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NYU’s Daily Student Newspaper

WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS Vol. 41, No. 69

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2013

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Shutdown could affect passport process

Students, unions protest outside Metropolitan Museum of Art Members of NYU’s Student Labor Action Movement and other city employees rallied against the NYU School of Law Board of Trustees at the school’s annual gala. The protesters held signs and called for the law school’s Board of Trustees to address their concerns.

STORY ON PAGE 3

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Fashion blogs create Rebel Wilson fails to style subcultures deliver ‘Fun Night’ By DANA RESZUTECK

As the latest collections are debuted at Fashion Weeks around the world, all eyes are on the runway. Trend reports from London and Milan meticulously analyze the highlights of each show, trying to predict what people will be wearing in seasons to come. For years, the true words of style were accessed exclusively through fashion publications — only by studying the September issue of Vogue could one obtain the latest designer inspirations for the season’s looks. This tradition, although still prominent, seems to be fading in comparison to

a more accessible place for fashion study — the Internet. Fashion bloggers, by means of blogging platforms like Tumblr and Blogspot, have formed more open subculture of fashion. By simply scrolling through a site, images of carefully styled outfits capture the imagination of the younger fashion-obsessed generation. Instead of purchasing the latest magazine, one can go online and check out these blogs for instantaneous and free style advice from those who have deemed themselves “The Man Repeller” or “The Style Rookie,” to name a couple of popular examples.

BLOGGERS cont’d on PG. 8

By CONNOR WRIGHT

Rebel Wilson is one of those actresses who you like not for what she says, but how she says it. After co-starring in comedies like “Bridesmaids” and “Pitch Perfect,” Wilson has nailed the art of the reaction shot, pulling out the perfect expression at the least expected time. In ABC’s “Super Fun Night,” Wilson uses those expressions to full advantage, and most of the audience’s enjoyment comes from merely wanting to see how Wilson will react next. After the pilot received unfavorable early reviews, ABC chose to air the second episode tonight as the premiere. And while this second episode lacks concrete introductions to the characters, it still manages to showcase the cast’s talents. At

the center, there’s Kimmie (Wilson), a socially clueless, and recently promoted lawyer who invites her charming co-worker Richard (Kevin Bishop) out for a night on the town alongside her two geeky roommates, Marika (Lauren Ash) and Helen-Alice (Liza Lapira). There’s also Kimmie’s co-worker Kendall (Kate Jenkinson), who decides to tag along to win over Richard. The episode culminates in a karaoke competition between Kimmie and Kendall. While this may seem predictable — and it certainly is — there’s an undeniable charm that elevates the episode above its mediocre material. It plays to Wilson’s talents and sports a cast of likable characters that have the potential to grow.

SUPER continued on PG. 4

By TONY CHAU For many students accepted into a NYU study abroad program for the spring 2014 semester yesterday, their happiness was coupled with confusion over how the shutdown would affect their passport and visa applications, and consequently fear of whether it would affect their chances of studying abroad. At the stroke of midnight on Monday, Sept. 30, the deadline passed for congressional leaders to pass a budget for the next fiscal year, leading to the first government shutdown in 17 years. Hundreds of thousands of nonessential federal employees have been furloughed pending the approval of a federal budget for the new fiscal year. Although many federal agencies have shut down, students worried about obtaining long stay visas from foreign countries have no reason to fret. Because the visas are issued from consulates of foreign countries, the consulates operate independently of the U.S. government and are not affected by the shutdown. As far as obtaining or renewing a passport or obtaining a visa to study in the United States, associate vice chancellor of global programs Josh Taylor maintained that effects of the shutdown would be minimal. “The U.S. State Department has indicated that there are no anticipated changes in fee-based passport and visa services,” Taylor said. “So at this time, we don’t expect that the shutdown will have an impact on students studying abroad, or on

VIA FLICKR.COM

If the shutdown continues, passport processing could halt. SHUTDOWN continued on PG. 3


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As temperatures drop, you may need to start looking for the perfect fall coat. If you want something unique and inexpensive, head to the Brooklyn Flea market, held on Saturdays and Sundays in Fort Greene and Williamsburg, respectively. Individual vendors sell vintage records, handmade jewelry and other one-of-a-kind items. Or go for people watching and street food. The flea market runs until November, so make the trip soon.

Although Six Flags Great Adventure is a thrilling destination well before the fall season, that does not mean it closes once the summer ends. The park heats up in the fall with Halloweenthemed attractions, including a blackout maze and a new terror trail. Ticket Central has discounted prices for students. Weekends through Oct. 27 cost $40. The Fright Fest is not for the faint of heart — 200 zombies are released into the park every night to add to the festivities.

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There’s something about the color orange, gradient leaves and pumpkins that complete fall. Experience all three on Saturday, Oct. 26 at Central Park’s Pumpkin Fest from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Relive childhood memories of the pumpkin patch, pumpkin carving and haunted houses at this free event. Walk on crispy red leaves at the city’s iconic park and enjoy the live music in the background. It’s a perfect marriage between the romance of autumn in New York and the classic traditions that remind you of home.

The “Lightness of Being” public art exhibit at City Hall Park is the perfect quick fall outing. Located just a few subway stops from campus, the exhibit combines the work of 11 international artists. As you stroll through the park, you’ll encounter sculptures that vary in shape and material and that seem both comical and eccentric. The exhibit also features a weekly performance.

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October is the perfect time to enjoy the autumn scenery at the High Line, which extends from Gansevoort Street to W. 34th St. between 10th and 11th avenues. New Yorkers are probably familiar with the park, which was converted from an abandoned freight rail line overlooking the Hudson River. What they might not know is that the High Line holds weekly activities such as Tuesday night stargazing with the Amateur Astronomers Association. Upcoming tours include a tree tour with authors Leslie Day and Trudy Smoke (Saturday, Oct. 5) and an art tour with curator Cecilia Alemani (Wednesday, Oct. 9). A couple walks along the Tennessee Riverwalk pathway on a rainy Saturday afternoon.

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About WSN: Washington Square News (ISSN 15499389) is the student newspaper of New York University. WSN is published Monday through Thursday during NYU’s academic year, except for university holidays, vacations and exam periods. Corrections: WSN is committed to accurate reporting. When we make errors, we do our best to correct them as quickly as possible. If you believe we have erred, contact managing editor Jordan Melendrez at managing@nyunews.com or at 212.998.4302.

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SHUTDOWN continued from PG. 1

Government shutdown might limit funds for passport processing

international students who plan on studying in New York this spring.” The caveat is that these services receive funding from a source based on fees, but they can eventually dry out, which could be an obstacle for students in the long run. “If the shutdown becomes protracted, the department has warned that funding for consular services could eventually be exhausted, which could in turn impact passport services,” Taylor said. “Given that, we encourage anyone who needs to obtain or renew a passport to do so sooner rather than later.” For students like Gabriela Billini, a CAS junior who needs to renew her passport to study abroad in Tel Aviv, the sudden rush to do so is proving to be an extra headache at an already hectic time.

“All of us NYU students have enough stresses on our minds with upcoming midterms, papers and waiting for the study abroad decision altogether,” Billini said. Like many others, Steinhardt junior Zoe Johnson, who also needs to renew her passport to study in Paris, is annoyed with the congressional impasse. “It’s frustrating that the senators and congressmen and women themselves are virtually unaffected by this shutdown,” she said. “They continue to receive their pay, but the people who need simple services like passports and visas, and the people who carry out those services, are the ones who have to deal with our elected officials’ mess.” Tony Chau is a senior editor. Email him at tchau@nyunews.com.

Porn star, pastor discuss industry ethics By CASEY DALRYMPLE

Craig Ross, pastor of the XXX Church, met with adult film star Ron Jeremy in the Great Hall in the Global Student Center for Academic Life to debate the ethics of pornography on Oct. 1. Ross took his usual stance against porn, while Jeremy defended his work in the industry. Price of Life NYC, a Christian antihuman trafficking organization, presented the event, which proved to be a source of confusion for some. “It was kind of a silly premise and, from the first place, a jump, which was indicative of a lot of jumps made,” Tisch sophomore Sawyer Eason said. Trevor Agatsuma, a chaplain affiliate for the on-campus religious outreach group InterVarsity Christian Fellowship and one of the organizers for the event, explained the connection between pornography and human trafficking. “Pornography can affect our mentality of treating others as a commodity, as a product to be consumed,” Agatsuma said. Jeremy expressed a measure of exasperation over comparisons drawn between porn and trafficking. “I represent the adult industry, [I have] nothing to do with that other stuff,” Jeremy said during the debate. “Unlike in human trafficking, in porn, there’s a lot of people on that set … They wouldn’t let someone get abused on set.”

Ross presented a nuanced view, recognizing the legitimacy of the porn industry but questioning the implications of paying women to perform sexual intercourse. “They don’t have the education that you have,” Ross said to the audience, referring to adult film actresses. “There’s a lot of sets that we’ve heard of from women saying, ‘Hey, I signed up just to do a girl-girl scene, and now there’s a guy, and then they offered me a few more bucks, so I went ahead and did it.’” This sentiment of poor decision-making raised controversy later in the evening, leading to some raised voices in an otherwise even-tempered debate. During the question-and-answer segment, Steinhardt sophomore Isabella Carr questioned the debate’s premise. “This entire debate … is based on the fact that women are being exploited and that we have no conscious ability to decide … Every person I’ve slept with, I’ve made that decision,” Carr said. Agatsuma was pleased with the amount of crowd participation. “That was really interesting that it came out,” Agatsuma said. “This is an emotional issue that goes beyond just intellects,” he said. Casey Dalrymple is copy chief. Email him at cdalrymple@nyunews.com.

NEDA JEBELLI/WSN

Ron Jeremy debates the ethics of porn with Pastor Craig Ross.

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University community reflects on bankruptcy of city’s opera house By MICHAEL DOMANICO

The New York City Opera announced it was filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy yesterday after a failed kickstarter campaign, marking the end of the second-largest opera house in New York. Meanwhile, the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Human Development has seen one of its largest incoming classes of students studying classical voice and opera studies. There are currently around 60 graduate and undergraduate students studying opera in Steinhardt, with approximately 17 students who entered the program this year. Brian Gill, a classical voice professor in Steinhardt, noted that more students in the incoming vocal performance class have chosen to pursue the classical track instead of the musical theater track, which he said he has not seen before. “I anticipate this year was a bit of a fluke because the appeal of musical theater ... has always outweighed classical,” Gill said. The New York City Opera filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy after failing to raise $7 million by the end of September. The company launched a Kickstarter campaign on Sept. 8 to raise $1 million of this goal, but the effort brought in only a little over $300,000 in donations. “I think this event is a big wakeup call for everyone,” said Steinhardt sophomore William Baugh,

who is studying opera. “Big ideas need to come together to find a solution to this financial crisis. I hope the New York City Opera’s declaration of bankruptcy catalyzes the process to soon result in revolutionary action in the live entertainment industry.” Gill explained that part of the demise of the company could be due to a change in the public’s tastes. “We’re in an era of louder is better, and that’s unfortunate,” Gill said. “The more bizarre [an opera is], the more press you get. [Operas should] focus on the details and how to deliver the music in a more soulful way.” Other students studying opera said they were not surprised by the company’s folding. “I wasn’t heartbroken when the news about City Opera came out,” Steinhardt junior Sarah Merten said. “I think with City Opera closing, people may be a bit rattled and wonder if opera is fading out, but I don’t think that is the case. Opera in the United States is certainly morphing into something that is much more modern. Classics are being done with a twist and the need for singers to also be actors is key.” Several students thought funding for the arts would help cultural institutions survive during an economic downturn. “It’s difficult to be studying classical music — voice or otherwise — in a climate where arts funding is quickly diminishing,” said Kyle Tieman-Strauss,

VIA FLICKR.COM

The New York City Opera declared bankruptcy. a Steinhardt sophomore studying musical composition. Melissa Goldman, a Steinhardt freshman on the musical theater track, agreed that more money should be allocated to the arts. “I’ve always thought that there wasn’t enough funding for the arts, both in schools and out in the real world,” Goldman said. Gill was optimistic that opera will continue to be a viable art form in New York. “My hope is that perhaps another company will rise up [and] take its place, [a company that] has a better ability to raise money and connect with the audience,” he said. Additional reporting by Billy Richling. Michael Domanico is a news editor. Email them at news@ nyunews.com.

SLAM, union workers rally for rights at law school gala By BILLY RICHLING

About 30 demonstrators gathered outside the Metropolitan Museum of Art during the NYU School of Law’s annual Weinfeld Gala in an attempt to protest what they called a violation of workers’ rights by Daniel Straus, Zachary Carter and Vincent Tese, who sit on the law school’s Board of Trustees. On Oct. 1, members of NYU’s Student Labor Action Movement, Communication Workers of America and 1199SEIU United Healthcare Workers East, an affiliate of the Service Employees International Union, held posters and shouted slogans accusing the three trustees of union-busting at the companies they run. “We think it’s tragic that the people who represent NYU as our trustees are doing nefarious and horrendous deeds like stealing money from workers and forcing them to work overtime,” said Gallatin sophomore and SLAM protester Robert Ascherman. Carter and Tese sit on Cablevision’s board of directors, which has been in a protracted dispute with CWA since January 2012, when Cablevision’s Brooklyn employees unionized. The union and Cablevision have still not agreed on a contract. “CWA reached out to us about this recently, and we were really excited to broaden the scope of their campaign,” said Gallatin senior and SLAM protester Katelyn McLaren. The SLAM campaign against Straus has lasted more than a year. Straus runs CareOne and Healthbridge Management companies, which operate nursing homes throughout the tri-state area. CareOne and Healthbridge employees, who are unionized under 1199SEIU and have the backing of the NLRB, said Straus violated labor laws and refused to negotiate a labor contract in good faith. “Straus doesn’t care about workers, he doesn’t

give good wages, he disrespects workers,” said CareOne employee and protester Jeffrey Jimenez, 23. Straus’ companies do not see it that way. On a page titled About the Union on CareOne’s website, that company says 1199SEIU is campaigning to injure CareOne’s reputation. “The SEIU has made numerous attempts to organize workers at CareOne Health Care Centers, only to be rebuffed by employees who do not want to spend their hard-earned money on union dues, and who prefer a direct and open relationship with management without the involvement of a third party,” the page read. McLaren said SLAM saw the Cablevision and CareOne cases as intimately connected. “We see this as a pattern of really wealthy, powerful people on our Board of Trustees who are really giving the short end to workers at their companies,” McLaren said. “We think NYU should stop accepting money from people who are basically stealing from workers, but the ideal outcome would be for the trustees to change their behavior.” As of press time, an NYU spokesman had not responded to a request for comment. Billy Richling is a deputy news editor. Email him at brichling@nyunews.com.

JONATHAN TAN/WSN

SLAM protest signs rest on the steps of the Met.


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‘Ironside’ remake fails to bring fresh ideas to police procedural genre by BOB TEOH

In what many are calling the “Golden Age” of television, numerous shows have eclipsed films in critical and commercial reception, drawing greater attention to those working on the small screen. However, this era has also been home to an increasing number of producers and writers resorting to remaking classic television shows to fit modern tastes. The concept is straightforward and simple — a remake would surely attract older, nostalgic audience members, while simultaneously catering to a new, younger demographic. Jumping in at the height of this trend, NBC has added a remake of the classic ’60s show “Ironside” to its lineup. While the show certainly demonstrates promise as a procedural drama, it suffers from a lack of originality. “Ironside” is problematic not only because it is a remake of a classic police drama, but because it feels like a remake of every police drama. Other adaptations, such as

CBS’s “Hawaii Five-0” successfully transfer a classic concept to a modern setting and take full advantage of both old and new aspects. Unfortunately, with stock characters like the hard-boiled, rule-bending cop, the smart but beautiful female sidekick and the overbearing chief, “Ironside” manages to force all of the genre’s clichés into a single series. The only unique aspect of “Ironside” is that its protagonist is a paraplegic, but the show never truly explores this concept. Instead, half of the pilot is spent on an uninteresting case, while Robert Ironside’s (Blair Underwood) backstory is hastily explained through un-

satisfying flashbacks. The original “Ironside,” on the other hand, succeeded because, in addition to the case at hand, the show explored the detective’s inner and external struggles as he proved his undeniable worth to the team. This narrative focus could have easily separated the new “Ironside” from other procedural dramas, but such an element is never fully embraced in the pilot. The result is an imbalanced story that does not know how to use its protagonist. Although “Ironside’s” writing certainly leaves plenty to be desired, the show is somewhat salvaged by an impressive cast. Leading the team as

COURTESY OF NBC

Blair Underwood stars as a paraplegic cop in “Ironside.”

Ironside, Underwood exudes charisma and confidence while sitting in a wheelchair throughout the entire episode. Ignoring the neverending onslaught of cheesy lines, Underwood powerfully portrays the paraplegic detective’s pain, as well as his determination to rise from above his tragic past. Ironside’s team consists of an equally promising supporting cast. Pablo Schreiber of “Orange is the New Black” fame plays a funny and street-smart cop, and Spencer Grammer plays Ironside’s beautiful sidekick in her first major role since ABC Family’s “Greek.” Seeing Underwood interact with his team partially makes up for the show’s unoriginal premise. The writers of “Ironside” need to take advantage of this promising cast if the show is going to avoid the chopping block. Otherwise, attracting both old and young audiences seems like a remote possibility.

Jason Osder’s documentary “Let the Fire Burn” takes a real event and edits it into a wildly compelling and emotional story, which creates an honest, raw film portrayal. In most documentaries, emo-

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“Burn” features archival footage to build its narrative.

tion and honesty seem to be at odds with each other. But in “Burn,” they flow together more cohesively than most fictional narrative films. This success comes largely from Osder’s decision to use archival footage. The lack of filmmaker commentary allows the viewer to sink into the facts of the story, all while being wonderfully manipulated by the masterful, yet subtle, editing. The film documents a 1985 police bombing in Philadelphia, which the police department used to evict the radical group MOVE from their homes. Dropping the two bombs led to a fire that killed six adults and five children and burned down 60 other homes, in addition to the targets. The film is bookended and guided by an interview with the child who survived the bombing, along with a mix of news and courtroom footage. “Burn” does an impressive, thorough job of portraying the entire situation without passing judgment. The film was made to examine how such an atrocity could occur, and it searches for the people potentially at fault. But calling a tragedy a tragedy is not the film suddenly demonstrating a bias — it is simply truthful. The film divides its time between explaining why the police and government officials of Philadelphia

Talented cast overcomes poor writing on ABC comedy

Richard, for example, is not the cliché unattainable office hunk, but instead a supportive friend to Kimmie who motivates her to carry on with the singing competition. Their back-and-forth dialogue is fun to watch and offers the possibility of an interesting relationship that has not been seen on many sitcoms before. The true problem is keeping the hit-to-miss ratio of its jokes favorable — some work, many do not. While most are forgivable, thanks to the charm of Wilson’s delivery, the other actors need to be used in more surprising ways. “Night” also seems too eager to throw out a fat joke every few minutes, to the point where Wilson seems to vacillate between ordering consolation pizzas for the karaoke competition and stripping down to her Spanx, a joke used more than you would expect. Nothing is truly offensive about “Super Fun Night.” The actors hit their marks, Wilson does her best with what’s given to her and the show carries on with a quick, light pace. But, it’s almost too light. If the show could manage to punch up its jokes and try some new things, it could rival some of network TV’s most popular comedies. For now, the show has set a good foundation for its future. Connor Wright is a contributing writer. Email him at entertainment@nyunews.com.

Bob Teoh is a staff writer. Email him at entertainment@nyunews.com.

Documentary ‘Burn’ sparks social discussion through archival footage By DREW GREGORY

SUPER continued from PG. 1

were concerned with MOVE and questioning the morality of their motives and actions. As a result, two people could leave the theater thinking two entirely different things — one may think that Osder’s film sympathizes with the police, while another may think the filmmaker was suggesting that the police’s behavior was caused by racism and extreme prejudice. Like any good documentary, “Burn” doesn’t give answers — it asks questions. The editing is also superb, both in pacing and in content. The film moves like a taut courtroom drama, unraveling the full story at just the right speed to both keep the audience guessing while never becoming boring for them. The fact that this is achieved all through archival footage is miraculous to say the least. Like this year’s “Fruitvale Station,” viewers will leave “Burn” feeling disturbed, and they will find themselves thinking about events that could be interpreted as racially motivated. These issues of race, class and violence are ones that demand discussion. If nothing else, “Let the Fire Burn” is a perfect instigator of such conversation. Drew Gregory is a staff writer. Email him at film@nyunews.com.

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‘Will & Grace’ star discusses saving world in NBC sitcom By BOB TEOH

Widely known for his hilarious portrayal of the flamboyant Jack McFarland in the iconic sitcom “Will & Grace,” Sean Hayes returns to NBC on Oct. 3 with the premiere of his new sitcom, “Sean Saves the World.” Hayes has been acting and producing for film, television and Broadway since “Grace” ended in 2006. But “World” marks his first return to a regular TV role. In the new sitcom, Hayes plays a divorced dad who struggles to balance work and family when his teenage daughter moves in full time. Sean is determined to raise the perfect family, but with his pushy mom and difficult boss, both facets of his life pose major challenges. “When I met with [series creator] Victor Fresco, we were tossing around ideas and we landed on this, and I was like, ‘I’ve never seen that character on TV before, a single gay dad raising a family,’” Hayes said in a conference call with WSN. “Television is all about characters and relationships you haven’t seen, and I thought this would be interesting.” Fresco and Hayes decided on the eyecatching title.

“It reflects the irony of my character thinking the weight of the world, quite literally, was on my shoulders,” he said. Although his character is a gay man, Hayes said he believes sexuality is far from the main focus of the show. “It’s definitely not in the forefront of our minds when creating this show week-to-week,” Hayes said. “It’s making

people laugh and telling great stories.” Instead, Hayes hopes audiences will connect with Sean not for being gay, but for being a single dad struggling to raise a family. “On a day-to-day level, society deals with these kinds of issues, but they’re within my daughter’s life, and my life, and our life together, as well as outside of it,” he said.

COURTESY OF NBC

Sean Hayes battles problems at work and at home in “Sean Saves the World.”

Hayes lauded newcomer Samantha Isler, who plays Sean’s daughter. “She is so unbelievably talented and her instincts are huge,” Hayes said. “She didn’t seem like a Hollywood young actress. She seemed like a very, very real person.” Hayes will also be sharing the sitcom stage with veteran actress Linda Lavin, who is well known for starring in classic comedy “Alice,” as well as numerous Broadway productions. Hayes expressed excitement over working on the show with someone who has such an illustrious career. “Linda Lavin is someone you could give literally any line to and she would get a huge laugh,” Hayes said. “We’ve got a lot of theater folks on the show, which I think is a huge factor in cultivating a hit sitcom. Sitcoms are multicams, which are the [closest] things related to theater.” With an impressive cast and unique premise, it seems as though Hayes and his co-stars are part of a winning formula. Audiences will be able to see for themselves if the strong cast is enough to save the world of NBC comedies after the first episode. Bob Teoh is a staff writer. Email him at entertainment@nyunews.com.

Danny Brown mixes ‘Old’ sounds, shows serious side on album By PETER SLATTERY

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Since he started rapping as a child, 31-yearold Danny Brown’s rise to fame is a strange story. After announcing his third studio album in December 2012, he changed the name of the album at least once, performed at Coachella, flirted with Kathy Griffin, toured with Bauuer, headlined his own tour, appeared in an Insane Clown Posse video and won a mtvU Woodie Award. Finally, this week, Brown released his newest album, “Old.” Much of “Old” hearkens back to his two previous albums “The Hybrid” and “XXX.” The first half of “Old” leans heavily toward a more “Hybrid”-sounding old-school vibe with tracks like “Gremlins” and “Torture.” The songs focus on the struggles of life in Detroit and feature gritty soul-sampling beats, with Brown using a deeper voice and simple flow. The second half of the album is far more electronic influenced, à la “XXX,” with ecstatic visions of drugs and women like “Smokin & Drinkin” and “Break It (Go),” which utilize electro-influenced beats mixed with Brown’s signature high-pitched yells. Both his vintage and experimental songs have their high points. “The Return” rides a shuffling, G-funk beat with a fitting grimy verse from Freddie Gibbs for a haunting, blue-collar feel, while “Dip” is a stimulating, manic drug frenzy with a techno beat from frequent collaborator SKYWLKR. The dichotomy makes for an interesting mix of Brown’s violent reality and trippy drug abuse, but it’s the tracks on which Brown maintains some distance from his previous albums where he finds the most success. For instance, album highlight “Float On” features both a subtly old school and trap-influenced beat with beautiful vocal assists from Charli XCX, while Brown whispers an introspective verse. Wherever it lands on the sonic spectrum of his work, “Old” contains some of Brown’s most thoughtful music yet. While there are many party songs, “Old” still does an excel-

lent job of providing perspective. Embedded in his most euphoric jams about excess are references to regret and pain, while his songs about the harshness of life are sprinkled with bits of joy. Brown’s lyricism and flow remain idiosyncratic but practiced throughout. There’s humor here and there, but fans uninterested in Brown’s serious side probably won’t enjoy this album. Even though tracks rarely exceed two or three minutes, a few of the songs from the latter half of the 19-song album should have been cut, as they do little to distinguish themselves. The short songs make the project a stimulating listen, but the downside of Brown allowing songs to feel like they write themselves lends a generally unfocused feeling to the album. “Old” is a cool, well-worded portrait of a man who has grown up tough, and is now trying to make the best of his life. Peter Slattery is a staff writer. Email him at music@nyunews.com.

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67-Across, man whose 1930 salary was $80,000 5 Gives off 10 Seventh anniversary ruiner? 14 Treats, as a sprain 15 Like some sprays 16 One’s part? 17 Nickname for 1-/67-Across 20 Peace and quiet 21 Injures 22 Bro’s sib 23 Whittle 24 Deerstalker, e.g. 27 It’s the law 30 Eleanor : F.D.R. :: Bess : ___ 33 Obama’s birthplace 35 School for James Bond 36 Be really annoying

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M A R B L E S S T E E V L O T O R D A O P O

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Man whose 1930 salary was $75,000 Snowy wader Writer James Faucet annoyance Kenny Rogers’s “___ Believes in Me” Battlers at sea Naval rank: Abbr. Newcastle Brown and others Pre-barbecuing mixture Deplorable Repay Quote from 1-/67-Across on why he outearned 38-Across One of the Jackson 5 It lights up when it’s excited Guitarist Clapton

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Go into the wild blue yonder Runs rampant See 1-Across

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1 Memory units 2 Be sore 3 “Beauty is in

the eye of the ___ holder”: 45 Kinky Friedman 48 4 Bluegrass duo? 5 Up in arms? 49 6 QB Stafford 7 “What can ___?” 50 8 Treat, as a hide 52 9 Not adept in 10 Time piece? 55 11 Go to ___ on 60 12 Attired 13 Sexual attraction, with “the” 62 18 One-piece garments, informally 63 19 Precede 23 Gave up by 64 giving up control 24 Crosses one’s fingers, TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE perhaps A N G L E A B B Y 25 “Good grief!” R O L E X S A L A 26 Word repeated when consoling M F R O N T S C U M someone O M O T O U K E S 28 Units of L S M O L A R S brilliance? T C H G E T B Y 29 Its capital is H O L D M E A R A Nuku’alofa T W O D O O R G A P 30 Le ___, France E A T S U P B E T S 31 Rathskeller E R E B A order D G E S R O T G U T 32 A.C.C. team, informally A N N E S H O V E F R E N C H O P E N 34 Purpose F O R G O I R A E 37 Surveyor’s unit E N T R Y L O S T 39 Vicina della Francia

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PUZZLE BY ERIK AGARD

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Listens up, quaintly Chestnutcolored flying mammal Litigant Zeal The “emptor” in “caveat emptor” Best sellers

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Home of the U.S.’s largest cities whose names start with X and Z Pro ___ Lender’s offering: Abbr. It’s elementary Big silver exporter

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Mathematical physicist Peter who pioneered in knot theory

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Philharmonic grp.

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“Inconstancy falls off ___ it begins”: Shak.

For answers, call 1-900-285-5656, $1.49 a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-814-5554. Annual subscriptions are available for the best of Sunday crosswords from the last 50 years: 1-888-7-ACROSS. AT&T users: Text NYTX to 386 to download puzzles, or visit nytimes.com/mobilexword for more information. Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 2,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). Share tips: nytimes.com/wordplay. Crosswords for young solvers: nytimes.com/learning/xwords.


NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

OPINION

EDITED BY RAQUEL WOODRUFF OPINION@NYUNEWS.COM

INTERNATIONAL LAW

Withdrawing from ECHR also means leaving EU By PETER KEFFER

U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron has indicated a potential withdrawal from the European Convention on Human Rights and the accompanying Court in Strasbourg. The withdrawal could be a necessary condition for the government to “keep our country safe,” Cameron said. In reality, a withdrawal from the ECHR would do nothing to keep the United Kingdom safe. Cameron’s move would impede a uniquely efficient supranational court professing human rights law and would also entail a withdrawal from the European Union. The European Court of Human Rights has been accused by the Conservative Party in the United Kingdom of jeopardizing national security by suspending the deportation of dangerous foreign nationals to home countries. Cameron himself insisted that the United Kingdom should be able to “chuck out of our country people who have no right to be here, who threaten our country.” However, this accusation is merely a response to an abuse of court rules, rather than a criticism of the court itself. Between 2008 and 2011, more than 4,000 U.K. applications were

made to the court in the hope of suspending deportation. Yet of these applications, only 911 were granted. This discrepancy has prompted the president of the court, Jean-Paul Costa, to stress that the judicial body “is not an appeal tribunal from the asylum and immigration tribunals of Europe.” The process of suspending deportation is in fact restricted by the Practice Directions for the court. The document affirms that the court will only suspend cases where “the [deportee] faces a real risk of serious, irreversible harm if the measure is not applied.” The large discrepancy is evidence of a misconception of Court Practices Directions on behalf of the lawyers who represent these applicants. Yet it is not only the lawyers who are mistaken. Cameron’s rash response is also evidence of a serious misconception — or purpose-

ful distortion — of the court’s role. The European Court of Human Rights does not undermine legitimate deportation processes. The court stops European countries from being complicit in the torture of deportees upon arrival in their home countries. Being a member of the European Union necessitates that the nation also be a member of the Council of Europe. To maintain membership to the Council of Europe, it must also be a signatory of the ECHR. It is inconceivable that Cameron, and the Conservative Party, is ignorant of these basic facts. It is also unlikely that Cameron is genuinely oblivious to the court’s role. These reasonable assumptions indicate that the government is acting strategically. Cameron is seeking to take advantage of technicalities within EU membership standards to effectively bypass a previously proposed referendum on the United Kingdom’s participation in Brussels. Attacking a straw man of the court has allowed the prime minister to advance a strategic and instrumental withdrawal from the European convention and consequently the European Union. Peter Keffer is a deputy opinion editor. Email him at pkeffer@nyunews.com.

EDUCATION

State universities need balanced financial aid By NIKOLAS REDA-CASTELAO

The financial dilemma beleaguering today’s youth in the rubble of an economic recession is the growing cost of acquiring a diploma from a four-year university. The costs have been slowly rising over the last couple decades, but the students hurt the most from this economic pox are those who attend public universities, who have been deprived of federal and state funding. Universities are normally given large pools of funds to provide aid to those who are financially incapable of funding their education. But oddly enough, less selective schools give the least to aspiring students desperately yearning for an education. A recently published New York Times article revealed an alarming trend among state universities across the United States nowadays — schools are receiving more funding from the state for financial aid, but they are allocating it specifically to merit-based awards. The cost of a public university has increased by 104 percent in the last decade on account of minimized funding from the government. So, at an average of $23,000 a year for a

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public four-year university, and with the median household income for the nation at roughly $51,000, the tuition of a single child is half of an average family’s annual income. It becomes an excellent inquiry, then, as to why public universities are doling out money to those above that 50 percent, who are more capable of covering these expenses, than to those who cannot. Public universities claim they are attempting to prevent a brain drain of their talent reservoirs and motivate high school achievement. The idea of rewarding merit and accomplishment is understandable and even encouraged by American higher education. However, studies and statistics show that higher income students perform the same with or without these incentives and are actually more likely to do poorly than if they

went to a private university that met their academic caliber. This system deeply hurts minorities, especially in areas of large urban sprawl that occupy much of the lower income brackets that are incapable of affording these rising costs. If the education system is incapable of assisting populations affected by lack of said education in affording or motivating their children to succeed, then it has no hope of actually ameliorating the conditions of abject poverty. A state university’s goal is to provide a solid four-year education to students who want to make a living in the globalizing economy. A bachelor’s degree is slowly becoming expected of everyone and can award almost double that of what someone with just a high school diploma can earn. The goals of this allocation of funds are economically shortsighted and ineffective. Education should be an equalizer, so it is unnerving to see it used to exacerbate the nation’s growing inequality. Nikolas Reda-Castelao is a staff columnist. Email him at opinion@nyunews.com.

STAFF EDITORIAL

Voter ID laws reinforce discrimination in U.S.

A new voter ID law came into effect in North Carolina on Oct. 1. It drastically altered the electoral procedures of the state and introduced some of the most stringent voting laws in the nation. The Justice Department plans to sue the state, citing that this law is a blatant attempt to disenfranchise minority voters. The issue is part of a larger effort by the Obama Administration to halt a series of voter ID laws, which have arisen since the Supreme Court ruled to cut a key provision of the Voting Rights Act this summer. The provision required the federal government to approve any legislation affecting electoral procedures in Southern states that have a history of racial tension. North Carolina’s law disproportionately targets black voters, requiring them to present a valid form of photo ID. It also cuts the early day voting period by seven days and eliminates same-day registration. One of the most readily available forms of photo ID is a driver’s licence, but according to a Department of Justice lawsuit, black households are three times less likely to own a vehicle than white households, and therefore less likely to carry a driver’s license. Blacks also predominantly cast their ballot early in the 2008 and 2012 elections. In 2008, 71 percent of blacks who cast ballots utilized early voting. Now, only 23 percent use the first week of voting to register their vote. Historically, black voters have largely supported Democratic candidates, which deepens concerns that restrictive voter ID laws are intended to further a Republican agenda. In 2012, 93 percent of blacks in the country voted for Obama. Contrary to conservative arguments that voter ID laws are necessary to combat voter fraud, the evidence does not meet these claims. Of the nearly 7 million North Carolina voters who cast ballots in the 2012 presidential elections, including the primaries, there were only 121 alleged cases of voter fraud in the state. Given the minute 0.00173 percent of unconfirmed voter fraud, the new law addresses an imaginary problem. Following the 2012 presidential election, American citizens began pushing for a more efficient voter registration system after widespread experiences of long lines and under-resourced election offices. But the real issue is deceptive voting laws with strict identification standards that limit the participation of a specific group of people. Laws like these are not protecting our democratic system from voter fraud, but deliberately making it harder for citizens to participate in the democratic process. North Carolina’s law is undemocratic at best and discriminatory at worst.

Email the WSN Editorial Board at editboard@nyunews.com. EDITORIAL BOARD: Raquel Woodruff (Chair), Edward Radzivilovskiy (Co-chair), Peter Keffer (Co-chair), Harry Brown, Marcelo Cicconet, Nicki Sethi, Nina Golshan, Ian Mark, Omar Etman, Christina Coleburn

Send mail to: 838 Broadway, Fifth Floor New York, N.Y. 10003 or email: opinion@nyunews.com WSN welcomes letters to the editor, opinion pieces and articles relevant to the NYU community, or in response to articles. Letters should be less than 450 words. All submissions must be typed or emailed and must include the author’s name, address and phone number. Members of the NYU community must include a year and school or job title.

WSN does not print unsigned letters or editorials. WSN reserves the right to reject any submission and edit accepted submissions in any and all ways. With the exception of the staff editorial, opinions expressed on the editorial pages are not necessarily those of WSN, and our publication of opinions is not an endorsement of them.


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NYUNEWS.COM | WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, 2013 | WASHINGTON SQUARE NEWS

BEAUTY AND STYLE

EDITED BY ARIANA DIVALENTINO BSTYLE@NYUNEWS.COM

Wine red lips add vampy edge to autumn season By VANESSA KARALIS

Unleash your dark side with this season’s hottest trend — red wine colored lips. Rooted in the ’90s, this vampy look offers a striking alternative to the classic red lip, and the fashion world can’t seem to get enough. Top designers like Vera Wang, Christian Dior and Derek Lam have featured the look in their fall 2013 collections. On the runway, deep red lips were paired with minimal makeup, which is great for everyday wear. It was also used with a metallic smoky eye for a more dramatic evening look. Fall has arrived and the craze for deep red lips has officially begun. So, as you pull out those scarves and combat boots, here are a few tips to rock the sought-after look.

can be easily avoided by moisturizing. If using a dark yet bright red, dab some concealer on your lips before application. This showcases the color and primes your lips for long-lasting wear.

Choosing the right product and application

Prepping the Lip

Stains Stains should be applied to bare, dry lips. Let the color sit for a few minutes before finishing with a balm. While stains tend to fade throughout the day, they do so in a way that looks natural. “I like lip stain because it doesn’t rub off or get on my teeth, and I think the color is a little more subtle, which can be really powerful,” LSP sophomore Cassia Araujo-Lane said. Pick up Revlon Just Bitten Lip Stain in Midnight ($8.99) at Walgreens.

When applying color to chapped lips, the lipstick adheres to the driest parts, leaving lips looking cracked and uneven. This problem

Lipstick A creamy lipstick can keep lips feeling velvety and may be worn

matte or glossy. While reapplication may be inevitable, there are some long-lasting options available. “I like Wet n Wild Mega Last Lip Color because it’s cheap, super pigmented and seems to stay,” LSP sophomore Mary Kang said.

RACHEL LIQUINDOLI/WSN

Dark, brooding red lips help to create a daring statement when paired with neutral makeup.

By BRENDA LIU

BRENDA LIU FOR WSN

Clashing colors create an eye-catching pattern, reverse French manicures bring vibrance to a common trend. (Walgreens, $5.99) will save you money, as it also doubles as a top coat. A slightly more expensive base coat is the OPI Nail Envy line (Walgreens, $16.99), which not only primes but also nourishes the nails, so they will grow faster and stronger. Once the base coat has dried, paint the desired color of the bottom remaining strip over the entire nail. An extra coat is not required because there will be another color on top. The OPI An Affair in Red Square ($8-$9) can be found either in drugstores or in nearby nail salons. After the first color has dried, begin to apply the reverse-French design with the second color by painting a half-moon shape at the base

n Wild Mega Last Lip Color in Cherry Bomb ($1.99) from Walgreens. Liquid Lip Color While liquid lipstick is a great, no-fuss way to keep your lip color vibrant throughout the day, careful application is crucial. Once the color is applied, it’s going to stay there, so take the time to avoid mistakes. These products also dry lips out, so don’t forget to top them off with a moisturizing lip balm. Look for SHISEIDO Lacquer Rouge in Nocturne ($25) at Sephora. Removal When the day is through and your lip color has survived, blot off with a gentle makeup remover like Neutrogena Makeup Remover Cleansing Towelettes ($5.99, Walgreens) to prevent the bloodthirsty vamp look.

Reverse-French manicures bring twist to seasonal style More subtle than a whole new wardrobe but as eyecatching as statement jewelry, a daring manicure can be a canvas for style right at your fingertips. Celebrities and designers alike are known to feature manicures that make highly unconventional use of shape and texture, with some recent trends including caviar-textured or almondshaped nails. Nail art is one of the subtlest way to try a bold beauty look, and is accessible even to those on a college student’s budget. Among the wildest looks, however, is a high-fashion paint job anyone can do at home — the reverse-French manicure. Also called the Ruffian for the fashion line that popularized it, the reverse-French manicure features a crescent of the accent color at the cuticle rather than the tip of the nail, and begins with a precise shape. The shape of one’s nails is the frame of the picture, so if the shape is off, the paint will not be as attractive. Stick to a classic square nail shape. Simply file perpendicular to one’s nails until the tip of the nail is a flat line, shaping it in a rounded rectangular shape. After filing, it’s time to move onto the polish. Always begin with a base coat. It helps fill in the ridges of the nails to provide a smooth surface. A base coat will also prevent staining to the actual nail. The Revlon Multi Care Base + Top Coat

For a softer look, press lipstick onto the lips rather than smearing it. For a more intense look, line lips with a lip brush and then fill in. To prevent the color from sticking to teeth, blot off the excess product with a tissue. Try Wet

of the nail. Paint on enough coats of this color to make it completely opaque. The Essie Beyond Cozy ($8) color is available at drugstores. One can choose to invert the colors for the ring finger, but this is merely preference. Once the polish has dried, cover the nails with a top coat. One option is Seche Vite ($9.50 at most drugstores), which offers quick drying — however, be cautious of the consistency. You can also use the Revlon Top and Base Coat. Once finished, flaunt your doit-yourself manicure as a glamorous complement to your fall wardrobe. Brenda Liu is a contributing writer. Email her at bstyle@nyunews.com.

Vanessa Karalis is a contributing writer. Email her at bstyle@ nyunews.com.

BLOGGERS continued from PG. 1

Bloggers inspire personal, accessible styles for Internet-era fashionistas

The college-aged generation has taken the concept of a trend into their own hands. The blogging culture has opened a door of stylistic freedom in which publicly displayed fashion creativity can rebel against the runways and form its own unique seasonal trends. The concept of street style has especially flourished in this online environment. It’s much easier to find inspiration in looks presented on real, relatable people than in editorial fashion spreads, which seem to be the driving force behind the success of readyto-wear fashion blogging. It’s almost as if the blogger presenting their self-styled looks — although cost may make these outfits just as unattainable as those displayed in publications — demonstrate an air of possibility, a suggestion that one does not have to be Vogue-worthy to enter the world of fashion. Accessibility comes from both the personal nature of the blog and the apparently feasible means of replicating the styles found therein. But what about the idea of the mo-

del — is the need to emulate a six-foot tall, size zero figure slowly disappearing? Fashion blogs present women of all body types, yet despite the physicality of whoever is modeling the styles, a subconscious desire remains to have a part of that image for ourselves. That idea is what most often encourages an imitation of looks. What, then, are we truly focusing on when we view these blogs? Are we admiring the clothes, or just the popular and charismatic Internet socialite wearing them? Regardless of the looks presented or the model’s popularity, it’s the emotion that is reflected from the image that captures our attention. Whether we’re looking at blogs or flipping through a magazine, one thing in fashion will never change — the way an image or an article of clothing strikes us, be it on a commercial or artistic level, is what draws in the viewer. Dana Reszutek is a staff writer. Email her at bstyle@nyunews.com.

VIA FACEBOOK.COM, THEDAYBOOKBLOG.COM

Personal, street style pictures are popular thanks to fashion-forward bloggers.

WSN100213  

Washington Square News October 2, 2013

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