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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 41, No. 92 INSIDE THIS ISSUE

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013

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Rev. DuBois recounts advising Obama’s faith By ANN SCHMIDT

FELIPE DE LA HOZ/WSN

Stern alum co-opens Empire Biscuit Offering a selection of custom options and traditional favorites, Empire Biscuit has garnered a dedicated following. STORY on PG. 4

JONATHAN TAN/WSN

Insomnia Cookies delivers to Carlyle After a campaign gained traction on social media, the popular cookie service now includes Carlyle Court as a delivery option. DANIEL COLE/WSN

STORY on PG. 3

The Rev. Joshua DuBois, former spiritual advisor to President Barack Obama held a reading of his recently published book, “The President’s Devotional” at NYU’s Kimmel Center for University Life on Nov. 11. DuBois and the Rev. Paul Raushenbush, senior religious editor of the Huffington Post, discussed different segments of DuBois’ book at the event yesterday before allowing questions from the audience. Yael Shy, co-director of the NYU Center for Spiritual Life, said the center sponsored the book reading and discussion because both DuBois and Raushenbush are advisory board members for the Of Many Institute for Multifaith Leadership at NYU and are passionate about the institute’s mission. “We believe that the devotionals, prayers, reflections [and] meditations, that DuBois sent to President Obama each day during his tenure will inspire our students and those who attend the event tonight in the same way that they inspired the president,” Shy said. “The President’s Devotional” consists of essays about DuBois’ experiences in the White House and a selection of the devotionals DuBois sent Obama daily, dating back to the 2008

The Rev. Joshua DuBois discusses faith and his book “The President’s Devotionals.”

DUBOIS continued on PG. 3

Lady Gaga earns no Violets prepare for D-III championship applause for ‘ARTPOP’ By MARY JANE DUMANKAYA

By ADDY BAIRD

As Lady Gaga returns with the release of her third studio album “ARTPOP,” the musician who is famous for her antics delivers simultaneously what was expected from her while also exploring new territory. In many ways, “ARTPOP” seems like the next logical step in the development of Lady Gaga’s work. On the album, she still wrestles with her feelings about fame, men and her own self-image. With most artists, there is pressure with the release of new work to bring something fresh to the table, which is something Gaga seems to understand. Her response? Disco beats and electronic dance music influences on tracks like “G.U.Y.” and “Venus,” rap and

pop infusions on “Jewels N’ Drugs” and, oftentimes, theatrics exceeding even her previous albums. In a word, “ARTPOP” is exhausting. It’s often devoid of real instruments aside from the single ballad near the end of the track list, “Dope,” which in its simplicity doesn’t make up for the lack of depth apparent throughout the rest of the album. An unrelenting electronic beat underlies the entire album, so the last hour of “ARTPOP” mostly sounds like noise. Memorable moments of Gaga’s past — such as the sing-along choruses of older songs like “Born This Way” and “Just Dance” — are few and far between. Whereas in past releases Ga-

ARTPOP continued on PG. 5

The NYU women’s volleyball team received a bid for the National Collegiate Athletic Association Division III Women’s Volleyball Championship on Monday, Nov. 11. The Violets, who finished the regular season with an overall record of 27 wins and 7 losses and a University Athletic Association record of four wins and three losses, did not automatically qualify for the NCAA Tournament. They were selected by the NCAA D-III Women’s Volleyball Committee to compete in the 64-team tournament. NYU was one of five UAA teams selected by the committee. The others are the UAA Champion University of Chicago, Emory University, Carnegie Mellon and Washington University in St. Louis.

FILE PHOTO BY CAROLINE COLLINS FOR WSN

Junior captain Allie Williams spikes the ball during a home game. “This NCAA bid is an awesome opportunity for us to have a clean start and redeem what we lost this past weekend,” Gallatin junior and co-captain Allie Williams said. “I am so excited to see how we progress.”

This is the first time the women’s volleyball team has made the tournament in four years. In 2010, the Violets reached the Elite Eight, where

VBALL continued on PG. 8


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

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By Jake Folsom Over the weekend, producer and guitarist Nile Rodgers held a Reddit Ask Me Anything. Particularly memorable was his comment that record executives always tell him that he and his music “suck” given a first listen. But later, when a record becomes popular, they seem to forget making these comments. He worked on recent hits for Avicii, Daft Punk and legends like Diana Ross, Madonna and David Bowie, not to mention his band Chic. Rodgers is an unfading talent and pop genius.

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CORRECTION

EDITORS-AT-LARGE

In an article published yesterday, Nov. 11, Steinhardt professor Elizabeth Norman’s book, “We Band of Angels: the Untold Story of American Nurses Trapped on Bataan by the Japanese,” was incorrectly referred to as a novel, when it is in fact a nonfiction historical book. The article also incorrectly stated the nurses became prisoners on Feb. 6 1942, when in fact that occurred on May 6, 1942. The book cover was also incorrectly attributed to Atria Books, when in fact it was designed by Random House. Parkgoers draw a tree with chalk on the ground in Washington Square Park.

PHOTO BY JONATHAN TAN

WSN regrets these errors.

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About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Jordan Melendrez at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

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NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SSC PANEL

DISCUSSION

Yesterday, WSN briefed you on NYU 2031, which will be one of the topics at the second panel discussion with representatives from the Student Senators Council on Thursday, Nov. 14 from 6 to 8 p.m. in room 405 of the Kimmel Center for University Life. The moderated discussion will also focus on the Global Network University. Audience members will have the opportunity to engage in a questionand-answer session, and students can also ask questions via Twitter by using the hashtag #askwsn. The GNU consists of 11 study away sites and three degree-granting portal sites. The portal sites, NYU New York NYU Abu Dhabi and NYU Shanghai, the latter two of which were opened in 2010 and 2013, respectively. NYU offers study away locations on six continents. Some faculty have expressed opposition to how decisions are made and concern over the quality of education at the abroad sites. The Faculty Advisory Committee on NYU’s Global Network was established last April to evaluate the academic state of the GNU, but the committee has not released a report this semester. Expansion abroad has been one of NYU President John Sexton’s priorities during his tenure, with the goals of broadening the scope of the university and attracting more international students.

NYU Reacts: Impact of Typhoon Haiyan By SCOTT MULLEN

While Typhoon Haiyan’s destruction is over 8,000 miles away, its impact is being felt by students with roots in the Philippines. The storm, which tore through the Philippines this past weekend with up to 195 mph winds, devastated a large portion of the island nation — it leveled cities, caused billions of dollars in damage and killed thousands. NYU Abu Dhabi senior Benjamin Jance IV, who is from the Philippines, said that his hometown near Manila was not hit as badly as other parts of the island. His grandparents, however, live on the island Negros Occidental, one of the places with the most destruction. “Having lived [in the Philippines] for various times in my life, visualizing the damage is disheartening,” Jance said. “The second-floor roof of my grandparents’ residence was ripped off, but they are thankfully alive and well.” Jance said the islands have a high tolerance for typhoons, but this storm is much higher on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale than previous ones. “Anywhere from 16 to 21 cyclones crash with the eastern seaboard from June to Novem-

DUBOIS continued from PG. 1

Rev. DuBois discusses book, work with President Obama campaign. The devotionals range from themes of prayer and wisdom to essays on specific events such as the Newtown, Conn. shooting. DuBois said, when he first started working on Obama’s campaign, he never thought he would be sending the future president of the United States daily devotionals. “I didn’t necessarily feel qualified to do that,” DuBois said. After saying personal prayers for the senator during the 2008 campaign, DuBois sent Obama a reflection on Psalm 23 from the Old Testament. He soon received a response from Obama asking him to continue to send similar emails. DuBois said different genres of music, including jazz and classical, inspired his devotionals, and the patterns could be found in his prose. DuBois added that his personal faith grew as he spent more time with the scripture. “I found my way back

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to the Bible in a way I hadn’t ever before,” DuBois said. Since working for the Obama administration, DuBois founded and serves as the CEO of Values Partnerships, a social enterprise set to launch this year. CAS senior Mikayla Terrell said her favorite part of the discussion was when DuBois talked about his struggles with his faith during his time in the White House. “Your faith is definitely part of everything you do, but I really liked what he said about the danger of professionalizing [faith],” Terrell said. Terrell plans on attending future events hosted by the Of Many Institute. “I think it is an incredible part of NYU that has a lot of potential,” Terrell said. “NYU is definitely embracing, more proudly and boldly, faith and religion.” Ann Schmidt is a staff writer. Email her at news@nyunews.com.

ber of each year,” Jance said. “But I can remember no previous storm of this magnitude.” Kristina Rodulfo, Gallatin senior and president of the International Filipino Association at NYU, said that while she doesn’t know anyone directly affected by the storm, the devastation is shocking. “The death toll jumped from 1,000 to 10,000 within a day,” Rodulfo said. “You get smacked in the face with perspective about your privilege. The first feeling is guilt. The next is empathy. Lastly, an urgency to help.” Steinhardt sophomore John Bautista, who grew up in Manila, said he feels helpless and guilty being so far away. “I was terrified when I learned that Haiyan would possibly be one of the strongest typhoons ever recorded,” Bautista said. “Even though I know that my family is safe, I still find it difficult to focus on school and my life here when I know that the Philippines is experiencing something this terrible.” Organizations and individuals around the world started organizing relief efforts within hours of the event, including members the NYU community. Service initiatives, such as

the NYUServiceProject, are brainstorming ideas about how to deliver aid to victims. The IFA at NYU has partnered with Anakbayan USA, a Filipino youth organization, and already has plans to donate the proceeds from its Mr. Philippines 2013 pageant to the Bayanihan Disaster Relief Fund, a campaign of the National Alliance for Filipino Concerns. Additionally, they are planning a fundraising event with their performance group #IFAcoustic for the end of the month. Jance said the majority of

the deaths have been low-tomiddle class families and infrastructure and agricultural damages already cost over 135 million PHP, or $3.1 million. Ultimately, though, Jance said the Filipinos will recover. “Filipinos will wait it out, assess the damage and start rebuilding,” Jance said. “People get up the next day and start building a better house in the hope that it will survive the next one. Life will continue.” Scott Mullen is a contributing writer. Email him at news@nyunews.com.

VIA WIKIPEDIA.ORG

Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines over the weekend.

Insomnia Cookies expands service to Carlyle BY KAVISH HARJAI

Students in Carlyle Court residence hall can now have cookies delivered to their doors. Insomnia Cookies has decided to include the residence hall in its delivery route. CAS sophomore Austin Rivers, a Carlyle resident and Insomnia employee, started a campaign for the company to alter its delivery boundaries. He could not speak to the press for contractual reasons. On the residence hall Facebook group, people expressed their dissatisfaction with Insomnia, which ended its delivery range one block from Carlyle. Steinhardt sophomore Suzanne

Kim commented on a Facebook post regarding the delivery range and said “life may as well be over.” Her comment received 17 likes. Rivers publicized his campaign on the Facebook group and garnered support from many of his fellow students. His post announcing his success received 66 likes. The campaign was successful and Insomnia started delivering cookies to Carlyle students around Nov. 8. “Insomnia’s new delivery route is one of the best things to happen to Carlyle this year,” CAS sophomore Zelda Groves said. “I am so excited to finally get some delicious cookies delivered right here.”

JONATHAN TAN/WSN

Carlyle Court residents can now receive delivery from Insomnia.

In CAS sophomore Haley Quinn’s post on the Facebook group — after she ordered Insomnia cookies — she called Rivers a real American hero. “I ordered Insomnia maybe every couple of weeks last year when I lived in Third North [residence hall],” Quinn said. “One night when I was up late with an essay, I tried to order cookies from Carlyle, and I couldn’t and it was pretty much devastating. I had cookies delivered here this weekend, and it was such a beautiful experience. Insomnia Cookies makes me feel emotionally and spiritually fulfilled.” Currently, most NYU dorms are in the radius of the Greenwich Village Insomnia boundary, for the exception of Lafayette Street and Broome Street residence halls. Gramercy Green residence hall falls in the Murray Hill-33rd Street delivery zone. Aggie, a customer service supervisor at Insomnia, explained the reasoning behind delivery ranges and said the corporate office makes the final decision. Insomnia does not release the full name of its employees. “The decision to open in various college towns and cities are made after much research and deliberation,” she said. “The delivery range is store specific and is determined by the business flow for that particular location. In order to expand the delivery range, we need to ensure that the delivery expansion will not slow down the balance of deliveries coming out of that store for the evening.” Kavish Harjai is a staff writer. Email him at news@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 | NYUNEWS.COM

DINING

EDITED BY DANIEL YEOM DINING@NYUNEWS.COM

Warm your soul with chicken soup recipes By BAILEY EVANS

Nov. 12 is Chicken Soup for the Soul Day. Whether or not you choose to celebrate the holiday, it’s hard to deny that chicken noodle soup is a classic comfort food. Chicken itself can be the ultimate protein, particularly for broke college students. Here are a couple budget friendly chicken soup recipes.

Chicken Lentil Soup 2 tablespoon olive oil 1 cup chopped onion 1/2 cup chopped carrot 1/2 cup chopped celery 1/2 cup chopped potatoes 1/2 cup chopped eggplant 2 cups chopped or shredded chicken, cooked 1 pound lentils, rinsed 8 cups chicken broth Salt, cumin and coriander to taste Directions: In a pot, saute the onion, carrot, celery, potatoes and eggplant with olive oil on medium heat until soft. Add chicken, lentils, chicken

broth, salt, cumin and coriander. Turn the heat to high and bring to a boil. Then, reduce the heat to simmer and cook until lentils are soft.

Chicken Noodle Soup 2 tablespoon olive oil 1 cup chopped onion 3 cloves chopped garlic 1 cup chopped carrot 1 cup chopped celery 2 cups chopped chicken 8 cups chicken broth 2 cups water 2 cups egg noodles

3 sprigs thyme 1/4 cup parsley Salt and pepper to taste

Directions: In a pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add onion, garlic, carrots and celery, saute until soft. Add the broth and water and bring to a boil. Add thyme, parsley and egg noodles and simmer until the noodles are tender. Add chicken and salt and pepper to taste. Let simmer until ready to serve. Bailey Evans is a staff writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

SHAWN PAIK/WSN

Lentils add a different texture to a classic chicken soup recipe.

Stern alum co-opens Empire Biscuit, offers custom biscuits, traditional favorites By CHANDLER WEST

When Yonadav Tsuna made a business plan with his friend Jonathan Price during spring break of his senior year, he said he did not expect the plan to ever come to fruition. The two devised a plan to open a 24hour Southern-style biscuit joint. Tsuna and Price envisioned a place where hot, fresh biscuits would be served graband-go throughout the day. “We wrote it from Gramercy Green [residence hall],” Tsuna, an NYU alumnus, said. “We locked ourselves in one of the study rooms.” “Even at that point, I was still like ‘I’m going into banking,’” he said. “I realized it was going to be real when we started pitching to investors.” Empire Biscuit opened on Avenue A between 12th and 13th streets two weeks ago. The opening received more customers and hype than Tsuna

and Price expected, so they closed for a few days to regroup, restock and hire more staff. Although Tsuna majored in finance at the Stern School of Business and minored in producing at the Tisch School of the Arts, he has always had an interest in food. “I had no help for paying for college besides financial aid, so I’d always work in restaurants during summers to make money,” he said. “My dad does catering back home in Memphis, so food has always been a part of my life, and I’ve always worked in the food industry.” Tsuna’s Memphis upbringing and Price’s experience as head-server of Magnolia Grill in Durham, N.C. is apparent from Empire Biscuit’s menu. So far, the spiced fried chicken biscuit sandwich with pickled carrots and sauce a l’orange ($8.50) is Empire Biscuit’s bestseller.

FELIPE DE LA HOZ/WSN

Empire Biscuit sells Southern-style biscuits in many variations.

In addition to biscuit sandwiches and biscuits with gravy, the menu features custom biscuit options ($4.50). Diners can mix and match from an extensive list of butters, spreads, jams, jellies and marmalades. Recommended custom biscuits include the Fancy Pants (foie gras butter with preserved lemon and cabbage jam), the Kiki (chocolate and caraway butter with coffee and walnut jam) and, named for Price’s wife, the Snuggah Boo (plum, prune and port with goat cheese and black pepper butter). “Everything is done in-house,” Tsuna said. “We make it all here from scratch.” The list of homemade items includes the Empire Cola and the ham, which they cure and smoke. LS sophomore Maggie Yang said she was surprised by the flavor combinations offered by Empire Biscuit. “The Fancy Pants sounds really interesting,” Yang said. “It’d be a nice change from my favorite Southernstyle biscuit-and-gravy.” As the seasons change, customers can look forward to special menu items. “In the winter, fairly soon, we’ll be doing pomegranate jelly. We will also do a blood orange and Campari marmalade,” Price said. “We’ve had five or six seasons to work on the menu, so we have a repertoire of 60 or 70 jams, jellies and marmalades that we can pull from as the seasons change.” Tsuna said everything on the menu is tasty — he would not sell an item he did not love. “I genuinely love everything that we sell here,” Tsuna said. Chandler West is a staff writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

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P TO

Best spots for vegan dishes

By DANA RESZUTEK

Eating out as a vegan is tricky. Finding the perfect restaurant with a wide variety of vegan options can be a nightmare. Thankfully, New York City is home to many vegan or vegan-friendly eateries that are sure to satisfy one’s appetite and wallet.

Sacred Chow A hidden gem located just minutes from Washington Square Park, Sacred Chow is the ideal vegan restaurant. Choose from a wide variety of paninis, tapas and salads with vegetables or soy-protein. Don’t forget to save room for the chocolate truffle cake ($11), which has a rich banana base. The most unique aspect of Sacred Chow is its all-vegan weekend brunch, which offers omelets, waffles and a banana-bread style French toast ($10-$12). 227 Sullivan St. Hotel Tortuga Hotel Tortuga offers options for both vegans and meatlovers. From 20-ounce burritos to 12-inch quesadillas, Hotel Tortuga serves large portions of food for reasonable prices — nearly everything on the menu is under $10. For only $1.50 extra, every dish can be made vegan with the addition of vegan cheese and sour cream. 246 E. 14th St. Angelica Kitchen One of the most famous vegan restaurants in the city, Angelica Kitchen has been serving organic and local fare for over 30 years. Try the dish that Angelica Kitchen has been serving since the start, the Dragon Bowl ($14). Consisting of rice, beans, tofu and vegetables, the bowl is a unique combination of simple ingredients that doesn’t disappoint. 300 E. 12th St. Blossom For a more upscale vegan dining experience, try Blossom, an animal-free New York City franchise with multiple Manhattan locations. Its Chelsea branch offers vegan variations of classic American, French and Italian dishes. Main entrees include pasta, vegetable, tofu and seitan preparations, including a cauliflower risotto ($20), a port wine seitan ($22) and a vegetable mezze plate ($18). 197 Ninth Ave. Babycakes Finding delicious vegan baked goods can be difficult. SoHo’s Babycakes solves that problem with tasty, exclusively vegan treats, from traditional cupcakes flavors like chocolate, vanilla and red velvet ($4.75) to muffins and brownies. Try the seasonal fall favorites such as a pumpkin spice loaf or a pumpkin muffin ($3.95). 248 Broome St. Dana Reszutek is a staff writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

VIA YELP.COM

Sacred Chow serves delicious vegan desserts.


NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

ARTS

EDITED BY JEREMY GROSSMAN ARTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Current ‘Homeland’ season lags in pace By NIVEA SERRAO

Midway into its third season, “Homeland” is still one of the most talked about shows on television, and Showtime has already renewed the high-stakes spy thriller for a fourth season. But while the first two seasons moved at a breakneck pace, this season started off as a slow exercise in consequences. Now, halfway through, it struggles to regain its momentum. Some of this ebb of quality results from the disappearance of one of the series’s most important mainstays. Sgt. Brody — the character that incited so much of the show’s initial appeal — is conspicuously absent, with the soldier-turned-terrorist-turnedgood guy hiding out in Venezuela. This seclusion makes sense considering he’s currently “America’s Most Wanted,” but squirreling him away has separated him from the major action. The show thrives on the CarrieBrody relationship — whether it’s their intense game of cat and mouse or their barely concealed mutual attraction. Without that dynamic, this season seems to be floundering. This is most apparent in Carrie’s storyline this season, as she finds herself committed to a mental institution with every secret she’s kept so far — her relationship with Brody as well as her bipolar disorder — leaked to the Senate subcommittee investigating the bombing at Langley. In the past, Carrie’s goal was to expose Brody as a terrorist. Now it’s the opposite, as she works to convince everyone of his innocence. Much like Brody, Carrie seems unfocused with no one to play off of. That she might be car-

rying Brody’s child only complicates matters further. As of yet, it’s unclear where exactly this storyline might be heading, but so far Carrie seems to be living in denial. Many critics also questioned whether Brody’s family should return, but their presences makes sense. The show used Brody’s relationship with his family to highlight just how big a lie he was living and it’s only fair we can see how much his betrayal affected them. Unsurprisingly, it’s been tough. Jessica is broke with no real means of income — her government benefits were revoked and no one is willing to hire a terrorist’s wife. Dana, meanwhile, has been dealing with her problems by attempting suicide and running away with a boy she met in group therapy, only to return home upon discovering his lies. Already, her storyline is much more unwieldy than her father’s. Despite being halfway through the season, it still feels like “Homeland” is setting up all its pieces, and that’s a problem. To make matters worse, the tension and drama present in previous seasons seems to be almost nonexistent this year. A quick fix would be to scale back on Dana and bring Brody back into the country as soon as possible. Not only would this instantly infuse the show with the tension and drama it’s been lacking, but it would also reunite him with Carrie. Playing up their chemistry will allow both of them to do what they do best — keep secrets. Nivea Serrao is a contributing writer. Email her at entertainment@nyunews.com.

Lady challenges preconceived notions, politics of rappers By CHARLOTTE GRAHAM

In 2010, Big Gates Records signed their first female rapper to the label — a young artist who goes by the name Lady. Lady has been teetering on the verge of stardom for the past few years, and she has finally found some mainstream success from her songs being featured on TV. Fans of HBO’s “Girls” will have heard her song “Yankin,” and those who watch Showtime’s “Ray Donovan,” know her track “Twerk.” People flocked to her live show at Mercury Lounge over the weekend. When her record label was asked to comment on their signing of Lady three years ago, the response was overwhelmingly positive, saying that Lady “is going to change the game … there hasn’t been, and still isn’t, a more real female rapper.” By all accounts, Lady is a promising and exciting new rapper to watch — except for one hitch. She’s not a rapper — even in her own record label’s praise of her artistry, she’s defined, not as a rapper, but as a “female rapper.” Would Taylor Swift ever have been introduced as an upcoming female country artist? Is the media fixated on Miley Cyrus’ crazy female pop artist antics? Perhaps because rap has long been a boy’s club, dominated by males in a way other music genres have not been, there seems to be a need to separate female rappers from their peers. So the question is, how do “female rappers” drop the modifier? Looking at the work of Lady and her contemporaries, it seems they’re working on the problem by rapping just like the

guys and just as well as the guys, and — more often than not — by beating the men at their own game. But rather than point this out, their talents are diverted by meaningless distractions. When the gangster rap genre began to emerge in the late ’90s and rap became mainstream, Lil’ Kim and Foxy Brown were among the only female rappers who could hold their own against heavyweights such as Dr. Dre, N.W.A., The Notorious B.I.G. and Tupac. However, Foxy Brown and Kim were embroiled in a feud for most of their time at the top. Arguments among women in rap are nothing new. The ’80s had the Roxanne Wars, and more recently there was the feud between Nicki Minaj and Lil’ Kim. Male rappers have had their fair share of spats, but the differ-

ence is that among male rappers, the fights consist of lyrics aimed at pointing out who is superior. Among female rappers, these contentions are aimed at negating each other and becoming the only female rapper in the game. This idea that there can only be one great female rapper was at the heart of the recent feud between Lil’ Kim and Minaj, with Lil’ Kim accusing Minaj of copying her style and fans bragging that Minaj has “replaced” Lil’ Kim. With luck, an influx of new rappers like Lady will teach the public that a female rapper is not an either-or proposition. In the meantime, it’s imperative to take note of the double standards we use with rappers. Charlotte Graham is a staff writer. Email her at music@nyunews.com.

VIA FACEBOOK.COM

Shameka Shanta Brown is better known as the rapper Lady.

ARTPOP continued from PG. 1

Lady Gaga overindulges in theatrics without substance on latest album, fails to live up to previous work ga’s wit was sharp, something about “ARTPOP” feels too on the nose. Perhaps the biggest problem is, with all the theatrics, Gaga is unable to be subtle in parodying herself, such as with the love-it-or-hate-it first verse in “Applause,” “I stand here waiting for you to bang the gong.” The avant-garde moments just feel too calculated. “Aura” is a desperate scream for controversy in its sexualization of Muslim women, as Gaga sings, “My veil is protection for the gorgeousness of my face” and “Do you wanna see me naked, lover? ... behind the burqa.” Her ode to marijuana “Mary Jane Holland” and fame-obsessed anthems like “Applause” and “Donatella” (which opens with “I am

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so fab, check it out/I’m blonde, I’m skinny/I’m rich, and I’m a bit of a bitch”) feel less like explorations of unique ideas and more like what Gaga’s management expects to succeed. Despite these issues, the album isn’t career-ending, especially considering highlights like “Do What U Want” and “Gypsy.” If you’re a diehard Little Monster, “ARTPOP” has descended from heaven as your saving grace, but that would be true no matter the album’s quality. If you aren’t amused by Gaga’s antics — what this album fixates on these above all else — then you aren’t going to be converted by “ARTPOP.” Addy Baird is a staff writer. Email her at music@nyunews.com.

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OPINION

EDITED BY RAQUEL WOODRUFF OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

FOREIGN RELATIONS STAFF EDITORIAL

U.S. skews Egypt’s progress toward democracy By EDWARD RADZIVILOVSKIY

In a meeting last week with Egyptian foreign minister Nabil Fahmy, Secretary of State John Kerry praised Egypt for its roadmap to democracy. Specifically, Kerry remarked, “I welcomed Minister Fahmy’s restatement of the interim government’s commitment to the roadmap that will move Egypt forward on an inclusive path to democracy and to economic stability.” Throughout the meeting, Kerry used the words democracy and stability interchangeably to describe the situation in Egypt, but to equate these terms is disingenuous. In 2011, the protests in Tahrir Square achieved an important goal by removing the former president, dictator Hosni Mubarak, from power. However, elements of this regime have remained. After Mubarak’s ousting, the military allowed for a parliamentary election. The Muslim Brotherhood, a group that has been organizing across Egypt for years, won. But on July 3 this past year, the Egyptian military overthrew the democratically elected Brotherhood government and put President Mohamed Morsi, as well as thousands of his supporters, in prison.

A report by Freedom House, a U.S.based nongovernmental organization that conducts research on political freedom and democracy, refuted Kerry’s claim on Egypt, saying that there was “no substantive progress toward democracy in the country during the four months since the July 3 coup.” That there was a military coup against a democratic government was mysteriously left unmentioned in Kerry’s praise of Egypt’s transition into a democracy. Moreover, he did not even broach the issue of Morsi’s trial. Some have speculated that Kerry simply fumbled in his remarks, but I do not think this is the case. In the game of international relations, each nation is strategically motivated by a balance of power politics to maintain regional stability. Kerry was bluntly describing the situation in a way that suits U.S. interests. The United States has good reason

for establishing a relationship with a military-controlled Egypt rather than a democratic one. Indeed, it never officially called the military overthrow a coup, even though the facts overwhelmingly point in the opposite direction. They are calling it a protodemocracy, when in fact it does not even come close. A real democracy in the region can actually make it harder for the United States to exert its influence and national interest. The United States and Egypt share a number of interests in the region, such as partnership in counterterrorism, the Suez Canal and the flow of oil. A democratically elected government might not want to be associated with the United States. The current government does. This is yet another example of state interests superseding humanitarian interests. Perhaps in the long run genuine humanitarian interests can become part of state interests. But those who hold power naturally want to protect and expand it. Given this dominant ethos in international affairs, it is hard to envision substantive reform. Edward Radzivilovskiy is a deputy opinion editor. Email him at eradzivilovskiy@nyunews.com.

POLITICS

Berlusconi leaving politics will not help Italy By VITTORIO BISIN

Silvio Berlusconi is a personality. In the United States, he is best known for his antics and scandals. He is currently in proceedings for four different trials, has been tried on 21 previous occasions and, on Aug. 1, his sentence for imprisonment because of tax evasion was confirmed. Berlusconi has no future in Italian politics, yet this does not equate to improvement for the country. On Oct. 2, Italy’s Prime Minister Enrico Letta and his left-right split coalition faced a parliamentary vote of no confidence. Perhaps out of humiliation or more possibly to assert his political control over the government, Berlusconi instructed his ministers to vote against this coalition. Halfway through the vote, there was a revolt inside his party, the Popolo della Libertà, and many members officially left. After realizing he no longer had enough votes to bring down the ruling coalition, he desperately declared that he switched intentions. The parliamentary no-confidence vote left Berlusconi publicly em-

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barrassed with a smaller and more fragmented PdL. Now it is more unlikely that Berlusconi will receive the presidential pardon and will serve his jail sentence under house arrest. To make matters worse for Berlusconi, the upper house of Parliament will soon vote on whether to remove him from the Senate. Many expect this vote will not go in his favor. Berlusconi has never seemed so weak since he entered politics in 1994. Despite Berlusconi’s looming exit, nothing obviously hints at any possible improvement in the near future. Italy has a debt-to-GDP ratio that has steadily increased to 130 percent, and the distance between Italian and German debt has only increased since 2012. Letta’s split coalition lacks the power to imple-

ment any of the major economic reforms that Italy desperately needs. In the 2013 elections, MoVimento Cinque Stelle, a newly formed antipolitics party founded by comedian Beppe Grillo and also known as the Five-Star Movement, gained 25 percent of the votes in both houses of the Senate. Their extreme and often contradictory views have great power in Italian politics, and their ability to veto any major bill has made it increasingly difficult for Letta’s coalition to pass anything through Parliament. At the end of last month, the national statistics office declared the economy to have continued to shrink this quarter. Italy has been on the verge of a Greecelike disaster for years. It is beginning to seem like the only way to unify politicians and enact these reforms is for Rome to become more like Athens in 2010. Perhaps Italy can climb out of the crevasse only by falling deeper into economic distress. Vittorio Bisin is a contributing columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

Veterans deserve better health care, service

More U.S. soldiers have killed themselves at home than have died while in combat last year. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan mark the longest U.S. conflict since the war in Vietnam. Most soldiers return home safely, but those who return with the physical and mental scars of war are left to rely on a faulty and incompetent Department of Veterans Affairs. In fact, more than half of our most recent veterans have said they feel that they have received inadequate care from the VA. Yesterday, the nation honored those who have served in the military — perhaps now is the time we begin caring for them, too. Despite aggressive government efforts to curb military and veteran suicides, the number of suicides has increased dramatically in recent years. In 2012 alone, 349 active-military members committed suicide — a number more than double what it was in 2001. But among all veterans, whose numbers are larger than ever, the statistics are far more harrowing. Some 8,000 veterans die by suicide each year, an increase of 11 percent between 2007 and 2010. The VA has started to buckle under the pressure of caring for more veterans returning from combat. The VA’s wait time for processing claims has increased dramatically since 2009, as it is likely that veterans must wait nine months before receiving benefits. Over 1 million veterans are now waiting for benefits. But the VA has been committed to addressing their plight with a new website, which has improved the processing of disability claims. However, the VA simply lacks the adequate amount of resources and manpower to deal with the demand. Furthermore, those who have served in the military are less likely to be employed than those who have not. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the unemployment rate of veterans who have served after 9/11 is 10 percent, in contrast to 6.8 percent civilian rate as of October of this year. Moreover, 13 percent of homeless people in the United States are veterans. These disheartening statistics reveal the inefficacy of the VA and the need for substantial solutions. Through exhaustive government effort, treatment of military personnel returning home has improved, but the increased suicide rate and delayed VA response time is a reminder that much work is left to be done. As Bertrand Russell once said, “war doesn’t determine who is right, only who is left.” For the military men and women returning home from prolonged tours, the government must do better to ensure that no veteran is left behind.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Raquel Woodruff (Chair), Edward Radzivilovskiy (Co-chair), Peter Keffer (Co-chair), Harry Brown, Marcelo Cicconet, Christina Coleburn, Omar Etman, Nina Golshan, Nickhil Sethi

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 450 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


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NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SPORTS VBALL continued from PG. 1

Women’s volleyball wins bid to NCAA tournament

they lost to UAA rival Washington in three straight sets. “We have focused our whole season on returning to the tournament,” head coach Jolie Ward said. “I believe the team will not squander this opportunity and will compete with everything they can give.” “Having started my first season making it to the Elite Eight, I’ve wanted to get to the tournament again before I graduated,” CAS senior and co-captain Alexandria Mao said. NYU will face Nazareth College in the regionals on Friday, Nov. 17. Nazareth had a season record of 29 wins and 8 losses, including a loss to the Violets in five sets. “In this Friday’s match, we will look to dominate the match and play a well-executed game for the win,” Ward said. If the Violets advance, they will play Clarkson University or Westfield State University match on Saturday, Nov. 16. The regional championship match is set for Sunday, Nov. 17. The Violets are ranked fourth in the New York region behind Clarkson University, Richard Stockton College and State University of New York at New Paltz. Mary Jane Dumankaya is a contributing writer. Email her at sports@nyunews.com.

EDITED BY FRANCISCO NAVAS SPORTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Basketball team prepares for season opener By SEAN BILLINGS

The NYU men’s basketball team is set to take to the court for the first game of the season this Saturday at 1 p.m. in Coles Sports Center. The Violets will attempt to make strides this year, improving on last year’s overall record of 15-11. After a hot start where the team posted a record of 12-2, setbacks after beginning conference play, including a few injuries, left the team finishing off the latter part of their season at 3-9 and claiming five wins in the University Athletic Association. The Violets will miss the efforts of graduated seniors — Kyle and Cory Stockmal, Carl Yaffe, Max Wein and Devin Karch. Wein, Yaffe and Kyle Stockmal were three of the four captains and, combined, averaged 34.1 points per game and averaged a remarkable 40.93 percent shooting from the field. Additionally, Karch’s veteran big-man game will be missed as he averaged 12.9 points per game, 4.8 rebounds and a field goal percentage of 59.8. Despite parting with crucial

players, the team is welcoming a few new faces. LS freshman Romas Marcinkevicius, who joins the team from Pine Crest High School in Florida. Marcinkevicius, who stands at 6’7”, averaged a doubledouble in his sophomore, junior and senior seasons and eventually helped lead his team to a Florida Class 4A State Championship. LS freshman Alec Papesch and SCPS freshman Joe Timmes join the squad from Cleveland, Ohio and Chatham, New Jersey, respectively. Papesch, a 6’6” forward, was selected as Third Team All-State his junior year and played with the The National Basketball Association Elite AAU. Timmes, a 6’4” guard from Chatham High School, was First Team All-Conference, First Team All-County performer, Third Team All-NJ Group Three, Morris County and New Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Association All-Star. Additionally, CAS sophomore Brad Lahens will join the team after not playing his freshman year. Lahens was a two-year team mem-

ber in high school, and he led that team to league championships. The team will look to lean on the entire spread of experienced sophomores and juniors on the team. Senior captains and CAS seniors Ryan Tana and Jed Borovik will look to increase their roles as leaders in the huddle and on the stat sheet, as they combined for an average of 8.5 points per game last season with a collective field goal percentage of 55.6. The experienced backcourt also includes CAS juniors Iyoha Agho and Conor Smith, who will look to take on bigger roles this season.

“This year we are going to have some challenges just like every year, but we have to stay focused and overcome the obstacles,” Agho said. “We have an amazing group of guys, and I hope that, as a team, we give it all we have and just see where it takes us.” “This team is filled with some of the hardest working guys I know,” he said. “So I’m sure that as a group we will be able to achieve some great things this year.” Sean Billings is a contributing writer. Email him at sports@nyunews.com.

FILE PHOTO BY JONATHAN TAN/WSN

The Violets basketball team plays against TCNJ in 2011.

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