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General Interest..........................1-13 Religion......................................14-18 History.......................................19-22 Law.............................................22-25 Media Studies............................25-30 American Studies......................30-34 Social Science............................34-44 Library of Arabic Literature...45-47 Clay Sanskrit Library......................48 Monthly Review Press..............49-53 New Village Press.....................54-56 Award-Winning Backlist...............57 Best of the Backlist.......................58 Index................................................59 Sales Information.....................60-61 MISSION STATEMENT

Making common cause with the best and the brightest, the great and the good, NYU Press aspires to nothing less than the transformation of the intellectual and cultural landscape. Infused with the conviction that the ideas of the academy matter, we foster knowledge that resonates within and beyond the walls of the university. If the university is the public square for intellectual debate, NYU Press is its soapbox, offering original thinkers a forum for the written word. Our authors think, teach, and contend; NYU Press crafts, publishes and disseminates. Step up, hold forth, and we will champion your work to readers everywhere.

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Stories from Trailblazing Women Lawyers N ew in Paperbac k The Securitization of Society Jill Norgren • pg. 7 Marc Schuilenburg • pg. 38 Jewish Radical Feminism Joyce Antler • pg. 8 JA NUA RY A Rich Brew Must We Defend Nazis? Richard Delgado, Jean Stefancic Shachar M. Pinsker • pg. 14 • pg. 2 Queer Nuns Melissa M. Wilcox • pg. 16 M A RC H Surviving State Terror First Ladies of the Republic Barbara Sutton • pg. 36 Jeanne E. Abrams • pg. 1 Graffiti Grrlz Struggling for Ordinary Jessica Nydia Pabón-Colón • pg.39 Andre Cavalcante • pg. 26 Compromise More Than Meets the Eye Edited by Jack Knight • pg. 40 Bob Rehak • pg. 28 The Life and Death of Latisha The Sex Offender Housing Dilemma King Monica Williams • pg. 41 Gayle Salamon • pg. 31 Inequalities of Aging New Immigrant Whiteness Claudia Sadowski-Smith • pg. 34 Elana D. Buch • pg. 42 L i b r a r y of A r a b i c L i t e r a t ur e America, As Seen on TV In Darfur Clara E. Rodríguez • pg. 34 Humphrey Davies, Muhammad N ew in Paperbac k al-Tunisi, R.S. O’Fahey • pg. 45 Unfreedom L i b r a r y of A r a b i c L i t e r a t ur e Jared Ross Hardesty • pg. 19 In Darfur N ew in Paperbac k Muhammad al-Tunisi, translated Dark Work by Humphrey Davies • pg. 45 Christy Clark-Pujara • pg. 19 M o n t h l y Review Pr es s

Culture as Politics Christopher Caudwell, David Margolies • pg. 50 A PR I L

Postcards from Auschwitz Daniel P. Reynolds • pg. 15 Feminist Manifestos Penny A. Weiss • pg. 21 Wife, Inc. Suzanne Leonard • pg. 27 Homegrown Piotr M. Szpunar • pg. 28 Colonial Phantoms Dixa Ramírez • pg. 30 Market Cities, People Cities Michael Oluf Emerson, Kevin T. Smiley • pg. 35

N ew i n Pa p e r b a c k

Ctrl + Z Meg Leta Jones • pg. 12 N ew i n Pa p e r b a c k

Unfit for Democracy Stephen E. Gottlieb • pg. 24 M on t h l y Rev i ew P r e ss

JU LY

Future of Tech Is Female Douglas M. Branson • pg. 10 Sugar, Cigars, and Revolution Lisandro Pérez • pg. 11 Ark Encounter James S. Bielo • pg. 18 Early Judaism Frederick E. Greenspahn • pg. 18 Dot-Com Design Megan Sapnar Ankerson • pg. 29 Playing to the Crowd Nancy K. Baym • pg. 30 Girlhood in the Borderlands Lilia Soto • pg. 32 Before Chicano Alberto Varon • pg. 32 Health Care in Crisis Theresa Morris • pg. 37 Ages of Anxiety Edited by William S. Bush, David S. Tanenhaus • pg. 42 Sustainability Edited by Julie Sze • pg. 43 Motherhood across Borders Gabrielle Oliveira • pg. 43 M on t h l y Rev i ew P r e ss

India after Naxalbari Bernard D’Mello • pg. 51

M on t h l y Rev i ew P r e ss

The Biofuels Deception Okbazghi Yohannes • pg. 52 N ew V i l l a g e P r e ss

The Monster in His Labyrinth Alfredo Cardona Peña, Alvaro Cardona-Hine • pg. 55

The Russians Are Coming, Again John Marciano, Jeremy Kuzmarov AU G U S T • pg. 50 The Soul of Judaism Bruce D. Haynes • pg. 17 N ew V i l l a g e P r e ss Homeboy Came to Orange Multiracials and Civil Rights Ernest Thompson, Mindy Tanya Katerí Hernández • pg. 22 Thompson Fullilove • pg. 56 Brown Beauty JU N E Laila Haidarali • pg. 22 The Trans Generation After the Party Ann Travers • pg. 9 Joshua Chambers-Letson • pg. 31 America’s Dark Theologian Biocitizenship Douglas E. Cowan • pg. 13 N ew in Paperbac k Edited by Kelly E. Happe, Jenell Shout to the Lord Black Women’s Christian Johnson, Marina Levina • pg. 36 Ari Y. Kelman • pg. 16 Activism Vulnerability Politics Betty Livingston Adams • pg. 20 Reimagining Equality Katie Oliviero • pg. 37 Nancy E. Dowd • pg. 23 N ew in Paperbac k Crisis of Connection Forging a Laboring Race Making Habeas Work Edited by Niobe Way, Alisha Ali, Paul R.D. Lawrie • pg. 20 Eric M. Freedman • pg. 23 Carol Gilligan, Pedro Noguera N ew in Paperbac k • pg. 44 Being Muslim Spreadable Media Sylvia Chan-Malik • pg. 33 N ew i n Pa p e r b a c k Henry Jenkins, Sam Ford, Joshua Calling the Shots Unnamable Green • pg. 25 Jennifer A. Reich • pg. 12 Susette Min • pg. 33 L ibr ar y o f A r abic L it er a t ur e N ew i n Pa p e r b a c k Immigrants Under Threat N ew in Paperbac k Ending Zero Tolerance Greg Prieto • pg. 38 What ‘Isa ibn Hisham Told Us Derek W. Black • pg. 25 The Path to Gay Rights Muhammad al-Muwaylihi, M on t h l y Rev i ew P r e ss Translated by Roger Allen • pg.46 Jeremiah J. Garretson • pg. 40 Can the Working Class Change America’s Jails M AY the World? Derek Jeffreys • pg. 41 The Defiant Michael D. Yates • pg. 49 N ew i n Pa p e r b a c k Dawson Barrett • pg. 3 M on t h l y Rev i ew P r e ss Just Medicine Activist New York Miseducating for the Global Dayna Bowen Matthew • pg. 24 Steven H. Jaffe, Eric Foner • pg.4 Economy M on t h l y Rev i ew P r e ss Gerald Coles • pg. 53 Eight Stories From Commune to Capitalism Erich Maria Remarque, Larry Zhun Xu • pg. 51 Wolff, Maria Tatar • pg. 6

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Cover Art (from top to bottom): Pixie, “My Thuggy Pony,” Bronx, NY, USA, 2013. Photo courtesy of Jessica Pabón-Colón. ClawMoney, Dona, Miss17, Lady Pink, “Bitches N’ Stitches,” Tucson, Arizona, USA, 2004. Photo courtesy of Jessica Pabón-Colón. Solitas, Santiago, Chile, 2014. Photo courtesy of Solitas. Activist New York page and artwork samples were created and provided by Pentegram Design. Activist New York is a co-publication with the Museum of the City of New York. WW W.N Y U P R E SS.O RG

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FIRST LADIES OF THE REPUBLIC

Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, Dolley Madison, and the Creation of an Iconic American Role

Jeanne E. Abrams How the three inaugural First Ladies defined the role for future generations, and carved a space for women in America

America’s first First Ladies—Martha Washington, Abigail Adams, and Dolley Madison—had the challenging task defining the nature of the American presidency to a fledgling nation and to the world. In First Ladies of the Republic, Jeanne Abrams breaks new ground by examining their lives as a group. From their visions for the future of the burgeoning new nation and its political structure, to ideas about family life and matrimony, these three women had a profound influence on one another’s views as they created the new role of presidential spouse.

Jeanne E. Abrams is Professor at the

University Libraries and the Center for Judaic Studies at the University of Denver, where she is also Director of the Rocky Mountain Jewish Historical Society, and Curator of the Beck Archives, Special Collections. She is the author of Revolutionary Medicine: The Founding Fathers and Mothers in Sickness and in Health (NYU Press, 2013).

Martha, Abigail, and Dolley walked the fine line between bringing dignity to their lives as presidential wives, and supporting their husbands’ presidential agendas, while at the same time distancing themselves from the behavior, customs and ceremonies that reflected the courtly styles of European royalty that were inimical to the values of the new republic. In the face of personal challenges, public scrutiny, and sometimes vocal criticism, they worked to project a persona that inspired approval and confidence, and helped burnish their husbands’ presidential reputations. The position of First Lady was not officially authorized or defined, and the place of women in society was more restricted than it is today. These capable and path-breaking women not only shaped their own roles as prominent Americans and “First Ladies,” but also defined a role for women in public and private life in America.

“First Ladies of the Republic offers a compelling new approach to understanding the meaning and significance of the lives of the first three occupants of the position of ‘First Lady.’…a significant contribution.” —Rebecca Tannenbaum, Yale University March 2018 328 pages | 6 x 9 12 black and white illustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-8653-1 | $28.95T (£23.99 ) History WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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MUST WE DEFEND NAZIS?

Why the First Amendment Should Not Protect Against Hate Speech and White Supremacy Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic A controversial argument for reconsidering the limits of free speech

Swirling in the midst of the resurgence of neo-Nazi demonstrations, hate speech, and acts of domestic terrorism are uncomfortable questions about the limits of free speech. The United States stands apart from many other countries in that citizens have the power to say virtually anything without legal repercussions. But, in the case of white supremacy, does the First Amendment demand that we defend Nazis? In Must We Defend Nazis?, legal experts Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic argue that it should not. Updated to consider the white supremacy demonstrations and counterprotests in Charlottesville and debates about hate speech on campus and on the internet, the book offers a concise argument against total, unchecked freedom of speech.

Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic are

Professors at the University of Alabama School of Law, where Delgado holds the John J. Sparkman Chair and Stefancic serves as Professor and Clement Research Affiliate. Prime figures in the critical race theory movement, they are authors of many books and articles on race and civil rights, including Crirical Race Theory, 3E (NYU Press 2017), The Latino Condition, 2nd edition (NYU Press, 2010), The Derrick Bell Reader (NYU Press, 2005), How Lawyers Lose Their Way: A Profession Fails Its Creative Minds, and Understanding Words That Wound.

Delgado and Stefancic instead call for a system of free speech that takes into account the harms that hate speech can inflict upon disempowered, marginalized people. They examine the prevailing arguments against regulating speech, and show that they all have answers. They also show how limiting free speech would work in a legal framework and offer suggestions for activist lawyers and judges interested in approaching the hate speech controversy intelligently. As citizens are confronting free speech in contention with equal dignity, access, and respect, Must We Defend Nazis? puts aside clichés that clutter First Amendment thinking, and presents a nuanced position that recognizes the needs of our increasingly diverse society.

January 2018 176 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-5783-8 | $14.95T (£11.99 ) Cloth |978-1-4798-8771-2 | $89.00X (£74.00 ) Current Affairs | Law 2

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THE DEFIANT

Protest Movements in Post-Liberal America Dawson Barrett In the tradition of Howard Zinn’s A People’s History of the United States, an engaging account of the last half-century of political discontent

The history of the United States is a history of oppression and inequality, as well as raucous opposition to the status quo. It is a history of slavery and child labor, but also the protest movements that helped end those institutions. Protesters have been the driving force of American democracy, from the expansion of voting rights and the end of segregation laws, to minimum wage standards and marriage equality. In this exceptional new book, Dawson Barrett calls our attention to the post-1960s period, in which US economic, cultural, and political elites turned the tide against the protest movement gains of the previous forty years and reshaped the ability of activists to influence the political process.

Dawson Barrett is Assistant Professor of

U.S. History at Del Mar College in Texas. He is the author of Teenage Rebels: Successful High School Activists, from the Little Rock Nine to the Class of Tomorrow. “Here is an indispensable manual for the defiant ones—the organizers and the activists, the rebels and resisters, the dissidents and the disobedient—and, in fact, for anyone paying attention to the gathering catastrophe...The Defiant is a book of the resistance—where to find it and how to organize it.”

The Defiant explores the major policy shifts of this new Gilded Age through the lens of dissent—through the picket lines, protest marches, and sit-ins that greeted them at every turn. Barrett documents these clashes at neoliberalism’s many points of impact, moving from the Arizona wilderness, to Florida tomato fields, to punk rock clubs in New York and California—and beyond. He takes readers right up to the present day with an epilogue tracing the Trump administration’s strategies and policy proposals, and the myriad protests they have sparked. Capturing a wide range of protest movements in action— from environmentalists’ tree-sits to Iraq War peace marches to Occupy Wall Street, #BlackLivesMatter, and more—The Defiant is a gripping analysis of the profound struggles of our times.

­—Bill Ayers, author of Fugitive Days, Public Enemy, and Demand the Impossible

May 2018 240 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth | 978-1-4798-0865-6| $24.95T (£20.99) History WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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ACTIVIST NEW YORK

A History of People, Protest, and Politic Steven H. Jaffe,

Foreword by

Eric Foner

Washington Mews Books

AN IMPRINT OF NEW YORK UNIVERSITY PRESS

Follows centuries of New York activism to reveal the city as a globally influential machine for social change

Activist New York surveys New York City’s long history of social activism from the 1650s to the 2010s. Bringing these passionate histories alive, Activist New York is a visual exploration into these movements, serving as a companion book to the highly-praised Museum of the City of New York’s exhibition of the same name. New York’s primacy as a metropolis of commerce, finance, industry, media, and ethnic diversity has given it a unique and powerfully influential role in the history of American and global activism. An incubator and battleground for activists for and against social change, Steven H. Jaffe explores how New York’s many identities have made it a “machine for change.” In responding to the city as a site of slavery, immigrant entry, labor conflicts, and supreme wealth disparity, New Yorkers have constantly challenged the status quo.

Steven H. Jaffe is a curator at the Museum

of the City of New York. He received his Ph.D. in history from Harvard University, and has written several books and articles on American and New York City history.

May 2018 336 pages | 8 x 10 336 color illustrations Cloth |978-1-4798-0460-3 | $40.00T (£33.00) History 4

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Activist New York celebrates the characters that make up these vibrant histories, including David Ruggles, an African American shopkeeper who helped enslaved fugitives on the city’s Underground Railroad during the 1830s; José Martí, an exiled poet who in 1895 launched a Cuban revolution from his lower Manhattan office; Clara Lemlich, the Ukrainian Jewish immigrant who helped spark the 1909 “Uprising of 20,000” that forever changed labor relations in the city’s booming garment industry; and Craig Rodwell, Karla Jay, and others who forged a Gay Liberation movement both before and after the Stonewall Riot of June 1969. From racial identity, gender, and sexual orientation, the city’s inhabitants have been at the forefront of social change from religious tolerance and civil rights to personal freedoms and economic justice. Across 16 lavishly illustrated chronological chapters focusing on specific historical episodes, Jaffe celebrates how New York and New Yorkers have changed the way Americans think, feel, and act.

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In late 1947, hundreds of New York University students turned Washington Square Park into a rallying ground. Their complaint: NYU had removed Professor Lyman Bradley as German Department chairman. Bradley and nine others had been convicted of contempt of Congress for refusing to hand over records of the Joint AntiFascist Refugee Committee (JAFRC). Although those convicted were awaiting an appeal, NYU had gone ahead and removed Bradley. general interest

Founded in New York in 1942, the JAFRC aided refugeesfrom Spain’s right-wing Franco regime. Bradley and other board members believed that handing over their papers would jeopardize the lives of activists within Spain, as well as subject thousands of American supporters to political persecution. To the House Un-American Activities Committee(HUAC), on the other hand, JAFRC was a dangerous organization, secretly controlled by Communists to advance their agenda of world revolution. In their view, obtaining the records was vital to the international fight against Communism. By December 1947, pro-Bradley demonstrationshad spread to City College, Columbia University,and Hunter College, as well as to Brooklyn College,where students were angered that novelist Howard Fast— also convicted over the JAFRC records—was barred from speaking on campus. The protests continued into the following year. On October 11,1948, 200 students tried to crowd into a meeting between Bradley and Dean Thomas Pollock. Students also started petitions and letter-writing campaigns; one letter praised Bradley for being “a real American, not un-American Committee brand… Shame on you!” WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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A co-publication with the Museum of the City of New York.


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EIGHT STORIES

Tales of War and Loss

Erich Maria Remarque Maria Tatar and Larry Wolff

With an Introduction by

Washington Mews Books

AN IMPRINT OF NEW YORK UNIVERSITY PRESS

A compelling set of short stories from the author of the World War I classic, All Quiet on the Western Front

German-American novelist Erich Maria Remarque captured the emotional anguish of a generation in his World War I masterpiece, All Quiet on the Western Front, as well as in an impressive selection of novels, plays, and short stories. This exquisite collection revives Remarque’s unforgettable voice, presenting a series of short stories that have long ago faded from public memory. From the haunting description of an abandoned battlefield to the pain of losing a loved one in the war to soldiers’ struggles with what we now recognize as PTSD, the stories offer an unflinching glimpse into the physical, emotional, and even spiritual implications of World War I. In this collection, we follow the trials of naïve war widow Annette Stoll, reflect on the power of small acts of kindness toward a dying soldier, and join Johann Bartok, a weary prisoner of war, in his struggle to reunite with his wife.

Erich Maria Remarque (1898-1970) was a

German-American novelist. He was the author of numerous plays, short stories, and novels, most notably All Quiet on the Western Front.

Although a century has passed since the end of the Great War, Remarque’s writing offers a timeless reflection on the many costs of war. Eight Stories offers a beautiful tribute to the pain that war inflicts on soldiers and civilians alike, and resurrects the work of a master author whose legacy‚like the war itself—will endure for generations to come.

“The world has a great writer in Erich Maria Remarque. He is a craftsman of unquestionably first rank, a man who can of Germanic Languages and Literatures at bend language to his will. Whether he writes of men or of Harvard University and a Senior Fellow at the inanimate nature, his touch is sensitive, firm, and sure.” Society of Fellows. —The New York Times Book Review Larry Wolff is Silver Professor of History at New York University, director of the NYU Center for European and Mediterranean Studies, and executive director of the NYU Remarque Institute. Maria Tatar is the John L. Loeb Professor

May 2018 192 pages | 5 x 7 Paper | 978-1-4798-8809-2 | $13.95T (£11.99) Cloth |978-1-4798-2485-4 |$89.00X (£74.00) Literature 6

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STORIES FROM TRAILBLAZING WOMEN LAWYERS Lives in the Law

Jill Norgren The captivating story of how a diverse group of women, including Janet Reno and Ruth Bader Ginsburg, broke the glass ceiling and changed the modern legal profession

In Stories from Trailblazing Women Lawyers, award-winning legal historian Jill Norgren curates the oral histories of one hundred extraordinary American women lawyers who changed the profession of law. Many of these stories are being told for the first time. As adults these women were on the front lines fighting for access to law schools and good legal careers. They challenged established rules and broke the law’s glass ceiling. Norgren uses these interviews to describe the profound changes that began in the late 1960s, interweaving social and legal history with the women’s individual experiences.

Jill Norgren is Professor Emerita of Political

Science at John Jay College and the Graduate Center, The City University of New York. She is the author of several books, including Rebels at the Bar: The Fascinating, Forgotten Stories of America’s First Women Lawyers (NYU Press, 2013) and Belva Lockwood: The Women Who Would Be President (NYU Press, 2007).

May 2018 304 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth |978-1-4798-6596-3 |$30.00A (£24.99) History | Law WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

In 1950, when many of the subjects of this book were children, the terms of engagement were clear: only a few women would be admitted each year to American law schools and after graduation their professional opportunities would never equal those open to similarly qualified men. Harvard Law School did not even begin to admit women until 1950. At many law schools, well into the 1970s, men told female students that they were taking a place that might be better used by a male student who would have a career, not babies. In 2005 the American Bar Association’s Commission on Women in the Profession initiated a national oral history project named the Women Trailblazers in the Law initiative: One hundred outstanding senior women lawyers were asked to give their personal and professional histories in interviews conducted by younger colleagues. The interviews, made available to the author, permit these women to be written into history in their words, words that evoke pain as well as celebration, humor, and somber reflection. These are women attorneys who, in courtrooms, classrooms, government agencies, and NGOs, have rattled the world with insistent and successful demands to reshape their profession and their society. They are women who brought nothing short of a revolution to the profession of law. S PRI N G 2 018 • NYU PRE S S

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JEWISH RADICAL FEMINISM Voices from the Women’s Liberation Movement Joyce Antler Fifty years after the start of the women’s liberation movement, a book that at last illuminates the profound impact Jewishness and second-wave feminism had on each other

Jewish women were undeniably instrumental in shaping the women’s liberation movement of the 1960s, 70s, and 80s. Yet historians and participants themselves have neglected their contributions as Jews, for varied and complex reasons, including the women’s own focus on gender and ethnic universalism, and the effects of external and internal anti-Semitism, denial, and selfcensorship. This has left many vital questions unasked and unanswered—until now. Delving into archival sources and conducting extensive interviews with these fierce pioneers, Joyce Antler has at last shattered the silence long at the crossroads of being Jewish and feminist.

Joyce Antler is the Samuel Lane Professor

of American Jewish History and Culture at Brandeis University, She is the author or editor of ten books, including, You Never Call! You Never Write! A History of the Jewish Mother (2007), and The Journey Home: How Jewish Women Shaped Modern America (1998). With Elinor Fuchs, she is the author of the prize-winning documentary drama, Year One of the Empire: A Play of American Politics, War and Protest, which was performed off-Broadway in 2008.

Antler’s exhilarating new book features dozens of compelling biographical narratives that reveal the struggles and achievements of Jewish radical feminists. Disproportionately represented in the movement, Jewish women’s liberationists helped to provide theories and models for radical action that were used throughout the United States and abroad. Their articles and books became classics of the movement and led to new initiatives in academia, politics, and grassroots organizing. Recovering this deeply hidden history, Jewish Radical Feminism places Jewish women’s activism at the center of feminist and Jewish narratives. The stories of over forty women’s liberationists and identified Jewish feminists— from Shulamith Firestone and Susan Brownmiller to Rabbis Laura Geller and Rebecca Alpert—illustrate how women’s liberation and Jewish feminism unfolded over the course of the lives of an extraordinary cohort of women, profoundly influencing the social, political, and religious revolutions of our era.

May 2018 464 pages | 6 x 9 64 black and white illustrations Cloth |978-0-8147-0763-0|$35.00A (£28.99) History | Women’s Studies In the Goldstein-Goren Series in American Jewish History 8

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THE TRANS GENERATION

How Trans Kids (and Their Parents) Are Creating a Gender Revolution

Ann Travers A groundbreaking look at the lives of transgender children and their families

Some “boys” will only wear dresses; some “girls” refuse to wear dresses; in both cases, as Ann Travers shows in this fascinating account of the lives of transgender kids, these are often more than just wardrobe choices. Travers shows that from very early ages, some at two and three years old, these kids find themselves to be different from the sex category that was assigned to them at birth. How they make their voices heard—to their parents and friends, in schools, in public spaces, and through the courts—is the focus of this remarkable and groundbreaking book.

Ann Travers is an Associate Professor in the

Department of Sociology & Anthropology at Simon Fraser University. “Compassionate and pragmatic, this is the book about trans kids that every parent, teacher, coach, caregiver, and policymaker needs to read!” —Heath Fogg Davis, author of Beyond Trans: Does Gender Matter?

June 2018 288 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth |978-1-4798-8579-4|$25.00A (£20.99) Current Affairs | Gender & Sexuality *No Canadian Rights WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

Based on interviews with transgender kids, ranging in age from 4 to 20, and their parents, and over five years of research in the US and Canada, The Trans Generation offers a rare look into what it is like to grow up as a trans child. From daycare to birthday parties and from the playground to the school bathroom, Travers takes the reader inside the day-to-day realities of trans kids who regularly experience crisis as a result of the restrictive ways in which sex categories regulate their lives and put pressure on them to deny their internal sense of who they are in gendered terms. As a transgender activist and as an advocate for trans kids, Travers is able to document from first-hand experience the difficulties of growing up trans and the challenges that parents can face. The book shows the incredible time, energy, and love that these parents give to their children, even in the face of, at times, unsupportive communities, schools, courts, health systems, and government laws. Keeping in mind that all trans kids are among the most vulnerable, Travers offers ways to support all trans kids through policy recommendations and activist interventions. Ultimately, the book is meant to open up options for kids’ own gender self-determination, to question the need for the sex binary, and to highlight ways that cultural and material resources can be redistributed more equitably. The Trans Generation offers an essential and important new understanding of childhood.

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general interest

THE FUTURE OF TECH IS FEMALE How to Achieve Gender Diversity Douglas M. Branson An accessible and timely guide to increasing female presence and leadership in tech companies

Tech giants like Apple and Google are among the fastest growing companies in the world, leading innovations in design and development. The industry continues to see rapid growth, employing millions of people: in the U.S. it is at the epicenter of the American economy. So why is it that only 5% of senior executives in the tech industry are female? Underrepresentation of women on boards of directors, in the C-suite, and as senior managers remains pervasive in this industry. As tech companies are plagued with high-profile claims of harassment and discrimination, and salary discrepancies for comparable work, one asks what prevents women from reaching management roles, and, more importantly, what can be done to fix it?

Douglas M. Branson is the W. Edward Sell

Chair at the University of Pittsburgh. He is author of 23 books, including No Seat at the Table: How Corporate Governance and Law Keep Women out of the Boardroom (NYU Press, 2007), and The Last Male Bastion: Gender and the CEO Suite in America’s Public Companies. “Branson brilliantly tackles the pervasive and age-old problem of gender inequality in the previously unexplored sector of tech. He offers a comprehensive critique of old and new solutions and strategies, identifying those likely to positively impact the trajectory of this sector to make it one in which women thrive.”

The Future of Tech is Female considers the paradoxes involved in women’s ascent to leadership roles, suggesting industrywide solutions to combat gender inequality. Drawing upon 15 years of experience in the field, Douglas M. Branson traces the history of women in the information technology industry in order to identify solutions for the issues facing women today. Branson explores a variety of solutions such as mandatory quota laws for female employment, pledge programs, and limitations on the H1-B VISA program, and grapples with the challenges facing women in IT from a range of perspectives. Branson unpacks the plethora of reasons women should hold leadership roles, both in and out of this industry, concluding with a call to reform attitudes toward women in one particular IT branch, the video and computer gaming field, a gateway to many STEM futures. An invaluable resource for anyone invested in gender equality in corporate governance, The Future of Tech is Female lays out the first steps toward a more diverse future for women in tech leadership.

—Hannah Brenner, California Western School of Law July 2018 336 pages | 6 x 9 2 black and white illustrations Cloth |978-1-4798-7517-7|$30.00A (£24.99) Business 10

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general interest

SUGAR, CIGARS, AND REVOLUTION The Making of Cuban New York Lisandro Pérez The dramatic story of the origins of the Cuban community in nineteenth-century New York

More than one hundred years before the Cuban Revolution of 1959 sparked an exodus that created today’s prominent Cuban American presence, Cubans were settling in New York City in what became largest community of Latin Americans in the nineteenth-century Northeast. This book brings this community to vivid life, tracing its formation and how it was shaped by both the sugar trade and the long struggle for independence from Spain. New York City’s refineries bought vast quantities of raw sugar from Cuba, ultimately creating an important center of commerce for Cuban émigrés as the island tumbled into the tumultuous decades that would close out the century and define Cuban nationhood and identity.

Lisandro Pérez is Professor of Latin American

and Latina/o Studies at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. He is the author, with Guillermo Grenier, of The Legacy of Exile: Cubans in the United States. “I grew up in Havana hearing New York stories. As I started researching the links between New York and Cuba, I discovered that my family’s connection with the city was part of a larger and dramatic story that originated in the early nineteenth century. Cuban New Yorkers emerged from the historical records I consulted as if clamoring to have their story told. This is that story: one that is part of the histories of both Cuba and New York.”

New York became the primary destination for Cuban émigrés in search of an education, opportunity, wealth, to start a new life or forget an old one, to evade royal authority, plot a revolution, experience freedom, or to buy and sell goods. While many of their stories ended tragically, others were steeped in heroism and sacrifice, and still others in opportunism and mendacity. Lisandro Pérez beautifully weaves together all these stories, showing the persistence of a people, and the formation of a culture. Historically rich and engrossing, Sugar, Cigars, and Revolution immerses the reader in the riveting drama of Cuban New York. Lisandro Pérez analyzes the major forces that shaped the community, but also tells the stories of individuals and families that made up the fabric of a little-known immigrant world that represents the origins of one of New York City’s most dynamic and influential populations.

Lisandro Pérez

July 2018 400 pages | 6 x 9 32 black and white illustrations Cloth |978-0-8147-6727-6| $35.00A (£28.99) History WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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general interest

New in Paperbac k

New in Paperbac k

CALLING THE SHOTS

CTRL + Z

Jennifer A. Reich

Meg Leta Jones

Why Parents Reject Vaccines

A rich, multi-faceted examination of the attitudes and beliefs of parents who choose not to immunize their children

Winner of the Outstanding Book Award for the Section on Altruism, Morality, and Social Solidarity, American Sociological Association For over a decade, Jennifer Reich has been studying the phenomenon of vaccine refusal from the perspectives of parents who distrust vaccines and the corporations that make them, as well as the health care providers and policy makers who see them as essential to ensuring community health. Based on interviews with parents who fully reject vaccines as well as those who believe in “slow vax,” or altering the number of and time between vaccinations, the author provides a fascinating account of these parents’ points of view.

The Right to Be Forgotten

A gripping insight into the digital debate over data ownership, permanence and policy

“This is going on your permanent record!” is a threat that has never held more weight than it does in the Internet Age, when information lasts indefinitely. The ability to make good on that threat is as democratized as posting a Tweet or making blog. One possible solution to this threat? A digital right to be forgotten, which would in turn create a legal duty to delete, hide, or anonymize information at the request of another user. The highly controversial right has been criticized as a repugnant affront to principles of expression and access, as unworkable as a technical measure, and as effective as trying to put the cat back in the bag. Ctrl + Z breaks down the debate and provides guidance for a way forward. In the end, the right to be forgotten can be innovative, liberating, and globally viable.

Calling the Shots offers a unique opportunity to understand the points of disagreement on what is best for children, communities, and public health, and the “[B]y laying out the terrain so thoughtfully, and ways in which we can bridge these differences. highlighting the concepts that should guide our actions, Jones has created the groundwork for a “Recent outbreaks of preventable diseases such as measles and whooping cough are focusing attention much needed conversation on the profound problem of permanent digital ballasts in the 21st century.” on this issue, making Reich’s able contribution especially pertinent.” —The New York Times Book Review —Kirkus Reviews Meg Leta Jones is Assistant Professor of Jennifer A. Reich is Associate Professor of Communication, Culture, & Technology at Sociology at the University of Colorado, Denver. Her Georgetown University. publications include the award-winning book Fixing Families: Parents, Power, and the Child Welfare System. August 2018 336 pages | 6 x 9 2 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-7483-5 | $18.95T (£15.99) Cloth | 978-1-479801279-0 Current Affairs 12

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May 2018 256 pages | 6 x 9 2 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-7674-7 | $17.95T (£15.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-8170-3 Current Affairs 1. 8 0 0 . 9 9 6 . NYUP


general interest

AMERICA’S DARK THEOLOGIAN The Religious Imagination of Stephen King Douglas E. Cowan

america’S DarK theologian The Religious Imagination of

Stephen King

Douglas E. Cowan

Douglas E. Cowan is Professor of Religious

Studies and Social Development Studies at Renison University College. His previous books include Sacred Space: The Quest for Transcendence in Science Fiction Film and Television and Sacred Terror: Religion and Horror on the Silver Screen.

Illuminating the religious and existential themes in Stephen King’s horror stories

Who are we? Why are we here? Where do we go when we die? For answers to these questions, people often look to religion. But religion is not the only place seekers turn. Myths, legends, and other stories have given us alternative ways to address the fundamental quandaries of existence. Horror stories, in particular, with their focus on questions of violence and mortality, speak urgently to the primal fears embedded in such existential mysteries. With more than fifty novels to his name, and hundreds of millions of copies sold, few writers have spent more time contemplating those fears than Stephen King. Yet despite being one of the most widely read authors of all time, King is woefully understudied. America’s Dark Theologian is the first in-depth investigation into how King treats religion in his horror fiction. Considering works such as Carrie, The Dead Zone, Misery, The Shining, and many more, Douglas E. Cowan explores the religious imagery, themes, characters, and, most importantly, questions that haunt Stephen King’s horror stories. Religion and its trappings are found throughout King’s fiction, but what Cowan reveals is a writer skeptical of the certainty of religious belief. Describing himself as a “fallen away” Methodist, King is less concerned with providing answers to our questions, than with constantly challenging both those who claim to have answers and the answers they proclaim. Whether he is pondering the existence of other worlds, exploring the origins of religious belief and how it is passed on, probing the nature of religious experience, or contemplating the existence of God, King invites us to question everything we think we know.

June 2018 272 pages | 6 x 9 32 black and white illustrations Cloth |978-1-4798-9473-4 | $30.00A (£24.99) Literary Studies | Religion WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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A RICH BREW

How Cafés Created Modern Jewish Culture

Shachar M. Pinsker A fascinating glimpse into the world of the coffee house and its role in shaping modern Jewish culture

Unlike the synagogue, the house of study, the community center, or the Jewish deli, the café is rarely considered a Jewish space. Yet, coffeehouses profoundly influenced the creation of modern Jewish culture from the midnineteenth to mid-twentieth centuries. With roots stemming from the Ottoman Empire, the coffeehouse and its drinks gained increasing popularity in Europe. The “otherness,” and the mix of the national and transnational characteristics of the coffeehouse perhaps explains why many of these cafés were owned by Jews, why Jews became their most devoted habitués, and how cafés acquired associations with Jewishness.

Shachar M. Pinsker is Associate Professor

of Hebrew Literature and Culture at the University of Michigan. He is the author of Literary Passports: The Making of Modernist Hebrew Fiction in Europe. “The café is seen as a substitute for what has been lost in modern life, and at the same time a place that is completely novel and exotic, a place that can open doors to unfamiliar worlds. Cafés embody the search for a space that can be both comforting and exhilarating, both familiar and strange.”

Examining the convergence of cafés, their urban milieu, and Jewish creativity, Shachar M. Pinsker argues that cafés anchored a silk road of modern Jewish culture. He uncovers a network of interconnected cafés that were central to the modern Jewish experience in a time of migration and urbanization, from Odessa, Warsaw, Vienna, and Berlin to New York City and Tel Aviv. A Rich Brew explores the Jewish culture created in these social spaces, drawing on a vivid collection of newspaper articles, memoirs, archival documents, photographs, caricatures, and artwork, as well as stories, novels, and poems in many languages set in cafés. Pinsker shows how Jewish modernity was born in the café, nourished, and sent out into the world by way of print, politics, literature, art, and theater. What was experienced and created in the space of the coffeehouse touched thousands who read, saw, and imbibed a modern culture that redefined what it meant to be a Jew in the world.

—from A Rich Brew

May 2018 384 pages | 6 x 9 59 black and white illustrations Cloth |978-1-4798-2789-3 | $35.00S (£28.99) Jewish Studies | History 14

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religion

POSTCARDS FROM AUSCHWITZ Holocaust Tourism and the Meaning of Remembrance Daniel P. Reynolds The uneasy link between tourism and collective memory at Holocaust museums and memorials

Each year, millions of people visit Holocaust memorials and museums, with the number of tourists steadily on the rise. What lies behind the phenomenon of “Holocaust tourism” and what role do its participants play in shaping how we remember and think about the Holocaust? In Postcards from Auschwitz, Daniel P. Reynolds argues that tourism to former concentration camps, ghettos, and other places associated with the Nazi genocide of European Jewry has become an increasingly vital component in the evolving collective remembrance of the Holocaust. Responding to the tendency to dismiss tourism as commercial, superficial, or voyeuristic, Reynolds insists that we take a closer look at a phenomenon that has global reach, takes many forms, and serves many interests.

Daniel P. Reynolds is Seth Richards Professor

in Modern Languages in the German Department at Grinnell College, Iowa.

The book focuses on some of the most prominent sites of mass murder in Europe, and then expands outward to more recent memorial museums. Reynolds provides a historically-informed account of the different forces that have shaped Holocaust tourism since 1945, including Cold War politics, the sudden emergence of the “memory boom” beginning in the 1990s, and the awareness that eyewitnesses to the Holocaust are passing away. Based on his on-site explorations, the contributions from researchers in Holocaust studies and tourism studies, and the observations of tourists themselves, this book reveals how tourism is an important part of efforts to understand and remember the Holocaust, an event that continues to challenge ideals about humanity and our capacity to learn from the past.

April 2018 336 pages | 6 x 9 20 black and white illustrations Cloth |978-1-4798-6043-2 | $35.00A (£28.99) Jewish Studies WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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QUEER NUNS

SHOUT TO THE LORD

Melissa M. Wilcox

Ari Y. Kelman

Religion, Activism, and Serious Parody

An engaging look into the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence, queer activists devoted to social justice

The Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence are an unlikely order of nuns. Selfdescribed as “twenty-first century queer nuns,” the Sisters offer outreach, support, and protest on behalf of more than 83 communities on four continents. In Queer Nuns, Melissa M. Wilcox offers new insights into this nuns’ order and into religious activism. The Sisters both spoof nuns and argue quite seriously that they are nuns, adopting an innovative approach the author refers to as serious parody. Wilcox argues that this approach could be adapted to a range of political movements, individual inclinations, and community settings, opening the door to a new world of religion and social activism. Melissa M. Wilcox is Professor and Holstein Family

and Community Chair of Religious Studies at the University of California, Riverside. She is the author of Queer Women and Religious Individualism, winner of the 2010 Book Award of the ASA’s Sociology of Religion Section.

Making Worship Music in Evangelical America

How music makes worship and how worship makes music in Evangelical churches

Music is a nearly universal feature of congregational worship in American churches. Congregational singing is so ingrained in the experience of being at church that it is often misunderstood to be synonymous with worship. For those who assume responsibility for making music for congregational use, the relationship between music and worship is both promising and perilous – promise in the power of musical style and collective singing to facilitate worship, peril in the possibility that the experience of the music might eclipse the worship it was written to facilitate. As a result, those committed to making music for worship are constantly reminded of the paradox that they are writing songs for people who wish to express themselves, as directly as possible, to God. Based on interviews with more than 75 songwriters, worship leaders, and music industry executives, Shout to the Lord accounts for the human qualities of religious experience and the practice of worship, and it makes a compelling case for how—sometimes— faith comes by hearing. Ari Y. Kelman is Jim Joseph Professor of Education

and Jewish Studies at the Stanford University Graduate School of Education. He is the author of Station Identification: A Cultural History of Yiddish Radio in the United States.

May 2018 336 pages | 6 x 9 6 black and white illustrations | 11 color illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-2036-8 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-6413-3 | $89.00X (£74.00) Religion In the Sexual Cultures series 16

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June 2018 224 pages | 6 x 9 5 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-6367-9 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-4468-5 | $89.00X (£74.00) Religion In the North American Religions series 1. 8 0 0 . 9 9 6 . NYUP


religion

THE SOUL OF JUDAISM Jews of African Descent in America Bruce D. Haynes A glimpse into the diverse stories of Black Jews in the United States

What makes a Jew? This book traces the history of Jews of African descent in America and the counter-narratives they have put forward as they stake their claims to Jewishness.

Bruce D. Haynes is Professor of Sociology

The Soul of Judaism offers the first exploration of the full diversity of Black Jews, blending historical analysis and oral history, Haynes showcases the lives of Black Jews within the Orthodox, Conservative, Reconstruction and Reform movements, as well as the religious approaches that push the boundaries of the common forms of Judaism we know today. He illuminates how in the quest to claim whiteness, American Jews of European descent gained the freedom to express their identity fluidly while African Americans have continued to be seen as a fixed racial group. This book demonstrates that racial ascription has been shaping Jewish selfhood for centuries. Pushing us to reassess the boundaries between race and ethnicity, it offers insight into how Black Jewish individuals strive to assert their dual identities and find acceptance within their respective communities.

at the University of California, Davis and a Senior Fellow in the Urban Ethnography Project at Yale University. He is author of Down the Up Staircase: Three Generations of a Harlem Family.

Putting to rest the simplistic notion that Jews are white and that Black Jews are therefore a contradiction, the volume argues that we can no longer pigeonhole Black Hebrews and Israelites as exotic, militant, and nationalistic sects outside the boundaries of mainstream Jewish thought and community “Black converts to Judaism, biracial Jews, Black. life. The volume spurs us to consider the significance of the growing population of self-identified Black Jews and its Hebrews and Israelites - this book explores implications for the future of American Jewry. the full diversity of Jews of African descent and their journey across the twentieth century, including the different strategies that they use to challenge the dominant perception that Jews are exclusively white.” Bruce D. Haynes August 2018 272 pages | 6 x 9 32 black and white illustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-1123-6 | $39.00S (£32.00) Jewish Studies | Race & Ethnicity In the Religion, Race, and Ethnicity series WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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ARK ENCOUNTER

EARLY JUDAISM

The Making of a Creationist Theme Park

New Insights and Scholarship

James S. Bielo

Edited by

Behind the scenes at a creationist theme park with a mission to convert visitors through entertainment

Opened to the public in July 2016, Ark Encounter is a creationist theme park in Kentucky. The park features an all-timber re-creation of Noah’s ark, built full scale to creationist specifications drawn from the text of Genesis, as well as exhibits that imagine the Bible’s account of life before the flood. More than merely religious spectacle, Ark Encounter offers important insights about the relationship between religion and entertainment, religious publicity and creativity, and fundamentalist Christian claims to the public sphere. James S. Bielo examines these themes, drawing on his unprecedented behind-the-scenes access to the Ark Encounter creative team during the initial design of the park. Through intriguing and surprising observations, Ark Encounter challenges readers to engage with the power of entertainment and to seriously grapple with creationist ambitions for authority. For believers and non-believers alike, this book is an invaluable glimpse into the complicated web of religious entertainment and cultural production. James S. Bielo is Assistant Professor of

Anthropology at Miami University. He is the author of four books including, Anthropology of Religion: The Basics, Emerging Evangelicals: Faith, Modernity, and the Desire for Authenticity, and Words Upon the Word: An Ethnography of Evangelical Group Bible Study. July 2018 240 pages | 6 x 9 33 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-42797 | $28.00S (£22.99) Cloth| 978-1-4798-4324-4 | $89.00X (£74.00) Religion 18

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Frederick E. Greenspahn An exploration of the emergence of Rabbinic Judaism drawing on primary sources and new methods

Over the past generation, several major findings and methodological innovations have led scholars to reevaluate the foundation of Judaism. The Dead Sea Scrolls are the most famous, but other materials have further altered our understanding of Judaism’s development after the Biblical era. This volume explores some of the latest clues into how early Judaism took shape, from the invention of rabbis to the parting of Judaism and Christianity, to whether ancient Jews considered themselves a nation. The contributors put familiar aspects of Judaism in a new light, exposing readers to the most current understanding of the origins of normative Judaism. This book is a must read for anyone interested in the study of Judaism and its formation. It is the most current review of the scholarship surrounding this rich history and what is next for the field at large. Frederick E. Greenspahn is Gimelstob Eminent

Scholar of Judaic Studies at Florida Atlantic University. He is the editor of The Hebrew Bible, Women in Judaism, Jewish Mysticism and Kabbalah, and Contemporary Israel, as well as author/editor of numerous other titles, including When Brothers Dwell Together.

July 2018 272 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-0990-5 | $28.00S (£22.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-9695-0 | $89.00X (£74.00) Jewish Studies In the Jewish Studies in the Twenty-First Century series 1. 8 0 0 . 9 9 6 . NYUP


h i s to ry

New in Paperbac k

New in Paperbac k

UNFREEDOM

DARK WORK

The Business of Slavery in Rhode Island Christy Clark-Pujara

Slavery and Dependence in EighteenthCentury Boston Jared Ross Hardesty

The surprising role slavery played in the economy of early Rhode Island

Historians have written expansively about the slave economy and its vital role in early American economic life. In Dark Work, Christy Clark-Pujara tells the story of one state in particular whose role was outsized: Rhode Island. Nowhere else was this business so important. More than 60 percent of all the slave ships that left North America left from Rhode Island. Clark-Pujara draws on the documents of the state, the business, organizational, and personal records of their enslavers, and the few first-hand accounts left by enslaved and free black Rhode Islanders to reconstruct their lived experiences. It is convenient, especially for northerners, to think of slavery as southern institution. The erasure or marginalization of the northern black experience and the centrality of the business of slavery to the northern economy allows for a dangerous fiction—that the North has no history of racism to overcome. But we cannot afford such a delusion if we are to truly reconcile with our past.

Examines the lives experience of slaves in eighteenth-century Boston

In Unfreedom, Jared Ross Hardesty argues we should understand slavery in Boston as part of a continuum of unfreedom. In this context, African slavery existed alongside many other forms of oppression, including Native American slavery, indentured servitude, apprenticeship, and pauper apprenticeship. Drawing on exhaustive research in colonial legal records, as well as newspapers, church records, and other contemporaneous sources, Hardesty masterfully reconstructs an eighteenth-century Atlantic world of unfreedom that stretched from Europe to Africa to America. By reassessing the lives of enslaved Bostonians as part of a social order structured by ties of dependence, Hardesty not only demonstrates how African slaves were able to decode their new homeland and shape the terms of their enslavement, but also tells the story of how marginalized peoples engrained themselves in the very fabric of colonial American society.

“This superb work should be read by anyone “Well written and meticulously researched, this interested in early American race relations or New outstanding book is an important contribution to England history.” the understanding of slavery, New England history, —Choice Colonial America, and the 18th Century Atlantic world.” Christy Clark-Pujara is Associate Professor of —Choice Connect History in the Afro-American Studies Department at Jared Ross Hardesty is Associate Professor of the University of Wisconsin, Madison. History at Western Washington University. March 2018 224 pages | 6 x 9 33 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-5563-6 | $22.00S (£20.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-7042-4 History In the Early American Places series WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

March 2018 272 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-0184-8 | $22.00S (£20.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-1614-9 History In the Early American Places series S PRI N G 2 018 • NYU PRE S S

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FORGING A LABORING RACE

The African American Worker in the Progressive Imagination Paul R.D. Lawrie

New in Paperbac k

BLACK WOMEN’S CHRISTIAN ACTIVISM

Seeking Social Justice in a Northern Suburb

Betty Livingston Adams Examines the relationship between race, industry, and labor

Reveals the role of religion in civil rights activism

“How does it feel to be a problem?” asked W.E.B. DuBois in The Souls of Black Folk. For many thinkers across the color line, the “Negro problem” was inextricably linked to the concurrent “labor problem,” occasioning debates regarding blacks’ role in the nation’s industrial past, present and future. With blacks freed from the seemingly protective embrace of slavery, many felt that the ostensibly primitive Negro was doomed to expire in the face of unbridled industrial progress.

2017 Wilbur Non-Fiction Award Recipient

Forging a Laboring Race charts the history of an idea—race management—building on recent work in African American, labor, and disability history to analyze how ideas of race, work, and the “fit” or “unfit” body informed the political economy of early twentieth-century industrial America. Forging a Laboring Race foregrounds the working black body as both a category of analysis and lived experience. “The book is a reminder of the need to examine the production, dissemination, and broad acceptance of scientific knowledge in historical context, and does so itself in a compact analysis that will interest scholars of race and ethnicity, progressivism, state formation, and the history of science.” —Choice Paul R.D. Lawrie is Associate Professor of History

and Senior Fellow, Institute of Urban Studies at the University of Winnipeg. April 2018 256 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-5140-9 | $25.00S (£20.99) Cloth | 978- 1-4798-5732-6 History In the Culture, Labor, History series 20

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In Black Women’s Christian Activism, Betty Livingston Adams examines the oft overlooked role of non-elite black women in the growth of northern suburbs and American Protestantism in the first half of the twentieth century. Focusing on the strategies and organizational models church women employed in the fight for social justice, Adams tracks the intersections of politics and religion, race and gender, and place and space in a New York City suburb, a local example that offers new insights on northern racial oppression and civil rights protest. As this book makes clear, religion made a key difference in the lives and activism of ordinary black women who lived, worked, and worshipped on the margin during this tumultuous time. “Adams follows the fascinating careers of Violet Johnson (1870-1939) and Florence Spearing Randolph (1866-1951), black women born in the South following emancipation, who traveled to New York City to find work.” —Christian Century Magazine Betty Livingston Adams is an Independent Scholar

whose work focuses on American/ African American religious history. A Yale PhD, she was a Global Scholar at the Institute for Research on Women and a Fellow at the Yale Center for the Study of Material and Visual Cultures of Religion April 2018 249 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-1481-7 | $25.00S (£20.99) Cloth | 978-0-8147-4546-5 History 1. 8 0 0 . 9 9 6 . NYUP


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FEMINIST MANIFESTOS

A Global Documentary Reader Edited by

Penny A. Weiss A wide-reaching collection of groundbreaking feminist documents from around the world

Feminist Manifestos is an unprecedented collection of 150 documents from feminist organizations and gatherings in over 50 countries over the course of three centuries. In the first book of its kind, the manifestos are shown to contain feminist theory and recommend actions for change, and also to expand our very conceptions of feminist thought and activism. Covering issues from political participation, education, religion and work to reproduction, violence, racism, and environmentalism, the manifestos together challenge simplistic definitions of gender and feminist movements in exciting ways. In a wide-ranging introduction, Penny Weiss explores the value of these documents, especially how they speak with and to each other. In addition, an introduction to each individual document contextualizes and enhances our understanding of it.

Penny A. Weiss is Professor of Political

Science and Chair of the Women’s and Gender Studies Program at Saint Louis University. She is the author of numerous books and articles, including Gendered Community: Rousseau, Sex, and Politics and Canon Fodder: Historical Women Political Thinkers.

Weiss is particularly invested in how communities work together toward social change, which is demonstrated through her choice to include only collectively authored texts. By assembling these documents into an accessible volume, Weiss reveals new possibilities for social justice and ways to advocate for equality. A unique and inspirational collection, Feminist Manifestos expands and evolves our understanding of feminism through the self-described agendas of women from every ethnic group, religion, and region in the world.

“This extensive, rich, and diverse anthology of collective feminist declarations is a vital source for understanding the long, global history of feminism.” —Estelle B. Freedman, author of No Turning Back: The History of Feminism and the Future of Women April 2018 704 pages | 7 x 10 165 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-37304 | $45.00S (£37.00) Cloth | 978-1-4798-71803 | $120.00X (£99.00) History | Women’s Studies | Politics WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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BROWN BEAUTY

MULTIRACIALS AND CIVIL RIGHTS

Laila Haidarali

Tanya Katerí Hernández

Color, Sex, and Race from the Harlem Renaissance to World War II Examines how the media influenced ideas of race and beauty among African American women from the Harlem Renaissance to World War II.

Between the Harlem Renaissance and the end of World War II, a complicated discourse emerged surrounding considerations of appearance of African American women and expressions of race, class, and status. Brown Beauty considers how the media created a beauty ideal for these women, emphasizing different representations and expressions of brown skin. Building on an impressive range of visual and media sources—from newspapers, journals, magazines, and newsletters to commercial advertising— Haidarali locates a complex, and sometimes contradictory, set of cultural values at the core of representations of women, envisioned as “brownskin.” She explores how brownness affected socially-mobile New Negro women in the urban environment during the interwar years, showing how the majority of messages on brownness were directed at an aspirant middle-class. Brown Beauty demonstrates the myriad values and judgments, compromises and contradictions involved in the social evaluation of women. This book is an eyeopening account of the intense dynamics between racial identity and the influence mass media has on what, and who we consider beautiful.

Mixed-Race Stories of Discrimination

Narratives of mixedrace people bringing claims of racial discrimination in court, illuminating traditional understandings of civil rights law

As the mixed-race population in the United States grows, public fascination with multiracial identity has promoted the belief that racial mixture will destroy racism. However, multiracial people still face discrimination. Many legal scholars hold that this is distinct from the discrimination faced by people of other races, and traditional civil rights laws built on a strict black/ white binary need to be reformed to account for cases of discrimination against those identifying as mixed-race. In Multiracials and Civil Rights, Tanya Katerí Hernández debunks this idea, and draws on a plethora of court cases to demonstrate that multiracials face the same types of discrimination as other racial groups. Coming at a time when explicit racism is resurfacing, Hernández’s look at multiracial discrimination cases is essential for fortifying the focus of civil rights law on racial privilege and the lingering legacy of bias against non-whites, and has much to teach us about how to move towards a more egalitarian society. Tanya Katerí Hernández is the Archibald R. Murray

women’s history at the University of Essex.

Professor of Law at Fordham University School of Law, where she co-directs the Center on Race, Law & Justice as its Head of Global and Comparative Law Programs and Initiatives.

August 2018 368 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-0208-1 | $35.00S (£28.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-7510-8 | $99.00X (£82.00) History

August 2018 224 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth | 978-1-4798-3032-9 | $40.00S (£33.00) Law

Laila Haidarali lectures on African American and

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l aw

REIMAGINING EQUALITY

MAKING HABEAS WORK

A New Deal for Children of Color

A Legal History

Nancy E. Dowd

Eric M. Freedman A comprehensive examination of developmental inequality among children

Developmental equality– whether every child has an equal opportunity to reach their fullest potential–is essential for children’s future growth and access to opportunity. In the United States, however, children of color are disproportionately affected by poverty, poor educational outcomes, and structural discrimination, limiting their potential. In Reimagining Equality, Nancy E. Dowd sets out to examine the roots of these inequalities by tracing the life course of black boys from birth to age 18 in an effort to create an affirmative system of rights and support for all children. Dowd argues for a new legal model of developmental equality, grounded in the real challenges that children face on the basis of race, gender, and class. Concluding with a “New Deal” for all children, Reimagining Equality provides a comprehensive set of policies that enables our political and legal systems to dismantle what harms and discriminates children, and maximize their development. Nancy E. Dowd is Professor and David Levin Chair

in Family Law at the University of Florida Levin College of Law. She is the editor of the Families, Law and Society series at NYU Press, and author or editor of numerous books, including A New Juvenile Justice System (NYU Press, 2015)

June 2018 256 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth | 978-1-4798-9335-5 | $39.00S (£32.00) Law WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

A reconsideration of the writ of habeas corpus casts new light on a range of current issues

Habeas corpus, the storied Great Writ of Liberty, is a judicial order that requires government officials to produce a prisoner in court, persuade an independent judge of the correctness of their claimed factual and legal justifications for the individual’s imprisonment, or else release the captive. Frequently the officials resist being called to account. Much of the history of the rule of law, including the history being made today, has emerged from the resulting clashes. Using dozens of previously unknown examples, Professor Freedman shows how the writ of habeas corpus has been just one part of an intricate machinery for securing freedom under law, and explores the lessons this history holds for some of today’s most pressing problems including terrorism, the Guantanamo Bay detentions, immigration, Brexit, and domestic violence. Exploring landmark cases of the past, Making Habeas Work brings to light the stories many people previously overlooked. The resulting insights lead to forward-thinking recommendations for strengthening the rule of law to ensure that it endures into the future. Eric M. Freedman is the Siggi B. Wilzig

Distinguished Professor of Constitutional Rights at the Maurice A. Deane School of Law at Hofstra University and author of Habeas Corpus: Rethinking the Great Writ of Liberty (NYU Press, 2003). June 2018 208 pages | 6 x 9 Cloth | 978-1-4798-7097-4 | $45.00S (£37.00) Law S PRI N G 2 018 • NYU PRE S S

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New in Paperbac k

New in Paperbac k

UNFIT FOR DEMOCRACY

JUST MEDICINE

Stephen E. Gottlieb

Dayna Bowen Matthew, with a new introduction

The Roberts Court and the Breakdown of American Politics

UNFIT FOR

Argues that the decisions of the Roberts Court cloud America’s democratic future

DEMOCRACY

Since its founding, THE ROBERTS Americans have worked COURT AND THE hard to nurture and BREAKDOWN OF AMERICAN protect their hard-won POLITICS democracy. And yet STEPHEN E. GOTTLIEB few consider the role of constitutional law in America’s survival. In Unfit for Democracy, Stephen Gottlieb argues that constitutional law without a focus on the future of democratic government is incoherent, illogical and contradictory. Approaching the decisions of the Roberts Court from political science, historical, comparative, and legal perspectives, Gottlieb highlights the dangers the court presents by neglecting to interpret the law with an eye towards preserving democracy. Unfit for Democracy calls for an interpretation of the Constitution that takes the future of democracy seriously. Gottlieb warns that the Roberts Court’s decisions have hurt ordinary Americans economically, politically, and in the criminal process. They have damaged the historic American melting pot, increased the risk of anti-democratic paramilitaries, and clouded the democratic future. “Stephen Gottlieb ambitiously combines methods of history, political science and legal analysis to assess the state of American democracy.” —Law and Politics Book Review Stephen E. Gottlieb is the Jay and Ruth Caplan

Distinguished Professor of Law at Albany Law School and author of numerous books on jurisprudence and constitutional law. May 2018 416 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-2314-7 | $25.00S (£20.99) Cloth | 978-0-8147-3242-7 Law 24

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A Cure for Racial Inequality in American Health Care Provides a solution to address implicit racial bias in health care

Over 84,000 black and brown lives are needlessly lost each year due to health disparities, the unfair, unjust, and avoidable differences between the quality and quantity of health care provided to Americans who are members of racial and ethnic minorities and care provided to whites. Health disparities have remained stubbornly entrenched in the American health care system— and in Just Medicine, Dayna Bowen Matthew finds that they principally arise from unconscious racial and ethnic biases held by physicians, institutional providers, and their patients. Implicit bias is the single most important determinant of health and health care disparities. Our continued failure to fashion an effective response that purges the effects of implicit bias from American health care, Matthew argues, is unjust and morally untenable. Just Medicine offers us a new, effective, and innovative plan to regulate implicit biases and eliminate the inequalities they cause, and to save the lives they endanger. “Her ambitious book lays out a case for a legal remedy for racial health inequality.” —Los Angeles Review of Books Dayna Bowen Matthew is Professor at University

of Colorado Law School and the Colorado School of Public Health.

June 2018 288 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-5162-1 | $18.00A (£14.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-9673-8 Current Affairs | Health & Medicine 1. 8 0 0 . 9 9 6 . NYUP


media studies

New in Paperbac k

New in Paperbac k

ENDING ZERO TOLERANCE

The Crisis of Absolute School Discipline Derek W. Black

SPREADABLE MEDIA

Creating Value and Meaning in a Networked Culture Henry Jenkins, Sam Ford and Joshua Green, with a new afterword

Calls for legal protections to curb excessive disciplinary actions in schools

How sharing, linking, and liking have transformed the media and marketing industries

In the era of zero tolerance, we are flooded with stories about schools issuing draconian punishments for relatively innocent behavior. Students from all demographic groups have suffered, but minority and special needs students have suffered the most. The effects of these policies are devastating. The risks associated with suspension and expulsion are so high that, as a practical matter, they amount to educational death penalties, not behavioral correction tools.

Spreadable Media is a rare inside look at today’s ever-changing media landscape. The days of corporate control over media content and its distribution have been replaced by the age of what the digital media industries have called “user-generated content.” Spreadable Media maps these fundamental changes, and gives readers a comprehensive look into the rise of participatory culture, from internet memes to presidential tweets.

Derek Black, a former attorney with the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, weaves stories about individual students, lessons from social science, and the outcomes of courts cases to unearth a shockingly irrational system of punishment. Ending Zero Tolerance argues for constitutional protections to check abuses in school discipline and lays out theories by which courts should re-engage to enforce students’ rights and support broader reforms.

“Spreadable Media is an essential read for anyone who wants to understand how media works today.” —Deep Media

“With the intent to address the toxic environment that zero tolerance perpetuates, Black outlines a convincing argument that the courts must step in to speed reform and ensure that all students are cared for equally.” —Library Journal Derek W. Black is is Professor of Law at the

University of South Carolina School of Law

“A wide-ranging examination of the contemporary media environment as individuals increasingly control their own creation of content.” —Kirkus Henry Jenkins is the Provost’s Professor of

Communication, Journalism, Cinematic Arts and Education at the University of Southern California. He is the author of Convergence Culture (NYU Press, 2006). Sam Ford is a research affiliate with the MIT

Program in Comparative Media Studies and an instructor for the Western Kentucky University Department of Communication. Joshua Green is a Solution Principal at Slalom

Consulting August 2018 256 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-2314-7 | $25.00S (£20.99) Cloth | 978-0-8147-3242-7 Current Affairs In the Families, Law, and Society series WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

April 2018 352 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-5605-3 | $19.00S (£15.99) Cloth | 978-0-8147-4350-8 Media Studies In the Postmillennial Pop series S PRI N G 2 018 • NYU PRE S S

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media studies

STRUGGLING FOR ORDINARY Media and Transgender Belonging in Everyday Life

Andre Cavalcante An in-depth look at the role of media in the struggle for transgender inclusion

From television shows like Orange is the New Black and Transparent, to the real-life struggles of Caitlyn Jenner splashed across the headlines, transgender visibility is on the rise. But what was it like to live as a transgender person in a media environment before this transgender boom in television? While pop culture imaginations of transgender identity flourish and shape audience’s perceptions of trans identities, what does this new media visibility mean for transgender individuals themselves?

Andre Cavalcante is an Assistant Professor

of Media Studies and Women, Gender & Sexuality at the University of Virginia. “I wrote this book because it seemed there were many scholars and writers talking about transgender people but very few actually talking to them about their experiences. Foregrounding transgender voices, my book explores the role of media and communications technologies in the everyday lives of trans people. It highlights the ways trans individuals engage with media to struggle for the ordinary rhythms and routines of everyday life, which many of us take for granted.”

Struggling for Ordinary engagingly answers these questions, offering a snapshot of how transgender individuals made their way toward a sense of ordinary life by integrating available media into their everyday experiences. Drawing on in-depth interviews with transgender communities, Andre Cavalcante offers a richly detailed account of how the media impacts the lives and experiences of transgender individuals. He grippingly looks at the emotional toll that media takes on this population along with their resilience in the face of disempowerment. Deeply rooted in the life stories of transgender people, the book uses everyday circumstances to show how media and technology operate as a medium through which transgender individuals are able to cultivate an understanding of their identities, build inhabitable worlds, and achieve the routine affordances of everyday life from which they are often excluded. Expertly researched and eloquently argued, Struggling for Ordinary sheds a fascinating new light on the everyday struggles of individuals and communities, to seek a life in which transgender identity is fully integrated into the ordinary.

Andre Cavalcante

March 2018 224 pages | 6 x 9 9 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-4131-8 | $27.00S (£21.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-8130-7 | $89.00X (£74.00) Media Studies In the Critical Cultural Communication series 26

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media studies

WIFE, INC.

The Business of Marriage in the Twenty-First Century Suzanne Leonard A fascinating look at the changing role of wives in modern America

After a half century of battling for gender equality, women have been freed from the necessity of securing a husband for economic stability, sexual fulfillment, or procreation. Marriage is a choice, and increasingly women (and men) are opting out. Yet despite these changes, the cultural power of marriage has burgeoned. What was once an obligation has become an exclusive club into which heterosexual women with the right amount of self-discipline may win entry. The newly exalted professionalized wife is no longer reliant on her husband’s status or money; instead she can wield her own power provided she can successfully manage the business of being a wife.

Suzanne Leonard is Associate Professor

of English at Simmons College, and cocoordinator of the college’s interdisciplinary minor in Cinema and Media Studies. She is the author of Fatal Attraction (2009) and coeditor of Fifty Hollywood Directors (2015).

Wife, Inc. tells a fiercely contemporary story revealing that today’s wives do not labor in kitchens or even homes. Instead, the work of wifedom occurs in online dating sites, on reality television, in social media, and on the campaign trail. Dating, marital commitment, and married life have been reconfigured. No longer the stuff of marriage vows, these realms are now controlled by brand management and marketability. To prosper, women must appear confident, empowered, and sexually savvy. Guiding readers through the stages of the “wife-cycle,” Suzanne Leonard follows women as they date, prepare to wed, and toil as wives, using examples from popular television, film, and literature, as well as mass market news, women’s magazines, new media, and advice culture. The first major study to focus on this new definition of “working wives,” Wife, Inc. reveals how marriage occupies a newly professionalized role in the lives of American women. Being a wife is a business that takes a lot more than a vow to maintain—this book tells that story.

April 2018 272 pages | 6 x 9 22 black and white illustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-7450-7 | $30.00A (£24.99) Media Studies In the Critical Cultural Communication series WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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media studies

HOMEGROWN

MORE THAN MEETS THE EYE

Identity and Difference in the American War on Terror

Special Effects and the Fantastic Transmedia Franchise

Piotr M. Szpunar

Bob Rehak An insightful study of how Americans grapple with identity, citizenship, and belonging in the face of homegrown terrorism

“You are either with us, or against us” is the refrain that captures the spirit of the global war on terror. Indeed, most Americans think of enemies – and most recently terrorists – as foreign “others” with a distinct identity from ‘us.’ However, in this book, Piotr Szpunar tells the story of a gray area: homegrown terrorism—Americans, both residents and citizens, who have taken up arms against their own country. Homegrown delves into the dynamics of domestic terrorism, revealing the complications that arise when the one who threatens us is no longer distinguishable from an ordinary citizen, but rather a foe that blends into the crowd, looking, talking, and acting “like us.” Drawing on popular media coverage, as well as “terrorist” produced media, Szpunar poses new questions about how we think about identity in times of conflict. The first critical examination of homegrown terrorism, this book will make you question how we make sense of the actions of others and how we instinctively, and unintentionally, categorize “them”. Piotr M. Szpunar is Assistant Professor in the

Department of Communication at the University at Albany, SUNY.

A rare look at the role of special effects in creating fictional worlds and transmedia franchises

From comic book universes crowded with soaring superheroes and shattering skyscrapers to cosmic empires set in far-off galaxies, today’s fantasy blockbusters depend on visual effects. Bringing science fiction from the studio to your screen, through film, television, or video games, these special effects power our entertainment industry. More Than Meets the Eye delves into the world of fantastic media franchises to trace the ways in which special effects over the last 50 years have become central not just to transmedia storytelling but to worldbuilding, performance, and genre in contemporary blockbuster entertainment. Examining high-profile franchises in which special effects have played a constitutive role such as Star Trek, Star Wars, The Matrix, and The Lord of the Rings, as well as more contemporary franchises like Pirates of the Caribbean and Harry Potter, Bob Rehak analyzes the ways in which production practices developed alongside the cultural work of industry professionals. More Than Meets the Eye argues that special effects are not simply an adjunct to blockbuster filmmaking, but central agents of an entire mode of production. Bob Rehak is Associate Professor of Film and

Media Studies at Swarthmore College. April 2018 224 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-7033-2 | $28.00S (£22.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-4190-5 | $89.00X (£74.00) Current Events In the Critical Cultural Communication series 28

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March 2018 256 pages | 6 x 9 19 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-5670-1 | $28.00S (£22.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-1315-5 | $89.00X (£74.00) Media Studies In the Postmillennial Pop series 1. 8 0 0 . 9 9 6 . NYUP


media studies

DOT-COM DESIGN

The Rise of a Usable, Social, Commercial Web Megan Sapnar Ankerson From dial-up to wi-fi, an engaging cultural history of the commercial web industry

In the 1990s, the World Wide Web, and the design it enabled, helped transform the Internet from the domain of computer scientists to a playground for mass audiences. As URLs leapt off computer screens and onto cereal boxes, billboards, and film trailers, the web changed the way many Americans experienced media, socialized, and interacted with brands. Businesses rushed online to set up corporate “home pages” and as a result, a new cultural industry was born: web design. But when the “dot-com bubble” burst in the spring of 2000, internet and web industries were demolished and hundreds of thousands of technology workers were laid off, becoming a cautionary tale of what transpires when greed, gullibility, and grossly overstated hype trump sound business decisions.

Megan Sapnar Ankerson is Assistant

Professor of Communication Studies at the University of Michigan. She is co-editor of the international journal Internet Histories: Digital Technology, Culture and Society. “Megan Ankerson has resurrected an era — attitudes and aesthetics, economics and practices, fantasies and futures — to explain how the present came to be. Indispensable reading for everyone who wants to understand what the web meant, and what it means.” —Finn Brunton, author of Spam: A Shadow History of the Internet July 2018 288 pages | 6 x 9 24 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-9290-7 | $28.00S (£22.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-7272-5 | $89.00X (£74.00) Media Studies In the Critical Cultural Communication series WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

In Dot-Com Design, Megan Sapnar Ankerson turns our attention instead to the ebb and flow of web design as a commercial industry, and the complex cultural work of making digital media in the socioeconomic context of the 1990s. Tracking shifts in the rules of “good web design,” Ankerson reimagines speculation and design as a series of contests and collaborations to conceive the boundaries of a new digitally networked future. What was it like to go online and “surf the Web” in the 1990s? How and why did the look and feel of the web change over time? How do new design paradigms like user-experience design (UX) gain traction? To answer these questions, Ankerson takes “dot-com” and “design” as useful conceptual frames to understand how the commercial web industry developed in the U.S. and chronicles the struggles over visions of the web and how it should look, feel, work, sound, and behave. By tracing the shifts in, and struggles over, the web’s production, aesthetics, and design this book provides a comprehensive look at the evolution of the web industry and into the vast web we browse today.

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american studies

PLAYING TO THE CROWD

COLONIAL PHANTOMS

Musicians, Audiences, and the Intimate Work of Connection

Belonging and Refusal in the Dominican Americas, from the 19th Century to the Present

Nancy K. Baym

Dixa Ramírez Explains what happened to music—for both artists and fans—when music went online.

Playing to the Crowd explores and explains how the rise of digital communication platforms has transformed artist-fan relationships into something closer to friendship or family. Through in-depth interviews with musicians such as Billy Bragg and Richie Hawtin, as well as members of the Cure, UB40, and Throwing Muses, Baym reveals how new media has facilitated these connections through the active, and often required, participation of the artists and their devoted, digital fan base. Drawing on her own rich history as an active and deeply connected music fan, Baym offers an entirely new approach to media culture, arguing that the work musicians put in to create and maintain these intimate relationships reflect the demands of the gig economy, one which requires resources and strategies that we must all come to recognize and appreciate. Nancy K. Baym is a Principal Researcher at

Microsoft in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She is the author and co-editor of three previous books about audiences, relationships, and the internet, including Personal Connections in the Digital Age.

Highlights the rich histories and cultural expressions of the Dominican people

Using a blend of historical and literary analysis, Colonial Phantoms reveals how Western discourses have ghosted— miscategorized or erased—the Dominican Republic since the nineteenth century despite its central place in the architecture of the Americas. Through a variety of Dominican cultural texts, from literature to public monuments to musical performance, it illuminates the Dominican quest for legibility and resistance. Dixa Ramírez places the Dominican people and Dominican expressive culture and history at the forefront of an insightful investigation of colonial modernity across the Americas and the African diaspora. In doing so, Colonial Phantoms demonstrates how the centrality of gender, race, and class in the nationalisms and imperialisms of the West have profoundly impacted the lives of Dominicans. “In this piercing and important study, Dixa Ramírez has given scholars of the so-called New World an indelible intellectual gift. Scholarship of the highest order.” —Junot Díaz, Pulitzer Prize winner and author of This is How You Lose Her Dixa Ramírez is Assistant Professor of American

Studies and Ethnicity, Race, and Migration at Yale University. July 2018 280 pages | 6 x 9 25 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-2158-7 | $29.00S (£23.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-9616-5 | $89.00X (£74.00) Media Studies In the Postmillennial Pop series 30

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April 2018 336 pages | 6 x 9 21 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-6756-1 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-5045-7 | $89.00X (£74.00) Media Studies In the Nation of Nations series 1. 8 0 0 . 9 9 6 . NYUP


american studies

THE LIFE AND DEATH OF LATISHA KING

A Critical Phenomenology of Transphobia Gayle Salamon What the killing of a transgender teen can teach us about the violence of misreading gender identity as sexual identity

The Life and Death of Latisha King examines a single incident, the shooting of 15-year-old Latisha King by 14-yearold Brian McInerney in their junior high school classroom in Oxnard, California in 2008. The press coverage of the shooting, as well as the criminal trial that followed, referred to Latisha, assigned male at birth, as Larry. Unpacking the consequences of representing the victim as Larry, a gay boy, instead of Latisha, a trans girl, Gayle Salamon draws on the resources of feminist phenomenology to analyze what happened in the school and at the trial that followed. “This beautifully crafted work is a model of careful and thoughtful philosophy and cultural criticism, bringing to life the resources of a phenomenological tradition that can name, describe, and oppose the obliteration of queer and trans lives. This work is as electric as its slow, making us think, and teaching us to see.” —Judith Butler, author of Gender Trouble Gayle Salamon is Professor of English and Gender

and Sexuality Studies at Princeton University. She is the author of Assuming a Body: Transgender and Rhetorics of Materiality, which won the Lambda Literary Award for Best Book in LGBT Studies in 2011.

March 2018 192 pages | 6 x 9 1 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-9252-5 | $23.00S (£20.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-4921-5 | $89.00X (£74.00) Gender Studies In the Sexual Cultures series WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

AFTER THE PARTY

A Manifesto for Queer of Color Life Joshua Chambers-Letson A new manifesto for performance studies on the art of queer of color worldmaking.

After the Party tells the stories of minoritarian artists who mobilize performance to produce freedom and sustain life in the face of subordination, exploitation, and annihilation. Building upon the thought of José Esteban Muñoz alongside prominent scholarship in queer of color critique, black studies, and Marxist aesthetic criticism, Joshua Chambers-Letson maps a portrait of performance’s capacity to produce what he calls a communism of incommensurability, a practice of being together in difference. Describing performance as a rehearsal for new ways of living together, After the Party moves between slavery, the Civil Rights Movement, the first wave of the AIDS crisis, the Vietnam War, and the catastrophe-riddled horizon of the early twenty-first century to consider this worldmaking practice as it is born of the tension between freedom and its negation. With urgency and pathos, Chambers-Letson argues that it is through minoritarian performance that we keep our dead alive and with us as we struggle to survive an increasingly precarious present. Joshua Chambers-Letson is Associate Professor of

Performance Studies at Northwestern University. He is the author of A Race So Different: Performance and Law in Asian America (NYU Press, 2013). August 2018 336 pages | 6 x 9 36 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-3277-4 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-9017-0 | $89.00X (£74.00) Performance Studies S PRI N G 2 018 • NYU PRE S S

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american studies

GIRLHOOD IN THE BORDERLANDS

Mexican Teens Caught in the Crossroads of Migration Lilia Soto How gender and generation shape perceptions of place and time as told through the voices of Mexican teenage girls

This book examines the lived experiences of Mexican teenage girls raised in transnational families and the varied ways they make meaning of their lives. Under the Bracero Program and similar recruitment programs, Mexican men have for decades been recruited for temporary work in the U.S., leaving their families for long periods of time to labor in the fields, factories, and service industry before returning home again. While the conditions for these adults who cross the border for work has been extensively documented, very little attention has been paid to the lives of those left behind. Over a six-year period, Lilia Soto interviewed more than sixty teenage girls in Napa, California and Zinapécuaro, Michoacán to reveal the ruptures and continuities felt by girls surrounded by the movement of families, ideas, and social practices across borders. In Girlhood in the Borderlands, Soto highlights the “structure of feeling” that girls from Zinapécuaro and Napa share, offering insight into the affective consequences of growing up at these social and geographic intersections. Lilia Soto is Associate Professor of American

BEFORE CHICANO

Citizenship and the Making of Mexican American Manhood, 1848-1959 Alberto Varon Uncovers the long history of how Latino manhood was integral to the formation of Latino identity

In the first booklength study of Latino manhood before the Civil Rights Movement, Before Chicano examines Mexican American print culture to explore how conceptions of citizenship and manhood developed in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Pulling from a wide-variety of familiar and lesserknown works—from fiction and newspapers to government documents, images, and travelogues— Varon illustrates how Mexican Americans during this period envisioned themselves as U.S. citizens through cultural depictions of manhood. Before Chicano reveals how manhood offered a strategy to disparate Latino communities across the nation to imagine themselves as a cohesive whole—as Mexican Americans—and as political agents in the U.S. Though the Civil Rights Movement is typically recognized as the origin point for the study of Latino culture, Varon pushes us to consider an intellectual history that far predates the late twentieth century, one that is both national and transnational. Alberto Varon is Assistant Professor of English and

Latino Studies at Indiana University, Bloomington.

Studies and Latina/o Studies at the University of Wyoming. July 2018 272 pages | 6 x 9 6 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-6201-6 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-3840-0 | $89.00X (£74.00) Race & Ethnicity In the Nation of Nations series 32

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July 2018 336 pages | 6 x 9 9 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-3119-7 | $35.00S (£28.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-6396-9 | $99.00X (£82.00) American Studies | Race & Ethnicity In the America and the Long 19th Century series 1. 8 0 0 . 9 9 6 . NYUP


american studies

BEING MUSLIM

A Cultural History of Women of Color in American Islam Sylvia Chan-Malik An exploration of twentieth and twentyfirst century U.S. Muslim womanhood that centers the lived experience of women of color

For Sylvia Chan-Malik, Muslim womanhood is constructed through everyday and embodied acts of resistance, what she calls affective insurgency. Being Muslim explores how U.S. Muslim women’s identities are expressions of Islam as both Black protest religion and universal faith tradition. By accounting for American Islam’s rich histories of mobilization and community, Being Muslim brings insight to the resistance that all Muslim women must engage in the post-9/11 United States. From the stories that she gathers, Chan-Malik demonstrates the diversity and similarities of Black, Arab, South Asian, Latina, and multiracial Muslim women, and how American understandings of Islam have shifted against the evolution of U.S. white nationalism over the past century. In borrowing from the lineages of Black and womenof-color feminism, Chan-Malik offers us a new vocabulary for U.S. Muslim feminism, one that is as conscious of race, gender, sexuality, and nation, as it is region and religion. Sylvia Chan-Malik is Assistant Professor of

American Studies and Women and Gender Studies at Rutgers University.

June 2018 288 pages | 6 x 9 21 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-2342-0 | $29.00S (£23.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-5060-0 | $89.00X (£74.00) Race & Ethnicity WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

UNNAMABLE

The Ends of Asian American Art Susette Min Redraws the contours of Asian American art, attempting to free it from a categorization that stifles more than it reveals

Charting its historical conditions and the expansive contexts of its emergence, Susette Min challenges the notion of Asian American art as a site of reconciliation or as a way for marginalized artists to enter into the canon or mainstream art scene. Unnamable reconceives Asian American art not as a subset of objects, but as a medium that disrupts representations and embedded knowledge. By approaching Asian American art in this way, Min refigures the way we see Asian American art as an oppositional practice, less in terms of its aspirations to be seen—its greater visibility—and more in terms of how it models a different way of seeing and encountering the world. Ultimately, Unnamable insists that in order to reassess Asian American art and its place in art history, we need to let go not only of established viewing practices, but potentially even the category of Asian American art itself. Susette Min is Associate Professor at the University

of California, Davis, where she teaches Asian American studies, art history, curatorial studies, and cultural studies.

June 2018 272 pages | 6 x 9 65 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-0-8147-6430-5 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-0-8147-6429-9 | $89.00X (£74.00) American Studies | Art In the Nation of Nations series S PRI N G 2 018 • NYU PRE S S

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social science

THE NEW IMMIGRANT WHITENESS

AMERICA , AS SEEN ON TV

Claudia Sadowski-Smith

Clara E. Rodríguez

Race, Neoliberalism, and Post-Soviet Migration to the United States The complications surrounding immigrants from post-Soviet Russia and their perceived whiteness

Tracing the long history of Russian and Eastern European immigration to the United States, this book compares the experience of the postSoviet diaspora with the upward mobility of other early twentieth century European immigrants. Claudia Sadowski-Smith focuses on the impact of legal status—including asylum, marriage, and adoption—on post-Soviet migrants’ quality of life. The New Immigrant Whiteness unmasks the fallacy that immigrants perceived as “white” unequivocally benefit from structures that place power and privilege in the hands of whites and limit resources for contemporary Latina/o and Asian migrants. Rather, Claudia SadowskiSmith shows that whatever benefits post-Soviet immigrants may receive for being perceived as white, there are also significant penalties for being that identification. A compelling and timely volume, The New Immigrant Whiteness offers a fresh perspective on race and immigration in the United States today. The paradox revealed in this book sheds a new light on diversity, human movement, and their relationship to citizenship and identity. Claudia Sadowski-Smith is Associate Professor of

English at Arizona State University. She is the author of Border Fictions: Globalization, Empire, and Writing at the Boundaries of the United States. March 2018 224 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-0671-3 | $28.00S (£22.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-4773-0 | $89.00X (£74.00) Race & Ethnicity In the Nation of Nations series 34

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How Television Shapes Immigrant Expectations around the Globe

The surprising effects of American TV on global viewers

As a dominant cultural export, American television is often the first exposure to American ideals and the English language for many people throughout the world. Yet, American television is flawed, and it represents race, class, and gender in ways that many find unfair and unrealistic. What happens, then, when people who grew up on American television decide to come to the United States? What do they expect to find, and what do they actually find? In America, As Seen on TV, Clara E. Rodríguez surveys international college students and foreign nationals working or living in the U.S. to examine the impact of American television on their views of the U.S. and on their expectations of life in the United States. The author also surveys millennials about their consumption of American television and finds that both groups share the sense that American TV does not accurately reflect racial/ethnic relations in the U.S. as they have experienced them. America, As Seen on TV explores the surprising effects of TV on global viewers and the realities they actually experience in the U.S. Clara E. Rodríguez is Professor of Sociology at

Fordham University’s College at Lincoln Center.

March 2018 240 pages | 6 x 9 6 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-1852- 5 | $28.00S (£22.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-5682-4 | $89.00X (£74.00) Sociology | Media Studies 1. 8 0 0 . 9 9 6 . NYUP


social science

MARKET CITIES, PEOPLE CITIES

The Shape of Our Urban Future

Michael Oluf Emerson and Kevin T. Smiley An in-depth look at the urban environments of Houston and Copenhagen

How are modern cities changing, and what implications do those changes have for city inhabitants? What kinds of cities do people want to live in, and what cities do people want to create in the future? Michael Oluf Emerson and Kevin T. Smiley argue that western cities have diverged into two specific and different types: market cities and people cities. Market cities are focused on wealth, jobs, individualism, and economic opportunities. People cities are more egalitarian, with government investment in infrastructure and an active civil society. Analyzing the practices and policies of cities with two separate foci, markets or people, has substantial implications both for everyday residents and future urban planning and city development.

Michael Oluf Emerson is Allyn and Gladys

Cline Professor of Sociology and CoDirector of the Kinder Institute for Urban Research at Rice University. He is author or co-author of several books, including Divided By Faith: Evangelical Religion and the Problem of Race in America, Transcending Racial Barriers, and Against All Odds: The Struggle for Racial Integration in Religious Organizations (NYU Press, 2005). Kevin T. Smiley is Assistant Professor of

Sociology at the University of Buffalo

Market Cities, People Cities examines these diverging trends through extended case studies of Houston, Texas as a market city and Copenhagen, Denmark as a people city, and draws on data from nearly 100 other cities. Emerson and Smiley track the history of how these two types of cities have been created, and how they function for governments and residents in various ways, examining transportation, the environment, and inequality, among other topics. Market Cities, People Cities also outlines the means and policies cities can adapt in order to become more of a market- or people-focused city. The afterword reflects on Houston’s response to the devastation caused by Hurricane Harvey in 2017. As twenty-first century cities diverge, Market Cities, People Cities is essential for urban dwellers anxious to be active in their pursuit of their best cities, as well as anyone looking to the future of cities around the world.

April 2018 256 pages | 6 x 9 6 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-0026-1 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-5679-4 | $89.00X (£74.00) Sociology | Environmental Studies WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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BIOCITIZENSHIP

The Politics of Bodies, Governance, and Power Edited by Kelly E. Happe, Jenell Johnson , Marina Levina

and

A groundbreaking exploration of biocitizenship

Citizenship has a long, complex relationship with the body. In recent years, developments in biomedicine and biotechnology, as well as a number of political initiatives, grassroots efforts, and public policies have given rise to new ways in which bodies shape the idea and practices of citizenship, or what has been called “biocitizenship.” This book, the first collection of essays on the topic of biocitizenship, aims to examine biocitizenship as a mode of political action and expand readers’ understanding of biopolitics. Organized into four distinct sections covering topics including AIDS, drug testing on the mentally ill, and force-feeding prisoners, Biocitizenship seeks to question who may count as a biological citizen and for what reasons. Kelly E. Happe is Associate Professor of Women’s

Studies and Communication Studies at the University of Georgia. Jenell Johnson is Mellon-Morgridge Professor

of the Humanities and Associate Professor of Communication Arts at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Marina Levina is Associate Professor of

SURVIVING STATE TERROR

Women’s Testimonies of Repression and Resistance in Argentina Barbara Sutton A profound reflection on state violence and women’s survival

In the 1970s and early 80s, military and security forces in Argentina hunted down, tortured, imprisoned, and in many cases, murdered political activists, student organizers, labor unionists, leftist guerrillas, and other people branded “subversives.” This period was characterized by massive human rights violations, which left a deep scar on contemporary Argentina. For many survivors and even the nation itself, talking about this dark period in recent history has been difficult, and at times taboo. In Surviving State Terror, Barbara Sutton draws upon a wealth of oral testimonies to place women’s bodies and voices at the center of the analysis of state terror. Recounting not only women’s traumatic experiences, but also emphasizing their historical and political agency, Surviving State Terror is a profound reflection on state violence, social suffering, and human resilience—both personal and collective. Barbara Sutton is Associate Professor of Women’s,

Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University at Albany, SUNY. She is the author of Bodies in Crisis: Culture, Violence, and Women’s Resistance in Neoliberal Argentina.

Communication at The University of Memphis.

August 2018 340 pages | 6 x 9 8 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-6053-1 | $32.00S (£25.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-4519-4 | $89.00X (£74.00) Sociology | Medicine In the Biopolitics series 36

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May 2018 328 pages | 6 x 9 6 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-2992-7 | $35.00S (£28.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-6157-6 | $99.00X (£82.00) Sociology | Women’s Studies 1. 8 0 0 . 9 9 6 . NYUP


social science

HEALTH CARE IN CRISIS

VULNERABILITY POLITICS

Theresa Morris

Katie Oliviero

Hospitals, Nurses, and the Consequences of Policy Change An inside look into how hospitals, nurses, and patients are faring under the Affordable Care Act

More and more non-profit hospitals are becoming financially unstable and seeking acquisition by large hospital systems. The effects range from not having necessary life-saving equipment to losing the most experienced nurses to better jobs. In Health Care in Crisis, Theresa Morris takes an in-depth look at how this unintended consequence of the Affordable Care Act plays out in a non-profit hospital’s obstetrical ward. In the context of a new environment where hospital reimbursements are tied to performance, nursing has come under much scrutiny as documentation of births—already laboriously high—has reached even greater levels. Morris maintains that what is most important in delivering quality care to patients is the amount of interaction time spent with patients, yet finding that time is a real challenge given the new standards of documentation. As questions and policies regarding health care are changing rapidly, Health Care in Crisis tells an important story of how these changes affect nurses’ ability to care for their patients. Theresa Morris is Associate Professor of Sociology

at Texas A&M. She is the author of Cut It Out: The C-Section Epidemic in America (NYU Press, 2013).

The Uses and Abuses of Precarity in Political Debate

A new understanding of vulnerability in contemporary political culture

Progressive thinkers have argued that placing the concept of vulnerability at the center of discussions about social justice would lead governments to more equitably distribute resources and create opportunities for precarious groups – especially women, children, people of color, queers, immigrants, and the poor. At the same time, conservatives claim that their values and communities are vulnerable to attack– often by these same groups. In turn, they craft antidemocratic representations of vulnerability that significantly influence the political landscape, restricting human and legal rights for many in order to expand them for a historically privileged few. Vulnerability Politics examines how twenty-first century political struggles over immigration, LGBTQ rights, reproductive justice, and police violence have created a sense of vulnerability that has an impact on culture and the law. Katie Oliviero shows how conservative movements use the rhetoric of risk to oppose liberal policies by claiming that the nation, family, and morality are imperiled and in need of government protection. The author argues that this sensationalism reinforces the idea that groups only deserve social justice protections when their beliefs reflect the dominant nationalist, racial, and sexual ideals. Katie Oliviero is Assistant Professor of Women’s,

Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Dickinson College. July 2018 272 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-2769-5 | $28.00S (£22.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-1352-0 | $89.00X (£74.00) Sociology | Medicine WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

August 2018 336 pages | 6 x 9 4 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-4782-2 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-5584-1 | $89.00X (£74.00) Sociology | Current Affairs S PRI N G 2 018 • NYU PRE S S

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New in Paperbac k

IMMIGRANTS UNDER THREAT

THE SECURITIZATION OF SOCIETY

Greg Prieto

Marc Schuilenburg Introduction by David Garland

Risk and Resistance in Deportation Nation

A portrait of two Mexican immigrant communities confronting threats of deportation, detention, and dispossession

Everyday life as an immigrant in a deportation nation is fraught with risk, but everywhere immigrants confront repression and dispossession, they also manifest resistance in ways big and small. Immigrants Under Threat shifts the conversation from what has been done to Mexican immigrants to what they do in response. Greg Prieto argues that immigrant communities turn inward to insulate themselves from the perceived risks of authorities and a hostile public. These barriers are overcome through the faceto-face work of social-movement organizing that transforms individual grievances into collective demands. The social movements that emerge are shaped by the local political climates in which they unfold and remain tethered to their material inspiration. Immigrants Under Threat explains that Mexican immigrants seek not to transcend, but to burrow into American institutions of law and family so that they might attain a measure of economic stability and social mobility that they have sought all along. Greg Prieto is Assistant Professor of Sociology at

Crime, Risk, and Social Order

Marc Schuilenburg Introduction by David Garland

A new critical perspective for examining the dynamic nature of security and its governance

Traditionally, security has been the realm of the CRIME, RISK, AND SOCIAL ORDER state and its uniformed police. However, in the last two decades, many actors and agencies, including schools, clubs, housing corporations, hospitals, shopkeepers, insurers, energy suppliers, and even private citizens, have enforced some form of security, effectively changing its delivery, and overall role. THE SECURITIZATION OF SOCIETY

translated by George Hall

Rooted in the works of the French philosophers Michel Foucault, Gilles Deleuze, and Gabriel Tarde, The Securitization of Society explores the ongoing structural and cultural changes that have impacted security in Western society from the 19th century to the present. An innovative, interdisciplinary approach to criminological theory, The Securitization of Society reveals how security is understood and enacted in urban environments today. Marc Schuilenburg is Assistant Professor at the

Department of Criminal Law and Criminology, at VU University Amsterdam. In 2014 he was awarded the triennial Willem Nagel Prize by the Dutch Society of Criminology for his book Order in Security: A Dynamic Perspective. David Garland is Professor of Sociology and Law

the University of San Diego.

at New York University. He is the author of Peculiar Institution: America’s Death Penalty in an Age of Abolition.

June 2018 256 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-2146-4 | $28.00S (£22.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-2392-5 | $89.00X (£74.00) Sociology | Latino Studies In the Latina/o Sociology series

November 2017 368 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-7659-4 | $25.00S (£20.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-5421-9 Criminology | Law In the Alternative Criminology series

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social science

GRAFFITI GRRLZ

Performing Feminism in the Hip Hop Diaspora

Jessica Nydia Pabón-Colón An inside look at women graffiti artists around the world

Since the dawn of Hip Hop graffiti writing on the streets of Philadelphia and New York City in the late 1960s, writers have anonymously inscribed their tag names on trains, buildings, and bridges. Passersby are left to imagine who the author might be, and, despite the artists’ anonymity, graffiti subculture is seen as a “boys club,” where the presence of the graffiti girl is almost unimaginable. In Graffiti Grrlz, Jessica Nydia Pabón-Colón interrupts this stereotype and introduces us to the world of women graffiti artists.

Jessica Nydia Pabón-Colón is an

interdisciplinary Latina feminist performance studies scholar from Boston, MA. She is Assistant Professor of Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at SUNY New Paltz. “Graffiti Grrlz will change the way we think about women’s involvement in Hip Hop culture and the way we think about feminist movements. Graffiti Grrlz gives us a part of the story we didn’t know we were waiting for and we didn’t know how much we needed.”

Drawing on the lives of over 100 women in 23 countries, Pabón-Colón argues that graffiti art is an unrecognized but crucial space for the performance of feminism. She demonstrates how it builds communities of artists, reconceptualizes the Hip Hop masculinity of these spaces, and rejects notions of “girl power.” Graffiti Grrlz also unpacks the digital side of Hip Hop graffiti subculture and considers how it widens the presence of the woman graffiti artist and broadens her networks, which leads to the formation of all-girl graffiti crews or the organization of all-girl painting sessions. A rich and engaging look at women artists in a maledominated subculture, Graffiti Grrlz reconsiders the intersections of feminism, hip hop, and youth performance and establishes graffiti art as a game that anyone can play.

—Gwendolyn D. Pough, author of Check It While I Wreck It: Black Womanhood, Hip-Hop Culture, and the Public Sphere May 2018 320 pages | 6 x 9 40 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-9593-9 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-0615-7 | $89.00X (£74.00) Sociology | Gender Studies WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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THE PATH TO GAY RIGHTS

How Activism and Coming Out Changed Public Opinion

Jeremiah J. Garretson

An innovative, datadriven explanation of how public opinion shifted on LGBTQ rights

The Path to Gay Rights is the first social science analysis of how and why the LGBTQ movement achieved its most unexpected victory— transforming gay people from a despised group of social deviants into a minority worthy of rights and protections in the eyes of most Americans. The book weaves together a narrative of LGBTQ history with new findings from the field of political psychology to provide an understanding of how social movements affect mass attitudes in the United States and globally. Using data going back to the 1970s, the book argues that the current understanding of how social movements change mass opinion—through sympathetic media coverage and endorsements from political leaders—cannot provide an adequate explanation for the phenomenal success of the LGBTQ movement at changing the public’s views. Garretson goes beyond the story of LGBTQ rights to develop an evidence-based argument for how social movements can alter mass opinion on any contentious topic. Jeremiah J. Garretson is Assistant Professor of

Political Science at California State University-East Bay.

June 2018 352 pages | 6 x 9 61 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-5007-5 | $35.00S (£28.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-2213-3 | $99.00X (£82.00) Political Science | LGBT Studies 40

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COMPROMISE NOMOS LIX Edited by

Jack Knight A distinguished group of scholars explores compromise in contemporary affairs

Do lawmakers have a greater ethical responsibility to compromise than ordinary citizens? How does one rectify what is at stake when lawmakers concede to compromise for the sake of reaching resolution? Is compromise necessarily equalizing and is it a reasonable mode of problem solving and dispute resolution? In this latest installment from the NOMOS series, distinguished scholars across the fields of political science, law, and philosophy tackle the complex set of questions that relate to the practice of compromise and its implications for social and political life in modern societies. The volume, edited by Jack Knight, brings together a range of perspectives – in both disciplinary and substantive terms – on representation, political morality, disagreement, negotiation, and various forms of compromise. Examining these issues and more, Compromise offers new and thought provoking insights into the pressing issue of the importance of compromise in social and political affairs. Jack Knight is Frederic Cleaveland Professor of

Law and Political Science at Duke University. His publications include Institutions and Social Conflict, The Choices Justices Make, with Lee Epstein, and The Priority of Democracy, with James Johnson.

May 2018 288 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 2 black and white illustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-3636-9 | $65.00X (£54.00) Political Science In the NOMOS - American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy series 1. 8 0 0 . 9 9 6 . NYUP


social science

THE SEX OFFENDER HOUSING DILEMMA Community Activism, Safety, and Social Justice Monica Williams

The controversy surrounding community responses to housing for sexually violent predators

When a South Carolina couple killed a registered sex offender and his wife after they moved into their neighborhood in 2013, the story exposed an extreme and relatively rare instance of violence against sex offenders. While media accounts would have us believe that vigilantes across the country lie in wait for predators who move into their neighborhoods, responses to sex offenders more often involve collective campaigns that direct outrage toward political and criminal justice systems. No community wants a sex offender in its midst, but instead of vigilantism, Monica Williams argues, citizens often leverage moral, political, and/or legal authority to keep these offenders out of local neighborhoods. Taking the reader into the center of these related issues, Monica Williams provokes debate on the role of communities in the execution of criminal justice policies, while also addressing the responsibility of government institutions to both groups of citizens. The Sex Offender Housing Dilemma is sure to promote increased civic engagement to help strengthen communities, increase public safety, and ensure government accountability.

AMERICA’S JAILS

The Search for Human Dignity in an Age of Mass Incarceration Derek S. Jeffreys

A look at the contemporary crisis in U.S. jails with recommendations for improving and protecting the dignity of inmates

Twelve million Americans go through the U.S. jail system on an annual basis. Jails, which differ significantly from prisons, are designed to house inmates for short amounts of time, and are often occupied by large populations of legally innocent people waiting for a trial. In America’s Jails, Derek Jeffreys draws on sociology, philosophy, history, and his personal experience volunteering in jails and prisons to provide an understanding of the jail experience from the inmates’ perspective, focusing on the stigma that surrounds incarceration. Using his research at Cook County Jail, the nation’s largest single-site jail, Jeffreys attests that jail inmates possess an inherent dignity that should govern how we treat them. Ultimately, fundamental changes in the U.S. jail system are necessary and America’s Jails provides specific policy recommendations for changing its poor conditions. Derek. S. Jeffreys is Professor of Humanistic Studies and Religion at the University of Wisconsin, Green Bay.

Monica Williams is Assistant Professor of Criminal

Justice at Weber State University.

May 2018 288 pages | 6 x 9 8 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-3649-9 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-9711-7 | $89.00X (£74.00) Criminology | Sociology WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

June 2018 256 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-4798-1482-4 | $28.00S (£22.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-3862-2 | $89.00X (£74.00) Criminology | Religion In the Alternative Criminology series S PRI N G 2 018 • NYU PRE S S

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AGES OF ANXIETY

Historical and Transnational Perspectives on Juvenile Justice Edited by William

S. Bush and David S. Tanenhaus Six compelling histories of youth crime in the twentieth century

Ages of Anxiety presents six case studies of juvenile justice policy in the twentieth century from around the world, adding context to the urgent and international conversation about youth, crime, and justice. By focusing on magistrates, social workers, probation and police officers, and youth themselves, editors William S. Bush and David S. Tanenhaus highlight the role of ordinary people as meaningful and consequential historical actors. After providing an international perspective on the social history of ideas about how children are different from adults, the contributors explain why those differences should matter for the administration of justice. They examine how reformers used the idea of modernization to build and legitimize juvenile justice systems in Europe and Mexico, and present histories of policing and punishing youth crime. Shedding new light on the substantive aims of the juvenile court, the book is a historically informed perspective on the critical topic of youth, crime, and justice. William S. Bush is Associate Professor of History at

Texas A&M University-San Antonio. David S. Tanenhaus is Professor of History and

James E. Rogers Professor of History and Law at the William S. Boyd School of Law, University of Nevada, Las Vegas.

July 2018 224 pages | 6 x 9 1 black and white illustration Cloth | 978-1-4798-3321-4 | $49.00S (£41.00) Criminology In the Youth, Crime, and Justice series 42

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INEQUALITIES OF AGING

Paradoxes of Independence in American Home Care Elana D. Buch

The troubling dynamic of the American home care industry, where increased independence for the elderly conflicts with the well being of caregivers

Paid home care is one of the fastest growing occupations in the United States, and millions of Americans rely on these workers to help them remain at home as they grow older. However, the industry is rife with contradictions. The United States spends a fortune of medical care, yet devotes comparatively few resources to improving wages, thus placing home care providers in the ranks of the working poor. As a result, the work that enables some older Americans to live independently generates profound social inequalities. Inequalities of Aging explores the ways in which these inequalities play out on the ground as workers, who are disproportionately women of color and immigrants, earn poverty-level wages and often struggle to provide for themselves and their families. Illuminating the lived experience of both workers and their clients, Inequalities of Aging shows the different ways in which the idea of independence both connects and shapes the lives of the elderly and the working poor. Elana D. Buch is Assistant Professor of

Anthropology at the University of Iowa.

May 2018 288 pages | 6 x 9 3 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-0717-8 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-1073-4 | $89.00X (£74.00) Anthropology In the Anthropologies of American Medicine Series 1. 8 0 0 . 9 9 6 . NYUP


social science

MOTHERHOOD ACROSS BORDERS

Immigrants and Their Children in Mexico and New York Gabrielle Oliveira G a br iel l e Ol i v eir a

The stories of Mexican migrant women who parent from afar, and how their transnational families stay together

While we have an incredible amount of Motherhood statistical information across Borders about immigrants coming in and out of the United States, we know very little about how migrant families stay together and raise their children. Beyond the numbers, what are the everyday experiences of families with members on both sides of the border? Immigrants and Their Children in Mexico and New York

Focusing on Mexican women who migrate to New York City and leave children behind, Motherhood across Borders examines parenting from afar, as well as the ways in which separated siblings cope with different experiences across borders. Drawing on more than three years of ethnographic research, Gabrielle Oliveira offers a unique focus on the many consequences of maternal migration and provides an invaluable resource for scholars, educators, and anyone with an interest in the current dynamics of U.S immigration. Gabrielle Oliveira is Assistant Professor at Boston

College Lynch School of Education.

SUSTAINABILITY

Approaches to Environmental Justice and Social Power Edited by

Julie Sze

A critical resource for approaching sustainability across the disciplines

Sustainability and social justice remain elusive even though each is unattainable without the other. Across the industrialized West and the Global South, unsustainable practices and social inequities exacerbate one another. How do social justice and sustainability connect? What does sustainability mean and, most importantly, how can we achieve it with justice? This volume tackles these questions, placing social justice and interdisciplinary approaches at the center of efforts for a more sustainable world. From indigenous land rights, and climate conflict, to militarization and urban drought resilience, the book offers examples of ways in which sustainability and social justice strengthen one another. Through an understanding of history, diverse cultural traditions, and complexity in relation to race, class, and gender, this volume demonstrates ways in which sustainability can help to shape better and more robust solutions to the world’s most pressing problems. Julie Sze is Professor and the Founding Chair of

the American Studies Department at University of California, Davis.

July 2018 272 pages | 6 x 9 14 black and white illustration Paper | 978-1-4798-6646-5 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-7462-0 | $89.00X (£74.00) Anthropology WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

July 2018 304 pages | 6 x 9 11 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-7034-9 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-9456-7 | $89.00X (£74.00) Environmental Studies S PRI N G 2 018 • NYU PRE S S

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THE CRISIS OF CONNECTION Roots, Consequences, and Solutions Edited by

Niobe Way, Alisha Ali, Carol Gilligan, and Pedro Noguera Illuminates the roots and consequences of and offers solutions to the widespread alienation and disconnection that beset modern society

Since the beginning of the 21st century, people have become increasingly disconnected from themselves, each other, and the world around them. A “crisis of connection” stemming from growing alienation, social isolation, and fragmentation characterizes modern society. The signs of this “crisis of connection” are everywhere, from decreasing levels of empathy and trust, to burgeoning cases of suicide, depression, and loneliness. The astronomical rise in inequality around the world has contributed to the critical nature of this moment.

Niobe Way is Professor of Applied

Psychology at New York University. She is the Founder and Executive Director of The Project for the Advancement of Our Common Humanity (PACH). Alisha Ali is Associate Professor in the

Department of Applied Psychology at New York University. Carol Gilligan is University Professor at New

York University. Pedro Noguera is the Distinguished Professor

of Education at the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies at University of California, Los Angeles

To delve into the heart of the crisis, leading researchers and practitioners draw from the science of human connection to tell a three-part story about its roots, consequences, and solutions. In doing so, they reveal how, in modern society, we have been captive to a false story about who we are as humans. This false narrative that takes individualism as a universal truth has contributed to many of the problems that we currently face. The new story now emerging from across the human sciences underscores our social and emotional capacities and needs. The science also reveals the ways in which the privileging of the self over relationships and of individual success over the common good as well as the perpetuation of dehumanizing stereotypes have led to a crisis of connection that is now widespread. Finally, the practitioners in the volume present concrete solutions that show ways we can create a more just and humane world. In these divisive times, The Crisis of Connection is an essential resource for bridging the political, religious, identity-based, and ideological gaps among individuals and communities. By exposing the barriers that stand in the way of our human desire to live in connection with ourselves and each other, this book illuminates concrete pathways to enhancing our awareness of our common humanity.

August 2018 544 pages | 6 x 9 8 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-4798-1929-4 | $30.00S (£24.99) Cloth | 978-1-4798-0278-4 | $89.00X (£74.00) Psychology 44

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l i b r a ry o f a r a b i c l i t e r at u r e

"The entire series, promises to be an invaluable mine of knowledge for scholars and general readers who need an introduction to the universal appeal and validity of the enlightening and enlightened literary heritage of the ArabicIslamic intellectual tradition.” —Journal of Islamic Studies

IN DARFUR

An Account of the Sultanate and Its People, Volumes One and Two Muhammad al-Tunisi Edited and Translated by Humphrey Davies, Introduction by R.S. O’Fahey

A merchant’s account of his travels through an independent African state

Muḥammad al-Tūnisī (d. 1274 H/1857 AD) belonged to a family of Tunisian merchants who traded with Egypt and what is now Sudan. Raised in Cairo, al-Tūnisī spent ten years traveling through the Darfur Sultanate. On his return to Egypt, he played an important part in Muḥammad ʿAli’s modernization project, supervising the translation of veterinary and medical texts, producing original scientific works in Arabic, and editing the first printed editions of classical Arabic texts. Humphrey Davies is an award-winning translator of Arabic literature from the Ottoman period to the present. He lives in Cairo. R.S. O’Fahey is Professor Emeritus of History in the Centre for Middle Eastern and Islamic Studies, University of Bergen, Norway.

Volume One May 2018 320 Pages | 6 x 9 3 black and white illustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-7638-9 | $40.00S (£33.00) Literature WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

Muḥammad ibn ʿUmar al-Tūnisī (d. 1274 H/1857 AD) belonged to a family of Tunisian merchants trading with Egypt and what is now Sudan. Al-Tūnisī was raised in Cairo and a graduate of al-Azhar. In 1803, at the age of fourteen, al-Tūnisī set off for the Sultanate of Darfur, where his father had decamped ten years earlier. He followed the Forty Days Road, was reunited with his father, and eventually took over the management of the considerable estates granted to his father by the sultan of Darfur. In Darfur is alTūnisī’s remarkable account of his ten-year sojourn in this independent state. In Volume One, al-Tūnisī relates the history of his muchtraveled family, his journey from Egypt to Darfur, and the reign of the noted sultan ʿAbd al-Raḥmān al-Rashīd. Volume Two describes the geography of the region, the customs of Darfur’s petty kings, court life and the clothing of its rulers, marriage customs, eunuchs, illnesses, food, hunting, animals, currencies, plants, magic, divination, and dances. In Darfur combines literature, history, ethnography, linguistics and travel adventure, and most unusually for its time, includes fifty-two illustrations, all drawn by the author. In Darfur is a rare example of an Arab description of Africa on the eve of Western colonization and vividly evokes a world in which travel was untrammeled by bureaucracy, borders were fluid, and startling coincidences appear almost mundane.

Volume Two May 2018 400 Pages | 6 x 9 53 black and white illustrations Cloth | 978-1-4798-6784-4 | $40.00S (£33.00) Literature S PRI N G 2 018 • NYU PRE S S

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l i b r a ry o f a r a b i c l i t e r at u r e

New in Paperbac k

WHAT ‘ĪSĀ IBN HISHĀM TOLD US Or, A Period of Time

Muḥammad al-Muwayliḥī Allen, Foreword by Maria Golia

Translated by Roger

Trenchant and witty critiques of life in Cairo under British rule What ʿĪsā ibn Hishām Told Us is a masterpiece of early 20thcentury Arabic prose. Penned by the Egyptian journalist Muḥammad al-Muwayliḥī, this highly original work was first introduced in serialized form in his family’s pioneering newspaper Miṣbāḥ al-Sharq (Light of the East) and later published in book form in 1907. Widely hailed for its erudition and mordant wit, What ʿĪsā ibn Hishām Told Us was embraced by Egypt’s burgeoning reading public and soon became required reading for generations of school students.

Muḥammad al-Muwayliḥī (d. 1348 H/1930 AD) was an Egyptian writer and political journalist, a career that he shared with his prominent father, Ibrāhīm al-Muwayliḥī, with whom he also published the reputable and incisive newspaper Miṣbāḥ al-Sharq (Light of the East).

Bridging classical genres and modern Arabic fiction, What ʿĪsā ibn Hishām Told Us is divided into two parts. Sarcastic in tone and critical in outlook, the first part of the book relates the excursions of its narrator, ʿĪsā ibn Hishām, and his companion, the Pasha, through a rapidly westernizing Cairo and provides vivid commentary on a society negotiating— however imperfectly—the clash between traditional norms and imported cultural values. The second half takes the narrator to Paris to visit the Exposition Universelle of 1900, where al-Muwayliḥī casts a critical eye on European society, modernity, and the role of Western imperialism as it ripples across the globe. Paving the way for the modern Arabic novel, What ʿĪsā ibn Hishām Told Us is invaluable both for its insight into colonial Egypt and its pioneering role in Arabic literary history.

Roger Allen is the author and translator of numerous publications on Arabic literature, modern fiction and drama, and language pedagogy. Maria Golia is a Cairo-based journalist and the author of Cairo: City of Sand and Photography and Egypt.

April 2018 524 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-4798-4091-5 | $17.00T (£13.99) Literature 46

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b e s t o f t h e bac k l i s t f ro m t h e l i b r a ry o f a r a b i c l i t e r at u r e

The Expeditions: An Early Biography of Muḥammad Maʿmar ibn Rāshid Translated by Sean W. Anthony Foreword by M.A.S. Abdel Haleem $15.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-1682-8

The Principles of Sufism ʿĀʾishah al-Bāʿūniyyah Translated by T. Emil Homerin Foreword by Ros Ballaster $15.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-2924-8

The Life of Ibn Hanbal Ibn al-JawzĪ Translated by Michael Cooperson Foreword by Garth Fowden $17.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-0530-3

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A Hundred and One Nights Foreword by Robert Irwin Translated by Bruce Fudge $15.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-7323-4

Consorts of the Caliphs: Women and the Court of Baghdad Ibn al-Sa’i Translated by Shawkat M. Toorawa $14.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-6679-3

A Treasury of Virtues: Sayings, Sermons, and Teaching of ʿAlī, with the one Hundred Proverbs, attributed to al-Jāḥiẓ al-Qāḍī al-Quḍāʿī Translated by Tahera Qutbuddin Foreword by Rowan Williams $15.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-9653-0

The Epistle of Forgiveness: Volumes One and Two Abū l-ʿAlāʾ al-Maʿarrī Translated by Geert Jan van Gelder and Gregor Schoeler Foreword by Matthew Reynolds $16.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-3494-5

Leg over Leg: Volumes One and Two Aḥmad Fāris al-Shidyāq Translated by Humphrey Davies $17.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-0072-8

Leg over Leg: Volumes Three and Four Aḥmad Fāris al-Shidyāq Translated by Humphrey Davies $17.00T | Paper | 978-1-4798-1329-2

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c l ay s a n s k r i t l i b r a r y

ANNOUNCING THE CLAY SANSKRIT LIBRARY DIGITAL EDITIONS! “Literary gold…Here are stories and poems crafted with joy in the art of storytelling and delight in the nuance and patterning of worlds.” —Times Literary Supplement The Clay Sanskrit Library, co-published by NYU Press and the JJC Foundation has been created to introduce classical Sanskrit literature to a wide international readership.

FIVE DISCOURSES ON WORLDLY WISDOM Vishnu•sharman Translated by

RÁKSHASA’S RING Visakhá•datta

Translated by Michael Coulson Foreword by Romila Thapar

This play is set just after Alexander’s invasion of India (c. 325 BCE) when the Emperor Chandra Gupta seized the throne and founded the Maurya dynasty. 385 pages | 978-0-8147-1702-8 $19.95 (£16.99)

SEVEN HUNDRED ELEGANT VERSES Go•várdhana

Translated by

MAHA •BHÁRATA III The Forest, Volume 4 Translated by

576 pages | 978-1-4798-7213-8| $19.95 (£16.99)

GITA•GOVÍNDA: LOVE SONGS OF RADHA AND KRISHNA Jaya•deva

Translated by Lee Siegel Foreword by Sudipta Kaviraj

This is a lyrical account of the illicit love affair of Krishna and Radha, a god and goddess manifesting on earth as a cowherd and milkmaid. The narrative was composed under royal patronage in the twelfth century.

Friedhelm Hardy Composed in Sanskrit in the twelfth century CE, these poems each consist of a single stanza, as condensed and allusive as a Japanese haiku. They cover the gamut of human life and emotions, though love, in all its aspects, is a favorite topic. 352 pages | 978-0-8147-3737-8 $19.95 (£16.99)

William J. Johnson Book III of this great Indian epic covers twelve years of the Pandeva’s exile in the forest, and contains some of the best-known stories in Indian literature, including the Story of Rama. 374 pages | 978-0-8147-4363-8 $19.95 (£16.99)

Patrick Olivelle A king despairs of his idle sons and hires a learned Brahmin to teach them about statecraft. The lessons are disguised as short stories featuring animal protagonists. Many of the narratives have traveled around the world and are known in the West as Aesop’s Fables.

262 pages | 978-0-8147-4079-8 $19.95 (£16.99)

HANDSOME NANDA Ashva•ghosha

Linda Covill When Nanda is made a reluctant recruit to the Buddha’s order of monks, he is forced to confront his all-too-human enslavement to his erotic and romantic desires. Ashva•ghosha’s “Handsome Nanda” portrays its hero’s spiritual makeover with compassion, psychological profundity and great poetic skill.

Translated by

387 pages | 978-1-4798-2041-2 | $19.95 (£16.99) 48

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m o n t h ly r e v i e w p r e s s

CAN THE WORKING CLASS CHANGE THE WORLD? Michael D. Yates

A guide for the working class to become a cohesive and radical force for change

One of the horrors of the capitalist system is that slave labor, which was central to the formation and growth of capitalism itself, is still fully able to coexist alongside wage labor. But, as Karl Marx pointed out, it is the fact of being paid for one’s work that validates capitalism as a viable socio-economic structure. Beneath this veil of “free commerce” – where workers are paid only for a portion of their workday, and buyers and sellers in the marketplace face each other as “equals” – lies a foundation of immense inequality. Yet workers have always rebelled. They’ve organized unions, struck, picketed, boycotted, formed political organizations and parties – sometimes they have actually won and improved their lives. But, Marx argued, because capitalism is the apotheosis of class society, it must be the last class society: it must, therefore, be destroyed. And only the working class, said Marx, is capable of creating that change.

Michael D. Yates is Associate Editor of

Monthly Review and Editorial Director of Monthly Review Press. For more than three decades, he was a labor educator, teaching working people across the United States. Among his books are The Great Inequality, Why Unions Matter, A Freedom Budget for All Americans (with Paul Le Blanc), and The ABCs of the Economic Crisis (with Fred Magdoff).

In his timely and innovative book, Michael D. Yates asks if the working class can, indeed, change the world. Deftly factoring in such contemporary elements as sharp changes in the rise of identity politics and the nature of work, itself, Yates asks if there can, in fact, be a thing called the working class? If so, how might it overcome inherent divisions of gender, race, ethnicity, religion, location – to become a cohesive and radical force for change? Forcefully and without illusions, Yates supports his arguments with relevant, clearly explained data, historical examples, and his own personal experiences. This book is a sophisticated and prescient understanding of the working class, and what all of us might do to change the world.

August 2018 224 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-5836-7710-0 | $19.00T Cloth | 978-1-5836-7711-7 | $95.00X Politics WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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CULTURE AS POLITICS

Selected Writings of Christopher Caudwell

Christopher Caudwell Edited by David Margolies

An introduction to Christopher Caudwell’s work through his most relevant writing

Considered by many to be the most innovative British Marxist writer of the twentieth century, Christopher Caudwell was killed in the Spanish Civil War at the age of 29. Although already a published writer of aeronautic texts and crime fiction, he was practically unknown to the public until reviews appeared of Illusion and Reality: A Study of the Sources of Poetry, which was published just after his death. A strikingly original study of poetry’s role, it explained in clear language how the organizing of emotion in society plays a part in social change and development. Caudwell had a powerful interest in how things worked – aeronautics, physics, human psychology, language, and society. In the anti-fascist struggles of the 1930s he saw that capitalism was a system that could not work properly and distorted the thinking of the age. Culture as Politics introduces Caudwell’s work through his most accessible and relevant writing. Christopher Caudwell (1907-1937) was the pen

THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING, AGAIN The First Cold War as Tragedy, the Second as Farce John Marciano and Jeremy Kuzmarov

Investigates the New Cold War through the lens of the first

Karl Marx famously wrote in The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon that history repeats itself, “first as tragedy, then as farce.” The Cold War, waged between the United States and Soviet Union from 1945 until the latter’s dissolution in 1991, was a great tragedy, resulting in millions of civilian deaths in proxy wars, and a destructive arms race that diverted money from social spending and nearly led to nuclear annihilation. The New Cold War between the United States and Russia is playing out as farce – a dangerous one at that. The Russians Are Coming, Again is a red flag to restore our historical consciousness about U.S.-Russian relations, and how denying this consciousness is leading to a repetition of past follies. Kuzmarov and Marciano’s book is timely and trenchant. The distortion of public memory surrounding the First Cold War has set the groundwork for the New Cold War, which the book explains is a key feature, skewing the nation’s politics yet again. This is an important, necessary book, one that, by including accounts of the wisdom and courage of the First Cold War’s victims and dissidents, will inspire a fresh generation of radicals in today’s new, dangerously farcical times.

name of Christopher St. John Sprigg, a British Marxist poet, writer, and thinker. He joined the Communist Party in 1935, and soon became a dedicated grassroots activist, continuing his writing, even though none of his Marxist works were printed during his lifetime.

John Marciano, Professor Emeritus at SUNY

David Margolies is is Professor Emeritus of

Jeremy Kuzmarov is Jay P. Walker Assistant

Cortland, is an antiwar and social justice activist, scholar, and trade unionist.

English at Goldsmiths, University of London.

Professor of American History, University of Tulsa.

March 2018 192 pages | 5.5 x 8.5 Paper | 978-1-5836-7686-8 | $25.00S Cloth | 978-1-5836-7687-5 | $95.00X Literary Criticism

May 2018 256 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-5836-7694-3 | $19.00S Cloth | 978-1-5836-7695-0 | $95.00X Politics

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INDIA AFTER NAXALBARI

Unfinished History Bernard D’Mello

FROM COMMUNE TO CAPITALISM

How China’s Peasants Lost Collective Farming and Gained Urban Poverty

Zhun Xu A modern history of the Naxalbari uprising

Although the 1967 revolutionary armed peasant uprising in Naxalbari, at the foot of the Indian Himalayas, was brutally crushed, the insurgency gained new life elsewhere in India. In fact, this revolt has turned out to be the world’s longest-running “people’s war,” and Naxalbari has come to stand for the road to revolution in India. What has gone into the making of this protracted Maoist resistance? Bernard D’Mello’s fascinating narrative answers this question by tracing the circumstances that gave rise to India’s “1968” decade of revolutionary humanism and those that led to the triumph of the “1989” era of appallingly unequal growth condoned by Hindutva-nationalism, the Indian variant of Nazism.

The surprising effects of China’s decollectivization campaign

In the early 1980s, China undertook a massive reform that dismantled its socialist rural collectives and divided the land among millions of small peasant families. Known as the decollectivization campaign, it is one of the most significant reforms in China’s transition to a market economy. From the beginning, the official Chinese accounts, and many academic writings, uncritically portray this campaign as a huge success, both for the peasants and the economy as a whole. This mainstream history argues that the rural communes, suffering from inefficiency, greatly improved agricultural productivity under the decollectivization reform. It also describes how the peasants, due to their dissatisfaction with the rural regime, spontaneously organized and collectively dismantled the collective system.

India after Naxalbari is far more than a simple history of the ongoing Naxalite/Maoist resistance; it is a deeply passionate and informed work that not only captures the essence of modern Indian history but also tries to comprehend the present in the context of that history – so that the oppressed can exercise their power to influence its shape and outcome.

A closer examination suggests a much different and more nuanced story. Decollectivization was, indeed, a huge success, although far from the sort suggested by mainstream accounts. This reform was mainly a top-down, coercive campaign.

Bernard D’Mello is a senior journalist with

Zhun Xu is Assistant Professor of Economics at

the Economic & Political Weekly and a civil rights activist with the Committee for the Protection of Democratic Rights, Mumbai.

Howard University.

July 2018 384 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-5836-7706-3 | $27.00S Cloth | 978-1-5836-7707-0 | $95.00X Politics WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

June 2018 224 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 13 black and white illustrations Paper | 978-1-5836-7698-1 | $25.00S Cloth | 978-1-5836-7699-8 | $95.00X Politics S PRI N G 2 018 • NYU PRE S S

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THE BIOFUELS DECEPTION Going Hungry on the Green Carbon Diet Okbazghi Yohannes Reveals the corporate roots of green energy solutions

There is by now no question among informed people that the Earth is undergoing severe climate change – soon to become catastrophic, if humans don’t take drastic measures to stop it. Heroically into the fray steps the biofuel industry, announcing to millions of anxious consumers that this eco-crisis can be averted if only they turn away from fossil fuels, to the saving power of synthetic bioproducts. But, although eliminating fossil fuels is essential, the manufacture of biofuels has far more to do with sating profit-hungry corporations than with saving the Earth.

Okbazghi Yohannes is Political Science

Professor Emeritus at University of Louisville in Louisville, KY and author of Eritrea, a Pawn in World Politics.

Combining meticulous scientific narrative with devastating economic analysis, The Biofuels Deception argues that the seemingly innovative, hopeful campaign for “green energy” is actually driven by bio-technology industries and global grain-trading corporations. These corporate players are motivated by a late-capitalist need to cope with a crisis of accumulation; they have no real interest in mitigating climate-change, alleviating poverty, or even creating “clean” energy. In fact, the manufacture of biochemical, bioplastics, and biomaterials, writes Okbazghi Yohannes, portends horrific contradictions and disastrous consequences for nature and society. Actually confronting climate change and the rampant inequality it engenders, Yohannes says, requires two steps. The first is to understand the driving socioeconomic forces behind the biofuels industry. The second is to unravel the tapestry of deceit itself. This book is a necessity for any scholar or environmental activist interested in seeing beyond corporate chimeras to actual environmental solutions.

July 2018 390 pages | 6 x 9 Paper | 978-1-5836-7702-5 | $28.00S Cloth | 978-1-5836-7703-2 | $95.00X Politics | Environmental Studies 52

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MISEDUCATING FOR THE GLOBAL ECONOMY How Corporate Power Damages Education and Subverts Students’ Futures

Gerald Coles Argues for a new educational approach to advance global humanity

All across the United States, corporations, politicians, economists, educators – and now, most remarkably, Ivanka Trump – cry out for new “education for the twenty-first century economy.” Meanwhile, millions of Americans face increasing difficulty finding well paying, secure jobs. But the current employment crisis is not so much due to the educational system as it is to a sustained corporate effort to keep the public in ignorance about the damage wrought by the global economy itself. Miseducating for the Global Economy reveals that behind the going concern for “global economy education” lies capitalism’s metastasizing indifference to human values, to a fair distribution of resources, to its radical restructuring of workplaces with an attendant intensification of work effort, and to the genuine well-being of workers and their families.

Gerald Coles is an educational psychologist

who has written extensively on literacy, learning disabilities, and the politics of education. Among his books are Reading Lessons: The Debate over Literacy and Reading the Naked Truth: Literacy, Legislation, and Lies. His articles have appeared in the Harvard Educational Review, Science & Society, the APA’s Journal of Peace Psychology, as well as in many other education, psychology, and political journals.

Gerald Coles’s book provides a real education about the twenty-first-century global economy – and what corporations are doing to prevent our learning about it. Corporations and business organizations, for instance, resolutely withhold massive wealth that could be used to fund more realistic occupational education, even as they skew educational curricula away from too much global economic awareness. Coles describes the intellectually narrow and morally crippling effects of the corporatecontrol of education; how the imperative for profit maximizes the misunderstanding of communities, nations, and the environment, even as it minimizes aesthetic appreciation, cultural expression, compassion itself. But it is by understanding all this, Coles argues, that real change can begin. Using this analysis, educators, parents, educational organizations, and activists can finally begin to craft schooling that truly serves students and advances global humanity.

April 2018 228 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-5836-7690-5 | $24.00S Cloth | 978-1-5836-7691-2 | $95.00X Education WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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new vill age press

LETTER FROM THE DIRECTOR Spring, 2018 Beginning February, 2018, New Village Press is delighted to partner with NYU Press for distributed sales and marketing services. New Village has been a publisher in the humanities and social sciences since 2005. We are best known for our transdisciplinary books in urban sociology, community cultural development, and healthy city design. Our titles aim to animate emerging movements in societal transformation with true stories about collaborative community building and the creative new roles that artists and scholars, citizens and planners can play in public life. NYU Press is the perfect publishing partner for us. Our interests align, and we are glad to be a fractal in the larger design of NYU Press, whose scale and publishing expertise can help our books reach their core audiences and introduce New Village titles to a wider readership. We are immeasurably grateful for the chance they have given us to share our work with you. With appreciation, Lynne Elizabeth Director, New Village Press

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CONVERSATIONS WITH DIEGO RIVERA

The Monster in His Labyrinth

Alfredo Cardona Peña Translated by Alvaro Cardona-Hine A year of weekly interviews with artist Diego Rivera by poet Alfredo Cardona Peña disclose Rivera’s iconoclastic views of life and the art world of that time.

These intimate Sunday dialogues with what is surely the most influential Mexican artist of the twentieth century show us the free-flowing mind of a man who was a legend in his own time; an artist who escaped being lynched on more than one occasion, a painter so controversial that his public murals inspired movements, or, like the work commissioned by John D. Rockefeller, were ordered torn down. The book has seven sections that loosely follow the range of the author’s questions and Rivera’s answers. They begin with childlike, yet vast questions on the nature of art, run through Rivera’s early memories and aesthetics, his views on popular art, his profound understanding of Mexican art and artists, the economics of art, random expositions on history or dreaming, and elegant analysis of art criticisms and critics.

Alfredo Cardona Peña was a poet, narrator,

essayist, journalist, and science fiction writer from Costa Rica, considered one of the greatest Latin American authors of the 20th century. Alvaro Cardona-Hine was a native of Costa

Rica and half brother of author Alfredo Cardona-Peña. Translating Alfredo’s interviews with Diego Rivera was a labor of love for Alvaro, the fulfillment of a promise he had made in 1971.

In his rich introduction, author Cardona Peña describes the difficulty of gaining entrance to Rivera’s inner sanctum, how government funtionaries and academics often waited hours to be seen, and his delicious victory. A series of Alfredo Cardona Peña’s weekly interviews with Rivera were published in 1949 and 1950 in the Mexican newspaper, El Nacional, for which Alfredo was a journalist. This extraordinary and rare exchange has been translated for the first time into English by Alfredo’s halfbrother Alvaro Cardona-Hine, also a poet.

July 2018 224 pages | 5.5 x 8.25 Paper | 978-1-6133-2028-0 | $19.95T (£6.99) Cloth | 978-1-6133-2029-7 | $89.00X (£74.99) Art | Memoir WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

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new vill age press

HOMEBOY CAME TO ORANGE

A Story of People’s Power

Ernest Thompson and Mindy Thompson Fullilove, Introduction by Coleman A. Young, Dominic T. Moulden, Epilogue by Molly R. Kaufman

With a foreword by

The story of a union organizer who found a second career in community organizing and helped a Jim Crow city become a more equitable place.

Ernest Thompson dedicated his life to organizing the powerless. This lively, illustrated personal narrative of his work shows the great contribution that people’s coalitions can make to the struggle for equality and freedom. Thompson cut his teeth organizing one of the great industrial unions, the United Electrical Radio and Machine Workers of America, and brought his organizing skills and commitment to coalition building to Orange, New Jersey. He built a strong organization and skillfully led fights for school desegregation, black political representation, and strong government in a city he initially thought of as a “dirty Jim Crow town going nowhere.” Thompson came to love the City of Orange and its caring citizens, seeing in its struggles a microcosm of America. This story of people’s power is meant for all who struggle for human rights, economic opportunity, decent housing, effective education, and a chance for children to have a better life. Ernest Thompson (1906-1971) was a

community organizer and was the first African American to hold a full-time organizing position with his union, the United Electrical Radio and Machine Workers of America. He also helped build the National Negro Labor Council, 1951-1956, and served as its director of organizing. Mindy Thompson Fullilove is Professor

of Urban Policy and Health, Urban Policy Analysis & Management Program, Milano School for International Affairs, Management & Urban Policy, The New School for Public Engagement.

Ernest Thompson (1906-1971) grew up on the Eastern Shore of Maryland, on a farm that had been given to his family at the end of the Civil War. The family was very poor and oppressed by racist practices. Thompson was determined to get away and to obtain power. He migrated to Jersey City, where he became part of the union organizing movement that built the Congress of Industrial Unions (CIO). Ernie “Home” Thompson organized to desegregate the regional schools, building strong coalitions and political power for the black community that ultimately served all the people of Orange.

May 2018 240 pages | 5.5 x 8.5 Paper | 978-1-6133-2032-7 | $20.00S (£16.99) Cloth | 978-1-6133-2033-4 | $89.00X (£74.99) Politics |Biography 56

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awa r d - w i n n i n g bac k l i s t

Finalist for 2017 Lora Romero First Book Publication Prize, American Studies Association

Albert J. Raboteau Prize, Journal of Africana Religions

Sex and Gender Section Book Award, American Sociological Association

The New Mutants

New World A-Coming

Contesting Intersex

Black Religion and Racial Identity during the Great Migration

The Dubious Diagnosis

Superheroes and the Radical Imagination of American Comics

Georgiann Davis

Judith Weisenfeld

$28.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-8704-0

Outstanding Book Award for the Peace, War, and Social Conflict Section, American Sociological Association

Jordan Schnitzer Book Award, American Jewish Studies Association

Honorable Mention, Theology and Religious Studies PROSE Award

Golem

The Ground Has Shifted

The Holocaust Across Generations

Modern Wars and Their Monsters

The Future of the Black Church in PostRacial America

Ramzi Fawaz

$29.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-2308-6

Trauma and its Inheritance Among Descendants of Survivors

$35.00A | Cloth | 978-1-4798-8880-1

Maya Barzilai

$35.00S | Cloth | 978-1-4798-8965-5

Walter Earl Fluker

$35.00A | Cloth | 978-1-4798-1038-3

Janet Jacobs

$24.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-3929-2

2017 American Society of Criminology’s Division on Critical Criminology and Social Justice Best Book Award

Best Non-Fiction Book Award, Pacific Book Review

Oliver Cromwell Cox Book Award, American Sociological Association

Beyond Deportation

From Deportation to Prison

Progressive Punishment

The Role of Prosecutorial Discretion in Immigration Cases

The Politics of Immigration Enforcement in Post-Civil Rights America

Shoba Sivaprasad Wadhia

Patrisia Macías-Rojas

Job Loss, Jail Growth, and the Neoliberal Logic of Carceral Expansion Judah Schept, $27.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-0877-9

WW W.NY U P R ESS.ORG

$28.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-7005-9

$28.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-3118-0

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best of the bac klist

Beyond Trans

Not Gay

Sex between Straight White Men

Does Gender Matter?

This Muslim American Life

Dispatches from the War on Terror

Jane Ward

Heath Fogg Davis

$25.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-2517-2 Sociology | LGBT Studies

$25.00A | Cloth | 978-1-4798-5540-7 Sociology | LGBT Studies

Cruising Utopia

Critical Race Theory, Third Edition

The Presidents and the Constitution

The Then and There of Queer Futurity

An Introduction

A Living History

José Esteban Muñoz

Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic

Ken Gormley

Life of the Buddha

Open Veins of Latin America

Root Shock

Ashva•ghosa

Five Centuries of the Pillage of a Continent

How Tearing Up City Neighborhoods Hurts America, and What We Can Do About It

$25.00S | Paper | 978-0-8147-5728-4 American Studies | LGBT Studies

Translated by Patrick Olivelle

$25.00S | Cloth | 978-0-8147-6216-5 Clay Sanskrit Library

$19.00S | Paper | 978-1-4798-0276-0 Law | Race and Ethnicity

Eduardo Galeano Foreword by Isabella Allende

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index

Abrams, Jeanne E........................................................1 Activist New York .......................................................4 Adams, Betty Livingston...........................................20 After the Party ..........................................................31 Ages of Anxiety..........................................................42 al Tunisi, Muhammad ..............................................45 Ali, Alisha ................................................................44 Allen, Roger..............................................................45 America, As Seen on TV ............................................34 America’s Dark Theologian.........................................13 America’s Jails ...........................................................41 Ankerson, Megan ......................................................29 Antler, Joyce................................................................8 Ark Encounter...........................................................18 Barrett, Dawson.........................................................3 Baym, Nancy K. .......................................................30 Before Chicano .........................................................32 Being Muslim ..........................................................33 Bielo, James S............................................................18 Biocitizenship...........................................................36 Biofuels Deception, The .............................................52 Black Women’s Christian Activism.............................20 Black, Derek W.........................................................25 Branson, Douglas M...................................................10 Brown Beauty ..........................................................22 Buch, Elana D..........................................................42 Bush, William S........................................................42 Calling the Shots.......................................................12 Can the Working Class Change the World?.................49 Cardona-Hine, Alvaro .............................................55 Caudwell, Christopher .............................................50 Cavalcante, Andre ....................................................26 Chambers-Letson, Joshua ..........................................31 Chan-Malik, Sylvia .................................................33 Clark-Pujara, Christy ..............................................19 Clay Sanskrit Library...............................................48 Coles, Gerald ............................................................53 Colonial Phantoms .......................................................30 Compromise..............................................................40 Cowan, Douglas E.....................................................13 Crisis of Connection .................................................44 Ctrl + Z ..................................................................12 Culture as Politics.....................................................50 Dark Work................................................................19 Davies, Humphrey....................................................45 Defiant, The................................................................3 Delgado, Richard........................................................2 D’Mello, Bernard .....................................................51 Dot-Com Design .....................................................29 Dowd, Nancy E........................................................23 Early Judaism...........................................................18 Eight Stories...............................................................6 Emerson, Michael O..................................................35 Ending Zero Tolerance..............................................25 Feminist Manifestos .................................................21 First Ladies of the Republic ........................................1 Ford, Sam ................................................................25 Forging a Laboring Race ..........................................20 Freedman, Eric M.....................................................23 From Commune to Capitalism....................................51 Fullilove, Mindy Thompson.......................................56 Future of Tech Is Female, The ....................................10 Garretson, Jeremiah J................................................40 Gilligan, Carol.........................................................44 Girlhood in the Borderlands ......................................32 Golia, Maria ...........................................................46 Gottlieb, Stephen E...................................................24 Graffiti Grrlz ...........................................................39 Green, Joshua ...........................................................25 Greenspahn, Frederick E............................................18 Haidarali, Laila.......................................................22 Happe, Kelly E. ........................................................36 Hardesty, Jared Ross .................................................19 Haynes, Bruce D........................................................17 Health Care in Crisis ................................................37 Hernández, Tanya Katerí ........................................22

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Homeboy Came to Orange .........................................56 Homegrown..............................................................28 Immigrants Under Threat..........................................38 In Darfur .................................................................45 In Darfur .................................................................45 India after Naxalbari................................................51 Inequalities of Aging .................................................42 Jaffe, Steven H............................................................4 Jeffreys, Derek ...........................................................41 Jenkins, Henry..........................................................25 Jewish Radical Feminism ...........................................8 Johnson, Jenell ..........................................................36 Jones, Meg Leta.........................................................12 Just Medicine............................................................24 Kaufman, Molly Rose ...............................................56 Kelman, Ari Y............................................................16 Knight, Jack..............................................................40 Kuzmarov, Jeremy....................................................50 Lawrie, Paul R. D....................................................20 Leonard, Suzanne ....................................................27 Levina, Marina .......................................................36 Life and Death of Latisha King, The ..........................31 Making Habeas Work ...............................................23 Marciano, John.........................................................50 Margolies, David .....................................................50 Market Cities, People Cities ......................................35 Matthew, Dayna Bowen ..........................................24 Min, Susette .............................................................33 Miseducating for the Global Economy ........................53 Monster in His Labyrinth, The ..................................55 More Than Meets the Eye .........................................28 Morris, Theresa.........................................................37 Motherhood across Borders.........................................43 Multiracials and Civil Rights....................................22 Must We Defend Nazis? .............................................2

Sugar, Cigars, and Revolution...................................11 Surviving State Terror..............................................36 Sustainability...........................................................43 Sutton, Barbara........................................................36 Sze, Julie ..................................................................43 Szpunar, Piotr...........................................................28 Tanenhaus, David S..................................................42 Thompson, Ernest .....................................................56 Trans Generation, The ................................................9 Travers, Ann ..............................................................9 Unfit for Democracy .................................................24 Unfreedom................................................................19 Unnamable ..............................................................33 Varon, Alberto ..........................................................32 Vulnerability Politics.................................................37 Way, Niobe...............................................................44 Weiss, Penny A..........................................................21 What ‘Isa ibn Hisham Told Us...................................46 Wife, Inc...................................................................27 Wilcox, Melissa M. .......................................................16 Williams, Monica......................................................41 Xu, Zhun..................................................................51 Yates, Michael D.......................................................49 Yohannes, Okbazghi..................................................52

New Immigrant Whiteness,The .................................34 Noguera, Pedro ........................................................44 Norgren, Jill ...............................................................7 O’Fahey, R.S............................................................46 Oliveira, Gabrielle ...................................................43 Oliviero, Katie .........................................................37 Pabón-Colón, Jessica Nydia.......................................39 Path to Gay Rights, The ...........................................40 Peña, Alfredo Cardona..............................................55 Pérez, Lisandro.........................................................11 Pinsker, Shachar M....................................................14 Playing to the Crowd ................................................30 Postcards from Auschwitz..........................................15 Prieto, Greg..............................................................38 Queer Nuns ..............................................................16 Ramírez, Dixa.........................................................30 Rehak, Bob...............................................................28 Reich, Jennifer A........................................................12 Reimagining Equality ..............................................23 Remarque, Erich Maria..............................................6 Reynolds, Daniel P....................................................15 Rich Brew, A ............................................................14 Rodríguez, Clara E...................................................34 Russians Are Coming, Again, The..............................50 Sadowski-Smith, Claudia.........................................34 Salamon, Gayle.........................................................31 Schuilenburg , Marc..................................................38 Securitization of Society, The.....................................38 Sex Offender Housing Dilemma, The .........................41 Shout to the Lord.......................................................16 Smiley, Kevin T........................................................35 Soto, Lilia ................................................................32 Soul of Judaism, The ..................................................17 Spreadable Media ........................................................25 Stefancic, Jean.............................................................2 Stories from Trailblazing Women Lawyers...................7 Struggling for Ordinary............................................26

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Stories from Trailblazing Women Lawyers N ew in Paperbac k The Securitization of Society Jill Norgren • pg. 7 Marc Schuilenburg • pg. 38 Jewish Radical Feminism Joyce Antler • pg. 8 JA NUA RY A Rich Brew Must We Defend Nazis? Richard Delgado, Jean Stefancic Shachar M. Pinsker • pg. 14 • pg. 2 Queer Nuns Melissa M. Wilcox • pg. 16 M A RC H Surviving State Terror First Ladies of the Republic Barbara Sutton • pg. 36 Jeanne E. Abrams • pg. 1 Graffiti Grrlz Struggling for Ordinary Jessica Nydia Pabón-Colón • pg.39 Andre Cavalcante • pg. 26 Compromise More Than Meets the Eye Edited by Jack Knight • pg. 40 Bob Rehak • pg. 28 The Life and Death of Latisha The Sex Offender Housing Dilemma King Monica Williams • pg. 41 Gayle Salamon • pg. 31 Inequalities of Aging New Immigrant Whiteness Claudia Sadowski-Smith • pg. 34 Elana D. Buch • pg. 42 L i b r a r y of A r a b i c L i t e r a t ur e America, As Seen on TV In Darfur Clara E. Rodríguez • pg. 34 Humphrey Davies, Muhammad N ew in Paperbac k al-Tunisi, R.S. O’Fahey • pg. 45 Unfreedom L i b r a r y of A r a b i c L i t e r a t ur e Jared Ross Hardesty • pg. 19 In Darfur N ew in Paperbac k Muhammad al-Tunisi, translated Dark Work by Humphrey Davies • pg. 45 Christy Clark-Pujara • pg. 19 M o n t h l y Review Pr es s

Culture as Politics Christopher Caudwell, David Margolies • pg. 50 A PR I L

Postcards from Auschwitz Daniel P. Reynolds • pg. 15 Feminist Manifestos Penny A. Weiss • pg. 21 Wife, Inc. Suzanne Leonard • pg. 27 Homegrown Piotr M. Szpunar • pg. 28 Colonial Phantoms Dixa Ramírez • pg. 30 Market Cities, People Cities Michael Oluf Emerson, Kevin T. Smiley • pg. 35

N ew i n Pa p e r b a c k

Ctrl + Z Meg Leta Jones • pg. 12 N ew i n Pa p e r b a c k

Unfit for Democracy Stephen E. Gottlieb • pg. 24 M on t h l y Rev i ew P r e ss

JU LY

Future of Tech Is Female Douglas M. Branson • pg. 10 Sugar, Cigars, and Revolution Lisandro Pérez • pg. 11 Ark Encounter James S. Bielo • pg. 18 Early Judaism Frederick E. Greenspahn • pg. 18 Dot-Com Design Megan Sapnar Ankerson • pg. 29 Playing to the Crowd Nancy K. Baym • pg. 30 Girlhood in the Borderlands Lilia Soto • pg. 32 Before Chicano Alberto Varon • pg. 32 Health Care in Crisis Theresa Morris • pg. 37 Ages of Anxiety Edited by William S. Bush, David S. Tanenhaus • pg. 42 Sustainability Edited by Julie Sze • pg. 43 Motherhood across Borders Gabrielle Oliveira • pg. 43 M on t h l y Rev i ew P r e ss

India after Naxalbari Bernard D’Mello • pg. 51

M on t h l y Rev i ew P r e ss

The Biofuels Deception Okbazghi Yohannes • pg. 52 N ew V i l l a g e P r e ss

The Monster in His Labyrinth Alfredo Cardona Peña, Alvaro Cardona-Hine • pg. 55

The Russians Are Coming, Again John Marciano, Jeremy Kuzmarov AU G U S T • pg. 50 The Soul of Judaism Bruce D. Haynes • pg. 17 N ew V i l l a g e P r e ss Homeboy Came to Orange Multiracials and Civil Rights Ernest Thompson, Mindy Tanya Katerí Hernández • pg. 22 Thompson Fullilove • pg. 56 Brown Beauty JU N E Laila Haidarali • pg. 22 The Trans Generation After the Party Ann Travers • pg. 9 Joshua Chambers-Letson • pg. 31 America’s Dark Theologian Biocitizenship Douglas E. Cowan • pg. 13 N ew in Paperbac k Edited by Kelly E. Happe, Jenell Shout to the Lord Black Women’s Christian Johnson, Marina Levina • pg. 36 Ari Y. Kelman • pg. 16 Activism Vulnerability Politics Betty Livingston Adams • pg. 20 Reimagining Equality Katie Oliviero • pg. 37 Nancy E. Dowd • pg. 23 N ew in Paperbac k Crisis of Connection Forging a Laboring Race Making Habeas Work Edited by Niobe Way, Alisha Ali, Paul R.D. Lawrie • pg. 20 Eric M. Freedman • pg. 23 Carol Gilligan, Pedro Noguera N ew in Paperbac k • pg. 44 Being Muslim Spreadable Media Sylvia Chan-Malik • pg. 33 N ew i n Pa p e r b a c k Henry Jenkins, Sam Ford, Joshua Calling the Shots Unnamable Green • pg. 25 Jennifer A. Reich • pg. 12 Susette Min • pg. 33 L ibr ar y o f A r abic L it er a t ur e N ew i n Pa p e r b a c k Immigrants Under Threat N ew in Paperbac k Ending Zero Tolerance Greg Prieto • pg. 38 What ‘Isa ibn Hisham Told Us Derek W. Black • pg. 25 The Path to Gay Rights Muhammad al-Muwaylihi, M on t h l y Rev i ew P r e ss Translated by Roger Allen • pg.46 Jeremiah J. Garretson • pg. 40 Can the Working Class Change America’s Jails M AY the World? Derek Jeffreys • pg. 41 The Defiant Michael D. Yates • pg. 49 N ew i n Pa p e r b a c k Dawson Barrett • pg. 3 M on t h l y Rev i ew P r e ss Just Medicine Activist New York Miseducating for the Global Dayna Bowen Matthew • pg. 24 Steven H. Jaffe, Eric Foner • pg.4 Economy M on t h l y Rev i ew P r e ss Gerald Coles • pg. 53 Eight Stories From Commune to Capitalism Erich Maria Remarque, Larry Zhun Xu • pg. 51 Wolff, Maria Tatar • pg. 6

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Cover Art (from top to bottom): Pixie, “My Thuggy Pony,” Bronx, NY, USA, 2013. Photo courtesy of Jessica Pabón-Colón. ClawMoney, Dona, Miss17, Lady Pink, “Bitches N’ Stitches,” Tucson, Arizona, USA, 2004. Photo courtesy of Jessica Pabón-Colón. Solitas, Santiago, Chile, 2014. Photo courtesy of Solitas. Activist New York page and artwork samples were created and provided by Pentegram Design. Activist New York is a co-publication with the Museum of the City of New York. WW W.N Y U P R E SS.O RG

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