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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 41, No. 94

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013

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University increases safety measures

INSIDE THIS ISSUE

By KAVISH HARJAI

Electric Cars under scrutiny Some argue electric car businesses need to improve while others say the technology will improve as time passes. STORY on PG. 7

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New York Jets live up to claim When the New York Jets started the season, many did not believe the team would be capable of its current record. STORY on PG. 8

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Panel looks at immigration from different perspectives Sukhdev Sandhu, a professor of Social and Cultural Analysis, introduces speakers Kathleen López and Gaiutra Bahadur and asks them questions about immigration at the Asian/ Pacific/American event on Nov. 13.

SAFETY continued on PG. 3

STORY ON PAGE 3

Steinhardt, public school students ‘Standing Tall’ By JULIANNE MCSHANE

Every day, countless school-aged children bring home paintings and drawings to be proudly displayed on their family fridges, but few have the opportunity to have their work exhibited publicly. Even fewer have the chance to take part in an art therapy exhibit. On Monday, Nov. 11, children from three different New York City public schools gathered on the eighth floor of the Kimmel Center for University Life with their families, teachers and art therapists for a reception to celebrate the opening of an exhibition featuring their artistic creations. The exhibit, titled “Standing Tall: Celebrating Resiliency in the NYU Art Therapy In Schools Program,” features 80 life-sized portraits created by students between the ages of 6 and 17. It runs until Jan. 2. Students from Millennium High School and Public Schools 6 and 124 spent months creating their portraits in

afterschool art therapy programs. The brightly hued drawings, which now cover the walls of the eighth floor lounge, depict the children in various poses. Accompanying each portrait is a small card bearing each child’s name, school, triggers that induce stress, a coping mechanism they can use and a personal attribute that makes them proud. On the evening of the reception, the artists ran through the halls on the eighth floor, proudly showed off their portraits to their families, and posed for photos with their art. Lindsay Wright, associate dean of the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development, kicked off the event by congratulating the students. “You’ve created extraordinary portraits of strength, resilience, resolve and confidence,” Wright said. Marygrace Berberian, director of the Steinhardt Art Therapy in Schools pro-

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In response to NYU’s two incidents of assault occurred around campus in October, university officials are in the process of reviewing the University’s Public Safety Standards. “Since the Catholic Center assault, Public Safety has increased its presence on campus with additional patrols in the early morning hours that use marked vehicles with roof-top bar lights turned on so they are more visible to the community,” NYU spokesman Philip Lentz said. On Oct. 31, a 24-year-old female NYU employee of the Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life was forced inside the Catholic Center and raped. In another high-profile incident on Oct. 8, a 20-yearold student was a victim of assault and robbery near SoHo. She was able to get away from the assailant, but she lost some of her personal belongings. Lentz said the increased security will continue during the investigations of recent crimes, and perhaps longer. “Even after the suspect is apprehended, such measures should be continued in order to prevent future crimes of a similar nature,” said Stern freshman Luisa Coutinho, who has a class in the Catholic Center. Margaret Smiley, CAS senior and the president of the Feminist Society at NYU, said the in-

Astin discusses ‘Ground Floor’ role By MOHAMED HASSAN

In the last few years, NYU alumnus Skylar Astin has established himself as a skilled actor and singer. He has risen from theatrical fame for his roles in the plays “Spring Awakening” and “Rent,” to comedic stardom in the films “Pitch Perfect” and “21 & Over.” In a conference call with WSN, Astin spoke about the newest credit to his resume — the lead in TBS’s original comedy series, “Ground Floor,” which premieres tonight. In “Ground Floor,” Astin stars as Brody, a young, hotshot banker who finds himself falling for a ground floor girl named Jennifer (Briga Heelan), who works for the office building’s support staff — an action that becomes highly criticized by his top floor colleagues. As Brody

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Skylar Astin stars in the TBS comedy “Ground Floor.” and Jennifer’s worlds collide, Brody must balance his budding career, his critical boss (John C. McGinley) and his romance in this modern take on “Romeo & Juliet.” “I loved the project as a whole,” Astin said. “I love the writing. I loved the char-

acters and how they were all fleshed out, and the dynamics between them.” Astin said the unique writing of series creator Bill Lawrence, best known for “Scrubs” and “Cougar Town” made his

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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

ON THE SIDE

COMPILED BY THE

WSN STAFF

WEEKEND AGENDA

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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

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Editor-in-Chief JONATHON DORNBUSH

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Managing Editor

JORDAN MELENDREZ Web Managing Editor

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HANQING CHEN Creative Director

LYANNE NATIVIDAD Blog Editor

AMY ZHANG

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Special Issues Director

KALEEL MUNROE

SENIOR STAFF

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news EMILY BELL, NICOLE BROWN,

THAR SHE BLOWS WHALE TALES, SEA SHANTIES AND MORE MELVILLAINY

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Friday, Nov. 15, 7 p.m. 126 Franklin St., Brooklyn Free admission While Moby-Dick Marathon NYC is on hiatus this year, come see “Thar She Blows,” which features Mary Pilon of The New York Times talking about exploding whales, a preview of the sitcom “Moby-Dick” and many other events and sea shanties.

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Saturday, Nov. 16, 8 p.m Apollo Theater, 253 West 125th St. Tickets start at $60 Few jazz groups are more synonymous with New Orleans than Preservation Hall, which is touring with songs both from the ensemble’s newest album and from throughout its 50-year career.

MICHAEL DOMANICO arts JEREMY GROSSMAN features JONATHAN KESHISHOGLOU sports FRANCISCO NAVAS multimedia JONATHAN TAN copy CASEY DALRYMPLE social media GENTRY BROWN senior editors VERONICA CARCHEDI, TONY CHAU, DAN HINTON, MICHELLE LIM, STEFAN MELNYK, SAM RULLO, WICY WANG

DEPUTY STAFF

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news KEVIN BURNS, NEELA QADIR,

BILLY RICHLING books/theater DYLAN JARRETT film ALEX GREENBERGER entertainment ISABEL JONES music JAKE FOLSOM the highlighter blog VALERIE NELSON features MARINA ZHENG beauty & style ARIANA DIVALENTINO dining DANIEL YEOM sports CHRIS MARCOTRIGIANO multimedia RACHEL KAPLAN, JOON LEE video ALEX LINZMEIER copy THOMAS DEVLIN social media SYMONE WILLIAMS

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PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND

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Friday, Nov. 15, 7:30 p.m. | 4140 Broadway, Washington Heights Pay what you wish Famous contemporary author Junot Díaz is celebrating the new deluxe edition of “This is How You Lose Her,” featuring illustrations by Jaime Hernandez (“Love and Rockets”).

OPINION PAGE opinion editor

RAQUEL WOODRUFF

JOHNNY MARR

Saturday, Nov. 16, 7 p.m. | Webster Hall, 125 E. 11th St Tickets start at $41 The Smiths may have been short lived, but guitarist Johnny Marr is playing at Webster Hall, so fans of the precursor to modern indie music should be sure to buy a ticket.

deputy opinion editors

EDWARD RADZIVILOVSKIY, PETER KEFFER

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ARIANA DIVALENTINO, ETHAN JACOBS

ADVISING DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS

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TISCH DEPARTMENT OF DANCE SHOWING

Thursday, Nov. 14 through Saturday Nov. 16, 8 p.m 111 2nd Ave., Fifth Floor Theater

JAEWON KANG, DAVID LIN, AMANDA RANDONE, EMILY YANG

Attendance is free, but guests must call ahead of time to reserve seats. Performances are all student choreographed. About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods.

A woman creates a large bubble on a sunny day in Washington Square Park.

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Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Jordan Melendrez at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

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NYUNEWS.COM | THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SSC PANEL

DISCUSSION

Today, WSN is hosting its second panel with four representatives from the Student Senators Council. The event will take place in room 405 of the Kimmel Center for University Life from 6 to 8 p.m. The topic will be NYU’s expansion, both abroad and in the city. The NYU 2031 plan is the university’s controversial plan to expand into Greenwich Village for academic space and housing. Some faculty, administrators and students have disagreed about the logistics and necessity of the growth. The Global Network University refers to NYU’s global sites and degree-granting portal campuses, established in Abu Dhabi and Shanghai.

SAFETY continued from PG. 1

Public Safety reasseses safety measures in wake of assault incidents

creased presence was a good step for student safety. “In regards to the attacks and attempted rapes on campus, I think the university did a good job of exposing the case and [the] situation [to] students,” Smiley said. NYU provides a 24/7 emergency response hotline with Crisis Response Counselors, in addition to walk-in counseling. The Feminist Society and the NYU Wellness Exchange co-created a website regarding sexual assault and prevention that launched in the fall of 2013, before either of the incidents. Lentz said the Wellness Exchange was a sufficient resource for students. “We do in fact offer all the services typically provided by rape crisis centers and more,” Lentz said. In addition, one of NYU’s main resources for students traveling at later hours is the late-night shuttle service SafeRide. Lentz said this year, SafeRide recorded 2,304 passengers in September, 3,309 in October and 1,692 in November thus far. Around 55 percent of the rides come from residence halls, around 32 percent from Bobst Library and about 13 percent from other NYU buildings and facilities. The primary destinations are residence halls. According to the NYU website, about 11,000 undergraduate and graduate students live in on-campus housing. Steinhardt freshman Sonja Haroldson said SafeRide can be inconsistent in its timeliness, but she is happy it is part of NYU’s services. “Being a college student, I would much rather wait an extra half-hour than pay $7 for a cab,” Haroldson said. Lentz said NYU and the New York Police Department have a strong relationship, in which the NYPD patrol Washington Square Park and surrounding neighborhoods. In addition to 23 emergency phones around campus, local businesses have agreed to be safe havens where students can seek safety. “Every student residence hall is staffed 24/7 by Public Safety officers, and most university buildings are staffed by Public Safety officers,” Lentz said. Some NYU buildings, like Bobst Library and the Kimmel Center for University Life, have turnstile entrances that require students to swipe or tap IDs. But others, like the Silver Center, simply require students show their ID as they walk in. Lentz said this discrepancy exists because of many factors, such as how lobbies are configured and compliance with the city’s fire and building codes. A review of Public Safety is ongoing but the results will not be publicized. The internal review aims to improve public safety’s operations in maintaining campus safety and preventing crime. Lentz said reviews occur after any major incident. Kavish Harjai is a staff writer. Email him at news@nyunews.com.

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Authors discuss Asian immigration By KLEIN ALEARDI

NYU’s Asian/Pacific/American Institute and the NYU Center for Multicultural Education and Programs hosted a conversation with authors Kathleen López and Gaiutra Bahadur about the history of indentured labor and the Asian diaspora in the Caribbean on Nov. 13 at the NYU China House. Founding director of the institute Jack Tchen said the event was organized when Bahadur, author of “Coolie Woman: The Odyssey of Indenture,” which comes out Nov. 15, contacted the A/P/A Institute about her book. “We were really delighted to have Gaiutra reach out to us,” Tchen said. Tchen said he hoped the audience’s eyes were opened to sometimes ignore portions of American history. “We tend to be very U.S.centric,” Tchen said. “We’re really trying to open up the history of colonialism and how [this] really refigured and remapped the world in

so many different ways ... so it’s really not just about other places, it’s about this place.” Tchen welcomed the audience with a brief speech about Asian immigrants. Social and Cultural Analysis professor Sukhdev Sandhu introduced the authors. Bahadur and López, who wrote “Chinese Cubans: A Transnational History,” read passages from their books, answered questions from Sandhu and participated in an audience question-andanswer session. Bahadur’s book tells the story of her grandmother’s journey as a lonely, pregnant, indentured laborer and the struggles that came with this role. She talked about her process of writing from the perspective of an indentured laborer. “The perspective of the indentured, their voices, for the most part, are missing from the historical record,” Bahadur said during her presentation. “I don’t see myself as overthrowing the text as much as questioning it.”

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A/P/A Institute director Jack Tchen talks about immigration. López’s book explores the experiences of Chinese people as indentured laborers in Cuba. López spoke about compiling her book and looking to the future of Cuban-Asian culture. “Just by way of completion, the collected histories in this book demonstrate nuances and layers in Chinese migration to Cuba from the 19th century to the present,” López said in her presentation. “One thing I would caution is to not forget the history.” CAS senior Alisa Liu, who

is enrolled in Sandhu’s AsianAmerican literature class, attended the lecture and said she enjoyed listening to various perspectives about the topic. “It really opened my eyes to a different kind of Asian migration,” Liu said. “We talk a lot about Chinese people moving to America, but we never really talk about Asian [migration] to Latin America.” Klein Aleardi is a staff writer. Email her at news@nyunews.com.

NYU sees rise in number of foreign enrollment, drops in IIE ranking By MICHAEL DOMANICO

NYU dropped to fourth place in a study measuring how many international students study at American universities. In last year’s report, conducted by the Institute of International Education, NYU ranked third overall. The Nov. 11 study measured the amount of students who matriculated to the United States during the time period of fall 2012 to spring 2013. Despite the drop in ranking, the number of foreign students at NYU increased from 8,660 students to 9,362 from 2012 to 2013. The same universities from the 2012 report topped the rankings this year — the University of Southern California, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and Purdue University. Purdue now occupies the third slot. The research is compiled as part of the Open Doors project, which is a resource for information on international students studying in the United States. Rajika Bhandari, IIE’s deputy vice president for Research and Evaluation, said these rankings are useful for explaining the extent of the international presence in U.S. schools. “The goal of the Open Doors project is to help policy makers and educators better understand the full scope of international student mobility to the U.S.,” Bhandari said. Joe Potts, the associate dean of International Programs at Purdue, said international students are attracted to the university because of positive reviews from students and alumni. “Surveys indicate that referrals from current and former students are the primary factor in students choosing to

FILE PHOTO BY FELIPE DE LA HOZ/WSN

NYU ranks in the top five for international student enrollment. study at Purdue,” Potts said. “Positive experiences here for students who now attend will affect future enrollment.” CAS sophomore and U.K. native Katie Moore said she made her decision to attend NYU only after visiting during Weekend on the Square. “I actually had never heard of NYU when I applied, but my adviser suggested I should,” Moore said. “Unless it’s an Ivy League, [students in the United Kingdom] probably haven’t heard of it, similar to Americans having only really heard of the traditional, top schools in the [United Kingdom] ... despite there being many amazing universities across the country.” Racha El-Khalil, a CAS sophomore from Lebanon, said NYU represented a contrast to the homogeneity of institutions of higher learning in Lebanon. “I come from a country that’s a little restricted in that sense, so I’m especially attracted to institutions with more freedom,” El-Khalil said.

The IIE report also looked at how many American students studied abroad in the 2011-2012 academic year, which is the most recent data available to the institute based on the number of students who received credit for the courses they took abroad. NYU ranked first in this list, with a 15-percent increase from 3,799 to 4,378 students. “In the years to come, a college degree will come to be seen as incomplete if it does not include a global experience,” NYU President John Sexton said in a press release addressing the report. “We have built a global presence to match that interest, and … [enable faculty and students] to pursue their scholarship and their degrees in major idea capitals across the world.” Additional reporting by Emily Bell. Michael Domanico is a news editor. Email him at news@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

FEATURES

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P O T

EDITED BY JONATHAN KESHISHOGLOU FEATURES@NYUNEWS.COM

Thrift stores to Steinhardt Art Therapy program works with warm up winter public school children for ‘Standing Tall’ exhibit wardrobes

By ILONA TUOMINEN

As college students, we are often on a strict budget. A great way to save money and find new pieces for your wardrobe this winter is to visit thrift stores. Besides spending less on secondhand clothing and accessories, thrift stores often donate their profits to charities.

1. Pippin 112 W. 17th St. (between Sixth and Seventh avenues) A relatively low-priced option, with goods ranging from 1940s costumes to handbags, Pippin is a great thrift store to find stunning, vintage jewelry. The cheapest pieces start at $5, but they have a variety of fancy jewelry for anyone willing to pay more. 2. Beacon’s Closet 10 W. 13th St. (between Fifth and Sixth avenues) Originally a Williamsburg store, Beacon’s Closet can also be found in Greenwich Village. What makes Beacon’s unique is how it offers 35 percent of the resale value or 55 percent in store credit when shoppers trade in old clothes. 3. Cure Thrift Shop 111 E. 12th St. (between Third and Fourth avenues) Any students who live in Found-

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ers residence hall or Third Avenue North residence hall can find this charming thrift shop right outside their building. The first floor is devoted to quirky vintage furniture and jewelry. The lower floor has clothing ranging from $4 to $30. Cure has a $1 sale for all clothing every six months and also donates proceeds to the Diabetes Research Institute.

4. Brooklyn Flea 176 Lafayette Ave., Brooklyn. An affordable market where vendors sell goods ranging from vintage artwork to quirky knickknacks, Brooklyn Flea has people buzzing from stall to stall haggling their way to great deals. Local food vendors also offer tasty treats to snack on while you shop. 5. New York Vintage 117 W. 25th St. (between Sixth and Seventh avenues) While New York Vintage is pricier than other thrift stores, it includes secondhand suits and dresses from the likes of Chanel. But the prices are only expensive in comparison to other vintage stores. New York Vintage encourages calling ahead to schedule fitting appointments. Ilona Tuominen is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

gram, encouraged parents to support their children’s creativity. “Most families in distress do not have the resources to get their children outside resources,” Berberian said. “So it needs to be offered at the school level to be accessible to all.” The Art Therapy in Schools program, which began in 1997, offers free art therapy to students in public schools as a means of expression for children with troubling behaviors or other difficulties “Everyone can utilize and benefit from art therapy,” Yaritza Torres, a 17-year-old Millennium student, said in her address to the audience. “When we’re not aware of problems, we can’t tackle them. But when we’re aware of them, we can evaluate them and tackle them completely.” Eden Rollé, an 11-year-old student at P.S. 124, agreed that she also benefitted from her four years in art therapy. “I remember coming home and feeling so empowered by how open and how encouraging the teaching staff was,” Rollé said. “They really just let me be me.” Current funding allows 95 students between the three public schools to participate in the program. The exhibition, however, allowed for the program to sponsor large workshops for entire schools.

DAY IN THE LIFE By UTPALA MENON As the president of the Arts Club at NYU, CAS sophomore Robin Chan juggles a packed schedule full of extracurriculars, on-campus jobs and classes ranging from economics to studio art. 10 a.m. | A grumpy Chan stumbles out of bed looking for his glasses. After washing up, Chan throws on one of his many Urban Outfitters ensembles and dashes out the door with water and scarf in hand. As he leaves his dorm, he grabs his regular breakfast — a Clif Bar and banana. 11 a.m. | As an information assistant for the University Learning Center, Chan spends his mornings in the Academic Resource Center. For his four hour shift, he manages students flowing in and out of the building. 3:30 p.m. | After work, Chan heads to Steinhardt’s Barney Building to work on a sculpture for his class with adjunct instructor Chris Bogia. Chan uses clay, tree branches, plaster and egg cartons to craft his latest piece. “We had to pick two words

from a hat and make something related to the words,” Chan said. “I got ‘gaudy’ and ‘feral.’” 6:15 p.m. | An active president of the Arts Club, Chan heads to the Kimmel Center for University Life to attend the painting social he organized. As the event administrator, Chan provides art materials for the guests. It doesn’t take long before attendees channel into their “artistic processes.” 7:30 p.m. | Serving customers delicious cupcakes from Crumbs Bake Shop, Chan proves himself to be a capable host. After the event ends, he stays behind to clean up. 9 p.m. | Chan spends the rest of the night finishing homework at a recently opened coffee shop called Kopi Kopi, which is located behind Bobst Library. “It’s very spacious,” Chan said. “They play really good music by Phoenix, Grizzly Bear and Cold War Kids.” 10:30 p.m. | An exhausted but content Chan makes his way back to Palladium residence hall, where he relaxes for the

COURTESY OF ROBIN CHAN

first time since waking up. With a schedule this hectic, he tries to get to sleep by midnight to ensure that he gets nine hours of sleep. Utpala Menon is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

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The “Standing Tall” exhibit fills Kimmel’s eighth floor lounge. “Art always captivates what’s alive and strong about individuals,” Berberian said. “And we have so many more children that want to be in art therapy than

we can serve.” Julianne McShane is a contributing writer. Email her at features@ nyunews.com.


NYUNEWS.COM | THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

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ARTS

EDITED BY JEREMY GROSSMAN ARTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Alexander Payne reflects on ‘Returned’ breathes paving road toward ‘Nebraska’ life into zombie genre By MOHAMED HASSAN

Alexander Payne is known for his satirical portrayals of American society and his obscure humor, having built a successful directing career with critically acclaimed feature films like “Election,” “Sideways” and “The Descendants.” After being delayed for nine years, Payne has finally released his latest film, “Nebraska.” In a conference call with WSN, Payne spoke about filming “Nebraska,” a movie that tells the tale of stubborn Woody Grant (Bruce Dern), who sets off on a road trip from Montana to Nebraska with his son David (Will Forte) to claim what he believes to be a million-dollar prize. “My job is film,” Payne said. “What’s the story? What’s the length of the lens? What’s the design of the shot?” “Nebraska” is shot entirely in black-and-white. Payne explained his reasoning for this stylistic approach. “When I first read the script nine years ago, the very austere nature of the screenplay, to me,

suggested a visual style in blackand-white … in terms of the tonalities and the shadings and how we used production design and costume design,” he said. “It’s a beautiful form.” “Nebraska” is the first film Payne directed for which he didn’t write the original screenplay. “I rewrote [the script]. It was not enough to want to seek screen credit because I kept [screenwriter] Bob Nelson’s basic vision and structure intact,” he said. Many have questioned Payne’s decision to wait nine years before finally producing and releasing “Nebraska.” “The only reason I didn’t make it nine years ago is because I just finished ‘Sideways’ and it was also a road movie,” Payne said. “I didn’t want to make two road trip movies in a row.” Payne explained his connection with the state of Nebraska, where most of his feature films take place. “I’m from there. I like to shoot there” Payne said. “I grew up there and no one else does it there. Where you’re from has an amazing gravitational pull on you.”

Payne united a diverse cast in “Nebraska,” including seasoned professional Bruce Dern and “Saturday Night Live” alum Will Forte, and elaborated on his casting methods. “I combine three groups of actors, highly seasoned professionals, nonprofessional actors who have been in community theater and nonactors, basically people who have never acted in their lives that bring a certain level of reality to movie,” Payne said. “I bring them together and make sure they are all part of the tapestry. I rarely have characters in mind — I really rely on auditions.” Payne reflected on what links his films — dark humor and stories of self-realization — and commented on what he wants next in his career. “I hope, though, in future films, I will have other attributes as well,” he said. “I’ve only made six [films], and I hope to make a lot more that will upset the average a little bit.” Mohamed Hassan is a staff writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com.

By JEREMY GROSSMAN

As AMC’s “The Walking Dead” continues to break ratings records and pave the way as one of cable’s greatest successes, a smaller, less extravagant zombie series is quietly breathing new life into the Sundance Channel. “The Returned,” a French series subtitled in English, airs its third episode Nov. 14 — and it’s everything “The Walking Dead” isn’t. There’s nothing wrong with the action-packed thrills of “The Walking Dead,” and the blood and guts make it a hit. But “The Returned” takes a more subdued and horrific approach to the zombie horror genre — the zombies aren’t brain-hungry monsters. Rather, they are in the same condition as they were before they died, with no recollection of ever having passed. They return home to their families expecting everything to be just how they left it. Here’s where “The Returned” takes an eerier and more bonechilling approach to our relationship with the dead. If our lost loved ones suddenly returned to us, would they approve of the person we’ve become? Camille (Yara Pilartz), a 15-year-old girl who died in a bus accident, comes home to find that her twin sister Lena (Jenna Thiam) — now four years older than her — has become a promiscuous drunk. Simon (Pierre Perrier), a young man who died on his wedding day, finds his former fiancee engaged to another man, more sad and emotionally disturbed than he remembers. Unlike “The Walking Dead,” it’s not the dead who have changed — it’s the living.

The show succeeds in its honest portrayal of human emotion, an area in which “The Walking Dead” has suffered for years. In the first episode of “The Returned,” Lena, is shocked to see her deceased sister come home — but instead of screaming in fear, like one might expect, she bursts into tears. When Adèle sees Simon in the flesh, she thinks her unstable mind is playing tricks on her and not that he is truly there. “The Returned” is realistic in displaying real-life grief and emotions as unpredictable — everyone reacts differently. “The Returned” may have found the key to revitalizing the zombie genre — treating relationships with the dead as a bundle of emotion and mystery instead of the typical bloody mess of terror. An American adaptation of “The Returned” is currently in the works for A&E. This is perhaps signaling that a more emotional, characterdriven horror is where the zombie genre is headed — and that’s nothing to fear. Jeremy Grossman is arts editor. Email him at jgrossman@nyunews.com.

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Camille’s family must deal with her return from the dead.

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Tisch alum discusses working on ‘Ground Floor’ of TBS comedy

character particularly well-rounded. “I think what really attracted me to Brody is that while he was a confident, rich, money manager character,” Astin said. “Bill Lawrence did not write him in the way that so many people do where they make this kind of character. He, in fact, is the hero. He’s got suave. He’s sensitive. He’s very human, and I just loved that ... I would have been an idiot to pass up this opportunity.” Known for playing dynamic characters in diverse casts, Astin provided insight into working with his “Ground Floor” colleagues. “It’s always a very exciting first-day-of-school-feeling whenever you’re starting with a new group,” he said. “I’ve been very

blessed, doing ‘Spring Awakening,’ ‘Pitch Perfect’ and now ‘Ground Floor,’ that I’ve had these kinds of ensemble casts.” The development of “Ground Floor” has exceeded Astin’s high expectations for the series. “It really found itself,” he said. “And it continues to find itself … now we’re 10 episodes deep, and I just feel like we can put these people [in any situation].” “Ground Floor” shows promise and gives viewers hope that there may be an office-set comedy worthy of staying afloat in a post-“The Office” era. Mohamed Hassan is a staff writer. Email him at entertainment@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

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For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


NYUNEWS.COM | THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY RAQUEL WOODRUFF OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

POINT STAFF EDITORIAL

Electric car businesses need improvements By MARCELO CICCONET

Last week and for the third time in less than two months, a Model S from electric carmaker Tesla Motors caught fire after being involved in an accident. Shares of the company fell at least 7 percent for two consecutive days. The business, run by celebrity CEO Elon Musk, had already reported a net loss of $38 million for the trimester ending in September. The fires in Model S vehicles originated in their lithium-ion batteries, which are of the same kind of problems that caused the grounding of the entire fleet of Boeing Dreamliners in January. Battery fires are not, however, the main issue Tesla has to deal with to build a good image and compete with other car manufacturers. The real issues are cost and infrastructure. In a talk at NYU’s Courant Institute last Friday, Carnegie Mellon professor Manuela Veloso argued it is not fair to ask complete responsibility from electric car companies without the government or private groups improving general infrastructure. For example, Veloso mentioned roads and highway, arguing that in-

stead of making cars drivable on every terrain, a gigantic web of smooth roads with signs and other amenities should be adopted. But while many carmakers already have hybrid or all-electric vehicles on the market, amenities specific for electricity-powered cars are practically non-existent. We can consider, for example, their capacity for long distance driving. While the average urban driver needs a car with fuel autonomy of about 20 miles per day, most people buy cars with consideration for vacations and other long-range trips. However in the US, conveniences such as battery-swap stations for Tesla owners are planned in the near future only for small trips from Los Angeles to San Francisco and Washington, D.C. to Boston. Regarding financial costs, a report by

the Harvard Kennedy School of Government found that at the 2010 rates of purchasing and operating, savings on gasoline over the lifetime of an electric car would not offset the higher cost of investment. The same report predicted a change in this picture, assuming that in the following 10 to 20 years, gasoline prices would increase and battery costs decrease. Still, the estimated quantity of electric cars in operation by 2020 is small according to another report by J.D. Power and Associates — just 7.3 percent of cars will be hybrid or all-electric. The 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated that 13 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions in 2004 came from energy used in transportation, and 95 percent of that energy came from petroleumbased fuels. Electric cars can play a central role in reducing transportation-related emissions. But that will only be achieved with significant public and private investments that allow them to be more than a luxury to show off around one’s neighborhood. Marcelo Cicconet is a staff columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

COUNTERPOINT

Electric cars will improve as tech advances By OMAR ETMAN

Tesla Motors is having a bad month of PR. Last week, a third Tesla vehicle erupted into flames. Naturally the skeptics of electric propulsion picked up the story first, using the combustion as a springboard for their cynicism. Automakers have struggled to market existing electric vehicles as viable alternatives to gas-powered predecessors — sales of the trailblazers of the electric vehicle including the Chevrolet Volt and Nissan Leaf have been modest at best. But the most recent slate of electric vehicles is encouraging. Here’s why the critics are about to be silenced. Internal combustion engines, which power nearly all vehicles on the road today, will never be as efficient as their electric counterparts. ICE drivetrains are composed of countless moving parts, leaving room for high inertia and heat loss. Even as ICE drivetrains become more efficient, their fundamental structure limits their room for improvement. Electric motors don’t share a similar problem. For example, a Leaf can travel 120 miles on 33 kilowatthours of electricity, the energy equivalent of one gallon of gas.

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Electric cars are often criticized not for their operation but production methods. Automakers can’t sell electric cars on the claim that they have small carbon footprints when the factories that produce them contribute enormous waste to the environment. Fossil fuels power most of the factories that produce electric cars, but automakers are making strides toward reversing that. BMW is leading the way — its recently unveiled line of electric vehicles is a technological tour de force, which ushers in an era of greener manufacturing. BMW expects its German factories to be powered exclusively by renewable resources by 2020. Until then, its improved recycling methods are reducing carbon emissions released by the extraction of raw materials, including aluminum, plastic and leather.

During its lifetime, BMW’s electric cars are expected to have carbon footprints that are 30 to 50 percent smaller than similar normal cars. Stock prices for Tesla have fallen 15 percent in the wake of the recent controversy. It must not be forgotten that Tesla’s cars are meticulously executed experiments, but experiments, nonetheless. Their failures, while inexcusable, are unsurprising. Few automakers are able to gain solid footing without faltering first. In spite of the fires, all three owners have publicly proclaimed their love for their sizzling Teslas. In an open letter, the third owner penned, “I would buy another one in a heartbeat.” Electric cars, though imperfect, are the future. The difficulties surrounding electric propulsion are significant, but as technology progresses, so too will electric vehicles. The infrastructure green motoring engenders is becoming commonplace, and encourages automakers to refine their electric fleets. Tesla and its competitors will learn from their missteps and grow. The future of electric cars is bright, and it won’t be because they’re on fire. Omar Etman is a staff columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

Rolling Jubilee shows good intentions, unsustainable

The Rolling Jubilee project, set up by the Occupy Strike Debt group, has canceled over $15 million worth of debt in the past year. Principally eliminating extortionate medical bills, the group has strived to help the lives of thousands of Americans struggling to repay their debts. However, although the group’s goals are admirable, the project can hardly be presented as a viable method to repair the systemic issues within the American economy. In cases of default, banks usually gain collateral from their loans. Thus, a third party may step in and purchase the loan, presumably for more than the value of the collateral. While debt buyers will usually attempt to elicit further payments out of their debtors, Rolling Jubilee simply forgives the debt, hoping that those they helped, now relieved of enormous financial burdens, will donate in the future. But even if the group were to buy a large amount of distressed debt, the nation’s multi-trillion dollar debt will remain unaffected. More specifically, if they are buying deeply discounted debt, it is debt that someone is already refusing and that someone else has given up on. That person’s life will not change as a result of this extinguished debt. If the Rolling Jubilee were able to buy real mortgages, this would be much more impressive than discounted unsecure loans. And banks generally fail to let people use the already existing, legal means for renegotiating mortgage debt and just foreclose. Thus, buying unsecured, discounted debt is clearly a symbolic act at best. The Rolling Jubilee has attempted to come to the aid of thousands Americans struggling under the burden of excessive levels of medical debt. But this is not enough. The project presents a window of opportunity for the members of Occupy to draw attention to the inordinate levels of debt incurred by ordinary Americans who simply want adequate and affordable access to health care. In spite of Rolling Jubilee’s laudable intentions, its questionable practicality revives many of the critiques Occupy garnered, such as its priority of message over substance. Similar issues with Rolling Jubilee indicate that Occupy’s troubled history could repeat itself. The project may combat mounting debt, but the sustainability of the venture remains to be seen.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Raquel Woodruff (Chair), Edward Radzivilovskiy (Co-chair), Peter Keffer (Co-chair), Harry Brown, Marcelo Cicconet, Christina Coleburn, Omar Etman, Nina Golshan, Nickhil Sethi

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 450 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


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NYUNEWS.COM | THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SPORTS

EDITED BY FRANCISCO NAVAS SPORTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Despite past flaws, Jets show potential to rocket to playoffs By FERENC PUSKAS

When the New York Jets selected quarterback Geno Smith out of West Virginia University, he boldly claimed the Jets would make the playoffs come January. Many analysts and pundits said this was a ridiculous claim. The Jets were the laughingstock of the NFL and considered a circus. ESPN even ranked the Jets 32nd in the league. The Jets were supposed to be devoid of talent throughout their roster. Mark Sanchez was supposed to burn out. Geno Smith’s rookie mistakes were supposed to follow Sanchez’s legacy. Head coach Rex Ryan was supposed to be the sacrificial lamb for the lame duck season. But going into the Week 10 bye, the Jets are over the .500 mark with a 5-4 record. Now, Smith’s bold claim should be taken seriously. If the season ended now, the Jets would have the sixth seed in the American Football Conference. Luck did not bring the Jets to their current position — they’ve earned it. The Jet’s defense has stood out among other teams. Anchored by third-year professional Muhammad Wilkerson and accompanied

by second-year professional Damon “Snacks” Harrison and rookie Sheldon Richardson, the Jets have made every team one-dimensional by shutting down the running game of players like Doug Martin, C.J. Spiller and Chris Johnson. The slow, aging linebacker core has been replaced with fast, athletic linebackers, such as second-year professionals Demario Davis and Quinton Coples. While the Jets have always had a stout defense under Ryan, their offense sets them apart from past Jets teams. Under offensive coordinator Marty Mornhinweg, the

VIA FLICKR.COM

The Jets are showing improvement this season.

team has been effective in running the ball with both Bilal Powell and newcomer Chris Ivory. The running game is especially important as it opens up the field for rookie signal caller Smith. This bodes well for the Jets because they have the tendency to do as well as their quarterback. By not placing the entire burden of the offense on Smith’s shoulders, the Jets hav found success, only calling upon him when they need a big play. By leading four game-winning drives in his young career, Smith is showing he carries a quality every franchise desires and all opponents dread — being clutch. This factor should bode well in ensuring the Jets make the playoffs. Not only has the Jets’ performance skyrocketed, but their remaining opponents haven’t been playing well. Of their seven remaining games, only one team, the North Carolina Panthers, has a winning record. Although those games won’t be easy, it gives the Jets the best chance to keep winning. The Jets should be considered for a playoff spot because of Ryan’s superb coaching. After two straight years of suspect coaching, he has returned his

focus to coaching the defense, and the results are showing. What’s more, Mornhinweg is a competent offensive coordinator who understands how to run the line effectively. Although many would call the Jet’s season a success, the

ultimate goal should be to qualify for the playoffs. The Jets are playing great football, and they should all the way to January. Ferenc Puskas is a contributing writer. Email him at sports@nyunews.com.


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