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NYU FALL PRESS 2017


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Content s General Interest..........................1-9 History...................................10-17 Law.......................................18-20 Medicine................................21-22 Social Science.......................23-28 Media Studies........................29-32 American Studies...................33-36 Religion..................................37-39 Ancient World.............................. 40 Library of Arabic Literature.......41-44 Clay Sanskrit Library.................... 45 Monthly Review Press.............46-52 Award-Winning Backlist............... 53 Best of the Backlist...................... 54 Index........................................... 55 Sales Information......................... 56 Mission St at e me nt Making common cause with the best and the brightest, the great and the good, NYU Press aspires to nothing less than the transformation of the intellectual and cultural landscape. Infused with the conviction that the ideas of the academy matter, we foster knowledge that resonates within and beyond the walls of the university. If the university is the public square for intellectual debate, NYU Press is its soapbox, offering original thinkers a forum for the written word. Our authors think, teach, and contend; NYU Press crafts, publishes and disseminates. Step up, hold forth, and we will champion your work to readers everywhere.

All books listed are also available as ebooks. Visit www.nyupress.org for more information.

Fa ll 2 0 1 7 P u b lica t ion S c hedule AVAILABLE NOW Amheida III Roger S. Bagnall and Rodney Ast • page 40 Clay Sanskrit Library Digital Editions Page 45 AUGUST Fandom, Second Edition Edited by Jonathan Gray, Cornel Sandvoss, and C. Lee Harrington • page 30 SEPTEMBER Gilded Suffragists Johanna Neuman • page 1

NEW IN PAPERBACK A Body, Undone Christina Crosby • page 34 NEW IN PAPERBACK Clean and White Carl A. Zimring • page 17 NEW IN PAPERBACK Wedlocked Katherine Franke • page 18 MONTHLY REVIEW PRESS Trump in the White House John Bellamy Foster • page 47 NOVEMBER Langston’s Salvation Wallace D. Best • page 9

LGBTQ Politics Edited by Marla Brettschneider, Susan Multiracial Parents Burgess, and Christine Keating • page 25 Miri Song • page 28 Hollywood’s Spies The Art of Confession Laura B. Rosenzweig • page 2 Christopher Grobe • page 33 Sacrifice in Judaism, Christianity, and American Catholic History, Second Islam Edition David L. Weddle • page 38 Edited by Catherine Osborne and Mark Massa • page 39 The Evolution of the Juvenile Court Barry C. Feld • page 8 Authentically Black and Truly Catholic Matthew J. Cressler • page 37 True Sex Emily Skidmore • page 11 The Filipino Primitive Sarita Echavez See • page 36 The Practices of Hope Christopher Castiglia • page 35 Death Makes the News Jessica M. Fishman • page 27 LIBRARY OF ARABIC LITERATURE NEW IN PAPERBACK The Urban Church Imagined A Hundred and One Nights Jessica M. Barron and Rhys H. Translated by Bruce Fudge • page 43 Williams • page 37 LIBRARY OF ARABIC LITERATURE NEW IN PAPERBACK NEW IN PAPERBACK Dissent Consorts of the Caliphs Ralph Young • page 12 Ibn al-Sai, translated by Marina Warner and the editors of the Library of Arabic NEW IN PAPERBACK Literature • page 42 Legalizing LGBT Families Amanda K. Baumle and D’Lane R. NEW IN PAPERBACK Compton • page 24 Homelessness in New York City Thomas J. Main • page 20 MONTHLY REVIEW PRESS Mapping My Way Home MONTHLY REVIEW PRESS Stephanie Urdang • page 49 A Foodie’s Guide to Capitalism Eric Holt-Giménez • page 46 DECEMBER Keywords for Latina/o Studies OCTOBER Edited by Lawrence La FountainCitizens but Not Americans Stokes, Nancy Raquel Mirabal, and Nilda Flores-Gonzalez • page 26 Deborah R. Vargas • page 32 Disability Media Studies Being Watched Edited by Elizabeth Ellcessor and Bill Jeffrey L. Vagle • page 19 Kirkpatrick • page 32 In the Presence of Power The Rise of Big Data Policing Edited by Evelyn Birge Vitz and Andrew Guthrie Ferguson • page 7 Maurice A. Pomerantz • page 40 Faithful Measures Skateboarding LA Edited by Christopher D. Bader and Gregory J. Snyder • page 23 Roger Finke • page 39 The Practice of Islam in America Jewish New York Edited by Edward E. Curtis • page 36 Deborah Dash Moore • page 3 Empire in the Air China, the United States, and the Future Chandra D. Bhimull • page 17 of Latin America Edited by David B. H. Denoon • page 24 Jews on the Frontier Shari Rabin • page 16 Racial Reconciliation and the Healing of a Nation Personalized Medicine Edited by Charles J. Ogletree, Jr. and Barbara Prainsack • page 22 Austin Sarat • page 20 Cotton Capitalists Christian Theologies of Salvation Michael R. Cohen • page 16 Edited by Justin S. Holcomb • page 38 Unequal Coverage LIBRARY OF ARABIC LITERATURE Edited by Jessica M. Mulligan and NEW IN PAPERBACK Heide Castañeda • page 21 Disagreements of the Jurists Catch and Release al-Qadi al-Numan, translated by Devin Lisa Jean Moore • page 22 Stewart • page 42

LIBRARY OF ARABIC LITERATURE Arabian Satire Hmedan al-Shwe’ir, edited and translated by Marcel Kurpershoek • page 41 NEW IN PAPERBACK For Liberty and the Republic Ricardo A. Herrera • page 12 MONTHLY REVIEW PRESS Rethinking Democracy Greg Albo and Leo Panitch • page 52 JANUARY What Works for Women at Work: A Workbook Joan C. Williams, Rachel Dempsey, and Marina Multhaup • page 4 A Biography of a Map in Motion Christian J. Koot • page 13 Brokering Servitude Andrew Urban • page 15 Legally Straight Joe Rollins • page 18 Open TV Aymar Jean Christian • page 31 Antisocial Media Greg Goldberg • page 30 Crip Times Robert McRuer • page 35 Facing the Rising Sun Gerald Horne • page 10 Revolutions in the Atlantic World, New Edition Wim Klooster • page 14 Feminists Rethink the Neoliberal State Edited by Leela Fernandes • page 25 NEW IN PAPERBACK What Works for Women at Work Joan C. Williams and Rachel Dempsey • page 5 NEW IN PAPERBACK The Secret Life of Stories Michael Bérubé • page 34 MONTHLY REVIEW PRESS Health Care Under the Knife Howard Waitzkin • page 48 MONTHLY REVIEW PRESS The Apocalypse of Settler Colonialism Gerald Horne • page 51 FEBRUARY Manifest Destinies, Second Edition Laura E. Gómez • page 14 The Procrastination Economy Ethan Tussey • page 6 Gender Reckonings Edited by James W. Messerschmidt, Patricia Yancey Martin, Michael A. Messner, and Raewyn Connell • page 26 Policy Drift Norma M. Riccucci • page 25 Algorithms of Oppression Safiya Umoja Noble • page 29 MONTHLY REVIEW PRESS Modern Imperialism, Monopoly Finance Capital, and Marx’s Law of Value Samir Amin • page 50


G e n e r a l I n t e re s t

G il ded S u ffra g i st s

The New York Socialites who Fought for Women's Right to Vote Johanna Neuman New York City’s elite women who turned a feminist cause into a fashionable revolution In the early twentieth century over two hundred of New York’s most glamorous socialites joined the suffrage movement. Their names—Astor, Belmont, Rockefeller, Tiffany, Vanderbilt, Whitney and the like—carried enormous public value. These women were the media darlings of their day because of the extravagance of their costume balls and the opulence of the French couture clothes, and they leveraged their social celebrity for political power, turning women’s right to vote into a fashionable cause. Although they were dismissed by critics as bored socialites “trying on suffrage as they might the latest couture designs from Paris,” these gilded suffragists were at the epicenter of the great reforms known collectively as the Progressive Era. From championing education for women, to pursuing careers, and advocating for the end of marriage, these women were engaged with the swirl of change that swept through the streets of New York City. Johanna Neuman restores these women to their rightful place in the story of women’s suffrage. Understanding the need for popular approval for any social change, these socialites used their wealth, power, social connections and style to excite mainstream interest and to diffuse resistance to the cause. In the end, as Neuman says, when change was in the air, these women helped push women’s suffrage over the finish line.

Johanna Neuman is a writer, historian and scholar in residence at American University in Washington, D.C. An award-winning journalist and former Nieman Fellow at Harvard, she covered the White House, the State Department and Congress for the Los Angeles Times and USA Today. “Imagine, if you will, you’ve managed an invitation to a society event in Gilded Age Manhattan. In her compelling study of personality and social power, Johanna Neuman introduces you to the women in the room, all fashionable, most wealthy beyond imagination, and yet all politically powerless. These are not the women we think of as leaders in the fight for women’s right to vote, yet here they are in this fascinating study, dressed to the nines, disarming to the patriarchy, and determined. Both socialites and activists, they shaped an age when fashion and celebrity became weapons of radical change.” —Marc Pachter, Director Emeritus, National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

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September 2017 240 pages | 6 x 9 30 black & white illustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-3706-9 | $24.95T (£20.99 ) History | New York City FAL L 2 0 1 7 • NYU PRESS

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Gen eral Interest

H ol l ywo o d’s Spi es

The Undercover Surveillance of Nazis in Los Angeles Laura B. Rosenzweig The remarkable story of the Jewish moguls in Hollywood who established the first anti-Nazi Jewish resistance organization in the country In April 1939, Warner Brothers studios released the first Hollywood film to confront the Nazi threat in the United States. Confessions of a Nazi Spy, starring Edward G. Robinson, told the story of German agents in New York City working to overthrow the U.S. government. The film alerted Americans to the dangers of Nazism at home and encouraged them to defend against it.

Laura B. Rosenzweig is an independent scholar. She has taught U.S. History and American Jewish History at the University of California, Santa Cruz and at San Francisco State University. She is currently an instructional designer for the University of California, Office of the President. “Demonstrating the active role of Jewish Hollywood moguls and detailing the cloakand-dagger exploits of individual informants, Rosenzweig adds a new dimension to our understanding of American Jewish responses to domestic antisemitism.” —Ellen Eisenberg, author of The First to Cry Down Injustice? Western Jews and Japanese Removal During WWII

Confessions of a Nazi Spy may have been the first cinematic shot fired by Hollywood against Nazis in America, but it by no means marked the political awakening of the film industry’s Jewish executives to the problem. Hollywood’s Spies tells the remarkable, as-yet untold story of the Jewish moguls in Hollywood who paid private investigators to infiltrate Nazi groups operating in Los Angeles, establishing the first antiNazi Jewish resistance organization in the country—the Los Angeles Jewish Community Committee (LAJCC). Drawing on more than 15,000 pages of archival documents, Laura B. Rosenzweig offers a compelling narrative illuminating the role that Jewish Americans played in combating insurgent Nazism in the United States in the 1930s. Forced undercover by the anti-Semitic climate of the decade, the LAJCC partnered with organizations whose Americanism was unimpeachable, such as the American Legion, to channel information regarding seditious Nazi plots to Congress, the Justice Department, the FBI and the Los Angeles Police Department. Hollywood’s Spies corrects the decades-long belief that American Jews lacked the political organization and leadership to assert their political interests during this period in our history and reveals that the LAJCC was one of many covert "fact finding" operations funded by Jewish Americans designed to root out Nazism in the United States.

September 2017 320 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth | 978-1-4798-5517-9 | $29.95T (£25.99) In the Goldstein-Goren Series in American Jewish History History

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G e n e r a l I n t e re s t

Je w is h N ew Yo r k

The Remarkable Story of a City and a People Deborah Dash Moore The definitive history of Jews in New York and how they transformed the city Based on the acclaimed multi-volume series, City of Promises: A History of the Jews of New York, Jewish New York reveals the multifaceted world of one of the city’s most important ethnic and religious groups. Spanning three centuries, Jewish New York traces the earliest arrival of Jews in New Amsterdam to the recent immigration of Jews from the former Soviet Union. Jewish immigrants transformed New York. They built its clothing industry and constructed huge swaths of apartment buildings. New York Jews helped to make the city the center of the nation’s publishing industry and shaped popular culture in music, theater, and the arts. With a strong sense of social justice, a dedication to civil rights and civil liberties, and a belief in the duty of government to provide social welfare for all its citizens, New York Jews influenced the city, state, and nation with a new wave of social activism. In turn, New York transformed Judaism and stimulated religious pluralism, Jewish denominationalism, and contemporary feminism. The city’s neighborhoods hosted unbelievably diverse types of Jews, from Communists to Hasids. Jewish New York not only describes Jews’ many positive influences on New York, but also exposes the group’s struggles with poverty and anti-Semitism. These injustices reinforced an exemplary commitment to remaking New York into a model multiethnic, multiracial, and multireligious world city.

Deborah Dash Moore is Frederick G. L. Huetwell Professor of History and Judaic Studies at the University of Michigan. She is the author/editor of a number of books, including GI Jews: How World War II Changed a Generation and, with Howard Rock, Cityscapes: A History of New York in Images. Praise for City of Promises “The full saga of Jewish New York, from the first small band of refugees to a population of two million, from a community ostracized in the colonial city to one that has produced leading intellectuals, social activists, financiers, and more...this is overall a highly valuable and vastly immersing study of how New York came to be considered a Jewish city.” —Publishers Weekly

October 2017 512 pages | 6 x 9 94 black & white illustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-5038-9 | $30.00A (£25.99) History | New York City WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

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W h at Wo rks f o r Wo m en a t Wo rk A Wor k b ook Joan C. Williams, Rachel Dempsey and Marina Multhaup

A workbook for women with practical tips, tricks, and strategies for succeeding in the workplace. A companion to the highly successful What Works for Women at Work, this workbook offers women a hands-on guide filled with interactive exercises, self-diagnostic quizzes, and actionoriented strategies for building successful careers.

Joan C. Williams is Distinguished Professor and Director of the Center for WorkLife Law at the University of California, Hastings College of Law. Her books include Unbending Gender: Why Work and Family Conflict and What to Do About It and Reshaping the Work-Family Debate: Why Men and Class Matter. Rachel Dempsey is an attorney and writer. She received her J.D. from Yale Law School in 2015 and her B.A. from Yale University in 2009. She lives in San Francisco. Marina Multhaup is Research & Policy Fellow for the Center for WorkLife Law.

The workbook helps women understand both how their personalities are viewed in the workplace and the features of their work environments in order to move up the professional ladder. Readers will discover the four patterns of gender bias—Prove-It-Again, the Tightrope, the Maternal Wall, and the Tug of War—and they can use the toolkit to learn how to navigate the ways these patterns affect their careers. Joan C. Williams and her co-authors also introduce the new concept of “gender judo,” which shows women how to achieve a typically masculine goal (e.g., asking for a raise) in a feminine way, in order to avoid a backlash. Chock full of insights, What Works for Women at Work: The Workbook will be an indispensable handbook for working women, providing the tools, the tips, and the tactics to get ahead.

This interactive Workbook can help any working woman make better choices and offers specific advice on: How to write a winning resume How to succeed on job interviews How to negotiate salary How to create a social media network How to create work-life balance How to navigate office politics

January 2018 256 pages | 8.5 x 11 1 fig, 9 tbl, 1 sidebar Paper | 978-1-4798-7266-4 | $17.95T (£14.99) Business | Self-help

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New in Paperback!

The best-selling What Works for Women at Work is now available in paperback!

Praised for offering an innovative, practical, and down-to-earth approach, What Works for Women at Work has already helped thousands of women successfully navigate gender bias in the workplace. The paperback edition includes a new Preface, and is an essential companion to What Works for Women at Work: The Workbook, providing the tools, tips, and tactics to get ahead.

Praise for What Works for Women at Work: "Written by a mother-daughter duo, this decidedly unwonky examination of gender bias doubles as a playbook on how to transcend and triumph." —O, The Oprah Magazine "Filled with street-smart advice and plain old savvy about the way life works in corporate America." —STARRED Booklist "This book can help women claim their seat at the table and lean in to their careers." —Sheryl Sandberg, author of Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead January 2018 394 pages | 6 x 9 55 boxes Paper | 978-1-4798-1431-2 | $14.95T (£12.99) Business | Self-help

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T he P ro cras ti n ati o n Eco n o m y The Big Business of Downtime Ethan Tussey How mobile devices make our in-between moments valuable to media companies while also providing a sense of control and connection In moments of downtime—waiting for a friend to arrive or commuting to work—we pull out our phones for a few minutes of distraction. Just as television reoriented the way we think about living rooms, mobile devices have taken over the interstitial spaces of our everyday lives. Ethan Tussey argues that these in-between moments have created a procrastination economy, an opportunity for entertainment companies to create products, apps, platforms, subscription services, micropayments, and interactive opportunities that can colonize our everyday lives.

Ethan Tussey is Assistant Professor of Communication at Georgia State University. He is the Coordinating Editor of In Medias Res, and co-founder of the Atlanta Media Project.

But as businesses commoditize our free time, and mobile devices become essential tools for promotion, branding, and distribution, consumers are using these devices as a means of navigating public and private space. These devices are not just changing the way we spend and value our time, but also how we interact with others and transform our sense the politics of space. By examining the four main locations of the procrastination economy—the workplace, the commute, the waiting room, and the “connected” living room—Ethan Tussey illuminates the relationship between the entertainment industry and the digitally empowered public.

“Ethan Tussey offers an exciting and foundational concept— the 'procrastination economy'—that is sure to have a long life and change the way we think about entertainment and mobile technology. Insightful and original, incorporating both industry insight and audience use, this book takes a smart approach to a new media phenomenon.” —Amanda D. Lotz, author of The Television Will Be Revolutionized

February 2018 256 pages | 5.5 X 8.25 7 black & white llustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-4423-4 | $27.00A (£$22.99) Media Studies | Business

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G e n e r a l I n t e re s t

The R is e of B i g D a t a P o l i c i n g Surveillance, Race, and the Future of Law Enforcement Andrew Guthrie Ferguson

Andrew Guthrie Ferguson

THE RISE OF

The consequences of big data and algorithm-driven policing and its impact on law enforcement In a high-tech command center in downtown Los Angeles, a digital map lights up with 911 calls, television monitors track breaking news stories, surveillance cameras sweep the streets, and rows of networked computers link analysts and police officers to a wealth of law enforcement intelligence. This is just a glimpse into a future where software predicts future crimes, algorithms generate virtual “most-wanted” lists, and databanks collect personal and biometric information. The Rise of Big Data Policing introduces the cutting-edge technology that is changing how the police do their jobs and shows why it is more important than ever that citizens understand the far-reaching consequences of big data surveillance as a law enforcement tool. Andrew Guthrie Ferguson reveals how these new technologies—viewed as race-neutral and objective—have been eagerly adopted by police departments hoping to distance themselves from claims of racial bias and unconstitutional practices. After a series of high-profile police shootings and federal investigations into systemic police misconduct, and in an era of law enforcement budget cutbacks, data-driven policing has been billed as a way to “turn the page” on racial bias. But behind the data are real people, and difficult questions remain about racial discrimination and the potential to distort constitutional protections.

BIG DATA POLICING Surveillance, Race, and the Future of Law Enforcement

Andrew Guthrie Ferguson is a national expert on predictive policing, big data surveillance, and the Fourth Amendment. He teaches criminal law, criminal procedure, and evidence at the UDC David A. Clarke School of Law. He is quoted widely in the media, and his articles have been published in many top law reviews. He is the author of Why Jury Duty Matters (NYU Press, 2012).

In this first book on big data policing, Ferguson offers an examination of how new technologies will alter the who, where, when and how we police. These new technologies also offer data-driven methods to improve police accountability and to remedy the underlying socio-economic risk factors that encourage crime. The Rise of Big Data Policing is a must read for anyone concerned with how technology will revolutionize law enforcement and its potential threat to the security, privacy, and constitutional rights of citizens. October 2017 272 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth | 978-1-4798-9282-2 | $28.00A (£23.99) Current Affairs | Politics WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

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T he Evo l u ti o n o f th e J uven i l e Co u rt

Race, Politics, and the Criminalizing of Juvenile Justice Barry C. Feld A major statement on the juvenile justice system by one of America’s leading experts The juvenile court lies at the intersection of youth policy and crime policy. Its institutional practices reflect our changing ideas about children and crime control. The Evolution of the Juvenile Court provides a sweeping overview of the American juvenile justice system’s development and change over the past century. Noted law professor and criminologist Barry C. Feld places special emphasis on changes over the last 25 years—the ascendance of “get tough” crime policies and the more recent Supreme Court recognition that “children are different.”

Barry C. Feld is Centennial Professor of Law Emeritus at the University of Minnesota. Crime has always been a young person’s game. But how we describe youthful offenders and how we respond to them has varied throughout the centurylong history of the juvenile court.The Evolution of the Juvenile Court explores how and why our ideas about youth and crime have changed. Over the past halfcentury, social, political, and legal changes associated with race strongly have contributed to increasingly punitive youth crime policies. Although I have long been critical of juvenile courts, as the Supreme Court recently has recognized, “children are different” and the legal response to them should be as well. Barry C. Feld

September 2017 392 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth | 978-1-4798-9569-4 | $35.00A (£29.99) Current Affairs

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Feld’s comprehensive historical analyses trace juvenile courts’ evolution though four periods—the original Progressive Era, the Due Process Revolution in the 1960s, the Get Tough Era of the 1980s and 1990s, and today’s Kids Are Different era. In each period, changes in the economy, cities, families, race and ethnicity, and politics have shaped juvenile courts’ policies and practices. Changes in juvenile courts’ ends and means—substance and procedure—reflect shifting notions of children’s culpability and competence. The Evolution of the Juvenile Court examines how conservative politicians used coded racial appeals to advocate “get tough” policies that equated children with adults and more recent Supreme Court decisions that draw on developmental psychology and neuroscience research to bolster its conclusions about youths’ reduced criminal responsibility and diminished competence. Feld draws on lessons from the past to envision a new, developmentally appropriate justice system for children. Ultimately, providing justice for children requires structural changes to reduce social and economic inequality—concentrated poverty in segregated urban areas—that disproportionately expose children of color to juvenile courts’ punitive policies. Historical, prescriptive, and analytical, The Evolution of the Juvenile Court evaluates the author’s past recommendations to abolish juvenile courts in light of this new evidence, and concludes that separate, but reformed, juvenile courts are necessary to protect children who commit crimes and facilitate their successful transition to adulthood.

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G e n e r a l I n t e re s t

La n gs ton ' s S a l v a t i o n

American Religion and the Bard of Harlem Wallace D. Best A new perspective on the role of religion in the work of Langston Hughes Langston's Salvation offers a fascinating exploration into the religious thought of Langston Hughes. Known for his poetry, plays, and social activism, the importance of religion in Hughes’s work has historically been ignored, or dismissed. This book puts this aspect of Hughes’s work front and center, placing it into the wider context of twentieth-century American and African American religious cultures. Wallace Best brings to life the religious orientation of Hughes’s work, illuminating how this powerful figure helped to expand the definition of African American religion during this period. Best argues that contrary to popular perception, Hughes was neither an avowed atheist nor unconcerned with religious matters. He demonstrates that Hughes’s religious writing helps to situate him and other black writers as important participants in a broader national discussion about race and religion in America. Through a rigorous analysis that includes attention to Hughes’s unpublished religious poems, Langston’s Salvation reveals new insights into Hughes’s body of work, and demonstrates that while Hughes is seen as one of the most important voices of the Harlem Renaissance, his writing also needs to be understood within the context of twentieth-century American religious liberalism and of the larger modernist movement. Combining historical and literary analyses with biographical explorations of Langston Hughes as a writer and individual, Langston’s Salvation opens a space to read Langston Hughes’s writing religiously, in order to fully understand the writer and the world he inhabited.

“Shows the beautiful mind of Langston Hughes as a ‘thinker about religion.’ Langston's Salvation heralds a new day, perhaps even a renaissance, not only in the study of Hughes and his poetry, but also of liberal religion in the United States. This book is like Hughes's poetry: an invitation to see more than what's on the surface.” —Edward J. Blum, author of W. E. B. Du Bois, American Prophet

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Wallace D. Best is Professor of Religion and African American Studies at Princeton University. He is the author of Passionately Human, No Less Divine: Religion and Culture in Black Chicago, 1915-1952. Langston’s Salvation emphatically shows that as the quintessential “New Negro” of the Harlem Renaissance, Langston Hughes wrote as much about religion as about any other topic. A failed salvation experience at age 13 profoundly shaped Hughes’s approach to religion and became the crucial backdrop for much of his writing. The event set in motion a life-long quest to understand the nature of “salvation” and the role religion plays in daily life. Indeed, one cannot fully understand Hughes without a careful examination of his thoughts on God, faith, the institution of the church, and matters of ultimate meaning. These concerns permeate the corpus of his work, revealing him to be what I call a “thinker about religion” of enormous range and depth. Wallace D. Best November 2017 320 pages | 6 x 9 7 black & white illustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-3489-1 | $32.50A (£27.99) Biography | Literary Studies FAL L 2 0 1 7 • NYU PRESS

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H i story

F aci n g th e Ri s i n g Su n

African Americans, Japan, and the Rise of Afro-Asian Solidarity Gerald Horne The surprising alliance between Japan and pro-Tokyo African Americans during World War II In November 1942 in East St. Louis, Illinois a group of African Americans engaged in military drills were eagerly awaiting a Japanese invasion of the U.S.—an invasion that they planned to join. Since the rise of Japan as a superpower less than a century earlier, African Americans across class and ideological lines had saluted the Asian nation, not least because they thought its very existence undermined the pervasive notion of “white supremacy.” The list of supporters included Booker T. Washington, Marcus Garvey, and particularly W.E.B. Du Bois.

Gerald Horne is Moores Professor of History and African American Studies at the University of Houston, and has published three dozen books including, The Counter-Revolution of 1776: Slave Resistance and the Origins of the USA and Race War! White Supremacy and the Japanese Attack on the British Empire.

Also of interest The A p o c a l y p se o f S e t t l e r Co l o n i a l i s m Gerald Horne See page 51 for more information

January 2018 240 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth | 978-1-4798-4859-1 | $30.00A (£25.99) History

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Facing the Rising Sun tells the story of the widespread proTokyo sentiment among African Americans during World War II, arguing that the solidarity between the two groups was significantly corrosive to the U.S. war effort. Gerald Horne demonstrates that Black Nationalists of various stripes were the vanguard of this trend—including followers of Garvey and the precursor of the Nation of Islam. Indeed, many of them called themselves “Asiatic”, not African. Following World War II, Japanese-influenced “Afro-Asian” solidarity did not die, but rather foreshadowed Dr. Martin Luther King’s tie to Gandhi’s India and Black Nationalists’ post-1970s fascination with Maoist China and Ho’s Vietnam. An insightful glimpse into the Black Nationalists’ struggle for global leverage and new allies, Facing the Rising Sun provides a complex, holistic perspective on a painful period in African American history, and a unique glimpse into the meaning of “the enemy of my enemy is my friend.”

“Through uncovering a rich, dynamic history of proJapanese views among U.S. Black nationalists during the Depression and World War II, Gerald Horne has produced a brilliant book that provides a powerful model for writing about transnational African American history, global white supremacy, and Afro-Asian solidarities.” —Erik S. McDuffie, author of Sojourning for Freedom: Black Women, American Communism, and the Making of Black Left Feminism

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H i s t or y

Tr ue S ex

The Lives of Trans Men at the Turn of the Twentieth Century Emily Skidmore The incredible stories of trans men who assimilated into mainstream communities in the late 1800s In 1883, Frank Dubois gained national attention for his life in Waupun, Wisconsin. There he was known as a hard-working man, married to a young woman named Gertrude Fuller. What drew national attention to his seemingly unremarkable life was that he was revealed to be anatomically female. Dubois fit so well within the small community that the townspeople only discovered his “true sex” when his former husband and their two children arrived in the town searching in desperation for their departed wife and mother. At the turn of the twentieth century, trans men were not necessarily urban rebels seeking to overturn stifling gender roles. In fact, they often sought to pass as conventional men, choosing to live in small towns where they led ordinary lives, aligning themselves with the expectations of their communities. They were, in a word, unexceptional. In True Sex, Emily Skidmore uncovers the stories of eighteen trans men who lived in the United States between 1876 and 1936. Despite their “unexceptional” quality, their lives are surprising and moving, challenging much of what we think we know about queer history. By tracing the narratives surrounding the moments of “discovery” in these communities—from reports in local newspapers to medical journals and beyond—this book challenges the assumption that the full story of modern American sexuality is told by cosmopolitan radicals. Rather, True Sex reveals complex narratives concerning rural geography and community, persecution and tolerance, and how these factors intersect with the history of race, identity, and sexuality in America.

Emily Skidmore is Assistant Professor of History at Texas Tech University, specializing in the history of gender and sexuality in the United States. I wrote True Sex in response to the popular idea that transgender issues are somehow new, or else limited to coastal cities like New York or San Francisco. What I uncovered is a long history of gender transgression in every corner of the United States—from wheat ranches in Utah to Booneville, Mississippi. And, in a moment where “fake news” is subject to sustained conversation, True Sex tracks the ways in which stories of trans men morphed as they circulated from the pages of their hometown newspapers and into headlines in national newspapers, such as the New York World, finding that often local papers offered support for their queer neighbors, whereas the sensational national press cast trans men as dangerous deviants. Thus, by prioritizing local narratives, True Sex reveals America’s surprisingly long and deep queer history. Emily Skidmore September 2017 272 pages | 6 x 9 10 black & white illustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-7063-9 | $27.00A (£22.99) History | LGBT Studies

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H i story New In Paperback

New In Paperback

Dissent

For Lib er ty and the Rep ub lic

Ralph Young

Ricardo A. Herrera

The History of an American Idea

The American Citizen as Soldier, 1775-1861

With a new preface An important reminder of the role dissent has played in the role of American politics Dissent: The History of an American Idea examines the key role dissent has played in shaping the United States. The emphasis is on the way Americans, celebrated figures and anonymous ordinary citizens, responded to what they saw as the injustices that prevented them from fully experiencing their vision of America. At its founding the United States committed itself to lofty ideals. When the promise of those ideals was not fully realized by all Americans, many protested and demanded that the United States live up to its promise. Some dissenters are celebrated heroes of American history, while others are ordinary people: frequently overlooked, but whose stories show that change is often accomplished through grassroots activism. The United States is a nation founded on the promise and power of dissent. In this stunningly comprehensive volume, featuring a new introduction that takes into account the wave of mass protests that occurred following the election and inauguration of President Trump, Ralph Young shows us its history. “Young convincingly demonstrates that the history of the United States is inextricably linked to dissent and shows how ‘protest is one of the consummate expressions of Americanness.’” —STARRED Publishers Weekly Ralph Young is Professor of History at Temple University. He is the author of Dissent in America: The Voices That Shaped a Nation, a compilation of primary documents of 400 years of American dissenters. November 2017 640 pages | 6.125 X 9.25 Paper | 978-1-4798-1983-6 | $25.00A (£21.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-0665-2 History | Current Affairs

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The relationship between soldier and citizen from the War of Independence through the first year of the Civil War In the early decades of the American Republic, American soldiers demonstrated and defined their beliefs about the nature of American republicanism and how they, as citizens and soldiers, were participants in the republican experiment through their service. The work analyzes an idealized republican ideology as a component of soldiering in both peace and war. Herrera argues that American soldiers’ belief system—the military ethos of republicanism—drew from the larger body of American political thought. Drawing from military and personal correspondence, journals, orderly books, militia constitutions, and other documents in over forty archives in twenty-three states, Herrera maps five broad, interrelated, and mutually reinforcing threads of thought constituting soldiers’ beliefs: Virtue; Legitimacy; Selfgovernance; Glory, Honor, and Fame; and the National Mission. Spanning periods of war and peace, these five themes constituted a coherent and long-lived body of ideas that informed American soldiers’ sense of identity for generations. "Herrera has produced an important volume addressing the relationship of civilians and soldiers during the period from the American Revolution to the beginning of the Civil War." —Choice Ricardo A. Herrera is Associate Professor of Military History at the School of Advanced Military Studies, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College. December 2017 272 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-6790-5 | $28.00S (£23.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-1994-2 In the Warfare and Culture series Military History 1.800.996.NYU P


H i s t or y

A B iogr aph y o f a M a p in M otion Augustine Herrman's Chesapeake Christian J. Koot Reveals the little known history of one of history’s most famous maps—and its maker Tucked away in a near-forgotten collection, Virginia and Maryland as it is Planted and Inhabited is one of the most extraordinary maps of colonial British America. Created by a colonial merchant, planter, and diplomat named Augustine Herrman, the map pictures the Mid-Atlantic in breathtaking detail, capturing its waterways, coastlines, and communities. Herrman spent three decades travelling between Dutch New Amsterdam and the English Chesapeake before eventually settling in Maryland and making this map. Although the map has been reproduced widely, the history of how it became one of the most famous images of the Chesapeake has never been told. A Biography of a Map in Motion uncovers the intertwined stories of the map and its maker, offering new insights into the creation of empire in North America. The book follows the map from the waterways of the Chesapeake to the workshops of London, where it was turned into a print and sold. Transported into coffee houses, private rooms, and government offices, Virginia and Maryland became an apparatus of empire that allowed English elites to imaginatively possess and accurately manage their Atlantic colonies. Investigating this map offers the rare opportunity to recapture the complementary and occasionally conflicting forces that created the British Empire. From the colonial and the metropolitan to the economic and the political to the local and the Atlantic, this is a fascinating exploration of the many meanings of a map, and how what some saw as establishing a sense of local place could translate to forging an empire.

Christian J. Koot is Associate Professor of History at Towson University, where he teaches courses on Colonial and Revolutionary America. He is author of Empire at the Periphery: British Colonists, Anglo-Dutch Trade, and the Development of the British Atlantic, 1621-1713. “This pioneering book compares Dutch, English, and Colonial attempts to control the mid-Atlantic American colonies through the history of the making of one map. I will never read a map the same way after finishing Koot’s book!” —Sarah Hand Meacham, author of Every Home a Distillery: Alcohol, Gender, and Technology in the Colonial Chesapeake

January 2018 304 pages | 6 x 9 35 black & white illustrations | 16 color illustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-3729-8 | $35.00S (£29.99) History WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

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H i story

Mani f e st D e sti n ies

Revolutions in the Atlantic World

Second Edition

New Edition

Laura E. Gómez

Wim Klooster

The Making of the Mexican American Race

An essential resource for understanding the complex history of Mexican Americans and racial classification in the United States Manifest Destinies tells the story of the original Mexican Americans—the people living in northern Mexico in 1846 during the onset of the Mexican American War. The war abruptly came to an end two years later, and 115,000 Mexicans became American citizens overnight. Yet their status as full-fledged Americans was tenuous at best. Due to a variety of legal and political maneuvers, Mexican Americans were largely confined to a second class status. How did this occur, and what are the implications? Manifest Destinies fills a gap in American racial history by linking westward expansion to slavery and the Civil War. This new edition reflects the most recent evidence of the ways in which Mexican Americans and other Latinos were racialized in both the twentieth and early twentyfirst centuries. The book ultimately concludes that it is problematic to continue to speak in terms of Hispanic “ethnicity” rather than consider Latinos qua Latinos alongside the United States’ other major racial groupings. “Expertly combining critical race theory, sociology, politics, ethnic studies, and military history, Gómez dramatizes both the peculiarities of the New Mexican case and its deep importance to understanding the nation’s racial history.” —David Roediger, author of How Race Survived U.S. History Laura E. Gómez is Professor of Law, Sociology and Chicana/o Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. February 2018 320 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-9428-4 | $26.00S (£21.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-8261-8 | $89.00X (£77.00) Previous edition: Paper | 978-0-8147-3205-2 History

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A Comparative History

A new look at a contentious period in the history of the Atlantic world Within just a half century, the American, French, Haitian, and Spanish American revolutions transformed the Atlantic world. This book is the first to analyze these events through a comparative lens, revealing several central themes in the field of Atlantic history. From the murky position of the European empire between the Old and New Worlds to slavery and diaspora, Wim Klooster offers insights into the forces behind the many conflicts in the Atlantic world in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Digging deeply into the structural causes and oppressive environments in which these revolutions occurred, Klooster debunks the popular myth that the “people” rebelled against a small ruling elite, arguing instead that the revolutions were civil wars in which all classes fought on both sides. The new edition covers the latest historiographical trends in the study of the Atlantic world, including new research regarding the role of privateers. Drawing on fresh research—such as primary documents and extant secondary literature—Klooster ultimately concludes that the Enlightenment was the ideological inspiration for the Age of Revolutions, although not its cause. Wim Klooster is Professor of History at Clark University. He is the author or (co-)editor of many books, including The Dutch Moment: War, Trade, and Settlement in the Seventeenth-Century Atlantic World, and Illicit Riches: Dutch Trade in the Caribbean, 1648-1795. January 2018 272 pages | 6 x 9 7 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-5717-3 | $26.00S (£21.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-7595-5 | $89.00X (£77.00) Previous edition: Paper | 978-0-8147-4789-6 History 1.800.996.NYU P


H i s t or y

Bro k er in g S e r v i t u d e

Migration and the Politics of Domestic Labor during the Long 19th Century Andrew Urban The history of domestic labor markets in 19th century America From the era of Irish Famine migration to the passage of quota restrictions in the 1920s, household domestic service was the single largest employer of women in the United States, and, in California, a pivotal occupation for male Chinese immigrants. Servants of both sexes accounted for eight percent of the total labor force—about one million people. In Brokering Servitude, Andrew Urban offers a history of these domestic servants, focusing on how Irish immigrant women, Chinese immigrant men, and American-born black women navigated the domestic labor market in the nineteenth century—a market in which they were forced to grapple with powerful racial and gendered discrimination. Through vivid examples like how post-famine Irish immigrants were enlisted to work as servants in exchange for relief, this book examines how race, citizenship, and the performance of domestic labor relate to visions of American expansion. Because household service was undesirable work stigmatized as unfree, brokers were integral to steering and compelling women, men, and children into this labor. By the end of the 19th century, the federal government became a major broker of domestic labor through border controls, and immigration officials became important actors in dictating which workers were available for domestic labor and under what conditions they could be contracted. Drawing on a range of sources—from political cartoons to immigrant case files to novels—Brokering Servitude connects Asian immigration, European immigration, and internal, black migration. The book ultimately demonstrates the ways in which employers pitted these groups against each other in competition not only for servant positions, but also for certain forms of social inclusion, offering important insights into an oft-overlooked area of American history.

Andrew Urban is Assistant Professor of American Studies and History at Rutgers University. As I researched this project, I was struck by the parallels between 19th century immigration policies— and attitudes—and the conversation taking place in U.S. immigration today. Nineteenth century America also obsessed over immigration and labor supply, as evidenced in their quest to end the alleged ‘monopoly’ that Irish women established in domestic service. Believing Irish workers to be lazy, resentful, and insolent, many white, middle-class employers sought to hire Chinese or black servants, workers they believed to be more suited to servitude. Thus, my book shows that America has a long history of recruiting migrant laborers for work that was deemed racially appropriate only to certain groups. Andrew Urban

January 2018 352 pages | 6 x 9 21 black & white illustrations | 6 color illustrations Cloth | 978-0-8147-8584-3 | $39.00S (£34.00) In the Culture, Labor, History series History WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

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H i story

Co t t o n C a p i ta l is t s

Jews on the Frontier

Michael R. Cohen

Shari Rabin

American Jewish Entrepreneurship in the Reconstruction Era

A vivid history of the American Jewish merchants who worked in the nation’s most important economic sector In the 19th century, Jewish merchants created a thriving niche economy in the United States’ most important industry—cotton— positioning themselves at the forefront of expansion during the Reconstruction Era. Jewish success in the cotton industry was transformative for both Jewish communities and their development, and for the broader economic restructuring of the South. Cotton Capitalists analyzes this niche economy and reveals its origins. Michael R. Cohen argues that Jewish merchants’ status as a minority fueled their success by fostering ethnic networks of trust. These American Jewish merchants reveal that ethnicity matters in the development of global capitalism. Ethnic minorities are and have frequently been at the forefront of entrepreneurship, finding innovative ways to expand narrow sectors of the economy. While this was certainly the case for Jews, it has also been true for other immigrant groups more broadly. The story of Jews in the American cotton trade is far more than the story of American Jewish success and integration—it is the story of the role of ethnicity in the development of global capitalism. Michael Cohen is Associate Professor of Jewish Studies at Tulane University, where he holds a Sizeler Professorship. He is the author of The Birth of Conservative Judaism: Solomon Schechter's Disciples and the Creation of an American Religious Movement.

December 2017 288 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth | 978-1-4798-7970-0 | $40.00S (£34.00) In the Goldstein-Goren Series in American Jewish History History | Jewish Studies

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Religion and Mobility in Nineteenth-Century America

An engaging history of the Jews who forged their own religious culture on the American frontier Jews on the Frontier offers a religious history that begins in an unexpected place: on the road. Shari Rabin recounts the journey of Jewish people as they left Eastern cities and ventured into the American West and South during the 19th century. She brings to life the successes and obstacles of these travels, from the unprecedented economic opportunities to the anonymity and loneliness that complicated the many legal obligations of traditional Jewish life. Rabin argues that Jewish mobility during this time was pivotal to the development of American Judaism. In the absence of key institutions like synagogues or charitable organizations which had played such a pivotal role in assimilating East Coast immigrants, ordinary Jews on the frontier created religious life from scratch, expanding and transforming Jewish thought and practice in the process. Jews on the Frontier vividly recounts the story of a neglected era in American Jewish history, offering a new interpretation of American religions, rooted not in congregations or denominations, but in the politics and experiences of being on the move. Shari Rabin is Assistant Professor of Jewish Studies and Associate Director of the Pearlstine/Lipov Center for Southern Jewish Culture at the College of Charleston.

December 2017 208 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth | 978-1-4798-3047-3 | $37.00S (£32.00) In the North American Religions series History | Jewish Studies 1.800.996.NYU P


H i s t or y New In Paperback

Cl e a n a n d W h it e

A History of Environmental Racism in the United States Carl A. Zimring Unravels the origins of environmental racism When Joe Biden attempted to compliment Barack Obama by calling him “clean and articulate,” he unwittingly tapped into one of America’s most destructive racial stereotypes. Clean and White tells the history of the corrosive idea that whites are clean and those who are not white are dirty. From the age of Thomas Jefferson to the Memphis Public Workers strike of 1968 through to the present day, ideas about race and waste have shaped where people have lived, where they have worked, and how American society’s wastes have been managed. Carl A. Zimring draws on historical evidence from statesmen, scholars, sanitarians, novelists, activists, advertisements, and the United States Census of Population to reveal changing constructions of environmental racism. The consequences of these attitudes persisted and expanded through the twentieth century, shaping waste management systems and environmental inequalities that endure today. “Traces the always shifting, always intertwined definitions of whiteness and cleanliness from the Civil War to the present day.” —Pacific Standard Carl A. Zimring is Associate Professor of Sustainability Studies in the Department of Social Science and Associate Professor of Cultural Studies at the Pratt Institute. He is the author of Cash for Your Trash: Scrap Recycling in America and general editor of the Encyclopedia of Consumption and Waste: The Social Science of Garbage.

October 2017 288 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-7437-8 | $24.00S (£20.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-2694-0 History | Environmental Studies WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

Em p ire in the Air

Airline Travel and the African Diaspora Chandra D. Bhimull Examines the role that race played in the inception of the airline industry Empire in the Air is at once a history of aviation, and an examination of how air travel changed lives along the transatlantic corridor of the African diaspora. Focusing on Britain and its Caribbean colonies, Chandra Bhimull reveals how the black West Indies shaped the development of British Airways. Bhimull offers a unique analysis of early airline travel, illuminating the links among empire, aviation, and diaspora, and in doing so provides insights into how racially oppressed people experienced air travel. As a new technology, airline travel retained the racialist ideas and practices that were embedded in British imperialism, and these ideas shaped every aspect of how commercial aviation developed, from how airline routes were set, to who could travel easily and who could not. The author concludes with a look at airline travel today, suggesting that racism is still enmeshed in the banalities of contemporary flight. Chandra D. Bhimull is Associate Professor at Colby College, where she teaches in the Department of Anthropology and the African American Studies Program. She is a coeditor of Anthrohistory: Unsettling Knowledge, Questioning Disciplines.

December 2017 224 pages | 6 x 9 6 black & white illustrations Cloth | 978-14798-4347-3 | $45.00S (£39.00) In the Social Transformations in American Anthropology series History | Anthropology FAL L 2 0 1 7 • NYU PRESS

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L aw New In Paperback

Leg a l l y S tr a i g h t

Sexuality, Childhood, and the Cultural Value of Marriage Joe Rollins Argues that cultural conceptions of children— and childhood—played a key role in legalizing gay marriage Legally Straight offers a critical reading of the legal debates over lesbian and gay marriage in the United States. The book draws on key judicial opinions to trace how our understanding of heterosexuality and marriage has changed. Upon closer inspection, it seemed that the cultural value of marriage was becoming tarnished and the trouble appeared to center on one very specific issue: reproduction. As opponents of lesbian and gay marriage emphasized the link between marriage and accidental pregnancy, the evidence mounted, the arguments proliferated, and resistance began to turn against itself. Heterosexuality, it seemed for a moment, was little more than a set of palliative prescriptions for the worst of human behavior, and children became the victims. It thus became the province of the courts to reinforce the cultural value of marriage by resisting what came to be known as the “procreation argument,” the assertion that marriage exists primarily to regulate the unruly aspects of heterosexual reproduction. Cultural conceptions of children and childhood were being put at risk as gays and lesbians were denied marriage, so that writing lesbian and gay families into the marriage law became the better option. Joe Rollins is Associate Professor of Political Science at Queens College and the Graduate Center, CUNY. He has also served as Co-Editor of Women’s Studies Quarterly.

January 2018 208 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth | 978-0-8147-7598-1 | $50.00S (£43.00) In the Critical America series LGBT Studies

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Wed locked

The Perils of Marriage Equality Katherine Franke Compares the experiences of post-Civil War black and contemporary gay couples in their campaign for marriage rights The staggering string of victories by the gay rights movement’s campaign for marriage equality raises questions about what kind of freedom and equality the ability to marry can mobilize. Wedlocked turns to history to compare today’s samesex marriage movement to the experiences of newly emancipated black people in the mid-nineteenth century, when they were able to legally marry for the first time. Katherine Franke relates stories of former slaves’ marriages and cautionary tales for today’s rights movements. While “be careful what you wish for” is a prominent theme, the stories show how the rights-bearing subject is inevitably shaped by the very rights they bear, often in ways that reinforce racialized gender norms and stereotypes. These experiences highlight how the potential and the perils of being subject to legal regulation: rights—and specifically the right to marriage—can both burden and set you free. "[E]ven if same-sex marriage recognition does not exactly replicate the experiences of post-Civil War African American couples, the history of state-sanctioned African American marriage...remains an important challenge to the dominant narrative that recognition is a pure good.” —Times Literary Supplement Katherine Franke is the Sulzbacher Professor of Law and the Director of the Center for Gender and Sexuality Law at Columbia University. October 2017 288 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-1400-8 | $26.00S (£21.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-1574-6 In the Sexual Cultures series LGBT Studies 1.800.996.NYU P


Law

Being Watch e d

Legal Challenges to Government Surveillance Jeffrey L. Vagle A riveting history of the Supreme Court decision that set the legal precedent for citizen challenges to government surveillance The tension between national security and civil rights is nowhere more evident than in the fight over government domestic surveillance. Governments must be able to collect information at some level, but surveillance has become increasingly controversial due to its more egregious uses and abuses, which tips the balance toward increased—and sometimes total—government control. After decades of abuses by U.S. law enforcement and intelligence agencies were revealed to the public in the early 1970s, new legislation and lawsuits challenged the constitutionality of these programs. However, plaintiffs faced a formidable obstacle due to a principle that limits court access only to those who have standing, meaning they can show actual or imminent injury— a significant problem when evidence of the challenged program is secret. In Being Watched, Jeffrey L. Vagle draws on the legacy of the 1972 Supreme Court decision in Laird v. Tatum to tell the fascinating and disturbing story of jurisprudence related to the issue of standing in citizen challenges to government surveillance. It examines the facts of surveillance cases and the reasoning of the courts that heard them, and considers whether the obstacle of standing to surveillance challenges in U.S. courts can ever be overcome.

Jeffrey L. Vagle is Lecturer in Law and Executive Director of the Center for Technology, Innovation and Competition at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. His research interests include surveillance law, cryptography and cybersecurity law, electronic privacy, Internet architecture, and networked economies and societies.

Vagle journeys through a history of military domestic surveillance, tensions between the three branches of government, the powers of the presidency in times of war, and the power of individual citizens in the ongoing quest for the elusive freedom-organization balance. The history brings to light the remarkable number of similarities among the contexts in which government surveillance thrives, including overzealous military and intelligent agencies and an ideologically fractured Supreme Court. More broadly, Being Watched looks at our democratic system of government and its ability to remain healthy and intact during times of national crisis. A compelling history of a Supreme Court decision and its farreaching consequences, Being Watched is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the legal justifications for— and objections to—surveillance.

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December 2017 208 pages | 6 x 9 2 black & white illustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-0927-1 | $26.00A (£21.99) Current Affairs FAL L 2 0 1 7 • NYU PRESS

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L aw New in Paperback

Ho m e l e ssn e ss in New Yo rk Cit y Policymaking from Koch to de Blasio Thomas J. Main

Beyond Law and Rights Edited by Charles J. and Austin Sarat

With a new preface The story of New York City’s struggle to provide shelter for its homeless population Homelessness in New York City tells the remarkable story of how America’s largest city has struggled for more than thirty years to meet the crisis of modern homelessness through the landmark development of a municipal shelter system based on a court-enforced right to shelter. New York City now shelters more than 50,000 otherwise homeless people at an annual cost of more than $1 billion in the largest and most complex shelter system in the world. Establishing the right to shelter was a dramatic break with long established practice. Developing and managing the shelter system required the city to repeatedly overcome daunting challenges, from dealing with mentally ill street dwellers to confronting community opposition to shelter placement. The tale of how five mayors—Koch, Dinkins, Giuliani, Bloomberg and de Blasio—have wrestled with these problems is one of caution and hope: the task is difficult and success is never unqualified, but positive change is possible. Homelessness in New York City explains what happened —for good and sometimes less good—when New York established the right to shelter. "[Main's] attention to detail and balanced judgment makes this a valuable history of social-policy research." ­—City Journal Thomas J. Main is Associate Professor at the School of Public Affairs, Baruch College, City University of New York.

September 2017 288 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-4687-0 | $24.00A (£20.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-9647-9 Current Affairs | New York City

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Racial Reconciliation and the H ealing of a N ation

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Ogletree, Jr. The work at hand for bridging the racial divide in the United States

From Baltimore and Ferguson to Flint and Charleston, the dream of a post-racial era in America has run up against the continuing reality of racial antagonism. Current debates reveal uncertainty and ambivalence about the place and meaning of race in American culture, and also suggest that the work of racial reconciliation remains incomplete. Racial Reconciliation and the Healing of a Nation seeks to assess where we are in that work, examining sources of continuing racial antagonism among blacks and whites. It also highlights strategies that promise to promote racial reconciliation in the future. Contributors explore previously unconsidered perspectives on reconciliation, and connect identity politics, the rhetoric of race and difference, and structural inequities to our thinking about tolerance and respect. Going beyond an assessment of the capacity of law to facilitate racial reconciliation, Racial Reconciliation and the Healing of a Nation challenges readers to examine issues that fuel racial antagonism, as well as the factors that might facilitate racial reconciliation. Charles J. Ogletree, Jr. is the Jesse Climenko Professor of Law and Executive Director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice at Harvard Law School. Austin Sarat is Associate Dean of the Faculty and William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science at Amherst College. October 2017 224 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-4353-4 | $28.00S (£23.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-4463-0 | $89.00X (£77.00) In The Charles Hamilton Houston Institute Series on Race and Justice Law | African American Studies 1.800.996.NYU P


Me d i c i n e

Unequ al C o v e r a g e

The Experience of Health Care Reform in the United States Edited by Jessica M. Mulligan and Heide Castañeda Inside the Affordable Care Act’s impact on coverage, access to care, and systematic exclusion in our health care system The Affordable Care Act set off an unprecedented wave of health insurance enrollment as the most sweeping overhaul of the U.S. health insurance system since 1965. In the years since its enactment, some 20 million uninsured Americans gained access to coverage. And yet, the law remained unpopular and politically vulnerable. While the ACA extended social protections to some groups, its implementation was troubled and the act itself created new forms of exclusion. Access to affordable coverage options were highly segmented by state of residence, income, and citizenship status. Unequal Coverage documents the everyday experiences of individuals and families across the U.S. as they attempted to access coverage and care in the five years following the passage of the ACA. It argues that while the Affordable Care Act succeeded in expanding access to care, it did so unevenly, ultimately generating inequality and stratification. The volume investigates the outcomes of the ACA in communities throughout the country and provides up-close, intimate portraits of individuals and groups trying to access and provide health care for both the newly insured and those who remain uncovered. The contributors use the ACA as a lens to examine more broadly how social welfare policies in a multiracial and multiethnic democracy purport to be inclusive while simultaneously embracing certain kinds of exclusions.

Jessica M. Mulligan is Associate Professor of Health Policy and Management at Providence College. She is the author of Unmanageable Care: An Ethnography of Health Care Privatization in Puerto Rico (NYU Press, 2014), as well as multiple journal articles.

Unequal Coverage concludes with an examination of the Affordable Care Act’s uncertain legacy under the new Presidential administration and considers what the future may hold for the American health care system. The book illustrates lessons learned and reveals how the law became a flashpoint for battles over inequality, fairness, and the role of government.

“If there was ever a time to shed light on the policies fostering health care inequality in the United States, that time is now...This book will appeal to health policy students and scholars, but is also an engaging ethnographic work accessible to any reader interested in understanding the inequalities created by the U.S. healthcare system.”

Heide Castañeda is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of South Florida.

—Mark Nichter, University of Arizona December 2017 336 Pages | 6 x 9 13 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-4873-7 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-9700-1 | $89.00X (£77.00) In the Anthropologies of American Medicine: Culture, Power, and Practice series Current Affairs | Medicine WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

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Med i cine

Perso n a l i z e d Medicin e

C atch and Release

Barbara Prainsack

Lisa Jean Moore

Empowered Patients in the 21st Century?

Inside today’s data-driven personalized medicine, and the time, effort, and information required from patients to make it a reality Medicine has been personal long before the concept of “personalized medicine” became popular. Health professionals have always taken into consideration the individual characteristics of their patients when diagnosing and treating them. Patients have cared for themselves and for each other, contributed to medical research, and advocated for new treatments. Given this history, why has the notion of personalized medicine gained so much traction at the beginning of the new millennium? Personalized Medicine investigates the recent movement for patients’ involvement in how they are treated, diagnosed, and medicated; a movement that accompanies the increasingly popular idea that people should be proactive, well-informed participants in their own healthcare. Bringing together empirical work and critical scholarship from medicine, public health, data governance, bioethics, and digital sociology, Personalized Medicine analyzes the challenges of personalization driven by patient work and data. This compelling volume proposes an understanding that uses novel technological practices to foreground the needs and interests of patients, instead of being ruled by them. Barbara Prainsack is Professor of Global Health & Social Medicine at King’s College London.

December 2017 288 pages | 6 x 9 11 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-1458-9 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-1487-9 | $89.00X (£77.00) In the Biopolitics series Medicine | Sociology

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The Enduring Yet Vulnerable Horseshoe Crab

The unexpected and fascinating interspecies relationship between humans and horseshoe crabs Horseshoe crabs are considered both a prehistoric and indicator species. They have not changed in tens of millions of years and provide useful data to scientists who monitor the health of the environment. From the pharmaceutical industry to paleontology, to fishing, the horseshoe crab has made vast, but largely unknown, contributions to human life and our shared ecosystem. Catch and Release examines how these intersections steer the trajectory of both species’ lives, and futures. Based on interviews with conservationists, field biologists, ecologists, and paleontologists, noted ethnographer Lisa Jean Moore shows how humans literally harvest the life out of the horseshoe crabs. The book details the biomedical bleeding of crabs; how they are caught, drained of 40% of their blood, and then released back into their habitat. The model of catch and release is essential. Horseshoe crabs cannot be bred in captivity and can only survive in their own ecosystems. Moore shows how horseshoe crabs are used as an exploitable resource, and are now considered a “vulnerable” species. An investigation of how humans approach animals that are essential for their survival, Catch and Release questions whether humans should have divine, moral, or ethical claims to any living being in their path. Lisa Jean Moore is Professor of Sociology and Women’s Studies at Purchase College, State University of New York. She is author of Buzz: Urban Beekeeping and the Power of the Bee. January 2018 224 pages | 6 x 9 28 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-4847-8 | $28.00S (£23.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-7630-3 | $89.00X (£77.00) Medicine | Nature 1.800.996.NYU P


So c i a l Sc i e n c e

Ska teboardi n g L A

Inside Professional Street Skateboarding Gregory J. Snyder Inside the complex and misunderstood world of professional street skateboarding On a sunny Sunday in Los Angeles, a crew of skaters and videographers watch as one of them attempts to land a “heel flip” over a fire hydrant on a sidewalk in front of the Biltmore Hotel. A staff member of the hotel demands they leave and picks up his phone to call the police. Not only does the skater land the trick, but he does so quickly, and spares everyone the unwanted stress of having to deal with the cops. This is not an uncommon occurrence in skateboarding, which is illegal in most American cities and this interaction is just part of the process of being a professional street skater. This is just one of Gregory Snyder’s experiences from eight years inside the world of professional street skateboarding: a highly refined, athletic and aesthetic pursuit, from which a large number of people profit. Skateboarding LA details the history of skateboarding, describes basic and complex tricks, tours some of LA's most famous spots, and provides an enthusiastic appreciation of this dangerous and creative practice. Particularly concerned with public spaces, Snyder shows that skateboarding offers cities much more than petty vandalism and exaggerated claims of destruction. Rather, skateboarding draws highly talented young people from around the globe to skateboarding cities, building a diverse and wide-reaching community of skateboarders, filmmakers, photographers, writers, and entrepreneurs. Snyder also argues that as stewards of public plazas and parks, skateboarders deter homeless encampments and drug dealers. In one stunning case, skateboarders transformed the West LA Courthouse, with Nike’s assistance, into a skateable public space. Through interviews with current and former professional skateboarders, Snyder vividly expresses their passion, dedication and creativity. Especially in relation to the city's architectural features—ledges, banks, gaps, stairs and handrails—they are constantly re-imagining and repurposing these urban spaces in order to perform their increasingly difficult tricks. For anyone interested in this dynamic and daunting activity, Skateboarding LA is an amazing ride.

WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

Gregory J. Snyder is Associate Professor of Sociology at Baruch College, City University of New York.

Also of interest G r a ffit i Liv e s Beyond the Tag in New York’s Urban Underground Gregory J. Snyder “Graffiti writers...cannot be

understood merely as practitioners of vandalism and social disorder, but also as members of a diverse subculture who, in many cases, have used their experiences to build legitimate careers.” —The New York Times

252 pages, 60 illustrations Paper | 978-0-8147-4046-0 | $22.00 In the Alternative Criminology series

December 2017 320 pages | 6 x 9 54 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-0-8147-3791-0 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-0-8147-6986-7 | $89.00X (£77.00) In the Alternative Criminology series Criminology | Sports FAL L 2 0 1 7 • NYU PRESS

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S oci al Sc ie nce New in Paperback

Leg a l i z i n g L G B T F amilies How the Law Shapes Parenthood Amanda K. Baumle and D’Lane R. Compton In-depth interviews examine the role of the law in the lives of LGBT parents The decision to have a child is seldom a simple one, often fraught with complexities regarding emotional readiness, finances, marital status, and compatibility with life and career goals. For LGBT individuals, parenting is also saturated with legality —including the initial decision of whether to have a child, how to have a child, whether one’s relationship with their child will be recognized, and everyday acts of parenting. Through interviews with 137 LGBT parents, Amanda K. Baumle and D’Lane R. Compton examine the role of the law in the lives of LGBT parents and how individuals use the law when making decisions about family formation or parenting. Baumle and Compton explore the ways in which LGBT parents participate in the process of constructing legality through accepting, modifying, or rejecting legal meanings about their families. They conclude that legality is constructed through a complex interplay of legal context, social networks, individual characteristics, and familial desires. Ultimately, the stories of LGBT parents in this book reflect a rich and varied relationship between the law, the state, and the private family goals of individuals. “Meticulously document[s] the great power that law has on LGBT families.” —Brian Powell, author of Counted Out

C hina, the U nited States, and the Future of Latin Am er ica U.S.-China Relations, Volume III Edited by David

B. H. Denoon Provides insight into U.S. and Chinese involvement in aid, trade, and investment in Latin America

In recent years, China has become the largest trading partner for more than half the countries in Latin America, and demonstrated major commitments in aid and direct investment in various parts of the region. China has also made a number of strategic commitments to countries like Nicaragua, Cuba, and Venezuela which have long-standing policies opposing U.S. influence in the region. China, the United States, and the Future of Latin America posits that this activity is a direct challenge to the role of the U.S. in Latin America and the Caribbean. Part of a three-volume series analyzing U.S.-China relations in parts of the world where neither country is dominant, this volume looks at the interactions between the U.S., China, and Latin America. China’s new global reach and its ambitions, as well as the U.S. response, are examined in detail. A nuanced analysis of current complexities and future implications, China, the United States and the Future of Latin America provides readers with varied perspectives on the changing economic and strategic picture in Latin America and the Caribbean. David B. H. Denoon is Professor of Politics and Economics at New York University

Amanda K. Baumle is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Houston. D’Lane R. Compton is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of New Orleans. November 2017 368 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-1181-6 | $28.00S (£23.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-5764-7 Sociology | LGBT Studies

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October 2017 432 pages | 6 x 9 29 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-2164-8 | $38.00S (£33.00) Cloth | 978-1-4798-9928-9 | $99.00X (£85.00) In the U.S.-China Relations series Current Affairs | Economics 1.800.996.NYU P


So c i a l Sc i e n c e

LGB T Q P o l i ti cs

Policy D r ift

A Critical Reader Edited by Marla

Brettschneider, Susan Burgess and Christine Keating A definitive collection of original essays on queer politics From Harvey Milk to ACT UP to Proposition 8, no political change in the last two decades has been as rapid as the advancement of civil rights for LGBTQ people. As we face a critical juncture in progressive activism, political science, which has been slower than most disciplines to study the complexity of queer politics, must grapple with the shifting landscape of LGBTQ rights and inclusion. LGBTQ Politics analyzes both the successes and obstacles to building the LGBTQ movement over the past twenty years, offering analyses that point to possibilities for the movement’s future. Essays cover a range of topics, including activism, law, and coalition-building, and draw on subfields such as American politics, comparative politics, political theory, and international relations. A comprehensive, thought-provoking collection, LGBTQ Politics: A Critical Reader will give rise to continued critical discussion of the parameters of LGBTQ politics. Marla Brettschneider is Professor of Political Philosophy with a joint position in Women’s Studies and Political Science at the University of New Hampshire. Susan Burgess is Professor of Political Science at Ohio University. Christine (Cricket) Keating is Associate Professor of Gender, Women’s, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Washington.

September 2017 592 pages | 7 X 10 68 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-3409-9 | $35.00S (£29.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-9387-4 | $99.00X (£85.00) Politics | LGBT Studies WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

Shared Powers and the Making of U.S. Law and Policy Norma M. Riccucci The role of formal and informal institutional forces in changing three areas of U.S. public policy: privacy rights, civil rights and climate policy There is no finality to the public policy process. Although it’s often assumed that once a law is enacted it is implemented faithfully, even policies believed to be stable can change or drift in unexpected directions. Much of the research in recent decades ignores the impact of large-scale, slowmoving, secular forces in political, social, and economic environments on public policy. In Policy Drift, Norma Riccucci sheds light on how institutional forces collectively contributed to major change in three key areas of U.S. policy (privacy rights, civil rights, and climate policy) without any new policy explicitly being written. Invariably, implementations of new policies are embedded within a political landscape. Political actors, motivated by social and economic factors, may explicitly employ strategies to shift the direction of existing public polices or derail them altogether. Some segments of the population will benefit from this process, while others will not; thus, “policy drifts” carry significant consequences for social and economic change. A comprehensive account of inadvertent changes to privacy rights, civil rights, and climate policy, Policy Drift demonstrates how unanticipated levers of change can modify the status quo in public policy. Norma M. Riccucci is Board of Governors Distinguished Professor in the School of Public Affairs and Public Administration at Rutgers University-Newark.

February 2018 304 pages | 6 x 9 11 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-3983-4 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-4504-0 | $89.00X (£77.00) Politics FAL L 2 0 1 7 • NYU PRESS

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S oci al Sc ie nce

Ci t i z e n s b u t N ot American s

Gend er Reckonings

Nilda Flores-Gonzalez

Edited by

Race and Belonging among Latino Millennials

James W. Messerschmidt, Patricia Yancey Martin, Michael A. Messner and Raewyn Connell

An exploration of how race shapes Latino millennials’ notions of national belonging Latino millennials constitute the second largest segment of the millennial population. By sheer numbers they will inevitably have a significant social, economic, and political impact on U.S. society. Beyond basic demographics, however, not much is known about how they make sense of themselves as Americans. In Citizens but Not Americans, Nilda Flores-González examines how Latino millennials understand race, experience race, and develop notions of belonging. Based on nearly one hundred interviews, Flores-González argues that though these groups of young Latina/os are legal citizens, they do not feel they are part of the “American project,” and are forever outsiders looking in. The voices of Latino millennials reveal their understanding of racialization along three dimensions—as an ethno-race, as a racial middle and as alien citizens—which keeps them outside of the boundaries of how an “American” is defined. Their stories also point to how these youths will propel the Latino population forward exponentially as they have children over the next two decades. Challenging current thinking about race, the racial structure, and the color line, Citizens but Not Americans significantly contributes to our understanding of the Latino millennial generation and makes a powerful argument about the nature of race in America. Nilda Flores-González is Associate Professor of Sociology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. October 2017 208 pages | 6 x 9 2 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-4077-9 | $27.00S (£22.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-2552-3 | $89.00X (£77.00) In the Latina/o Sociology series Sociology | Latino Studies

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New Social Theory and Research

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Vivid narratives, fresh insights, and new theories on where gender theory and research stand today Gender Reckonings aims to map new directions for understanding gender and sexuality within a more pragmatic, dynamic, and socially relevant framework. It shows how gender relations must be understood on a large scale as well as in intimate detail. The contributors return to the basics, questioning how gender patterns change, how we can realize gender equality, and how the structures of gender impact daily life. Gender Reckonings combines the insights of gender and sexuality scholars from different generations, fields, and world regions. The editors and contributors are leading social scientists from six continents, and the book gives vivid accounts of the changing politics of gender in different communities. Rich in empirical detail and novel thinking, Gender Reckonings is a lasting resource for students, researchers, activists, policymakers, and everyone concerned with gender justice. James W. Messerschmidt is Professor of Sociology and Women’s and Gender Studies at the University of Southern Maine. Patricia Yancey Martin is Emerita Professor of Sociology at Florida State University, Tallahassee. Michael A. Messner is Professor of Sociology and Gender Studies at the University of Southern California. Raewyn Connell is Professor Emerita at University of Sydney and Life Member of the National Tertiary Education Union. February 2018 384 Pages | 6 x 9 1 black & white illustration Paper | 978-1-4798-0934-9 | $35.00S (£29.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-9714-8 | $99.00X (£85.00) Sociology | Gender Studies 1.800.996.NYU P


So c i a l Sc i e n c e

De ath M ak e s t h e N e w s

How the Media Censor and Display the Dead Jessica M. Fishman A behind-the-scenes account of how death is presented in the media Death is considered one of the most newsworthy events, but words do not tell the whole story. Pictures are also at the epicenter of journalism, and when photographers and editors illustrate fatalities, it often raises questions about how they distinguish between a “fit” and “unfit” image of death. Death Makes the News is the story of this controversial news practice: picturing the dead. Jessica Fishman uncovers the surprising editorial and political forces that structure how the news and media cover death. The patterns are striking, overturning long-held assumptions about which deaths are newsworthy and raising fundamental questions about the role that news images play in our society. In a look behind the curtain of newsrooms, Fishman observes editors and photojournalists from different types of organizations as they deliberate over which images of death make the cut, and why. She also investigates over 30 years of photojournalism in the tabloid and patrician press to establish when the dead are shown and whose dead body is most newsworthy, illustrating her findings with high-profile news events, including recent plane crashes, earthquakes, hurricanes, homicides, political unrest, and war-time attacks.

Jessica M. Fishman, Ph.D., holds a joint appointment at the University of Pennsylvania’s Perelman School of Medicine and Annenberg School for Communication, where she studies behavioral and social science, including mass media effects.

Death Makes the News reveals that much of what we think we know about the news is wrong: while the patrician press claims that they do not show dead bodies, they are actually more likely than the tabloid press to show them—even though the tabloids actually claim to have no qualms showing these bodies. Dead foreigners are more likely to be shown than American bodies. At the same time, there are other unexpected but vivid patterns that offer insight into persistent editorial forces that routinely structure news coverage of death. An original view on the depiction of dead bodies in the media, Death Makes the News opens up new ways of thinking about how death is portrayed.

November 2017 336 pages | 6 x 9 67 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-0-8147-6045-1 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-0-8147-7075-7 | $89.00X (£77.00) Sociology | Journalism WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

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S oci al Sc ie nce

Mul t ir a c i a l P a re n t s

Mixed Families, Generational Change, and the Future of Race Miri Song

Fem inists Rethink the N eolib er al State

Inequality, Exclusion, and Change Edited by Leela

The views and experiences of multiracial people as parents The world’s multiracial population is considered to be one of the fastest growing of all ethnic groups. In the United States alone, it is estimated that over 20% of the population will be considered “mixed race” by 2050. Public figures— such as former President Barack Obama and Hollywood actress Ruth Negga—further highlight the highly diverse backgrounds of those classified under the umbrella term of “multiracial.” Multiracial Parents considers how mixed-race parents identify with and draw from their cultural backgrounds in raising and socializing their children. A revealing portrait of how multiracial identity is and is not transmitted to children, Multiracial Parents focuses on couples comprised of one white and one non-white minority, who were mostly “first generation mixed,” situating her findings in a trans-Atlantic framework. By drawing on detailed narratives about the parents’ children and family lives, this book explores what it means to be multiracial, and whether multiracial identity and status will matter for multiracial people’s children. A critical perspective on contemporary multiracial families, Multiracial Parents raises fundamental questions about the future significance of racial boundaries and identities. Miri Song is Professor of Sociology at the University of Kent.

Fernandes A rich set of feminist perspectives on the varied and often contradictory nature of state practices, structures, and ideologies

Growing socio-economic inequality and exclusion are defining features of the twenty-first century. While debates on globalization, free trade, and economic development have been linked to the paradigm of “neo-liberalism,” it does not explain all the forms of social change that have been unfolding in comparative contexts. Feminists Rethink the Neoliberal State provides a timely intervention into discussions about the boundaries, practices, and nature of the post-liberalization state, suggesting that an understanding of economic policies, the corresponding rise of socio-economic inequality, and the possibilities for change requires an in-depth reconceptualization. Drawing on original field research both globally and within the United States, the essays develop an interdisciplinary approach that treats an understanding of historicallyspecific forms of inequality—such as gender, race, caste, sexuality and class—as integral to, rather than as aftereffects of, the policies and ideologies associated with the “neoliberal project.” A truly international and interdisciplinary volume, Feminists Rethink the Neoliberal State deepens our understanding of how policies of economic liberalization shape and produce various forms of inequality. Leela Fernandes is the Glenda Dickerson Collegiate Professor of Women’s Studies and Professor of Political Science at the University of Michigan.

November 2017 192 pages | 6 x 9 3 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-2590-5 | $27.00S (£22.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-4054-0 | $89.00X (£77.00) Sociology | Race and Ethnicity

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January 2018 272 pages | 6 x 9 3 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-9530-4 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-0015-5 | $89.00X (£77.00) Sociology | Politics 1.800.996.NYU P


Me d i a St u d i e s

Alg or ith ms o f O p p re ss i o n How Search Engines Reinforce Racism Safiya Umoja Noble A revealing look at how negative biases against women of color are embedded in search engine results and algorithms Run a Google search for “black girls”—what will you find? “Big Booty” and other sexually explicit terms are likely to come up as top search suggestions. But, if you type in “white girls,” the results are radically different. The porn sites and un-moderated discussions about “why black women are so sassy” or “why black women are so angry” present a disturbing portrait of black womanhood in modern society. In Algorithms of Oppression, Safiya Umoja Noble challenges the idea that search engines like Google offer an equal playing field for all forms of ideas, identities, and activities. Data discrimination is a real social problem; Noble argues that the combination of private interests in promoting certain sites, along with the monopoly status of a relatively small number of Internet search engines, leads to a biased set of search algorithms that privilege whiteness and discriminate against people of color, specifically women of color. Through an analysis of textual and media searches as well as extensive research on paid online advertising, Noble exposes a culture of racism and sexism in the way discoverability is created online. As search engines and their related companies grow in importance—operating as a source for email, a major vehicle for primary and secondary school learning, and beyond—understanding and reversing these disquieting trends and discriminatory practices is of utmost importance. An original, surprising and, at times, disturbing account of bias on the internet, Algorithms of Oppression contributes to our understanding of how racism is created, maintained, and disseminated in the 21st century.

“Compelling and accessible...raises crucial questions regarding the power and control of algorithms, and is essential reading for understanding the way media works in the contemporary moment.“ —Sarah Banet-Weiser, author of Authentic™: The Politics of Ambivalence in a Brand Culture

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Safiya Umoja Noble is Assistant Professor in the Department of Information Studies in the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles. Noble is the co-editor of two books, The Intersectional Internet: Race, Sex, Culture and Class Online and Emotions, Technology & Design. “All search results are not created equal...Read this book to understand how supposedly race neutral zeros and ones simply don’t add up.” —Matthew W. Hughey, author of White Bound: Nationalists, Antiracists, and the Shared Meanings of Race

February 2018 256 pages | 6 x 9 56 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-3724-3 | $28.00S (£23.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-4994-9 | $89.00X (£77.00) Media Studies | Science & Technology | Sociology FAL L 2 0 1 7 • NYU PRESS

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Med i a Studies

Fand o m

Identities and Communities in a Mediated World Second Edition

Gray, Cornel Sandvoss, and C. Lee Harrington

Antisocial M ed ia

Anxious Labor in the Digital Economy Greg Goldberg

Edited by Jonathan

A completely updated edition of a seminal work on fans and communities Whether we follow our favorite celebrities on Twitter, attend fan conventions such as Comic Con, or simply wait with bated breath for the next episode of our favorite television drama—we are all fans. Recognizing that fandom is a universal subculture, the contributions in this book demonstrate that understanding fans is vital to an understanding of media audiences, use, engagement, and participatory culture in a digital age. Including 16 new, original essays covering topics such as activism directed at racism in sports fandom, fan/ producer interactions at Comic Con, the impact of new technologies, and the politics and legality of fanfic, this wide-ranging collection provides diverse approaches to fandom for anyone seeking to understand modern life in our increasingly mediated, globalized, and binge-watching world. Praise for the First Edition: “Fandom explores the multidimensional aspects of the fascination, enthrallment, obsession that fans have with their various interests.” —Journal of Mass Communication Quarterly Jonathan Gray is Professor of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and author of Show Sold Separately: Promos, Spoilers, and Other Media Paratexts (NYU Press, 2010).

The debate surrounding the transformation of work at the hands of digital technology and the anxieties brought forth by automation, the sharing economy, and the exploitation of leisure We have been told that digital technology is now threatening the workplace as we know it, that advances in computing and robotics will soon make human labor obsolete, that the sharing economy, exemplified by Uber and Airbnb, will degrade the few jobs that remain, and that the boundaries between work and play are collapsing as Facebook and Instagram infiltrate our free time. In this timely critique, Greg Goldberg examines the fear that work is being eviscerated by digital technology. He argues that it is not actually the degradation or disappearance of work that is so troubling, but rather the underlying notion that society itself is under attack, and more specifically the bonds of responsibility on which social relations depend. Rather than rushing to the defense of the social, however, Goldberg instead imagines the appeal of refusing the hard work of being a responsible and productive member of society. Greg Goldberg is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Wesleyan University, and Affiliated Fellow at Yale University’s Information Society Project.

C. Lee Harrington is Professor of Sociology at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. Cornel Sandvoss is Subject Leader in Media,Communication and Cultural Studies at the University of Surrey. August 2017 448 pages | 6 x 9 6 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-1276-9 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-8113-0 | $89.00X (£77.00) Previous edition: Paper | 978-0-8147-3182-6 Media Studies

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January 2018 224 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-2190-7 | $27.00S (£22.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-2998-9 | $89.00X (£77.00) In the Postmillennial Pop series Media Studies | Social Science 1.800.996.NYU P


Me d i a St u d i e s

O p en TV

Innovation Beyond Hollywood and the Rise of Web Televsion Aymar Jean Christian How the internet transformed television Before HBO’s hit show Insecure, Issa Rae’s comedy about being a nerdy black woman debuted as a YouTube web series The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl, her response to the absence of diverse black characters on the small screen. Broad City, a feminist sitcom now on Comedy Central, originated as a web series on YouTube, developed directly out of funny women Ilana Glazer and Abbi Jacobson’s real-life friendship. These unconventional stories took advantage of the freedom afforded outside the traditional television system: online. Open TV shows how we have left “the network era” far behind and entered the networked era, with the web opening up new possibilities for independent producers, entrepreneurs, and media audiences. Based on interviews with writers, producers, show-runners, and network executives, visits to festivals and award shows, and the experience of producing his own series, Aymar Jean Christian argues that the web brought innovation to television by opening up series development to new producers, fans, and sponsors who had previously been excluded. Online access to distribution provides creative freedom for indie producers, allows for more diverse storytelling from marginalized communities, and introduces new ways of releasing and awarding shows. Open TV is essential reading for anyone interested in the changing environment of television and how the internet can inspire alternatives to what’s on TV tonight.

Aymar Jean Christian is Assistant Professor at Northwestern University and a Peabody Fellow. His work on television has been published in numerous journals, including The International Journal of Communication, Cinema Journal, and Continuum. He leads Open TV (beta), a platform for independent artists, whose partners have included the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago and City of Chicago.

January 2018 320 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-1597-5 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-7422-4 | $89.00X (£77.00) In the Postmillennial Pop series Media Studies WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

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Med i a Studies

D i s ab i l i ty Me di a St u dies

Keyword s for Latina/ o Stud ies

Edited by Elizabeth Ellcessor and Bill Kirkpatrick

Edited by Deborah

Introduces key ideas and offers a sense of the new frontiers and questions in the emerging field of disability media studies Disability Media Studies articulates the formation of a new field of study, based in the rich traditions of media, cultural, and disability studies. Necessarily interdisciplinary and diverse, this collection weaves together work from scholars from a variety of disciplinary homes, into a broader conversation about exploring media artifacts in relation to disability. The book provides a comprehensive overview for anyone interested in the study of disability and media today. Case studies include familiar contemporary examples—such as “Iron Man 3,” Lady Gaga, and Oscar Pistorius— as well as historical media, independent disability media, reality television, and media technologies. The contributors consider disability representation, the role of media in forming cultural assumptions about ability, the construction of disability via media technologies, and how disabled audiences respond to particular media artifacts. Disability Media Studies is a crucial text for those interested in this flourishing field, and will pave the way for a greater understanding of disability media studies and its critical concepts and conversations. Elizabeth Ellcessor is Assistant Professor of Cinema and Media Studies at Indiana University—Bloomington and the author of Restricted Access: Media, Disability, and the Politics of Participation (NYU Press, 2016).

Vargas, Nancy R. Mirabal and Lawrence La Fountain-Stokes A vocabulary of Latina/o studies Keywords for Latina/o Studies enhances the ongoing dialogue within a rapidly growing and changing field. The keywords included in this collection represent established and emergent terms, categories, and concepts that undergird Latina/o studies; they delineate the shifting contours of a field best thought of as an intellectual imaginary and experiential project of social and cultural identities within the U.S. academy. Bringing together 63 essays, from humanists, historians, anthropologists, sociologists, among others, each focused on a single term, the volume reveals the broad range of the field while also illuminating the tensions and contestations surrounding issues of language, politics, and histories of colonization, specific to this area of study. From “borderlands” and “migration,” to “citizenship” and “mestizaje,” this accessible volume will be informative for those who are new to Latina/o studies, as well as provide a valuable resource for scholars to expand their knowledge and critical engagement with the dynamic transformations in the field. Deborah R. Vargas is Associate Professor in the Department of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Riverside. Nancy Raquel Mirabal is Associate Professor in the American Studies Department and Director of the US Latina/o Studies Program at the University of Maryland.

Bill Kirkpatrick is Associate Professor of Communication at Denison University.

Lawrence La Fountain-Stokes is Associate Professor of American Culture, Romance Languages and Literatures, and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan.

October 2017 416 pages | 6 x 9 16 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-4938-3 | $35.00S (£29.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-6782-0 | $99.00X (£85.00) Media Studies

December 2017 288 pages | 8 x 8.5 Paper | 978-1-4798-8330-1 | $27.00S (£22.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-6604-5 | $89.00X (£77.00) In the Keywords series Latino Studies | American Studies

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A m e r i c a n St u d i e s

The A r t of C o n f e s s i o n

The Performance of Self from Robert Lowell to Reality TV Christopher Grobe The story of a new style of art—and a new way of life—in postwar America: confessionalism What do midcentury “confessional” poets have in common with today’s reality TV stars? They share an inexplicable urge to make their lives an open book, and also a sense that this book can never be finished. Christopher Grobe argues that, in postwar America, artists like these forged a new way of being in the world. Identity became a kind of work—always ongoing, never complete—to be performed on the public stage. The Art of Confession tells the history of this cultural shift and of the movement it created in American art: confessionalism. Like realism or romanticism, confessionalism began in one art form, but soon pervaded them all: poetry and comedy in the 1950s and ’60s, performance art in the ’70s, theater in the ’80s, television in the ’90s, and online video and social media in the 2000s. Everywhere confessionalism went, it stood against autobiography, the art of the closed book. Instead of just publishing, these artists performed—with, around, and against the text of their lives. A blend of cultural history, literary criticism, and performance theory, The Art of Confession explores iconic works of art and draws surprising connections among artists who may seem far apart, but who were influenced directly by one another. Studying extraordinary art alongside ordinary experiences of self-betrayal and -revelation, Christopher Grobe argues that a tradition of “confessional performance” unites poets with comedians, performance artists with social media users, reality TV stars with actors—and all of them with us. There is art, this book shows, in our most artless acts.

Christopher Grobe is Assistant Professor of English at Amherst College. His scholarly essays have appeared in PMLA, Theater, and Theatre Survey. It used to be that people told the story of their lives in books. More and more they perform them instead: on stage, on TV, on social media. Today, even people who write books about themselves basically sign this contract: that (if all goes well) they’ll also perform on talk shows, at readings, and, really, anywhere an audience wants them. I’m asking: How did this happen? And once people do think of their lives this way (that is, as something to be performed) how does it change our understanding of what a self even is? Art imitates life, but it also shows us how to live. That’s why The Art of Confession is about more than a “confessional” movement in art. It’s also about a “confessional” way of life—one we now take for granted in the age of Facebook and reality TV. Christopher Grobe November 2017 320 pages | 6 x 9 35 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-8208-3 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-2917-0 | $89.00X (£77.00) In the Performance and American Cultures series Literary Studies | Performing Arts

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A meri ca n Studie s New in Paperback

New in Paperback

The Secret Life of Stor ies

A B o d y, U n do ne

Living On After Great Pain Christina Crosby A compelling account of creating a life through writing, memory, and desire In the early evening on October 1, 2003, Christina Crosby was three miles into a seventeen mile bicycle ride, intent on reaching her goal of 1,000 miles for the riding season. As she crested a hill, she caught a branch in the spokes of her bicycle, which instantly pitched her to the pavement. Her chin took the full force of the blow, and her head snapped back. In that instant, she was paralyzed. In A Body, Undone, Crosby puts into words a broken body that seems beyond the reach of language and understanding. She writes about a body shot through with neurological pain, disoriented in time and space, incapacitated by paralysis and deadened sensation. To address this foreign body, she calls upon the readerly pleasures of narrative, critical feminist and queer thinking, and the concentrated language of lyric poetry. Deeply unsentimental, Crosby communicates in unflinching prose the experience of "diving into the wreck" of her body to acknowledge grief, and loss, but also to recognize the beauty, fragility, and dependencies of all human bodies. "Part grueling diary of living with chronic pain and part celebration of survival, this is a complicated understanding of what it means to change your definition of living while living through it." —Elle Christina Crosby is a Professor of English and Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Wesleyan University. She is the author of The Ends of History: Victorians and the 'Woman Question'. October 2017 208 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-4798-5316-8 | $14.95T (£12.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-3353-5 In the Sexual Cultures series Literary Studies | Memoir

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From Don Quixote to Harry Potter, How Understanding Intellectual Disability Transforms the Way We Read Michael Bérubé

How an understanding of intellectual disability can transform our understanding of narrative

Narrative informs everything we think, do, plan, remember, and imagine. Some argue that the capacity to understand narrative is innate to our species; others claim that while that might be so, the invention of writing then re-wired our brains. In The Secret Life of Stories, Michael Bérubé tells a dramatically different tale, in a compelling account of how an understanding of intellectual disability can transform our understanding of narrative. Instead of focusing on characters with disabilities, he shows how ideas about intellectual disability inform an astonishingly wide array of narrative strategies, providing a new and startling way of thinking through questions of time, self-reflexivity, and motive in the experience of reading. Armed only with the tools of close reading, Bérubé demonstrates the immense possibilities in the ways disability is deployed within fiction, finding in them powerful meditations on what it means to be a social being, a sentient creature with an awareness of mortality and causality—and sentience itself. Persuasive and witty, Michael Bérubé engages Harry Potter fans and scholars of literature alike. For all readers, The Secret Life of Stories will fundamentally change the way we think about the way we read. “[A] concise, fresh, and deeply informed look at how we read.” —STARRED Kirkus Reviews Michael Bérubé is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of Literature and Director of the Institute for the Arts and Humanities at Penn State University. He is the author of several books. January 2018 240 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-4798-3273-6 | $17.00S (£14.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-2361-1 Literary Studies 1.800.996.NYU P


A m e r i c a n St u d i e s

Cr i p T i m e s

The Pr actices of H op e

Robert McRuer

Christopher Castiglia

Disability, Globalization, and Resistance

Contends that disability is a central but misunderstood element of global austerity politics Broadly attentive to the political and economic shifts of the last several decades, Robert McRuer asks how disability activists, artists, and social movements generate change and resist the dominant forms of globalization in an age of austerity, or “crip times.” Throughout Crip Times, McRuer considers how transnational queer disability theory and culture provide important and generative sites for both contesting austerity politics and imagining alternatives. The book engages various cultural flashpoints, including the spectacle surrounding the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games; the murder trial of South African Paralympian Oscar Pistorius; the photography of Brazilian artist Livia Radwanski; the defiance of Chilean students demanding free and accessible education; and the problematic rhetoric of “aspiration” dependent upon both able-bodied and disabled figurations that emerged in Thatcher’s England. Crip Times asserts that disabled people themselves are demanding that disability be central to our understanding of political economy and uneven development and suggests that, in some locations, their demand for disability justice is starting to register. Ultimately, McRuer argues that a politics of austerity will always generate the compulsion to fortify borders and to separate a narrowly defined “us” in need of protection from “them.”

Literary Criticism in Disenchanted Times

Offers a positive approach to literary criticism At a moment when the “hermeneutics of suspicion” is under fire in literary studies, The Practices of Hope encourages an alternative approach that, rather than abandoning critique altogether, relinquishes its commitment to disenchantment. As an alternative, Castiglia offers hopeful reading, a combination of idealism and imagination that retains its analytic edge yet moves beyond nay-saying to articulate the values that shape our scholarship and creates the possible worlds that animate genuine social critique. Drawing on a variety of critics from the Great Depression to the Vietnam War, from Granville Hicks and Constance Rourke to Lewis Mumford, C.L.R. James, Charles Feidelson, and Richard Poirier, Castiglia demonstrates that their criticism simultaneously denounced the social conditions of the Cold War United States and proposed ideal worlds as more democratic alternatives. Organized around a series of terms that have become anathema to critics—nation, liberalism, humanism, symbolism—The Practices of Hope shows how they were employed in criticism’s “usable past” to generate an alternative critique, a practice of hope. Christopher Castiglia is Distinguished Professor of English and Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Pennsylvania State University.

Robert McRuer is Professor of English at George Washington University. He is the author of Crip Theory: Cultural Signs of Queerness and Disability (NYU Press, 2006). January 2018 320 pages | 6 x 9 49 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-7415-6 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-2631-5 | $89.00X (£77.00) In the Crip: New Directions in Disability Studies series Literary Studies WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

September 2017 240 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-0355-2 | $28.00S (£23.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-1827-3 | $89.00X (£77.00) Literary Studies FAL L 2 0 1 7 • NYU PRESS

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A meri ca n Studie s

T he F i l i p i n o P r imit ive

Accumulation and Resistance in the American Museum Sarita Echavez See How the practice of collecting and showing the Filipino “primitive” shaped the foundations of American knowledge Nowhere can we appreciate so easily the intertwined nature of the triple forces of knowledge accumulation— capital, colonial, and racial—than in the imperial museum, where the objects of accumulation remain materially, visibly preserved. Sarita Echavez See maintains that it is this material collection of artifacts associated with the racial, colonial primitive that forms the foundation of American knowledge production. Taking us through the Philippine collections at the University of Michigan Natural History Museum and the Frank Murphy Memorial Museum, also in Michigan, See reveals these exhibits as both allegory and real cases of the primitive accumulation subtending imperial American knowledge, just as the extraction of Filipino labor contributes to American capitalist colonialism. With this understanding of the Filipino foundations of the development of an American accumulative drive toward power and knowledge, we can appreciate the value of Filipino American cultural producers like Carlos Bulosan, Stephanie Syjuco, and Ma-Yi Theater Company who have created incisive parodies of an accumulative epistemology, even as they articulate powerful alternative, anti-accumulative social ecologies.

The Pr actice of Islam in Am er ica An Introduction

Edited by Edward

E. Curtis IV

An introduction to the ways in which ordinary Muslim Americans practice their faith Muslims have long been part of the United States, but very little is known about how Muslim Americans practice their religion. How do they pray? What’s it like to go on pilgrimage to Mecca? What rituals accompany the birth of a child, a wedding, or the death of a loved one? What holidays do Muslims celebrate and what charities do they support? How do they learn about the Qur’an? The Practice of Islam in America introduces readers to the way Islam is lived in the United States, offering vivid portraits of Muslim American life passages, ethical actions, religious holidays, prayer, pilgrimage, and other religious activities. It takes readers into homes, religious congregations, schools, workplaces, cemeteries, restaurants—and all the way to Mecca—to understand the diverse religious practices of Muslim Americans. Going beyond a theoretical discussion of what Muslims are supposed to do, this volume focuses on what they actually do. Readers gain practical information about Islamic religion while also coming to understand how the day-to-day realities of American life shape Muslim American practice.

Sarita Echavez See is Associate Professor in the Department of Media and Cultural Studies at the University of California Riverside and she is the co-founder of the Center for Art and Thought. She is the author of The Decolonized Eye: Filipino American Art and Performance.

Edward E. Curtis IV is Millennium Chair of the Liberal Arts and Professor of Religious Studies at the Indiana University School of Liberal Arts in Indianapolis. A recipient of Mellon, NEH, Fulbright, and Carnegie fellowships, Curtis is author of Muslims in America: A Short History and editor of the Encyclopedia of MuslimAmerican History.

November 2017 272 pages | 6 x 9 40 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-2505-9 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-4266-7 | $89.00X (£77.00) Art

December 2017 296 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-0488-7 | $28.00S (£23.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-8267-0 | $89.00X (£77.00) Religion

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R e l i gi o n

Auth e n ti c a l l y B lack an d Tr u l y Ca th o l i c The Rise of Black Catholicism in the Great Migration

The U r b an C hurch Im agined

Religion, Race, and Authenticity in the City Jessica M. Barron and Rhys H. Williams

Matthew J. Cressler Explores the contentious debates among Black Catholics about the proper relationship between religious practice and racial identity Chicago has been known as the Black Metropolis, but before the Great Migration, Chicago could have been called the Catholic Metropolis, with its skyline defined by parish spires as well as industrial smoke stacks and skyscrapers. This book uncovers the intersection of the two. Authentically Black and Truly Catholic traces the developments within the church in Chicago to show how Black Catholic activists in the 1960s and 1970s made Black Catholicism as we know it today. The sweep of the Great Migration brought many Black migrants face-to-face with white missionaries for the first time and tens of thousands of Black men and women became Catholic. These converts saved failing parishes by embracing relationships and ritual life that distinguished them from the evangelical churches proliferating around them. However, their unique rituals and relationships came under intense scrutiny in the late 1960s. Inspired by both Black Power and Vatican II, Black Catholic activists fought for the self-determination of Black parishes and the right to identify as both Black and Catholic. This book brings to light the complexities of these debates in what became one of the most significant Black Catholic communities in the country, changing the way we view the history of American Catholicism. Matthew J. Cressler is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the College of Charleston. November 2017 288 pages | 6 x 9 10 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-8096-6 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-4132-5 | $89.00X (£77.00) Religion | African American Studies WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

The role of race and consumer culture in attracting urban congregants to an evangelical church The Urban Church Imagined illuminates the dynamics surrounding white urban evangelical congregations’ approaches to organizational vitality and diversifying membership. Many evangelical churches are moving to urban areas to build their congregations and attract younger members. The urban environment fosters a deep familiarity and reverence for popular consumer culture and the presence of racial diversity. Church leaders use these ideas when they imagine what a “city church” should look like, but this often and inadvertently ends up reproducing racial and economic inequality. Drawing on several years of research, Jessica M. Barron and Rhys H. Williams explore the cultural contours of one such church in downtown Chicago. They show that church leaders’ and congregants’ understandings of the connections between race, consumer culture, and the city is a motivating factor for many members who value interracial interactions as a part of their worship experience. But these initiatives often unintentionally exclude members along racial and economic lines. The Urban Church Imagined adds to the growing constellation of studies on urban religious organizations and offers important insights into a developing trend among evangelical churches. Jessica M. Barron is a Researcher and Consultant at Frontline Solutions, Inc. Rhys H. Williams is Professor of Sociology and Director of the McNamara Center for the Social Study of Religion at Loyola University Chicago. November 2017 240 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-8710-1 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-7766-9 | $89.00X (£77.00) Religion | Sociology FAL L 2 0 1 7 • NYU PRESS

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R el i gi on

Chri sti a n T h e o log ies o f Salvat ion A Comparative Introduction Edited by Justin

S. Holcomb

The ways in which pivotal theological figures have attempted to address the complex and various theories of salvation Salvation—redemption or deliverance from sin—has been a key focus of Christian theology since the first days of the church. Theologians from St. Augustine to Karl Barth have debated the finer points of salvation for nearly as long, offering a bewildering array of competing and often contradictory theories. Christian Theologies of Salvation explores the ways in which pivotal theological figures have attempted to answer these questions, tracing doctrines of salvation from the first century into the twenty-first century. The volume offers a comparative focus, including doctrines of salvation that reflect the historical development of Catholic, Orthodox, and Protestant views. By illuminating the ways in which doctrines of salvation have evolved over the church’s history, Justin Holcomb provides a much-needed map to the options and implications of different theologies of salvation. This book is essential reading for students and scholars of Christian thought. Justin S. Holcomb is Affiliate Professor of Theology at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, Canon for Vocations in the Episcopal Diocese of Central Florida, and editor of Christian Theologies of Scripture (NYU Press, 2006) and Christian Theologies of Sacraments (NYU Press, 2017).

October 2017 384 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-0-8147-6294-3 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-0-8147-2443-9 | $89.00X (£77.00) Religion

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Sacr ifice in Jud aism , C hr istianity, and Islam David L. Weddle

An examination of the practice and philosophy of sacrifice in three religious traditions In the book of Genesis, God tests the faith of the Hebrew patriarch Abraham by demanding that he sacrifice the life of his beloved son, Isaac. Bound by common admiration for Abraham, the religious traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam also promote the practice of giving up human and natural goods to attain religious ideals. Each tradition negotiates the moral dilemmas posed by Abraham’s story in different ways, while retaining the willingness to perform sacrifice as an identifying mark of religious commitment. This book considers the way in which Jews, Christians, and Muslims refer to “sacrifice”—not only as ritual offerings, but also as the donation of goods, discipline, suffering, and martyrdom. Weddle highlights objections to sacrifice within these traditions as well, presenting voices of dissent and protest in the name of ethical duty. Weddle places sacrifice in the larger context of the worldviews of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, using this nearly universal religious act as a means of examining similarities of practice and differences of meaning among these important world religions. David L. Weddle is Professor Emeritus of Religion at Colorado College. He is the author of Miracles: Wonder and Meaning in World Religions (NYU Press, 2010).

September 2017 272 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-0-8147-8931-5 | $30.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-0-8147-6491-6 | $89.00X (£77.00) Religion 1.800.996.NYU P


R e l i gi o n

Am e r i c a n C a th olic His t ory

Faithful M easures

Second Edition

Edited by Roger Fink and Christopher D.

A Documentary Reader

Edited by Mark Massa, S.J. and Catherine Osborne An overview in primary documents of almost four hundred years of the American Catholic experience

New Methods in the Measurement of Religion Bader A venture into the art and science of measuring religion in everyday life

Among the first European explorers of the Americas, Catholics have a long and rich history in the United States. In this collection of significant letters, diaries, theological reflections, and other primary documents, the voices of Catholics in this country reveal what they have thought, believed, feared, and dreamed.

In an era of rapid technological advances, the measures and methods used to generate data about religion have undergone remarkably little change. Faithful Measures pushes the study of religion into the 21st century by evaluating new and existing measures of religion and introducing new methods for tapping into religious behaviors and beliefs.

American Catholic History spans the earliest missionary voyages in the 16th century to the present day, illuminating the complex history, beliefs, and practices of what has become North American Roman Catholicism. In an engaging and accessible style, the brief introductions to each text provide historical and biographical context and illuminate broad themes in the development of the American Catholic tradition. From Catholicism’s encounters with new frontiers to its long-time position outside mainstream culture, and from its intellectual life and political engagement to patterns of worship and spirituality, this book offers a lively first-hand review of Catholicism’s multifaceted history in the United States.

This book offers a global and innovative approach, with chapters on the intersection of religion and new technology, such as smart phone apps, Google Ngrams, crowdsourcing data, and Amazon buying networks. It also shows how old methods can be improved by using new technology to create online surveys with experimental designs and by developing new ways of mining data from existing information. Contributors explain how to employ new techniques, and offer insights into understanding the complex topic of religion in modern life. Beyond its quantitative contributions, Faithful Measures will be an invaluable resource for inspiring a new wave of creativity and exploration in our connected world.

This expanded edition includes 34 new documents, and offers more robust coverage of the diverse communities of Catholics in this country. Mark Massa, S.J. is Professor of Church History and Director of the Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life at Boston College. Catherine Osborne is a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Cushwa Center for the Study of American Catholicism at the University of Notre Dame. November 2017 368 pages | 6 x 9 8 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-7468-2 | $35.00S (£29.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-7474-3 | $99.00X (£85.00) Previous edition: Paper | 978-0-8147-5746-8 Religion WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

Roger Finke is Distinguished Professor of Sociology, Religious Studies and International Affairs at the Pennsylvania State University and is Director of the Association of Religion Data Archives (theARDA.com), funded by the Templeton Foundation and Lilly Foundation. Christopher Bader is Professor of Sociology at Chapman University and affiliated with the Institute for Religion, Economics and Culture (IRES). He is Associate Director of the Association of Religion Data Archives (theArda.com). October 2017 400 pages | 6 x 9 29 black & white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-7710-2 | $35.00S (£29.00) Cloth | 978-1-4798-7521-4 | $99.00X (£85.00) Religion | Sociology FAL L 2 0 1 7 • NYU PRESS

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A n ci ent World

Amhe i d a I I I

Ostraka from Trimithis, Volume 2 Rodney Ast

and Roger S. Bagnall with contributions by Clementina Caputo and Raffaella Cribiore A new trove of information from the Amheida House excavation This archaeological report provides a comprehensive study of the excavations carried out at Amheida House B2 in Egypt's Dakhleh Oasis between 2005 and 2007. The excavations so far have focused on three areas of this very large site: a centrally located upper-class fourth-century AD house; a more modest house of the third century; and the temple hill. Architectural conservation has protected and partly restored two standing funerary monuments, a mud-brick pyramid and a tower tomb, both of the Roman period. This is the second volume of ostraka from the excavations Amheida (ancient Trimithis) in Egypt. It adds 491 items to the growing corpus of primary texts from the site. In addition to the catalog, the introductory sections make important contributions to understanding the role of textual practice in the life of a pre-modern small town. This volume will be of interest to specialists in Roman-period Egypt as well as to scholars of literacy and writing in the ancient world and elsewhere. Roger S. Bagnall is Professor of Ancient History and Leon Levy Director of the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University. Rodney Ast is Senior Research and Teaching Associate at the University of Heidelberg.

In the Presence of Power Court and Performance in the Pre-Modern Middle East

Edited by Maurice A. Pomerantz and Evelyn Birge Vitz Insights into power, spectacle, and performance in the courts of Middle Eastern rulers In recent decades, scholars have produced much new research on courtly life in medieval Europe, but studies on imperial and royal courts across the Middle East have received much less attention, particularly for courts before 1500 AD. In the Presence of Power, however, sheds new light on courtly life across the region. This insightful, exploratory collection of essays uncovers surprising commonalities across a broad swath of cultures. This study does not presume the presence of one shared courtly institution across time and space, but rather seeks to understand the different ways in which contemporaries experienced and spoke about these places of power and performance. Adopting a very broad view of performances, In the Presence of Power includes exuberant expressions of love in Arabic stories, shadow plays in Mamluk Cairo, Byzantine storytelling, religious food traditions in Christian Cyprus, advice, and political and ethnographic performances of power. Maurice A. Pomerantz is Assistant Professor of Literature at New York University Abu Dhabi. Evelyn Birge Vitz is Professor of French and director of Medieval and Renaissance Studies at New York University.

Clementina Caputo is Post-Doctoral Researcher in the Collaborative Research Centre 933, “Material Text Cultures”, at the University of Heidelberg. Rafaella Cribiore is Professor of Classics at New York University. AVAILABLE NOW 310 pages | 8.5 x 11 24 black & white illustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-5374-8 | $85.00X (£73.00) An Institute for the Study of the Ancient World title Archaeology

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December 2017 304 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-8300-4 | $40.00S (£34.00) Cloth | 978-1-4798-7936-6 | $99.00X (£85.00) Middle Eastern Studies 1.800.996.NYU P


L i b r a r y o f A r a b i c L i t e r a t u re

"The entire series, promises to be an invaluable mine of knowledge for scholars and general readers who need an introduction to the universal appeal and validity of the enlightening and enlightened literary heritage of the ArabicIslamic intellectual tradition.” —Journal of Islamic Studies

Ar a b i a n Sat ire

Poetry from 18th-Century Najd Hmedan al-Shwe'ir Edited and Translated by Marcel Kurpershoek This lively volume collects key poems by the 18th-century poet, Hmedan al-Shwe'ir, who lived in the Najd region of the Arabian Peninsula, what is now Saudi Arabia, shortly before the hegemony of the Wahhabi movement. A master of satire known for his ribald humor, self-deprecation, and invective verse (hija), Hmedan was acerbic in his criticisms of society and its morals, which he voiced in a poetic idiom widely referred to as “Nabati,” here a mix of Najdi vernacular and vocabulary and images dating back to the origins of Arabic poetry. In his poetry Hmedan is mostly concerned with worldly matters, and addresses these in different guises: as the patriarch at the helm of the family boat and its unruly crew; as a picaresque anti-hero who revels in taking pot shots at the established order, its hypocrisy, and its moral failings; as a peasant who labors over his palm trees, often to no avail and with no guarantee of success; and as a poet recording in verse how he thinks things ought to be. The poems in Arabian Satire reveal a plucky, headstrong, yet intensely socially committed figure—representative of the traditional Najdi ethos—who infuses his verse with proverbs, maxims, and words of wisdom expressed plainly and conversationally. Although frequently quoted by Najdi historians and in anthologies of popular sayings, this is the first full translation of Hmedan’s collected poetry (diwan).

Hmedan al-Shwe’ir was an early 18th-century poet from the region of Najd in the Arabian Peninsula, in what is now modern-day Saudi Arabia. Marcel Kurpershoek is a senior research fellow at New York University Abu Dhabi. He is a specialist in the oral traditions and poetry of Arabia and has written the five-volume Oral Poetry and Narratives from Central Arabia (1994-2005), as well as several books on Middle Eastern historical and cultural topics.

Library of Arabic Literature December 2017 208 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth | 978-1-4798-7806-2 | $35.00S (£29.99) Literature WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

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L i b rary of Ara bic Liter at ure New In Paperback

New In Paperback

Women and the Court of Baghdad Ibn al-Saʿi

A Manual of Islamic Legal Theory Al-Qadi al-Nuʿman Translated by Devin Stewart Foreword by John Coughlin and John Sexton

Conso r t s o f t h e C aliph s

Translated by Shawkat M. Toorawa and the editors of the Library of Arabic Literature Introduction by Julia Bray and foreword by

Marina Warner

Lyrical biographical sketches of the concubines of ancient Baghdad Consorts of the Caliphs is a seventh/thirteenth-century compilation of anecdotes about thirty-eight women who were consorts to those in power, most of them concubines of the early Abbasid caliphs and wives of latter-day caliphs and sultans. This illuminating volume is one of the few surviving texts by Ibn al-Sa’i (d. 674 H/1276 AD), a prolific Baghdadi scholar who chronicled the academic and political elites of his city in the final years of the Abbasid dynasty and the period following the cataclysmic Mongol invasion of 656 H/1258 AD. Ibn al-Sa’i is keen to forge a connection between the munificent wives of his time and the storied lovers of the so-called golden age of Baghdad. Informed by the author’s own sources, insider knowledge, and well-known literary materials, these singular biographical sketches, though delivered episodically, bring the belletristic culture of the Baghdad court to life, particularly in the personal narratives and poetry of culture heroines otherwise lost to history. Ibn al-Saʿi (d. 674 H/1276 AD) was a historian, law librarian, and prolific author from Baghdad. His considerable scholarly output included treatises on hadith, literary commentaries, histories of the caliphs, and biographical collections, though little has survived. Shawkat M. Toorawa is Associate Professor in the Department of Near Eastern Studies at Cornell University.

Disa gre e me nts of the Jurists

Paves the foundation of Islamic legal tradition This rich dive into the history of law brings forward the life and legacy of Al-Qadi al-Nu’man, chief legal theorist and ideologue of the North African Fatimid dynasty in the tenth century. This translation makes available in English for the first time his major work on Islamic legal theory (usul al-fiqh), which presents a legal model in support of the Fatimids’ principle of legitimate rule over the Islamic community. Composed as part of a grand project to establish the theoretical bases of the official Fatimid legal school, Disagreements of the Jurists expounds a distinctly Shi’i system of hermeneutics. The work begins with a discussion of the historical causes of jurisprudential divergence in the first Islamic centuries and goes on to engage, point by point, with the specific interpretive methods of Sunni legal theory. While its immediate mission is to pave the foundation of the Isma’ili legal tradition, the text also preserves important passages from several Islamic legal theoretical works no longer extant—including Ibn Dawud’s manual, al- Wusul ila ma’rifat al-usul—and thus throws light on a critical stage in the historical development of Islamic legal theory that would otherwise be lost to history. Al-Qadi al-Nuʿman (d. 364 H/974 AD) was born in Tunisia and joined the service of the Fatimids in 313 H/925 AD, eventually rising to the position of supreme judge. As the most important jurist and legal author of the Fatimid Empire, his work founded Ismaʿili law as a discipline. Devin J. Stewart is Associate Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies at Emory University.

Library of Arabic Literature September 2017 176 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-4798-6679-3 | $14.00T (£11.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-5098-3 Literature

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Library of Arabic Literature October 2017 256 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-4798-0807-6 | $15.00T (£12.99) Cloth | 978-0-8147-6375-9 Literature 1.800.996.NYU P


L i b r a r y o f A r a b i c L i t e r a t u re New In Paperback

A Hun dr ed a n d O n e Nig h t s Foreword by Robert Translated by Bruce

Irwin Fudge

A luminous translation of Arabic tales of enchantment and wonder Edited and translated into English for the very first time, A Hundred and One Nights is a marvelous example of the rich tradition of popular Arabic storytelling. Like the celebrated Thousand and One Nights, this collection opens with the frame story of Shahrazad, the vizier’s gifted daughter who recounts imaginative tales night after night in an effort to distract the murderous king from taking her life. However, A Hundred and One Nights features an almost entirely different set of stories, each one more thrilling, amusing, and disturbing than the last. Here, we encounter tales of epic warriors, buried treasure, disappearing brides, cannibal demon-women, fatal shipwrecks, and clever ruses, where human strength and ingenuity play out against a backdrop of inexorable, inscrutable fate. Distinctly rooted in Arabic literary culture and the Islamic tradition, these tales draw on motifs and story elements that circulated across cultures, including Indian and Chinese antecedents, and features a frame story likely much older than that of its more famous sibling. This vibrant translation of A Hundred and One Nights promises to transport readers, new and veteran alike, into its fantastical realms of magic and wonder.

"Accessibility is central to Fudge's translation of A Hundred and One Nights into English as well as his new edition of the original Arabic text."

Bruce Fudge is Professor of Arabic at the University of Geneva. He is the author of Quranic Hermeneutics: al-Tabrisi and the Craft of Commentary (2011) as well as a number of articles on the interpretation of the Quran and medieval and modern Arabic literature. Robert Irwin is the author of The Arabian Nights: A Companion as well as numerous other studies of Middle Eastern politics, art, and mysticism.

—The National

Library of Arabic Literature September 2017 272 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-4798-7323-4 | $15.00T (£12.99) Cloth | 978-0-8147-4519-9 Literature WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

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Lively depictions of the natural life, peoples, and kingdoms around the Indian Ocean

L I T E R AT U R E A R A B I C

¯ i Abu¯ Zayd al-S¯ir af¯ translated by tim mackintosh-smith foreword by zvi ben-dor benite

O F

Accounts of China and India

L I B R A R Y

L I B R A R Y

O F

A R A B I C

L I T E R AT U R E

B est of the Bac klist fro m t he Li br ary o f Arabi c Li t e r a t u re

Mission to the Volga Ah·mad ibn Fad·l¯an

translated by james e. montgomery foreword by tim severin

A riveting travelogue from Baghdad to the Central Asian steppe

The Expeditions An Early Biography of Muḥammad Maʿmar ibn Rāshid Translated by Sean W. Anthony Foreword by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem $15.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-1682-8

Accounts of China and India Abu Zayd al-Sirafi Translated by Tim Mackintosh-Smith Foreword by Zvi Ben-Dor Benite $15.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-3059-6

Mission to the Volga Ahmad Ibn Fadlan Translated by James Montgomery Foreword by Tim Severin $15.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-9989-0

The Principles of Sufism ʿĀʾishah al-Bāʿūniyyah Translated by T. Emil Homerin Foreword by Ros Ballaster $15.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-2924-8

A Treasury of Virtues Sayings, Sermons, and Teaching of ʿAlī, with the one Hundred Proverbs, attributed to al-Jāḥiẓ al-Qāḍī al-Quḍāʿī Translated by Tahera Qutbuddin Foreword by Rowan Williams $15.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-9653-0

The Epistle of Forgiveness Volumes One and Two Abū l-ʿAlāʾ al-Maʿarrī Translated by Geert Jan van Gelder and Gregor Schoeler Foreword by Matthew Reynolds $16.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-3494-5

Leg over Leg Volumes One and Two Aḥmad Fāris al-Shidyāq Translated by Humphrey Davies $17.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-0072-8

Leg over Leg Volumes Three and Four Aḥmad Fāris al-Shidyāq Translated by Humphrey Davies $17.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-1329-2

The Life of Ibn Hanbal Ibn al-JawzĪ Translated by Michael Cooperson Foreword by Garth Fowden $17.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-0530-3

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C l a y Sa n s k r i t L i b r a r y

A n n o un cin g th e C lay S an sk rit Libra ry Digita l Editions! “Literary gold…Here are stories and poems crafted with joy in the art of storytelling and delight in the nuance and patterning of worlds.” —Times Literary Supplement The Clay Sanskrit Library, co-published by NYU Press and the JJC Foundation, has been created to introduce classical Sanskrit literature to a wide international readership.

Ma ha bha ra ta VI Bhishma, Volume 2 Translated by

Garland of the Buddha’s Past Lives

Volumes 1 & 2 Aryashura

Translated by Justin Meiland Written in the 4th century C.E., this two volume collection of 34 stories depicts the the virtues of giving and morality and the Buddha’s quest for enlightenment Volume 1: 548 pages | 978-1-4798-8583-1 | $19.95A (£16.99) Volume 2: 450 pages | 978-1-4798-3992-6 | $19.95A (£16.99)

Alex Cherniak

This volume describes the events in the great battle between the Kauravas and the Pandavas up to the death of Bhishma. 582 pages | 978-1-4798-5595-7 | $19.95A (£16.99)

Ma ha bha ra ta VII Drona, Volume 2 Translated by

Vaughan Pilikian

Drona becomes the leader after Bhishma is cut down on the battle field, and the fighting rages on in spite of heavy losses on both sides. 400 pages | 978-1-4798-1383-4 | $19.95A (£16.99)

Ma ha bha ra ta X a nd XI Dead of Night and The Women Translated by

Kate Crosby

The great war of the Mahabharata is over – or is it? These books give voice to the vanquished, to the psychology of loss and the conflicting desires for understanding and revenge.

“The Lady of the Jewel Necklace” & “The Lady Who Shows Her Love” Harsha

Translated by

Wendy Doniger

350 pages | 978-1-4798-3799-1 | $19.95A (£16.99)

Ma ha bha ra ta XII

Peace, Volume Three: The Book of Liberation Translated by

Alex Wynne

Two Sanskrit plays written by King Harsha, who reigned over the kingdom of Kanauj from 606 to 647 C.E.

The most enigmatic philosophical text from ancient India, this volume presents the teachings of Bhishma as he lies dying on the battlefield.

514 pages | 978-0-8147-4489-5 | $19.95A | (£16.99)

626 pages | 978-0-8147-9542-2 | $19.95A (£16.99)

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A Foodie’s Guide to Capitalism Understanding the Political Economy of What We Eat Eric Holt-Giménez The social, environmental, and economic crises of the capitalist mode of food production Capitalism drives our global food system. Everyone who wants to end hunger, who wants to eat good, clean, healthy food, needs to understand capitalism. This book will help do that. In his latest book, Eric Holt-Giménez draws from classical and modern analyses, to introduce the reader to the history of our food system and to the basics of capitalism. In straightforward prose, A Foodie’s Guide to Capitalism explains the political economics of why—even as local, organic, and gourmet food have spread around the world— billions go hungry in the midst of abundance; why obesity is a global epidemic; and why land-grabbing, global warming, and environmental pollution are increasing.

Eric Holt-Giménez is the director of the Institute for Food and Development Policy, known as Food First, a “people’s think tank” dedicated to ending the injustices that cause hunger. For over two decades, he has worked with peasant movements in Mexico and Central America, and has taught and published widely. He is the author of Campesino a Campesino: Voices from Latin America’s Farmer to Farmer Movement for Sustainable Agriculture.

Holt-Giménez offers emblematic accounts—and critiques—of past and present-day struggles to change the food system, from "voting with your fork," to land occupations. We learn about the potential and the pitfalls of organic and communitysupported agriculture, certified fair trade, microfinance, land trusts, agrarian reform, cooperatives, and food aid. We also learn about the convergence of growing social movements using the food system to challenge capitalism. How did racism, classism, and patriarchy become structural components of our food system? Why is a rational agriculture incompatible with the global food regime? Can transforming our food system transform capitalism? These are questions that can only be addressed by first understanding how capitalism works.

September 2017 256 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-5836-7659-2 | $25.00S Cloth | 978-1-5836-7660-8 | $95.00X Current Affairs | Food Studies

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Mo n t h l y R e v i e w P re s s

Tr u mp in the W h i t e H o u se Tragedy and Farce

John Bellamy Foster Foreword by Robert W. McChesney The full historical context of the system that created Trump’s moral and political emergency, and how to resist it Remember that metaphor about the frog that slowly cooks to death in the pot of increasingly warming water? Leftists have used it for years to describe how people can accept dwindling health care, fading job opportunities, eroding racial and gender equality—as long as the loss occurs gradually. Now, with Donald Trump having slouched off to Washington, most of the mainstream media are working overtime to convince us that we can still stand the heat. Leave it to John Bellamy Foster, one of the world’s outstanding radical scholars, to expose Trump for who and what he is: a neofascist. Just at the boiling point, Foster offers us cool logic to comprehend the system that created Trump’s moral and political emergency—and to resist it. In Trump in the White House, John Bellamy Foster does what no other Trump analyst has done before: he places the president and his administration in full historical context. Foster reveals that Trump is merely the endpoint of a stagnating economic system whose liberal democratic sheen has begun to wear thin. Beneath a veneer of democracy, we see the authoritarian rule that oversees decreasing wages, anti-science and climate-change denialism, a dying public education system, and expanding prisons and military—all powered by a phony populism seething with centuries of racism that never went away. But Foster refuses to end his book in despair. Inside his analysis is a clarion call to fight back. Protests, popular demands, coalitions: everyone is needed. Change can’t happen without radical, anti-capitalist politics, and Foster demonstrates that—even now, with the waters ever warming— it may yet be possible to stop the desecration of the Earth; to end endless war; to create global solidarity with all oppressed people. Could a frog do that?

John Bellamy Foster is editor of Monthly Review and Professor of Sociology at the University of Oregon. He has written widely on political economy and ecology, including The Endless Crisis (with Robert W. McChesney) and The Ecological Rift (with Brett Clark and Richard York). Praise for The Endless Crisis: “The authors carefully develop a powerful case that the normal state of ‘really existing capitalist economies,’ increasingly dominated by multinational megacorporations along with associated financialization, is not growth with occasional recession, but rather stagnation with occasional escapes that have diminishing prospects. Hence an ‘endless crisis’.… This valuable inquiry should be carefully studied and pondered, and should be taken as an incentive to action.” —Noam Chomsky

October 2017 144 pages | 5 x 7.5 Paper | 978-1-58367-680-6 | $14.95T Cloth | 978-1-58367-681-3 | $95.00X Current Affairs WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

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Mon th ly Review Pres s

H e al th Care U n der th e Kn i f e Moving Beyond Capitalism for Our Health

Howard Waitzkin and the Working Group on Health Beyond Capitalism Essays by health-care professionals, scholars, and activists addressing the medical system’s history, problems, and future “I’ve still got my health so what do I care?” goes a lyric in an old Cole Porter song. Most of us, in fact, assume we can’t live full lives, or take on life’s challenges, without also assuming that we’re basically healthy and will be for the foreseeable future. But these days, our health and well-being are sorted through an ever-expanding, profit-seeking financial complex that monitors, controls, and commodifies our very existence. Given that our access to competent, affordable health care grows more precarious each day, the arrival of Health Care Under the Knife could not be more timely. In this empowering book, noted health-care professionals, scholars, and activists—including editor Howard Waitzkin—impart their inside knowledge of the medical system: what’s wrong, how it got this way, and what we can do to heal it. Howard Waitzkin is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Sociology at the University of New Mexico and Adjunct Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Illinois. He has been active for years in the struggles for national health programs in the United States and Latin America. He is the author of Medicine and Public Health at the End of Empire, among other books. Praise for Medicine and Public Health at the End of Empire: “Health-care reform is a lively and contentious topic, but, as Waitzkin shows in this informative study, our debates on reform are too narrowly framed. His thoughtful analysis raises important questions about conventional assumptions of doctrine and practice, scrutinizing alternatives— among them notably the record of social medicine in Latin America." —Noam Chomsky

The book is comprised of individual essays addressing the “medical industrial complex,” the impact of privatization and cutbacks under neoliberalism, the nature of health-care work, and the intersections between health care and imperialism, both historically and at present. We see how the health of our bodies in “developed” countries is tied to the health of the bodies of the labor force in the Global South, and how the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund are linked strangely, inextricably, to our physical well-being. But this analysis would not be complete without the book’s final section, which delivers invaluable guidance for how to change this system. Recounting case studies and successful efforts for creating a more humane community, this book ultimately gives us hope that our health-care system can be rescued and made an integral part of a new and radically different society.

January 2018 344 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-5836-7674-5 | $27.00S Cloth | 978-1-5836-7675-2 | $95.00X Current Affairs | Medicine

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Mo n t h l y R e v i e w P re s s

Ma p p ing M y Wa y H o m e

Activism, Nostalgia, and the Downfall of Apartheid South Africa Stephanie J. Urdang Stephanie J. Urdang’s memoir tracking the slow demise of apartheid that led to South Africa’s first democratic elections Stephanie Urdang was born in Cape Town, South Africa, into a white, Jewish family staunchly opposed to the apartheid regime. In 1967, at the age of twenty-three, no longer able to tolerate the grotesque iniquities and oppression of apartheid, she chose exile and emigrated to the United States. There she embraced feminism, met anti-apartheid and solidarity movement activists, and encountered a particularly American brand of racial injustice. Urdang also met African revolutionaries such as Amilcar Cabral, who would influence her return to Africa and her subsequent journalism. In 1974, she trekked through the liberation zones of Guinea-Bissau during its war of independence; in the 1980’s, she returned repeatedly to Mozambique and saw how South Africa was fomenting a civil war aimed to destroy the newly independent country. Urdang’s memoir maps out her quest for the meaning of home and for the lived reality of revolution with empathy, courage, and a keen eye for historical and geographic detail. This is a personal narrative, beautifully told, of a journey traveled by an indefatigable exile who, while yearning for home, continues to question where, as a citizen of both South Africa and the United States, she belongs. “My South Africa!” she writes, on her return in 1991, after the release of Nelson Mandela, “How could I have imagined for one instant that I could return to its beauty, and not its pain?”

Stephanie J. Urdang was born in Cape Town, South Africa. She is the author of two books on Africa, including And Still They Dance: Women, War, and the Struggle for Change in Mozambique. She has worked as an anti-apartheid activist, journalist, academic writer, university lecturer, and freelance consultant, as well as gender specialist and senior advisor on HIV/AIDS for the United Nations. She lives in Montclair, New Jersey and returns regularly to South Africa.

Praise for And Still They Dance: “Much of the power and importance of And Still They Dance derives from Urdang’s refusal to puree the complexities of Mozambique into a smooth soup. Rather she allows the reader to feel the conflicts and contradiction in the stories women tell of their own lives…Urdang’s moving yet restrained narrative recounts dizzying acts of courage…a path-making book.” —Anne McClintock, A. Barton Hepburn Professor in the Program in Gender and Sexuality Studies and the Department of English, Princeton University November 2017 320 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-5836-7667-7 | $26.00S Cloth | 978-1-5836-7668-4 | $95.00X Memoir | Politics WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

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Mon th ly Review Pres s

M oder n Im peri al i s m , M on o po l y F i n an ce Capi tal , a nd Marx 's L aw o f Val u e Samir Amin The complete collection of Samir Amin’s work on Marxian value theory Unlike such obvious forms of oppression as feudalism or slavery, capitalism has been able to survive through its genius for disguising corporate profit imperatives as opportunities for individual human equality and advancement. But it was the genius of Karl Marx, in his masterwork, Capital, to discover the converse law of surplus value: behind the illusion of the democratic, supply-anddemand marketplace, lies the workplace, where people trying to earn a living are required to work way beyond the time it takes to pay their wages. Leave it to the genius of Samir Amin to advance Marx's theories—adding to them the work of radical economists such as Michal Kalecki, Josef Steindl, Paul Baran, and Paul Sweezy—to show how Marxian theory can be adapted to modern economic conditions. Samir Amin was born in Egypt in 1931 and received his Ph.D. in economics in Paris in 1957. He is director of the Third World Forum in Dakar, Senegal. His numerous works include Eurocentrism: Second Edition, The World We Wish to See, The Liberal Virus, Unequal Development, and Spectres of Capitalism. Praise for the works of Samir Amin: “What is splendid in Amin’s writing…is his lucidity of expression, his clear consistency of approach, and, above all, his absolutely unwavering condemnation of the ravages of capital and of bourgeois ideology in all its forms.… Amin remains an essential point of reference, and an inspiration.” —Bill Bowring, Marx & Philosophy Review of Books

Amin extends Marx's analysis to describe a concept of “imperialist rent” derived from the radically unequal wages paid for the same labor done by people in both the Global North and the Global South, the rich nations and the poor ones. This is global oligopolistic capitalism, in which finance capital has come to dominate worldwide production and distribution. Amin also advances Baran and Sweezy’s notion of economic surplus to explain a globally monopolized system in which Marx's “law of value” takes the form of a “law of globalized value,” generating a super-exploitation of workers in the Global South. Modern Imperialism, Monopoly Finance Capital, and Marx's Law of Value offers readers, in one volume, the complete collection of Samir Amin’s work on Marxian value theory. The book includes texts from two of Amin's recent works, Three Essays on Marx’s Value Theory and The Law of Worldwide Value, which have provoked considerable controversy and correspondence. Here, Amin answers his critics with a series of letters, clarifying and developing his ideas. This work will occupy an important place among the theoretical resources for anyone involved in the study of contemporary Marxian economic and political theory.

February 2018 280 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-5836-7655-4 | $29.00S Cloth | 978-1-5836-7656-1 | $95.00X Politics

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Mo n t h l y R e v i e w P re s s

The A p ocalyp se o f S e t t l e r C olonialis m

The Roots of Slavery, White Supremacy, and Capitalism in Seventeenth-Century North America and the Caribbean

Gerald Horne

The complex and intertwined history of seventeenth century European colonization and slavery in Africa and the New World Virtually no part of the modern United States—the economy, education, constitutional law, religious institutions, sports, literature, economics, even protest movements—can be understood without first understanding the slavery and dispossession that laid its foundation. To that end, historian Gerald Horne digs deeply into Europe’s colonization of Africa and the New World, when, from Columbus’s arrival until the Civil War, some 13 million Africans and some 5 million Native Americans were forced to build and cultivate a society extolling “liberty and justice for all.” The seventeenth century was, according to Horne, an era when the roots of slavery, white supremacy, and capitalism became inextricably tangled into a complex history involving war and revolts in Europe, England’s conquest of the Scots and Irish, the development of formidable new weaponry able to ensure Europe’s colonial dominance, the rebel merchants of North America who created “these United States,” and the hordes of Europeans whose newfound opportunities in this “free” land amounted to “combat pay” for their efforts as “white” settlers. Centering his book on the Eastern Seaboard of North America, the Caribbean, Africa, and what is now Great Britain, Horne provides a deeply researched, harrowing account of the apocalyptic loss and misery that likely has no parallel in human history. This is an essential book that will not allow history to be told by the victors. It is especially needed now, in the age of Trump. For it has never been more vital, Horne writes, “to shed light on the contemporary moment wherein it appears that these malevolent forces have received a new lease on life.”

Gerald Horne is John J. and Rebecca Moores Professor of African American History at the University of Houston. A prolific scholar, he has published more than three dozen books, including Confronting Black Jacobins and Race to Revolution, both by Monthly Review Press.

Also of interest Faci ng t he Ri si ng S un Gerald Horne See page 10 for more information

Praise for Confronting Black Jacobins: “Gerald Horne is one of the great historians of our time. His scholarly erudition is impeccable and his revolutionary fervor is undeniable.” —Cornel West, public intellectual and author of Race Matters January 2018 280 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-5836-7663-9 | $25.00S Cloth | 978-1-5836-7664-6 | $95.00X History WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

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Mon th ly Review Pres s

y db h ite Ed anitc lbo oP Le eg A r dG an

NGY I NKRAC I THOC E R EM D

S OCI A L I S T R E G I S T E R

Leo Panitch and Greg Albo are professors in the Department of Political Science at York University, Toronto. Praise for the Socialist Register:

R eth i n ki n g D em o cracy Socialist Register 2018 Edited by Leo

Panitch and Greg Albo

New visions and practices for developing a real socialist democracy For years, intellectuals have argued that, with the triumph of capitalist, liberal democracy, the Western World has reached “the end of history.” Recently, however, there has been a rise of authoritarian politics in many countries. Concepts of postdemocracy, anti-politics, and the like are gaining currency in theoretical and political debate. Now that capitalist democracies are facing seismic and systemic challenges, it becomes increasingly important to investigate not only the inherent antagonism between liberalism and the democratic process, but also socialism. Is socialism an enemy of democracy? Could socialism develop, expand, even enhance democracy? While this volume seeks a reappraisal of existing liberal democracy today, its main goal is to help lay the foundation for new visions and practices in developing a real socialist democracy. Amid the contradictions of neoliberal capitalism, the responsibility to sort out the relationship between socialism and democracy has never been greater. No revival of socialist politics in the twenty-first century can occur without founding new democratic institutions and practices.

“The Socialist Register has been the intellectual lodestar for the international left since 1964.” —Mike Davis “I know the Register very well and have found it extremely stimulating, often invaluable.” —Noam Chomsky “Compulsory reading for people who refuse to be resigned to the idea that there can be no alternative to our unacceptable society.” —Daniel Singer

December 2017 296 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-5836-7671-4 | $29.00S Politics

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Awa rd- Win n in g Ba c klist

Winner of the 2016 Errol Hill Award Presented by ASTR Winner of the 2016 William Sanders Scarborough Prize presented by the Modern Language Association Embodied Avatars: Genealogies Of Black Feminist Art And Performance Uri Mcmillan $29.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-5247-5

First Prize, Arabic to English Category, for the Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding (Doha, Qatar) The Life Of Ibn Hanbal

Ibn Al-Jawzi $17.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-0530-3

Lois P. Rudnick Book Prize presented by the New England American Studies Association The Racial Mundane: Asian American Performance And The Embodied Everyday

Ju Yon Kim $28.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-4432-6 WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

Book of the Year presented by the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education

Sounds Of Belonging: U.S. SpanishLanguage Radio And Public Advocacy Dolores Inés Casillas $25.00S | Paper | 978-0-8147-7024-5

2017 Wilbur Non-Fiction Award Recipient presented by Religion Communicators Council

Black Women’s Christian Activism: Seeking Social Justice In A Northern Suburb Betty Livingston Adams $55.00X | Cloth | 978-0-8147-4546-5

Winner of the 2016 Religious Communication Book of the Year Award

Honorable Mention, Theology and Religious Studies PROSE Award

Terry Lindvall $35.00A | Cloth | 978-1-4798-8673-9

Walter Earl Fluker $35.00A | Cloth | 978-1-4798-1038-3

Michigan Notable Book Selection presented by The Detroit Free Press

2016 Choice 25 Top Academic Titles

God Mocks: A History Of Religious Satire From The Hebrew Prophets To Stephen Colbert

Women Doing Life: Gender, Punishment And The Struggle For Identity Lora Bex Lempert $27.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-2705-3

The Ground Has Shifted: The Future Of The Black Church In PostRacial America

Asian American Media Activism: Fighting For Cultural Citizenship

Lori Kido Lopez $27.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-6683-0

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Be s t of th e Bac k l i s t

Honorable Mention, 2017 ESS Mirra Komarovsky Book Award, ESS Calling the Shots: Why Parents Reject Vaccines

2016 Donald Light Award for the Applied Public Practice of Medical Sociology, ASA Contesting Intersex: The Dubious Diagnosis

Jennifer A. Reich $29.95T | Cloth | 978-1-4798-1279-0 Sociology | Medicine

Georgiann Davis $28.00S Paper | 978-1-4798-8704-0 Sociology | LGBT Studies

Creativity without Law: Challenging the Assumptions of Intellectual Property

Ending Zero Tolerance: The Crisis of Absolute School Discipline

Muslim Cool: Race, Religion, and Hip Hop in the United States

Edited by Kate Darling and Aaron Perzanowski $30.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-5624-4 Law

Derek W. Black $24.95T | Cloth | 978-1-4798-7702-7 Law | Political Science

Su’ad Abdul Khabeer $30.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-9450-5 Anthropology | Religion

New World A-Coming: Black Religion and Racial Identity during the Great Migration

Botox Nation: Changing the Face of America

Restricted Access: Media, Disability, and the Politics of Participation

Judith Weisenfeld $35.00A | Cloth | 978-1-4798-8880-1 Religion | African American Studies

Dana Berkowitz $27.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-2526-4 Sociology | Medicine

Elizabeth Ellcessor $28.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-5343-4 Media Studies | Disability Studies

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The Case for the Corporate Death Penalty: Restoring Law and Order on Wall Street Mary Kreiner Ramirez and Steven A. Ramirez $30.00A | Cloth | 978-1-4798-8157-4 Law | Current Affairs

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Index

A Biography of a Map in Motion ...............................13 A Body, Undone ........................................................34 A Foodie’s Guide to Capitalism ..................................46 A Hundred and One Nights .......................................43 A Treasury of Virtues.................................................44 Accounts of China and India ......................................44 al-Bāʿūniyyah, Ibn ʿĀʾishah ....................................44 al-JawzĪ, Ibn............................................................44 al-Maʿarrī, Abū l-ʿAlāʾ..............................................44 al-Sai, Ibn ...............................................................42 al-Shidyāq, Aḥmad Fāris.........................................44 al-Sirafi, Abu Zayd ..................................................44 al-Shwe’ir, Hmedan................................................41 al-Numan, Al-Qadi................................................42 al-Quḍāʿī, al-Qāḍī ...................................................44 Albo, Greg ..............................................................52 Algorithms of Oppression ..........................................29 American Catholic History, Second Edition .............39 Amheida III ............................................................40 Amin, Samir ...........................................................50 Antisocial Media ....................................................30 Apocalypse of Settler Colonialism, The ........................51 Arabian Satire .........................................................41 Art of Confession, The ...............................................33 Ast, Rodney ............................................................40 Authentically Black and Truly Catholic ......................37

Finke, Roger...........................................................39 Fishman, Jessica M..................................................27 Flores-Gonzalez, Nilda..........................................26 For Liberty and the Republic ....................................12 Foster, John Bellamy...............................................47 Franke, Katherine...................................................18 Fudge, Bruce...........................................................43

Rāshi, Maʿmar ibn ..................................................44 Rethinking Democracy ..............................................52 Revolutions in the Atlantic World, New Edition .......14 Riccucci, Norma M. ...............................................25 Rise of Big Data Policing, The .....................................7 Rollins, Joe..............................................................18 Rosenzweig, Laura B.................................................2

Gender Reckonings ................................................26 Gilded Suffragists .....................................................1 Goldberg, Greg.......................................................30 Gómez, Laura E.......................................................14 Gray, Jonathan........................................................30 Grobe, Christopher.................................................33

Sacrifice in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam ............38 Sandvoss, Cornel....................................................30 Sarat, Austin ..........................................................20 Secret Life of Stories, The .......................................34 See, Sarita Echavez.................................................36 Skateboarding LA ..................................................23 Skidmore, Emily.....................................................11 Snyder, Gregory J....................................................23 Song, Miri ..............................................................28 Stewart, Devin........................................................42

Bader, Christopher D. ............................................39 Bagnall, Roger S.....................................................40 Barron, Jessica M....................................................37 Baumle, Amanda K................................................24 Being Watched ........................................................19 Bérubé, Michael .....................................................34 Best, Wallace D.........................................................9 Bhimull, Chandra D................................................17 Brettschneider, Marla.............................................25 Brokering Servitude ................................................15 Burgess, Susan........................................................25

Jewish New York ........................................................3 Jews on the Frontier ..................................................16

Caputo, Clementina ...............................................40 Castañeda, Heide....................................................21 Castiglia, Christopher.............................................35 Catch and Release.....................................................22 China, the United States, and the Future of Latin America ..........................................................24 Christian Theologies of Salvation ..............................38 Christian, Aymar Jean ............................................31 Citizens but Not Americans ......................................26 Clay Sanskrit Library .............................................45 Clean and White 1........................................................17 Cohen, Michael R...................................................16 Compton, D’Lane R...............................................24 Connell, Raewyn....................................................26 Consorts of the Caliphs ..............................................42 Cotton Capitalists ...................................................16 Cressler, Matthew J.................................................37 Cribiore, Raffaella ..................................................40 Crip Times ...............................................................35 Crosby, Christina ...................................................34 Curtis, Edward E. IV ............................................36 Death Makes the News .............................................27 Dempsey, Rachel ..................................................4 ,5 Denoon, David B. H. .............................................24 Disability Media Studies ........................................32 Disagreements of the Jurists.......................................42 Dissent ....................................................................12 Ellcessor, Elizabeth................................................32 Empire in the Air.......................................................17 Epistle of Forgiveness, The.........................................44 Expeditions, The.......................................................44 Evolution of the Juvenile Court, The............................8 Facing the Rising Sun .............................................10 Fadlan, Ahmad .......................................................44 Faithful Measures ...................................................39 Fandom, Second Edition ........................................30 Feld, Barry C. ...........................................................8 Feminists Rethink the Neoliberal State ......................28 Ferguson, Andrew Guthrie ......................................7 Fernandes, Leela.....................................................28 Filipino Primitive ....................................................36

WWW.N Y UP R E S S .O R G

Harrington, C. Lee ................................................30 Health Care Under the Knife.....................................48 Herrera, Ricardo A..................................................12 Holcomb, Justin S....................................................38 Hollywood’s Spies.....................................................2 Holt-Giménez, Eric ...............................................46 Homelessness in New York City..................................20 Horne, Gerald ..................................................10, 51 In the Presence of Power............................................40 Irwin, Robert..........................................................43

Keating, Christine..................................................25 Keywords for Latina/o Studies ..................................32 Kirkpatrick, Bill......................................................32 Klooster, Wim.........................................................14 Koot, Christian J.....................................................13 Kurpershoek, Marcel...............................................41 La Fountain-Stokes, Lawrence...............................32 Langston’s Salvation .................................................9 Leg over Leg Volumes One and Two ..........................44 Leg over Leg Volumes Three and Four ........................44 Legalizing LGBT Families.......................................24 Legally Straight ........................................................18 LGBTQ Politics .......................................................25 Life of Ibn Hanbal, The .............................................44

Toorawa, Shawkat M...............................................42 True Sex ...................................................................11 Trump in the White House ........................................47 Tussey, Ethan ...........................................................6 Unequal Coverage ...................................................21 Urban Church Imagined, The ...................................37 Urban, Andrew........................................................15 Urdang, Stephanie..................................................49 Vagle, Jeffrey L.........................................................19 Vargas, Deborah R...................................................32 Vitz, Evelyn Birge...................................................40 Waitzkin, Howard..................................................48 Warner, Marina ......................................................42 Weddle, David L. ...................................................38 Wedlocked... ..............................................................18 ............................5 What Works for Women at Work .....4 What Works for Women at Work: A Workbook Williams, Joan C ..................................................4, 5 Williams, Rhys H. .................................................37 Young, Ralph ..........................................................12 Zimring, Carl A......................................................17

Main, Thomas J. .....................................................20 Manifest Destinies, Second Edition .........................14 Mapping My Way Home...........................................49 Martin, Patricia Yancey..........................................26 Massa, Mark...........................................................39 McRuer, Robert......................................................35 Messerschmidt, James W........................................26 Messner, Michael A................................................26 Mirabal, Nancy Raquel ..........................................32 Mission to the Volga ..................................................44 Modern Imperialism, Monopoly Finance Capital, and Marx’s Law of Value ............................50 Moore, Deborah Dash..............................................3 Moore, Lisa Jean.....................................................22 Mulligan, Jessica M.................................................21 Multhaup, Marina....................................................4 Multiracial Parents .................................................28 Neuman, Johanna......................................................1 Noble, Safiya Umoja ...............................................29 Ogletree, Charles J. Jr..............................................20 Open TV...................................................................31 Osborne, Catherine................................................39 Panitch, Leo............................................................52 Personalized Medicine... ...........................................22 Policy Drift .............................................................25 Pomerantz, Maurice A............................................40 Practice of Islam in America, The.... ...........................36 Practices of Hope, The ...............................................35 Prainsack, Barbara..................................................22 Principles of Sufism, The............................................44 Procrastination Economy, The .....................................6 Rabin, Shari ............................................................16 Racial Reconciliation and the Healing of a Nation .....20

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NYU Press Fall 2017 Catalog  

Uncover how spies brought down Nazis in Hollywood, what big data means for policing, the racism behind Google, the anxiety of the Gig Econom...

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