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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 40, No. 33

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2012

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Sandy elicits climate change concerns

Nor’easter to hit city after election

By TONY CHAU

By ISAAC MARSHALL

Roughly a mile away from the coastline and outside of the mandatory evacuation Zone A, Steinhardt senior Nicolette Ursini and her family were confident they were far enough away from Hurricane Sandy’s wrath in Staten Island. But in a record-breaking storm surge, Sandy flooded Ursini’s sixfoot high basement almost to the top. Ursini recalled images of her family’s couches, tables, computer screens and other furniture floating around the basement-turned-pool. “The damage [Sandy] has caused my community is unlike anything I have ever witnessed firsthand before,” she said. But, many environmentalists and climatologists said that a climate change natural disaster like Sandy, which has been widely labeled a once-in-a-century storm, will occur much more frequently in the future.

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Even as many Mid-Atlantic and New England states struggle to recover from the devastation left by Hurricane Sandy, another storm is brewing off the coast of Mexico and is expected to hit the region late Wednesday and into Thursday. The nor’easter is poised to slam the area, packing in rain, snow and winds that can reach up to 50 miles per hour, according to the National Weather Service. With possible coastal flooding and wind gusts potentially knocking down more power lines, some people in the area are worried that the storm could exacerbate conditions in neighborhoods that have not had a chance to recover from Hurricane Sandy. “A lot of people didn’t have VIA WEATHER.GOV

High winds from the northeast threaten areas already ravaged by Hurricane Sandy.

Chastain’s royal outing cannot save ‘Heiress’ By CLIO MCCONNELL

This November, “The Heiress” transports theatergoers back to the mid-19th century. Moisés Kaufman directs a cast of talented, wellknown actors in this revival, which is based on Henry James’ 1880 novel, “Washington Square.” Scrupulously staged, this production stars Jessica Chastain as the titular heiress Catherine Sloper and David Strathairn as her pragmatic father Austin Sloper. Dan Stevens, of “Downton Abbey” fame, plays Chastain’s suitor, Morris Townsend. “The Heiress” follows Morris’s pursuit of Catherine, a plain young woman who is almost cripplingly awkward among company. Catherine is a huge disappointment to her father, who is a successful and wealthy doctor. Catherine is expected to receive quite a large inheritance from her father and is starved for affection while Morris is a handsome, charismatic young man who has just spent the last of his small inheritance.

The heroine’s conflict is that she loves two men, both of whom might only be interested in money. Indeed, her father seems far more concerned with his legacy than with his daughter’s happiness, and we can never be sure whether Morris is truly in love with Catherine or her money. In this production, Stevens’ portrayal of Morris appears entirely genuine from the first act. Instead of being a sleazy opportunist, he gallantly defends Catherine when her father criticizes her and generally shows fondness for the poor girl, who has been emotionally neglected throughout her life. Paired with Chastain’s shy, funny and terrifically tragic Catherine, Morris seems lovesick and even awkward — a far cry from the more calculating figure the script portrays. When we arrive at the very dramatic ending, this choice proves problematic. Through most of the night, Morris’ affection for

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Village restaurant cooks classic French sandwich By JONATHAN KESHISHOGLOU Greenwich Village’s newest French restaurant is all about sandwiches. La Maison du Croque Monsieur located on 17 E. 13th St. centers its menu around the croque monsieur, a grilled ham and cheese sandwich similar to an American grilled cheese. Yves Jadot, one of the restaurant’s owners said there is one special ingredient that is entirely unique to the croque monsieur. It’s called béchamel, a white sauce made up of flour, milk, salt and pepper. The classic croque monsieur is also generally open-faced, but La Maison is willing to make changes to accommodate their customers. “We make them [closedfaced] because people want it on the go,” Jadot said. The restaurant has a variety of croque monsieur sandwiches, ranging from the classic ham and cheese sandwich on toasted sourdough to croques with banana and Nutella. The menu is separated into four categories: classic, new, break-

VIA YELP.COM

La Maison du Croque Monsieur offers a variety of sandwiches. fast and sweet. Each item on the menu is also named after a certain person, such as the classic Mr. Henry or the Mr. Gonzalo. Each name has an interesting story behind it, such as the Mme. Anaïs, named after Anaïs Nin, the famous author who used to live in the building. Other sandwiches have names such

as the Mr. Gore, named after Gore Vidal, which has a combination of mushrooms, sundried tomatoes, goat cheese and pine nuts. According to Jadot, the restaurant is inspired by the local neighborhood, especially the NYU community.

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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2012 | NYUNEWS.COM

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RECOMMENDATIONS At the nearby SoHo playhouse, a relaxed comedy is capturing the attention of New York audiences. “The Other Josh Cohen” is a play about a nice guy. When robbers take everything Josh has to his name, besides a Neil Diamond CD, he has to learn to cope with loss through classic rock. Josh loses some and wins some in life, but the play offers a glimmer of hope for the nice guy. — TALI KUHEL

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“The Perks of Being a Wallflower” is still in theaters, but for anyone looking for a coming-of-age film with a little more humor and English accents, they should definitely check out the Ben Stiller produced, Richard Ayode directed comedy-drama “Submarine.” Starring newcomer Craig Roberts and featuring Sally Hawkins in a supporting role, it is a delightfully awkward journey through adolescence, first love, parental strife and arson. — IFE OLUJOBI

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university GENTRY BROWN city/state TONY CHAU arts STEFAN MELNYK features NICOLA PRING multimedia JAMES KELLEHER copy JORDAN MELENDREZ senior editors HANNAH BORENSTEIN,

In “Sidewalk,” Mitchell Duneier offers an amazing ethnography of the enterprising African-American men who sell books along Sixth Avenue. Compelling and insightful, the book is a must-read, especially for NYU students who regularly walk through the area. — LEORA ROSENBERG

Yellowcard is a band whose music has stayed relevant to my life no matter how old I seem to get. “Southern Air” is no different, and with its masterful guitar and violin solos, catchy hooks and poignant lyrics, this album has been in constant rotation since it came out in August. — BECKY KOVACH VIA MACMILLAN.COM GRAPHIC BY RACHEL PHAM AND EMORY LOPICCOLO FOR WSN

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TODAY

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7 p.m. The Puck Building, 2nd floor | 295 Lafayette St.

7 p.m. The Village Pourhouse and SideBAR | 64 Third Ave. and 120 E. 15th St.

7 p.m. to midnight Housing Works Bookstore Cafe | 126 Crosby St.

Support your candidate at SideBAR or the Village Pourhouse while you wait for the presidential winner to be announced. The Village Pourhouse will offer $5 Barack O-Bombs for Democrats while SideBAR will serve $5 Rum-ney shots for Republicans.

Watch the results come in at Housing Works as polls close for Election Day 2012. If you watched the debates at the bookstore and used the bookstore’s punchcard, then you will receive a bucket of beers.

ELECTION NIGHT LIVE

Watch the election results with the NYU Wagner Graduate School of Public Service. Enjoy refreshments, debates and activities with fellow Wagner students. The event is open to Wagner students, alumni, faculty, staff and their guests only. Register online at wagner.nyu.edu/electionnightlive.

CELEBRATE OUR NEW PRESIDENT

SNAPSHOT

ELECTION NIGHT RESULTS WATCH PARTY

ON THE WIRE

Small step for two men, giant leap towards Bigfoot

Despite widespread dismissal of the existence of Bigfoot, some scientists are still hunting for evidence of the enormous mythical creature. Next spring, Idaho State University professor Jeffrey Meldrum plans to launch the Falcon Project, a blimp with a thermalimaging camera designed to detect Bigfoot in its natural habitat. Meldrum has already devoted much of his research to finding Bigfoot: He published a book in 2006 called “Sasquatch: Legend Meets Science.” He was approached by William Barnes, a Utah native who claimed to have seen Bigfoot in northern California in 1997, and together the two have spearheaded the Falcon Project. The pair hopes to raise $300,000 in private donations to begin their expedition but has yet to raise any funds. — REUTERS

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Students rally in response to claims that UCLA considers race in admissions — DAILY BRUIN

A halal vendor serves Union Square residents during Hurricane Sandy.

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University plans for smoke-free campus — THE GW HATCHET

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FRANCIS POON About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Jaewon Kang at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

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NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2012 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

NYU professors share insight on Election 2012 By SUSIE PARK and PIA BRAR As Americans head to voting booths today to decide the future of the United States for the next four years, NYU professors weigh in on Election Day 2012. “I still have a difficult time identifying with one party; I vote for the best person, regardless of affiliation, to lead our country. I’m voting for Obama. Again. Am I completely satisfied with what he’s accomplished in the past four years? No. Do I think there is anyone who could’ve done better? Absolutely not. The process of healing this country from the inside-out is timely and complicated. I have faith in Obama because he has faith in us. It’s that simple.” — TAMUIRA REID, LSP professor of Writing “If my candidate wins or if my candidate does not win, I will do the same thing. [I will] analyze, organize, agitate and fight for what I think is right for the country. This is what we should all do, no matter who wins and [for whom we voted]. Politicians only act in the public interest when the public makes its interests well-known.” — STEPHEN DUNCOMBE, Gallatin associate professor “Right before the election, candidates can’t touch on any hard issues, like climate change. I’m hoping that whoever is elected will be able to start tackling issues related to climate change. I’m also worried about people not being able to vote because of the hurricane.” — CATHERINE KING, LSP professor of Environmental Studies “Whether Mitt Romney wins or loses on Election Day 2012, one of the biggest questions that will arise for the Republican Party is how it can expand its coalition to include groups that are becoming ever more powerful in American politics. The party will face serious electoral trouble in the future unless it grows its support among black, Latino and Asian voters as well as the youngest generations of Americans of every background. Watch for a renewed struggle in the GOP between its base, which tends to resist responding to these demographic trends, and its leadership, which knows that the party must gain new supporters to remain viable.” — PATRICK EGAN, CAS assistant professor of Politics

By WICY WANG

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Nor’easter to hit East Coast on heels of Sandy

power, and PSEG [a New Jersey gas and electric utility company] called them and said they wouldn’t be able to evaluate their situation until Nov. 9,” said Stern freshman Sarah Rothstein, who went home to Glen Rock, N.J. during the hurricane. Before her town will even have the effects of Sandy evaluated by the local electricity provider, the nor’easter will already be upon them, setting back recovery. For communities such as Point Lookout, N.Y. in Long Island, the storm is leaving residents not only pessimistic, but also unsure of what to do next. “They say we won’t have power or gasoline for at least six weeks,

and now that this storm is coming Wednesday, we’re really not sure what to expect because the town is still underneath water,” said Katie Ryan, a resident of Point Lookout. The nor’easter also finds the NYU area at a bad time, with many local businesses just beginning to get back on their feet. “We just opened last night. It took a couple hours to clean and throw all the food in the garbage ... we tried to avoid a huge loss, but the loss happened,” said Amir Ibrahim, a 25-year-old employee at Mamoun’s Falafel on St. Marks Place. Despite the loss, Ibrahim was not too worried about the coming storm. “I don’t think it’s going to be as

strong,” he said. “Maybe, I think, we won’t even feel it.” Those in the local homeless community, such as Mike Spider, are a bit more cautious about the storm. “We had to find somewhere warm to sleep,” Spider said. “The shelters were all messed up, filled, overloaded ... finally, they shut the shelters down.” While the nor’easter is not forecasted to be nearly as bad as Sandy, the impact of the storm will test the Tri-State area’s resilience in recovering from a natural disaster. Additional reporting by Tony Chau. Isaac Marshall is a staff writer. Email them at cstate@nyunews.com.

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Sandy impact puts climate change in perspective “Climate change is causing more extreme weather,” said Nicole Heller an ecologist at Duke University. “There is no doubt that increased carbon dioxide and other greenhouses gases in the atmosphere are making our weather more extreme, like more intense rainfall events and stronger hurricanes.” But Jerry Brotzge, a professor at the University of Oklahoma and managing director of the Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms, disputed the role of climate change in contributing to catastrophes like Sandy. “Hurricanes hitting [New York City] are not that unusual, and we can expect more in the future, with or without global warming,” Brotzge said. However, Edwin Gerber, an assistant professor at the Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science at NYU, said there are effects of climate change, even if they do not involve stronger hurricanes. “Climate change will make us more vulnerable to storms in the future due to sea level rise,” Gerber said. “This means that an equivalent hurricane in a few decades will cause more damage than today.”

The power loss in downtown Manhattan and the major disruption of the New York City transit system were embedded in Sandy’s destruction. With the future of New York increasingly vulnerable to destruction by natural disaster, the city may be short on time to come up with a game plan to combat that potential doomsday. “Let’s assume that we decide that we’re not damaging our planet and later on find out that we were. It literally could be too late,” Mayor Michael Bloomberg said at a press conference last Wednesday. “The consequences of making a mistake in one direction is pretty severe, and I think what we have to do is learn from this and protect our infrastructure to the extent possible.” Rae Zimmerman, NYU professor of Planning and Public Administration and director for the Institute for Civil Infrastructure System, emphasized one major aspect of protecting the city. “The most important thing is to prevent the flooding,” Zimmerman said. “There’s got to be some way of sealing or elevating the system.”

Even though Zimmerman’s colleague Carlos Restrepo recommended an environmental approach to protecting the city through restoring its natural ecosystem, he said such a redesign would face numerous obstacles. “Investment in climate change adaptation will be substantial and is unlikely to be successful if pursued only at the local level,” Restrepo said. “Either you put the money in the redesign and the reconstruction, and that’ll be very, very expensive and difficult and take a very long time,” Zimmerman said. “Or you’re going to have to acknowledge that you’re going to have very expensive recovery and preemptive actions.” Without the infrastructure improvements, those who suffered from Sandy — like Ursini — are left to wonder what is in store for them. “If they become more frequent and stronger, I can only imagine what New York, especially Staten Island, is going to look like,” she said. Tony Chau is city/state editor. Email him at tchau@nyunews.com.

Student loan debt continues to soar

Nearly 90 percent of first year graduate student Lisa Luo’s tuition is covered by student loans. It is a burden to be sure, but Luo, who is studying computer science at the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, has carefully broken down her living expenses. She lives off campus to minimize room and board and works a part-time job. “I took out loans according to a budget I calculated for the year that did not include wages earned from part-time work, so I might take out a smaller amount for the spring semester,” she said. Luo might be a graduate student, but student debt is a concern of undergraduate and graduate students alike. In fact, it has become a problem with national ramifications, as the total amount of student debt soars to over a trillion dollars, which is even more than credit-card debt. Horror stories of college graduates struggling to pay rent

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while working multiple jobs have almost become commonplace. Within NYU, 54 percent of the graduating class of 2011 took out loans — both federal and private — in the 2010-2011 school year, according to director for public affairs Philip Lentz. A U.S. News and World Report survey stated the percentage of students nationwide who took out federal loans for the 2011-2012 school year is approximately 34 percent, and only 10 percent took out private loans. While the nationwide debt average of the graduating 2011 senior is around $26,600, NYU’s infamously high tuition is reflected in the average 2011 undergraduate debt, which was $36,351. The reason for NYU’s pricey tuition is multi-faceted. “For universities like NYU, with ambitious construction plans, student tuition becomes a key revenue stream to realize those ambitions,” said professor Randy

Martin, art and public policy chair at the Tisch School of the Arts. However, because NYU does not make public its fiscal affairs, exactly how its student tuition is spent remains unclear. “I think students and parents should know what their tuition goes to,” said NYU social and cultural analysis professor Andrew Ross, who advocates greater transparency in universities’ fiscal matters. Students acknowledge that NYU is expensive, but the fact that they are attending the school says something about how they view the price tag. “People forget NYU’s high tuition is in line with those of private universities,” said Steinhardt senior Jameson Lee. “Also, New York City isn’t cheap. You also have access to affordable housing and world class professors.” “And when you graduate you’re becoming part of a gigantic alumni network,” he said. “When you’re in school, you can take advantage of internships and student networking,

and you leave with the maturity and identity of a New Yorker. These are things that you can’t put a price on, but they are worth making sacrifices for.” The correct magnitude of those sacrifices is the question. There is an increasingly large group of protesters who believe that tertiary education in the United States has become extravagantly overpriced. “I come from Scotland, where the government paid me to go to college,” said professor Ross, who is part of the Strike Debt campaign, an offshoot of the Occupy Wall Street movement. “It’s agonizing for me to walk into a classroom where the majority of students are struggling under the burden of student debt, and they don’t even know it.” Part two of this article will appear at a later date. Wicy Wang is a contributing writer. Email her at university@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2012 | NYUNEWS.COM

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Traditional French ham and cheese sandwich comes to Village “We know how expensive it is to study in the city, so we made a product that was affordable,” Jadot said. Most sandwiches are priced around $7.00, with sides such as coleslaw or chips for only a couple of dollars extra, making the restaurant a good destination for students who want quality food for a relatively low price. Even though La Maison du Croque Monsieur is inspired by the Greenwich Village community, the restaurant’s interior is reminiscent of a quaint French bistro. Antiquated lamps and mirrors line the second floor of the building, where most of the tables are located, creating a very relaxing atmosphere to enjoy a well-made sandwich. La Maison du Croque Monsieur also has plans to start a delivery service soon, and Steinhardt freshman Rachel Lindsey is looking forward to the prospect of delivering to local students. “It’s so good. I can’t wait until they start delivering,” Lindsey said. “I’ll have dinner for the rest of my life.” Jonathan Keshishoglou is a staff writer. Email him at dining@nyunews.com.

EDITED BY LAVYA YALAMANCHI DINING@NYUNEWS.COM

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P O T

Snacks for the season: Tips for dips By ARIANA DIVALENTINO

MEDITERRANEAN GREEK YOGURT DIP (Trader Joe’s, $2.99) This dip has a Greek yogurt and feta cheese base and a healthy dose of spices, so it is both creamy and flavorful without being heavy or overpowering. The light and tangy dip tastes great on plain tortilla chips and would also be a perfect match for wheat crackers and pita chips. SABRA SPICY GUACAMOLE (Westside Market, $3.99) Typical guacamole is already fresh and flavorful, but this kind has a spicy kick that contrasts the creaminess in a surprisingly delicious way. Gallatin freshman Victoria Marino found the dip unusual but tasty. “I like that it has chunks of avocado in it,” she said. “It tastes very natural.” Try this guacamole for an interesting twist on a classic. STONEWALL KITCHEN BLACK BEAN SALSA (Space Market, $6.59) Rather than tomato-based, this salsa is mostly black beans and corn, giving it a garden-fresh taste. It is just spicy enough without being intolerable, and the corn has a hint of sweetness. This would be the perfect dip for any sort of corn chips. SUN-DRIED TOMATO PESTO HUMMUS (Agata & Valentina, $3.99) Hummus is a slightly more exotic dip option, but can run the risk of being too bland or heavy. This style, however, is topped with sundried tomato pesto, which adds amazing flavor and cuts some of the heaviness. This dip is good for not only chips or crackers, but also for vegetables, if you’re looking for a healthier option.

WHAT’S IN YOUR FRIDGE? By PIA BRAR Allie Connolly and Brittany Yu are two LSP sophomores rooming together at Second Street residence hall. Even though the two roommates are very different — Connolly is passionate about painting and photography while Yu loves hip-hop music and worships the New York Giants — they share a passion for cooking bizarre recipes and consuming large amounts of sugar. COOKIES “We have two different rolls of cookie dough,” said Connolly. “Sugar cookie dough and chocolate chip.” The two roommates bake cookies every day, but Connolly said this is done with moderation. “We keep the dough rolled in the freezer, slice one [portion] off, put it on a pan and bake it,” she said. “And then ... you have your own individual, fresh-baked cookie.” They also keep their overstuffed minifridge stocked with milk to complement their cookie-a-day diet. “If you have a cookie, you also obviously need milk,” Yu said. “But our fridge doesn’t close properly, so sometimes we have to throw out our milk.” She and Connolly have to buy new milk every two days, which they explained is a huge waste of food and money. “A mini-fridge is not enough for a college student who doesn’t have a meal plan,” Yu said.

With football season well underway, basketball season starting up and the presidential election right around the corner, many students are preparing to gather around their TVs with lively debates over politics or teams, and of course, snacks. No election or sports party would be complete without big bowls of chips and dip, so try adding some culinary variety to your party with these unique and delicious options.

HENNA EGGS In addition to their love for sugar, Conolly and Yu like to explore unique flavors by combining unexpected ingredients. Through this process, they have come up with their own breakfast recipe. The roommates discovered that the henna leaf, usually used in a paste to decorate hands, is also a delicious and healthy egg seasoning. “We’ve got a bottle of henna in our fridge because it’s really good in an egg scramble with some feta,” said Yu. MINT LEAVES, TOMATO PASTE, COOKIE BUTTER Because neither Connolly or Yu has a meal plan, Connolly cooks a stew in a gigantic pot at the beginning of every week. “We eat it as the week goes on,” Connolly stated. “Last week we had chick pea stew.” Yu chooses to add mint leaves from Trader Joe’s to her stews because it enhances the flavors. She explained that tomato paste and cookie butter are two inexpensive ingredients used to thicken the stews These students know how to prepare for the long winter based on the contents of their refridgerator. Pia Brar is a staff writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

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While watching TV, snack on dips like specialty guacamole. GREEK TZATZIKI (Westside Market, $4.99) For those unfamiliar with tzatziki, it is a creamy dip made with yogurt, cucumbers and herbs. “The distinct dill flavor reminds me of my mother’s herb garden,” CAS freshman Tanner Nelson said of the natural taste. This dip in particular is very light, with more cucumber than yogurt, giving it a fresh quality. Use something sturdy, like pita chips or vegetables, to hold the sizable cucumber chunks. Ariana Divalentino is a staff writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.

Essex Market brings culinary cultures indoors By KATYA SIMKHOVICH

The Essex Market has a welcoming atmosphere that makes shopping a more enjoyable experience and provides the opportunity to meander amongst friendly and enthusiastic vendors. It is the result of 76 years of local residents’ combined efforts, transient immigrant populations, three mayors, local merchants and their suppliers. What began as a safe harbor for street merchants seeking sanctuary from crowded streets has turned into a cohesive indoor market that caters to many local restaurants and residents. The influx of Puerto Rican immigrants in the 1950s has significantly influenced the market, even today. One can find a respectable amount of yucca, aloe, cabocha squash, cassava dried beans, among several other Puerto Rican produce sold by Batista’s Grocery and Viva Fruits & Vegetables. As much as an influence that Batista’s Grocery seems to impose, the market’s diversity extends to a myriad of goods and produce, ranging from imported cheeses and sardines in hot tomato sauce to macrobiotic Japanese delicacies and locally sourced heritage pork chops. Other vendors include Heritage Meat Shop, New Star Fish Market,

Rainbo’s Fish, Roni-Sue’s Chocolates, Saxelby Cheesemongers, Brooklyn Taco Company, Port Rice Importing Co., Tra La La Juice Bar and even a place to get your hair done — Aminova’s Barber Shop. Prices at the market are reasonable, depending on how artisanal and local you want to get. Produce is cheap, with peppers and eggplant for sale at 99 cents per pound. If you happen to be yearning to splurge, you can also find octopus marinated in olive oil for $9.95 from Formaggio Essex, or a small bag of chocolate-covered bacon for $5 from Roni-Sue’s Chocolates. Andrew Clark, 31, who works at Formaggio Essex, agreed. “There’s always a nice buzz in the air,” Clark said. “Modern supermarkets are convenient, but they’re so sterile, but here it’s very lovely, and you can come here and actually enjoy shopping for your groceries.” Steinhardt freshman Annamaria Louloudis said the atmosphere was very welcoming. “I love the communal feel of the place,” Louloudis said. “The vendors are friendly to customers and to [one other] plus there are tons of awesome finds.” Katya Simkhovich is a contributing writer. Email her at dining@nyunews.com.


NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2012 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

ARTS

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TV’s weakest links clutter airwaves By ISABEL JONES

’Tis the season for cancellation. While some shows like NBC’s “Animal Practice” and CBS’ “Made in Jersey” may have had their runs cut short, there are other shows still on the air that deserve cancellation just as much, if not more. The most obvious example is NBC’s lifeless sitcom “Whitney.” Created by and starring comedian Whitney Cummings, the show held great promise. But it has quickly devolved into a train wreck. Cliché dialogue, painfully forced acting and overt stockcharacters disgrace a time-slot once held by fan-favorite “Will and Grace.” The comical plight of the modern 30-somethings featured in the show has gone too far. Renewed for its second season, the show’s longevity is a wonder, especially considering its dismal ratings and utter lack of critical acclaim. If the similarly terrible, albeit more buzzworthy “Are You There, Chelsea?” can be dumped, there’s hope yet

for the demise of “Whitney.” While the age of the primetime soap opera has hit its stride, turning out many well-mounted, deliciously guilty pleasures such as ABC’s “Revenge,” it is a marvel that such low-grade drama as “Grey’s Anatomy” has managed to survive for nine seasons. The show is an embarrassment to medical dramas, focusing on the steamy lives of inordinately beautiful medical interns and residents in lieu of actual drama. Such antics leave little time for the patients, and the other characters are so dull and lifeless they cannot hope to redeem the series. The only bright spot in the show’s ensemble is Sandra Oh, and even her performance in the series leaves much to be desired. Since it gets high ratings, routinely topping the coveted 18 to 49 bracket ratings, cancellation is unlikely to grace “Anatomy.” But perhaps the doctors in the show will grow tired of such hijinks after so many seasons. Other shows seem to be more clearly on the way out. Singing

Danish ‘Affair’ shallow yet royal treat By YIFANG ZHAO

Aside from a handful of history buffs and Danish nationalists, only a few people are familiar with the rule of King Christian VII, whose reign lasted from 1749 to 1808. It is a shame because his story is a remarkable tale that many would enjoy. It is with this in mind that Nikolaj Arcel directed “A Royal Affair,” a thrilling depiction of the rule of Christian VII and Denmark’s official entry for Best Foreign Language Film at the 85th Academy Awards. The film is set in Denmark during the Age of Enlightenment, a time of radical shifts away from established norms. Spearheading the charge toward change are Queen Caroline Matilda (Alicia Vi-

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kander) and Dr. Johann Struensee (Mads Mikkelsen). Together they entice Christian VII (Mikkel Boe Folsgaard) to play the role of an enlightened despot introducing progressive reforms. Amid these important historical events is a love triangle between three main characters. Most of the action in the plot revolves around the rapidly escalating love story, adding continuous intrigue. All of the critical moments in the film are historically accurate, and the plot largely arranges itself around the historical chronology. The writing is high-quality and the plot engaging, though there are some scenes that are incongruous with the broader course of the film. Even when making a historical film, a director must decide which parts can be included or excluded. Certain unnecesary scenes in the film could have been expurgated without sacrificing much historical merit. Thematically, the film dabbles in many areas, including feminism, class struggle and religion. However, it merely plays in these areas and does not develop them into integral elements of the story. Viewers expecting a profound message will be disappointed. That’s not to denigrate “A Royal Affair,” which is still a fine movie for anyone who wishes to see an intelligent and engaging, if shallow film. Yifang Zhao is a contributing writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com.

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its swan song at last is NBC’s “The Office,” left in tatters by the departure of Steve Carell’s character, Michael Scott. Also retreating is The CW’s “Gossip Girl,” leaving its sixth season only 10 episodes deep. With storylines growing thin, this is a wise move for the show. A similar voluntary step backward would also be welcome from the likes of preteen trash “90210,” and ABC Family’s “Pretty Little Liars.” It was bad enough the first time “90210” aired in the ’90s, and the ever-evolving mystery of “Pretty Little Liars” is becoming trite. Television euthanasia is recommended in both cases. Ideally, executives should take a cue from shows like Showtime’s strongly written and wellacted “Homeland,” AMC’s “Mad Men” or NBC’s ever-clever “Parks and Recreation.” For many other shows, however, a spring cleaning will be sorely needed. Isabel Jones is a staff writer. Email her at entertainment@nyunews.com

Wild, inconsistent tone plagues otherwise interesting “Heiress” Catherine makes him appear endearing, but a few incongruously callous statements in the script serve to unravel his otherwise lovable performance. Audience members may leave the theater wondering whether or not Catherine makes the right choice. It is this troublesome denouement that points to the show’s greatest misstep: an awfully inconsistent tone. What begins as a comedy of caricatures awkwardly morphs into an emotional tragedy. The saving grace of this version of “The Heiress” is Chastain’s steady portrayal of Catherine as a character worthy of sympathy. In the beginning Catherine is naive to the point of pity, but by the end she presents a gracefully disillusioned woman who has finally emerged from under the shadow of others’ low opinions. “The Heiress” is playing at the Walter Kerr Theatre, 219 W. 48th

Discover the city’s unsung music heroes

St., through Feb. 10. For tickets and more information, see theheiressonbroadway.com. Clio McConnell is books/theater editor. Email her at cmcconnell@nyunews.com.

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Strong performances cannot save problematic production.

By JOSHUA JOHNSON

Even in the wake of Hurricane Sandy, a heightened sense of community could be found, not only at NYU but throughout the entire city. With that in mind, there are bands within New York City who deserve recognition for their excellent work. Here is a playlist of top picks performed by local artists.

1. “ANAHITA” — Wilsen Imagine if you took the “Friday Night Lights” theme song but upped the epic-factor tenfold. Then you would be somewhere in the vicinity of this song’s awesomeness.

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2. “BEAST” — Everest Cale The silky indie-rock stylings of “Beast” explode halfway through the song when the band starts to channel the glory days of Alice in Chains.

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3. “PARENTHESES” — The Antlers Revel in the combination of sharp, violent guitars and Peter Silberman’s soft, eerie falsetto. 4. “MAGIC” — Blonds Cari Rae completely owns this song with her sultry, jazzy voice, proving that Blonds is one of the best up-and-coming bands in the city.

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5. “BREATH AND SOUND” — The Spring Standards Heather Robb’s touching, sensitive voice really pulls at the heartstrings in this quietly forceful track. 6. “INTERSTELLAR” — Frankie Rose Better known as the drummer for the Dum Dum Girls, Rose makes her presence felt with this assertive number from her debut solo album.

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7. “A MORE PERFECT UNION” — Titus Andronicus Listen to this song if you’d like to hear about a modern New Jersey man fighting in the Civil War or if you just like really good rock ‘n’ roll songs. Joshua Johnson is music editor. Email him at jjohnson@nyunews.com.


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WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2012 | NYUNEWS.COM

2012 INFLUENTIAL ISSUE Every year, WSN profiles students who have made a meaningful impact on the NYU community. We are now accepting nominations for the 2012 Influential Issue. Check nyunews.com for more information.

The New York Times Syndication Sales Corporation

Eighth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 THE620NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD & DAILY SUDOKU For Information Call: 1-800-972-3550 For Tuesday, November 06, 2012

Edited by Will Shortz 1 5 10 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 23 24 25 34

Across Like the people on the Forbes 400 list Mountains out of molehills ___ facto Restatement? First group to get invites Like an “Open 24 hours” sign, perhaps It’s impressive Former French first lady ___ Bruni-Sarkozy “Surely you ___” “The Tsar’s Bride” composer N.Y.S.E. debut Prefix with -logue It has its own Grammy category Taken into account in terms of a container’s weight

35 Crosswise, at sea 36 Some genetic coding, for short 37 Dramatic cry 38 Sneaked 39 Do some post office work 40 Crony 41 Wipe the board clean 42 Possible result of doing questionable accounting 43 NASA launch of 1990 46 Untreated 47 Cricket World Cup powerhouse: Abbr. 48 Beginning of 20-, 25- or 43-Across 56 Minimal resistance 57 Coupling 58 Spanish-speaking explorer 60 Airhead

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE M E C C A T L A S C E N A B R E V E A V E R H E R R A M T S A R T H C E R E M A D J O N G O L D E B O S S

A R S A T F I G A R I E A L L O U S E

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S A F A R I N A V Y S E A L

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61 Programme shower 62 Operating system since 1969 63 Leave rolling in the aisles 64 Witchcraft trials city 65 John, Paul or John Paul

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Down One who knows what it means to travel Cake decorator Spiced Indian tea Feedback producers Add for good measure Oil of ___ Straight-bladed dagger Home for Ibsen Observed intently Locked up Furtive look Nothing to write home about Airing Went 80 or 90, say ___ folder Kind of infection Pacific island nation Toothbrush brand “The ___ Home,” 1996 Emilio Estevez film Carrying a lot? Push away

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Puzzle by Ethan Cooper

31 Tortellini in ___ (Italian dish) 32 Tear open 33 Not glossy, as a photo 38 Army barber’s specialties 39 Was obsequious, informally 41 Israeli carrier

42 ___ example 44 Light, as a conversation 45 Louis Braille or Louis Chevrolet 48 Joins as a couple 49 Word repeated before “the gang’s all here” 50 “Cómo ___?”

51 Most eligible for service 52 Grinding place 53 Firehouse fixture 54 “What were you thinking?!” 55 Common game show prize 59 Guitar, slangily

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2012 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY CHRIS DINARDO OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

FOREIGN POLICY STAFF EDITORIAL

Iran’s nuclear potential safety risk for U.S. By MIA APPELBAUM The 2012 presidential campaigns have come and gone, and they certainly have confirmed that bipartisan cooperation is scarce. Still, there are some issues on which we all agree, including Iran’s nuclear threat. President Obama emphasized this during the foreign policy debate: “But to the issue of Iran, as long as I’m president of the United States, Iran will not get a nuclear weapon ... Iran is a threat to our national security, and it is a threat to Israel’s national security. We cannot afford to have a nuclear arms race in the most volatile region of the world.” And Gov. Mitt Romney agreed: “A nuclear-capable Iran is unacceptable to America. It presents a threat not only to our friends but ultimately a threat to us.” The candidates exhibited our country’s bipartisan opposition to a nuclear-armed Iran, stressing the threats it poses to our allies and to us. We must remember that the reverberations of this situation are boundless: U.S. citizens would be affected as

much as the international community. Although Tehran insists that its nuclear program would be for innocuous purposes like generating electricity, its uranium enrichment suggests otherwise. If Iran were to obtain nuclear capability, it would trigger an arms race in the Middle East, exacerbating the region’s current unrest from the Arab Spring. Saudi Arabia and Egypt, for example, have already expressed interest in pursuing a nuclear program. Iran maintains close ties to terrorist organizations such as Hezbollah and Palestinian Islamic Jihad, and could transfer its nuclear weaponry to these groups. If Islamic terrorists wield nuclear power, it would end global stability and pose the largest strategic threat to the United States in history. Iran’s quest for obtaining nuclear weapons will not only encourage many Arab nations in the Middle East to follow suit, but it will also rise to a new world prominence. This new status will transpose many nations’ allegiance to Iran from the United States, shuffling the international power rankings, causing us to drop down. Our global reputation will not only be damaged; our effort to deliver

justice to the region would also be significantly curtailed. If Iran gains nuclear capability, our fragile economy will shatter. Iran will be able to prevent robust oil-producing countries from exporting to the United States, causing gas prices to skyrocket and U.S. consumers to lose confidence. It also will decrease domestic manufacturing and reverse the effects of the Obama administration’s bank bailout and stimulus work over the past few years. The bipartisan opposition to Iran’s pursuit of nuclear weapons emphasizes that this issue is non-negotiable. A nuclear Iran is a danger to global security, and united opposition to its developing program is the strongest form of defense. This is why the entire U.S. Congress agrees with both the President and his challenger that crippling sanctions against Iran must be increased, and a credible military option must remain on the table. Mia Appelbaum is a contributing writer. Email her at opinion@nyunews.com.

MEDIA CRITICISM

NY Post critique silences discourse By CHRIS DINARDO Last week a report from The New York Post lambasted a graduate class in the School for Continuing and Professional Studies at NYU. The report was originally kept exclusive, probably because no self-respecting journalistic venue would ever dream of publishing it. The class, Transnational Terrorism, is taught by former Navy criminal investigator Marie-Helen Maras. She recently assigned a project asking students to describe a hypothetical terrorist attack along with its aftermath, factoring in sources of funding, number of operatives and method of execution. The utter depravity in silencing students in an educational environment from exploring the root causes of terrorism discounts the scholarly approach to defending against, and thus preventing, such a plot. By avoiding any sort of empathy and promoting complete suppression instead, we avoid stopping the ills that have plagued us and ensure they can continue. The Post, recalling the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, noted, “The [New York City Police Department] lost 23 cops

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on that dark day, and the Port Authority saw 37 cops vanish in the rubble.” But using the deaths of 9/11 victims as a be-all, end-all red line for debate is not magnanimous. Treating terrorism as taboo disregards the important role it can play. It is cowardly to use those men and women who lost their lives as a tool for stifling discussion concerning why their lives were cut short. A class like this and, by extension, a university that harbors it encourages honest and open discussion in an intellectual environment. The Post should commend an assignment like this, which attempts to tackle a dangerous problem in a different manner than the newpaper’s age-old prescription of fighting death with more death, using American troops or bombs or missiles. Unfortunately, the Post doesn’t think we should discuss the ramifications of terrorism, unless they come from the plot of actual terrorists — in other words, until it’s too late. It seems they prefer enjoying the unification that occurs in the aftermath of tragedy to brainstorming ways of preventing it. Even worse, the Post goes on to use some of our brave men and women in blue to slander the assignment some more. An NYPD source for the Post’s

story called it “the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever heard.” The source continued, “What is this, we have our students do the work for the terrorists?” Sept. 11, the NYPD’s logistical Rumspringa from citywide crime prevention to national terror squelching, has allowed the police to capitalize on our fear while unnecessarily ramping up on scare tactics. It’s preposterous to presume that we are any less safe as a result of hypotheticals from this class. The fact that this assignment can even stir debate sends a clear message: We can’t talk about aggression against America unless we are trying to stifle it through aggression by America, and we can’t attempt to enter the minds of those who want to do us harm because, somehow, that allows them to win. Cheerleading our current practices overseas assures moral defeat, not some homework assignment at NYU. I may have to strain my neck to see the Post and NYPD on their high horse, but bear in mind that it’s a long fall down. Chris DiNardo is opinion editor. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

Governmental changes the Editorial Board hopes to see by 2016 The future of our country is dependent on what millions of Americans will decide today: our next president. Our nation currently faces a myriad of social and economic problems. There are a few changes we at WSN would like to see by the time we get our next opportunity to choose a commander-in-chief. To most voters, economic issues are most important. First, the Bush tax cuts, which are expiring in January, should not be extended for the wealthy. The issues of unemployment and growth must also be addressed. Spending should be curbed to create a balanced budget and to lower the deficit. This should be combined with tax increases for the wealthy and cuts for the middle class. Once these steps are taken, we can again increase regulation to ensure the long-term health of our economy. In four years’ time, we hope to see women’s rights to abortion and birth control uncontested by the government. It is time for America to trust its female citizens to make intelligent choices regarding such personal decisions. Similarly, we look forward to tolerance regarding gay marriage, another private decision made between two people whose relationship validity should not be questioned by politicians. We hope to see the government do more about crushing student debt and rising education costs. With more grants and loans from the government, we hope that by 2016 the price of higher education for most students will have fallen considerably, so that our future leaders are better equipped to handle problems like the ones we are facing now. Neither candidate’s foreign policy plan would be our ideal position in the coming years. We must remember that diplomacy, not threats or arms races, is the key to safety for Americans at home and abroad. Diplomacy to the Middle East is, as always, of particular importance. We hope that by 2016 our leaders will have learned to communicate better with Israel and its enemies to ensure the safety of its citizens and our own. The tenor of the 2012 campaign is reflective of the partisan divide in both Washington and the media. Instead of engaging in rational and responsible debate, candidates amplify problems, negate solutions and are not held accountable for misleading rhetoric. Political action committees are virtually able to buy politicians and elections, and we hope to see them much more regulated by the time the next election rolls around. We all have the responsibility to educate ourselves and stay engaged with these policies even after Election Day. Voting is only effective if we are politically literate and committed to an ongoing conversation regarding these issues.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Chris DiNardo (Chair), Jessica Littman (Co-Chair), Christopher Drake, Sanchay Jain, Sasha Leshner, Peter Murphy, Raquel Woodruff and Richard Zhang.

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 150 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


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NYUNEWS.COM | TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 2012 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

SPORTS

EDITED BY THE WSN STAFF SPORTS@NYUNEWS.COM

Ronaldo, Messi again atop list for individual FIFA award By NICO CANTOR

FIFA’s Ballon d’Or is the most prestigious individual award in soccer. The award, which denotes the best soccer player of the previous year, will be presented on Jan. 7, 2013. Out of all the players in every league around the world, a shortlist was announced last week with 23 players. On Nov. 29, three finalists will be chosen. Finally, captains and head coaches of national teams and international media representatives selected by French magazine France Football will cast their votes. After this process, a winner will be chosen. It would be shocking if Lionel Messi or Cristiano Ronaldo were to lose this prize to a third player, be it Andrés Iniesta, Xavier “Xavi” Hernández Creus or Iker Casillas. No other player has won the Ballon d’Or since 2007 when former A.C. Milan star Kaká came in first place over Ronaldo and Messi. Ronaldo would go on to win in 2008, followed by Messi, who has recieved the Ballon d’Or three consecutive years. Had I written this article in the summer, I would have said there is no chance anyone could take the Player of the Year Award away from Ronaldo. All the signs pointed toward him: Real Madrid won La Liga with a decisive nine point lead over F.C. Barcelona as well as the Spanish Super Cup over Barça. My opinion began to change

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Either Lionel Messi or Cristiano Ronaldo will most likely receive the most prestigious individual award in soccer. when Portugal reached the semifinals in the European Football Championship and fell to Spain via a penalty shootout. Ronaldo performed well throughout the tournament. The unstoppable Portuguese striker was taking his country to the top until he had to kick one of five decisive penalty shots against Spain to proceed to the finals. Ronaldo was waiting to kick fifth and hopefully last. Portugal lost before Ronaldo could even take his

turn, after Bruno Alves missed the fourth kick. The best penalty kickers usually go first. Did Ronaldo purposely want to take the last kick for individual glory? If so, then he placed his need for the stardom over his team’s need to win. That one poor decision might not have cost Ronaldo the Ballon d’Or, but it did allow Messi to enter center stage. Certainly Messi would have taken the first or second pen-

alty kick. After, I also considered Messi’s individual accomplishments: top goal scorer in Europe; La Liga’s top goal scorer; most goals in a season (82 goals in 69 games) and Messi is now approaching the legendary Pelé’s record of most goals scored in a calendar year (127). These two players are in the best form they have ever been. Messi’s 30-yard free kicks and Ronaldo’s powerful cannon of a shot consistently leave fans’ jaws hanging.

Both players are again at the top of the goal-scoring charts in the Spanish league. Everyone has their own case to argue. Some maintain that Ronaldo is stronger while Messi is quicker. Messi is more clever, but Ronaldo is more technical. At this rate, the arguments and debates won’t end until the final decision in January. Nico Cantor is a contributing writer. Email him at sports@nyunews.com.

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Washington Square News November 6, 2012

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