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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 40, No. 35

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012

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Faculty research condemns food portions

Election year nods to new freedoms

NYU professors found a direct connection between a rise in food portion sizes and overweight adults and children. In a report published in the November issue of the American Journal of Preventative Medicine, Marion Nestle and Lisa Young, professors of Nutrition, Food Studies and Public Health, described increases in food portions. They also offered suggestions to manage the issue in today’s society. “I was motivated to write this paper because portion sizes have continued to increase despite public health initiatives,” Young said. They found that, from 2000 to 2009, 147 large-sized portions were instituted, including candy bars, beverages, burritos, hamburgers and pizza. Many of these larger portions were served in fast food, family-style and carry-out restaurants. In an article published in October by the Huffington Post, Young

Even though Tuesday’s election focused mostly on the presidential race, it also brought a series of historic state ballot initiatives that included the legalization of samesex marriage and recreational marijuana usage. Marriage equality supporters saw progress in four states. Maine, Maryland and Washington joined the ranks of New York and six other states by voting to fully legalize same-sex marriage. Minnesota voters rejected a proposed constitutional amendment that would have banned same-sex marriage. Natalie Briggs, an LSP freshman who voted in Minnesota by absentee ballot, said she was excited by the decision the voters made in her state. “I’m happy that many of my friends won’t face discrimination should they choose to marry the person they love in Minnesota,” Briggs said. “This is a really important

By EMILY BELL

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By VERONICA CARCHEDI

CARINA WONG/WSN

Nor’easter bears down on Sandy-battered university and city Even though some students in downtown Manhattan are still navigating the recovery path post-Sandy, many are huckering down in preparation for a storm that will bring high winds, cold temperatures, snow and sleet.

‘Skyfall’ among Bond franchise’s best films By HENRY HSIAO

LONDON — James Bond is a powerfully nostalgic figure in our culture. There will forever be debates on which Bond is the best and struggles between old traditions and new forms with each film. It is a little strange to think that this generation is growing up with Daniel Craig as their image of James Bond. Unlike the Bonds of previous decades, Craig’s character has blond hair and an affinity for close-combat fighting, not to mention a more muscular personality. While the first two installments of the Craig era arguably fell short, “Skyfall” lives up to the pedigree of the franchise. The

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story is fairly tame, following the trend of exploiting fears of terrorism and technological warfare. When Great Britain and MI6, the British secret intelligence agency, are under attack by an enigmatic terrorist group, Agent 007 is

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Severe allergies pose risk at dining halls By CLAIRE KNEBL

CAS junior Giulia Gallo’s food allergies have been severe since childhood. In fact, Gallo’s peanut allergies could kill her within 20 minutes. “You have to wrap your head around the fact that a sandwich can kill you,” Gallo said. Gallo also has potentially life-threatening allergies to tree nuts, shellfish and soy. On average, two students in kindergarten through 12th grade in the United States have food allergies, said Eleanor Garrow, vice president of education and outreach at the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network. When those students with allergies go to college, they often enter an environment of increased risk, especially in dining halls. NYU first formally recognized food allergies with a 2008 policy that acknowledged the risk of cross-contamination of food and the potential inability to address all students’ needs. Since 2008, perspectives on food allergies have evolved, and Gallo thinks NYU’s approach should, also. Owen Moore, assistant vice president for opera-

tions at NYU, said he has only heard of few severe cases at the university’s dining halls. “I can honestly say in my 14 years, I have been notified of three reactions,” Moore said. One of those incidents occurred in October of this year when a student had an allergic reaction to tuna fish. “To one individual, it was obvious that this had tuna in it. To another, it wasn’t,” Moore said. “Do we remove it from salad bars? From the delis?” Lisa Sasson, clinical associate professor of nutrition and food studies at Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development, said she has noticed a general increase in food allergies recently, particularly nut allergies. “People need to make themselves known to the food staff,” Sasson said, noting that ingredient lists should be readily available to students. LSP freshman Claudia Zapata, who has a severe peanut allergy, agreed. “It is terrifying never knowing if something will cause an allergic reaction,” Zapata said.

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Nov. 8 to 15, times vary IFC Center | 323 Sixth Avenue

NEW YORK’S DOCUMENTARY FESTIVAL The third annual DOC NYC film festival will take place until Nov. 15 and will feature films ranging from memoirs to comedies. Various films will be screened at the IFC Center in Greenwich Village and the SVA Theater in Chelsea. Tickets are $16.50.

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Nov. 9 to 15, times vary Quad Cinema | 34 W. 13th St.

INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

This Friday kicks off the six-day International Film Festival Manhattan. IFFM showcases dramas, documentaries, shorts, music videos, narrative feature and student films from around the globe. The festival will take place at the historic Quad Cinema, which has been owned and operated by the same family since 1972. Showtimes vary, but each day the festival starts at 1 p.m. Most tickets are $15.

Nov. 11, 7 p.m. to 4 a.m. Sullivan Hall | 214 Sullivan St.

DISC JOCKEY MUSIC FESTIVAL

InterSearchMedia presents the biannual CollegeDJ Music Festival, which was created by Celestine O. Chukumba, a former professor at Pennsylvania State University. The festival will present up-and-coming disc jockeys from the New York area who will spin hip hop, R&B, dance and pop music throughout the night.

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Hocus Pocus

Before the election on Tuesday, Jon Dimo, a Kenyan witch doctor who claimed to be 105 years old, correctly predicted that President Obama would emerge victorious. Dimo said the premonition came to him after interpreting the landing positions of tossed mystical artifacts, including shells and bones. Obama’s late father was born in Kogelo located in Western Kenya, where expectations of Obama’s victory was high. — ASSOCIATED PRESS

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UCLA will adopt tobacco-free policy in April — THE DAILY BRUIN

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A man films the decorated ice skating rink at Rockefeller Center last night on Election day.

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BU Sigma Chi suspended, under investigation for alleged hazing — THE DAILY FREE PRESS

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FRANCIS POON About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Jaewon Kang at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

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Candidates predicted to take stage in 2016 Student loan debt continues to soar, part two By TONY CHAU

By WICY WANG Robert Wosnitzer, a doctoral candidate in Media, Culture and Communication, said that students nowadays are choosing between getting loans or not getting an education. “I believe there should be a state response to the problem,” Wosnitzer said. Randy Martin, a Tisch professor, said there is also the social impact of a high student debt. “When we look at the overall capacity of an economy that generates over 14 trillion [dollars] a year, forgiving debt that is roughly one half of one percent of that total certainly seems possible,” Martin said. “The larger question, perhaps, is the cost to society of living with an increasingly indentured population.” What can student borrowers do? Although there may come a day when the federal government will take college students under its wing, student debtors are still bound by law to pay off their loans, no matter how grueling the process might be. “I think it’s impossible to [save up] if one is in a position to take out student loans,” Wosnitzer said. “And many people forget that unemployment is at a record high for people under the age of 25.” For now, saving could be the good old-fashioned way of preparing for a rainy day. “I do think that it’s important to build personal savings in order to prevent the need to take out more loans in the future or at least re-

duce the size of those loans,” said Lisa Luo, a first-year GSAS student at NYU’s Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences. “However, it’s counterproductive to pay off those loans if you’ll be taking out more loans to replace those savings.” “[Part-time jobs are] also a great way to build your resume, even in a small way,” she said. Andrew Ross, a professor of Social and Cultural Analysis, said students can join various groups and movements that aim to raise more awareness and cut student debt. “My advice to debtors is to join the movement,” Ross said. For the many students who find loans inevitable, it may be helpful to have an open discussion with their parents and grandparents. “My parents were very real about what the burden would be like,” said Steinhardt senior Jameson Lee. Discussing the loans with friends and family may also reveal other choices and possibilities because, in the end, being financially aware may be the key to managing student loans. Although Luo said her undergraduate financial aid was generous, she has not finished paying off undergraduate loans. However, she is not too worried. Paying her way through school might not be easy, but she said she knows exactly how she’s going to do it. “I’ve been handling my own finances since early on,” Luo said. Wicy Wang is a contributing writer. Email her at university@nyunews.com.

With the election now in the rear view mirror, the United States will turn its attention to what President Obama will do in his second term. Some, however, are looking even further at the 2016 election. Below are three candidates from each party who are possible presidential candidates four years from now.

REPUBLICAN 1. CHRIS CHRISTIE, Governor of New Jersey Known for his aggressive, brazen, tell-it-likeit-is style, Christie is an early frontrunner for the 2016 Republican nomination. If not a national figure already, Christie garnered widespread attention by delivering the keynote address at the Republican National Convention in August. His cooperation with Obama in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy could also bolster a potential bid, giving him a record of working with the opposite party. A Quinnipiac poll released in mid-October showed that the Republican governor enjoyed a 56 percent approval rating in a traditionally Democratic state. 2. PAUL RYAN, Vice Presidential nominee and U.S. Representative in Wisconsin As the running mate for Gov. Mitt Romney, Ryan would be the most experienced in presidential campaigning. The native Wisconsinite fared quite well against Joe Biden in the vice presidential debate last month, which would also undoubtedly give him an advantage in future primary and potentially presidential debates should he choose to run. Ryan is also well-known for his budget plan, which at times has contested with Romney’s policies. The plan includes major cuts in federal spending, reworking personal income taxes into two brackets and reducing corporate taxes by 10 percent. 3. MARCO RUBIO, Senator in Florida Dubbed by many media outlets as the crown prince of the Tea Party Movement, Rubio was also mentioned as a possible running mate for Romney. Big-name GOP figures, including Jeb Bush, John McCain and Rudy Giuliani, all endorsed Rubio to be Romney’s running mate. Ru-

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DEMOCRAT 1. ANDREW CUOMO, Governor of New York City Cuomo, whose father was also the governor of New York City, has constrained himself to rarely appearing on the national stage. However, Cuomo’s record as governor, which includes balancing the state budget and legalizing same-sex marriage, would appeal to the national audience. In April, the Washington Post ranked Cuomo as the most popular governor in the United States, and both Obama and Romney raised the idea of Cuomo running for the Oval Office at the Al Smith dinner last month. 2. HILLARY CLINTON, Secretary of State Like Biden, Clinton also ran for the presidency in 2008, fighting tooth and nail with Obama before conceding and eventually becoming a member of Obama’s cabinet. A USA Today and Gallup poll in May 2012 revealed that 66 percent have a favorable view of Clinton. Bill Clinton, who has been perhaps the most effective campaigner for Obama’s successful re-election, would give the former First Lady an edge that would be hard to overcome. Even though Clinton is stepping down as Secretary of State for Obama’s second term and has persistently denied presidential aspirations, her intentions may ripen four years from now. 3. JOE BIDEN, Vice President of the United States Biden fueled further speculation at a potential 2016 presidential run when he told a reporter that his vote on Tuesday would likely not be the last time he votes for himself. Having ran for the presidency twice, including in 2008 before bowing out to Obama, Biden has not been shy about higher political aspirations. *Honorable mention: Martin O’Malley, Governor of Maryland Tony Chau is city/state editor. Email him at tchau@nyunews.com.

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NYU professors’ research reveals portion size as main culprit to obesity epidemic

blames the accessibility of larger portion sizes and foods with higher calories as part of obesity. “The trend toward larger portions coincides with the availability of calories in the U.S. food supply and the rising prevalence of obesity,” she wrote in the article. The paper details four calls to action. First, it recommends education and public health campaigns aimed at individuals. It also argues for clearly defining serving size standards and incentivizing smaller portions by providing price breaks. Finally, the paper calls for caps on portion sizes. Examples of these include Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s size limit initiative on sweetened beverages. “We need to do more to encourage [the] food industry to sell smaller portions, and to encourage consumers to buy smaller portions,” Young said. “Health professionals should also be involved.” Even though registered dietician Kelly Paneitz said the findings were not groundbreaking, she said they might help the general public. Paneitz said the smaller-portion price incentive is an interesting tactic. “I think that the focus has been more directed towards the value of what people perceive for their dollar, so it will be really interesting if a smaller portion campaign could actually be implemented and what the public’s perception of that would be,” Paneitz said.

bio, who is of Cuban descent, is likely to garner support from the Hispanic community, which overwhelmingly votes Democratic and is an increasingly important voting bloc in elections. *Honorable mention: Bobby Jindal, Governor of Louisiana

Portion sizes also affect college students, many of whom are on a meal plan or are eating in dining halls. Alyx Steadman, a freshman in the Silver School of Social Work, said certain dining halls like the Kimmel Center Market Place and Palladium dining hall give healthy portion sizes, but that this also depends on the students’ order. However, Steadman said portion size is a problem in the NYU dining system. “I feel like the [size of the] plates are too big in most dining halls,” Steadman said. “You feel almost obligated to load it up, otherwise you don’t get your money’s worth. In some ways I wish I had more control over what I eat.” Nestle and Young said an environment that promotes excessive food intake while underplaying the importance of physical activity contributes to the obesity epidemic. Paneitz agreed. She said there is not enough focus on exercise and balance. “I think a lot of people put too much focus on ‘What am I eating? How much am I eating? What quality of food am I eating?,’ but if they just went out and exercised more they would feel better, and they wouldn’t want to eat as much. It’s kind of a vicious pattern we get into,” Paneitz said. Emily Bell is a staff writer. Email her at university@nyunews.com.

Ballot initiatives give green light to gay marriage, marijuana

victory for my community and my state, and I’m glad I was able to be a part of it.” Emma Lindsay, a sophomore at Bates College in Maine, agreed. Lindsay said she is optimistic about what this ballot initiative could mean for the future of marriage equality. “It was a long-time coming here, and hopefully Maine will set a precedent for other states who are on the fence about legalizing same-sex marriage,” Lindsay said. Colorado and Washington also became the first states to approve the legalization of marijuana for recreational purposes. The U.S. Justice Department said it is reviewing the initiatives but did not comment on how it would proceed. In both states, marijuana users must be at least 21 years old and can only legally purchase marijuana from licensed retailers, whose businesses are subject to state taxation and regulation. Christine Harrington, a professor of politics at NYU, said much of this decision hinges on fiscal policy at the state level. “States don’t want to be paying to lock people up for smoking [marijuana] for recreational use,” Harrington said. “So the fiscal politics are coming together to form a coalition with a long enduring movement of [marijuana legalization advocates].” CAS freshman Richard Perez, a Colorado

native and voter, said even though the decision will not affect him, he knows a lot of people in Colorado who are happy. “I believe it should be up to the states to choose to legalize it or not,” Perez said. “I wouldn’t have an idea if it will become a national trend.” News organizations said Generation Y voters may have heavily affected the results of these state ballot measures. Fox News exit polls revealed that voters from 18 to 29 made up for 15 to 22 percent of the vote in Maine, Maryland, Minnesota, Washington and Colorado. In every decision that was made, the majority of this group was on the winning side. Maryland’s Question 6 to legalize samesex marriage, for example, received overwhelming support among younger voters, with 70 percent in favor of its passing. Harrington said these initiatives reveal a larger trend in state policies. “In terms of the direction that is going on now as opposed to 2005, 2006 at the state level, the movement is in the direction of expanding civil rights,” she said. “I think that is in line with the national trajectory as well.” Veronica Carchedi is a deputy university editor. Email her at vcarchedi@nyunews.com.


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Cozy date spots in New York City

By PAIGE BROTT As the weather gets colder, couples want to cozy up at romantic restaurants. Whether it’s a first date or a night out with your boyfriend or girlfriend, the perfect restaurant can make any rendezvous special. Here are the top five spots to take your significant other for an intimate meal. PEPEGIALLO 253 10th Ave. Located in the heart of Chelsea, this gem of a restaurant offers simple, flavorful, classic Italian dishes like spaghetti bolognese, chicken Milanese and penne with tomato and basil. PepeGiallo is quaint and candlelit, not to mention affordable — dishes range from $6 to $18. The restaurant is also conveniently close to the High Line, so you can enjoy a romantic stroll after your delicious Italian meal. SOY AND SAKE 47 Seventh Avenue South Soy and Sake is a delicious West Village spot known for exquisite vegan and vegetarian Japanese, Chinese, Thai and Malaysian cuisine. With a chic and classy décor, complete with a beautiful fish tank, this restaurant is an ideal date night spot. Whether you are craving soy chicken pad thai or a soy chicken katsu bento box, Soy and Sake offers a swanky, scrumptious meal at a fair price, ranging from $9 to $15.

S’MAC 345 E. 12th St. Looking for an American favorite? S’Mac, a little restaurant in the East Village, specializes in maraconi and cheese — the ultimate comfort food. With gluten-free, vegan and meat options, this place will make your date night one to remember. Price ranges from $4.75 to $15. MESKEREM 124 MacDougal St. Meskerem, a romantic Ethiopian restaurant on MacDougal Street, provides an intimate setting for your date. Be prepared to have fun with your food, as there are no forks to be found; you eat your meal with injera, a flatbread with a slightly spongy texture. Whether you are a meat eater or a vegetarian, you are bound to have fun at Meskerem. Price ranges from $9.75 to $15.45. PENELOPE 159 Lexington Ave. For a classy and romantic Saturday or Sunday brunch beyond the Palladium dining hall, try Penelope, a slice of comfy goodness in Murray Hill. The restaurant has a prix-fixe menu for $15 on weekends from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. that includes coffee or tea and juice. Penelope has great options for everyone including Nutella French toast, omelettes, à la carte eggs and bacon and a great vegetarian bacon BLT.

Paige Brott is a staff writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

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Students with allergies call on university to address food risks There are already signs posted in NYU dining halls that provide nutritional information, but Zapata thinks signs should also include allergen information. Even without eliminating nuts from dining halls, some students feel that additional allergen-specific information is necessary, and marking foods that contain nuts or that may contain nuts could facilitate a safer experience for students with severe allergies. Both Zapata and Gallo have experienced nut-related allergic reactions in NYU dining halls, but neither incident was reported to staff. Victor Caruso, executive chef at Weinstein dining hall, said it is possible for a dining hall to be entirely nut-free. Caruso said the decision to be nut-free would be a joint decision between NYU and Aramark, the food service contractor that the university uses. College campuses across the

country are introducing nut-free dining halls. Boston University, which also uses Aramark, has maintained a nut-free dining hall system since 2005, according to the university’s dining services department. NYU alumna Kayla Flaherty, who transferred to NYU from BU, said she felt safer eating in nutfree dining halls at BU. “NYU was clear that they could not control cross-contamination, so I opted to eat off campus,” Flaherty said. Moore said if students report their allergies to NYU, the dining staff is better able to address specific needs. “In this atmosphere, communication between all is one of the most important steps,” said Edward Nagy, executive chef at Palladium dining hall. Claire Knebl is a contributing writer. Email her at features@nyunews.com.

NYU freshman blogs about body image By HELEN HOLMES

Stella Boonshoft was not expecting Thursday, Oct. 18 to be a particularly eventful day. But when the curvaceous Steinhardt freshman saw street photographer and creator of the popular blog Humans of New York, Brandon Stanton, on the street, she jumped at the chance to approach him. Although Boonshoft originally approached Stanton to take his picture, he took hers instead. Boonshoft, who has her own blog, The Body Love Blog, proceeded to discuss her interests with Stanton. Later that day, Stanton posted a picture of Boonshoft on Humans of New York. But the photo was not one of the serene street portraits he is known for. Instead, Stanton chose a black-and-white shot of Boonshoft cheerily posing in her underwear that Boonshoft had sent to Stanton after their encounter. On her own blog, the photo accompanies a powerful written message about body image, her selfacceptance and her rejection of the hurt bullies have inflicted in her past. A typical photo on Humans of New York gets about 5,000 likes on Facebook. Boonshoft’s self-portrait has well over 700,000. Boonshoft has since appeared on the “Today

Show,” has guest-blogged for the Huffington Post and has been the subject of countless articles from outlets including the Daily Mail and People. Boonshoft, a New York native, said she has always struggled with body image. “Growing up in New York City was definitely intense for a little, chubby kid like me,” she said. “From a very young age, I ached for people to not only love me, but to constantly remind me that I was worthy.” Her desire for acceptance stemmed from encounters with bullies. “I seriously just thought something was wrong with me,” Boonshoft said. “Instead of rejecting bullies, or telling an adult, I constantly tried to be accepted by these kids. They were popular, after all, and that was all I wanted to be. It took me until sophomore year of high school to realize that who I was wasn’t defined by who I hung out with.” Boonshoft started The Body Love Blog shortly after arriving at NYU this fall. She originally intended for the blog to be an outlet to express herself and to help other girls struggling with self worth. The media attention she has received after being featured on Humans of New York has shifted her perspective. “I’m not interested in doing talk shows and being some sort of

weird, pseudo-celebrity who writes a blog about her life,” Boonshoft said. “So with the help of [Stanton], I’m rebranding and redesigning my blog to become a space where others can share their stories and a safe place for young people dealing with these issues.” Boonshoft’s 17,000 followers are receptive to her message. “I think this message is really good for our generation because we’re very up front about things, and we’re a very honest generation,” said Tisch freshman Joseph Giordano. “I think our society has become much more accepting in general. Her message represents a revolution.” As a student poised on the cusp of major influence in the struggle against bullying and skewed body image, Boonshoft’s future appears incredibly bright. But she seems more concerned with offering advice to young people struggling with body image issues than her own personal success. “We hold in so much fear, selfhatred and anxiety, and that’s counterproductive to the process,” she said. “Your feelings are totally valid and ok, however, they aren’t facts. You are beautiful, strong and worthy of love.” Helen Holmes is a staff writer. Email her a features@nyunews.com.


NYUNEWS.COM | THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

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‘Flore’ weaves different stories into one vibrant film By ISABEL JONES

Offering a complex, tragic and at times heartwarming look at eternal love, “Cafe de Flore” is one of the more unique films of the season. It ignores the barriers of traditional genres and cultural norms and blazes its own trail. Inspiring art direction, a talented cast and a plot reminiscent of M. Night Shyamalan’s best work conspire to make the film a captivating 120 minutes. “Flore” tells two different tales. One is of a single mother, Jacqueline (Vanessa Paradis), living in 1960s Paris with her son, Laurent, who has been diagnosed with Down syndrome. Jacqueline’s devotion to her son, however, soon turns to into obsession when Laurent falls for a girl named Veronique, who also has Down syndrome. The second story is about two recently divorced former high school sweethearts, Carole (Helene Florent) and Antoine (Kevin Parent), struggling to move on with their lives in modern-day Montreal. After 25 lost years together, Carole cannot seem to move past her broken marriage, exacerbated by the emergence of Antoine’s young new girlfriend, Rose.

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Acclaimed Canadian director Jean-Marc Vallee (“The Young Victoria”) beautifully and insightfully brings “Flore” to life. The film takes a unique approach to storytelling, with much of its plot revealed in eerie dream sequences. The audience receives a myriad of cryptic clues to decipher, some remaining unexplained even after the credits have rolled. Part psychological thriller, part period piece and part human-interest tale, “Flore” succeeds in leaving an enthralled audience in its wake. The result is breathtaking and at times terrifying. The film’s immensely talented cast delves deep into their multidimensional characters. Paradis effortlessly transitions from the role of loving mother to woman scorned when her son develops other affections. Similarly, Antoine must straddle the gap between the life he left behind and the one he has just begun. Deeply connected to his ex-wife, but wildly infatuated with his new girlfriend, the eras of Antoine’s life are marked by his romantic entanglements. Florent delivers a strong performance as Carole, who is heartbroken but forced to put on a brave face for the sake of her teenage daughters. “Flore” is of a rare breed — it mesmerizes its audience while beautifully capturing the tragic plight of the lovelorn. But however insightful, the film is not for the faint of heart. Emotional shock and terror plague much of its landscape, with an unsettling undertone running from beginning to end. Matched with the perfect director and an equally skilled cast, “Cafe de Flore” proves to be a chance worth taking. If nothing else, it’s difficult to not get caught up in the characters’ world. Isabel Jones is a staff writer. Email her at film@nyunews.com.

Del Rey’s ‘Paradise Edition’ falls short of paradise By ALEXANDRIA ETHRIDGE

Ladies and gentlemen, prepare yourselves: We are apparently in the midst of Lana del Rey’s comeback. After an abysmal performance on Saturday Night Live last January and a disappointing debut album, the polarizing songwriter has slowly been building steam with low-key gigs and several modeling campaigns. With the release of “Born to Die: The Paradise Edition,” del Rey presents fans with eight new tracks pulled from her old bag of tricks. Much like the songs from “Born to Die,” the new tracks on “The Paradise Edition” feature the slow tempo and drawling vocals that have become the essence of del Rey’s music. However, these droning melodies soon become tiresome, and all the songs sound too similar to stand out from one another. In addition to the plethora of clichés and references that constitute the singer’s lyrical verses, del Rey has given her poorlittle-girl persona a new twist by adding a variety of hackneyed American iconography. “Cola” begins rather explicitly, comparing specific body parts to Pepsi and cherry pie, and then goes on to say, “I pledge allegiance to my dad for teaching me everything he knows.” The tracks are also sprinkled with unabashed references to Elvis and Marilyn Monroe that will surely

COURTESY OF POLYDOR

speak to del Rey’s legions of teenaged fans who pride themselves on their trips to thrift stores and obsessions with “Breakfast at Tiffany’s.” “The Paradise Edition” marks del Rey’s progress as a singer but does not demonstrate much development in any other categories. Her cover of “Blue Velvet” proves that she is not without talent, but as the rest of the album demonstrates, that talent just doesn’t happen to include songwriting. She seems to believe that her success and popularity are derived entirely from the constructed image of a lost, vulnerable girl who speaks in clichés while using every possible opportunity to remind viewers of her alternative lifestyle. The new songs have a decidedly more ’60s dream-pop feel and are aesthetically stunning, but del Rey is in for a rude awakening if she thinks her career will survive on aesthetics alone. Alexandria Ethridge is a staff writer. Email her at music@nyunews.com.

SKYFALL continued from PG. 1

Craig, Bardem star in generation’s best Bond film called up to investigate. After killing anonymous henchmen and indulging his libido, he meets the head of the terrorist group, Silva (Javier Bardem). Craig continues his portrayal of a rough, gritty Bond, more reminiscent of Jason Bourne or Batman than past Bonds. The film delves slightly more into Bond’s broken soul and chaotic upbringing, but thankfully resists fully humanizing him. Craig looks more in-shape and confident than in previous performances, which makes the fight sequences and the one-liners more convincing. Naomie Harris and Berenice Marlohe star as this film’s Bond girls. Harris plays a tough and independent character, while Marlohe’s role in the film is little more than eye candy. Both are overshadowed, however, by the film’s true Bond girl, M, played by Judi Dench. In this installment, M is much more layered and complicated than in any previous film, and the audience sympathizes with her as she battles both physical danger and her inner demons.

Similarly, the introductions of Ben Whishaw’s Q and Ralph Fiennes’s Gareth Mallory are overshadowed by a heavyweight performance from Bardem, who brings the menace he had in “No Country for Old Men” to Silva. Bardem is a psychotic, deeply tortured character, and while Silva is also one of the few explicitly gay villains in recent cinema, he also manages to avoid stereotypes and ends up being the most multidimensional and interesting character in the film. Most notable, however, is Sam Mendes’ brilliant directorial vision. Mendes’ storytelling ability and indulgent cinematic set pieces — a fight in a skyscraper in Shanghai and an epic finale in Scotland — finds the art-versusentertainment equilibrium that nearly every film yearns for. While the first two installments of Craig’s Bond films fell short, “Skyfall” finally gives the current generation a Bond they can grow up with and someday brag about. Henry Hsiao is a foreign correspondent. Email him at film@nyunews.com.


6

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 | NYUNEWS.COM

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation

Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 THE620NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD & DAILY SUDOKU For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Thursday, November 08, 2012

Edited by Will Shortz The seven circled letters reading from top to bottom describe an event occurring at four locations in this puzzle. 1 5 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 22 24 25

27 28

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32 — 35 Drum kit component 37 “Oops, sorry” 38 Build on, with “to” 39 Deuce follower 40 Govt. security 41 Certain spot 42 “Delta of Venus” author 43 Actress Davis 44 One carrying dust, maybe 45 Hides, in a way 46 — 48 Place for a particle accelerator 49 Photoshop option: Abbr. 50 Help-wanted letters 53 “Man who catch fly with chopstick accomplish anything” speaker

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE T H E R M A L

R A N H A R D

O N E A C T S

T A R M A C

T H E J E T S

H A P E U R R D O U M P B O L O T E N E A

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A D D E N D S

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No. 1004

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Puzzle by Bill Thompson

32 Kato Kaelin portrayer on “S.N.L.” 33 Purim’s month 34 Whirl 35 “___ ’em!” (mob’s cry) 36 Graphic beginning? 40 Tots’ sports equipment

53 Singer Jason 54 Rake 55 Team whose Image on the colors are blue “E.T.” poster and orange Feature of Mike 56 Tech whiz, say Wazowski in 57 Meaning of “Ich “Monsters, Inc.” bin ein” in J.F.K.’s Work after work? quote Basket material 59 “In your dreams!” Chair for Cleopatra 62 Big tank

41 Whup

43 Greeting in Oz 44 47 48 51 52

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


NYUNEWS.COM | THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY CHRIS DINARDO OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

HOLIDAY

U.S. deserves day off to vote for president By SAMEER JAYWANT

Americans woke up on Nov. 7 and prepared for a new day, carrying with us the fresh memory of a historic election that managed to change ... well, not too much. The country’s body politic reined in its brief euphoria following our president’s re-election, and the success of some key ballot measures that tested, and passed, the standard of popular social progressivism, coming to the sobering realization that the next four years will carry with them the same political frustrations, challenges and, worst of all, Congressmen, as the preceding four. There will be no weeklong celebrations or Nobel Prizes this time — only the grim resolution that we must press on as a nation under Obama’s leadership, tempered with a predictable, reactionary shift to the right in most states. It’s easy to call 2012 a politically wasted year, as the last 18 months were spent in a tiresome struggle that expectedly ended in an extension of the status quo. But that, in a somewhat perverse, beating-adead-horse kind of way, is quintessential American democracy. Only in America do we spend upwards of $4 billion while campaigning and work ourselves into an ideological furor to say, “We’ll just stick with this.”

The American political machine can arguably be condensed to one word — vote. Politicians, local governments and citizens alike came together this year and repeated the time-honored case that regardless of one’s political affiliation, disillusionment with the system or statistical insignificance of one vote, it is every eligible citizen’s societal duty to contribute to the selection of our leader and representatives. In many ways, their ceaseless urging and infuriatingly persistent email spam, cheesily telling us to “Rock the Vote,” were vindicated by the early election results. Florida seems to have been won by a margin smaller than the entire NYU population. The current difference in the popular vote is approximately the size of Brooklyn. Imagine if hipsters had collectively decided to vote Republican — frightening, isn’t it? But for all their seemingly nonpartisan lobbying, policymakers seem to have overlooked a simple solution to increasing voter turnout — an Election Holiday. For millions of Americans, leaving work to cast a ballot at a polling station half an hour away is simply not an option. Consider the case of a middle-class household where a parent must work two or three jobs, coordinate picking up their kids from school and somehow get dinner on the table. To that individual, voting is, understandably, not

worth it. It is counterintuitive and almost masochistic to subject these people to the agony of enduring an election and then indirectly exclude their vote because of their financial circumstances. Admittedly, many of these constrained potential voters would object strongly to losing a full day of pay for a process that could take under an hour. A modified policy incentive to vote could include a stipulation that all employers must allow their employees a two-hour paid break for registered voters to fulfill their civic duty. Most democratic countries have already acknowledged the national significance of Election Day by voting on Sundays, and others have historically observed it as a day of reflection and responsibility that should not be spent in the workplace. Despite America’s unflinching non-stop culture, it is evident that we are behind the ball on this one. The practical advantages of a national holiday is overshadowed by its symbolic importance in our society. Election Day is the finale of our modern-day political gladiator and a quadrennial milestone that deserves greater recognition in our national consciousness. Sameer Jaywant is a staff columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

ELECTION

Re-election marks time to move forward By RAQUEL WOODRUFF Tuesday night, the American people decided what course our nation would take for the next four years. But for many looking forward, the course — an actual plan of action — seems to have been lost behind the ideals of the 2012 presidential race. This was not an issues election but a concept-based one: platform over policy. Now, newly re-elected President Obama has another four years to take the platform he ran on — one of equal opportunity, affordable health care and accessible education — and execute a plan of action. The cacophony of the Romney campaign will no longer be a distraction, and America can focus again on the right policies to responsibly get us back on track. So, let us recall Obama’s plan for his next term. His goal is to raise taxes for those whose incomes are more than $250,000 a year. Clintonera tax rates are the objective, and the extension of the middle-class

SUBMITTING TO

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tax cuts are the bread and butter of Obama’s economic policy. The president also plans to pass pro-growth measures for the manufacturing sector, cutting taxes for manufacturers here at home and ending deductions for companies sending jobs overseas. In an investment particularly important to students at NYU, Obama will revamp the Perkins loan program under the proposition of rewarding colleges that offer lower tuition prices. He also looks to provide $1 billion in aid to states that reign in higher education costs while awarding those institutions that increase their profits via innovative policies an additional $55 million in initial funding. Republicans object to these proposals because they would add to the national debt. Taxpayers wouldn’t need to worry about the Perkins loan program though, since students would pay off financial aid with interest. Just as the 2012 race displayed, it’s about priorities. One party opposes investments in education and infrastruc-

ture but continues to push for lower taxes on the rich and additional defense spending — a budget already bloated and not requested by our military leaders. And the other supports the rebuilding of roads, bridges and schools to create jobs and spur economic growth and legislation such as Wall Street reform so that our financial system is more transparent and accountable. Even with Obama in office, there are many uncertainties and challenges ahead. We need single-payer health care. This reform would save $400 billion expended each year on insurance companies, and instead, cover the uninsured and provide better coverage for the rest of the 99 percent. While promises of bipartisanship and compromise sound nice, I count on some real progressive change over the next four years without much help from Republicans. And I’m okay with that. Raquel Woodruff is a staff columnist. Email her at opinion@nyunews.com.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Liberal ideals to be tested in next four years

Tuesday’s election was a resounding victory for American progressives, but not just because of the decision to give President Obama a second term. Whether it was through key congressional elections or state-by-state ballot initiatives, liberal politics were advanced not because of the president, but in spite of him. Since the GOP marginalized many minority groups during the campaign, from women to Hispanics to LGBT Americans, Obama’s win can be chalked up more to a lesser-of-two-evils mentality than the optimistic hope that launched him to victory in 2008. In regards to Congressional election results, those wanting stricter fiscal reform saw the triumph of Elizabeth Warren, former overseer of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, in her Massachusetts Senate race. Tammy Baldwin of Wisconsin, a staunch liberal on social issues, became the first openly gay U.S. Senator in history. And somehow, not a single Democratic incumbent for Senate was defeated. In statewide referendums and propositions, advocates of traditional marriage were soundly defeated in Maine, Maryland and Washington, marking the first time ballot initiatives for marriage equality were ever upheld by voters. Meanwhile, Colorado and Washington both legalized the possession of marijuana for recreational use, a blow to drug war advocates who have long warned against its legalization. Now President Obama has an important role to play if he is to continue this liberal trend. In his first term, he directed his Justice Department to stop defending the Defense of Marriage Act in court, putting him on the progressive side of marriage equality. We can only hope that federal drug enforcement does not get in the way of Colorado and Washington allowing marijuana to be regulated within state borders. Unfortunately, as the Drug Enforcement Administration pronounced their continuation of the Controlled Substances Act yesterday, that does not appear to be likely. These results reflect the changing of the tides, naturally rolling towards equality and tolerance, more than they do the Democratic Party. But we still have a president who wants to cut the crown jewels of liberal programs — Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. Whether the newly elected will stick to their guns and risk being labeled as ideologues or compromise values to be cooperative party-players remains to be seen, but the results show that the nation is striving towards a different, forward perspective. Obama, however, did not build that attitude. We did.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Chris DiNardo (Chair), Jessica Littman (Co-Chair), Christopher Drake, Sanchay Jain, Sasha Leshner, Peter Murphy, Raquel Woodruff and Richard Zhang.

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 150 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


8

NYUNEWS.COM | THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 2012 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SPORTS

Denver looking to be AFC’s top contender By NISHAAD RUPAREL The NFL season is about halfway through, but many fans are still uncertain about what to expect from their favorite teams. This season, to be candid, has been a palatable blend of the unexpected and the perennially obvious. We saw the Indianapolis Colts, a team that emerged from one of the worst seasons in franchise history, fight to a 5-3 record under the leadership of a rookie quarterback and a cancer-stricken head coach. We watched Peyton Manning, who was expected to struggle in his recovery from four neck surgeries this summer, rally the Denver Broncos to the top of the American Football Conference West division. We are even starting to fear the Atlanta Falcons, an always dangerous but commonly overlooked squad, as they stand alone as the league’s only unbeaten team. Meanwhile, past AFC powerhouses like the New York Jets and the New Orleans Saints are still struggling to find some traction and locate their identities. With all that said, some things never change. Tony Romo, Michael Vick and Mark Sanchez are still on the hot seat. The Jaguars are still terrible. And of course, Tim Tebow is still making headlines for everthing except his performance. Among the muck and confusion, I’m here to offer some clarity as to how the rest of the season may play out. First, it is important to distinguish the surprisingly good teams from the legitimate Super Bowl contenders. Teams like the Seattle Seahawks and the Indianapolis Colts may have winning records and tons of media attention, but that is only because they’re unexpectedly above average; don’t expect either team to do anything significant this postseason. Looking past the pretenders, the picture is muddled. Teams like the Houston Texans, Baltimore Ravens and Chicago Bears lead their divisions in the standings, and all have respected reputations around the league. However, don’t be fooled by their performance so far. These teams lack either post-season leadership or the ability to perform well under pressure; both of these factors are necessary to pull away with a Super Bowl ring. This season’s Ravens squad is no different from the one that botched an opportunity to eliminate New England last year. We should, however, focus our attention on teams like the Patriots, Broncos, Giants, Steelers, 49ers, Packers and Falcons. While I consider all of these

COURTESY OF MIKE MORBECK

Colts are impressive, but the Broncos will take playoffs. teams to be legitimate contenders because of their proven mixture of experience, leadership and poise, I think the Broncos will be Super Bowl Champions. Manning is playing like he has something to prove, and the running game continues to supplement his efforts and reinforce the Denver offense. The Broncos also have a legitimate pass rush and a relatively easy schedule that may help the team acquire home field advantage in the playoffs. The National Football Conference contender may well be the Atlanta Falcons or even the Giants or Packers. But at the end of the day, Manning’s insatiable desire to win another Super Bowl will fuel Denver to victory. Around the league, we can expect Andy Reid to be fired and Michael Vick to lose his place as an NFL starting quarterback, barring a major turnaround from the Eagles. Tony Romo will likely keep his job, but Dallas will probably try to make serious acquisitions to boost their squad back into relevance. The Jets will have to act on Sanchez’s failures and Rex Ryan’s inadequacy; I won’t try to predict the specific actions of such an unpredictable franchise. Despite all the uncertainty, one thing will always remain true. Regardless of the chaos and mid-season fanfare, the team with the right combination of leadership, experience and desire will win the Super Bowl. This season, I think it is Denver’s time. Nishaad Ruparel is a contributing writer. Email him at sports@nyunews.com.

WSN110812  

Washington Square News November 8, 2012

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