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GENERAL INTEREST

A call to end an intolerable policy

Ending Zero Tolerance The Crisis of Absolute School Discipline Derek W. Black In the era of zero tolerance, we are flooded with stories about schools issuing draconian punishments for relatively innocent behavior. One student was suspended for chewing a Pop-Tart into the shape of a gun. Another was expelled for cursing on social media from home. Suspension and expulsion rates have doubled over the past three decades as zero tolerance policies have become the normal response to a host of minor infractions. Students from all demographic groups have suffered, but minority and special needs students have suffered the most. On average, middle and high schools suspend one out of four African American students at least once a year. The effects of these policies are devastating. Just one suspension in the ninth grade doubles the likelihood that a student will drop out. Fifty percent of students who drop out are subsequently unemployed. Eighty percent of prisoners are high school drop outs. The risks associated with suspension and expulsion are so high that, as a practical matter, they amount to educational death penalties, not behavioral correction tools.

DEREK W. BLACK is Professor of Law at the University of South Carolina School of Law. He is a former attorney with the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.

Ending Zero Tolerance answers the calls of grassroots communities pressing for integration and increased education funding with a complete rethinking of school discipline. Derek Black weaves stories about individual students, lessons from social science, and the outcomes of court cases to unearth a shockingly irrational system of punishment. While schools and legislatures have proven unable and unwilling to amend their failing policies, Ending Zero Tolerance argues for constitutional protections to check abuses in school discipline and lays out ways in which courts should re-engage to enforce students’ rights and support broader reforms. SEPTEMBER 256 PAGES CLOTH • 978-1-4798-7702-7 • $24.95T (£18.99) In the Families, Law, and Society series CURRENT AFFAIRS WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

FA L L 2016 • NY U PRESS

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GENERAL INTEREST

The possible future of a flawed policy

STOP AND FRISK

Stop and Frisk

The Use and Abuse of a Controversial Policing Tactic Michael D. White and Henry F. Fradella

“The most comprehensive discussion of the topic to date….White and Fradella offer plausible recommendations for reining in this contentious police practice that promises public safety, but in some communities, has replaced fear of crime with fear of the police.” Delores Jones-Brown, co-author of Policing and Minority Communities MICHAEL D. WHITE is Professor in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University and the Associate Director of ASU’s Center for Violence Prevention and Community Safety. His publications include Jammed Up: Bad Cops, Police Misconduct, and the New York City Police Department (NYU Press, 2012). HENRY F. FRADELLA is Professor and Associate Director in the School of Criminology and Criminal Justice at Arizona State University. His publications include America’s Courts and the Criminal Justice System.

No policing tactic has been more controversial than “stop and frisk,” whereby police officers stop, question and frisk ordinary citizens, who they may view as potential suspects, on the streets. As Michael White and Henry Fradella show in the first authoritative history and analysis of this tactic, there is a disconnect between our everyday understanding and the historical and legal foundations for this policing strategy. First ruled constitutional in 1968, stop and frisk would go on to become a central tactic of modern day policing, particularly by the New York City Police Department. By 2011 the NYPD recorded 685,000 ‘stop-question-and-frisk’ interactions with citizens; yet, in 2013, a landmark decision ruled that the police had over- and mis-used this tactic. Stop and Frisk tells the story of how and why this happened, and offers ways that police departments can better serve their citizens. While much of the book focuses on the NYPD’s use of stop and frisk, examples are also shown from police departments around the country, including Philadelphia, Baltimore, Chicago, Newark and Detroit. White and Fradella argue that not only does stop and frisk have a legal place in 21st-century policing but also that it can be judiciously used to help deter crime in a way that respects the rights and needs of citizens. They also offer insight into the history of racial injustice that has all too often been a feature of American policing’s history and propose concrete strategies that every police department can follow to improve the way they police. A hard-hitting yet nuanced analysis, Stop and Frisk shows how the tactic can be a just act of policing and, in turn, shows how to police in the best interest of citizens.

OCTOBER 256 PAGES • 10 black & white illustrations CLOTH • 978-1-4798-3588-1 • $30.00A (£22.99) CURRENT AFFAIRS • CRIMINOLOGY 2

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GENERAL INTEREST

What lies ahead for the Black Church

The Ground Has Shifted

The Future of the Black Church in PostRacial America Walter Earl Fluker If we are in a post-racial era, then what is the future of the Black Church? If the U.S. will at some time in the future be free from discrimination and prejudices that are based on race, how will that affect the church’s very identity? In The Ground Has Shifted, Walter Earl Fluker passionately and thoroughly discusses the historical and current role of the Black Church and argues that older race-based language and metaphors of religious discourse have outlived their utility. He offers instead a larger, global vision for the Black Church that focuses on young black men and other disenfranchised groups who have been left behind in a world of globalized capital. With a compelling and lyrical writing style, Fluker argues that the church must find new ways to use race as an emancipatory instrument if it is to remain central in black life, and he points the way for a new generation of church leaders, scholars and activists to reclaim the black church’s historical identity and to turn to the task of infusing character, civility, and a sense of community among its congregants.

“This is the most decisive statement on postracialism, the American dilemma, and black church positive agency. On each page, Fluker’s writing moans and wails us out of southern African American religiosity, up north into the fragmentation of black urban life, and into an ethical world of hope for an America becoming. A defining direction and persuasive proposal on how to get us to healthy community.” Dwight N. Hopkins, author of Being Human: Race, Culture, and Religion WALTER EARL FLUKER is the Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of Ethical Leadership, the editor of the Howard Thurman Papers Project, and the Director of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Initiative for the Development of Ethical Leadership (MLKIDEAL) at Boston University School of Theology and the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences.

NOVEMBER 304 PAGES CLOTH • 978-1-4798-1038-3 • $35.00A (£26.99) In the Religion, Race, and Ethnicity series RELIGION • AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

FA L L 2016 • NY U PRESS

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GENERAL INTEREST

When a single image captures a movement

Make Art Not War

Political Protest Posters from the Twentieth Century Edited by Ralph Young Two of the most recognizable images of twentiethcentury art are Pablo Picasso’s “Guernica” and the rather modest mass-produced poster by an unassuming illustrator, Lorraine Schneider “War is Not Healthy for Children and Other Living Things.” From Picasso’s masterpiece to a humble piece of poster art, artists have used their talents to express dissent and to protest against injustice and immorality.

RALPH YOUNG is Professor of History at Temple University. He is the author of Dissent: The History of an American Idea (NYU Press, 2015) and Dissent in America: The Voices That Shaped a Nation, a compilation of primary documents of 400 years of American dissenters.

As the face of many political movements, posters are essential for fueling recruitment, spreading propaganda, and sustaining morale. Disseminated by governments, political parties, labor unions and other organizations, political posters transcend time and span the entire spectrum of political affiliations and philosophies. Drawing on the celebrated collection in the Tamiment Library’s Poster and Broadside Collection at New York University, Ralph Young has compiled an extraordinarily visceral collection of posters that represent the progressive protest movements of the twentieth century: labor, civil rights, the Vietnam War, LGBT rights, feminism, and other minority rights. Make Art Not War can be enjoyed on aesthetic grounds alone, and also offers fascinating and revealing insights into twentieth century cultural, social, and political history.

NOVEMBER 128 PAGES • 87 color illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-1367-4 • $29.95T (£22.99) A Washington Mews title POLITICS • HISTORY 4

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GENERAL INTEREST

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GENERAL INTEREST

The changing face of a historic neighborhood

The Jews of Harlem The Rise, Decline, and Revival of a Jewish Community Jeffrey S. Gurock

New York Times columnist David W. Dunlap wrote a decade ago that “on the map of the Jewish Diaspora, Harlem is Atlantis...A vibrant hub of industry, artistry and wealth is all but forgotten. It is as if Jewish Harlem sank 70 years ago beneath waves of memory beyond recall.” During World War I, Harlem was home to the second largest Jewish community in America. But in the 1920s Jewish residents began to scatter to other parts of Manhattan, to the outer boroughs, and to other cities. Now nearly a century later, Jews are returning uptown to a gentrified Harlem. JEFFREY S. GUROCK is Libby M. Klaperman Professor of Jewish History at Yeshiva University (NY). He is the author or editor of eighteen books, including the prize-winning Jews in Gotham: New York Jews in a Changing City, 1920-2010 (NYU Press, 2013). Also of interest:

Jews in Gotham New York Jews in a Changing City, 1920-2010

JANUARY 2015 368 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-7846-8 • $24.00S

The Jews of Harlem follows Jews into, out of, and back into this renowned metropolitan neighborhood over the course of a century and a half. It analyzes the complex set of forces that brought several generations of central European, eastern European, and Sephardic Jews to settle there. It explains the dynamics that led Jews to exit this part of Gotham and explores the enduring Jewish presence uptown after Harlem became overwhelmingly black and decidedly poor. And it looks at the beginnings of Jewish return as part of the transformation of New York City in our present era. The Jews of Harlem contributes much to our understanding of Jewish and African American history in the metropolis as it highlights the ever-changing story of America’s largest city. With The Jews of Harlem, the beginning of Dunlap’s hoped-for resurfacing of this neighborhood’s history is underway. Its contemporary story merits telling even as the memories of what Jewish Harlem once was warrants recall.

OCTOBER 320 PAGES • 13 black & white illustrations CLOTH • 978-1-4798-0116-9 • $35.00A (£26.99) HISTORY • NEW YORK CITY 6

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GENERAL INTEREST

Visit a village of foolish souls

How the Wise Men Got to Chelm The Life and Times of a Yiddish Folk Tradition Ruth von Bernuth When God created the world, so it is said, he sent out an angel with a bag of foolish souls with instructions to distribute them equally all over the world—one fool per town. But the angel’s bag broke and all the souls spilled out onto the same spot. They built a settlement where they landed: the town is known as Chelm. The collected tales of these fools, or “wise men,” of Chelm constitute the best-known folktale tradition of the Jews of eastern Europe. This tradition includes a sprawling repertoire of stories about the alleged intellectual limitations of the members of this old and important Jewish community. Chelm did not make its debut in the role of the foolish shtetl par excellence until late in the nineteenth century. Since then, however, the town has led a double life—as a real city in eastern Poland and as an imaginary place onto which questions of Jewish identity, community, and history have been projected. How the Wise Men Got to Chelm is the first in-depth study of Chelm literature and its relationship to its literary precursors. By placing literary Chelm and its “foolish” antecedents in a broader historical context, it shows how they have functioned for over three hundred years as models of society, somewhere between utopia and dystopia. These imaginary foolish towns have enabled writers both to entertain and highlight a variety of societal problems, a function that literary Chelm continues to fulfill in Jewish literature to this day.

“Using the example of ‘foolish’ culture, von Bernuth shows that Jews shared the assumptions, themes, and expressions of the general German culture, while lending that culture a Jewish inflection. Yet, social barriers persisted. Von Bernuth illuminates this paradoxical combination of cultural partnership and social alienation, showcasing the relationship between minority and majority groups. Her book is a milestone in both literary history and cultural studies.” Moshe Rosman, author of How Jewish Is Jewish History? RUTH VON BERNUTH is Associate Professor in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures and Director of the Carolina Center for Jewish Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

OCTOBER 336 PAGES • 16 black & white illustrations CLOTH • 978-1-4798-2844-9 • $35.00A (£26.99) LITERATURE • JEWISH STUDIES WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

FA L L 2016 • NY U PRESS

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GENERAL INTEREST

Because someone should have to pay

The Case for the Corporate Death Penalty

Restoring Law and Order on Wall Street Mary Kreiner Ramirez and Steven A. Ramirez

MARY KREINER RAMIREZ is professor of law at Washburn University School of Law. She is a former prosecutor for the Department of Justice Antitrust Division, where she prosecuted white collar criminals. STEVEN A. RAMIREZ is a Professor of Law and Associate Dean at Loyola University of Chicago, where he also serves as Director of the Business Law Center. He previously served as an Enforcement Attorney for the Securities and Exchange Commission and a Senior Attorney for the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. He is the author of Lawless Capitalism (NYU Press, 2012).

JANUARY 288 PAGES • 2 black & white illustrations CLOTH • 978-1-4798-8157-4 • $30.00A (£22.99) CURRENT AFFAIRS 8

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An unprecedented breakdown in the rule of law occurred in the United States after the 2008 financial collapse. Bank of America, JPMorgan, Citigroup, Goldman Sachs, and other large banks settled securities fraud claims with the Securities and Exchange Commission for failing to disclose the risks of subprime mortgages they sold to the investing public. But a corporation cannot commit fraud except through human beings working at and managing the firm. Rather than breaking up these powerful megabanks, essentially imposing a corporate death penalty, the government simply accepted fines that essentially punished innocent shareholders instead of senior leaders at the megabanks. It allowed the real wrongdoers to walk away from criminal responsibility. In The Case for the Corporate Death Penalty, Mary Kreiner Ramirez and Steven A. Ramirez examine the best available evidence about the wrongdoing underlying the financial crisis. They reveal that the government failed to use its most powerful law enforcement tools despite overwhelming proof of wide-ranging and large-scale fraud on Wall Street before, during, and after the crisis. The pattern of criminal indulgences exposes the onset of a new degree of crony capitalism in which the most economically and political powerful can commit financial crimes of vast scale with criminal and regulatory immunity. The Case for the Corporate Death Penalty shows that this new lawlessness poses a profound threat that urgently demands political action and proposes attainable measures to restore the rule of law in the financial sector.

1.800.996.NYUP


GENERAL INTEREST

Honoring New York’s past

The Landmarks of New York

The Landmarks of New York

An Illustrated, Comprehensive Record of New York City’s Historic Buildings, Sixth Edition

An Illustrated, Comprehensive Record of New York City’s Historic Buildings

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel As the definitive resource on the architectural history of New York City, The Landmarks of New York documents and illustrates the 1,352 individual landmarks and 135 historic districts that have been accorded landmark status by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission since its establishment in 1965. Arranged chronologically by date of construction, the book offers a sequential overview of the city’s architectural history and richness, presenting a broad range of styles and building types: colonial farmhouses, Gilded Age mansions, churches, schools, libraries, museums, and the great twentieth-century skyscrapers that are recognized throughout the world. That so many of these structures have endured is due, in large measure, to the efforts of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. Since the commission was established, New York City has become the leader of the preservation movement in the United States. The Landmarks of New York includes such iconic structures as Grand Central Station, the Chrysler Building, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Carnegie Hall, as well as those that may be less well known: the Pieter Claesen Wyckoff House in Brooklyn, the oldest structure in New York City; the Bowne House in Queens, the birthplace of American religious freedom; the Watchtower in Harlem; the New York Botanical Garden; and Sailors Snug Harbor. The sixth edition adds 106 new individual landmarks, two special addenda on the hotly-contested “backlog” and resultant 30 pending designations, over 150 new photographs, and new historic district maps.

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sixt h e di t ion

Ba r ba r a l e e Di a monst ein-Spie lvoge l

Praise for the Fifth Edition: “A spectacular book….Diamonstein-Spielvogel has proven that New York City cares deeply about its past and its connections to the present and future.” Gotham Magazine “To read this book from cover to cover is to reread the past 400 years of New York history.…Highly recommended.” Library Journal BARBARALEE DIAMONSTEIN-SPIELVOGEL is the founder and chair of the New York Landmarks50 Alliance, chairperson of the Historic Landmarks Preservation Center and vice-chair of the New York State Council on the Arts. She is also a commissioner of the American Battle Monuments Commission, and a director of the Trust for the National Mall. She served as the first director of the Office of Cultural Affairs of New York City, and is the longest-serving commissioner of the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission.

OCTOBER 912 PAGES • black & white illustrations throughout CLOTH • 978-1-4798-8301-1 • $75.00A (£58.00) A Washington Mews title HISTORY • ARCHITECTURE • NEW YORK CITY FA L L 2016 • NY U PRESS

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GENERAL INTEREST

Showcasing how religion and race are bound together in black new religious movements

New World A-Coming Black Religion and Racial Identity During the Great Migration Judith Weisenfeld Black Religion and Racial Identity During the Great Migration

“I have long been fascinated by the black religious movements of the Great Migration, whose members rejected Christianity and Negro identity as false. In changing their names, adopting colorful dress, and taking up novel religious practices, they broke with the past and preached new possibilities for blacks in America. My book examines the religious worlds, family lives, community formations, and political perspectives of the earliest members of these groups. Readers will gain fresh insight into the power of both race and religion in African American history by following the path such women and men took to remake themselves through embrace of new religious and racial identities.” --Judith Weisenfeld

JUDITH WEISENFELD is Agate Brown and George L. Collord Professor in the Department of Religion at Princeton University. She is the author of Hollywood Be Thy Name: African American Religion in American Film, 1929-1949 and African American Women and Christian Activism: New York’s Black YWCA, 1905-1945. FEBRUARY 368 PAGES • 28 black & white illustrations CLOTH • 978-1-4798-8880-1 • $35.00A (£26.99) HISTORY • RELIGION • AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES 10

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When Joseph Nathaniel Beckles registered for the draft in 1942, he rejected the racial categories presented to him and persuaded the registrar to cross out the check mark she had placed next to Negro and substitute “Ethiopian Hebrew.” “God did not make us Negroes,” declared religious leaders in black communities of the early twentieth-century urban North. They insisted that so-called Negroes are, in reality, Ethiopian Hebrews, Asiatic Muslims, or raceless children of God. Rejecting conventional American racial classification, many black southern migrants and immigrants from the Caribbean embraced these alternative visions of black history, racial identity, and collective future, thereby reshaping the black religious and racial landscape. Focusing on the Moorish Science Temple, the Nation of Islam, Father Divine’s Peace Mission Movement, and a number of congregations of Ethiopian Hebrews, Judith Weisenfeld contends that the appeal of these groups lay not only in the new religious opportunities membership provided, but also in the novel ways they formulated a religio-racial identity. Arguing that members of these groups understood their religious and racial identities as divinelyordained and inseparable, the book examines how this sense of self shaped their conceptions of their bodies, families, religious and social communities, space and place, and political sensibilities. Weisenfeld draws on extensive archival research and incorporates a rich array of sources to highlight the experiences of average members. The book demonstrates that the efforts by members of these movements to contest conventional racial categorization contributed to broader discussions in black America about the nature of racial identity and the collective future of black people that still resonate today. 1.800.996.NYUP


GENERAL INTEREST

An intimate portrait of a towering figure

Jacob Neusner

An American Jewish Iconoclast Aaron W. Hughes

Jacob Neusner (born 1932) is one of the most important figures in the shaping of modern American Judaism. He was pivotal in transforming the study of Judaism from an insular project only conducted by— and of interest to—religious adherents to one which now flourishes in the secular setting of the university. He is also one of the most colorful, creative, and difficult figures in the American academy. But even those who disagree with Neusner’s academic approach to ancient rabbinic texts have to engage with his pioneering methods. In this comprehensive biography, Aaron W. Hughes shows Neusner to be much more than a scholar of rabbinics. He is a social commentator, a postHolocaust theologian, and an outspoken political figure active in public debates especially during the height of the cultural wars of the 1980s. Neusner’s life reflects the story of what happened as Jews migrated to the suburbs in the late 1940s, daring to imagine new lives for themselves as they successfully integrated into the fabric of American society. It is also the story of how American Jews tried to make sense of the world in the aftermath of the extermination of European Jewry and the subsequent creation of the State of Israel in 1948, and how they sought to define what it meant to be an American Jew.

“Aaron Hughes has written a comprehensive, compelling, and candid intellectual portrait of Jacob Neusner and his unparalleled lifetime of achievements…Hughes has succeeded brilliantly in highlighting the singular significance Neusner holds as an academic, as a religious thinker, and as a public intellectual. Hughes has given his readers a captivating intellectual biography to savor!” David Ellenson, Chancellor Emeritus and former President of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion AARON W. HUGHES holds the Philip S. Bernstein Chair of Jewish Studies at the University of Rochester.

Unlike other great American Jewish thinkers, Neusner was born in the U.S., and his Judaism was informed by an American ethos. It is an American Judaism, one that has enabled American Jews—the freest in history—to be fully American and fully Jewish.

SEPTEMBER 336 PAGES CLOTH • 978-1-4798-8585-5 • $35.00A (£26.99) BIOGRAPHY • HISTORY • JEWISH STUDIES WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

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GENERAL INTEREST

Protecting the marketplace of ideas

Free Speech Beyond Words The Surprising Reach of the First Amendment Mark V. Tushnet, Alan K. Chen and Joseph Blocher The Supreme Court has unanimously held that Jackson Pollock’s paintings, Arnold Schöenberg’s music, and Lewis Carroll’s poem “Jabberwocky” are “unquestionably shielded” by the First Amendment. Nonrepresentational art, instrumental music, and nonsense: all receive constitutional coverage under an amendment protecting “the freedom of speech,” even though none involves what we typically think of as speech—the use of words to convey meaning.

MARK V. TUSHNET is William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Law at Harvard University and the author of Why the Constitution Matters. ALAN K. CHEN is William M. Beaney Memorial Research Chair & Professor of Law at the University of Denver Sturm College of Law. He is the co-author of Public Interest Lawyering: A Contemporary Perspective. JOSEPH BLOCHER is Professor of Law at Duke University School of Law.

FEBRUARY 272 PAGES • 16 black & white illustrations CLOTH • 978-1-4798-8028-7 • $28.00A (£20.99) POLITICS • LAW 12

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As a legal matter, the Court’s conclusion is clearly correct, but its premises are murky, and they raise difficult questions about the possibilities and limitations of law and expression. Nonrepresentational art, instrumental music, and nonsense do not employ language in any traditional sense, and sometimes do not even involve the transmission of articulable ideas. How, then, can they be treated as “speech” for constitutional purposes? What does the difficulty of that question suggest for First Amendment law and theory? And can law resolve such inquiries without relying on aesthetics, ethics, and philosophy? Comprehensive and compelling, this book represents a sustained effort to account, constitutionally, for these modes of “speech.” While it is firmly centered in debates about First Amendment issues, it addresses them in a novel way, using subject matter that is uniquely well suited to the task, and whose constitutional salience has been under-explored. Drawing on existing legal doctrine, aesthetics, and analytical philosophy, three celebrated law scholars show us how and why speech beyond words should be fundamental to our understanding of the First Amendment.

1.800.996.NYUP


GENERAL INTEREST

Commemorating 100 years of Irish resistance

Atlas of the Irish Revolution Edited by John Crowley, Mike Murphy and Donal Ó Drisceoil.

The Atlas of the Irish Revolution is a definitive resource that brings to life this pivotal moment in Irish history and nation-building. Published to coincide with the centenary of the Easter Rising, this comprehensive and visually compelling volume brings together all of the current research on the revolutionary period, with contributions from leading scholars from around the world and from many disciplines. A chronological and thematically organized treatment of the period serves as the core of the Atlas, enhanced by over 400 color illustrations, maps and photographs. This academic tour de force illuminates the effects of the Revolution on Irish culture and politics, both past and present, and animates the period for anyone with a connection to or interest in Irish history. Also available:

Atlas of the Great Irish Famine “An indispensable reference work...” Times Literary Supplement

JOHN CROWLEY is Lecturer in the Department of Geography, University College Cork. He is co-editor of Atlas of the Great Irish Famine, the Atlas of Cork City and co-author of The Iveragh Peninsula: A Cultural Atlas of the Ring of Kerry with John Sheehan. MIKE MURPHY has been cartographer at the Department of Geography, University College Cork for over twenty-five years. He has worked on the Atlas of the Great Irish Famine, Atlas of Cork City and The Iveragh Peninsula: A Cultural Atlas of the Ring of Kerry. DONAL Ó DRISCEOIL is a lecturer in History at University College Cork.

JUNE 2012 512 PAGES CLOTH • 978-0-8147-7148-8 • $75.00S (£49.00) CUSA

OCTOBER 750 PAGES • 500 color illustrations CLOTH • 978-1-4798-3428-0 • $75.00S until March 2017, $99.00S thereafter CUSA HISTORY • REFERENCE WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

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SO CIAL SCIENCE

Botox Nation

Pride Parades

Changing the Face of America

How a Parade Changed the World

Dana Berkowitz

Katherine McFarland Bruce

The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery estimates there are about two-and-a-half million Botox procedures performed annually, and that number continues to increase. The procedure is used as a preventive measure against aging and Da na Ber kow itz a means by which bodies, particularly women’s, can be transformed and “improved” through the appearance of youth. But why is Botox so popular, and why is aging such a terrifying concept?

BO T OX N ATION

C h a n g i n g t h e Fa c e o f A m e r i c a

Botox Nation draws from engaging, in-depth interviews with Botox users and providers as well as Dana Berkowitz’s own experiences receiving the injections. The interviews reveal the personal motivations for using Botox and help unpack how anti-aging practices are conceived by, and resonate with, everyday people. Berkowitz is particularly interested in how Botox is now being targeted to younger women; since Botox is a procedure that must be continually administered to work, the strategic choice to market to younger women, Berkowitz argues, aims to create lifetime consumers. Berkowitz also analyzes magazine articles, advertisements, and even medical documents to consider how narratives of aging are depicted. The first in-depth social investigation into the development of Botox as a phenomenon, Botox Nation is a captivating and critical story of how norms about bodies, gender, and aging are constructed and reproduced on both cultural and individual levels. DANA BERKOWITZ is Associate Professor of Sociology and Women’s and Gender Studies at Louisiana State University.

PRIDE PARADES

HOW A PARADE CHANGED THE WORLD KATHERINE McFARLAND BRUCE

“Pride is at the heart of most social movements, and nothing embodies it better than a joyous public parade. This is a charming, stirring book, one of the best yet about the modern LGBT movement.” James M. Jasper, author of Protest: A Cultural Introduction to Social Movements

On June 28, 1970, two thousand gay and lesbian activists in New York, Los Angeles, and Chicago paraded down the streets of their cities in a new kind of social protest, one marked by celebration, fun, and unashamed declaration of a stigmatized identity. Forty-five years later, over six million people annually participate in 115 Pride parades across the United States. They march with church congregations and college gay-straight alliance groups, perform dance routines and marching band numbers, and gather with friends to cheer from the sidelines. With vivid imagery, and showcasing the voices of these participants, Pride Parades tells the story of Pride from its beginning in 1970 to 2010. Though often dismissed as frivolous spectacles, the author builds a convincing case for the importance of Pride parades as cultural protests at the heart of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community. Weaving together interviews, archival reports, quantitative data, and ethnographic observations at six diverse contemporary parades in New York City, Salt Lake City, San Diego, Burlington, Fargo, and Atlanta, Bruce describes how Pride parades are a venue for participants to challenge the everyday cultural stigma of being queer in America, all with a flair and sense of fun absent from typical protests. Unlike political protests that aim to change government laws and policies, Pride parades are coordinated, concerted attempts to improve the standing of LGBT people in American culture. KATHERINE MCFARLAND BRUCE is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Salem College in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

JANUARY 256 PAGES • 14 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-2526-4 • $27.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-4794-5 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Intersections series SOCIOLOGY • MEDICINE 14

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OCTOBER 320 PAGES • 25 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-6954-1 • $28.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-0361-3 • $89.00X (£68.00) LGBT STUDIES • SOCIOLOGY 1.800.996.NYUP


SO CIAL SCIENCE

Is prejudice a disease?

Sander L. Gilman and

Are Racists Crazy? James M. Thomas

Sander L. Gilman & James M. Thomas

How Prejudice, Racism, and Antisemitism Became Markers of Insanity

are racists crazy?

Sander L. Gilman and James M. Thomas In 2012, an interdisciplinary team of scientists at the University of Oxford reported that — based on their clinical experiment — the beta-blocker drug, Propranolol, could reduce implicit racial bias among its users. Shortly after the experiment, an article How in Prejudice, Time Magazine cited the study, posing the question: Racism, Is racism becoming a mental illness? In Are Racistsand Antisemitism Crazy? Sander Gilman and James Thomas trace Became the idea of race and racism as psychopathological Markers of categories, from mid-nineteenth century Europe, to Insanity contemporary America, up to the aforementioned clinical experiment at the University of Oxford, and ask a slightly different question than that posed by Time: How did racism become a mental illness? Using historical, archival, and content analysis, the authors provide a rich account of how the nineteenth century ‘Sciences of Man’—including anthropology, medicine, and biology—used race as a means of defining psychopathology and how assertions about race and madness became embedded within disciplines that deal with mental health and illness. An illuminating and riveting history of the discourse on racism, antisemitism, and psychopathology, Are Racists Crazy? connects past and present claims about race and racism, showing the dangerous implications of this specious line of thought for today.

“Sander Gilman and James Thomas have provided a unique intellectual and political history of racial theorizing – and have generated a virtual ‘cognitive road map’ of how anti-Semitism as leitmotif has played such a powerful, even dominant role in the way scholars and researchers have approached the subject matter, whether in Europe, the United States, or South Africa. Few works even attempt to piece together so much material, while pulling a convincing thread through a sustained argument.” Troy Duster, author of Backdoor to Eugenics SANDER L. GILMAN is Distinguished Professor of the Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Professor of Psychiatry, at Emory University. He is the author or editor of more than ninety books, including Seeing the Insane. JAMES M. THOMAS is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Mississippi. He is the author of Working to Laugh: Assembling Difference in American Stand-Up Comedy Venues and Affective Labour: (Dis) Assembling Distance and Difference. DECEMBER 368 PAGES CLOTH • 978-1-4798-5612-1 • $35.00A (£26.99) In the Biopolitics series PSYCHOLOGY

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SO CIAL SCIENCE

Race and the Politics of Deception

From Deportation to Prison

The Making of an American City

The Politics of Immigration Enforcement in Post-Civil Rights America

Christopher Mele

Patrisia Macías-Rojas

What is the relationship between race and space, and how do racial politics inform the organization and development of urban locales? In Race and the Politics of Deception, Christopher Mele unpacks America’s history of dealing with racial problems through the inequitable use of public space. Mele focuses on Chester, Pennsylvania—a small city comprised of primarily low-income, black residents, roughly twenty miles south of Philadelphia. Like many cities throughout the United States, Chester is experiencing post-industrial decline. A development plan touted as a way to “save” the city, proposes to turn one section into a desirable waterfront destination, while leaving the rest of the struggling residents in fractured communities. Dividing the city into spaces of tourism and consumption versus the everyday spaces of lowincome residents, Mele argues, segregates the community by creating a racialized divide. While these development plans are described as socially inclusive and economically revitalizing, Mele asserts that political leaders and real estate developers intentionally exclude certain types of people—most often, low-income people of color. Race and the Politics of Deception provides a revealing look at how our ever-changing landscape is being strategically divided along lines of class and race. CHRISTOPHER MELE is an urban sociologist at the University at Buffalo. He is the author or editor of several books, including Selling the Lower East Side: Culture, Real Estate, and Resistance in New York City.

“Patrisia Macias-Rojas’ commanding book narrates the profound restructuring of immigration policies in the AFTER MARRIAGE US. Using rich ethnographic EQUALITY data and sharp policy analyses, THE FUTURE OF she shows how the merging of LGBT RIGHTS enforcement and deportation policies with the rigid structures of the criminal justice system CAR LOS A . BAL L result in a vicious punishment regime...essential reading for scholars, activists and policy makers.” Beth E. Richie, author of Arrested Justice: Black Women, Violence, and America’s Prison Nation EDITED BY

Criminal prosecutions for immigration offenses have more than doubled over the last two decades, as national debates about immigration rights and reforms became headline topics. What lies behind this unprecedented increase? Why are immigration violations treated as criminal offenses? How do deportation, detention, and criminal prosecution actually operate, and how do enforcement priorities that target “felons” and “criminals” work in policy and practice? Today’s border policing and immigration law enforcement practices are less concerned with distinguishing immigrants from citizens than with classifying people as either deserving or undeserving of rights: as “victims” or “criminals.” The distinction has serious implications for migrants and residents of predominantly Latina/o border communities, and Patrisia Macías-Rojas shows how, within this new regime, such strategic divisions serve to justify aggressive punishment for those branded as criminals. Overall, From Deportation to Prison presents a thorough and captivating exploration of how mass incarceration and law and order policies of the past forty years have transformed immigration and border enforcement in unexpected and important ways. PATRISIA MACÍAS-ROJAS is Assistant Professor of Sociology and Latin American and Latino Studies at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

JANUARY 208 PAGES • 21 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-8043-0 • $27.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1 4798-6609-0 • $89.00X (£68.99) SOCIOLOGY • URBAN STUDIES 16

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OCTOBER 240 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-3118-0 • $28.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-0466-5 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Latina/o Sociology series SOCIOLOGY 1.800.996.NYUP


SO CIAL SCIENCE

New in Paperback

The Price of Paradise

Surviving Poverty

The Costs of Inequality and a Vision for a More Equitable America

Joan Maya Mazelis

Creating Sustainable Ties among the Poor

David Dante Troutt “A forcefully presented eye-opener sure to provoke controversy as well as interest.” Kirkus Reviews American communities are facing chronic problems: fiscal stress, urban decline, environmental sprawl, mass incarceration, political isolation, disproportionate foreclosures and severe public health risks. In The Price of Paradise, David Troutt argues that it is a lack of mutuality in our local decision making that has led to this looming crisis facing cities and local governments. Arguing that there are structural flaws in the American dream, Troutt investigates the role that place plays in our thinking and how we have organized our communities to create or deny opportunity. Legal rules and policies that promoted mobility for most citizens simultaneously stifled and segregated a growing minority by race, class and—most importantly—place. A conversation about America at the crossroads, The Price of Paradise is a multilayered exploration of the legal, economic and cultural forces that contribute to the squeeze on the middle class, the hidden dangers of growing income and wealth inequality and the literature on how growth and consumption patterns are environmentally unsustainable. DAVID DANTE TROUTT is Professor of Law and Justice John J. Francis Scholar at the Rutgers University-Newark Law School. He also serves as Director of the Center on Law in Metropolitan Equity at Rutgers Law School.

Surviving Poverty carefully examines the experiences of people living below the SURVIVING POVERTY AFTER poverty level, looking in Creating MARRIAGE Sustainable Ties among the Poor particular at the tension EQUALITY THE FUTURE OF between social isolation and LGBT RIGHTS social ties among the poor. Joan Maya Mazelis draws on in-depth interviews with CAR LOS A . BAL L poor people in Philadelphia to explore how they survive and the benefits they gain by being connected to one another. Half of the study participants are members of the Kensington Welfare Rights Union, a distinctive organization that brings poor people together in the struggle to survive. The mutually supportive relationships the members create, which last for years, even decades, contrast dramatically with the experiences of participants without such affiliation. Joan Maya Mazelis

EDITED BY

In interviews, participants discuss their struggles and hardships, and their responses highlight the importance of cultivating relationships among people living in poverty. Surviving Poverty documents the ways in which social ties become beneficial and sustainable, allowing members to share their skills and resources and providing those living in similar situations a space to unite and speak collectively to the growing and deepening poverty in the United States. The study concludes that productive, sustainable ties between poor people have an enduring and valuable impact. Grounding her study in current debates about the importance of alleviating poverty, Mazelis proposes new modes of improving the lives of the poor. Surviving Poverty is invested in both structural and social change and demonstrates the power that support services can have to foster relationships and build sustainable social ties for those living in poverty. JOAN MAYA MAZELIS is Assistant Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Criminal Justice at Rutgers University, Camden, and an affiliated scholar at Rutgers-Camden’s Center for Urban Research and Education.

OCTOBER 282 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-2880-7 • $25.00S (£18.99) CLOTH • 978-0-8147-6055-0 SOCIOLOGY • LAW WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

JANUARY 304 PAGES • 5 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-7008-0 • $28.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-7359-3 • $89.00X (£68.00) SOCIOLOGY FA L L 2016 • NY U PRESS

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SO CIAL SCIENCE

Brown Bodies, White Babies The Politics of Cross-Racial Surrogacy Laura Harrison

L A U R A

H A R R I S O N

Plucked A History of Hair Removal Rebecca M. Herzig Named one of the best books of 2015 by The Economist

“Brown Bodies, White Babies reveals fresh insights on the politics of reproduction in the United States and globally by investigating the racialized and gendered meanings of kinship in the context of cross-racial gestational surrogacy...An important and provocative contribution to critical analyses of assisted reproduction.” Dorothy Roberts, author of Killing the Black Body: Race, Reproduction, and The Meaning of Liberty

Brown Bodies, White Babies focuses on the practice of cross-racial gestational surrogacy, in which a woman—through in-vitro fertilization using the sperm and egg of intended parents or donors— carries a pregnancy for intended parents of a different race. Focusing on the racial differences between parents and surrogates, this book is interested in how reproductive technologies intersect with race, particularly when brown bodies produce white babies. While the potential of reproductive technologies is far from predetermined, the ways in which these technologies are currently deployed often serve the interests of dominant groups, through the creation of white, middle-class, heteronormative families. Laura Harrison, providing an important understanding of the work of women of color as surrogates, connects this labor to the history of racialized reproduction in the United States. Joining the ongoing feminist debates surrounding reproduction, motherhood, race, and the body, Brown Bodies, White Babies ultimately critiques the new potentials for parenthood that put the very contours of kinship into question. LAURA HARRISON is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Gender and Women’s Studies at Minnesota State University, Mankato.

SEPTEMBER 320 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-9486-4 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-0817-5 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Intersections series SOCIOLOGY 18

New in Paperback

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“Humanity has used an impressive array of tools to remove hair. This is, biologically speaking, pretty strange. Most of earth’s mammals possess luxuriant fur. Only one seeks to remove it. Rebecca Herzig’s delightful history explains why: smooth skin is a cultural imperative.” The Economist From the clamshell razors and homemade lye depilatories used in colonial America to the diode lasers and prescription pharmaceuticals available today, Americans have used a staggering array of tools to remove hair deemed unsightly, unnatural, or excessive. How and when does hair become a problem—what makes some growth “excessive”? Who or what separates the necessary from the superfluous? In Plucked, Rebecca Herzig shows how, over time, dominant American beliefs about visible hair changed: where once elective hair removal was considered a “mutilation” practiced primarily by “savage” men, by the turn of the twentieth century, hair-free faces and limbs were expected for women. Herzig’s extraordinary account also reveals some of the collateral damage of the intensifying pursuit of hair-free skin. Moving beyond the experiences of particular patients or clients, Herzig describes the surprising histories of race, science, industry, and medicine behind today’s hair-removing tools. Plucked is an unsettling, gripping, and original tale of the lengths to which Americans will go to remove hair. REBECCA M. HERZIG is Christian A. Johnson Professor of Interdisciplinary Studies at Bates College. Her previous work includes Suffering for Science: Reason and Sacrifice in Modern America.

NOVEMBER 280 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-5281-9 • $19.95S (£14.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-4082-3 In the Biopolitics series SOCIOLOGY • SCIENCE 1.800.996.NYUP


SO CIAL SCIENCE

The everyday lives of exotic dancers

Stripped

BERNADETTE C. BARTON

More Stories from Exotic Dancers, Completely Revised and Updated Edition Bernadette C. Barton What kind of woman dances naked for money? Bernadette Barton takes us inside countless strip bars and clubs, from upscale to back road as well as those that specialize in lap dancing, table dancing, topless only, and peep shows, to reveal the startling lives of exotic dancers. Originally published in 2006, the product of years of first-hand research in strip clubs around the country, Stripped is a classic portrait of what it’s like for those who choose to strip as a profession. Barton explores why women begin stripping, the initial excitement and financial rewards of the work, the dangers of the life—namely, drugs and prostitution—and, inevitably, the difficulties in staying in the business over time, especially for their relationships, sexuality and selfesteem. In this completely revised and updated edition, Barton returns to the strip clubs she originally studied to observe the major changes in the industry that have occurred over the last decade. She examines how “raunch culture” affects exotic dancers’ treatment by their clientele, who are now accustomed to seeing nudity and sexualized performance in accessible, R and X -rated media from a variety of outlets, particularly the Internet. Barton explores how new media has transformed exotic dancing, allowing dancers to build an online brand, but also introducing possibilities for customers to take unauthorized nude photos and videos of the entertainers.. And finally, Barton speaks to new dancers as well as dancers she interviewed in the previous edition, examining how the toll of stripping still impacts the lives of exotic dancers in a changing industry.

STRIPPED

MORE STORIES FROM EXOTIC DANCERS

Completely Revised and Updated edition

Praise for the original edition: “Compelling. . . . This accessibly written, matterof-fact book makes important contributions to what is known about the lives and experiences of the growing number of women who ‘dance’ naked for money... Throughout, the author listens attentively to the shifting, insightful, diverse voices of women with whom she has a palpably respectful connection. Barton uses the complex picture that emerges to engage longstanding debates over the meanings of commodified femininity and sexuality.” Choice “Stripped is a revealing book about a revealing (and controversial) trade that focuses on a philosophical clash between old—and new—school feminism.” Courier-Journal BERNADETTE C. BARTON is Professor Sociology and Gender Studies at Morehead State University in Kentucky. She is the author of Pray the Gay Away: The Extraordinary Lives of Bible Belt Gays (NYU Press, 2014).

JANUARY 256 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-1569-2 • $26.00A (£19.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-9728-5 • $89.00X (£68.00) SOCIOLOGY • GENDER STUDIES WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

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SO CIAL SCIENCE

Fast Food Kids French Fries, Lunch Lines, and Social Ties Amy L. Best

In recent years, questions such as “what are kids eating?” and “who’s feeding our kids?” have sparked a torrent of public and policy debates as we increasingly focus our attention on the issue of childhood obesity. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that while 1 in 3 American children are either overweight or obese, that number is higher for children living in concentrated poverty. Enduring inequalities in communities, schools, and homes affect young people’s access to different types of food, with real consequences in life choices and health outcomes. Fast Food Kids sheds light on the social contexts in which kids eat, and the broader backdrop of social change in American life, demonstrating why attention to food’s social meaning is important to effective public health policy, particularly actions that focus on behavioral change and school food reforms. AMY L. BEST

fast food kids

French Fries, Lunch Lines, and Social Ties

Through in-depth interviews and observation with high school and college students, Amy Best provides rich narratives of the everyday life of youth, highlighting young people’s voices and perspectives and the places where they eat. Fast Food Kids examines the complex relationship between youth identity and food consumption, offering answers to those straightforward questions that require crucial and comprehensive solutions. AMY L. BEST is Professor of the Sociology at George Mason University. She is author of Prom Night: Youth, Schools and Popular Culture, which was selected for the 2002 American Educational Studies Association Critics’ Choice Award, and Fast Cars, Cool Rides: The Accelerating World of Youth and Their Cars (NYU Press, 2005).

New in Paperback

Cut It Out The C-Section Epidemic in America Theresa Morris

“Must Read! Anyone riveted by Ricki Lake’s documentary The Business of Being Born should snag a copy of Cut It Out.” Fit Pregnancy “In Cut It Out, [Morris] refreshingly steers clear of the home-birthing-good, hospitalsbad dogma that tends to dominate this conversation, instead encouraging empathy with all involved...Morris’s impressive research, as well as the solutions she offers to women, providers and policy planners, makes the book an important contribution to the C-section debate.” The New York Times Book Review Cut It Out examines the exponential increase in the United States of the most technological form of birth that exists: the cesarean section. While c-section births pose a higher risk of maternal death and medical complications, can have negative future reproductive consequences for the mother, increase the recovery time for mothers after birth, and cost almost twice as much as vaginal deliveries, the 2011 cesarean section rate of 33 percent is one of the highest recorded rates in U.S. history, and an increase of 50 percent over the past decade. How did this happen? Theresa Morris challenges most existing explanations of the unprecedented rise in c-section rates, arguing that there is a new culture within medicine that avoids risk or unpredictable outcomes and instead embraces planning and conservative choices. Based on 130 in-depth interviews with women who had just given birth, obstetricians, midwives, and labor and delivery nurses, Cut It Out provides a comprehensive, riveting look at a little-known epidemic that greatly affects the lives, health, and families of each and every woman in America. THERESA MORRIS is Associate Professor of Sociology at Texas A&M.

FEBRUARY 256 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-0232-6 • $26.00S (£19.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-4270-4 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Critical Perspectives on Youth series SOCIOLOGY 20

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NOVEMBER 255 PAGES • 5 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-0-8147-6412-1 • $19.95S (£14.99) CLOTH • 978-0-8147-6411-4 SOCIOLOGY • MEDICINE 1.800.996.NYUP


SO CIAL SCIENCE

Middle East Studies for the New Millennium

The Utopia Reader

Infrastructures of Knowledge

Edited by Gregory Claeys and Lyman Tower Sargent

Edited by Seteny Shami and Cynthia Miller-Idriss Few world regions today are of more pressing social and political interest than the Middle East: hardly a day has passed in the last decade without events there making global news. Understanding the region has never been more important, yet the field of Middle East studies in the United States is in flux, enmeshed in ongoing controversies about the relationship between knowledge and power, the role of the federal government at universities, and ways of knowing “other” cultures and places. Assembling a wide range of scholars, Middle East Studies for the New Millennium explores the big-picture issues affecting the field, from the geopolitics of knowledge production to structural changes in the university to broader political and public contexts. Tracing the development of the field from the early days of the American university to the “Islamophobia” of the present day, this book explores Middle East studies as a discipline and, more generally, its impact on the social sciences and academia. Topics include how different disciplines engage with Middle East scholars, how American universities teach Middle East studies and related fields, and the relationship between scholarship and U.S.-Arab relations, among others. Middle East Studies for the New Millennium presents a comprehensive, authoritative overview of how this crucial field of academic inquiry came to be and where it is going next. SETENEY SHAMI is founding director of the Arab Council for the Social Sciences and also program director at the Social Science Research Council where she directs the InterAsia program. CYNTHIA MILLER-IDRISS is Associate Professor of Education and Sociology at American University, where she also directs the International Training and Education Program.

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Second Edition

Utopianism is defined as the various ways of imagining, creating, or analyzing an reader ideal or alternative society. Prominent writers and scholars across history have explored how or why to envision different ways edited by of life. The Utopia Reader Gregory Claeys and Lyman Tower Sargent compiles primary texts from a variety of authors and movements in the history of theorizing utopias. The volume includes texts from classical Greek literature, the Old Testament, and Plato’s Republic, to Sir Thomas More’s Utopia, to George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four and beyond. By balancing well-known and obscure examples, the text provides a comprehensive and definitive collection of the various ways Utopias have been conceived throughout history and how Utopian ideals have served as criticisms of existing sociocultural conditions. second edition

the

Utopia

This new edition includes many historically wellknown works, little known but influential texts, and contemporary writings, providing even more expansive coverage of the varieties of approaches and responses to the concept of utopia in the past, present, and even the future. In particular, the volume now includes feminist writings and work by authors of color, and contends with current concerns, such as the exploration of the ecological ideals of Utopia. Furthermore, Claeys and Sargent highlight twenty-first century trends and popular narrative explorations of Utopias through the genres of young adult dystopias, survivalist dystopias, and non-print utopias. GREGORY CLAEYS is Professor of the History of Political Thought at the University of London. LYMAN TOWER SARGENT is Professor Emeritus of Political Science at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. He was the Founding Editor of the journal Utopian Studies.

FEBRUARY 576 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-3707-6 • $40.00S (£30.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-6465-2 • $99.00X (£76.00) POLITCIAL SCIENCE FA L L 2 0 1 6 • NY U PRESS

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SO CIAL SCIENCE

Civil Society The Critical History of an Idea, Second Edition

Immigration, Emigration, and Migration NOMOS LVII

John Ehrenberg

Edited by Jack Knight

In the absence of noble public goals, admired leaders, and compelling issues, many warn of a dangerous erosion of civil society, which includes families, religious organizations, and all other the critical hiStory Thean Critical of idea History of an Idea NGOs. Are they right? How John Ehrenberg can public life be enriched John Ehrenberg in a period marked by fraying communities, widespread apathy, and unprecedented levels of contempt for politics? How should we be thinking about civil society?

Questions of immigration and border enforcement practices are particularly Immigration, Emigration, salient in contemporary and Migration public discourse, and examinations of policy and practice bring forth new philosophical quandaries. Why the common assumption that each country has the right to control its own borders? How are laws that restrict or regulate migration created and justified? Why has the criminalization of migration increased? How can migration be better considered through the point of view of the migrants themselves? What are the differences in international and national institutional migratory policy?

Civil Civil Society Society, Second Edition Second Edition

Civil Society: The Critical History of an Idea provides a comprehensive discussion and analysis of two and a half millennia of Western political theory, as well as how civil society might be understood in the future. John Ehrenberg analyzes both the usefulness and the limitations of civil society and maps the political and theoretical evolution of the concept and its employment in academic and public discourse. From Aristotle and the Enlightenment philosophers to Black Lives Matter and the Occupy movement, Ehrenberg provides an indispensable analysis of the possibilities of what this important idea can, and cannot, offer to contemporary political affairs. In this new, second edition Ehrenberg brings the historical overview up to present day, specifically considering how major events alter and shape our relationship to contemporary civil society. Civic engagement, political participation, and volunteerism in contemporary life has faded, he argues, and in order to bring civil society back to the fore, we need to counter the suffocating inequality that has taken hold in recent years. Thorough and accessible, Civil Society gives a sweeping overview of a foundational part of political life. JOHN EHRENBERG is a Senior Professor of Political Science and Department Chair at the Brooklyn Campus of Long Island University. He is the winner of the 1999 Michael J. Harrington Prize from the American Political Science Association. FEBRUARY 352 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-9160-3 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-9671-4 • $89.00X (£68.00) POLITICAL SCIENCE 22

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NOMOS LV I I

Edited by

Jack Knight

Immigration, Emigration and Migration consists of essays written by distinguished scholars across the fields of law, political science, and philosophy that examine questions of travel and migration across national borders. The volume explores questions of border control and enforcement, criminalization of borders, and how to address current debates and changes in regards to migration and immigration. The intersection of analysis and prescription provides both an assessment of current forms of thought or regulation and suggestion of alterations to address the flaws or failures of present approaches. The eight essays in this volume reflect a variety of considerations and explorations across interdisciplinary lines, and provide a new and thought-provoking discussion of policy, practice, and philosophy of migratory and border practices. JACK KNIGHT is Frederic Cleaveland Professor of Law and Political Science at Duke University. His publications include Institutions and Social Conflict, The Choices Justices Make, with Lee Epstein, and The Priority of Democracy, with James Johnson.

JANUARY 320 PAGES CLOTH • 978-1-4798-6095-1 • $65.00X (£50.00) In the NOMOS - American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy series POLITICAL SCIENCE • LAW 1.800.996.NYUP


SO CIAL SCIENCE

What does a political revolution look like if young people don’t run for office?

Out of the Running Why Millennials Reject Political Careers and Why It Matters Shauna L. Shames Millennials are often publicly criticized for being apathetic about the American political process and their lack of interest in political careers. But what do millennials themselves have to say about the prospect of holding political office? Are they as disinterested in political issues and the future of the American political system as the media suggests?

Out ofthe Running WHY MILLENNIALS REJECT POLITICAL CAREERS AND

Out of the Running goes directly to the source and draws from extensive research, including over 50 interviews, with graduate students in elite institutions that have historically been a direct link into state or federal elected office: Harvard Law, Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, and Boston’s Suffolk University Law School. Shauna Shames, herself a young graduate of Harvard University, suggests that millennials are not disinterested; rather, they don’t believe that a career in politics is the best way to create change. Millennials view the system as corrupt or inefficient and are particularly skeptical about the fundraising, frenzied media attention, and loss of privacy that have become staples of the American electoral process. They are clear about their desire to make a difference in the world but feel that the “broken” political system is not the best way to do so—a belief held particularly by millennial women and women of color. The implications of Shames’ argument are crucial for the future of the American political system—how can a system adapt and grow if qualified, intelligent leaders are not involved? An engaging and accessible resource for anyone who follows American politics, Out of the Running highlights the urgent need to fix the American political system, as an absence of diverse millennial candidates leaves its future in a truly precarious position.

WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

WHY IT MATTERS

SHAUNA L. SHAMES

SHAUNA L. SHAMES is Assistant Professor of Political Science at Rutgers UniversityCamden. Prior to entering academia, she worked with several nonprofit and feminist organizations, including the National Organization for Women (NOW) and The White House Project.

JANUARY 272 PAGES • 48 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-7748-5 • $27.00A (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-2599-8 • $89.00X (£68.00) POLITICS • CURRENT AFFAIRS FA L L 2016 • NY U PRESS

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SO CIAL SCIENCE

Women as Wartime Rapists Beyond Sensation and Stereotyping Laura Sjoberg

The Criminal Brain Understanding Biological Theories of Crime, Second Edition Nicole Rafter, Chad Posick and Michael Rocque

Very few women are wartime rapists. Very few women issue commands to commit sexual violence. Very few women play a role in making war plans that feature the intentional sexual violation of other women. This book is about those very few women. Women as Wartime Rapists reveals the stories of female perpetrators of sexual violence and their place in wartime conflict, legal policy, and the punishment of sexual violence. More broadly, Laura Sjoberg asks, what do the actions and perceptions of female perpetrators of sexual violence reveal about our broader conceptions of war, violence, sexual assault, and gender?

What is the relationship between criminality and biology? Nineteenth-century phrenologists insisted that criminality was innate, The Criminal Brain Understanding Biological Theories of Crime inherent in the offender’s brain matter. While they were eventually repudiated as pseudo-scientists, today the pendulum has swung back. Both criminologists and biologists have begun to speak of a tantalizing but disturbing possibility: that criminality may be inherited as a set of genetic deficits that place one at risk to commit theft, violence, or acts of sexual deviance. But what do these new theories really assert? How can we prepare for a future in which leaders may propose crime-control programs based on biology?

This book explores specific historical case studies, such as Nazi Germany, Serbia, the contemporary case of ISIS, and others, to understand how and why women participate in rape during war and conflict. Sjoberg examines the contrast between the visibility of female victims and the invisibility of female perpetrators, as well as the distinction between rape and genocidal rape, which is used as a weapon against a particular ethnic or national group. Further, she explores women’s engagement with genocidal rape and how some orchestrated the ethnic cleansing of entire regions. A provocative approach to a sensationalized topic, Women as Wartime Rapists offers important insights into not only the topic of female perpetrators of wartime sexual violence, but also into larger notions of gender and violence with crucial cultural, legal, and political implications.

In this second edition of The Criminal Brain, the authors describe early biological theories of crime and provide a lively, up-to-date overview of the newest research in biosocial criminology. New chapters introduce the theories of the latter part of the 20th century and provide a vision for the future of criminology and crime policy from a biosocial perspective. The book is a careful, critical examination of each research approach and conclusion. Both compiling and analyzing the body of scholarship devoted to understanding the criminal brain, this volume serves as a condensed, accessible, and contemporary exploration of biological theories of crime and their everyday relevance.

LAURA SJOBERG is Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Florida. She is the author of several books, including Gendering Global Conflict and, with Caron Gentry, Beyond Mothers, Monsters, and Whores.

CHAD POSICK is Assistant Professor in the Department of Criminal Justice and Criminology at Georgia Southern University.

SECOND EDITION

Nicole R afteR, chad Posick, & Michael Rocque

The late NICOLE RAFTER was Professor Emeritus of Criminology at Northeastern University.

MICHAEL ROCQUE is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Bates College, and the Senior Research Advisor for the Maine Department of Corrections. NOVEMBER 320 PAGES PAPER • 978-0-8147-7140-2 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-0-8147-2927-4 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Gender and Political Violence series POLITICAL SCIENCE • LAW 24

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SO CIAL SCIENCE

The Matrix is real

Hacked A Radical Approach to Hacker Culture and Crime Kevin F. Steinmetz Public discourse, from pop culture to political rhetoric, portrays hackers as deceptive, digital villains. But what do we actually know about them? In Hacked, Kevin F. Steinmetz explores what it means to be a hacker and the nuances of hacker culture. Through extensive interviews with hackers, observations of hacker communities, and analyses of hacker cultural products, Steinmetz demystifies the figure of the hacker and situates the practice of hacking within the larger political and economic structures of capitalism, crime, and control. This captivating book challenges many of the common narratives of hackers, suggesting that not all forms of hacking are criminal and, contrary to popular opinion, the broader hacker community actually plays a vital role in our information economy. Hacked thus explores how governments, corporations, and other institutions attempt to manage hacker culture through the creation of ideologies and laws that protect powerful economic interests. Not content to simply critique the situation, Steinmetz ends his work by providing actionable policy recommendations that aim to redirect the focus from the individual to corporations, governments, and broader social issues. A compelling study, Hacked helps us understand not just the figure of the hacker, but also digital crime and social control in our high-tech society.

“A highly original, insightful, carefully researched and elegantly written study of hacker culture. Through an impressive synthesis of insights from critical and cultural criminology, classical and contemporary social theory, politics and political economy, Kevin Steinmetz delivers a new and provocative understanding of hacking and its place in contemporary information capitalism. A ‘must read’ for students and scholars of crime, new media and digital culture.” Majid Yar, author of Cybercrime and Society KEVIN F. STEINMETZ is Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology, Anthropology and Social Work at Kansas State University

NOVEMBER 288 PAGES • 8 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-6971-8 • $28.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-6610-6 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Alternative Criminology series CRIMINOLOGY WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

FA L L 2016 • NY U PRESS

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SO CIAL SCIENCE

After Life Imprisonment

Meth Wars

Reentry in the Era of Mass Incarceration

Police, Media, Power

Marieke Liem, Foreword by Robert J. Sampson

Travis Linnemann

“Considering the enormity of the sanction, it is remarkable how little we know about the lives of those who survive life imprisonment. With the powerful narratives in this ground-breaking book, Marieke Liem brings their perspectives into new light and asks ‘when is enough, enough?’ in terms of the punitive state.” Shadd Maruna, co-author of Making Good: How Ex-Convicts Reform and Rebuild Their Lives One out of every ten prisoners in the United States is serving a life sentence—roughly 130,000 people. While some have been sentenced to life in prison without parole, the majority of prisoners serving ‘life’ will be released back into society. But what becomes of those people who reenter the everyday world after serving life in prison? In After Life Imprisonment, Marieke Liem carefully examines the experiences of “lifers” upon release. Through interviews with over sixty homicide offenders sentenced to life but granted parole, Liem tracks those able to build a new life on the outside and those who were re-incarcerated. The interviews reveal prisoners’ reflections on being sentenced to life, as well as the challenges of employment, housing, and interpersonal relationships upon release. Liem explores the increase in handing out of life sentences, and specifically provides a basis for discussions of the goals, costs, and effects of long-term imprisonment. A profound criminological examination, After Life Imprisonment reveals the untold, lived experiences of prisoners before and after their life sentences.

From the hit television series Breaking Bad, to daily news reports, anti-drug advertising campaigns and highly publicized world-wide hunts for “narcoterrorists” such as Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, the drug, methamphetamine occupies a unique and important space in the public’s imagination. In Meth Wars, Travis Linnemann situates the “meth epidemic” within the broader culture and politics of drug control and mass incarceration. Linnemann draws together a range of examples and critical interdisciplinary scholarship to show how methamphetamine, and the drug war more generally, are part of a larger governing strategy that animates the politics of fear and insecurity and links seemingly unrelated concerns such as environmental dangers, the politics of immigration and national security, policing tactics, and terrorism. The author’s unique analysis presents a compelling case for how the supposed “meth epidemic” allows politicians, small town police and government counter-narcotics agents to engage in a singular policing project in service to the broader economic and geo-strategic interests of the United States. TRAVIS LINNEMANN is Assistant Professor of Justice Studies at Eastern Kentucky University.

MARIEKE LIEM is Senior Researcher and chair of the Violence Research Initiative at Leiden University and a Marie Curie Fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School. ROBERT J. SAMPSON is Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences at Harvard University and Director of the Boston Area Research Initiative. He is the author of several books, including Great American City: Chicago and the Enduring Neighborhood Effect. SEPTEMBER 288 PAGES • 18 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-8282-3 • $28.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-0692-8 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the New Perspectives in Crime, Deviance, & Law series CRIMINOLOGY 26

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DECEMBER 304 PAGES • 16 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-0002-5 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-7869-7 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Alternative Criminology series CRIMINOLOGY 1.800.996.NYUP


SO CIAL SCIENCE

Women of the Street

Transnational Reproduction

How the Criminal Justice-Social Services Alliance Fails Women in Prostitution

Race, Kinship, and Commercial Surrogacy in India

Susan Dewey and Tonia St. Germain

Daisy Deomampo

Women How the Criminal Justice -

of the -Social Services Alliance

Street Fails Women in Prostitution

Susan Dewey and Tonia St. Germain

“The most comprehensive and in-depth study of street prostitution on the market. Based on years of fieldwork with women involved in illicit commerce as well as interviews with the authorities and service providers who interact with them, the authors provide a fascinating ethnographic window into this world.” Ronald Weitzer, author of Legalizing Prostitution

Women of the Street explores encounters between those who make their living by engaging in streetbased prostitution and the criminal justice and social service workers who try to curtail that work. Drawing on extraordinarily rich ethnographic research, including interviews with over one hundred street-involved women and dozens of criminal justice and social service professionals, the book argues that despite the intimate knowledge these groups have about each other, measures designed to help these women consistently fail because they do not take into account false assumptions about street life, homelessness, drug use, and sex trading. The criminal justice-social services alliance operates on the general belief that the women they police and otherwise regulate choose sex work as a result of traumatization, rather than acknowledging the fact that socioeconomic realities often inform their choices. Reaching beyond disciplinary silos by combining the analysis of an anthropologist and a legal scholar, Women of the Street offers an evidencebased argument for the decriminalization of prostitution. SUSAN DEWEY is Assistant Professor of Gender & Women’s Studies and adjunct in International Studies at the University of Wyoming. Her books include Neon Wasteland: On Love, Motherhood, and Sex Work in a Rust Belt Town.

T r a n s n aT i o n a l r ep r o d u c T i o n Race, Kinship, and Commercial Surrogacy in India

Daisy Deomamp o

“Combining detailed ethnography with critical medical anthropological perspectives, Transnational Reproduction is both hard-hitting and provocative, challenging the race, class, and gender inequities underlying India’s commercial gestational surrogacy scene.” Marcia C. Inhorn, author of Cosmopolitan Conceptions: IVF Sojourns in Global Dubai

Transnational Reproduction traces the relationships among Western aspiring parents, Indian surrogates, and egg donors from around the world. In the early 2010s India was one of the top providers of surrogacy services. Drawing on interviews with commissioning parents, surrogates, and egg donors as well as doctors and family members, Daisy Deomampo argues that while the surrogacy industry in India offers a clear example of “stratified reproduction”—the ways in which political, economic, and social forces structure the conditions under which women carry out physical and social reproductive labor—it also complicates that concept as the various actors in this reproductive work struggle to understand their relationships to one another. The book shows how these actors make sense of their connections, illuminating the ways in which kinship ties are challenged, transformed, or reinforced in the context of transnational gestational surrogacy. It demonstrates that while reproductive actors share a common quest for conception, they make sense of family in the context of globalized assisted reproductive technologies in very different ways. In doing so, Deomampo uncovers the specific racial reproductive imaginaries that underpin the unequal relations at the heart of transnational surrogacy. DAISY DEOMAMPO is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Fordham University.

TONIA ST. GERMAIN, JD, is retired Director of Women’s and Gender Studies, Eastern Oregon University.

FEBRUARY 288 PAGES • 17 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-4194-3 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-5449-3 • $89.00X (£68.00) ANTHROPOLOGY • CRIMINOLOGY WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

SEPTEMBER 288 PAGES • 1 black & white illustration PAPER • 978-1-4798-2838-8 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-0421-4 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Anthropologies of American Medicine: Culture, Power, and Practice series ANTHROPOLOGY • GENDER STUDIES FA L L 2 0 1 6 • NY U PRESS

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SO CIAL SCIENCE

Sharing Our Worlds

Japanese American Ethnicity

An Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology, Third Edition

In Search of Heritage and Homeland across Generations

Joy Hendry

Takeyuki Tsuda Praise for the previous edition:

Sharing Our Worlds An Introduction to Cultural and Social Anthropology JOY HENDRY

THIRD EDITION

“A superb learning experience for anyone curious about humanity and cultural dynamics. Joy Hendry dazzles with provocative questions, compelling stories, and profound answers.” Christopher C. Fennell, University of Illinois

“With examples from around the world, a wide palette of topics, and clear explanations of key concepts and theories, this is a highly engaging and vividly rendered introduction to social and cultural anthropology for new students and general readers alike.” William W. Kelly, Yale University Sharing Our Worlds offers readers the perfect introduction to cultural and social anthropology, introducing the classic theoretical ideas of its key founders and and placing them in their historical and geographical context. This new edition is fully updated, including “topics for reflection” at the end of each chapter which offer issues for debate and further discussion, as well as a new final chapter illuminating the valuable ways in which anthropology may be used in the world at large. Incorporating discussion of a wide array of countries, the text brings the subject of cultural and social anthropology right into the neighborhood of its readers, wherever they are in the world. Written in a refreshingly accessible style, the volume offers a compelling introduction to an enigmatic and exciting subject, drawing out its relevance and value for the complex multicultural world in which we live. JOY HENDRY is Professor Emerita of Oxford Brookes University, a Senior Member of St. Antony’s College, Oxford University, and an Honorary Fellow of Edinburgh University. She is the author of many books, including Wrapping Culture: Politeness, Presentation and Power in Japan and Other Societies.

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Japanese American

Ethnicity In Search of Heritage and Homeland Across Generations

Takeyuki Tsuda

“In drawing and reflecting upon the voices and experiences of different generational cohorts, Tsuda not only fills a void in Japanese American studies but expands our very understanding of the concept of ‘ethnic heritage.’” Michael Omi, University of California, Berkeley

As one of the oldest groups of Asian Americans in the United States, most Japanese Americans are culturally assimilated and well-integrated in mainstream American society. In Japanese American Ethnicity, Takeyuki Tsuda explores the contemporary ethnic experiences of Japanese Americans from the second to the fourth generations and the extent to which they remain connected to their ancestral cultural heritage. He places Japanese Americans in transnational and diasporic context and also analyzes the performance of ethnic heritage through the example of taiko drumming ensembles. Drawing on extensive fieldwork with Japanese Americans in San Diego and Phoenix, Tsuda argues that the ethnicity of immigrant-descent minorities does not simply follow a linear trajectory. Increasing cultural assimilation does not always erode the significance of ethnic heritage and identity over the generations. Instead, each new generation of Japanese Americans has negotiated its own ethnic positionality in different ways. Young Japanese Americans today are reviving their cultural heritage and embracing its salience in their daily lives more than the previous generations. This book demonstrates how culturally assimilated minorities can simultaneously maintain their ancestral cultures or even actively recover their lost ethnic heritage. TAKEYUKI TSUDA is Professor of Anthropology in the School of Human Evolution and Social Change at Arizona State University. He is the editor of Diasporic Homecomings: Ethnic Return Migration in Comparative Perspective.

SEPTEMBER 352 PAGES • 23 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-1079-6 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-2178-5 • $89.00X (£68.00) ANTHROPOLOGY • ETHNIC STUDIES 1.800.996.NYUP


SO CIAL SCIENCE

Muslim Cool

Culture Jamming

Race, Religion, and Hip Hop in America

Activism and the Art of Cultural Resistance

Su’ad Abdul Khabeer

Edited by Marilyn DeLaure and Moritz Fink, Foreword by Mark Dery

“Offers an account of how Muslims in Chicago feel, think, and act. Fashionistas, hiphop heads, and activists will recognize this scholarly work as chronicling the edginess of a possible future. Imagine Black Power meets twenty-first century faith-based social justice and cultural organizing. A must read for all those who didn’t know, and even those who do!” Junaid Rana, author of Terrifying Muslims: Race and Class in the South Asian Diaspora This groundbreaking study of race, religion, and popular culture in the 21st century United States focuses on a new concept, “Muslim Cool.” Muslim Cool is a way of being an American Muslim— displayed in ideas, dress, and social activism in the ’hood, and in complex relationships to state power. Constructed through hip hop and the performance of Blackness, Muslim Cool is a way of engaging with the Black American experience by both Black and non-Black young Muslims that challenges racist norms in the U.S. as well as dominant ethnic and religious structures within American Muslim communities. Drawing on over two years of ethnographic research, Su’ad Khabeer illuminates the ways in which young and multiethnic U.S. Muslims draw on Blackness to construct their identities as Muslims. By countering the notion that Blackness and the Muslim experience are fundamentally distinet, Muslim Cool poses a critical challenge to dominant ideas that Muslims are “foreign” to the United States and puts Blackness at the center of the study of American Islam. SU’AD ABDUL KHABEER is Assistant Professor of Anthropology and African American Studies at Purdue University.

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Coined in the 1980s, “culture jamming” refers to an array of tactics deployed by activists to critique, subvert, and otherwise Activism “jam” the workings of And the Art consumer culture. Ranging from media hoaxes and of culturAl advertising parodies to flash resistAnce mobs and street art, these actions seek to interrupt the flow of dominant, capitalistic messages that permeate our daily lives. Employed by Occupy Wall Street protesters and the Russian feminist punk band Pussy Riot alike, culture jamming scrambles the signal, injects the unexpected, and spurs audiences to think critically and challenge the status quo.

culture JAmminG edited by mArilyn delAure And moritz fink

With A foreWord by mArk dery

The essays, interviews, and creative work assembled in this unique volume explore the shifting contours of culture jamming by plumbing its history, mapping its transformations, testing its force, and assessing its efficacy. Revealing how culture jamming is at once playful and politically transgressive, this accessible collection explores the degree to which culture jamming has fulfilled its revolutionary aims. Featuring original essays from prominent media scholars discussing Banksy and Shepard Fairey, foundational texts such as Mark Dery’s culture jamming manifesto, and artwork by and interviews with noteworthy culture jammers including the Guerilla Girls, The Yes Men, and Reverend Billy, Culture Jamming makes a crucial contribution to our understanding of creative resistance and participatory culture. MARILYN DELAURE is an Associate Professor of Communication Studies at the University of San Francisco. MORITZ FINK is a media scholar and author. MARK DERY is a cultural critic. His latest book is the essay collection I Must Not Think Bad Thoughts.

FEBRUARY 464 PAGES • 51 black & white illustrations • 9 color illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-0620-1 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-7096-7 • $89.00X (£68.00) MEDIA STUDIES • AMERICAN STUDIES FA L L 2016 • NY U PRESS

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MEDIA STUDIES

A world beyond wi-fi

Whose Global Village? Rethinking How Technology Shapes Our World Ramesh Srinivasan In the digital age, technology has shrunk the physical world into a “global village,” where we all seem to be connected as an online community as information travels to the farthest reaches of the planet with the click of a mouse. Yet while we think of platforms such as Twitter and Facebook as open and accessible to all, in reality, these are commercial entities developed primarily by and for the Western world. Considering how new technologies increasingly shape labor, economics, and politics, these tools often reinforce the inequalities of globalization, rarely reflecting the perspectives of those at the bottom of the digital divide.

RAMESH SRINIVASAN is the Director of the Digital Cultures Lab and Associate Professor of Information Studies and Design and Media Arts at UCLA. His work has been featured by Al Jazeera, The Washington Post, The Young Turks, National Public Radio, and The Huffington Post.

This book asks us to re-consider ‘whose global village’ we are shaping with the digital technology revolution today. Sharing stories of collaboration with Native Americans in California and New Mexico, revolutionaries in Egypt, communities in rural India, and others across the world, Ramesh Srinivasan urges us to re-imagine what the Internet, mobile phones, or social media platforms may look like when considered from the perspective of diverse cultures. Such collaborations can pave the way for a people-first approach toward designing and working with new technology worldwide. Whose Global Village seeks to inspire professionals, activists, and scholars alike to think about technology in a way that embraces the realities of communities too often relegated to the margins. We can then start to visualize a world where technologies serve diverse communities rather than just the Western consumer.

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LAW

Vaccine Court

The Health of Newcomers

The Law and Politics of Injury

Immigration, Health Policy, and Solidarity for Global Health

Anna Kirkland

Patricia Illingworth and Wendy E. Parmet “Vaccine Court provides historical, political, and social context to our country’s unprecedented attempt to resolve the conflict between those certain of vaccine harms and the science that may or may not support their claims. In a compelling and sympathetic manner, Kirkland explores the murky netherworld between science, where truths are often determined by decades of study, and court, where truths are determined after a few weeks of testimony.” Paul A. Offit, M.D., author of Deadly Choices: How the Anti-Vaccine Movement Threatens Us All The so-called vaccine court is a small special court in the United States Court of Federal Claims that handles controversial claims that a vaccine has harmed someone. Here, lawyers, activists, judges, doctors, and scientists come together trying to figure out whether a vaccine really caused a person’s medical problem. In Vaccine Court, Anna Kirkland explores how legal institutions resolve complex scientific questions. What are vaccine injuries, and how do we come to recognize them? What does it mean to transform these questions into a legal problem and funnel them through a special national vaccine court? What does justice require for vaccine injury claims, and how can we deliver it? These are highly contested questions, and the terms in which they have been debated over the last forty years are highly revealing of deeper fissures. While many scholars argue that it’s foolish to let judges and lawyers decide medical claims, Kirkland argues that our political and legal response to vaccine injury claims shows how well legal institutions can handle specialized scientific matters. Vaccine Court is an accessible and thorough account of what the vaccine court is, why we have it, and what it does.

Immigration and health care are hotly debated NEWCOMERS and contentious issues. Policies that relate to both issues—to the health of newcomers—often reflect mis-impressions about immigrants, and their impact on health care systems. Despite the fact that immigrants are typically younger and healthier than natives, and that many immigrants play a vital role as care-givers in their new lands, native citizens are often reluctant to extend basic health care to immigrants, choosing instead to let them suffer, to let them die prematurely, or to expedite their return to their home lands. Likewise, many nations turn against immigrants when epidemics such as Ebola strike, under the false belief that native populations can be kept well only if immigrants are kept out. THE

HEALTH OF

I m m i g r at i o n , H e a lt h P o l i c y, and the Case for Gl oba l Solida r it y

Patricia Illingworth and Wendy E. Parmet

In The Health of Newcomers, Patricia Illingworth and Wendy E. Parmet demonstrate how shortsighted and dangerous it is to craft health policy on the basis of ethnocentrism and xenophobia. Because health is a global public good and people benefit from the health of neighbor and stranger alike, it is in everyone’s interest to ensure the health of all. Drawing on rigorous legal and ethical arguments and empirical studies, as well as deeply personal stories of immigrant struggles, Illingworth and Parmet make the compelling case that global phenomena such as poverty, the medical brain drain, organ tourism, and climate change ought to inform the health policy we craft for newcomers and natives alike. PATRICIA ILLINGWORTH is Professor in the Department of Philosophy and in the D’Amore-McKim College of Business Administration at Northeastern University. She is the author of AIDS and the Good Society.

ANNA KIRKLAND is Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and Associate Professor of Women’s Studies and Political Science at the University of Michigan.

WENDY E. PARMET is George J. and Kathleen Waters Matthews Distinguished Professor of Law and Professor of Public Policy and Urban Affairs at Northeastern University, where she directs the program on Health Policy & Law. She is the author of Populations, Public Health, and the Law.

DECEMBER 288 PAGES CLOTH • 978-1-4798-7693-8 • $40.00S (£30.99) LAW • MEDICINE

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LAW

Pardon and Parole in New York from the Revolution to the Depression

Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Feminist Foundations of Family Law

Carolyn Strange

Tracy A. Thomas

Discretionary Justice

The pardon is an act of mercy, tied to the divine JUSTICE right of kings. Why did New York retain this mode of discretionary justice after the Revolution? And how PA R D O N A N D PA R O L E did governors’ use of this IN NEW YORK FROM THE REVOLUTION prerogative change with the TO THE DEPRESSION advent of the penitentiary and the introduction of CAROLYN STRANGE parole? This book answers these questions by mining previously unexplored evidence held in official pardon registers, clemency files, prisoner aid association reports and parole records. DISCRETIONARY

This is the first book to analyze the histories of mercy and parole through the same lens, as related but distinct forms of discretionary decisionmaking. It draws on governors’ public papers and private correspondence to probe their approach to clemency, and it uses qualitative and quantitative methods to profile petitions for mercy, highlighting controversial cases that stirred public debate. Political pressure to render the use of discretion more certain and less personal grew stronger over the nineteenth century, peaking during constitutional conventions and reaching its height in the Progressive Era. Yet, New York’s legislators left the power to pardon in the governor’s hands, where it remains today. Unlike previous works that portray parole as the successor to the pardon, this book shows that reliance upon and faith in discretion has proven remarkably resilient, even in the state that led the world toward penal modernity. CAROLYN STRANGE is a Senior Fellow at the Australian National University. She has published extensively in the fields of criminal justice history and the history of gender and sexuality.

ELIZABETH CADY STANTON and the Feminist Foundations of Family Law

Tracy A. Thomas

“Thomas does both legal studies and feminist history a great service. Thomas’ enjoyable and eminently readable text unearths new information about this most important legal mind while deftly directing our attention to the key ways our legal culture has been indelibly stamped with Stanton’s towering intellect and radical spirit.” TJ Boisseau, Purdue University

Much has been written about women’s rights pioneer Elizabeth Cady Stanton. Historians have written her biography, detailed her campaign for woman’s suffrage, documented her partnership with Susan B. Anthony, and compiled all of her extensive writings and papers. Stanton herself was a prolific author; her autobiography, History of Woman Suffrage, and Woman’s Bible are classics. Despite this body of work, scholars and feminists continue to find new and insightful ways to reexamine Stanton and her impact on women’s rights and history. Law scholar Tracy A. Thomas extends this discussion of Stanton’s impact on modern-day feminism by analyzing her intellectual contributions to—and personal experiences with—family law. Stanton’s work on family issues has been overshadowed by her work (especially with Susan B. Anthony) on woman’s suffrage. But throughout her fifty-year career, Stanton emphasized reform of the private sphere of the family as central to achieving women’s equality. Using feminist legal theory as a lens to interpret Stanton’s political, legal, and personal work on the family, Thomas argues that Stanton’s positions on divorce, working mothers, domestic violence, childcare, and many other topics were strikingly progressive for her time, providing significant parallels from which to gauge the social and legal policy issues confronting women in marriage and the family today. TRACY A. THOMAS is Professor of Law at the University of Akron School of Law, where she holds the Seiberling Chair of Constitutional Law and directs the Center for Constitutional Law.

DECEMBER 336 PAGES • 4 black & white illustrations CLOTH • 978-1-4798-9992-0 • $55.00X (£40.00) LAW 32

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NOVEMBER 328 PAGES • 16 black & white illustrations CLOTH • 978-0-8147-8304-7 • $55.00X (£40.00) LAW • HISTORY 1.800.996.NYUP


LAW

What do roller derbies, tattoo artists, and bartenders have in common?

Creativity without Law Challenging the Assumptions of Intellectual Property

Edited by Kate Darling and Aaron Perzanowski Intellectual property law, or IP law, is based on certain assumptions about creative behavior. The case for regulation assumes that creators have a fundamental legal right to prevent copying, and without this right they will under-invest in new work. But this premise fails to fully capture the reality of creative production. It ignores the range of powerful non-economic motivations that compel creativity, and it overlooks the capacity of creative industries for self-governance and innovative social and market responses to appropriation. This book reveals the on-the-ground practices of a range of creators and innovators. In doing so, it challenges intellectual property orthodoxy by showing that incentives for creative production often exist in the absence of, or in disregard for, formal legal protections. Instead, these communities rely on evolving social norms and market responses— sensitive to their particular cultural, competitive, and technological circumstances—to ensure creative incentives. From tattoo artists to medical researchers, Nigerian filmmakers to roller derby players, the communities illustrated in this book demonstrate that creativity can thrive without legal incentives, and perhaps more strikingly, that some creative communities prefer, and thrive, in environments defined by self-regulation rather than legal rules. Beyond their value as descriptions of specific industries and communities, the accounts collected here help to ground debates over IP policy in the empirical realities of the creative process. Their parallels and divergences also highlight the value of rules that are sensitive to the unique mix of conditions and motivations of particular industries and communities, rather than the monoculture of uniform regulation of the current IP system.

WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

KATE DARLING is Research Specialist at the MIT Media Lab, where she advises on intellectual property issues and researches the intersection of technology, law, and society. AARON PERZANOWSKI is Professor of Law at Case Western Reserve University School of Law. He is the author of The End of Ownership: Personal Property in the Digital Economy.

FEBRUARY 304 PAGES • 8 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-5624-4 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-4193-6 • $89.00X (£68.00) LAW FA L L 2016 • NY U PRESS

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HISTORY

Suspect Freedoms

Drawdown

The Racial and Sexual Politics of Cubanidad in New York, 1823-1957

The American Way of Postwar Edited by Jason W. Warren

Nancy Raquel Mirabal Beginning in the early nineteenth century, Cubans migrated to New York City to organize and protest against Spanish colonial rule. While revolutionary wars raged in Cuba, expatriates envisioned, dissected, and redefined meanings of independence and nationhood. An underlying element was the concept of Cubanidad, a shared sense of what it meant to be Cuban. Deeply influenced by discussions of slavery, freedom, masculinity, and United States imperialism, the question of what and who constituted “being Cuban” remained in flux and often, suspect.

SUSPECT FREEDOMS

The Racial and Sexual Politics of Cubanidad in New York, 1823-1957

NANCY R AQUEL MIR ABA L

The first book to explore Cuban racial and sexual politics in New York during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Suspect Freedoms chronicles the largely unexamined and often forgotten history of more than a hundred years of Cuban exile, migration, diaspora, and community formation. Nancy Mirabal delves into the rich cache of primary sources to write what Michel Rolph Trouillot has termed an “unthinkable history.” Situating this pivotal era within larger theoretical discussions of potential, future, visibility, and belonging, Mirabal shows how these transformations complicated meanings of territoriality, gender, race, power, and labor. She argues that slavery, nation, and the fear that Cuba would become “another Haiti” were critical in the making of early diasporic Cubanidades, and documents how, by the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, AfroCubans were authors of their own experiences; organizing movements, publishing texts, and establishing important political, revolutionary, and social clubs.

THE AME RIC AN

WAY OF POS T WAR

“In Drawdown, the contributors explain how and why America, despite repeated lessons, failed to sustain ready military forces in sufficient scale to secure the nation. Jason Warren has pulled together well-researched and accessible essays that shed light and understanding on the cultural, political, strategic, and financial causes of unpreparedness.” General H.R. McMaster, author of Dereliction of Duty

While traditionally Americans view an expensive military structure as a poor investment and a threat to liberty, they also require a guarantee of that very freedom, necessitating the employment of armed forces. Beginning with the seventeenth-century wars of the English colonies, Americans typically increased their military capabilities at the beginning of conflicts only to decrease them at the apparent conclusion of hostilities. In Drawdown: The American Way of Postwar, a stellar team of military historians argue that the United States sometimes managed effective drawdowns, yet at other times, the drawing down of military capabilities undermined our readiness and flexibility, leading to more costly wars and perhaps defeat. With the termination of large-scale operations in Iraq and the winnowing of forces in Afghanistan, the United States military once again faces a significant drawdown in standing force structure and capabilities. The political and military debate currently raging around how best to affect this force reduction continues to lack a proper historical perspective. This volume aspires to inform this dialogue. Not a traditional military history, Drawdown analyzes cultural attitudes, political decisions, and institutions surrounding the maintenance of armed forces.

NANCY RAQUEL MIRABAL is Associate Professor in the American Studies Department and U.S. Latina/o Studies Program at the University of Maryland and serves on the Advisory Board for the Center for the History of the New America.

MAJOR JASON W. WARREN is Assistant Professor of History at the U.S. Army War College. He is the author of Connecticut Unscathed: Victory in the Great Narragansett War, 1675-1676.

JANURARY 320 PAGES • 17 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-0-8147-6112-0 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-0-8147-6111-3 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Culture, Labor, History series HISTORY

OCTOBER 336 PAGES • 5 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-7557-3 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-2840-1 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Warfare and Culture series MILITARY HISTORY

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HISTORY

New in Paperback

New in Paperback

Brooklyn’s Promised Land

Managing Inequality

The Free Black Community of Weeksville, New York Judith Wellman

The Free Black Community of Weeksville, New York

bro ok ly n ’s prom i s e d l a n d

“In Brooklyn’s Promised Land: The Free Black Community of Weeksville, New York, Judith Wellman…reanimates this black nationalist enclave in the borough’s eastern Bedford Hills, which by the Civil War had more than 500 residents.” The New York Times

“Not a novel, but nevertheless a fascinating story of Weeksville, the little-known community of free blacks in what is today Crown Heights. Nearly lost to demolition, Weeksville was rediscovered in 1966 and is today home to several restored houses and a handsome new welcome center. Wellman tells the whole story, from the village’s roots in the 1830s to its near fall into oblivion in the late 20th century.” Newsweek.com Judith Wellman

Weeksville was founded by African American entrepreneurs after slavery ended in New York State in 1827. Located in eastern Brooklyn, Weeksville provided a space of physical safety, economic prosperity, education, and even political power for its black population, who organized churches, a school, orphan asylum, home for the aged, newspapers, and the national African Civilization Society. Notable residents of Weeksville, such as journalist and educator Junius P. Morell, participated in every major national effort for African American rights, including the Civil War. In Brooklyn’s Promised Land, Judith Wellman not only tells the important narrative of Weeksville’s growth, disappearance, and eventual rediscovery, but also highlights the stories of the people who created this community. Drawing on maps, newspapers, census records, photographs, and the material culture of buildings and artifacts, Wellman reconstructs the social history and national significance of this extraordinary place. Through the lens of this local community, Brooklyn’s Promised Land highlights themes still relevant to African Americans across the country.

Northern Racial Liberalism in Interwar Detroit Karen R. Miller In the wake of the Civil War, many white northern leaders supported raceneutral laws and antidiscrimination statutes. These positions helped amplify the distinctions they drew between their political economic system, which they saw as forwardthinking in its promotion of free market capitalism, and the now vanquished southern system, which had been built on slavery. But this interest in legal race neutrality should not be mistaken for an effort to integrate northern African Americans into the state or society on an equal footing with whites. During the Great Migration, which brought tens of thousands of African Americans into northern cities after World War I, white northern leaders faced new challenges from both white and African American activists and were pushed to manage race relations in a more formalized and proactive manner. MANAGING INEQUALITY

NORTHERN RACIAL LIBERALISM IN

INTERWAR DETROIT

KAREN R. MILLER

The result was northern racial liberalism: the idea that all Americans, regardless of race, should be politically equal, but that the state cannot and indeed should not enforce racial equality by interfering with existing social or economic relations. In Managing Inequality, Karen R. Miller examines the formulation, uses, and growing political importance of northern racial liberalism in Detroit between the two World Wars. Miller argues that racial inequality was built into the liberal state at its inception, rather than produced by antagonists of liberalism. Managing Inequality shows that our current racial system—where race neutral language coincides with extreme racial inequalities that appear natural rather than political—has a history that is deeply embedded in contemporary governmental systems and political economies. KAREN R. MILLER is Professor of History at LaGuardia Community College, City University of New York.

JUDITH WELLMAN is Professor Emerita from the State University of New York at Oswego and Director of Historical New York Research Associates. FEBRUARY 320 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-7447-7 • $25.00S (£18.99) CLOTH • 978-0-8147-2415-6 HISTORY • AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

JANUARY 352 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-4920-8 • $28.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-8009-6 HISTORY • AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES FA L L 2016 • NY U PRESS

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HISTORY

New in Paperback

New in Paperback

The Counter-Revolution of 1776

Fighting over the Founders

Slave Resistance and the Origins of the United States of America

Andrew M. Schocket

How We Remember the American Revolution

Gerald Horne

Nihad M. Farooq

u ndiscipli ned Science, Ethnography, and Personhood in the Americas, 1830-1940

“Horne returns with insights about the American Revolution that fracture…some comforting myths about the Founding Fathers. The author does not tiptoe through history’s grassy fields; he swings a scythe… [showing] us the persistent nastiness underlying our founding narrative.” Kirkus Reviews

“A challenging and potentially explosive critique of foundational myths of liberty and rebellion.” The American Historical Review The successful 1776 revolt against British rule in North America has been hailed almost universally as a great step forward for humanity. In this trailblazing book, Gerald Horne shows that in the prelude to 1776, the abolition of slavery seemed all but inevitable in London, delighting Africans as much as it outraged slaveholders, and sparking the colonial revolt. Prior to 1776, anti-slavery sentiments were deepening throughout Britain and in the Caribbean. For European colonists in America, the major threat to their security was a foreign invasion combined with an insurrection of the enslaved. It was a real and threatening possibility that London would impose abolition throughout the colonies—a possibility the founding fathers feared would bring slave rebellions to their shores. To forestall it, they went to war.

“Schocket is an opinionated and sometimes cynical writer who makes his argument— which is that institutions and politicians use the founding fathers for commercial and political purposes—with direct and provocative examples... Schocket covers a lot of ground in an accessible and entertaining style…” Publishers Weekly “Fighting over the Founders is copious and entertaining. It leaves little doubt that sharp divisions in our collective memory about the Revolution reflect and shape equally sharp political contests.” Claremont Review of Books The American Revolution is all around us. It is pictured as big as billboards and as small as postage stamps, evoked in political campaigns and car advertising campaigns, relived in museums and revised in computer games. As the nation’s founding moment, the American Revolution serves as a source of powerful founding myths, and remains the most accessible and most contested event in U.S. history: more than any other, it stands as a proxy for how Americans perceive the nation’s aspirations. Americans’ increased fascination with the Revolution over the past two decades represents more than interest in the past. It’s also a site to work out the present, and the future. What are we using the Revolution to debate?

The so-called Revolutionary War, Horne writes, was in part a counter-revolution, a conservative movement that the founding fathers fought in order to preserve their right to enslave others. The Counter-Revolution of 1776 brings us to a radical new understanding of the traditional heroic creation myth of the United States.

In Fighting over the Founders, Andrew M. Schocket shows how today’s memories of the American Revolution reveal Americans’ conflicted ideas about class, about race, and about gender—as well as the nature of history itself. Fighting over the Founders plumbs our views of the past and the present, and illuminates our ideas of what United States means to its citizens in the new millennium.

GERALD HORNE is Moores Professor of History and African-American Studies at the University of Houston. His books include Race Woman and Race War!.

ANDREW M. SCHOCKET is Director of American Culture Studies and Associate Professor of History and American Culture Studies at Bowling Green State University (OH).

SEPTEMBER 363 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-0689-8 • $22.00A (£16.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-9340-9 HISTORY • AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

FEBRUARY 256 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-8410-0 • $19.95A (£14.99) CLOTH • 978-0-8147-0816-3 HISTORY

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JEWISH STUDIES

New in Paperback

New in Paperback

A Great Conspiracy against Our Race

The Rag Race

Italian Immigrant Newspapers and the Construction of Whiteness in the Early 20th Century

How Jews Sewed Their Way to Success in America and the British Empire Adam D. Mendelsohn

Peter G. Vellon “[A] concise yet thoroughly researched book. . . . An important contribution to Italian American studies specifically and immigrant and racial history in general.” Choice “Powerfully affirms the centrality of race to immigration history… The story of Italian Americans in particular illustrates ‘the tremendous cost of an assimilation process that inculcates the values of white over black,’ reminding us of the powerful legacy of race hatred and prejudice that still haunts American society today.” Journal of American History Racial history has always been the thorn in America’s side, with a swath of injustices—slavery, lynching, segregation, and many other ills— perpetrated against black people. This very history is complicated by, and also dependent on, what constitutes a white person in this country. Many of the European immigrant groups now considered white also had to struggle with their own racial identities. In A Great Conspiracy against Our Race, Peter Vellon explores how the immigrant press was a site where socially constructed categories of race, color, civilization, and identity were reworked, created, contested, and negotiated. Vellon also uncovers how Italian immigrants filtered societal pressures and redefined the parameters of whiteness, constructing their own identity. This work is an important contribution to not only Italian American history, but America’s history of immigration and race. PETER G. VELLON is Associate Professor of History at Queens College.

JANUARY 192 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-5345-8 • $28.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-0-8147-8848-6 In the Culture, Labor, History series HISTORY WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

“An inquiry into the wellspring of modern Jewish economic success, [the volume] attends to the origins of the garment industry, poking around in the dusty, and often little-known, corners of a global exchange based on kinship and the Jewish collective...The Rag Race is a remarkable achievement...” Jewish Review of Books “Mendelsohn joins the scholarly debate over the roots of Jewish economic success in the U.S. This he does with great style and energy, offering vivid descriptions, telling detail, and clear arguments, all based on meticulous research. This is a superb book that is a model of comparative and transnational history.” American Historical Review

Winner, 2015 Book Prize from the Southern Jewish Historical Society Winner, 2014 National Jewish Book Award in American Jewish Studies The majority of Jewish immigrants who made their way to the United States between 1820 and 1924 arrived nearly penniless; yet today their descendants stand out as exceptionally successful. How can we explain their dramatic economic ascent? Have Jews been successful because of cultural factors distinct to them as a group, or because of the particular circumstances that they encountered in America? Comparing the history of Jewish participation within the clothing trade in the United States with that of Jews in the same business in England, The Rag Race demonstrates that differences within the garment industry on either side of the Atlantic contributed to a very real divergence in social and economic outcomes for Jews in each setting. ADAM D. MENDELSOHN is Director of the Isaac and Jessie Kaplan Centre for Jewish Studies and Research and Associate Professor of Historical Studies at the University of Cape Town. OCTOBER 320 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-1438-1 • $22.00S (£16.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-4718-1 In the Goldstein-Goren Series in American Jewish History series HISTORY • JEWISH STUDIES FA L L 2016 • NY U PRESS

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JEWISH STUDIES

When deliverance turns to destruction

Golem

Modern Wars and Their Monsters Maya Barzilai

GOLEM O MODERN WA R S A ND T HEIR MONS T ER S

M AYA B A R ZIL A I

“Barzilai certainly puts her finger on a central paradox of European and Jewish culture coming out of the Great War: how can death and technological creativity coexist? The golem myth is a clever and successful way to probe that question... Fascinating and intellectually venturesome.” Alan Mintz, Chana Kekst Professor of Jewish Literature, The Jewish Theological Seminary “Savior, soldier, demon, oaf—a golem is all these and more, and Barzilai guides us on a fascinating tour of its supple mythology through shifting cultural and historical contexts.” Jonathan Kellerman and Jesse Kellerman, authors of The Golem of Paris MAYA BARZILAI is Assistant Professor of Hebrew Literature and Jewish Culture at the University of Michigan.

In the 1910s and 1920s, a “golem cult” swept across Europe and the U.S., later landing in Israel. Why did this story of a powerful clay monster molded and animated by a rabbi to protect his community become so popular and pervasive? The golem appears in a remarkable range of literary and popular culture: from the Yiddish theater to American comic books, from German silent film to Quentin Tarantino movies. The dramatic evolution of the golem—from its origins as a Jewish mystical object and legendary servant to its development into a muscular combatant and even avenging angel—is made comprehensible by, and also helps us to better understand, one of the defining aspects ofthe last one hundred years: mass warfare and its ancillary technologies. In the twentieth century the golem became a figure of war. It represented the chaos of warfare, the automation of war technologies, and the devastation wrought upon soldiers’ bodies and psyches. Golem: Modern Wars and Their Monsters draws on some of the most popular and significant renditions of this story in order to unravel the paradoxical coincidence of wartime destruction and the fantasy of artificial creation. Due to its aggressive and rebellious sides, the golem became a means for reflection about how technological progress has altered human lives, as well as an avenue for experimentation with the media and art forms capable of expressing the monstrosity of war.

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RELIGION

The Holocaust across Generations Trauma and its Inheritance among Descendants of Survivors Janet Jacobs THE HOLOCAUST ACROSS GENERATIONS TRAUMA AND ITS INHERITANCE AMONG DESCENDANTS OF SURVIVORS

“This important book illustrates the social structures through which the trauma of the Holocaust has been transmitted to the children and grandchildren of survivors. Based on carefully documented narratives gathered over ten years, Jacobs’s contribution is profound and illuminating.” Wendy Cadge, Brandeis University

Over the last two decades, the cross-generational transmission of trauma has become an important area of research within both Holocaust studies and the more broad study of genocide. The impact of social memory on the construction of survivor identities among succeeding generations has not yet been adequately explained. Moreover, the importance of gender to the intergenerational transmission of trauma has, for the most part, been overlooked. In The Holocaust Across Generations, Janet Jacobs fills these significant gaps in the study of traumatic transference. The volume brings together the study of postHolocaust family culture with the study of collective memory. It explores the social structures—such as narratives, rituals, belief systems, and memorial sites—through which the collective memory of trauma is transmitted within families, examining the social relations of traumatic inheritance among children and grandchildren of Holocaust survivors. Within this analytic framework, feminist theory and the importance of gender are brought to bear on the study of traumatic inheritance and the formation of trauma-based identities among Holocaust carrier groups. JANET JACOBS is Professor of Sociology and Women and Gender Studies at the University of Colorado. She is the author of numerous books and journal articles, including Hidden Heritage:The Legacy of the Crypto-Jews and Memorializing the Holocaust: Gender, Genocide and Collective Memory.

JANUARY 184 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-3929-2 • $24.00S (£17.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-3356-6 • $89.00X (£68.00) JEWISH STUDIES • PSYCHOLOGY WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

Televised Redemption Black Religious Media and Racial Empowerment Carolyn M. Rouse, John L. Jackson Jr., and Marla F. Frederick The institutional structures of white supremacy— slavery, Jim Crow laws, ME ER AC W BL AL EMPO AND RACI convict leasing, and mass incarceration—require a commonsense belief that black people lack the moral and intellectual capacities of white people. It is through this lens of belief that racial exclusions have been justified and reproduced in the United States. Televised Redemption argues that African American religious media has long played a key role in humanizing the race by unabashedly claiming that blacks are endowed by God with the same gifts of goodness and reason as whites—if not more, thereby legitimizing black Americans’ rights to citizenship. PTION SED REDEM S MEDIA TELEVI NT K RELIGIOU EY ROUS CAROLYN MOXL

E, JOHN L. JACK

SON, JR., AND MARL

A F. FREDERICK

If racism is a form of perception, then religious media has not only altered how others perceive blacks, but has also altered how blacks perceive themselves. Televised Redemption argues that black religious media has provided black Americans with new conceptual and practical tools for how to be in the world, and changed how black people are made intelligible and recognizable as moral citizens. From Christian televangelism to Muslim periodicals to Black Hebrew Israelite radio, Televised Redemption explores the complicated but critical redemptive history of African American religious media. CAROLYN M. ROUSE is Professor of Anthropology at Princeton University and the author of Uncertain Suffering: Racial Health Care Disparities and Sickle Cell Disease. JOHN L. JACKSON, JR. is Richard Perry University Professor and Dean of the School of Social Policy & Practice at the University of Pennsylvania and co-author of Impolite Conversations: On Race, Politics, Sex, Money and Religion. MARLA F. FREDERICK is Professor of African and African American Studies and the Study of Religion at Harvard University and the author of Colored Television: American Religion Gone Global. NOVEMBER 256 PAGES • 17 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-1817-4 • $28.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-7603-7 • $89.00X (£68.00) RELIGION • MEDIA STUDIES FA L L 2 0 1 6 • NY U PRESS

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RELIGION

New in Paperback

My Soul Is in Haiti Protestantism in the Haitian Diaspora of the Bahamas Bertin M. Louis, Jr.

My Soul Is in Haiti P R O T E S TA N T I S M I N T H E H A I T I A N D I A S P O R A OF THE BAHAMAS

“Bertin M. Louis, Jr. has just offered to the world of intelligentsia a remarkable book on the culture of Haitian Protestantism in the Haitian diaspora of the Bahamas. It is, without a doubt, a roadmap for cultural anthropology or ethnography...” Ethnic and Racial Studies

B E R T I N M. L O U I S, J R.

The Mary Daly Reader Edited by Jennifer Rycenga and Linda Barufaldi, Preface by Robin Morgan, Biographical Sketch by Mary E. Hunt

Outrageous, humorous, inflammatory, Amazonian, Rea deR intellectual, provocative, controversial, and a discoverer of feminist word-magic, Mary Daly’s influence on Second Wave feminism was enormous. This comprehensive reader offers a vital introduction to the core of Daly’s work and the complexities secreted away in the pages of her books. The

Mary Daly

E di t E d by

Jennifer Rycenga and

Linda Barufaldi

pR e fac e By Robin Morgan

In the Haitian diaspora, as in Haiti itself, the majority of Haitians have long practiced Catholicism or Vodou. However, Protestant forms of Christianity now flourish both in Haiti and beyond. In the Bahamas, where approximately one in five people are now Haitian-born or Haitian-descended, Protestantism has become the majority religion for immigrant Haitians. In My Soul Is in Haiti, Bertin M. Louis, Jr. has combined multi-sited ethnographic research in the United States, Haiti, and the Bahamas with a transnational framework to analyze why Protestantism has appealed to the Haitian diaspora community in the Bahamas. This important look at transnational migration between second and third world countries shows how notions of nationalism among Haitian migrants in the Bahamas are filtered through their religious beliefs. By studying local transformations in the Haitian diaspora of the Bahamas, Louis offers a greater understanding of the spread of Protestant Christianity, both regionally and globally BERTIN M. LOUIS, JR. is Assistant Professor of Anthropology and Africana Studies, Affiliated Faculty of American Studies, and a Faculty Fellow of the Center for the Study of Social Justice, Global Studies, and Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

Bio gR a ph ica l Sk e T c h By Mary E. Hunt

The text has been crafted to be accessible to a broad readership without diluting Daly’s witty but complicated vocabulary. Begun in collaboration with Daly while she was still alive, and completed after her death in 2010, the chapters in this book will surprise even those who thought they knew her work. They contain highlights from Mary Daly’s published works over a forty-year span, as well as smaller articles and excerpts, with additional contributions from Robin Morgan and Mary E. Hunt. Perfect for those seeking an introduction to this path-breaking feminist thinker, The Mary Daly Reader makes key excerpts from her work accessible to new readers as well as to those already familiar with her work who are seeking to access the essence of her thought in a single volume. JENNIFER RYCENGA is Professor of Comparative Religious Studies at San José State University. LINDA BARUFALDI is a lifelong radical feminist activist. ROBIN MORGAN is the editor of Sisterhood Is Powerful, named “One of the 100 most influential Books of the 20th Century” by the New York Public Library. MARY E. HUNT is Co-Founder and Co-Director of the Women’s Alliance for Theology, Ethics and Ritual (WATER). MARY DALY (1928-2010) was an American radical feminist philosopher, academic, and theologian. She taught at Boston College for 33 years.

DECEMBER 200 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-4166-0 • $28.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-0993-6 RELIGION • RACE AND ETHNICITY 40

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JANUARY 464 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-7776-8 • $35.00S (£26.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-9203-7 • $99.00X (£76.00) RELIGION • GENDER STUDIES 1.800.996.NYUP


AMERICAN STUDIES

Illuminating the “African American Spanish archive”

Archives of Flesh

African America, Spain, and PostHumanist Critique

African America,

Robert F. Reid-Pharr

Post-Humanist

Spain, and

Critique

In Archives of Flesh, Robert Reid-Pharr reveals the deep history of intellectual engagement between African America and Spain. Opening a fascinating window onto black and anti-Fascist intellectual life from 1898 through the mid-1950s, Reid-Pharr argues that key institutions of Western Humanism, including American colleges and universities, developed in intimate relation to slavery, colonization, and white supremacy. This retreat to rigidly established philosophical and critical traditions can never fully address—or even fully recognize—the deep-seated hostility to black subjectivity underlying the humanist ideal of a transcendent Manhood. Calling for a specifically anti-white supremacist reexamination of the archives of black subjectivity and resistance, Reid-Pharr enlists the principles of post-humanist critique in order to investigate decades of intimate dialogues between African American and Spanish intellectuals, including Salaria Kea, Federico Garcia Lorca, Nella Larsen, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, Chester Himes, Lynn Nottage, and Pablo Picasso. In the process Reid-Pharr takes up the “African American Spanish Archive” in order to resist the anti-corporeal, anti-black, anti-human biases that stand at the heart of Western Humanism.

Robert F. Reid-Pharr

ROBERT F. REID-PHARR is Distinguished and Presidential Professor of American Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. He is the author of three books, Once You Go Black: Choice, Desire, and the Black American Intellectual (NYU Press, 2007), Black, Gay, Man: Essays (NYU Press, 2001), and Conjugal Union: The Body, the House, and the Black American (1999).

DECEMBER 264 PAGES • 11 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-4362-6 • $28.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-8573-2 • $89.00X (£68.00) AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

FA L L 2 0 1 6 • NY U PRESS

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AMERICAN STUDIES

The 9/11 Generation Youth, Rights, and Solidarity in the War on Terror Sunaina Marr Maira

THE GENERATION

9/11

Youth, Rights, and Solidarity in the War on Terror

SUNAINA MARR MAIRA

Gender, Race, and Media Leah Perry

Since the attacks of 9/11, the banner of national security has led to intense monitoring of the politics of Muslim and Arab Americans. Young people from these communities have come of age in a time when the question of political engagement is both urgent and fraught.

In The 9/11 Generation, Sunaina Marr Maira uses extensive ethnography to understand the meaning of political subjecthood and mobilization for Arab, South Asian, and Afghan American youth. Maira explores how young people from communities targeted in the War on Terror engage with the “political,” forging coalitions based on new racial and ethnic categories, even while they are under constant scrutiny and surveillance, and organizing around notions of civil rights and human rights. The 9/11 Generation explores the possibilities and pitfalls of rights-based organizing at a moment when the vocabulary of rights and democracy has been used to justify imperial interventions, such as the U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Maira further reconsiders political solidarity in crossracial and interfaith alliances at a time when U.S. nationalism is understood as not just multicultural but also post-racial. Throughout, she weaves stories of post-9/11 youth activism through key debates about neoliberal democracy, the “radicalization” of Muslim youth, gender, and humanitarianism. SUNAINA MARR MAIRA is Professor of Asian American Studies at UC Davis. She is the author of Desis in the House: Indian American Youth Culture in New York City (2002) and Missing: Youth, Empire, and Citizenship After 9/11 (2009). She co-edited Youthscapes: The Popular, the National, and the Global (2004) and Contours of the Heart: South Asians Map North America, which won the American Book Award in 1997.

SEPTEMBER 320 PAGES • 8 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-8051-5 • $28.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-1769-6 • $89.00X (£68.00) AMERICAN STUDIES 42

The Cultural Politics of U.S. Immigration

N Y U PR E S S • FAL L 2 0 1 6

In the 1980s, amid increasing immigration from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Asia, the circle of who was considered American seemed to broaden, reflecting the democratic gains made by racial minorities and women. LEAH PERRY Although this expanded circle was increasingly visible in the daily lives of Americans through TV shows, films, and popular news media, these gains were circumscribed by the discourse that certain immigrants, for instance single and working mothers, were feared, censured, or welcome exclusively as laborers. GENDER,

RACE, AND

MEDIA

In The Cultural Politics of U.S. Immigration, Leah Perry argues that 1980s immigration discourse in law and popular media was a crucial ingredient in the cohesion of the neoliberal idea of democracy. Blending critical legal analysis with a feminist media studies methodology over a range of sources, including legal documents , congressional debates, and popular media, such as Golden Girls, Who’s the Boss?, Scarface, and Mi Vida Loca, Perry shows how even while “multicultural” immigrants were embraced, they were at the same time disciplined through gendered discourses of respectability. Examining the relationship between law and culture, this book weaves questions of legal status and gender into existing discussions about race and ethnicity to revise our understanding of both neoliberalism and immigration. LEAH PERRY is Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies at SUNY-Empire State College.

SEPTEMBER 288 PAGES • 3 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-2386-4 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-2877-7 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Nation of Nations series AMERICAN STUDIES 1.800.996.NYUP


AMERICAN STUDIES

Neocitizenship Political Culture after Democracy

Strange Fruit of the Black Pacific

Eva Cherniavsky

Imperialism’s Racial Justice and Its Fugitives Vince Schleitwiler

Neocitizenship explores how the constellation of political and economic forces of neoliberalism have assailed and arguably dismantled the institutions of modern democratic governance in the U.S. As overtly oligarchical structures of governance replace the operations of representative democracy, the book addresses the implications of this crisis for the practices and imaginaries of citizenship through the lens of popular culture. Rather than impugn the abject citizen-subject who embraces her degraded condition, Eva Cherniavsky asks what new or hybrid forms of civic agency emerge as popular sovereignty recedes. Drawing on a range of political theories, Neocitizenship also suggests that theory is at a disadvantage in thinking the historical present, since its analytical categories are wrought in the very historical contexts whose dissolution we now seek to comprehend. Cherniavsky thus supplements theory with a focus on popular culture that explores the de-democratization for citizenship in more generative and undecided ways. Tracing the contours of neocitizenship in fiction through examples such as The White Boy Shuffle and Distraction, television shows like Battlestar Galactica, and in the design of American studies abroad, Neocitizenship aims to take the measure of a transformation in process, while evading the twin lures of optimism and regret. Neocitizenship

POLITICAL

CU LT U R E AFTER

D EMO CR AC Y

Eva Cherniavsky

EVA CHERNIAVSKY is the Andrew R. Hilen Professor of American Literature and Culture at the University of Washington. She is the author of Incorporations, Race, Nation and the Body Politics of Capital (2006) and That Pale Mother Rising: Sentimental Discourses and the Imitation of Motherhood in 19th-C. America (1995).

Set between the rise of the U.S. and Japan as Pacific imperial powers in the Racial Justice 1890s and the aftermath and Its of the latter’s defeat in Fugitives World War II, Strange Fruit of the Black Pacific traces the interrelated migrations of African Americans, l er i w l ei t Japanese Americans, S ch e c V in and Filipinos across U.S. domains. Offering readings in literature, blues and jazz culture, film, theatre, journalism, and private correspondence, Vince Schleitwiler considers how the collective yearnings and speculative destinies of these groups were bound together along what W.E.B. Du Bois called the world-belting color line. The links were forged by the paradoxical practices of race-making in an aspiring empire—benevolent uplift through tutelage, alongside overwhelming sexualized violence— which together comprise what Schleitwiler calls “imperialism’s racial justice.” This process could only be sustained through an ongoing training of perception in an aesthetics of racial terror, through rituals of racial and colonial violence that also provide the conditions for an elusive countertraining. St r a ng e Fr ui oF Bl ac k Pa citFic

t he

’s Imperialism

With an innovative prose style, Strange Fruit of the Black Pacific pursues the poetic and ethical challenge of reading, or learning how to read, the black and Asian literatures that take form and flight within the fissures of imperialism’s racial justice. Through startling reinterpretations of such canonical writers as James Weldon Johnson, Nella Larsen, Toshio Mori, and Carlos Bulosan, alongside considerations of unexpected figures such as the musician Robert Johnson and the playwright Eulalie Spence, Schleitwiler seeks to reactivate the radical potential of the Afro-Asian imagination through graceful meditations on its representations of failure, loss, and overwhelming violence. VINCE SCHLEITWILER is a Lecturer in the Department of American Studies & Ethnicity at the University of Southern California.

JANUARY 232 PAGES • 4 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-9357-7 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-8091-1 • $89.00X (£68.00) AMERICAN STUDIES WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

JANUARY 288 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-5708-1 • $28.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-6469-0 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Nation of Nations series AMERICAN STUDIES FA L L 2 0 1 6 • NY U PRESS

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AMERICAN STUDIES

The Color of Kink Black Women, BDSM, and Pornography Ariane Cruz

How to Read African American Literature Post-Civil Rights Fiction and the Task of Interpretation Aida Levy-Hussen

The Color of Kink explores black women’s representations and THE COLOR performances within OF KINK American pornography and BDSM (bondage and discipline, domination and submission, and sadism and masochism) from the 1930s to the present, revealing the ways in which they illustrate a complex and contradictory negotiation of pain, pleasure, and power for black women. ARIANE CRUZ

BLACK WOMEN, BDSM, AND

PORNOGRAPHY

Based on personal interviews conducted with pornography performers, producers, and professional dominatrices, visual and textual analysis, and extensive archival research, Ariane Cruz reveals BDSM and pornography as critical sites from which to rethink the formative links between Black female sexuality and violence. She explores how violence becomes not just a vehicle of pleasure but also a mode of accessing and contesting power. Drawing on feminist and queer theory, critical race theory, and media studies, Cruz argues that BDSM is a productive space from which to consider the complexity and diverseness of black women’s sexual practice and the mutability of black female sexuality. Illuminating the crosspollination of black sexuality and BDSM, The Color of Kink makes a unique contribution to the growing scholarship on racialized sexuality. ARIANE CRUZ is Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Pennsylvania State University.

OCTOBER 320 PAGES • 14 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-2746-6 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-0928-8 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Sexual Cultures series AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES 44

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How to Read African American Literature offers a series of provocations designed to unsettle the predominant assumptions and interpretations readers HOW TO READ make when encountering AFRICAN AMERICAN post-Civil Rights black LITERATURE fiction. Convening around the prolific slavery narratives that lie at the heart of contemporary black literary studies, Aida Levy-Hussen’s argument develops on two levels: as a textual analysis of black historical fiction, and as a critical examination of the reading practices that characterize the scholarship of our time. Examining a body of novels written after the Civil Rights era, including works by Toni Morrison, David Bradley, Octavia Butler, Charles Johnson, and others, Levy-Hussen engages the charged debate over how these writers and their critics understand the work of black literature and its preoccupation with narratives of slavery. Through a series of readings informed by psychoanalysis, affect theory, memory studies, and feminist and queer theory, she reveals how social injury and collective grief inhabit and drive post-Civil Rights African Americanist discourses. Levy-Hussen contends that rather than wed ourselves to a “therapeutic” mode of reading (the idea that working through historical trauma will enable psychic healing in the present) or “prohibitive” reading (the belief that such fictions of historical return are dangerous and to be avoided), we must develop a supple method of reading and interpretation that attends to the indirect, unexpected, and opaque workings of historical fantasy and desire. Moving beyond the redemption of historical wounds, Levy-Hussen makes a crucial intervention into African American literary studies, proposing new ways to read African American literature. A ida Lev y-Hussen

Post-Civil Rights Fiction

and the Task of Interpretation

AIDA LEVY-HUSSEN is Assistant Professor of English at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. DECEMBER 224 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-8471-1 • $26.00S (£19.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-9094-1 • $89.00X (£68.00) AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES 1.800.996.NYUP


AMERICAN STUDIES

Listening, Power and Race

The Sonic Color Line Race and the Cultural Politics of Listening Jennifer Lynn Stoever

African America, Spain, and Post-Humanist

Race is a visual phenomenon, the ability to see “difference.” At least that is what conventional wisdom has lead us to believe. Yet, The Sonic Color Line argues that American ideologies of white supremacy are just as dependent on what we hear— voices, musical taste, volume—as they are on skin color or hair texture. Reinforcing compelling new ideas about the relationship between race and sound with meticulous historical research, Jennifer Lynn Stoever helps us to better understand how sound and listening not only register the racial politics of our world, but actively produce them. Through analysis of the historical traces of sounds of African American performers, Stoever reveals a host of racialized aural representations operating at the level of the unseen—the sonic color line—and exposes the racialized listening practices she figures as “the listening ear.” Using an innovative multimedia archive spanning 100 years of American history (1845-1945) and several artistic genres—the slave narrative, opera, the novel, so-called “dialect stories,” folk and blues, early sound cinema, and radio drama—The Sonic Color Line explores how black thinkers conceived the cultural politics of listening at work during slavery, Reconstruction, and Jim Crow. By amplifying Harriet Jacobs, Frederick Douglass, Elizabeth Taylor Greenfield, Charles Chesnutt, The Fisk Jubilee Singers, Ann Petry, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Lena Horne as agents and theorists of sound, Stoever provides a new perspective on key canonical works in African American literary history. In the process, she radically revises the established historiography of sound studies. The Sonic Color Line sounds out how Americans have created, heard, and resisted “race,” so that we may hear our contemporary world differently.

WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

Critique

Robert F. Reid-Pharr

JENNIFER LYNN STOEVER is Associate Professor of English at the State University of New York at Binghamton. She is cofounder and Editor-in-Chief of Sounding Out!: The Sound Studies Blog.

NOVEMBER 352 PAGES • 14 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-8934-1 • $28.00S (£20.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-9043-9 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Postmillennial Pop series AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES FA L L 2 0 1 6 • NY U PRESS

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AMERICAN STUDIES

Whiteness on the Border

The Latino Nineteenth Century

Mapping the U.S. Racial Imagination in Brown and White

Edited by Rodrigo Lazo and Jesse Alemán

Lee Bebout

Historically, ideas of whiteness and L ee Bebou t Americanness have been built on the backs of racialized communities. The legacy of anti-Mexican stereotypes stretches back to the early nineteenth on the century when AngloBorder American settlers first came into regular contact with Mexico and Mexicans. The images of the Mexican Other as lawless, exotic, or non-industrious continue to circulate today within US popular and political culture. Through keen analysis of music, film, literature, and US politics, Whiteness on the Border demonstrates how contemporary representations of Mexicans and Chicano/as are pushed further to foster the idea of whiteness as Americanness. Illustrating how the ideologies, stories, and images of racial hierarchy align with and support those of fervent US nationalism, Lee Bebout maps the relationship between whiteness and American exceptionalism. He examines how renderings of the Mexican Other have expressed white fear, and formed a besieged solidarity in anti-immigrant rhetoric and policies. Moreover, Whiteness on the Border elucidates how seemingly positive representations of Mexico and Chicano/as are actually used to reinforce investments in white American goodness and obscure systems of racial inequality. Whiteness on the Border pushes readers to consider how the racial logic of the past continues to thrive in the present.

Whiteness

Mapping the U.S. Racial Imagination in Brown and White

LEE BEBOUT is Associate Professor of English at Arizona State University where he is affiliated with the School of Transborder Studies and the Program in American Studies. He is the author of Mythohistorical Interventions: The Chicano Movement and Its Legacies (2011).

DECEMBER 304 PAGES • 16 black & white illustrations PAPER • 978-1-4798-5853-8 • $26.00S (£19.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-8534-3 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the Nation of Nations series LATINO STUDIES 46

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The essays in The Latino Nineteenth Century retell U.S., Latin American, and Latino/a literary history through archival recovery and the comparative textual The Latino analysis of writing by NINE TEENTH CENTURY Latinos/as who lived in the Edited by United States during the Rodrigo Lazo & Jesse Alemán long nineteenth century. Written by both established and emerging scholars, the essays engage materials in Spanish and English and genres ranging from the newspaper to the novel, delving into new texts and areas of research as they shed light on well-known writers. This volume situates nineteenth-century Latino intellectuals and writers within crucial national, hemispheric, and regional debates. The Latino Nineteenth Century offers a long-overdue corrective to the Anglophone and nation-based emphasis of American literary history. Contributors track Latino/a lives and writing through routes that span Philadelphia to San Francisco and roots that extend deeply into Mexico, the Caribbean, Central and South Americas, and Spain. Readers will find in the rich heterogeneity of texts and authors discussed fertile ground for discussion and will discover the depth, diversity, and long-standing presence of Latinos/as and their literature in the United States. RODRIGO LAZO is Associate Professor English and an affiliate of the Chicano/Latino Studies Department at the University of California, Irvine. He is the author of Writing to Cuba: Filibustering and Cuban Exiles in the United States (2005). JESSE ALEMÁN is Professor of English at the University of New Mexico, where he teaches nineteenth-century American and Mexican American literary studies. He is the editor of The Woman in Battle (2003) and co-editor of Empire and the Literature of Sensation (2007).

NOVEMBER 384 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-5587-2 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-9683-7 • $89.00X (£68.00) In the America and the Long 19th Century series LITERARY STUDIES 1.800.996.NYUP


CULTURAL STUDIES

Moments of Silence

Amheida II

Authenticity in the Cultural Expressions of the Iran-Iraq War, 1980-1988

A Late Romano-Egyptian House in Dakleh Oasis: Amheida House B2

Edited by Arta Khakpour, Mohammad Mehdi Khorrami, and Shouleh Vatanabadi

Anna Lucille Boozer

The Iran-Iraq War was the longest conventional war of the 20th century. The memory of it may have faded in the wake of more Moments of Silence recent wars in the region, but the harrowing facts remain: over one million soldiers and civilians dead, millions more permanently displaced and disabled, and an entire generation marked by prosthetic implants and teenage martyrdom. These same facts have been instrumentalized by agendas both foreign and domestic, but also aestheticized, defamiliarized, readdressed and reconciled by artists, writers, and filmmakers across an array of identities. Official discourses have unsurprisingly tried to dominate the process of production and distribution of war narratives. In doing so, they have ignored and silenced other voices.

This archaeological report provides a comprehensive study of the excavations carried out at Amheida House B2 in Egypt’s Dakhleh Oasis between 2005 and 2007, followed by three study seasons between 2008 and 2010. The excavations at Amheida in Egypt’s western desert, begun in 2001 under the aegis of Columbia University and sponsored by NYU since 2008, are investigating all aspects of social life and material culture at the administrative center of ancient Trimithis. The excavations so far have focused on three areas of this very large site: a centrally located upper-class fourthcentury AD house with wall paintings, an adjoining school, and underlying remains of a Roman bath complex; a more modest house of the third century; and the temple hill, with remains of the Temple of Thoth built in the first century AD and of earlier structures. Architectural conservation has protected and partly restored two standing funerary monuments, a mud-brick pyramid and a tower tomb, both of the Roman period.

Authenticity in the Cultural Expressions of the Iran-Iraq War, 1980-1988

Edited by

Arta Khakpour, Mohammad Mehdi Khorrami, Shouleh Vatanabadi

Centering on novels, films, memoirs, and poster art that gave aesthetic expression to the Iran-Iraq War, the essays gathered in this volume present multiple perspectives on the war’s most complex and underrepresented narratives. These scholars do not naively claim to represent an authenticity lacking in official discourses of the war, but rather, they call into question the notion of authenticity itself. Finding, deciding upon, and creating a language that can convey any sort of truth at all—collective, national, or private—is the major preoccupation of the texts and critiques in this diverse collection. ARTA KHAKPOUR studied modern Persian literature at NYU’s Department of Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies. MOHAMMAD MEHDI KHORRAMI is Professor of Persian language and literature at New York University. SHOULEH VATANABADI teaches Global Cultures in the Global Liberal Studies Program at NYU.

DECEMBER 304 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-0509-9 • $30.00S (£22.99) CLOTH • 978-1-4798-4158-5 • $89.00X (£68.00) CULTURAL STUDIES WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

This volume presents and discusses the architecture, artifacts and ecofacts recovered from B2 in a holistic manner, which has rarely before been attempted in a full report on the excavation of a Romano-Egyptian house. The primary aim of this volume is to combine an architectural and material-based study with an explicitly contextual and theoretical analysis. In so doing, it develops a methodology and presents a case study of how the rich material remains of Romano-Egyptian houses may be used to investigate the relationship between domestic remains and social identity. ANNA LUCILLE BOOZER is Assistant Professor of Mediterranean Archaeology at Baruch College.

NOW AVAILABLE 460 PAGES • 179 black & white illustrations CLOTH • 978-1-4798-8034-8 • $55.00X (£0.00) A co-publication with the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World ARCHAEOLOGY FA L L 2 0 1 6 • NY U PRESS

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LIBRARY OF ARABIC LITERATURE

Announcing new paperback editions from the Library of Arabic Literature! “A series that will be of inestimable value to both scholars and general readers.” - THE SILK ROAD -

A Treasury of Virtues

Sayings, Sermons and Teachings of ʿAlī with the One Hundred Proverbs attributed to al-Jāḥiẓ Al-Qāḍī al-Quḍāʿī Translated by Tahera Qutbuddin Foreword by Rowan Williams

The Life of Ibn Ḥanbal Ibn al-Jawzī Translated by Michael Cooperson Foreword by Garth Fowden

A R A B I C

with the One Hundred Proverbs attributed to al-Ja¯ hiz ˙ ˙

A Treasury of Virtues is a collection of sayings, sermons, and teachings attributed to ʿAlī ibn Abī Ṭālib (d. 40 H/661 AD), the cousin and son-in-law of the Prophet Muḥammad, the first Shia Imam and the fourth Sunni Caliph. An acknowledged master of Arabic eloquence and a sage of Islamic wisdom, ʿAlī was renowned for his eloquence: his words were collected, quoted, and studied over the centuries, and extensively anthologized, excerpted, and interpreted. O F

al-Q¯ad·i¯ al-Qud·a¯ ¯i

L I B R A R Y

translated by tahera qutbuddin foreword by rowan williams

Insights into a life of integrity by a master of Arabic eloquence

Of the many compilations of ʿAlī’s words, A Treasury of Virtues, compiled by the Fatimid Shāfiʿī judge al-Quḍāʿī (d. 454 H/1062 AD), arguably possesses the broadest compass of genres and the largest variety of themes. Included are aphorisms, proverbs, sermons, speeches, homilies, prayers, letters, dialogues, and verse, all of which provide instruction on how to be a morally upstanding human being. The shorter compilation included here, One Hundred Proverbs, is attributed to the eminent writer al-Jāḥiẓ (d. 255 H/869 AD). This volume presents the first English translation of both of these important collections. AL-QADI AL-QUDAʿI (D. 454 H/1062 AD) was a Sunni jurist, a scholar of hadith and history, and a senior government official of the Fatimid dynasty in Cairo. Tahera Qutbuddin is Associate Professor of Arabic Literature at the University of Chicago. She is the author of Al-Muʾayyad al-Shirazi and Fatimid Daʿwa Poetry: A Case of Commitment in Classical Arabic Literature. OCTOBER 196 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-9653-0 • $15.00T (£9.99) ARABIC LITERATURE 48

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A R A B I C

Sayings, Sermons and Teachings of Ali¯

The Life of Ibn H · anbal

Journal of Islamic Studies

Aḥmad ibn Ḥanbal (d. 241 H/855 AD), renowned for his profound knowledge of hadiths—the reports of the Prophet’s sayings and deeds—is a major figure in the history of Islam. He was famous for living according to his own strict interpretation of the Prophetic model and for denying himself the most basic comforts. Ibn Ḥanbal’s piety and austerity made him a folk hero. His subsequent imprisonment and flogging is one of the most dramatic episodes of medieval Islamic history, and his principled resistance influenced the course of Islamic law, the rise of Sunnism, and the legislative authority of the caliphate. O F

Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies

L I B R A R Y

L I T E R AT U R E

A Treasury of Virtues

“[A] grand success. It will be valuable for teachers to illustrate early Islamic piety, early Islamic law, early Sunni theology, and everyday life in Baghdad.” L I T E R AT U R E

“Tahera Qutbuddin’s edition proves to be definitive… A smooth presentation of the Arabic texts and a first-rate English translation.”

Ibn al-Jawz¯i

translated by michael cooperson foreword by garth fowden

The formidable life tale of one of the most influential Muslims in history

The Life of Ibn Ḥanbal is a translation of the biography of Ibn Ḥanbal by the Baghdad preacher, scholar, and storyteller Ibn al-Jawzī (d. 597 H/1200 AD). Set against the background of fierce debates over the role of reason and the basis of legitimate government, it tells the formidable life tale of one of the most influential Muslims in history. IBN AL-JAWZI (d. 597 H/1201 AD) was a Baghdadi storyteller, preacher, and prolific Islamic scholar associated with the Hanbali school of jurisprudential thought. MICHAEL COOPERSON is Professor of Arabic language and literature at UCLA. GARTH FOWDEN is the Sultan Qaboos Professor of Abrahamic Faiths at the University of Cambridge. OCTOBER 480 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-4798-0530-3 • $17.00T (£10.99) RELIGION 1.800.996.NYUP


LIBRARY OF ARABIC LITERATURE (1) al-Qāḍī al-Quḍāḍī Light in the Heavens Sayings of the Prophet Muḍammad Edited and translated by TAHERA QUTBUDDIN

(1)

(2)

al-Qāḍī al-Quḍāḍī

A Hundred and One Nights

Light in the Heavens Sayings of the Prophet Muḍammad

“These LAL translations can be pored over by experts and students of the classical Arabic tradition, and the same books offer the non-Arabist, scholar and amateur alike, immediate access to the rich colour of the classical Arabic tradition.” Edited and translated by Bruce Fudge Foreword by Robert Irwin (3)

Muhammad ibn Mahfūḍ al-Sanhūri Risible Rhymes

Edited and translated by HUMPHREY DAVIES

Edited and translated by TAHERA QUTBUDDIN (2)

AL-QĀḌĪ AL-QUḌĀʿĪ

MUḤAMMAD IBN MAḤFŪẒ

Edited and translated by Bruce Fudge SAYINGS OF THE Foreword by Robert Irwin

RISIBLE RHYMES

PROPHET MUḤAMMAD

A HUNDRED AND ONE

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NIGHTS

Muhammad ibn Mahfūḍ al-Sanhūri Risible Rhymes

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AL-SANHŪRĪ

LIGHT IN THE HEAVENS

A Hundred and One Nights

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Light in the Heavens Sayings of the Prophet Muḥammad Al-Qāḍī al-Quḍāʿī

A Hundred and One Nights

Edited and Translated by Bruce Fudge

Edited and Translated by Tahera Qutbuddin

Foreword by Robert Irwin

The words of Muḥammad (d. 11 H/632 AD), God’s messenger and prophet of Islam, have a special place in the hearts of his followers. Assembling Muḥammad’s words has been a major preoccupation for scholars throughout the fourteen centuries since his death, resulting in an abundance of compilations. One which stands out in particular is Light in the Heavens (Kitāb al-Shihāb) by al-Qāḍī al-Quḍāʿī (d. 454 H/1062 AD), a Shāfiʿī judge in the Fatimid court in Egypt.

Known to us only through North African manuscripts, and translated into English for the first time, A Hundred and One Nights is a marvelous example of the rich tradition of popular Arabic storytelling. A Hundred and One Nights features an almost entirely different set of stories, however, each one more thrilling, amusing, and disturbing than the last. In them, we encounter tales of epic warriors, buried treasures, disappearing brides, cannibal demon women, fatal shipwrecks, and clever ruses, where human strength and ingenuity play out against a backdrop of inexorable, inscrutable fate.

From North Africa to India, generations have used Light in the Heavens as a teaching text for children as well as adults, and many of its 1200 sayings are familiar to individuals of diverse denominations. For Muslims—who consider Muḥammad’s teachings the fount of wisdom and the beacon of guidance in all things—these sayings provide a direct window into the inspired vision of one of the most influential humans to have walked the Earth. AL-QADI AL-QUDAʿI (d. 454 H/1062 AD) was a Sunni jurist, and a scholar of hadith and history. TAHERA QUTBUDDIN is Associate Professor of Arabic Literature at the University of Chicago. NOVEMBER 192 PAGES CLOTH • 978-1-4798-7146-9 • $30.00S (£26.99) RELIGION WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

This careful edition and vibrant translation of A Hundred and One Nights promises to transport readers, new and veteran alike, into its fantastical realms of magic and wonder. BRUCE FUDGE is Professor of Arabic at the University of Geneva. He is the author of Qur’anic Hermeneutics: al-‘abrisi and the Craft of Commentary (2011) as well as a number of articles on the interpretation of the Qur’an and medieval and modern Arabic literature.

SEPTEMBER 416 PAGES CLOTH • 978-0-8147-4519-9 • $35.00S (£22.99) LITERATURE

Risible Rhymes

Muḥammad ibn Maḥfūẓ alSanhūrī Edited and Translated by Humphrey Davies

Written in mid-17th century Egypt, Risible Rhymes is a short, comic disquisition on “rural” verse, mocking the pretensions and absurdities of uneducated poets from Egypt’s countryside. It combines a biting satire on Egyptian rural society with a hilarious parody of the verseand-commentary genre so beloved by scholars of the day. Nothing is known about the author, al-Sanhūri, who likely hailed from Egypt’s Fayyum region, although he describes his text as having been written at the behest of an unnamed friend. al-Sanhūrī’s Risible Rhymes provides further evidence of a hitherto unrecognized genre of Arabic literature during this period, namely, mock-scholarly commentary on verse of supposedly rural provenance. Using clever literary analysis and wordplay, this mordant commentary offers readers a rare window on rural life in Ottoman-era Egypt. HUMPHREY DAVIES is an award-winning translator of Arabic literature from the Ottoman period to the present. He has also authored, with Madiha Doss, an anthology of writings in Egyptian colloquial Arabic. He lives in Cairo.

OCTOBER 128 PAGES CLOTH • 978-1-4798-7792-8 • $30.00S (£22.99) LITERATURE FA L L 2 0 1 6 • NY U PRESS

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CLAY SANSKRIT LIBRARY

Announcing the Clay Sanskrit Library Digital Editions! “One of the most exciting publishing projects of recent years…the appeal of these books…is often their simplicity, the apparently effortless way so many of them distill complex truths into parables that resonate for people and in places distant from the works’ authors or origins.” - HARPER’S MAGAZINE -

“An admirable enterprise… [the volumes] offer realms of literary gold…Here are stories and poems crafted with joy in the art of storytelling and delight in the nuance and patterning of worlds.” Times Literary Supplement “The books line up on my shelf like bright Bodhisattvas ready to take tough questions or keep quiet company. They stake out a vast territory, with works from two millennia in multiple genres: aphorism, lyric, epic, theater, and romance.” Willis G. Regier The Chronicle Review

The Clay Sanskrit Library was created by the philanthropist, John Clay to introduce Classical Sanskrit literature to an international readership. Co-published by NYU Press and the JCC Foundation, the series consists of 56 volumes, covering a wide spectrum of Sanskrit literature. Offering fresh new translations by leading scholars from around the world, each volume features the original Sanskrit text in transliterated Roman letters facing its English translation as well as extensive explanatory notes. Now, for the first time, seven volumes are available in digital form, in editions that retain the facing page translations and which provide additional search and navigation features.

Releasing in October

BHATTI’S POEM: THE DEATH OF RAVANA

Translated by Oliver Fallon

Composed in the 4th century CE, this poetic retelling of Rama’s adventures has been one of the most popular poems in Sanskrit literature. 550 PAGES • 978-1-4798-8693-7 • $19.95A

THE RISE OF WISDOM MOON

Krishna Misra Translated by Matthew Kapstein Forward by J.N. Mohanty An 11th century poem offering a satirical account of the conquest of the holy city of Benares. The Rise of Wisdom Moon was composed during the mid-eleventh century by Krishna Mishra, an otherwise unknown poet in the service of the Chandella dynasty, whose cultural and religious capital was Khajuraho.

“HOW THE NAGAS WERE PLEASED” AND “THE SHATTERED THIGH”

Harsa and Bhasa Translated by Andrew Skilton Two tragic plays composed in the 17th century that broke the rules by allowing the heroes to die onstage; a scenario forbidden in Sanskrit dramaturgy. 380 PAGES • 978-1-4798-0286-9 • $19.95A

396 PAGES • 978-1-4798-5264-2 • $19.95A

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MAHABHARATA

Mahabharata is one of the major Sanskrit epics of ancient India and an important source of information on the development of Hinduism. The poem describes the struggle for sovereignty between two groups of warring cousins.

MAHABHARATA IX

MAHABHARATA IX

Volume 1: Shalya Translated by Justin Meiland

Volume 2: Shalya Translated by Justin Meiland

The Book of Shalya recounts in gory detail the final destruction of the Káurava army and the defeat of its leader, Dur·yódhana. In this first volume heroic duels and martial speeches abound as Shalya, the king of the Madras, is made general of the Káurava army, only to be slaughtered in his turn.

In one of the most famous passages in Maha·bhárata, Dur·yódhana, the heroic but flawed king of the Káuravas, meets his end when he is dishonorably defeated in battle by his arch-enemy, Bhima. Framing a fascinating account of the sacred sites along the river Sarásvati, the duel poignantly portrays the downfall of a once great hero in the face of a new order governed by Krishna, in which the warrior code is brushed aside in order to ensure the predestined triumph of the Pándavas.

465 PAGES • 978-1-4798-9437-6 • $19.95A

465 PAGES • 978-1-4798-9437-6 • $19.95A

MAHABHARATA VII: DRONA

Translated by Vaughan Pilikian

After Bhishma is cut down at the end of the previous book of the Mahabhárata, Duryódhana selects Drona as leader of his forces. Drona accepts the honor with Bhishma’s blessing, despite his ongoing personal conflicts as mentor to both the Pándava and Káurava heroes in their youth. The fighting rages on, with heavy losses on both sides. 400 PAGES • 978-1-4798-8217-5 • $19.95A

MAHABHARATA VII: BHISHMA

Translated by Alex Cherniak Forward by Ranajit Guha (including the “Bhagavad Gita”)

“Bhishma,” the sixth book of the eighteen-book epic The Mahabhárata, narrates the first ten days of the great war between the Káuravas and the Pándavas. This first volume covers four days from the beginning of the great battle and includes the famous “Bhágavadgita (“The Song of the Lord”), presented here within its original epic context. 582 PAGES • 978-1-4798-8268-7 • $19.95A

WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

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MONTHLY REVIEW PRESS

Facing the Anthropocene

Fossil Capitalism and the Crisis of the Earth System Ian Angus Science tells us that a new and dangerous stage in planetary evolution has begun—the Anthropocene, a time of rising temperatures, extreme weather, rising oceans, and mass species extinctions. Humanity faces not just more pollution or warmer weather, but a crisis of the Earth System. If business as usual continues, this century will be marked by rapid deterioration of our physical, social, and economic environment. Large parts of Earth will become uninhabitable, and civilization itself will be threatened. Facing the Anthropocene shows what has caused this planetary emergency, and what we must do to meet the challenge. “A crisp, eloquent, and deeply informed call to arms by a leading eco-socialist.” Mike Davis, author of Planet of Slums and In Praise of Barbarians: Essays against Empire IAN ANGUS is editor of the online ecosocialist journal Climate and Capitalism and co-author of the Belém Ecosocialist Declaration. His previous books include Too Many People? Population, Immigration, and the Environmental Crisis (with Simon Butler) and The Global Fight for Climate Justice.

Bridging the gap between Earth System science and ecological Marxism, Ian Angus examines not only the latest scientific findings about the physical causes and consequences of the Anthropocene transition, but also the social and economic trends that underlie the crisis. Cogent and compellingly written, Facing the Anthropocene offers a unique synthesis of natural and social science that illustrates how capitalism’s inexorable drive for growth, powered by the rapid burning of fossil fuels that took millions of years to form, has driven our world to the brink of disaster. Survival in the Anthropocene, Angus argues, requires radical social change, replacing fossil capitalism with a new, ecosocialist civilization.

SEPTEMBER 280 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-58367-609-7 • $19.00S CLOTH • 978-1-58367-610-3 • $95.00X POLITICAL SCIENCE • ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES 52

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Creating an Ecological Society Toward a Revolutionary Transformation Fred Magdoff and Chris Williams

Sickened by the contamination of their water, their air, of the Earth itself, more and more people are coming to realize that it is capitalism that is, quite literally, killing them. It is now clearer than ever that capitalism is also degrading the Earth’s ability to support other forms of life. Capitalism’s imperative— to make profits at all costs and expand without end— is destabilizing the Earth’s climate, while increasing human misery and inequality on a planetary scale. Already, hundreds of millions of people are facing poverty in the midst of untold wealth, perpetual war, growing racism, and gender oppression. The need to organize for social and environmental reforms has never been greater. But crucial as reforms are, they cannot solve our intertwined ecological and social crises. Creating an Ecological Society reveals an overwhelmingly simple truth: Fighting for reforms is vital, but revolution is essential. Because it aims squarely at replacing capitalism with an ecologically sound and socially just society, Creating an Ecological Society is filled with revolutionary hope. Fred Magdoff and Chris Williams, who have devoted their lives to activism, Marxist analysis, and ecological science, provide informed, fascinating accounts of how a new world can be created from the ashes of the old. Their book shows that it is possible to envision and create a society that is genuinely democratic, equitable, and ecologically sustainable. And possible—not one moment too soon—for society to change fundamentally and be brought into harmony with nature.

FRED MAGDOFF is Professor Emeritus of Plant and Soil Science at the University of Vermont. His most recent books include Agriculture and Food in Crisis (edited with Brian Tokar), The ABCs of the Economic Crisis (with Michael Yates), and The Great Financial Crisis (with John Bellamy Foster). CHRIS WILLIAMS is an environmental activist, teacher, and author of Ecology and Socialism: Solutions to Capitalist Ecological Crisis.

FEBRUARY 384 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-58367-629-5 • $25.00S CLOTH • 978-1-58367-630-1 • $95.00X POLITICAL SCIENCE • ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

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MONTHLY REVIEW PRESS

Educational Justice

Teaching and Organizing Against the Corporate Juggernaut Howard Ryan That education should instill and nurture democracy is an American truism. Yet organizations such as the Business Roundtable, together with conservative philanthropists such as Bill Gates and Walmart’s owners, the Waltons, have been turning public schools into corporate mills. Their top-down programs, such as Common Core State Standards, track, judge, and homogenize the minds of millions of American students from kindergarten through high school. But corporate funders would not be able to implement this educational control without the de facto partnership of government at all levels, channeling public moneys into privatization initiatives, school closings, and high-stakes testing that discourages independent thinking. “Howard Ryan’s book is a celebration of the growing ranks of educators, parents, and community organizations’ successful resistance to school closures, moribund unionism, high stakes testing, and undemocratic control of our public schools. Ryan’s portrait lifts up how regular people can reassert democracy through broad-based coalitions and rank-and-file activism.” Jackson Potter, staff coordinator, Chicago Teachers Union HOWARD RYAN has taught college English, worked for many years in union organizing and representation in higher education, as well as in labor journalism. Now retired, he writes and organizes for quality education in public schools.

Educational Justice offers hope that there’s still time to take on corporatized schools and achieve democratic justice in the classroom. Forcefully written by educator and journalist Howard Ryan, with contributing authors, the book opens with four chapters that discuss theories on teacher unionism, social justice pedagogy, and corporate school reform. These chapters are balanced with four case-study chapters documenting exemplary teaching and school-site organizing practices in the field. Reports from various educational fronts include innovative union strategies against charter school expansion, as well as teaching visions drawn from the vibrant “whole language” movement. Bold, informative, clearly reasoned, this book is an education in itself—a democratic one at that.

NOVEMBER 248 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-58367-613-4 • $23.00S CLOTH • 978-1-58367-614-1 • $95.00X POLITICAL SCIENCE • EDUCATION 54

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Union Power

The United Electrical Workers in Erie, Pennsylvania James Young If you’re lucky enough to be employed today in the United States, there’s about a one-in-ten chance that you’re in a labor union. And even if you’re part of that unionized 10 percent, chances are your union doesn’t carry much economic or political clout. But this was not always the case, as historian and activist James Young shows in this vibrant story of the United Electrical Workers Union. The UE, built by hundreds of rank-and-file worker-activists in the quintessentially industrial town of Erie, Pennsylvania, was able to transform the conditions of the working class largely because it went beyond the standard call for living wages to demand quantum leaps in worker control over workplaces, community institutions, and the policies of the federal government itself. James Young’s book is a richly empowering history told from below, showing that the collective efforts of the many can challenge the supremacy of the few. Erie’s two UE locals confronted a daunting array of obstacles: the corporate superpower General Electric; ferocious red-baiting; and later, the debilitating impact of globalization. Yet, by working through and across ethnic, gender, and racial divides, communities of people built a viable working-class base powered by real democracy. While the union’s victories could not be sustained completely, the UE is still alive and fighting in Erie. This book is an exuberant and eloquent testament to this fight, and a reminder to every worker—employed or unemployed; in a union or out—that an injury to one is an injury to all.

“That the United Electrical Workers Union was still alive at the end of the 1950s, a decade of red-baiting, raids, and repression against the labor left, has been considered a minor miracle. In this wonderfully detailed account of human courage and solidarity, based on dozens of interviews with participants, Jim Young uncovers the secret behind that miracle. A must-read for labor activists and students of labor history.”

Alan Hart, Managing Editor, UE News, former Erie GE worker

JAMES YOUNG is Professor of History Emeritus at Edinboro University, Pennsylvania. He has been a union member all his life and a worker in several unions, including the SEIU and USWA. He is a contributing author to Fear Itself: Enemies Real and Imagined in American Culture and Advocates and Activists, 1919-1941: Men and Women Who Shaped the Period Between the Wars.

FEBRUARY 248 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-58367-617-2 • $29.00S CLOTH • 978-1-58367-618-9 • $95.00X POLITICAL SCIENCE • HISTORY WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

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The Syriza Wave

Surging and Crashing with the Greek Left Helena Sheehan Foreword by Stathis Kouvelakis Utterly corrupt corporate and government elites bankrupted Greece twice over. First, by profligate deficit spending benefitting only themselves; second, by agreeing to an IMF “bailout” of the Greek economy, devastating ordinary Greek citizens who were already enduring government-induced poverty, unemployment, and hunger. Finally, in response to dire “austerity” measures, the people of Greece stood up, forming, from their own historic roots of resistance, Syriza—the Coalition of the Radical Left. For those who caught the Syriza wave, there was, writes Helena Sheehan, a minute of “precarious hope.”

“Deeply grounded in philosophy and Marxist theory, Sheehan shows in plain language that the leadership of SYRIZA proved vacuous in theory and opportunist in practice. Her intellectual and political honesty will be a benchmark in the debate in the coming years.” Costas Lapavitsas, Professor of Economics at University of London, and Syriza MP from January to August 2015 HELENA SHEEHAN is Professor Emerita at Dublin City University, where she taught history of ideas and media studies. She is also the author of several books, including Marxism and the Philosophy of Science: A Critical History and Irish Television Drama: A Society and Its Stories, as well as magazine articles on politics, culture, and philosophy.

A seasoned activist and participant-observer, Helena Sheehan adroitly places us at the center of the whirlwind beginnings of Syriza, its jubilant victory at the polls, and finally at Syriza’s surrender to the very austerity measures it once vowed to annihilate. Along the way, she takes time to meet many Greeks in tavernas, on the street, and in government offices, engage in debates, and compare Greece to her own economically blighted country, Ireland. Beginning as a strong Syriza supporter, Sheehan sees Syriza transformed from a horizon of hope to a vortex of despair. But out of the dust of defeat, she draws questions radiating optimism. Just how did what was possibly the most intelligent, effective instrument of the Greek left self-destruct? And what are the consequences for the Greek people, for the international left, for all of us driven to work for a better world? The Syriza Wave is a page-turning blend of political reportage, personal reflection, and astute analysis.

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Rethinking Revolution Socialist Register 2017 Leo Panitch and Greg Albo

One hundred years ago, “October 1917” galvanized leftists and oppressed peoples around the globe, and became the lodestar for 20th century politics. Today, the left needs to reckon with this legacy—and transcend it. Social change, as it was understood in the 20th century, appears now to be as impossible as revolution, leaving the left to rethink the relationship between capitalist crises, as well as the conceptual tension between revolution and reform. Populated by an array of passionate thinkers and thoughtful activists, Rethinking Revolution reappraises the historical effects of the Russian revolution— positive and negative—on political, intellectual, and cultural life, and looks at consequent revolutions after 1917. Change needs to be understood in relation to the distinct trajectories of radical politics in different regions. But the main purpose of this Socialist Register edition—one century after “Red October”—is to look forward, to what might happen next. Acclaimed authors interrogate and explore compelling issues, including: •Greg Albo: New socialist strategies—or detours?

“I know the Register very well and have found it extremely stimulating, often invaluable.” Noam Chomsky “Compulsory reading for people who refuse to be resigned to the idea that there can be no alternative to our unacceptable society.” Daniel Singer LEO PANITCH and GREG ALBO are Professors in the Department of Political Science at York University, Toronto.

•Jodi Dean: Are the multitudes communing? Revolutionary agency and political forms today. •Adolph Reed: Are racial minorities revolutionary agents? •Zillah Eisenstein: Revolutionary feminisms today. •Nina Power: Accelerated technology, decelerated revolution. •David Schwartzman: Beyond global warming: Is solar communism possible? •Andrea Malm: Revolution and counter-revolution in an era of climate change. WWW.NYUPRESS.ORG

DECEMBER 369 PAGES PAPER • 978-1-58367-633-2 • $29.00S POLITICAL SCIENCE FA L L 2016 • NY U PRESS

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AWARD-WINNING BACKLIST

2015 National Jewish Book Award presented by the Jewish Book Council

Winner of the Alan Bray Memorial Book Prize presented by the GL/Q Caucus of the Modern Language Association

Book of the Year presented by the American Association of Hispanics in Higher Education

An Overstuffed History of the Jewish Deli Ted Merwin

Juana María Rodriguez

CLOTH • 978-0-8147-6031-4 • $26.95T Religion • History

Advocacy Dolores Ines Casillas

PAPER • 978-0-8147-6492-3 • $24.00A American Studies • LGBT Studies

Best Edited Book Award presented by the Society for Research on Adolescence

Best Authored Book presented by the Society for Research on Adolescence

2016 Association for Asian American Studies Award for Best Book in Cultural Studies

Ben Kirshner

Biopolitics, Biosociality, and Posthuman Ecologies Rachel Lee

PASTRAMI ON RYE

TRANSITIONS

The Development of Children of Immigrants Edited by Carola Suárez-Orozco, Mona M. Abo-Zena, Amy K. Marks

SEXUAL FUTURES, QUEER GESTURES, SOUNDS OF BELONGING U.S. Spanish-language Radio and Public AND OTHER LATINA LONGINGS

YOUTH ACTIVISM IN AN ERA OF EDUCATIONAL INEQUALITY

PAPER • 978-1-4798-9805-3 $27.00A Psychology • Political Science

PAPER • 978-0-8147-7024-5 $30.00A Psychology • Youth Studies

Anna Julia Cooper/CLR James Award for Outstanding Book in Africana Studies presented by the National Council for Black Studies

WHOSE HARLEM IS THIS, ANYWAY?

Community Politics and Grassroots Activism during the New Negro Era Shannon King CLOTH • 978-1-4798-1127-4 $49.00A History • African American Studies 58

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PAPER • 978-0-8147-7024-5 $25.00A Media Studies • Latino/a Studies

THE EXQUISITE CORPSE OF ASIAN AMERICA

PAPER • 978-1-4798-0978-3 • $26.00A American Studies • Asian American Studies

Honorable Mention, 2015 Book Award presented by the American Revolution Round Table of Richmond

RENEGADE REVOLUTIONARY

The Life of General Charles Lee Phillip Papas

CLOTH • 978-0-8147-6765-8 • $40.00S History • Military History

2015 Julian Steward Award presented by the American Anthropological Association

THE DRUG COMPANY NEXT DOOR Pollution, Jobs, and Community Health in Puerto Rico Alexa S. Dietrich PAPER • 978-0-8147-2473-6 • $26.00A Anthropology • Environmental Studies

1.800.996.NYUP


INDEX “How the Nagas Were Pleased” . . . . . .51 Foundations of Family Law. . . . . . . . . .32 Macías-Rojas, Patrisia. . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Schleitwiler, Vincent. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 9/11 Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Ending Zero Tolerance. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Magdoff, Fred. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Schocket, Andrew M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 A Hundred and One Nights . . . . . . . . .49

Mahabharata Book Nine (Volume 1). . . .51 Shames, Shauna. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

A Treasury of Virtues . . . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Facing the Anthropocene . . . . . . . . . . .52 Mahabharata Book Nine (Volume 2). . . .51 Shami, Seteny. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 After Life Imprisonment. . . . . . . . . . . .26 Fast Food Kids. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Mahabharata Book Seven (Volume 1). . .51 Sharing Our Worlds, 3e . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Albo, Greg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .57 Fighting over the Founders. . . . . . . . . .36 Mahabharata Book Six (Volume 1). . . . . 51 Sheehan, Helena. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Alemán, Jesse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46 Fink, Moritz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Maira, Sunaina Marr . . . . . . . . . . . . . .42 Sjoberg, Laura. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Amheida II. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .47 Fluker, Walter Earl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Make Art Not War. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Skilton, Andrew. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Angus, Ian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 Fowden, Garth. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Managing Inequality. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Sonic Color Line. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Archives of Flesh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Fradella, Henry F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Mary Daly Reader. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Srinivasan, Ramesh. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Are Racists Crazy? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Frederick, Marla F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .39 Mazelis, Joan Maya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 St. Germain, Tonia. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Atlas of the Irish Revolution. . . . . . . . .13 Free Speech Beyond Words . . . . . . . . . 12 Mele, Christopher. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 Steinmetz, Kevin F. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 From Deportation to Prison . . . . . . . . 16 Mendelsohn, Adam D. . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 Stoever, Jennifer Lynn. . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Barton, Bernadette C. . . . . . . . . . . . . .19 Fudge, Bruce. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Meth Wars. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Stop and Frisk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Middle East Studies for the New

Barufaldi, Linda. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

Strange Fruit of the Black Pacific. . . . 43

Barzilai, Maya. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Gilman, Sander L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Millennium. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Strange, Carolyn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .32 Bebout, Lee. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Golem. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .38 Miller, Karen R. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Stripped. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Berkowitz, Dana. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Great Conspiracy against Our Race. . 37 Miller-Idriss, Cynthia. . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Surviving Poverty. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Best, Amy L. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Ground Has Shifted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Mirabal, Nancy Raquel. . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Suspect Freedoms. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34 Black, Derek W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Gurock, Jeffrey S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Mohanty, J. N. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Syriza Wave. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 Moments of Silence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Blocher, Joseph. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Boozer, Anna Lucille. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Hacked . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Morgan, Robin. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 Televised Redemption. . . . . . . . . . . . . 439 Botox Nation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 Harrison, Laura . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Morris, Theresa. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 The Life of Ibn Hanbal. . . . . . . . . . . . .48 Brooklyn’s Promised Land. . . . . . . . . . .35 Health of Newcomers . . . . . . . . . . . . . .31 Murphy, Mike. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Thomas, James M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .15 Brown Bodies, White Babies. . . . . . . . 18 Hendry, Joy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Muslim Cool. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29 Thomas, Tracy A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Bruce, Katherine McFarland. . . . . . . .14 Herzig, Rebecca M. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 My Soul Is in Haiti. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Transnational Reproduction. . . . . . . .27 Holocaust Across Generations. . . . . . 39

Troutt, David Dante. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17

Case for the Corporate Death Penalty, The . .8 Horne, Gerald. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Neocitizenship. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Tsuda, Takeyuki. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 Chen, Alan K. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 How the Wise Man Got to Chelm. . . . . 7 New World A-Coming . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Tushnet, Mark V. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Cherniak, Alex . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .51 How to Read African American Literature. . 44 Cherniavsky, Eva . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 Hughey, Aaron W. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Out of the Running. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .23 Union Power. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55 Civil Society, Second Edition . . . . . . . .22 Hunt, Mary E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Claeys, Gregory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

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