we’re doing it all together and they think they are spending 10K on their wedding photography - which sounds a lot scarier. Do you think there are any disadvantages on focusing on digital files as your main product? {Amber} It’s the loss of control, of the printing process and what they are going to do with them. But I think a lot of places are getting good enough now, that it doesn’t freak me out too much. Every now and then we’ll Skype with past clients and they’ve got big canvases up on the wall. And generally they look pretty good. {Isaac} We do printing and framing in house as well. And we say to clients, “you are absolutely welcome to print them yourself anywhere you wish, but if you want a premium beautiful art product, we can do you something like this” And we show them. {Amber} We don’t like saying “no” to clients, we like saying “yes, you absolutely can, and here’s how much that will cost.” Do you often see much of your work coming back printed at all sorts of labs and you get a shock? {Isaac} Personally I am stoked if they actually print them! I’d rather that they print it somewhere, and have physical prints. We say to our clients, “You’ve got your digital files, now do something with them, put them somewhere”.

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PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP


NOVEMBER 2013

Executive Updates

We sell them on the concept that having an album makes your photos so much more accessible, even if you do your own album. But at least put them in an album. Then we grab the Queensberry sample albums and we talk about heirlooms, we talk about their children and Grandchildren, and we say…. {Amber} …if you want to do it properly, we can do that for you. We don’t do photo books, we don’t do half a job with albums, we do beautiful, big, gorgeous albums. So we are saying, “you can do what you want, you can DIY your own thing - but if you want real quality stuff, then come back to us and we will look after you.” How many people would come back down the track to do their album with you? {Amber} More than half of our clients would walk away with an album, about 60% of these book them at the time of the wedding (or within a few weeks) and 40% a while down the track. Often the wife always wanted an album, but it took the husband seeing the results to be convinced that actually ‘yes we do need an album’. {Isaac} My favourite example of when that happened was when we had a couple who booked our cheapest coverage option. The groom drew the line and said “we are not spending that much on our photos”… the bride said “can we please have them do the coverage” They booked, and on the day we managed to win the groom over, he got really involved in the process and was really excited as we showed them shots on the back of the camera LCD throughout the day. When we blogged the wedding and gave them their photos, he was over the moon. And it was his decision to get an album. They ended up spending more on their album than they did on their coverage. But if we had of told them upfront that it was going to be 9 ½ K for their package it would have never flown - as we barely convinced them on 4K to start with. So that’s our mentality, we keep the initial cost as low as we can for people, because it is still high. My biggest bugbear is with those photographers who are against giving digital files, who say: “by giving digital files you’re cheapening your business” - whereas I say that’s just the wrong way to look at it. You price your digital files for how much money you want to make. What is your philosophy on wedding albums, and the value of them? {Amber} It’s actually funny, speaking to you a while ago. I personally never really ‘got’ wedding albums. I’d look at ours every now and then - maybe once a year. But I’d look at the photos we have on Facebook more often. So I thought, that’s our business model, that’s what I want, and that’s what I want our clients to be able to do. And then talking to you the other day about sharing your album with your girls, I was like HA! I get it! My kids, our kids are going to LOVE this, our Grandkids, and they are not going to care what I put on Facebook. So for us personally the digital files are really, really important, and for those next generations I’m like ok ‘This is why albums are important, it’s not for us, it’s for our kids’. So that’s has come into our philosophy more. And it’s also making sure we are selling the quality products that will last - because we are not designing them just for the bride and groom. PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP

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Executive Updates

Wedding Directors Report Continued

NOVEMBER 2013

{Isaac} So that’s our ideological philosophy on wedding albums. From a business point of view, It’s a great upsell and it’s a great addition financially to what we do. So we totally have an album sales process and strategy, but it’s just separate to our wedding photography. What advice would you have for anyone new to the industry looking to structure a similar business model to yours? {Amber} With weddings particularly, it’s easy to book up 12-18 months in advance at prices that you are going to kick yourself for when you get round to shooting them. I know we’ve done it, we’ve booked out at prices that were existent a year ago, and we begrudge our clients for it. And we’re saying “that’s our cheap package, you guys are getting such a good deal” but it’s not our clients problem - it’s our problem for not charging enough back then. So you have to be forward thinking with your prices and think: “In 12-18 months time, where am I going to be? What will my goals be? What experience will I have under my belt?” And you need to try and get to your goal as quickly as possible, rather than booking up at your starting out prices. {Isaac} In terms of adopting a similar business model to ours, just know the value of what you’re providing, and recognize the amount of time and effort and energy that is going into creating that product. Then price it appropriately. {Amber} With our digital files, we edit every single one of them that the client gets, to a level where we would be happy if they became the canvas on their wall. It’s a lot of time and effort, and that is why it costs as much as it does. It is not a shoot and burn, we aren’t just flicking them a disc with everything that we took. Everything on their disc is edited and beautiful. {Isaac} They are essentially digital prints. Edited to the same level as we would to print every single file. {Amber} When you bring a file into Lightroom or Photoshop you have all these options open to you, and you’re giving your clients a half finished product if you don’t make it look as good as you possibly can. You are doing a disservice to your client if you are not editing it. You may as well put the time and effort into it and charge accordingly. {Isaac} A lot of people have no idea about how much it costs to run their own business. So just be very, very aware of how much it is costing you. Do the calculator on the NZIPP website and have a good accountant who sits you down and tells you when you are spending to much in various areas of your business. {Amber} As your business grows, your costs will grow. As we’ve got a studio, more gear, more insurance, got promotional material, have a functional website and all the other costs which keep skyrocketing. You have to keep constant tabs on what you’re doing to ensure it remains profitable. Where do you see our industry headed - digital revolution full steam ahead, or print and album revival? Or, a marrying of both together? {Amber} I totally think a marrying of both together. There’s absolutely a place for albums and for printed products, and we need to make sure our clients are getting something beautiful and are understanding the value in those products. But I think you’re burying your head in the sand if you don’t think digital is where it is headed.

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PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP


NOVEMBER 2013

Executive Updates

Do you think your product or your service is the most important aspect of your business? {Amber} I actually think service. Well, it’s an experience - and that sums up a little bit of both. We make sure we are taking photos that are more than they are expecting. So part of that is just blowing their minds, and that’s a service thing. But you can’t do that without the wow photos to back it up. For sure it’s a bit of both - but it is equally important that people have an amazing experience with us. {Isaac} In terms of our products, we are not relying on beautiful prints or beautiful albums to get our clients excited. Those are extras in our business model, so what they get excited about from our point of view should be the actual images themselves. And that’s why digital files work for us, because it’s the content of the image that for us is the selling point. Not how it is presented, or how it is delivered. Thanks guys, that was… Epic.

Katherine Williams NZIPP Wedding Director

PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP

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Executive Updates

Honours Council Report

NOVEMBER 2013

Becoming a Judge … Visual literacy – the “ability to understand, interpret and evaluate visual messages” (Bristor & Drake, 1994) We often receive queries on what it takes to become a judge, and while the next awards are still some time away the road to becoming a judge can also take time. So, the following is designed to give both our newer and our aspiring judges some information they can work on over the coming months. It is a great honour to be asked to judge, and along with that comes a great responsibility. For new judges it can be a bit intimidating, especially when needing to justify (articulate) your score to other judges in a challenge debate. New Zealand (NZIPP) has a relatively small pool of what could be described as “A-list” judges. These are the judges who have the x-factor when it comes to appraising, and articulating their views on imagery presented to them at print judging. An “A-lister” has a very sound knowledge of photography (and in fact art overall): the historical contexts, photographers and photographic techniques (from throughout history), the tools and techniques of photography, aesthetics and contemporary practices. They ask questions about what they are seeing, and most importantly, an “A-lister” is very quickly able to draw on and reference this extensive knowledge, articulating this through strong, clear, concise and much of the time persuasive, statements; statements that reflect a decision based on fairness (objectivity), integrity, diplomacy and one of encouragement. An “A-lister” is also usually a person who has had a wealth of experience both judging and in photography. Their placing at the top has come from years of practice, but also remember that they themselves were once newbies to the judging arena. So how does one become a judge? Some aspects of being a good judge can be taught (or learnt), others come naturally and are part of a judge’s character; and while a person may have all the knowledge and photographic experience in the world, this doesn’t always translate into being an effective judge. If you are new to judging, or if this is a direction that interests you, there are things you can do to assist the process:

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View the process as a long-term goal and put steps in place to achieve this

Be prepared to undertake further learning – read and learn about our photographic past and the practitioners (past and present)

Gain as much technical knowledge as possible

Enrol in a course to learn about and develop visual literacy

Attend as many judging sessions as possible, to listen and learn – Iris awards, APPA’s or online judging

PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP


NOVEMBER 2013

Executive Updates

Take up opportunities to practice and develop skills in talking about images (your own and others). A starting point could be offering your services at local camera club judging (there may even be opportunities through online discussions and events).

Attend regional critique sessions

Take time to view and analyse contemporary imagery from around the world (magazines, books and online)

Join groups such as Toastmasters to gain confidence in speaking

To add to this process Honours are intending to run pre-awards critique/ judge training sessions around the regions. This will be a valuable learning opportunity, and we will be encouraging newer judges, and those interested in getting involved, to attend one of these. Kind Regards

Kaye Davis - GMNZIPP, AAIPP, MCGD Chair of the NZIPP Honours Council On behalf of the NZIPP Honours Council Team including: Ollie Dale, Blair Quax and Tony Stewart.

PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP

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NZIPP News

NOVEMBER 2013

NZIPP News Q Submission Dates 2013

New Members mbers.....

me Welcome to our new ing – Central Districts Penny Aspin – Emerg rthland erging – Auckland/No Nina Gastreich – Em al – Central Districts Kim Sargent – Provision

For those who aren’t qualified yet it’s time to start planning for your Q submissions in 2014. Once successful your member profile will appear in the Find a Photographer function on the NZIPP website, and you’ll be able to work towards NZIPP Accreditation. Q submission dates for 2014 are...

ers Qualified Membwly . qualified members....

February 4th, 2014

r ne Congratulations to ou stland rtrait - Canterbury/We Vivienne Laursen – Po it - Waikato/BOP Emma Steiner – Portra

July 1st, 2014 November 4th, 2014 For more info see the Q Programme under Quick Links on the NZIPP website.

8th Annual Black & White Spider Awards Congratulations to a number of NZIPP members have won accolades in the 8th Annual Black & White Spider Awards:

Find NZIPP on Facebook - check out the links below.... NZIPP - National • NZIPP - Auckland/Northland Region • NZIPP - Waikato/BOP Region

Claire Birks – 1st Place Portrait

Richard Wood – Honourable Mention Fine Art

• NZIPP - Central Districts

Nominations:

• NZIPP - Wellington Region

Adrian Barrett – Fashion, Sport

• NZIPP - Canterbury/Westland Region

Martin Bentley-Smith – Fashion x 1

Claire Birks – Portrait x 2

Olwen Evans – Wildlife x 1

Mike Hollman – Architecture, Nature, Wildlife

Richard Wood – Fine Art x 3, Nature x 1, Portrait x 3, Architecture x 1, Fashion x 1

• NZIPP - Otago/Southland Region

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PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP


NOVEMBER 2013

NZIPP News

Epson/NZIPP Iris Professional Photography Awards 2012

Jackie Ranken - NZ Photographer of the Year 2012

IRIS PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY AWARDS 2009 - 2012 BOOKS

Principal Sponsor

Epson/NZIPP Iris Professional Photography Awards 2009

Iris Award books are produced annually by the NZIPP from the award winning entries submitted every year. The books showcase all the major award winners, as well as all the Gold, Silver, and Bronze winning images from each year. The books have been published in conjunction with BLURB and ISSUU and are available in three different formats: •

hardcopy/print - available via Blurb’s print on demand service. The book is a 20 X 25cm landscape format, with a hardcover & dust jacket, printed on Premium Lustre finish paper. Each book can be purchased via Blurb’s print on demand service. Prices vary depending on the book size.

eBook on iPad - available via Blurb’s ebook service for downloading to an iPad. eBook’s can be purchased for $24.99 USD via Blurb’s eBook download service.

online book/magazine - a low resolution version is available to view online for free via Issuu’s digital publishing platform .

Paul Gummer - NZ Photographer of the Year 2009

Principal Sponsor

Epson/NZIPP Iris Professional Photography Awards 2010

Tony Carter - NZ Photographer of the Year 2010

Principal Sponsor

Go to the NZIPP website (www.nzipp.org.nz, and click on the Iris Awards tab followed by Iris Awards Books) for more information and download links for each of the three options.

Epson/NZIPP Iris Professional Photography Awards 2011

Richard Wood - NZ Photographer of the Year 2011

Principal Sponsor

PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP

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Ilford Diary

NZIPP News

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PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP

NOVEMBER 2013


Regional Updates

NOVEMBER 2013

Ilford Diary November 2013

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Kindly sponsored by

Q Submission - Closing Date

5 - 8 A Bit More Soul - Wellington 12

Waikato/BOP Regional Meeting

13

Auckland/Northland Regional Seminar - TONIC 2013

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Canterbury/Westland Regional Meeting

19

Wellington Regional Meeting

TBC Otago/Southland Regional Meeting

December 2013

09

Canterbury/Westland Regional Christmas Party

10

Waikato/BOP Regional Meeting

TBC Wellington Regional Christmas Party

January 2014

February 2014

TBC Otago/Southland Regional Meeting 20

Canterbury/Westland Social Meeting

04

Q Submission - Closing Date

12

Auckland/Northland Regional Meeting

17

Canterbury/Westland Regional Meeting

TBC Wellington Regional Meeting TBC Otago/Southland Regional Meeting

Don’t forget, if you are travelling around New Zealand, as an NZIPP member you can go to any NZIPP Regional Meeting. If you are in the area, take the opportunity to participate in a regional meeting outside your own region. CLICK ON A DIARY ENTRY FOR MORE INFORMATION.

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3 Workshops

Kingsize Studios 27 Sackville Street Contents Ponsonby Auckland

for the

price of 1 NOVEMBER 2013

nzippakl@gmail.com

Lunch and BBQ provided

Spot prizes through out the day The Auckland NZIPP presents

a Tonic

Time: 8.30am registration 9.00am start 5.00pm finish followed by BBQ

2013

Hands-on Lighting and Posing Workshops

Wednesday 13 November 2013

Amber & Isaac de Reus And last but by no means least, the dream team of Wedding photography, Isaac and Amber shows us how they are leading the way for Video and Stills photography at weddings. They call it “Epic Story Telling�. http://www.perspectives.co.nz/

Talia Stephens

Luke White

Talia Stephens will demonstrate her world class Pin up shooting style. Something you would not want to miss. Check out the Miss T Pinups website for examples of what you will learn.

Luke White from Kingsize will show us his secrets for product photography. Luke is an experienced educator running workshops for Kingsize and holds a firstclass honours degree and has worked as a commercial photographer both in England and NZ.

http://misstpinups.co.nz/

http://kingsizestudios.com/

Proudly supported by

Book NOW on Eventfinder! 20 PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP http://www.eventfinder.co.nz/2013/a-tonic-2013/auckland/ponsonby


NOVEMBER 2013

Regional Updates

Regional Updates Upcoming Meeting… A TONIC 2013 Venue: Kingsize Studios, 27 Sackville St, Ponsonby, Auckland Date: November 13th, 2013 Time: 9am - 5pm

Auckland/Northland Region I want to start of this month by congratulating Mike Hollman for taking out the Auckland Photographer of the Year Award for the second year in a row. This year proved to be one of the most highly contested awards we have ever had. With 6 photographers scoring higher than last years winner. At the Iris awards Mike won the Travel photographer of the year title along with 2 Golds, 1 Silver Distinction, 4 Silvers and 3 Bronze. Well done Mike your an outstanding ambassador for photography in Auckland. October brought indifferent weather to Auckland, and our October meeting certainly felt the brunt of the windy and rainy weather. We asked Michel Perrin and Harry Janssen to take us on a photo walk around the Silo park in the Wynyard Quarter. The focus was on taking great pictures and following the process all the way through to finished and edited product. So after about 2 hours of shooting we all went back to Atico Cocina to take a look at the results and to discuss the post production workflow. It was a great way to get an insight to how both Harry and Michel approach a scene to create an image. For our November meeting we are very excited to announce that we are once again hosting “aTonic”. Three high caliber workshops in one day. aTonic has been around for close to a decade, originally hosted by the NZIPP and Queensberry as a way of inspiring and energising the local wedding and portrait community. Since then it’s become a real institution with a host of international and local speakers. The focus has always been on the practical aspects of photography, and this year is no different with 3 great workshops. Product Lighting presented by Luke White, Pin Up mastery with Talia Stephens and “Epic Storytelling” a wedding workshop presented by Isaac and Amber de Reus. aTonic is on November 13th at Kingsize Studios in Auckland for further details, please head to : https://www.facebook.com/events/506672939428424/ See you all there. Next event “aTonic” 13th November.

Images by Gino Demeer

Gino Demeer Auckland/Northland - Regional Chairperson

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Regional Updates

NOVEMBER 2013

Regional Updates Upcoming Meeting… Waikato/BOP Regional Meeting Date: November 12th, 2013 Venue: 5.30pm - Meet for Dinner & Drinks (own cost) - Cooks, 7 Cook Street, Hamilton 7.00pm - Meeting starts at Nicola Inglis Studio - 223 Victoria Street, Hamilton.

Waikato/BOP Region Our October Meeting was a Waikato/BOP first - in Taupo! Because the meeting fell within the school holidays & we never do anything by halves ...Bring the Partners & kids for a BBQ/sleepover seemed appropriate. Big Thanks to Harry Janssen for entertaining the Crew as our Guest Speaker. We heard about Harry’s photographic Journey, from Darkroom to Digital & what makes him tick as a digital artist, how he fills his fridge and pays the bills. Harry is one of the few NZ Adobe certified Lightroom teachers and man does this guy know his stuff! Harry has offered to do a LIGHTROOM Workshop in 2014 for NZIPP Waikato/BOP if we have enough members interested. Register your expression of interest with Alana - weddings@alanadresner.com Our upcoming 12 November meeting will be in Hamilton and our guest speaker is Bianca Duimel, a Fellow with NZIPP, who has gained numerous awards and has been a member with NZIPP for 15 years. Bianca was born in the Netherlands and came to New Zealand as a young teenager with her parents settling Auckland. With a strong interest in Art, drawing painting and the like, photography sparked an interest. Working as a photographic technician , chemical mixing, densitometry and darkroom printing, fueling her interest in photography. From there Bianca worked and then as a trouble shooter technician for larger companies setting up mini-labs when they first arrived in New Zealand. She then worked as a Camera Sales manager for a further 4 years. An opportunity came along to purchase an existing “Glamour” studio in the mid-nineties, which became a successful Glamour, Family, and Wedding studio for 6 years . Further developing a photographic style and becoming a trained Make up artist along the way .

Images © Bianca Duimel

Bianca then built a studio from home, specializing in Wedding, Newborn and Makeover Pregnancy photography, children’s and family portraiture . Taking a long time to “convert” to the digital age, Bianca has since discovered digital art now with a passion, and is currently creating unique pieces that have become very popular. Bianca has always had a love of Renaissance art works and attended Art History lectures with Professor Phillipa Mackay for 2 years. “I am very strongly influenced by not only the fascinating and beautiful historical art works, but the masters that created them and their own passion and amazing accuracy and attention to detail . The legacies they left behind for all of us to revel in, making me more passionate about image making via several medias enjoying pencil drawing, painting and now and digital photographic art . I have many ideas and concepts I would like to create as a result and am looking forward to sharing these with everyone.” Alana Dresner Waikato/BOP - Regional Secretary

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PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP


NOVEMBER 2013

Regional Updates

Upcoming Meetings… Central Districts Regional Meeting Venue: To Be Confirmed Date/Time: To Be Confirmed

Central Districts Region Palmerston North had a busy month in September, starting off with a Q workshop run by Kaye Davis. We had a really big turn out and it was lovely seeing new faces as well as familiar faces. We were kindly hosted in Kim and Vanessa’s beautiful studio in the square. Next we had Tony Stewart visit us from Christchurch to give us a presentation about Copyright, licensing, model release etc. It was a really great talk and was definitely one not to be missed. I know that there were a lot of “Aha!” moments because Tony was really thorough at explaining all the ins and outs of it all. It was a great refresher to some and a good learning curve for some of the newer members. Thank you so much Tony for taking time out of your busy schedule to visit us in Palmerston North.

Laura Ridley Central Districts - Regional Chairperson

Images by Laura Ridley

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Regional Updates

NOVEMBER 2013

Regional Updates Coming in November… Wellington Regional Meeting with Danelle Bohane Venue: WPS, Wellington Date/Time: Tuesday 19th November 2013 - 6pm Danelle’s Website: www.danellebohane.com

Wellington Region The October meeting in Wellington was focussed on a presentation by Tony Drayton, the Auckland based, internationally recognised fashion & beauty photographer, TVC director & current AIPA President...www.tonydrayton.com A packed WPS audience listened and watched his presentation so in the words of some of them:. •

“Listening to Tony’s story about pursuing work in international markets, & then back in NZ again, reminded me that none of us - even those at the top of our game - can become complacent. We all know photography is a changing landscape, but none of us are immune to these changes. Keep an eye on the market. Listen to your customers. Learn to adapt, because you will need to.” - Jason Naylor. Wellington Chair

“It was a great coup to secure Tony Drayton for local NZIPPites. I’ve been a huge fan of his beautiful commercial work for over 20 years, so it was fantastic to hear him in person. He certainly wowed us with his talent & creative vision! Tony’s talk reiterated the difficulties of the current commercial marketplace. Once again I think we all have to question just what is the future business model for photographers, regardless of genre & areas of brilliance & expertise, as things are continuing to change so rapidly. I’ve always believed you only need to come away with one piece of relevant information from a speaker or a presentation that you can apply to your own business or learn from & it makes it worthwhile, & this is why working with the AIPA is successful. With the relationship between the two organisations, we can pool resources & all be exposed to a far greater variety of expertise. You never know what you might learn from someone else’s genre. If I’ve learnt anything its that referring only to our own areas of ‘interest’ can often be limiting & blinkered. “ - Esther Bunning - Wellington Secretary

“It was great to have Tony Drayton who is the president of the AIPA to talk in Wellington, his presentation was on his work (which is world class) & did not cover any aspect of the AIPA” - Terry Wreford Hann - NZIPP Commercial Director

“Hearing Tony Drayton talk was an enlightening experience, in an area of photography where you’re constantly hearing stores of photographers being undervalued & marginalized it’s always good to hear a story of success, especially one where the photographer has managed to keep the level of control over their work that he has, From which make-up & hair team he works with to the retouching, he is producing finished work rather than being just another cog in the production processes.” - Mel Waite

“The most impressive part of Tony’s presentation? He managed to talk about big jobs with several assistants and a big crew and a cast of thousands and huge budgets without ever sounding boastful or immodest about it. His matter-of-fact tone was refreshing, and he answered the many questions frankly and honestly.” - Nick Servian

Danelle is Auckland based photographer, and also the 2013 Wedding Classic Photographer of the Year.

Tony Drayton presenting at the Wellington meeting

Wellington Regional Meeting Images by Jason Naylor

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PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP


NOVEMBER 2013

Regional Updates

Special appreciation to Tony Drayton for making the time in a very busy and fast moving schedule and to Larissa Warren for her determination and organisation to get Tony here. Jason Naylor Wellington - Regional Chair

Amy Schulz Amy is the newest Qualified member in our region. Here are her thoughts... What is your website: www.amyschulz.co.nz List some of your favourite camera gear, & at least one surprise item in your camera bag: My Nikon D7000 is one of my favs, it’s video capabilities are great & I love my tiltshift. Mostly I shoot with my D3 & 24-70mm f2.8. The surprise is probably the audio recorder I use to capture speeches & the ceremony for my couples. What is your formal/informal photography education: BFA with Honours, Massey University, majoring in Photomedia. What type of photos do you specialise in: Weddings & portraits, natural lighting, relaxed & creative. What do you love about the Professional photo industry: The friends I’ve made, the people I meet & all my amazing clients who inspire me. Name some photographers who inspire you: Sue Bryce, Fer Juaristi, Todd Hunter McGaw, Gregory Crewdson. What is something that makes you grumpy: Lack of sleep, not a good thing when you have a one year old! Is there a website or blog that you enjoy: Offbeat Bride. Are you an avid collector of anything: At the moment I’m a bit obsessed with old suitcases, they’re piling up in the hallway. Name the last book / magazine you read: Slinky Malinki, (Myla’s favourite night time story) & before that catching up on D-Photo. Name one thing that not many people know about you: If I wasn’t a photographer I’d want to be a rally car driver. Name one thing that you miss about being a kid: What felt like endless Summer days riding my bike around the street. If you could travel anywhere in the world, where would you go first and why: France, I went when I was younger & fell in love. List 5 things you would take if deserted on an island: My family, my camera, a good book, my ipod & a nice bottle of wine. Images © Amy Schulz PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP

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Regional Updates

NOVEMBER 2013

Regional Updates Upcoming Meetings‌ Otago/Southland Regional Meeting Venue: To Be Confirmed Date/Time: To Be Confirmed

Fortnightly cafe meetings continue in Dunedin. For details email alan@ dovephotography.co.nz. Fortnightly cafe meetings in Queenstown, have also began. For details email matthew.hawke@gmail. com.

Otago/Southland Region This month we held our meeting Queenstown and had the team from Apix Photographics join us for a mini lighting demo of their newest products, followed by some image critiquing and dinner with the Apix team. Our big Otago/Southland Away Excursion was to Dingleburn Station, a private shearing quarters near Lake Hawea. Thanks Jim Pollard for getting us access to such a great location. A great group joined in for our two night away trip and lots of fun was had by all. Tracy Stamatakos wins the award for traveling the furtherest to attend! On the day we headed in on the very treacherous 4WD only road, it was misty and raining, it really set the tone for off road adventure races through rivers. The accommodation and facilities were excellent and we explored and talked all things photography. The photographs attached are a just a very small amount of the wonderful images created on the trip. There will be more to come, check out our fb page to see more: https:// www.facebook.com/nzippos We look forward to arranging another trip in the New Year and welcome any members from around the country to come and join in, or we can come to you in your region! Our region wishes you all a great and safe holiday season.

Emily Adamson Otago/Southland - Regional Co Chair

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PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP


NOVEMBER 2013

Regional Updates

PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP

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Photo Competitions

NOVEMBER 2013

Photo Competitions The NZIPP does not endorse any of the following competitions. Anyone interested in entering these or any other competitions should read the rules of entry carefully to ensure that the moral rights of the photographer are not being undermined in anyway. If you do come across any competitions where the copyright is demanded by the organisers, please send details to: marketing@nzipp.org.nz

EYEcon Photographic Competition Register Interest by: 1st October 2013

Final Submission Deadline: 4th November 2013

Registrations for the 2013 Canon EYECON competition are now open, starting the search to find New Zealand’s top creative talent throughout the country. Following the success of the last four years, the renowned competition is expanding further for 2013; and for the first time ever will be calling for both film and photography entries, as well as opening up photography submissions to high school students in years 12 & 13 throughout New Zealand. Click here for more information.

2013 Entries Close: 15th November 2013 The 6th Annual International Loupe Awards are now open, showcasing some of the best photography from around the world. Featuring Amateur, Open and Medium Format sections, there is the opportunity for all photographers to challenge themselves, get creative and have the chance at some of the big prizes on offer. The awards are open to professionals, amateurs and students, and are judged by 25 leading photographers from around the world with diverse experience and backgrounds in fields that support the categories being judged. The Major Open Awards first prize is valued at US$27,000! The top 5 images in each Open category also receive cash prizes. Platinum, Gold, Silver and Bronze merits are also awarded based on score, as in previous years. Enter online at http://www.loupeawards.com

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PRO REPORT Member Magazine of the NZIPP


NOVEMBER 2013

Corporate Members

Entries Close: 29th November 2013 KODAK Professional is, once again, delighted to introduce the KODAK Professional Gold Awards 2013 as part of our ongoing commitment to support the Professional Wedding and Portrait Industry in New Zealand. The Industry continues to recognise the need to raise the profile of Professional Wedding and Portrait Photography with the general public. By encouraging Photographers to enter and have their work judged, we offer an opportunity to continue the development of their creative skills. The resulting publicity generated from their successes will certainly raise the profile of Wedding and Portrait Photographers. Photographers who achieve Gold Awards will receive certificates in addition to print corner identifiers. Silver Award winners will receive print corner identifiers. Click here for more information.

Corporate Members A special thank you to our Corporate Members for their continuing support:

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NEW ZEALAND INSTITUTE OF PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY

www.nzipp.org.nz


NZIPP Pro Report November 2013